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Sample records for amyloid beta peptides

  1. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Astrocytic Redox Remodeling by Amyloid Beta Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sanjay K.; Vitvitsky, Victor; Albin, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Astrocytes are critical for neuronal redox homeostasis providing them with cysteine needed for glutathione synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate that the astrocytic redox response signature provoked by amyloid beta (Aβ) is distinct from that of a general oxidant (tertiary-butylhydroperoxide [t-BuOOH]). Acute Aβ treatment increased cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) levels and enhanced transsulfuration flux in contrast to repeated Aβ exposure, which decreased CBS and catalase protein levels. Although t-BuOOH also increased transsulfuration flux, CBS levels were unaffected. The net effect of Aβ treatment was an oxidative shift in the intracellular glutathione/glutathione disulfide redox potential in contrast to a reductive shift in response to peroxide. In the extracellular compartment, Aβ, but not t-BuOOH, enhanced cystine uptake and cysteine accumulation, and resulted in remodeling of the extracellular cysteine/cystine redox potential in the reductive direction. The redox changes elicited by Aβ but not peroxide were associated with enhanced DNA synthesis. CBS activity and protein levels tended to be lower in cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease than in age-matched controls. Our study suggests that the alterations in astrocytic redox status could compromise the neuroprotective potential of astrocytes and may be a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in Alzheimer's disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 2385–2397. PMID:21235355

  3. Oxidation of cholesterol by amyloid precursor protein and beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Thomas J; Alkon, Daniel L

    2005-02-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of the neurotoxic peptide beta-amyloid, which is produced by proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP is a large membrane-bound copper-binding protein that is essential in maintaining synaptic function and may play a role in synaptogenesis. beta-Amyloid has been shown to contribute to the oxidative stress that accompanies AD. Later stages of AD are characterized by neuronal apoptosis. However, the biochemical function of APP and the mechanism of the toxicity of beta-amyloid are still unclear. In this study, we show that both beta-amyloid and APP can oxidize cholesterol to form 7beta-hydroxycholesterol, a proapoptotic oxysterol that was neurotoxic at nanomolar concentrations. 7beta-Hydroxycholesterol inhibited secretion of soluble APP from cultured rat hippocampal H19-7/IGF-IR neuronal cells and inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha-converting enzyme alpha-secretase activity but had no effect on beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 activity. 7beta-Hydroxycholesterol was also a potent inhibitor of alpha-protein kinase C, with a K(i) of approximately 0.2 nm. The rate of reaction between cholesterol and beta-amyloid was comparable to the rates of cholesterol-metabolizing enzymes (k(cat) = 0.211 min(-)1). The rate of production of 7beta-hydroxycholesterol by APP was approximately 200 times lower than by beta-amyloid. Oxidation of cholesterol was accompanied by stoichiometric production of hydrogen peroxide and required divalent copper. The results suggest that a function of APP may be to produce low levels of 7-hydroxycholesterol. Higher levels produced by beta-amyloid could contribute to the oxidative stress and cell loss observed in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. In vitro oligomerization and fibrillogenesis of amyloid-beta peptides.

    PubMed

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Klementieva, Oksana; Cladera, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid beta Ab(1-40) and Ab(1-42) peptides are the main components of the fibrillar plaques characteristically found in the brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. Fibril formation has been thoroughly studied in vitro using synthetic amyloid peptides and has been described to be a nucleation dependent polymerization process. During this process, defined by a slow nucleation phase followed by a rapid exponential elongation reaction, a whole range of aggregated species (low and high molecular weight aggregates) precede fibril formation. Toxic species related to the onset and development of Alzheimer's disease are thought to be found among these prefibrillar aggregates. Two main procedures are used to experimentally monitor fibril formation kinetics: through the measurement of the light scattered by the different peptide aggregates and using the fluorescent dye thioflavin T, which fluorescence increases when specifically interacting with amyloid fibrils. Reproducibility may, however, be difficult to achieve when measuring and characterizing fibril formation kinetics. This fact is mainly due to the difficulty in experimentally handling amyloid peptides, which is directly related to the difficulty of having them in a monomeric form at the beginning of the polymerization process. This has to do mainly with the type of solvent used for the preparation of the peptide stock solutions (water, DMSO, TFE, HFIP) and the control of determinant physicochemical parameters such as pH. Moreover, kinetic progression turns out to be highly dependent on the type of peptide counter-ion used, which will basically determine the duration of the nucleation phase and the rate at which high molecular weight oligomers are formed. Centrifugation and filtration procedures used in the preparation of the peptide stock solutions will also greatly influence the duration of the fibril formation process. In this chapter, a survey of the alluded experimental procedures is provided and a general

  5. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Lerma, Armando I.; Ordaz, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM). We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function. PMID:23878547

  6. Self-Assembly and Anti-Amyloid Cytotoxicity Activity of Amyloid beta Peptide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Castelletto, V.; Ryumin, P.; Cramer, R.; Hamley, I. W.; Taylor, M.; Allsop, D.; Reza, M.; Ruokolainen, J.; Arnold, T.; Hermida-Merino, D.; Garcia, C. I.; Leal, M. C.; Castaño, E.

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of two derivatives of KLVFF, a fragment Aβ(16–20) of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, is investigated and recovery of viability of neuroblastoma cells exposed to Aβ (1–42) is observed at sub-stoichiometric peptide concentrations. Fluorescence assays show that NH2-KLVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse and amyloid formation at the same critical aggregation concentration (cac). In contrast, NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse at a low concentration, followed by amyloid formation at a higher cac. These findings are supported by the β-sheet features observed by FTIR. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 forms a significant population of oligomeric species above the cac. Cryo-TEM, used together with SAXS to determine fibril dimensions, shows that the length and degree of twisting of peptide fibrils seem to be influenced by the net peptide charge. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering from thin peptide films shows features of β-sheet ordering for both peptides, along with evidence for lamellar ordering of NH2-KLVFF-CONH2. This work provides a comprehensive picture of the aggregation properties of these two KLVFF derivatives and shows their utility, in unaggregated form, in restoring the viability of neuroblastoma cells against Aβ-induced toxicity. PMID:28272542

  7. Self-Assembly and Anti-Amyloid Cytotoxicity Activity of Amyloid beta Peptide Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, V; Ryumin, P; Cramer, R; Hamley, I W; Taylor, M; Allsop, D; Reza, M; Ruokolainen, J; Arnold, T; Hermida-Merino, D; Garcia, C I; Leal, M C; Castaño, E

    2017-03-08

    The self-assembly of two derivatives of KLVFF, a fragment Aβ(16-20) of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, is investigated and recovery of viability of neuroblastoma cells exposed to Aβ (1-42) is observed at sub-stoichiometric peptide concentrations. Fluorescence assays show that NH2-KLVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse and amyloid formation at the same critical aggregation concentration (cac). In contrast, NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse at a low concentration, followed by amyloid formation at a higher cac. These findings are supported by the β-sheet features observed by FTIR. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 forms a significant population of oligomeric species above the cac. Cryo-TEM, used together with SAXS to determine fibril dimensions, shows that the length and degree of twisting of peptide fibrils seem to be influenced by the net peptide charge. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering from thin peptide films shows features of β-sheet ordering for both peptides, along with evidence for lamellar ordering of NH2-KLVFF-CONH2. This work provides a comprehensive picture of the aggregation properties of these two KLVFF derivatives and shows their utility, in unaggregated form, in restoring the viability of neuroblastoma cells against Aβ-induced toxicity.

  8. Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta peptides in vitro electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2017-04-01

    The oxidative behaviour of the human amyloid beta (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42) peptides and a group of similar peptides: control inverse (Aβ40-1 and Aβ42-1), mutants (Aβ1-40Phe(10) and Aβ1-40Nle(35)), rat Aβ1-40Rat, and fragments (Aβ1-28, Aβ1-16, Aβ10-20, Aβ12-28, and Aβ17-42), in solution or adsorbed, at a glassy carbon electrode, by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry, were investigated and compared. Structurally the Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 sequences contain five electroactive amino acid residues, one tyrosine (Tyr(10)), three histidines (His(6), His(13) and His(14)) and one methionine (Met(35)). The Aβ peptide 3D structure influenced the exposure of the redox residues to the electrode surface and their oxidation peak currents. Depending on the amino acid sequence length and content, the Aβ peptides gave one or two oxidation peaks. The first electron transfer reaction corresponded to the tyrosine amino acid residue oxidation, and the second to both histidines and methionine amino acid residues. The highest contribution to the second oxidation peak current was from His(13), followed by His(14) and His(6) residues, and Met(35) residue had the lowest contribution. The Aβ peptides electron transfer depended on peptide hydrophobicity and 3D structure, the redox residues position in the sequence, the redox residues close to N-termini giving the highest oxidation peak currents.

  9. Fusogenic properties of the C-terminal domain of the Alzheimer beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Pillot, T; Goethals, M; Vanloo, B; Talussot, C; Brasseur, R; Vandekerckhove, J; Rosseneu, M; Lins, L

    1996-11-15

    A series of natural peptides and mutants, derived from the Alzheimer beta-amyloid peptide, was synthesized, and the potential of these peptides to induce fusion of unilamellar lipid vesicles was investigated. These peptide domains were identified by computer modeling and correspond to respectively the C-terminal (e.g. residues 29-40 and 29-42) and a central domain (13-28) of the beta-amyloid peptide. The C-terminal peptides are predicted to insert in an oblique way into a lipid membrane through their N-terminal end, while the mutants are either parallel or perpendicular to the lipid bilayer. Peptide-induced vesicle fusion was demonstrated by several techniques, including lipid-mixing and core-mixing assays using pyrene-labeled vesicles. The effect of peptide elongation toward the N-terminal end of the entire beta-amyloid peptide was also investigated. Peptides corresponding to residues 22-42 and 12-42 were tested using the same techniques. Both the 29-40 and 29-42 beta-amyloid peptides were able to induce fusion of unilamellar lipid vesicles and calcein leakage, and the amyloid 29-42 peptide was the most potent fusogenic peptide. Neither the two mutants or the 13-28 beta-amyloid peptide had any fusogenic activity. Circular dichroism measurements showed an increase of the alpha-helical content of the two C-terminal peptides at increasing concentrations of trifluoroethanol, which was accompanied by an increase of the fusogenic potential of the peptides. Our data suggest that the alpha-helical content and the angle of insertion of the peptide into a lipid bilayer are critical for the fusogenic activity of the C-terminal domain of the amyloid peptide. The differences observed between the fusogenic capacity of the amyloid 29-40 and 29-42 peptides might result from differences in the degree of penetration of the peptides into the membrane and the resulting membrane destabilization. The longer peptides, residues 22-42 and 12-42, had decreased, but significant, fusogenic

  10. Proteolysis of chimeric beta-amyloid precursor proteins containing the Notch transmembrane domain yields amyloid beta-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimin; Ye, Wenjuan; Wang, Rong; Wolfe, Michael S; Greenberg, Barry D; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2002-04-26

    gamma-Secretase is an unusual intramembranous protease that has been reported to cleave the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) near the middle of its transmembrane domain (TMD) but cleave Notch near the cytoplasmic end of its TMD. To ascertain whether the TMD sequence of the substrate determines where gamma-secretase cleaves and whether the region just before the TMD participates in recognition by the enzyme, we expressed chimeric human APP molecules containing either the TMD or pre-TMD regions of Notch or other transmembrane proteins. APP chimeras bearing either the Notch or the amyloid precursor-like protein-2 TMD released similar amounts of approximately 4-kDa amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta)-like peptides as did intact APP. Mass spectrometry revealed that the principal Abeta-like peptide ended at residue 40, indicating cleavage at the middle of the Notch TMD in the chimera. Generation of Abeta-like peptides was significantly decreased when the APP TMD was replaced by those of SREBP-1 or human epithelial growth factor receptor 3. Replacement of the APP pre-TMD region (Abeta 10-28) with that of SREBP-1 increased generation of Abeta-like peptides, while those of human epithelial growth factor receptor 3 or amyloid precursor-like protein-2 decreased it. We conclude that gamma-secretase can cleave near the middle of the Notch TMD, that Abeta-like peptides may arise during Notch processing, and that the pre-TMD sequence of the substrate influences recognition or binding by the enzyme.

  11. Solvent effects on self-assembly of beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C L; Murphy, R M

    1995-01-01

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) is the primary protein component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Synthetic A beta spontaneously assembles into amyloid fibrils and is neurotoxic to cortical cultures. Neurotoxicity has been associated with the degree of peptide aggregation, yet the mechanism of assembly of A beta into amyloid fibrils is poorly understood. In this work, A beta was dissolved in several different solvents commonly used in neurotoxicity assays. In pure dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), A beta had no detectable beta-sheet content; in 0.1% trifluoroacetate, the peptide contained one-third beta-sheet; and in 35% acetonitrile/0.1% trifluoroacetate, A beta was two-thirds beta-sheet, equivalent to the fibrillar peptide in physiological buffer. Stock solutions of peptide were diluted into phosphate-buffered saline, and fibril growth was followed by static and dynamic light scattering. The growth rate was substantially faster when the peptide was predissolved in 35% acetonitrile/0.1% trifluoroacetate than in 0.1% trifluoroacetate, 10% DMSO, or 100% DMSO. Differences in growth rate were attributed to changes in the secondary structure of the peptide in the stock solvent. These results suggest that formation of an intermediate with a high beta-sheet content is a controlling step in A beta self-assembly. PMID:8527678

  12. Antagonistic effects of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzymes 1 and 2 on beta-amyloid peptide production in cells.

    PubMed

    Basi, Guriqbal; Frigon, Normand; Barbour, Robin; Doan, Tam; Gordon, Grace; McConlogue, Lisa; Sinha, Sukanto; Zeller, Michelle

    2003-08-22

    The deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in the brain is a pathologic feature of Alzheimer's disease. The beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), an integral membrane aspartyl protease responsible for cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the beta-site, promotes A beta production. A second integral membrane aspartyl protease related to BACE1, referred to as beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 2 (BACE2) has also been demonstrated to cleave APP at the beta-cleavage site in transfected cells. The role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production remains unresolved. We investigated the role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production in cells by selective inactivation of its transcripts using RNA interference. We are able to reduce steady state levels for mRNA for each enzyme by >85%, and protein amounts by 88-94% in cells. Selective inactivation of BACE1 by RNA interference results in decreased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells, as expected. Selective inactivation of BACE2 by RNAi results in increased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells. Simultaneous targeting of both enzymes by RNA interference does not have any net effect on A beta released from cells. Our observations of changes in APP metabolism and A beta are consistent with a role of BACE2 in suppressing A beta production in cells that co-express both enzymes.

  13. Cupric-amyloid beta peptide complex stimulates oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Vitek, Michael P; Mason, Ronald P

    2004-02-01

    A growing body of evidence supports an important role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, a number of papers have shown a synergistic neurotoxicity of amyloid beta peptide and cupric ions. We hypothesized that complexes of cupric ions with neurotoxic amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) can stimulate copper-mediated free radical formation. We found that neurotoxic Abeta (1-42), Abeta (1-40), and Abeta (25-35) stimulated copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate, whereas nontoxic Abeta (40-1) did not. Formation of ascorbate free radical was significantly increased by Abeta (1-42) in the presence of ceruloplasmin. Once cupric ion is reduced to cuprous ion, it can be oxidized by oxygen to generate superoxide radical or it can react with hydrogen peroxide to form hydroxyl radical. Hydrogen peroxide greatly increased the oxidation of cyclic hydroxylamines and ascorbate by cupric-amyloid beta peptide complexes, implying redox cycling of copper ions. Using the spin-trapping technique, we have shown that toxic amyloid beta peptides led to a 4-fold increase in copper-mediated hydroxyl radical formation. We conclude that toxic Abeta peptides do indeed stimulate copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, cupric-amyloid beta peptide-stimulated free radical generation may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Structural Transformation and Aggregation of cc-beta Peptides Into Amyloid Proto-fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Yuba; Steckmann, Timothy; Chapagain, Prem; Gerstman, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    The study of amyloid fibrils has important implications in understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. During the formation of amyloid fibrils, peptide polymers manifest fascinating physical behavior by undergoing complicated structural transformations. We examine the behavior of a small engineered peptide called cc-beta, that was designed to mimic the structural changes of the much larger, naturally occurring amyloid beta proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to uncover the underlying physics that is responsible for the large scale structural transformations. By using implicit solvent replica exchange MD simulations, we examined the behavior of 12 peptides, initially arranged in four different cc-beta alpha helix trimers. We observed various intermediate stages of aggregation, as well as an organized proto-fibril beta aggregate. We discuss the time evolution and the various interactions involved in the structural transformation.

  15. Conversion of non-fibrillar {beta}-sheet oligomers into amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptide aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Benseny-Cases, Nuria; Cocera, Mercedes; Cladera, Josep

    2007-10-05

    A{beta}(1-40) is one of the main components of the fibrils found in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. It is known that prior to the formation of amyloid fibrils in which the peptide adopts a well-ordered intermolecular {beta}-sheet structure, peptide monomers associate forming low and high molecular weight oligomers. These oligomers have been previously described in electron microscopy, AFM, and exclusion chromatography studies. Their specific secondary structures however, have not yet been well established. A major problem when comparing aggregation and secondary structure determinations in concentration-dependent processes such as amyloid aggregation is the different concentration range required in each type of experiment. In the present study we used the dye Thioflavin T (ThT), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron microscopy in order to structurally characterize the different aggregated species which form during the A{beta}(1-40) fibril formation process. A unique sample containing 90 {mu}M peptide was used. The results show that oligomeric species which form during the lag phase of the aggregation kinetics are a mixture of unordered, helical, and intermolecular non-fibrillar {beta}-structures. The number of oligomers and the amount of non-fibrillar {beta}-structures grows throughout the lag phase and during the elongation phase these non-fibrillar {beta}-structures are transformed into fibrillar (amyloid) {beta}-structures, formed by association of high molecular weight intermediates.

  16. Amyloid-beta peptide binds to microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B).

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-05-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Conversion of non-fibrillar beta-sheet oligomers into amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Cócera, Mercedes; Cladera, Josep

    2007-10-05

    Abeta(1-40) is one of the main components of the fibrils found in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. It is known that prior to the formation of amyloid fibrils in which the peptide adopts a well-ordered intermolecular beta-sheet structure, peptide monomers associate forming low and high molecular weight oligomers. These oligomers have been previously described in electron microscopy, AFM, and exclusion chromatography studies. Their specific secondary structures however, have not yet been well established. A major problem when comparing aggregation and secondary structure determinations in concentration-dependent processes such as amyloid aggregation is the different concentration range required in each type of experiment. In the present study we used the dye Thioflavin T (ThT), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron microscopy in order to structurally characterize the different aggregated species which form during the Abeta(1-40) fibril formation process. A unique sample containing 90microM peptide was used. The results show that oligomeric species which form during the lag phase of the aggregation kinetics are a mixture of unordered, helical, and intermolecular non-fibrillar beta-structures. The number of oligomers and the amount of non-fibrillar beta-structures grows throughout the lag phase and during the elongation phase these non-fibrillar beta-structures are transformed into fibrillar (amyloid) beta-structures, formed by association of high molecular weight intermediates.

  18. Membrane Pore Formation by Amyloid beta (25-35) Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Nabin; Tatulian, Suren

    Amyloid (A β) peptide contributes to Alzheimer's disease by a yet unidentified mechanism. One of the possible mechanisms of A β toxicity is formation of pores in cellular membranes. We have characterized the formation of pores in phospholipid membranes by the Aβ25 - 35 peptide (GSNKGAIIGLM) using fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. CD and FTIR identified formation of β-sheet structure upon incubation of the peptide in aqueous buffer for 2 hours. Unilamellar vesicles composed of a zwitterionic lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and 70 % POPC plus 30 % of an acidic lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), are made in 30 mM CaCl2. Quin-2, a fluorophore that displays increased fluorescence upon Ca2+ binding, is added to the vesicles externally. Peptide addition results in increased Quin-2 fluorescence, which is interpreted by binding of the peptide to the vesicles, pore formation, and Ca2+ leakage. The positive and negative control measurements involve addition of a detergent, Triton X-100, which causes vesicle rupture and release of total calcium, and blank buffer, respectively.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress promotes amyloid-beta peptides production in RGC-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingqian; Zhu, Yingting; Zhou, Jiayi; Wei, Yantao; Long, Chongde; Chen, Mengfei; Ling, Yunlan; Ge, Jian; Zhuo, Yehong

    2014-11-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. We have previously observed amyloid production in the retina of the Tg2576 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we used tunicamycin-induced ER stress in RGC-5 cells, a cell line identical to the photoreceptor cell line 661W, to investigate the effect of ER stress on production of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides. We found that the mRNA level of amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) remained stable, while the protein level of amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) was decreased, the amyloid-beta precursor protein cleaving enzymes beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 and presenilin 1 were upregulated, Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 production were increased, and reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis markers were elevated following induction of ER stress. The protein level of Abeta degradation enzymes, neprilysin, endothelin-converting enzyme 1, and endothelin-converting enzyme 2 remained unchanged during the prolonged ER stress, showing that the generation of Abeta did not result from reduction of proteolysis by these enzymes. Inclusion of group II caspase inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK, increased the ER stress mediated Abeta production, suggesting that they are generated by a caspase-independent mechanism. Our findings provided evidence of a role of ER stress in Abeta peptide overproduction and apoptotic pathway activation in RGC-5 cells.

  20. Ethyl ether fraction of Gastrodia elata Blume protects amyloid beta peptide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Ju; Moon, Kwang-Deog; Lee, Dong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Han

    2003-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Recently, it has been reported that Alzheimer's disease is associated with cell death in neuronal cells including the hippocampus. Amyloid beta-peptide stimulates neuronal cell death, but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In order to develop anti-dementia agents with potential therapeutic value, we examined the effect of the herbal compound Gastrodia elata Blume (GEB) on neuronal cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. The fractionation of GEB was carried out in various solvents. The hydroxyl radical scavenging effect of the ethyl ether fraction was more potent than any other fractions. In cells treated with amyloid beta-peptide, the neuroprotective effect of the ethyl ether, chloroform, and butanol fractions was 92, 44, and 39%, respectively, compared with control. Taken together, these results suggest that the ethyl ether fraction of GEB contains one or more compounds that dramatically reduce amyloid beta-peptide induced neuronal cell death in vitro.

  1. Energy landscape theory for Alzheimer's amyloid beta-peptide fibril elongation.

    PubMed

    Massi, F; Straub, J E

    2001-02-01

    Recent experiments on the kinetics of deposition and fibril elongation of the Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide on preexisting fibrils are analyzed. A mechanism is developed based on the dock-and-lock scheme recently proposed by Maggio and coworkers to organize their experimental observations of the kinetics of deposition of beta-peptide on preexisting amyloid fibrils and deposits. Our mechanism includes channels for (1) a one-step prion-like direct deposition on fibrils of activated monomeric peptide in solution, and (2) a two-step deposition of unactivated peptide on fibrils and subsequent reorganization of the peptide-fibril complex. In this way, the mechanism and implied "energy landscape" unify a number of schemes proposed to describe the process of fibril elongation. This beta-amyloid landscape mechanism (beta ALM) is found to be in good agreement with existing experimental data. A number of experimental tests of the mechanism are proposed. The mechanism leads to a clear definition of overall equilibrium or rate constants in terms of the energetics of the elementary underlying processes. Analysis of existing experimental data suggests that fibril elongation occurs through a two-step mechanism of nonspecific peptide absorption and reorganization. The mechanism predicts a turnover in the rate of fibril elongation as a function of temperature and denaturant concentration. Proteins 2001;42:217-229.

  2. Secondary structure of amyloid beta peptide correlates with neurotoxic activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simmons, L K; May, P C; Tomaselli, K J; Rydel, R E; Fuson, K S; Brigham, E F; Wright, S; Lieberburg, I; Becker, G W; Brems, D N

    1994-03-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (A beta), the major protein constituent of senile plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, is believed to facilitate the progressive neurodegeneration that occurs in the latter stages of this disease. Early attempts to characterize the structure-activity relationship of A beta toxicity in vitro were compromised by the inability to reproducibly elicit A beta-dependent toxicity across different lots of chemically equivalent peptides. In this study we used CD spectroscopy to demonstrate that A beta secondary structure is an important determinant of A beta toxicity. Solubilized A beta was maximally toxic when the peptide adopted a beta-sheet conformation. Three of the four A beta lots tested had a random coil conformation and were weakly toxic or inactive, whereas the single A beta lot exhibiting toxic activity at low peptide concentrations had significant beta-sheet structure. Incubation of the weakly toxic A beta lots in aqueous stock solutions for several days before use induced a time-dependent conformational transition from random coil to beta-sheet and increased A beta toxicity in three different toxicity assays. Furthermore, the secondary structure of preincubated A beta was dependent upon peptide concentration and pH, so that beta-sheet structures were attenuated when peptide solutions were diluted or buffered at neutral and basic pH. Our data could explain some of the variable toxic activity that has been associated with A beta in the past and provide additional support for the hypothesis that A beta can have a causal role in the molecular neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  4. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  5. Competitive Mirror Image Phage Display Derived Peptide Modulates Amyloid Beta Aggregation and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Stephan; Klein, Antonia Nicole; Tusche, Markus; Schlosser, Christine; Elfgen, Anne; Brener, Oleksandr; Teunissen, Charlotte; Gremer, Lothar; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Kutzsche, Janine; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease is the most prominent type of dementia and currently no causative treatment is available. According to recent studies, oligomeric species of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide appear to be the most toxic Aβ assemblies. Aβ monomers, however, may be not toxic per se and may even have a neuroprotective role. Here we describe a competitive mirror image phage display procedure that allowed us to identify preferentially Aβ1–42 monomer binding and thereby stabilizing peptides, which destabilize and thereby eliminate toxic oligomer species. One of the peptides, called Mosd1 (monomer specific d-peptide 1), was characterized in more detail. Mosd1 abolished oligomers from a mixture of Aβ1–42 species, reduced Aβ1–42 toxicity in cell culture, and restored the physiological phenotype in neuronal cells stably transfected with the gene coding for human amyloid precursor protein. PMID:26840229

  6. Cytosolic amyloid-{beta} peptide 42 escaping from degradation induces cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Park, Yong Wook; Shin, Dong Yeon; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Yoo, Yung Joon . E-mail: yjyoo@gist.ac.kr

    2006-06-02

    Accumulating evidence suggests that intracellular amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide triggers the early pathological events in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about the consequence of cytosolic A{beta}. In this study, we ectopically expressed A{beta}42 in the cytoplasm of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by expressing a fusion protein of GFP-tagged ubiquitin and A{beta}42 (GFPUb-A{beta}42). Although GFPUb and A{beta}42 are stochastically produced with the same molar ratio in the cytoplasm, A{beta}42 was completely degraded in more than 50% of the GFPUb-expressing cells. However, if A{beta}42 was not degraded in their cytoplasm, then A{beta}42-expressing cells underwent apoptosis. The number of A{beta}42-expressing cells is significantly increased by the inhibition of proteasome with MG132. Cytosolic A{beta}42 which has escaped degradation inhibits proteasome and thereby may accelerate the accumulation of A{beta}42 and its detrimental effects. Our findings suggest that cells have the potential to degrade A{beta}42 in their cytoplasm but if A{beta}42 appears in the cytoplasm due to its incomplete degradation, it accumulates and may trigger the fatal cascade of pathology of AD.

  7. Organic solvent mediated self-association of an amyloid forming peptide from beta2-microglobulin: an atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nitin; Singh, Shashi; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2008-01-01

    Human beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) forms amyloid fibrils in hemodialysis related amyloidosis. Peptides spanning the beta strands of beta(2)m have been shown to form amyloid fibrils in isolation. We have studied the self-association of a 13-residue peptide Ac-DWSFYLLYYTEFT-am (Pbeta(2)m) spanning one of the beta-strands of human beta(2)-microglobulin when dissolved in various organic solvents such as methanol (MeOH), trifluoroethanol (TFE), hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP), and dimethylsulfoxide. We have observed that Pbeta(2)m forms amyloid fibrils when diluted from organic solvents into aqueous buffer at pH 7.0 as judged by increase in thioflavin T fluorescence. Fibril formation was observed to depend on the solvents in which peptide stock solutions were prepared. Circular dichroism spectra indicated propensity for helical conformation in MeOH, TFE, and HFIP. In buffer, beta-structure was observed irrespective of the solvent in which the peptide stock solutions were prepared. Atomic force microscopy images obtained by drying the peptide on mica from organic solvents indicated the ability of Pbeta(2)m to self-associate to form nonfibrillar structures. Morphology of the structures was dependent on the solvent in which the peptide was dissolved. Peptides that have the ability to self-associate such as amyloid-forming peptides would be attractive candidates for the generation of self-assembled structures with varying morphologies by appropriate choice of surfaces and solvents for dissolution. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Beta-amyloid peptide blocks the fast-inactivating K+ current in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Good, T A; Smith, D O; Murphy, R M

    1996-01-01

    Deposition of beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in senile plaques is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease neuropathology. Chronic exposure of neuronal cultures to synthetic A beta is directly toxic, or enhances neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxins. Exposure to A beta may cause a loss of cellular calcium homeostasis, but the mechanism by which this occurs is uncertain. In this work, the acute response of rat hippocampal neurons to applications of synthetic A beta was measured using whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. Pulse application of A beta caused a reversible voltage-dependent decrease in membrane conductance. A beta selectively blocked the voltage-gated fast-inactivating K+ current, with an estimated KI < 10 microM. A beta also blocked the delayed rectifying current, but only at the highest concentration tested. The response was independent of aggregation state or peptide length. The dynamic response of the fast-inactivating current to a voltage jump was consistent with a model whereby A beta binds reversibly to closed channels and prevents their opening. Blockage of fast-inactivating K+ channels by A beta could lead to prolonged cell depolarization, thereby increasing Ca2+ influx. PMID:8770205

  9. Amyloid beta peptide 22-35 induces a negative inotropic effect on isolated rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Yousefirad, Neda; Kaygısız, Ziya; Aydın, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    Evidences indicate that deposition of amyloid beta peptides (Aβs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Aβs may influence cardiovascular system and ileum contractions. But the effect of amyloid beta peptide 22-35 (Aβ22-35) on cardiovascular functions and contractions of ileum has not been studied. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the possible effects of this peptide on isolated rat heart and ileum smooth muscle. Langendorff-perfused rat heart preparations were established. The hearts were perfused under constant pressure (60 mmHg) with modified Krebs-Henseleit solution. Aβ22-35 at doses of 1, 10 and 100 nM significantly decreased left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP; an index of cardiac contractility) and maximal rate of pressure development of left ventricle (+dP/dtmax; another index of cardiac contractility). This peptide at doses studied had no significant effect on heart rate, coronary flow, monophasic action potential amplitude (MAPamp), MAP duration at 90% repolarization (MAP90) and ileum contractions. We suggest that Aβ22-35 exerts a negative inotropism on isolated rat hearts with unchanged heart rate, coronary flow, MAPamp, MAP90 and smooth muscle contractility of ileum. PMID:28078053

  10. Presynaptic localization of neprilysin contributes to efficient clearance of amyloid-beta peptide in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Nobuhisa; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Shirotani, Keiro; Takaki, Yoshie; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma P; Gerard, Craig; Ozawa, Keiya; Saido, Takaomi C

    2004-01-28

    A local increase in amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is closely associated with synaptic dysfunction in the brain in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report on the catabolic mechanism of Abeta at the presynaptic sites. Neprilysin, an Abeta-degrading enzyme, expressed by recombinant adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer, was axonally transported to presynaptic sites through afferent projections of neuronal circuits. This gene transfer abolished the increase in Abeta levels in the hippocampal formations of neprilysin-deficient mice and also reduced the increase in young mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice. In the latter case, Abeta levels in the hippocampal formation contralateral to the vector-injected side were also significantly reduced as a result of transport of neprilysin from the ipsilateral side, and in both sides soluble Abeta was degraded more efficiently than insoluble Abeta. Furthermore, amyloid deposition in aged mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice was remarkably decelerated. Thus, presynaptic neprilysin has been demonstrated to degrade Abeta efficiently and to retard development of amyloid pathology.

  11. Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide modulators and other current treatment strategies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD)

    PubMed Central

    Lukiw, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common, progressive neurological disorder whose incidence is reaching epidemic proportions. The prevailing ‘amyloid cascade hypothesis’, which maintains that the aberrant proteolysis of beta-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) into neurotoxic amyloid beta (Aβ)-peptides is central to the etiopathology of AD, continues to dominate pharmacological approaches to the clinical management of this insidious disorder. This review is a compilation and update on current pharmacological strategies designed to down-regulate Aβ42-peptide generation in an effort to ameliorate the tragedy of AD. Areas Covered This review utilized on-line data searches at various open online-access websites including the Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer Research Forum; individual drug company databases; the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Medline; Pharmaprojects database; Scopus; inter-University research communications and unpublished research data. Expert Opinion Aβ immunization-, anti-acetylcholinesterase-, β-secretase-, chelation-, γ-secretase-, N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist-, statin-based and other strategies to modulate βAPP processing have dominated pharmacological approaches directed against AD-type neurodegenerative pathology. Cumulative clinical results of these efforts remain extremely disappointing, and have had little overall impact on the clinical management of AD. While a number of novel approaches are in consideration and development, to date there is still no effective treatment or cure for this expanding healthcare concern. PMID:22439907

  12. Amyloid beta-HSP60 peptide conjugate vaccine treats a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nemirovsky, Anna; Fisher, Yair; Baron, Rona; Cohen, Irun R; Monsonego, Alon

    2011-05-23

    Active vaccination with amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) to induce beneficial antibodies was found to be effective in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but human vaccination trials led to adverse effects, apparently caused by exuberant T-cell reactivity. Here, we sought to develop a safer active vaccine for AD with reduced T-cell activation. We treated a mouse model of AD carrying the HLA-DR DRB1*1501 allele, with the Aβ B-cell epitope (Aβ 1-15) conjugated to the self-HSP60 peptide p458. Immunization with the conjugate led to the induction of Aβ-specific antibodies associated with a significant reduction of cerebral amyloid burden and of the accompanying inflammatory response in the brain; only a mild T-cell response specific to the HSP peptide but not to the Aβ peptide was found. This type of vaccination, evoking a gradual increase in antibody titers accompanied by a mild T-cell response is likely due to the unique adjuvant and T-cell stimulating properties of the self-HSP peptide used in the conjugate and might provide a safer approach to effective AD vaccination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE)--amyloid-beta-peptide complexes in Alzheimer's disease. the Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Urra, Soledad; Colombres, Marcela

    2004-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by selective neuronal cell death, which is probably caused by amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) oligomers and fibrils. We have found that acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a senile plaque component, increases amyloid fibril assembly with the formation of highly toxic complexes (Abeta-AChE). The neurotoxic effect induced by Abeta-AChE complexes was higher than that induced by the Abeta peptide alone as shown both in vitro (hippocampal neurons) and in vivo (rats injected with Abeta peptide in the dorsal hippocampus). Interestingly, treatment with Abeta-AChE complexes decreases the cytoplasmic beta-catenin level, a key component of Wnt signaling. Conversely, the activation of this signaling pathway by Wnt-3a promotes neuronal survival and rescues changes in Wnt components (activation or subcellular localization). Moreover Frzb-1, a Wnt antagonist reverses the Wnt-3a neuroprotection effect against Abeta neurotoxicity. Compounds that mimic the Wnt signaling or modulate the cross-talking with this pathway could be used as neuroprotective agents for therapeutic strategies in AD patients.

  14. p75NTR antagonistic cyclic peptide decreases the size of beta amyloid-induced brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L; Stewart, Kenneth B; Qureshi, Nazer H; Kowall, Neil W; Gilchrest, Barbara A

    2008-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75(NTR) antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Abeta and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75(NTR). In vivo injections of Abeta into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Abeta and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Abeta to p75(NTR) may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Three-dimensional structures of the amyloid beta peptide (25-35) in membrane-mimicking environment.

    PubMed

    Kohno, T; Kobayashi, K; Maeda, T; Sato, K; Takashima, A

    1996-12-17

    The three-dimensional structure of amyloid beta peptide (25-35), which has neurotoxic activity, in lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles was determined by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy with simulated annealing calculations. A total of 20 converged amyloid beta peptide structures were obtained on the basis of 110 experimental constraints, including 106 distance constraints reduced from the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) connectivities and four torsion angle (phi) constraints. The atomic root mean square difference about averaged coordinates is 1.04 +/- 0.25 A for the backbone atoms (N, C alpha, C) and 1.39 +/- 0.27 A for all heavy atoms of the entire peptide. The molecular structure of amyloid beta peptide in membrane-mimicking environment is composed of a short alpha helix in the C terminal position. The three residues from the N-terminus are disordered, but the remaining eight C-terminal residues are well-ordered, which is supported by the RMSD values of the C-terminal region, Lys28-Leu34. In this region, the RMS differences from averaged coordinates are 0.26 +/- 0.11 A for the backbone atoms (N, C alpha, C) and 0.77 +/- 0.21 A for all heavy atoms, which is very low compared with those for the entire peptide. The four amino acid residues from the N-terminus are hydrophilic and the other seven amino acid residues in C-terminus are hydrophobic. So, our results show that the C-terminal region of amyloid beta peptide (25-35) is buried in the membrane and assumes alpha-helical structure, whereas the N-terminal region is exposed to the solvent with a flexible structure. This structure is very similar to membrane-mediated structure of substance P previously reported. The three-dimensional structure of a non-neurotoxic mutant of amyloid beta peptide (25-35), where Asn27 is replaced by Ala, in lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles was also determined. The structure is similar to that of the wild type amyloid beta peptide (25-35) in the C-terminal region, but the N

  16. MALDI, AP/MALDI and ESI techniques for the MS detection of amyloid [beta]-peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Mineo, Placido; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Amyloid [beta]-peptides (A[beta]s) are involved in several neuropathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and considerable experimental evidences have emerged indicating that different proteases play a major role in regulating the accumulation of A[beta]s in the brain. Particularly, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been shown to degrade A[beta]s at different cleavage sites, but the experimental results reported in the literature and obtained by mass spectrometry methods are somehow fragmentary. The detection of A[beta]s is often complicated by solubility issues, oxidation artifacts and spontaneous aggregation/cleavage and, in order to rationalize the different reported results, we analyzed A[beta]s solutions by three different MS approaches: matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF), atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI ion trap and electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap. Differences in the obtained results are discussed and ESI is chosen as the most suitable MS method for A[beta]s detection. Finally, cleavage sites produced by interaction of A[beta]s with IDE are identified, two of which had never been reported in the literature.

  17. Measurement of beta-amyloid peptides in specific cells using a photo thin-film transistor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Beom; Chae, Cheol-Joo; Shin, Hye-Rim; Song, Ki-Bong

    2012-01-06

    The existence of beta-amyloid [Aβ] peptides in the brain has been regarded as the most archetypal biomarker of Alzheimer's disease [AD]. Recently, an early clinical diagnosis has been considered a great importance in identifying people who are at high risk of AD. However, no microscale electronic sensing devices for the detection of Aβ peptides have been developed yet. In this study, we propose an effective method to evaluate a small quantity of Aβ peptides labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC] using a photosensitive field-effect transistor [p-FET] with an on-chip single-layer optical filter. To accurately evaluate the quantity of Aβ peptides within the cells cultured on the p-FET device, we measured the photocurrents which resulted from the FITC-conjugated Aβ peptides expressed from the cells and measured the number of photons of the fluorochrome in the cells using a photomultiplier tube. Thus, we evaluated the correlation between the generated photocurrents and the number of emitted photons. We also evaluated the correlation between the number of emitted photons and the amount of FITC by measuring the FITC volume using AFM. Finally, we estimated the quantity of Aβ peptides of the cells placed on the p-FET sensing area on the basis of the binding ratio between FITC molecules and Aβ peptides.

  18. Measurement of beta-amyloid peptides in specific cells using a photo thin-film transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Beom; Chae, Cheol-Joo; Shin, Hye-Rim; Song, Ki-Bong

    2012-01-01

    The existence of beta-amyloid [Aβ] peptides in the brain has been regarded as the most archetypal biomarker of Alzheimer's disease [AD]. Recently, an early clinical diagnosis has been considered a great importance in identifying people who are at high risk of AD. However, no microscale electronic sensing devices for the detection of Aβ peptides have been developed yet. In this study, we propose an effective method to evaluate a small quantity of Aβ peptides labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC] using a photosensitive field-effect transistor [p-FET] with an on-chip single-layer optical filter. To accurately evaluate the quantity of Aβ peptides within the cells cultured on the p-FET device, we measured the photocurrents which resulted from the FITC-conjugated Aβ peptides expressed from the cells and measured the number of photons of the fluorochrome in the cells using a photomultiplier tube. Thus, we evaluated the correlation between the generated photocurrents and the number of emitted photons. We also evaluated the correlation between the number of emitted photons and the amount of FITC by measuring the FITC volume using AFM. Finally, we estimated the quantity of Aβ peptides of the cells placed on the p-FET sensing area on the basis of the binding ratio between FITC molecules and Aβ peptides.

  19. Binding of amyloid beta peptide to beta2 adrenergic receptor induces PKA-dependent AMPA receptor hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Govindaiah, G; Liu, Ruijie; De Arcangelis, Vania; Cox, Charles L; Xiang, Yang K

    2010-09-01

    Progressive decrease in neuronal function is an established feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide induces acute increase in spontaneous synaptic activity accompanied by neurotoxicity, and Abeta induces excitotoxic neuronal death by increasing calcium influx mediated by hyperactive alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptors. An in vivo study has revealed subpopulations of hyperactive neurons near Abeta plaques in mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that can be normalized by an AMPA receptor antagonist. In the present study, we aim to determine whether soluble Abeta acutely induces hyperactivity of AMPA receptors by a mechanism involving beta(2) adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR). We found that the soluble Abeta binds to beta(2)AR, and the extracellular N terminus of beta(2)AR is critical for the binding. The binding is required to induce G-protein/cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, which controls PKA-dependent phosphorylation of GluR1 and beta(2)AR, and AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). beta(2)AR and GluR1 also form a complex comprising postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), PKA and its anchor AKAP150, and protein phosphotase 2A (PP2A). Both the third intracellular (i3) loop and C terminus of beta(2)AR are required for the beta(2)AR/AMPA receptor complex. Abeta acutely induces PKA phosphorylation of GluR1 in the complex without affecting the association between two receptors. The present study reveals that non-neurotransmitter Abeta has a binding capacity to beta(2)AR and induces PKA-dependent hyperactivity in AMPA receptors.

  20. Pulsed hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes conformational changes in amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Rempel, Don L.; Zhang, Jun; Sharma, Anuj K.; Mirica, Liviu M.; Gross, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Probing the conformational changes of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is challenging owing to the vast heterogeneity of the resulting soluble aggregates. To investigate the formation of these aggregates in solution, we designed an MS-based biophysical approach and applied it to the formation of soluble aggregates of the Aβ42 peptide, the proposed causative agent in Alzheimer’s disease. The approach incorporates pulsed hydrogen–deuterium exchange coupled with MS analysis. The combined approach provides evidence for a self-catalyzed aggregation with a lag phase, as observed previously by fluorescence methods. Unlike those approaches, pulsed hydrogen–deuterium exchange does not require modified Aβ42 (e.g., labeling with a fluorophore). Furthermore, the approach reveals that the center region of Aβ42 is first to aggregate, followed by the C and N termini. We also found that the lag phase in the aggregation of soluble species is affected by temperature and Cu2+ ions. This MS approach has sufficient structural resolution to allow interrogation of Aβ aggregation in physiologically relevant environments. This platform should be generally useful for investigating the aggregation of other amyloid-forming proteins and neurotoxic soluble peptide aggregates. PMID:23959898

  1. Glutamatergic synaptic depression by synthetic amyloid beta-peptide in the medial septum.

    PubMed

    Santos-Torres, Julio; Fuente, Antonio; Criado, Jose Maria; Riolobos, Adelaida Sanchez; Heredia, Margarita; Yajeya, Javier

    2007-02-15

    The medial septum/diagonal band region, which participates in learning and memory processes via its cholinergic and GABAergic projection to the hippocampus, is one of the structures affected by beta amyloid (betaA) deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The acute effects of betaA (25-35 and 1-40) on action potential generation and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in slices of the medial septal area of the rat brain were studied using current and patch-clamp techniques. The betaA mechanism of action through M1 muscarinic receptors and voltage-dependent calcium channels was also addressed. Excitatory evoked responses decreased (30-60%) in amplitude after betaA (2 microM) perfusion in 70% of recorded cells. However, the firing properties were unaltered at the same concentration. This depression was irreversible in most cases, and was not prevented or reversed by nicotine (5 microM). In addition, the results obtained using a paired-pulse protocol support pre- and postsynaptic actions of the peptide. The betaA effect was blocked by calcicludine (50 nM), a selective antagonist of L-type calcium channels, and also by blocking muscarinic receptors with atropine (5 muM) or pirenzepine (1 microM), a more specific M1-receptor blocker. We show that in the medial septal area this oligomeric peptide acts through calcium channels and muscarinic receptors. As blocking any of these pathways blocks the betaA effects, we propose a joint action through both mechanisms. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology at the onset of AD. This understanding will be required for the development of new therapeutic agents.

  2. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions.

  3. Dynamics in Alzheimer's disease: the role of peptide flexibility on amyloid beta aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonieta Sanchez Farran, Maria; Maranas, Janna

    2010-03-01

    Aggregates of the amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) are thought to trigger brain cell death in Alzheimer's patients. Two different types of Aβ aggregates have been identified: soluble, and insoluble. Soluble aggregates are formed in early stages of peptide association, whereas insoluble aggregates are the final state of aggregation. Interestingly, it is the soluble aggregates, not the insoluble ones, which correlate with disease progression. Despite the relevance of soluble aggregates as a target for Alzheimer's disease, their mechanism of formation is unknown. The role of local flexibility in protein function has recently received attention: in this study we ask if local flexibility plays a similar role in how soluble aggregates form. To answer this question, we perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type Aβ monomer, and two mutated forms that vary in their ability to form soluble aggregates. We find that enhanced flexibility facilitates the formation and availability of nucleation sites by allowing the peptide to more easily access the conformations most favorable to association. Peptides with high flexibility show larger conformational changes than less flexible peptides, the extent of these changes could determine the ability of Aβ to self associate.

  4. Isoflurane and desflurane at clinically relevant concentrations induce amyloid {beta}-peptide oligomerization: An NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Pravat K Fodale, Vincenzo

    2009-02-13

    Current understanding on Alzheimer's disease (AD) reveals that soluble amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) oligomeric formation plays an important role in AD pathophysiology. A potential role for several inhaled anesthetics in promoting A{beta} oligomer formation has been suggested. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, we previously demonstrated that at a high concentration (higher than clinically relevant concentrations), the inhaled anesthetics halothane and isoflurane, interact with specific amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31) and induce A{beta} oligomerization. The present study confirms this is true at a clinically relevant concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane induce A{beta} oligomerization by inducing chemical shift changes of the critical amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31), reinforcing the evidence that perturbation of these three crucial residues indeed plays an important role in oligomerization. These findings support the emerging hypothesis that several commonly used inhaled anesthetics could be involved in neurodegeneration, as well as risk factor for accelerating the onset of AD.

  5. Effects of amyloid beta-peptides on the lysis tension of lipid bilayer vesicles containing oxysterols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dennis H; Frangos, John A

    2008-07-01

    Amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) applied directly from solution to model lipid membranes produced dramatic changes in the material properties of the bilayer when certain oxysterols were present in the bilayer. These effects were dependent on both lipid and peptide composition, and occurred at peptide concentrations as low as 100 nM. Using micropipette manipulation of giant unilamellar vesicles, we directly measured the lysis tension of lipid bilayers of various compositions. The glycerophospholipid 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) constituted the main lipid component at 70 mol %. The remaining 30 mol % was composed of the following pure or mixed sterols: cholesterol (CHOL), 7-ketocholesterol (KETO), or 7beta-hydroxycholesterol (OHCHOL). SOPC/CHOL bilayers did not exhibit significant changes in mechanical properties after exposure to either Abeta(1-42) or Abeta(1-40). Partial substitution of CHOL with KETO (5 mol %), however, caused a drastic reduction of the lysis tension after exposure to Abeta(1-42) but not to Abeta(1-40). Partial substitution of CHOL with OHCHOL (5 mol %) caused a drastic reduction of the lysis tension after exposure to Abeta(1-40) and to Abeta(1-42). We attribute these effects to the reduction in intermolecular cohesive interactions caused by the presence of the second dipole of oxysterols, which reduces the energetic barrier for Abeta insertion into the bilayer.

  6. Clearance mechanisms of Alzheimer's amyloid-beta peptide: implications for therapeutic design and diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Bates, K A; Verdile, G; Li, Q-X; Ames, D; Hudson, P; Masters, C L; Martins, R N

    2009-05-01

    Currently, the 'amyloid hypothesis' is the most widely accepted explanation for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). According to this hypothesis, altered metabolism of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide is central to the pathological cascade involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Although Abeta is produced by almost every cell in the body, a physiological function for the peptide has not been determined, and the pathways by which Abeta leads to cognitive dysfunction and cell death are unclear. Numerous therapeutic approaches that target the production, toxicity and removal of Abeta are being developed worldwide. Although therapeutic treatment for AD may be imminent, the value and effectiveness of such treatment are largely dependent on early diagnosis of the disease. This review summarizes current knowledge of Abeta clearance, transport and degradation, and evaluates the use of such information in the development of diagnostic tools. The conflicting results of plasma Abeta ELISAs are discussed, as are the more promising results of Abeta imaging by positron emission tomography. Current knowledge of Abeta-binding proteins and Abeta-degrading enzymes is analysed in the context of a potential therapy for AD. Transport across the blood-brain barrier by the receptor for advanced glycation end products and efflux via the multi-ligand lipoprotein receptor LRP-1 is also reviewed. Enhancing clearance and degradation of Abeta remains an attractive therapeutic strategy, and improved understanding of Abeta clearance may lead to advances in diagnostics and interventions designed to prevent or delay the onset of AD.

  7. Effect of graphene oxide on the conformational transitions of amyloid beta peptide: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Lokesh; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between nanomaterials (NMs) and amyloid proteins are central to the nanotechnology-based diagnostics and therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Graphene oxide (GO) and its derivatives have shown to modulate the aggregation pattern of disease causing amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. However, the mechanism is still not well understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) having carbon:oxygen ratio of 4:1 and 10:1, respectively, on the conformational transitions (alpha-helix to beta-sheet) and the dynamics of the peptide was investigated. GO and rGO decreased the beta-strand propensity of amino acid residues in Aβ. The peptide displayed different modes of adsorption on GO and rGO. The adsorption on GO was dominated by electrostatic interactions, whereas on rGO, both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions contributed in the adsorption of the peptide. Our study revealed that the slight increase in the hydrophobic patches on rGO made it more effective inhibitor of conformational transitions in the peptide. Alpha helix-beta sheet transition in Aβ peptide could be one of the plausible mechanism by which graphene oxide may inhibit amyloid fibrillation.

  8. Multi-layer Parallel Beta-Sheet Structure of Amyloid Beta peptide (1-40) aggregate observed by discrete molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shouyong; Urbanc, Brigita; Ding, Feng; Cruz, Luis; Buldyrev, Sergey; Dokholyan, Nikolay; Stanley, H. E.

    2003-03-01

    New evidence shows that oligomeric forms of Amyloid-Beta are potent neurotoxins that play a major role in neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Detailed knowledge of the structure and assembly dynamics of Amyloid-Beta is important for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here we apply a two-atom model with Go interactions to model aggregation of Amyloid-Beta (1-40) peptides using the discrete molecular dynamics simulation. At temperatures above the transition temperature from an alpha-helical to random coil, we obtain two types of parallel beta-sheet structures, (a) a helical beta-sheet structure at a lower temperature and (b) a parallel beta-sheet structure at a higher temperature, both with inter-sheet distance of 10 A and with free edges which possibly enable further fibrillar elongation.

  9. Amnestic effects in mice of four synthetic peptides homologous to amyloid beta protein from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Flood, J F; Morley, J E; Roberts, E

    1991-01-01

    Immediate post-training intracerebroventricular administration of a synthetic peptide homologous to beta protein of brain amyloid, [Gln11]beta-(1-28), caused amnesia for footshock active avoidance training in mice in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was specific to memory processing since the peptide did not cause amnesia when injected 24 hr after training nor did it disturb storage or retrieval of older memories. Shorter fragments of the amyloid beta protein consisting of residues 12-28, 18-28, and 12-20 also were amnestic when given intracerebroventricularly, residues 12-20 being least effective. The hippocampus, a brain structure importantly involved in learning and memory, consistently shows severe pathological changes and deposition of amyloid in patients with Alzheimer disease. Immediate post-training bilateral intrahippocampal injection of [Gln11]beta-(1-28) produced amnesia at much lower doses than did [Gln11]beta-(1-28) injected intracerebroventricularly. Thus these experimental results suggest a possible direct role of amyloid beta protein or fragments thereof in an aspect of the spectrum of cognitive deficit in Alzheimer disease. Images PMID:2014256

  10. Amnestic effects in mice of four synthetic peptides homologous to amyloid beta protein from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Flood, J F; Morley, J E; Roberts, E

    1991-04-15

    Immediate post-training intracerebroventricular administration of a synthetic peptide homologous to beta protein of brain amyloid, [Gln11]beta-(1-28), caused amnesia for footshock active avoidance training in mice in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was specific to memory processing since the peptide did not cause amnesia when injected 24 hr after training nor did it disturb storage or retrieval of older memories. Shorter fragments of the amyloid beta protein consisting of residues 12-28, 18-28, and 12-20 also were amnestic when given intracerebroventricularly, residues 12-20 being least effective. The hippocampus, a brain structure importantly involved in learning and memory, consistently shows severe pathological changes and deposition of amyloid in patients with Alzheimer disease. Immediate post-training bilateral intrahippocampal injection of [Gln11]beta-(1-28) produced amnesia at much lower doses than did [Gln11]beta-(1-28) injected intracerebroventricularly. Thus these experimental results suggest a possible direct role of amyloid beta protein or fragments thereof in an aspect of the spectrum of cognitive deficit in Alzheimer disease.

  11. Bloodstream Amyloid-beta (1-40) Peptide, Cognition, and Outcomes in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Barallat, Jaume; de Antonio, Marta; Domingo, Mar; Zamora, Elisabet; Vila, Joan; Subirana, Isaac; Gastelurrutia, Paloma; Pastor, M Cruz; Januzzi, James L; Lupón, Josep

    2017-03-06

    In the brain, amyloid-beta generation participates in the pathophysiology of cognitive disorders; in the bloodstream, the role of amyloid-beta is uncertain but may be linked to sterile inflammation and senescence. We explored the relationship between blood levels of amyloid-beta 1-40 peptide (Aβ40), cognition, and mortality (all-cause, cardiovascular, and heart failure [HF]-related) in ambulatory patients with HF. Bloodstream Aβ40 was measured in 939 consecutive patients with HF. Cognition was evaluated with the Pfeiffer questionnaire (adjusted for educational level) at baseline and during follow-up. Multivariate Cox regression analyses and measurements of performance (discrimination, calibration, and reclassification) were used, with competing risk for specific causes of death. Over 5.1 ± 2.9 years, 471 patients died (all-cause): 250 from cardiovascular causes and 131 HF-related. The median Aβ40 concentration was 519.1 pg/mL [Q1-Q3: 361.8-749.9 pg/mL]. The Aβ40 concentration correlated with age, body mass index, renal dysfunction, and New York Heart Association functional class (all P < .001). There were no differences in Aβ40 in patients with and without cognitive impairment at baseline (P = .97) or during follow-up (P = .20). In multivariable analysis, including relevant clinical predictors and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, Aβ40 remained significantly associated with all-cause death (HR, 1.22; 95%CI, 1.10-1.35; P < .001) and cardiovascular death (HR, 1.18; 95%CI, 1.03-1.36; P = .02), but not with HF-related death (HR, 1.13; 95%CI, 0.93-1.37; P = .22). Circulating Aβ40 improved calibration and patient reclassification. Blood levels of Aβ40 are not associated with cognitive decline in HF. Circulating Aβ40 was predictive of mortality and may indicate systemic aging. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. X-ray absorption and diffraction studies of the metal binding sites in amyloid beta-peptide.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor

    2008-03-01

    A major source of neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's disease is believed to be caused by the toxicity from reactive oxygen species produced in the brain mediated by the A beta protein and mainly copper species. An atomic model of an amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) Cu2+ complex or at least the structure of the metal binding site is of great interest. Accurate information about the Cu-binding site of A beta protein can facilitate simulation of redox chemistry using high level quantum mechanics. Complementary X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption techniques can be employed to obtain such accurate information. This review provides a blend of X-ray diffraction results on amyloid structures and selected works on A beta Cu2+ binding based on spectroscopic measurements with emphasis on the X-ray absorption technique.

  13. Surfaces modulate beta-amyloid peptide aggregation associated with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Elizabeth Anne

    A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a late onset neurodegenerative disease, is the presence of neuritic amyloid plaques deposited within the brain composed of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide aggregates. Abeta can aggregate into a variety of polymorphic aggregate structures under different chemical environments, specifically affected by the presence of differing surfaces. There are several point mutations clustered around the central hydrophobic core of Abeta (E22G Arctic mutation, E22K Italian mutation, D23N Iowa mutation, and A21G Flemish mutation). These mutations are associated with hereditary diseases ranging from almost pure cerebral amyloid angiopathy to typical Alzheimer's disease pathology with both plaques and tangles. To determine how these different point mutations, which modify both peptide charge and hydrophobic character, altered Abeta aggregation and morphology under free solution conditions, at an anionic surface/liquid interface and in the presence of supported lipid bilayers, atomic force microscopy was used. Additionally, the non-native conformation of Abeta leads to the formation of nanoscale, toxic aggregates which have been shown to strongly interact with supported lipid bilayers, which may represent a key step in potential toxic mechanisms. Understanding how specific regions of Abeta regulate its aggregation in the absence and presence of surfaces can provide insight into the fundamental interaction of Abeta with cellular surfaces. Specific fragments of Abeta (Abeta1-11, Abeta 1-28, Abeta10-26, Abeta12-24, Abeta 16-22, Abeta22-35, and Abeta1-40), represent a variety of chemically unique regions along Abeta, i.e., the extracellular domain, the central hydrophobic core, and transmembrane domain. Using various scanning probe microscopic techniques, the interaction of these Abeta sequences with lipid membranes was shown to alter aggregate morphology and induce mechanical changes of lipid bilayers compared to aggregates formed under free solution

  14. The killing of neurons by beta-amyloid peptides, prions, and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Dal Pra, Ilaria; Whitfield, James F; Armato, Ubaldo

    2006-01-01

    Reportedly, beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta40 and Abeta42) induce the neurodegenerative changes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) both directly by interacting with components of the cell surface to trigger apoptogenic signaling and indirectly by activating astrocytes and microglia to produce excess amounts of inflammatory cytokines. A possible cell surface target for Abetas is the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)). By using SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cells without neurotrophin receptors or engineered to express the full-length p75(NTR) or various parts of it, we have proven that p75(NTR) does mediate the Abeta-induced cell killing via its intracellular death domain (DD). This signaling via the DD activates caspase-8, which then activates caspase-3 and apoptogenesis. We also found a strong cytocidal interaction of direct p75(NTR)-mediated and indirect pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated neuronal damage induced by Abeta. In fact, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IL-1beta from Abeta-activated microglia potentiated the neurotoxic action of Aalpha mediated by p75(NTR) signaling. The pro-inflammatory cytokines probably amplify neuronal damage and killing by causing astrocytes to flood their associated neurons with NO and its lethal oxidizing ONOO- derivative. Indeed, we have found that a combination of three major pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta+IFN-gamma+TNF-alpha, causes normal adult human astrocytes (NAHA) to express nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) and make dangerously large amounts of NO via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Soluble Abeta40, the major amyloid precursor protein cleavage product, by itself stimulates astrocytes to express NOS-2 and make NO, possibly by activating p75(NTR) receptors, which they share with neurons, and can considerably amplify NOS-2 expression by the pro-inflammatory cytokine trio. These observations have uncovered a deadly synergistic interaction of Abeta peptides with pro-inflammatory cytokines in the neuron

  15. Topography of a binding site for small amnestic peptides deduced from structure-activity studies: relation to amnestic effect of amyloid beta protein.

    PubMed

    Flood, J F; Roberts, E; Sherman, M A; Kaplan, B E; Morley, J E

    1994-01-04

    Four peptides homologous to amyloid beta protein containing the Val-Phe-Phe (VFF) sequence administered intracerebroventricularly after training caused amnesia for footshock active avoidance training in mice. Results with VFF and other peptides containing VFF or portions thereof were used to generate a topographic map for a hypothetical binding surface for amnestic peptides, termed Z. Effects on retention of footshock active avoidance training were rationalized in terms of fit to Z, making possible design of potential memory-modulating peptidic and nonpeptidic substances. Three peptides that neither improved nor impaired retention blocked the amnestic effects of beta-(12-28), a peptide homologous to amyloid beta protein, opening the way to development of substances that can antagonize the neurotoxic effects of amyloid beta protein on neural structures and thus attenuate symptoms and progression of Alzheimer disease.

  16. Topography of a binding site for small amnestic peptides deduced from structure-activity studies: relation to amnestic effect of amyloid beta protein.

    PubMed Central

    Flood, J F; Roberts, E; Sherman, M A; Kaplan, B E; Morley, J E

    1994-01-01

    Four peptides homologous to amyloid beta protein containing the Val-Phe-Phe (VFF) sequence administered intracerebroventricularly after training caused amnesia for footshock active avoidance training in mice. Results with VFF and other peptides containing VFF or portions thereof were used to generate a topographic map for a hypothetical binding surface for amnestic peptides, termed Z. Effects on retention of footshock active avoidance training were rationalized in terms of fit to Z, making possible design of potential memory-modulating peptidic and nonpeptidic substances. Three peptides that neither improved nor impaired retention blocked the amnestic effects of beta-(12-28), a peptide homologous to amyloid beta protein, opening the way to development of substances that can antagonize the neurotoxic effects of amyloid beta protein on neural structures and thus attenuate symptoms and progression of Alzheimer disease. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8278398

  17. A bifunctional non-natural tetrapeptide modulates amyloid-beta peptide aggregation in the presence of Cu(ii).

    PubMed

    Márquez, Maripaz; Blancas-Mejía, Luis M; Campos, Adriana; Rojas, Luis; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Quintanar, Liliana

    2014-12-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) aggregation is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and metal ions such as Cu(ii) have been proposed to play a role in amyloid formation and the onset of this progressive neurodegenerative disorder. This study reports the design and characterization of a novel bifunctional non-natural tetrapeptide, Met-Asp-d-Trp-Aib, that is capable of binding copper, competing with Aβ for Cu(ii), and modulating Aβ aggregation. The study of this tetrapeptide provides further insights into the role of Cu(ii) in the Aβ aggregation pathway, and into the design of compounds with therapeutic potential for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Aloe arborescens Extract Protects IMR-32 Cells against Alzheimer Amyloid Beta Peptide via Inhibition of Radical Peroxide Production.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Maria Elisabetta; Tringali, Giuseppe; Triggiani, Doriana; Giardina, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Aloe arborescens is commonly used as a pharmaceutical ingredient for its effect in burn treatment and ability to increase skin wound healing properties. Besides, it is well known to have beneficial phytotherapeutic, anticancer, and radio-protective properties. In this study, we first provided evidence that A. arborescens extract protects IMR32, a neuroblastoma human cellular line, from toxicity induced by beta amyloid, the peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease. In particular, pretreatment with A. arborescens maintains an elevated cell viability and exerts a protective effect on mitochondrial functionality, as evidenced by oxygen consumption experiments. The protective mechanism exerted by A. arborescens seems be related to lowering of oxidative potential of the cells, as demonstrated by the ROS measurement compared with the results obtained in the presence of amyloid beta (1-42) peptide alone. Based on these preliminary observations we suggest that use ofA. arborescens extract could be developed as agents for the management of AD.

  19. Oxidation of cholesterol catalyzed by amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta)-Cu complex on lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Noriko; Tasaki, Makoto; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Kuboi, Ryoichi

    2005-10-01

    A catalytic reaction of H2O2 production by an amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta)-Cu complex with cholesterol incorporated in a liposome was kinetically analyzed. The Michaelis-Menten model was applied to the H2O2 production reaction using cholesterol as the substrate catalyzed by the Abeta-Cu complex. The Km value for the Abeta-Cu complex catalytic reaction with cholesterol-containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) liposomes (Km=0.436 microM for Abeta(1-40); Km=0.641 microM for Abeta(1-42)) was found to be smaller than that with cholesterol-containing 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) liposomes (Km=0.585 microM for Abeta(1-40), Km=0.890 microM for Abeta(1-42)). The results imply that membrane properties could play an important role in the interactions of the Abeta-Cu complex with cholesterol in these liposomes. Considering the physical states of the cholesterol/POPC (liquid disordered phase) and cholesterol/DPPC (liquid ordered phase) liposomes in the present reaction conditions, the data obtained suggests that the H2O2-generating activity of the Abeta-Cu complex, accompanied by oxidation of membrane-incorporated cholesterol, could be effected by the phase of the liposome membranes.

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of the molecular interactions between amyloid beta-peptide 42 and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Hui; Liu, Fu-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-09-09

    One of the key factors of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the conversion of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) from its soluble random coil form into various aggregated forms. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been proved effective in preventing the aggregation of Abeta, but the thermodynamic mechanisms are still unclear. In this work, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was utilized to study the interactions between Abeta42 and EGCG at different temperatures, salt concentrations, pH values, and EGCG and Abeta42 concentrations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to study the hydrogen bonding between Abeta42 and EGCG. The results indicate that the binding stoichiometry N is linearly related to the EGCG/Abeta42 ratio. Hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding are both substantial in the binding process, but the extent of their contributions changes with experimental conditions. Namely, the predominant interaction gradually shifts from a hydrogen bonding to a hydrophobic interaction with the increase of the EGCG/Abeta42 ratio, resulting in a transition of the binding from enthalpy-driven to entropy-driven. This experimental observation is validated by the MD simulations. The binding of EGCG to Abeta42 can be promoted by increasing temperature and salt concentration and changing pH away from Abeta42's pI. The findings have provided new insight into the molecular interactions between Abeta42 and EGCG from a thermodynamic perspective and are expected to facilitate the research on the inhibition of Abeta42 aggregation.

  1. Alzheimer's disease beta-amyloid peptide is increased in mice deficient in endothelin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Elizabeth A; Watson, Mona; Marlow, Laura; Sambamurti, Kumar; Eckman, Christopher B

    2003-01-24

    The abnormal accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in the brain is an early and invariant feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is believed to play a pivotal role in the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. As such, a major focus of AD research has been the elucidation of the mechanisms responsible for the generation of Abeta. As with any peptide, however, the degree of Abeta accumulation is dependent not only on its production but also on its removal. In cell-based and in vitro models we have previously characterized endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) as an Abeta-degrading enzyme that appears to act intracellularly, thus limiting the amount of Abeta available for secretion. To determine the physiological significance of this activity, we analyzed Abeta levels in the brains of mice deficient for ECE-1 and a closely related enzyme, ECE-2. Significant increases in the levels of both Abeta40 and Abeta42 were found in the brains of these animals when compared with age-matched littermate controls. The increase in Abeta levels in the ECE-deficient mice provides the first direct evidence for a physiological role for both ECE-1 and ECE-2 in limiting Abeta accumulation in the brain and also provides further insight into the factors involved in Abeta clearance in vivo.

  2. Amyloid beta-peptide disrupts carbachol-induced muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction in cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J F; Furukawa, K; Barger, S W; Rengen, M R; Mark, R J; Blanc, E M; Roth, G S; Mattson, M P

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic pathways serve important functions in learning and memory processes, and deficits in cholinergic transmission occur in Alzheimer disease (AD). A subset of muscarinic cholinergic receptors are linked to G-proteins that activate phospholipase C, resulting in the liberation of inositol trisphosphate and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. We now report that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which forms plaques in the brain in AD, impairs muscarinic receptor activation of G proteins in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of rodent fetal cortical neurons to Abeta25-35 and Abeta1-40 resulted in a concentration and time-dependent attenuation of carbachol-induced GTPase activity without affecting muscarinic receptor ligand binding parameters. Downstream events in the signal transduction cascade were similarly attenuated by Abeta. Carbachol-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP, IP2, IP3, and IP4) was decreased and calcium imaging studies revealed that carbachol-induced release of calcium was severely impaired in neurons pretreated with Abeta. Muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction was disrupted with subtoxic levels of exposure to AP. The effects of Abeta on carbachol-induced GTPase activity and calcium release were attenuated by antioxidants, implicating free radicals in the mechanism whereby Abeta induced uncoupling of muscarinic receptors. These data demonstrate that Abeta disrupts muscarinic receptor coupling to G proteins that mediate induction of phosphoinositide accumulation and calcium release, findings that implicate Abeta in the impairment of cholinergic transmission that occurs in AD. PMID:8692890

  3. P3 beta-amyloid peptide has a unique and potentially pathogenic immunohistochemical profile in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, L. S.; Murphy, G. M.; Forno, L. S.; Catalano, R.; Cordell, B.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of beta-amyloid in brain tissue is characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A naturally occurring derivative of the beta-amyloid peptide, p3, possesses all of the structural determinants required for fibril assembly and neurotoxicity. p3-specific antibodies were used to examine the distribution of this peptide in brain. p3 reactivity was absent or sparse in aged non-AD brains but was prevalent in selected areas of AD brain in diffuse deposits and in a subset of dystrophic neurites. p3-reactive dystrophic neurites were found both independent in the neuropil and associated with plaques. Little or no reactivity was observed to amyloid cores in classical plaques or to amyloid in the cerebral vasculature. The exclusive appearance of p3 reactivity in AD brain plus the selective localization of p3 reactivity to abnormal structures in the temporal lobe limbic system suggests that p3 may be a contributing factor to AD pathology. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8701997

  4. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin; Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki; Akaike, Akinori; Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  5. Bilirubin and amyloid-beta peptide induce cytochrome c release through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, C. M.; Solá, S.; Silva, R.; Brites, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of bilirubin encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease appears to result from accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, respectively, which may cause apoptosis. Permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane, with release of intermembrane proteins, has been strongly implicated in cell death. Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability is one pathway by which ursodeoxycholate (UDC) and tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC) protect against apoptosis in hepatic and nonhepatic cells. In this study, we further characterize UCB- and Abeta-induced cytotoxicty in isolated neural cells, and investigate membrane perturbation during incubation of isolated mitochondria with both agents. In addition, we evaluate whether the anti-apoptotic drugs UDC and TUDC prevent any changes from occurring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Primary rat neuron and astrocyte cultures were incubated with UCB or Abeta peptide, either alone or in the presence of UDC. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation and nuclear morphological changes. Isolated mitochondria were treated with each toxic, either alone or in combination with UDC, TUDC, or cyclosporine A. Mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically and cytochrome c protein levels determined by Western blot. RESULTS: Incubation of neural cells with both UCB and Abeta induced apoptosis (p < 0.01). Coincubation with UDC reduced apoptosis by > 50% (p < 0.05). Both toxins caused membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria (p < 0.001); whereas, pretreatment with UDC was protective (p < 0.05). TUDC was even more effective at preventing matrix swelling mediated by Abeta (p < 0.01). UDC and TUDC markedly reduced cytochrome c release associated with mitochondrial permeabilization induced by UCB and Abeta, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, cyclosporine A significantly inhibited mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c efflux mediated by UCB (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: UCB and Abeta peptide

  6. The Structure of the Amyloid-[beta] Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N.

    2008-11-03

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of A{beta}-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in A{beta} may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of A{beta} peptides complexed with Cu{sup 2+} in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to A{beta} can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  7. Characterization of the effects of anti-aging medicine Fructus lycii on beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man-Shan; Lai, Cora Sau-Wan; Ho, Yuen-Shan; Zee, Sze-Yong; So, Kwok-Fai; Yuen, Wai-Hung; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2007-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease. There are increasing lines of evidence showing that the molecular signaling pathways in aged cells are altered so that cells are susceptible to injury. We and other laboratories have demonstrated the significant involvement of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) in beta-amyloid (A beta) peptide neurotoxicity and in AD. Fructus lycii (the fruit of Lycium barbarum) has long been used in oriental medicine as an anti-aging agent. Our previous studies demonstrated that the aqueous extract isolated from L. barbarum exhibited significant protection on cultured neurons against harmful chemical toxins such as A beta and dithiothreitol. We also showed that the polysaccharide-containing extract (LBP) from L. barbarum exhibited neuroprotective effects in the retina against ocular hypertension in a laser-induced glaucoma animal model. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether LBP can elicit neuroprotection to neurons stressed by A beta peptides. Furthermore, we planned to isolate and identify the neuroprotective agent from LBP using chromatographic methods. Our results showed that pretreatment of LBP effectively protected neurons against A beta-induced apoptosis by reducing the activity of both caspase-3 and -2, but not caspase-8 and -9. A new arabinogalactan-protein (LBP-III) was isolated from LBP and attenuated A beta peptide-activated caspase-3-like activity. LBP-III markedly reduced the phosphorylation of PKR triggered by A beta peptide. Since the phosphorylation state of PKR increased with age, reduction of its phosphorylation triggered by A beta peptide may implicate that LBP-III from Fructus lycii is a potential neuroprotective agent in AD. As herbal medicine has received increasing attention for the treatment of AD, our study will open a window for the development of a neuroprotective agent for anti-aging from Chinese medicine.

  8. Estimation of electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties of relevant amyloid-beta peptides through the modeling of their effective electrophoretic mobilities and analysis of their propensities to aggregation.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Piaggio, Maria V; Peirotti, Marta B

    2014-09-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused by amyloid-beta peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here amyloid-beta peptides (1-42, 1-40, 1-39, 1-38, and 1-37) are characterized through the modeling of their experimental effective electrophoretic mobilities determined by a capillary zone electrophoresis method as reported in the literature. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are used to evaluate amyloid-beta peptide propensities to aggregation through pair particles interaction potentials and Brownian aggregation kinetic theories. Two background electrolytes are considered at 25°C, one for pH 9 and ionic strength I = 40 mM (aggregation is inhibited through NH4OH) the other for pH 10 and I = 100 mM (without NH4OH). Physical explanations of peptide oligomerization mechanisms are provided. The effect of hydration, electrostatic, and dispersion forces in the amyloidogenic process of amyloid-beta peptides (1-40 and 1-42) are quantitatively presented. The interplay among effective charge number, hydration, and conformation of chains is described. It is shown that amyloid-beta peptides (1-40 and 1-42) at pH 10, I = 100 mM and 25°C, may form soluble oligomers, mainly of order 2 and 4, after an incubation of 48 h, which at higher times evolve and end up in complex structures (protofibrils and fibrils) found in plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  9. AIP-1 ameliorates beta-amyloid peptide toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Wail M; Merin, David A; Fonte, Virginia; Link, Christopher D

    2009-08-01

    Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are causally linked to aggregation-prone proteins. Cellular mechanisms involving protein turnover may be key defense mechanisms against aggregating protein disorders. We have used a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer's disease model to identify cellular responses to proteotoxicity resulting from expression of the human beta amyloid peptide (Abeta). We show up-regulation of aip-1 in Abeta-expressing animals. Mammalian homologues of AIP-1 have been shown to associate with, and regulate the function of, the 26S proteasome, leading us to hypothesize that induction of AIP-1 may be a protective cellular response directed toward modulating proteasomal function in response to toxic protein aggregation. Using our transgenic model, we show that overexpression of AIP-1 protected against, while RNAi knockdown of AIP-1 exacerbated, Abeta toxicity. AIP-1 overexpression also reduced accumulation of Abeta in this model, which is consistent with AIP-1 enhancing protein degradation. Transgenic expression of one of the two human aip-1 homologues (AIRAPL), but not the other (AIRAP), suppressed Abeta toxicity in C. elegans, which advocates the biological relevance of the data to human biology. Interestingly, AIRAPL and AIP-1 contain a predicted farnesylation site, which is absent from AIRAP. This farnesylation site was shown by others to be essential for an AIP-1 prolongevity function. Consistent with this, we show that an AIP-1 mutant lacking the predicted farnesylation site failed to protect against Abeta toxicity. Our results implicate AIP-1 in the regulation of protein turnover and protection against Abeta toxicity and point at AIRAPL as the functional mammalian homologue of AIP-1.

  10. Copper enhances amyloid-beta peptide neurotoxicity and non beta-aggregation: a series of experiments conducted upon copper-bound and copper-free amyloid-beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xueling; Sun, Yaxuan; Gao, Zhaolan; Jiang, Zhaofeng

    2010-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the abnormal aggregation of amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) in extracellular deposits known as senile plaques. However, the nature of the toxic Abeta species and its precise mechanism of action remain unclear. Previous reports suggest that the histidine residues are involved in copper-Abeta interaction, by which resulting in the neurotoxicity of Abeta and free radical damage. Here, we employed a mutant Abeta (Abeta H13R) in which a histidine residue was replaced by arginine. Copper facilitated the precipitation of both wild-type and mutant Abeta in the spectrophotometric absorbance assay but suppressed beta-structure aggregates according to Thioflavine-T assay. Wild-type Abeta alone is more cytotoxic but produced less amount of H(2)O(2) than AbetaH13R-copper complexes, suggesting that Abeta-membrane interaction may also implicated in the pathologic progress. Abeta toxicity is in positive correlation to its competence to aggregate despite the aggregation is mainly composed of non-beta fibril substances. In short, these findings may provide further evidence on the role of copper in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Inhibition of APP trafficking by tau protein does not increase the generation of amyloid-beta peptides.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire; Mocanu, Maria-Magdalena; Thies, Edda; Kaether, Christoph; Haass, Christian; Keller, Patrick; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2006-07-01

    Amyloid-beta, a peptide derived from the precursor protein APP, accumulates in the brain and contributes to the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased generation of amyloid-beta might be caused by axonal transport inhibition, via increased dwell time of APP vesicles and thereby higher probability of APP cleavage by secretase enzymes residing on the same vesicles. We tested this hypothesis using a neuronal cell culture model of inhibited axonal transport and by imaging vesicular transport of fluorescently tagged APP and beta-secretase (BACE1). Microtubule-associated tau protein blocks vesicle traffic by inhibiting the access of motor proteins to the microtubule tracks. In neurons co-transfected with CFP-tau, APP-YFP traffic into distal neurites was strongly reduced. However, this did not increase amyloid-beta levels. In singly transfected axons, APP-YFP was transported in large tubules and vesicles moving very fast (on average 3 microm/s) and with high fluxes in the anterograde direction (on average 8.4 vesicles/min). By contrast, BACE1-CFP movement was in smaller tubules and vesicles that were almost 2x slower (on average 1.6 microm/s) with approximately 18x lower fluxes (on average 0.5 vesicles/min). Two-colour microscopy of co-transfected axons confirmed that the two proteins were sorted into distinct carriers. The results do not support the above hypothesis. Instead, they indicate that APP is transported on vesicles distinct from the secretase components and that amyloid-beta is not generated in transit when transport is blocked by tau.

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 stimulates production of amyloid beta-peptide in neuroblastoma x glioma hybrid NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Kadoyama, K; Takahashi, Y; Higashida, H; Tanabe, T; Yoshimoto, T

    2001-02-23

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) synthesizes bioactive prostaglandins from arachidonic acid, and there are COX-1 and COX-2 isoforms with distinct pathophysiological functions. Recent studies demonstrated that COX-2 expression was up-regulated in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. We established mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid NG108-15 cells stably expressing human COX-2. The COX-2-expressing cells showed 3- to 4-fold increases in both COX activity and prostaglandin E(2) production. The mRNA level of amyloid precursor protein (APP) was elevated by approximately 2-fold in the COX-2-expressing cells compared with mock-transfected cells. Amyloid beta-peptide and a secreted form of APP, both derived from APP by proteolysis was also increased. Interestingly, neurite outgrowth was stimulated in the COX-2-expressing cells with concomitant reduction of the cell proliferation rate. A selective COX-2 inhibitor (JTE-522) and a nonselective COX inhibitor (indomethacin) suppressed production of amyloid beta-peptide and a secreted form of APP by inhibition of APP mRNA level, suggesting that COX-2 plays important roles in the neurodegenerative processes of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation: toward engineering of functional nanomedicines for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin; Nicolas, Julien; Taverna, Myriam; Kóňa, Juraj; Lettiero, Barbara; Hashemi, S Hossein; De Kimpe, Line; Canovi, Mara; Gobbi, Marco; Nicolas, Valérie; Scheper, Wiep; Moghimi, S Moein; Tvaroška, Igor; Couvreur, Patrick; Andrieux, Karine

    2012-07-24

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aβ(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs on the interaction with monomeric and soluble oligomeric forms of Aβ(1-42) peptide was demonstrated by capillary electrophoresis, surface plasmon resonance, thioflavin T assay, and confocal microscopy, where the binding affected peptide aggregation kinetics. The capture of peptide by NPs in serum was also evidenced by fluorescence spectroscopy and ELISA. Moreover, in silico and modeling experiments highlighted the mode of PEG interaction with the Aβ(1-42) peptide and its conformational changes at the nanoparticle surface. Finally, Aβ(1-42) peptide binding to NPs affected neither complement activation in serum nor apolipoprotein-E (Apo-E) adsorption from the serum. These observations have crucial implications in NP safety and clearance kinetics from the blood. Apo-E deposition is of prime importance since it can also interact with the Aβ(1-42) peptide and increase the affinity of NPs for the peptide in the blood. Collectively, our results suggest that these engineered long-circulating NPs may have the ability to capture the toxic forms of the Aβ(1-42) peptide from the systemic circulation and potentially improve Alzheimer's disease condition through the proposed "sink effect".

  14. Multiscale MD Simulations of Folding Dynamics and Mobility of Beta-Amyloid Peptide on Lipid Bilayer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilburg, Scott; Cheng, Kelvin

    2013-03-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid peptides with the neuronal membranes play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We have used multiscale Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to study the protein folding dynamics and lateral mobility of beta-amyloid protein on the cholesterol-enriched and -depleted lipid nano-domains. Several independent simulation replicates of all-atom and coarse-grained MD simulations of beta-amyloid on different lipid bilayer nano-domains have been generated. Using Define Secondary Structure of Proteins (DSSP) algorithm and mean-square-distance (MSD) analysis, the protein conformation and the lateral diffusion coefficients of protein, as well as the lipid and water, were calculated as a function of simulation time up to 200 nanoseconds for atomistic and 2 microseconds for coarse-grained simulations per replicate in different bilayer systems. Subtle differences in the conformation and mobility of the protein were observed in lipid bilayers with and without cholesterol. The structural dynamics information obtained from this work will provide useful insights into understanding the role of protein/lipid interactions in the membrane-associated aggregation of protein on neuronal membranes. HHMI-Trinity University and NIH RC1-GM090897-02

  15. Short-term effects of beta-amyloid25-35 peptide aggregates on transmitter release in neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Neus; Santafé, Manel M; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria A; Tomàs, Josep

    2008-03-01

    The beta-amyloid (AB) peptide25-35 contains the functional domain of the AB precursor protein that is both required for neurotrophic effects in normal neural tissues and is involved in the neurotoxic effects in Alzheimer disease. We demonstrated the presence of the amyloid precursor protein/AB peptide in intramuscular axons, presynaptic motor nerve terminals, terminal and myelinating Schwann cells, and the postsynaptic and subsarcolemmal region in the Levator auris longus muscle of adult rats by immunocytochemistry. Using intracellular recording, we investigated possible short-term functional effects of the AB fragment (0.1-10 micromol/L) on acetylcholine release in adult and newborn motor end plates. We found no change in evoked, spontaneous transmitter release or resting membrane potential of the muscle cells. A previous block of the presynaptic muscarinic receptor subtypes and a previous block or stimulation of protein kinase C revealed no masked effect of the peptide on the regulation of transmitter release. The aggregated form of AB peptide25-35, however, interfered acutely with acetylcholine release (quantal content reduction) when synaptic activity was maintained by electric stimulation. The possible relevance of this inhibition of neurotransmission by AB peptide25-35 to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer remains to be determined.

  16. Lipid peroxidation and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formation by copper ion bound to amyloid-beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takaaki; Shishido, Naomi; Nakayama, Kenji; Nunomura, Akihiko; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George; Nakamura, Masao

    2007-12-01

    The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is proposed to be a toxic factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The primary products of lipid peroxidation are phospholipid hydroperoxides, and degraded reactive aldehydes, such as HNE, are considered secondary peroxidation products. In this study, we investigated the role of amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) in the formation of phospholipid hydroperoxides and HNE by copper ion bound to A beta. The A beta1-42-Cu2+ (1:1 molar ratio) complex showed an activity to form phospholipid hydroperoxides from a phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl phosphatidylcholine, through Cu2+ reduction in the presence of ascorbic acid. The phospholipid hydroperoxides were considered to be a racemic mixture of 9-hydroperoxide and 13-hydroperoxide of the linoleoyl residue. When Cu2+ was bound to 2 molar equivalents of A beta(1-42) (2 A beta1-42-Cu2+), lipid peroxidation was inhibited. HNE was generated from one of the phospholipid hydroperoxides, 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroperoxy-cis-9, trans-11-octadecadienoyl) phosphatidylcholine (PLPC-OOH), by free Cu2+ in the presence of ascorbic acid through Cu2+ reduction and degradation of PLPC-OOH. HNE generation was markedly inhibited by equimolar concentrations of A beta(1-40) (92%) and A beta(1-42) (92%). However, A beta(1-42) binding 2 or 3 molar equivalents of Cu2+ (A beta1-42-2Cu2+, A beta1-42-3Cu2+) acted as a pro-oxidant to form HNE from PLPC-OOH. These findings suggest that, at moderate concentrations of copper, A beta acts primarily as an antioxidant to prevent Cu2+-catalyzed oxidation of biomolecules, but that, in the presence of excess copper, pro-oxidant complexes of A beta with Cu2+ are formed.

  17. Arginine metabolising enzymes as therapeutic tools for Alzheimer's disease: peptidyl arginine deiminase catalyses fibrillogenesis of beta-amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Mohlake, Peter; Whiteley, Chris G

    2010-06-01

    The accumulation of arginine in the cerebrospinal fluid and brains of patients suffering from acute neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, point to defects in the metabolic pathways involving this amino acids. The deposits of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques perhaps as a consequence of fibrillogenesis of beta-amyloid peptides has also been shown to be a hallmark in the aetiology of certain neurodegenerative diseases. Peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD II) is an enzyme that uses arginine as a substrate and we now show that PAD II not only binds with the peptides Abeta(1-40), Abeta(22-35), Abeta(17-28), Abeta(25-35) and Abeta(32-35) but assists in the proteolytic degradation of these peptides with the concomitant formation of insoluble fibrils. PAD was purified in 12.5% yield and 137 fold with a specific activity of 59 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) from bovine brain by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sephacel. Characterisation of the enzyme gave a pH and temperature optima of 7.5 degrees C and 68 degrees C, respectively, and the enzyme lost 50% activity within 38 min at this temperature. Michaelis-Menten kinetics established a V(max) and K(m) of 1.57 micromol min(-1) ml(-1) and 1.35 mM, respectively, with N-benzoyl arginine ethyl ester as substrate. Kinetic analysis was used to measure the affinity (K(i)) of the amyloid peptides to PAD with values between 1.4 and 4.6 microM. The formation of Abeta fibrils was rate limiting involving an initial lag time of about 24 h that was dependent on the concentration of the amyloid peptides. Turbidity measurements at 400 nm, Congo Red assay and Thioflavin-T staining fluorescence were used to establish the aggregation kinetics of PAD-induced fibril formation.

  18. Alzheimer amyloid beta-peptide A-beta25-35 blocks adenylate cyclase-mediated forms of hippocampal long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Bisel, Blaine E; Henkins, Kristen M; Parfitt, Karen D

    2007-02-01

    Progressive memory loss and deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides throughout cortical regions are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several studies in mice and rats have shown that overexpression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) or pretreatment with Abeta peptide fragments results in the inhibition of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as impairments in learning and memory of hippocampal-dependent tasks. For these studies we have investigated the effects of the Abeta(25-35) peptide fragment on LTP induced by adenylate cyclase stimulation followed immediately by application of Mg(++)-free aCSF ("chemLTP"). Treatment of young adult slices with the Abeta(25-35) peptide had no significant effect on basal synaptic transmission in area CA1, but treatment with the peptide for 20 min before inducing chemLTP with isoproterenol (ISO; 1 microM) or forskolin (FSK;10 microM) + Mg(++)-free aCSF resulted in complete blockade of LTP. In contrast, normal ISO-chemLTP was observed after treatment with the control peptide Abeta(35-25). The ability of the Abeta(25-35) peptide fragment to block this and other forms of synaptic plasticity may help elucidate the mechanisms underlying hippocampal deficits observed in animal models of AD and/or AD individuals.

  19. Structural Studies of Copper(I) Complexes of Amyloid-Beta Peptide Fragments: Formation of Two-Coordinate Bis(Histidine) Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Himes, R.A.; Park, G.Young.; Siluvai, G.Sutha.; Blackburn, N.J.; Karlin, K.D.

    2009-05-18

    The beta bind: Copper(I) binds to amyloid {beta}-peptide fragments (see structure) as a stable bis(histidine), two-coordinate, near-linear complex, even in the presence of potential additional ligands. As has been proposed or assumed in other studies, the copper(I)-peptide complexes react with dioxygen to form the reactive oxygen species H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, without the need for a third histidine ligand to promote the chemistry.

  20. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  1. Soluble protein oligomers in neurodegeneration: lessons from the Alzheimer's amyloid beta-peptide.

    PubMed

    Haass, Christian; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2007-02-01

    The distinct protein aggregates that are found in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and prion diseases seem to cause these disorders. Small intermediates - soluble oligomers - in the aggregation process can confer synaptic dysfunction, whereas large, insoluble deposits might function as reservoirs of the bioactive oligomers. These emerging concepts are exemplified by Alzheimer's disease, in which amyloid beta-protein oligomers adversely affect synaptic structure and plasticity. Findings in other neurodegenerative diseases indicate that a broadly similar process of neuronal dysfunction is induced by diffusible oligomers of misfolded proteins.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation and molecular docking studies of Angiotensin converting enzyme with inhibitor lisinopril and amyloid Beta Peptide.

    PubMed

    Jalkute, Chidambar Balbhim; Barage, Sagar Hindurao; Dhanavade, Maruti Jayram; Sonawane, Kailas Dasharath

    2013-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) cleaves amyloid beta peptide. So far this cleavage mechanism has not been studied in detail at atomic level. Keeping this view in mind, we performed molecular dynamics simulation of crystal structure complex of testis truncated version of ACE (tACE) and its inhibitor lisinopril along with Zn(2+) to understand the dynamic behavior of active site residues of tACE. Root mean square deviation results revealed the stability of tACE throughout simulation. The residues Ala 354, Glu 376, Asp 377, Glu 384, His 513, Tyr 520 and Tyr 523 of tACE stabilized lisinopril by hydrogen bonding interactions. Using this information in subsequent part of study, molecular docking of tACE crystal structure with Aβ-peptide has been made to investigate the interactions of Aβ-peptide with enzyme tACE. The residues Asp 7 and Ser 8 of Aβ-peptide were found in close contact with Glu 384 of tACE along with Zn(2+). This study has demonstrated that the residue Glu 384 of tACE might play key role in the degradation of Aβ-peptide by cleaving peptide bond between Asp 7 and Ser 8 residues. Molecular basis generated by this attempt could provide valuable information towards designing of new therapies to control Aβ concentration in Alzheimer's patient.

  3. SPF-5506-A4, a new peptaibol inhibitor of amyloid beta-peptide formation produced by Trichoderma sp.

    PubMed

    Hosotani, Nobuo; Kumagai, Kazuo; Honda, Shigeyuki; Ito, Akira; Shimatani, Takuro; Saji, Ikutaro

    2007-03-01

    A new peptaibol compound, SPF-5506-A4, was isolated from the fermentation broth of Trichoderma sp. SPF-5506. The chemical structure of the 14-residue peptide was determined by MS, NMR and amino acid sequence analyses. The absolute configuration of amino acid residues in the acid hydrolysate was determined by Marfey's method. The structure of SPF-5506-A4 was established as Ac-Aib-L-Asn-L-Ile-Aib-L-Pro-L-Ser-L-Ile-Aib-L-Pro-L-Leu-L-Leu-Aib-L-Pro-L-leucinol. The compound inhibited amyloid beta-peptide formation in primary guinea pig cerebral cortex neuron cell culture dose-dependently with an IC50 of 0.1 microg/ml. Cytotoxicity was not observed at concentrations of <3 microg/ml.

  4. Amyloid-beta peptide degradation in cell cultures by mycoplasma contaminants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haitian; Dreses-Werringloer, Ute; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2008-06-30

    Cell cultures have become an indispensable tool in Alzheimer's disease research for studying amyloid-beta (Abeta) metabolism. It is estimated that up to 35% of cell cultures in current use are infected with various mycoplasma species. In contrast with common bacterial and fungal infections, contaminations of cell cultures with mycoplasmas represent a challenging issue in terms of detectability and prevention. Mycoplasmas are the smallest and simplest self-replicating bacteria and the consequences of an infection for the host cells are variable, ranging from no apparent effect to induction of apoptosis. Here we present evidence that mycoplasmas from a cell culture contamination are able to efficiently and rapidly degrade extracellular Abeta. As a result, we observed no accumulation of Abeta in the conditioned medium of mycoplasma-positive cells stably transfected with the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP). Importantly, eradication of the mycoplasma contaminant - identified as M. hyorhinis - by treatments with a quinolone-based antibiotic, restored extracellular Abeta accumulation in the APP-transfected cells. These data show that mycoplasmas degrade Abeta and thus may represent a significant source of variability when comparing extracellular Abeta levels in different cell lines. On the basis of these results, we recommend assessment of mycoplasma contaminations prior to extracellular Abeta level measurements in cultured cells.

  5. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Ion, Laura; Murariu, Manuela; Habasescu, Laura

    2014-10-06

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloidpeptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  6. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Murariu, Manuela; Ion, Laura; Habasescu, Laura

    2014-10-01

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1-3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloidpeptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  7. Elucidation of insulin degrading enzyme catalyzed site specific hydrolytic cleavage of amyloid beta peptide: a comparative density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Bora, Ram Prasad; Ozbil, Mehmet; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2010-05-01

    In this B3LYP study, the catalytic mechanisms for the hydrolysis of the three different peptide bonds (Lys28-Gly29, Phe19-Phe20, and His14-Gln15) of Alzheimer amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) have been elucidated. For all these peptides, the nature of the substrate was found to influence the structure of the active enzyme-substrate complex. The catalytic mechanism is proposed to proceed through the following three steps: (1) activation of the metal-bound water molecule, (2) formation of the gem-diol intermediate, and (3) cleavage of the peptide bond. With the computed barrier of 14.3, 18.8, and 22.3 kcal/mol for the Lys28-Gly29, Phe19-Phe20, and His14-Gln15 substrates, respectively, the process of water activation was found to be the rate-determining step for all three substrates. The computed energetics show that IDE is the most efficient in hydrolyzing the Lys28-Gly29 (basic polar-neutral nonpolar) peptide bond followed by the Phe19-Phe20 (neutral nonpolar-neutral nonpolar) and His14-Gln15 (basic polar-neutral polar) bonds of the Abeta substrate.

  8. Subcellular and metabolic examination of amyloid-beta peptides in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis: evidence for Abeta(25-35).

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Yury G; Marlatt, Michael W; Smith, Mark A; Kosenko, Elena A

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is a central player in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. It aggregates to form the core of Alzheimer disease-associated plaques found in coordination with tau deposits in diseased individuals. Despite this clinical relevance, no single hypothesis satisfies and explicates the role of Abeta in toxicity and progression of the disease. To explore this area, investigators have focused on mechanisms of cellular dysfunction, aggregation, and maladaptive responses. Extensive research has been conducted using various methodologies to investigate Abeta peptides and oligomers, and these multiple facets have provided a wealth of data from specific models. Notably, the utility of each experiment must be considered in regards to the brain environment. The use of Abeta(25-35) in studies of cellular dysfunction has provided data indicating that the peptide is indeed responsible for multiple disturbances to cellular integrity. We will review how Abeta peptide induces oxidative stress and calcium homeostasis, and how multiple enzymes are deleteriously impacted by Abeta(25-35). Understanding and discussing the origin and properties of Abeta peptides is essential to evaluating their effects on various intracellular metabolic processes. Attention will also be specifically directed to metabolic compartmentation in affected brain cells, including mitochondrial, cytosolic, nuclear, and lysosomal enzymes.

  9. Structural and Functional Properties of Peptides Based on the N-terminus of HIV-1 gp41 and the C-terminus of the Amyloid-Beta Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Larry M.; Nisthal, Alex; Lee, Andy B.; Eskandari, Sepehr; Ruchala, Piotr; Jung, Chun-Ling; Waring, Alan J.; Mobley, Patrick W.

    2008-01-01

    Given their high alanine and glycine levels, plaque formation, α-helix to β-sheet interconversion and fusogenicity, FP (i.e., the N-terminal fusion peptide of HIV-1 gp41; 23 residues) and amyloids were proposed as belonging to the same protein superfamily. Here, we further test whether FP may exhibit ‘amyloid-like’ characteristics, by contrasting its structural and functional properties with those of Aβ(26–42), a 17-residue peptide from the C-terminus of the amyloid-beta protein responsible for Alzheimer’s. FTIR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, light scattering and predicted amyloid structure aggregation (PASTA) indicated that aqueous FP and Aβ(26–42) formed similar networked β-sheet fibrils, although the FP fibril interactions were weaker. FP and Aβ(26–42) both lysed and aggregated human erythrocytes, with the hemolysis-onsets correlated with the conversion of α-helix to β-sheet for each peptide in liposomes. Congo red (CR), a marker of amyloid plaques in situ, similarly inhibited either FP- or Aβ(26–42)-induced hemolysis, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that this may be due to direct CR-peptide binding. These findings suggest that membrane-bound β-sheets of FP may contribute to the cytopathicity of HIV in vivo through an amyloid-type mechanism, and support the classification of HIV-1 FP as an ‘amyloid homolog’ (or ‘amylog’). PMID:18515070

  10. Increased production of 4 kDa amyloid beta peptide in serum deprived human primary neuron cultures: possible involvement of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, A

    1995-12-01

    The etiology of the amyloid beta peptide in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not known. Amyloid beta peptide (A beta), a proteolytic product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is deposited in the senile plaques and cerebrovascular tissues of individuals with either sporadic or familial AD (FAD). Increased A beta production from mutant APPs in FAD fosters the hypothesis that overexpression of A beta plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of AD. The absence of APP mutations in sporadic AD which displays identical pathological features than FAD such as synapse and neuronal loss, senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, suggests other causes for overexpression and/or deposition of A beta. To investigate the effect of neuronal death on APP metabolism and A beta secretion, human primary neuron cultures were induced to undergo apoptosis by serum deprivation. Serum deprived neurons display shrunken and rounded morphology, contain condensed chromatine and fragmented DNA, which are characteristic of apoptosis. In serum deprived neurons, metabolism of APP through the nonamyloidogenic secretory pathway is decreased to 20% from 40% in control cultures whereas 4kDa A beta is increased three- to fourfold. The results suggest that human neurons undergoing apoptosis generate excess A beta and indicates a possible mechanism for increased A beta in the absence of APP mutations.

  11. Pramipexole prevents neurotoxicity induced by oligomers of beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Uberti, Daniela; Bianchi, Irene; Olivari, Luca; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Canonico, PierLuigi; Memo, Maurizio

    2007-08-27

    Here we demonstrate that pramipexole, an antiparkinsonian dopamine receptor agonist drug, exerts neuroprotective effects against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity. Using a specific protocol to test individually oligomers, fibrils, or unaggregated amyloid beta-peptide, we found pramipexole able to protect cells against oligomers and fibrils. Unaggregated amyloid beta-peptide was found unable to cause cell death. Fibrils and oligomers were also found to produce elevated amount of free radicals, and this effect was prevented by pramipexole. We propose pramipexole may become in the future a coadjuvant in the treatment of neuropathologies, besides Parkinson's disease, where amyloid beta-peptide-mediated oxidative injury exerts a relevant role.

  12. Protective spin-labeled fluorenes maintain amyloid beta peptide in small oligomers and limit transitions in secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, Robin; Ly, Sonny; Hilt, Silvia; Petrlova, Jitka; Maezawa, Izumi; Kálai, Tamás; Hideg, Kálmán; Jin, Lee-Way; Laurence, Ted A.; Voss, John C.

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques comprised of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. Soluble oligomers of the Aβ peptide underlie a cascade of neuronal loss and dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease. Single particle analyses of Aβ oligomers in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were used to provide real-time descriptions of how spin-labeled fluorenes (SLFs; bi-functional small molecules that block the toxicity of Aβ) prevent and disrupt oligomeric assemblies of Aβ in solution. The FCS results, combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy, demonstrate SLFs can inhibit the growth of Aβ oligomers and disrupt existing oligomers while retaining Aβ in a largely disordered state. Furthermore, while the ability of SLF to block Aβ toxicity correlates with a reduction in oligomer size, our results suggest the conformation of Aβ within the oligomer determines the toxicity of the species. Attenuation of Aβ toxicity, which has been associated primarily with the soluble oligomeric form, can be achieved through redistribution of the peptides into smaller oligomers and arrest of the fractional increase in beta secondary structure.

  13. Atomic-Resolution Map of the Interactions between an Amyloid Inhibitor Protein and Amyloid Beta (Aβ) Peptides in the Monomer and Protofibril States.

    PubMed

    Algamal, Moustafa; Ahmed, Rashik; Jafari, Naeimeh; Ahsan, Bilal; Ortega, Joaquin; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2017-08-10

    Self-association of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and serves as a general prototype for amyloid formation. A key endogenous inhibitor of Aβ self-association is Human Serum Albumin (HSA), which binds ~90% of plasma Aβ. However, the exact molecular mechanism by which HSA binds Aβ monomers and protofibrils is not fully understood. Here, using dark-state exchange saturation transfer (DEST) NMR and relaxation experiments, complemented by morphological characterization, we mapped the HSA-Aβ interactions at atomic resolution by examining HSA's effects on Aβ monomers and soluble high-molecular weight oligomeric protofibrils. We found that HSA binds both monomeric and protofibrillar Aβ, but the affinity of HSA for Aβ monomers is lower than for Aβ protofibrils (Kd ~ sub-mM vs. μM), yet physiologically relevant owing to the ~0.6 - 0.7 mM plasma HSA concentration. In both Aβ protofibrils and monomers, HSA targets key Aβ self-recognition sites spanning the β strands found in cross-β protofibril structures, leading to a net switch from direct to tethered contacts between the monomeric Aβ and the protofibril surface. These HSA-Aβ interactions are isoform specific, as the Aβ monomer - HSA interactions were weaker for Aβ (1-42) than for Aβ (1-40). In addition, the HSA-induced perturbations of the monomer / protofibrils pseudo-equilibrium extended to the C-terminal residues in the Aβ (1-42) isoform but not in Aβ (1-40). These results provide an unprecedented view of how albumin interacts with Aβ and illustrate the potential of DEST NMR in mapping the interactions between amyloid-inhibitory proteins and amyloidogenic peptides. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Charge regulation phenomenon predicted from the modeling of polypeptide electrophoretic mobilities as a relevant mechanism of amyloid-beta peptide oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2016-03-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities of amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides and their aggregates are modeled to study the amyloidogenic pathway associated with Alzheimer´s Disease. The near molecule pH generated by the intraparticle charge regulation phenomenon during the oligomerization of amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides is evaluated and discussed as a relevant mechanism supporting the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" proposed in the literature. A theoretical framework associated with the oligomerization of amyloid-beta peptides including simple scaling laws and the consideration of electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties of oligomers is presented. The central finding is the explanation of the near molecule pH change toward the pI when the oligomerization number increases. These results allow one to rationalize consecutive physical stages that validate the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Concluding remarks involving mainly the effects of pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena on the amyloidogenic pathway with some suggestions for future research are provided.

  15. Mechanical Dilution of Beta-amyloid Peptide and Phosphorylated Tau Protein in Alzheimer's Disease: Too Simple to be True?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the widespread accumulation of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of deposits of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (phospho-tau) respectively. Considerable effort has been expended to identify methods to retard the deposition of these proteins or to enhance their clearance. It is strikingly surprising that until now, very few researchers have attempted to remove these proteins using mechanical procedures. In this article, we start by showing the rationale of mechanical dilution of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a therapeutic approach in AD. Then, we present models of implantable systems allowing mechanical dilution of CSF by means of CSF replacement and CSF filtration (liquorpheresis). We conclude that even though this approach seems simplistic, it is feasible and deserves exploration.

  16. Chronic cladribine administration increases amyloid beta peptide generation and plaque burden in mice.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Crystal D; Dey, Debleena; Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Araki, Wataru; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2012-01-01

    The clinical uses of 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-CDA) or cladribine which was initially prescribed to patients with hematological and lymphoid cancers is now extended to treat patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Previous data has shown that 2-CDA has high affinity to the brain and readily passes through the blood brain barrier reaching CSF concentrations 25% of that found in plasma. However, whether long-term administration of 2-CDA can lead to any adverse effects in patients or animal models is not yet clearly known. Here we show that exposure of 2-CDA to CHO cells stably expressing wild-type APP751 increased generation and secretion of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in to the conditioned medium. Interestingly, increased Aβ levels were noticed even at non-toxic concentrations of 2-CDA. Remarkably, chronic treatment of APdE9 mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease with 2-CDA for 60 days increased amyloid plaque burden by more than 1-fold. Increased Aβ generation appears to result from increased turnover of APP as revealed by cycloheximide-chase experiments. Additionally, surface labeling of APP with biotin and immunoprecipitation of surface labeled proteins with anti-biotin antibody also indicated increased APP at the cell surface in 2-CDA treated cells compared to controls. Increased turnover of APP by 2-CDA in turn might be a consequence of decreased protein levels of PIN 1, which is known to regulate cis-trans isomerization and phosphorylation of APP. Most importantly, like many other oncology drugs, 2-CDA administration led to significant delay in acquiring a reward-based learning task in a T maze paradigm. Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence for the first time that chronic 2-CDA administration can increase amyloidogenic processing of APP leading to robustly increased plaque burden which may be responsible for the observed deficits in learning skills. Thus chronic treatment of mice with 2-CDA can have deleterious effects in vivo.

  17. Protective spin-labeled fluorenes maintain amyloid beta peptide in small oligomers and limit transitions in secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Robin; Ly, Sonny; Hilt, Silvia; Petrlova, Jitka; Maezawa, Izumi; Kálai, Tamás; Hideg, Kálmán; Jin, Lee-Way; Laurence, Ted A.; Voss, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques comprised of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. Soluble oligomers of the Aβ peptide underlie a cascade of neuronal loss and dysfunction associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Single particle analyses of Aβ oligomers in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were used to provide real-time descriptions of how spin-labeled fluorenes (SLFs; bi-functional small molecules that block the toxicity of Aβ) prevent and disrupt oligomeric assemblies of Aβ in solution. Furthermore, the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of untreated Aβ shows a continuous, progressive change over a 24-hour period, while the spectrum of Aβ treated with SLF remains relatively constant following initial incubation. These findings suggest the conformation of Aβ within the oligomer provides a complementary determinant of Aβ toxicity in addition to oligomer growth and size. Although SLF does not produce a dominant state of secondary structure in Aβ, it does induce a net reduction in beta secondary content compared to untreated samples of Aβ. The FCS results, combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and CD spectroscopy, demonstrate SLFs can inhibit the growth of Aβ oligomers and disrupt existing oligomers, while retaining Aβ as a population of smaller, yet largely disordered oligomers. PMID:26374940

  18. Loss of proteostasis induced by amyloid beta peptide in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Oliveira, Catarina R; Pereira, Cláudia F; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition to neurotoxic effects, Aβ also damages brain endothelial cells (ECs) and may thus contribute to the degeneration of cerebral vasculature, which has been proposed as an early pathogenic event in the course of AD and is able to trigger and/or potentiate the neurodegenerative process and cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying Aβ-induced endothelial dysfunction are not completely understood. Here we hypothesized that Aβ impairs protein quality control mechanisms both in the secretory pathway and in the cytosol in brain ECs, leading cells to death. In rat brain RBE4 cells, we demonstrated that Aβ1-40 induces the failure of the ER stress-adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), deregulates the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) decreasing overall proteasome activity with accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and impairs the autophagic protein degradation pathway due to failure in the autophagic flux, which culminates in cell demise. In conclusion, Aβ deregulates proteostasis in brain ECs and, as a consequence, these cells die by apoptosis.

  19. Mitochondrial Cholesterol Loading Exacerbates Amyloid Beta Peptide-Induced Inflammation and Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Anna; Llacuna, Laura; Fernández-Checa, José C.; Colell., Anna

    2009-01-01

    The role of cholesterol in Alzheimer's disease has been linked to the generation of toxic amyloid β peptides (Aβ). Using genetic mouse models of cholesterol loading, we examined whether mitochondrial cholesterol regulates Aβ neurotoxicity and AD pathology. Isolated mitochondria from brain or cortical neurons of transgenic mice overexpressing SREBP-2 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 2) or NPC1 (Niemann-Pick type C1) knockout mice exhibited mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation, mitochondrial GSH (mGSH) depletion and increased susceptibility to Aβ1-42-induced oxidative stress and release of apoptogenic proteins. Similar findings were observed in pharmacologically GSH-restricted rat brain mitochondria, while selective mGSH depletion sensitized human neuronal and glial cell lines to Aβ1-42-mediated cell death. Intracerebroventricular human Aβ delivery co-localized with mitochondria resulting in oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neuronal damage that were enhanced in Tg-SREBP-2 mice and prevented upon mGSH recovery by GSH ethyl ester co-infusion, with a similar protection observed by i.p. administration of GSH ethyl ester. Finally, APP/PS1 mice, a transgenic AD mouse model, exhibited mitochondrial cholesterol loading and mGSH depletion. Thus, mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation emerges as a novel pathogenic factor in AD by modulating Aβ toxicity via mGSH regulation; strategies boosting the particular pool of mGSH may be of relevance to slow down disease progression. PMID:19458211

  20. Quantitative analysis of co-oligomer formation by amyloid-beta peptide isoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iljina, Marija; Garcia, Gonzalo A.; Dear, Alexander J.; Flint, Jennie; Narayan, Priyanka; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Frenkel, Daan; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Klenerman, David

    2016-06-01

    Multiple isoforms of aggregation-prone proteins are present under physiological conditions and have the propensity to assemble into co-oligomers with different properties from self-oligomers, but this process has not been quantitatively studied to date. We have investigated the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and the aggregation of its two major isoforms, Aβ40 and Aβ42, using a statistical mechanical modelling approach in combination with in vitro single-molecule fluorescence measurements. We find that at low concentrations of Aβ, corresponding to its physiological abundance, there is little free energy penalty in forming co-oligomers, suggesting that the formation of both self-oligomers and co-oligomers is possible under these conditions. Our model is used to predict the oligomer concentration and size at physiological concentrations of Aβ and suggests the mechanisms by which the ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40 can affect cell toxicity. An increased ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40 raises the fraction of oligomers containing Aβ42, which can increase the hydrophobicity of the oligomers and thus promote deleterious binding to the cell membrane and increase neuronal damage. Our results suggest that co-oligomers are a common form of aggregate when Aβ isoforms are present in solution and may potentially play a significant role in Alzheimer’s disease.

  1. Minocycline recovers MTT-formazan exocytosis impaired by amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Kreutzmann, Peter; Wolf, Gerald; Kupsch, Kathleen

    2010-10-01

    Minocycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, has been reported to exert beneficial effects in models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To characterize the mechanisms underlying the putative minocycline-related neuroprotection, we studied its effect in an in vitro model of AD. Primary hippocampal cultures were treated with β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and cell viability was assessed by standard MTT-assay. Incubation with 10 μM Aβ for 24 h significantly inhibits cellular MTT-reduction without inducing morphological signs of enhanced cell death or increase in release of lactate dehydrogenase. This indicates that cell viability was not affected. The inhibition of MTT-reduction by Aβ was due to an acceleration of MTT-formazan exocytosis. Intriguingly, the Aβ-triggered increase in MTT-formazan exocytosis was abolished by co-treatment with minocycline. In vehicle-treated cells minocycline had no effect on formazan exocytosis. This hitherto unrecognized property of minocycline has to be noticed in the elucidation of the underlying mechanism of this promising neuroprotectant.

  2. The metabolic enhancer piracetam ameliorates the impairment of mitochondrial function and neurite outgrowth induced by beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Kurz, C; Ungerer, I; Lipka, U; Kirr, S; Schütt, T; Eckert, A; Leuner, K; Müller, W E

    2010-05-01

    beta-Amyloid peptide (Abeta) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by initiating a cascade of events from mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been shown to improve mitochondrial dysfunction following brain aging and experimentally induced oxidative stress. We used cell lines (PC12 and HEK cells) and murine dissociated brain cells. The protective effects of piracetam in vitro and ex vivo on Abeta-induced impairment of mitochondrial function (as mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production), on secretion of soluble Abeta and on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were investigated. Piracetam improves mitochondrial function of PC12 cells and acutely dissociated brain cells from young NMRI mice following exposure to extracellular Abeta(1-42). Similar protective effects against Abeta(1-42) were observed in dissociated brain cells from aged NMRI mice, or mice transgenic for mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) treated with piracetam for 14 days. Soluble Abeta load was markedly diminished in the brain of those animals after treatment with piracetam. Abeta production by HEK cells stably transfected with mutant human APP was elevated by oxidative stress and this was reduced by piracetam. Impairment of neuritogenesis is an important consequence of Abeta-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and Abeta-induced reduction of neurite growth in PC12 cells was substantially improved by piracetam. Our findings strongly support the concept of improving mitochondrial function as an approach to ameliorate the detrimental effects of Abeta on brain function.

  3. Dual response of BDNF to sublethal concentrations of beta-amyloid peptides in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, E; Silhol, M; Bonneau, N; Maurice, T; Arancibia, S; Tapia-Arancibia, L

    2010-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposition is one important pathological hallmark in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, low levels of Abeta may modify critical endogenous protection systems before neurodegeneration occurs. We examined the time-course effect of sublethal concentrations of Abeta on total BDNF (panBDNF), BDNF transcripts (I, II, IV and VI), trkB.FL, trkB.T1 and p75(NGFR) mRNA expression in cultured cortical neurons. We have shown that Abeta exhibited a dual response on BDNF mRNA, i.e. an increase at short times (3-5 h) and a dramatic decrease at longer times (24 or 48 h). The early increase in BDNF expression seems to be driven by increased expression of transcripts I and IV. The BDNF drop was specific since did not occur for other mRNAs examined. The BDNF protein content showed a similar profile but did not follow the dramatic reduction as its encoding mRNA. These observations may help to explain cognitive deficits observed at initial stages of AD.

  4. Antagonizing beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity of the anti-aging fungus Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cora Sau-Wan; Yu, Man-Shan; Yuen, Wai-Hung; So, Kwok-Fai; Zee, Sze-Yong; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2008-01-23

    Ganoderma lucidum (Leyss. ex Fr.) Karst. (Lingzhi) is a medicinal fungus used clinically in many Asian countries to promote health and longevity. Synaptic degeneration is another key mode of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have shown the loss of synaptic density proteins in each individual neuron during the progression of AD. It was recently reported that beta-amyloid (Abeta) could cause synaptic dysfunction and contribute to AD pathology. In this study, we reported that aqueous extract of G. lucidum significantly attenuated Abeta-induced synaptotoxicity by preserving the synaptic density protein, synaptophysin. In addition, G. lucidum aqueous extract antagonized Abeta-triggered DEVD cleavage activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further studies elucidated that phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and p38 MAP kinase was attenuated by G. lucidum in Abeta-stressed neurons. Taken together, the results prove a hypothesis that anti-aging G. lucidum can prevent harmful effects of the exterminating toxin Abeta in AD.

  5. Amyloid beta peptides do not form peptide-derived free radicals spontaneously, but can enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of hydroxylamines to nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Dikalov, S I; Vitek, M P; Maples, K R; Mason, R P

    1999-04-02

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Free radical generation by Abeta peptides was suggested to be a key mechanism of their neurotoxicity. Reports that neurotoxic free radicals derived from Abeta-(1-40) and Abeta-(25-35) peptides react with the spin trap N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) to form a PBN/.Abeta peptide radical adduct with a specific triplet ESR signal assert that the peptide itself was the source of free radicals. We now report that three Abeta peptides, Abeta-(1-40), Abeta-(25-35), and Abeta-(40-1), do not yield radical adducts with PBN from the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF). In contrast to OMRF PBN, incubation of Sigma PBN in phosphate buffer without Abeta peptides produced a three-line ESR spectrum. It was shown that this nitroxide is di-tert-butylnitroxide and is formed in the Sigma PBN solution as a result of transition metal-catalyzed auto-oxidation of the respective hydroxylamine present as an impurity in the Sigma PBN. Under some conditions, incubation of PBN from Sigma with Abeta-(1-40) or Abeta-(25-35) can stimulate the formation of di-tert-butylnitroxide. It was shown that Abeta peptides enhanced oxidation of cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-4-oxo-2,2,6, 6-tetramethylpiperidine (TEMPONE-H), which was strongly inhibited by the treatment of phosphate buffer with Chelex-100. It was shown that ferric and cupric ions are effective oxidants of TEMPONE-H. The data obtained allow us to conclude that under some conditions toxic Abeta peptides Abeta-(1-40) and Abeta-(25-35) enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of hydroxylamine derivatives, but do not spontaneously form peptide-derived free radicals.

  6. Biochemical studies in Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) patients: change in CSF levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and phospho-tau.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Reyes, Patricio F; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2011-04-01

    Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) is one of the causes of dementia of the elderly characterized by impaired mental function, gait difficulties and urinary incontinence. Previously, it was proposed that some of the NPH patients may develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) like pathology. Aim of this study was to compare levels of different CSF biomarkers, including total secreted β-amyloid precursor protein (sAPP), sAPP-alpha form (sAPPα), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, total-tau protein and hyperphosphorylated-tau protein in subjects from NPH and Non-NPH Control (NNC). CSF was collected from 23 NPH patients and 13 Non-NPH controls by lumber puncture. Western blot analysis was performed to measure levels of sAPP-total. ELISA was used separately to determine levels of sAPPα, Aβ peptide, total-tau and phospho-tau proteins. We found a significant decrease in levels of total secreted APP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) in the CSF sample of NPH patients vs. NNC. We did not observe any change in levels of total-tau or phospho-tau in NPH vs. NNC subjects. Notably, phospho-tau level was significantly increased in the NPH patients, who were suffering from the disease for more than one year, vs. NNC. Among five biomarkers studied, decreased sAPP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) levels in CSF can be molecular markers to distinguish NPH cases from NNC. Disease severity can also be assessed by increased levels of CSF phospho-tau protein and the ratio of phospho-tau to Aβ (1-42), which might be a useful tool for predicting conversion of NPH individuals to other neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  7. Microfluidic Isoelectric Focusing of Amyloid Beta Peptides Followed by Micropillar-Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mikkonen, Saara; Jacksén, Johan; Roeraade, Johan; Thormann, Wolfgang; Emmer, Åsa

    2016-10-18

    A novel method for preconcentration and purification of the Alzheimer's disease related amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides by isoelectric focusing (IEF) in 75 nL microchannels combined with their analysis by micropillar-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is presented. A semiopen chip-based setup, consisting of open microchannels covered by a lid of a liquid fluorocarbon, was used. IEF was performed in a mixture of four small and chemically well-defined amphoteric carriers, glutamic acid, aspartyl-histidine (Asp-His), cycloserine (cSer), and arginine, which provided a stepwise pH gradient tailored for focusing of the C-terminal Aβ peptides with a pI of 5.3 in the boundary between cSer and Asp-His. Information about the focusing dynamics and location of the foci of Aβ peptides and other compounds was obtained using computer simulation and by performing MALDI-MS analysis directly from the open microchannel. With the established configuration, detection was performed by direct sampling of a nanoliter volume containing the focused Aβ peptides from the microchannel, followed by deposition of this volume onto a chip with micropillar MALDI targets. In addition to purification, IEF preconcentration provides at least a 10-fold increase of the MALDI-MS-signal. After immunoprecipitation and concentration of the eluate in the microchannel, IEF-micropillar-MALDI-MS is demonstrated to be a suitable platform for detection of Aβ peptides in human cerebrospinal fluid as well as in blood plasma.

  8. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Streltsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloidpeptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloidpeptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloidpeptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  9. Beta-secretase cleavage at amino acid residue 34 in the amyloid beta peptide is dependent upon gamma-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Ping; Tugusheva, Katherine; Bruce, James E; Lucka, Adam; Wu, Guo-Xin; Chen-Dodson, Elizabeth; Price, Eric; Li, Yueming; Xu, Min; Huang, Qian; Sardana, Mohinder K; Hazuda, Daria J

    2003-06-06

    The amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) are the major components of the senile plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Abeta peptides are generated from the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases. Beta-secretase (BACE), a type-I transmembrane aspartyl protease, cleaves APP first to generate a 99-amino acid membrane-associated fragment (CT99) containing the N terminus of Abeta peptides. Gamma-secretase, a multi-protein complex, then cleaves within the transmembrane region of CT99 to generate the C termini of Abeta peptides. The production of Abeta peptides is, therefore, dependent on the activities of both BACE and gamma-secretase. The cleavage of APP by BACE is believed to be a prerequisite for gamma-secretase-mediated processing. In the present study, we provide evidence both in vitro and in cells that BACE-mediated cleavage between amino acid residues 34 and 35 (Abeta-34 site) in the Abeta region is dependent on gamma-secretase activity. In vitro, the Abeta-34 site is processed specifically by BACE1 and BACE2, but not by cathepsin D, a closely related aspartyl protease. Moreover, the cleavage of the Abeta-34 site by BACE1 or BACE2 occurred only when Abeta 1- 40 peptide, a gamma-secretase cleavage product, was used as substrate, not the non-cleaved CT99. In cells, overexpression of BACE1 or BACE2 dramatically increased the production of the Abeta 1-34 species. More importantly, the cellular production of Abeta 1-34 species induced by overexpression of BACE1 or BACE2 was blocked by a number of known gamma-secretase inhibitors in a concentration-dependent manner. These gamma-secretase inhibitors had no effect on enzymatic activity of BACE1 or BACE2 in vitro. Our data thus suggest that gamma-secretase cleavage of CT99 is a prerequisite for BACE-mediated processing at Abeta-34 site. Therefore, BACE and gamma-secretase activity can be mutually dependent.

  10. Molecular mechanisms linking diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer disease: beta-amyloid peptide, insulin signaling, and neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuko; Sato, Naoyuki; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-06-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing at an alarming rate and has become a major public health concern worldwide. Recent epidemiological studies have provided direct evidence that DM is a strong risk factor for AD; this finding is now attracting attention. However, the underlying mechanisms for this association remain largely unknown. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies reported that diabetic conditions could cause an increase in the beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) levels, which exhibits neurotoxic properties and plays a causative role in AD. However, unexpectedly, recent clinicopathological studies have shown no evidence that the pathological hallmarks of AD, including amyloid plaque, were increased in the brains of diabetic patients, suggesting that DM could affect the pathogenesis of AD through mechanisms other than modulation of Aβ metabolism. One possible mechanism is the alteration in brain insulin signaling. It has been shown that insulin signaling is involved in a variety of neuronal functions, and that it also plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of AD. Thus, the modification of neuronal insulin signaling by diabetic conditions may contribute to AD progression. Another possible mechanism is cerebrovascular alteration, a common pathological change observed in both diseases. Accumulating evidence has suggested the importance of Aβ-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction in AD, and indicated that pathological interactions between the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and Aβ peptides may play a role in this dysfunction. Our study has provided a further understanding of the potential underlying mechanisms linking DM and AD by establishing novel mouse models showing pathological manifestations of both diseases. The current review summarizes the results from recent studies on the pathological relationship between DM and AD while focusing on brain insulin signaling and cerebrovascular alteration

  11. The structure of the amyloid-beta peptide high-affinity copper II binding site in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor A; Titmuss, Stephen J; Epa, V Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J; Masters, Colin L; Varghese, Joseph N

    2008-10-01

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of Abeta-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in Abeta may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of Abeta peptides complexed with Cu(2+) in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length Abeta-Cu(2+) peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the Abeta-Cu(2+) complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu(2+) binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to Abeta can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  12. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs) and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells). Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study "Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides" [1].

  13. Free fatty acids stimulate the polymerization of tau and amyloid beta peptides. In vitro evidence for a common effector of pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D. M.; Binder, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by the concomitant deposition of extracellular filaments composed of beta-amyloid peptides and intracellular filaments composed of the microtubule-associated protein tau. We have discovered that free fatty acids (FFAs) stimulate the assembly of both amyloid and tau filaments in vitro. The minimal concentration of arachidonic acid observed to stimulate tau assembly ranged from 10 to 20 mumol/L, depending on the source of the purified tau. Tau preparations that do not exhibit spontaneous assembly were among those induced to polymerize by arachidonic acid. All long-chain FFAs tested enhanced assembly to some extent, although greater stimulation was usually associated with unsaturated forms. Utilizing fluorescence spectroscopy, unsaturated FFAs were also demonstrated to induce beta-amyloid assembly. The minimal concentration of oleic or linoleic acid observed to stimulate the assembly of amyloid was 40 mumol/L. The filamentous nature of these thioflavin-binding amyloid polymers was verified by electron microscopy. These data define a new set of tools for examining the polymerization of amyloid and tau proteins and suggest that cortical elevations of FFAs may constitute a unifying stimulatory event driving the formation of two of the obvious pathogenetic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9176408

  14. Increased vulnerability of hippocampal neurons from presenilin-1 mutant knock-in mice to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity: central roles of superoxide production and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Sebastian, L; Sopher, B L; Miller, M W; Ware, C B; Martin, G M; Mattson, M P

    1999-03-01

    Many cases of early-onset inherited Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by mutations in the presenilin-1 (PS1) gene. Overexpression of PS1 mutations in cultured PC12 cells increases their vulnerability to apoptosis-induced trophic factor withdrawal and oxidative insults. We now report that primary hippocampal neurons from PS1 mutant knock-in mice, which express the human PS1M146V mutation at normal levels, exhibit increased vulnerability to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity. The endangering action of mutant PS1 was associated with increased superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and caspase activation. The peroxynitrite-scavenging antioxidant uric acid and the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone protected hippocampal neurons expressing mutant PS1 against cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide. Increased oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenic action of PS1 mutations, and antioxidants may counteract the adverse property of such AD-linked mutations.

  15. Activation of Toll-like receptor 2 on microglia promotes cell uptake of Alzheimer disease-associated amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keqiang; Iribarren, Pablo; Hu, Jinyue; Chen, Jianhong; Gong, Wanghua; Cho, Edward H; Lockett, Stephen; Dunlop, Nancy M; Wang, Ji Ming

    2006-02-10

    The human G-protein-coupled formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) and its mouse homologue mFPR2 mediate the chemotactic activity of a variety of polypeptides associated with inflammation and bacterial infection, including the 42-amino acid form of amyloid beta peptide (Abeta42), a pathogenic factor in Alzheimer disease. Because mFPR2 was inducible in mouse microglial cells by proinflammatory stimulants, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a ligand for the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), we investigated the role of TLR2 in the regulation of mFPR2. We found that a TLR2 agonist, peptidoglycan (PGN) derived from Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, induced considerable mFpr2 mRNA expression in a mouse microglial cell line and primary microglial cells. This was associated with a markedly increased chemotaxis of the cells in response to mFPR2 agonist peptides. In addition, activation of TLR2 markedly enhanced mFPR2-mediated uptake of Abeta42 by microglia. Studies of the mechanistic basis showed that PGN activates MAPK and IkappaBalpha, and the effect of PGN on induction of mFPR2 was dependent on signaling pathways via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs. The use of TLR2 on microglial cells by PGN was supported by the fact that N9 cells transfected with short interfering RNA targeting mouse TLR2 failed to show increased expression of functional mFPR2 after stimulation with PGN. Our results demonstrated a potentially important role for TLR2 in microglial cells of promoting cell responses to chemoattractants produced in lesions of inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases in the brain.

  16. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins, such as APP

  17. Homocysteine and folate deficiency sensitize oligodendrocytes to the cell death-promoting effects of a presenilin-1 mutation and amyloid beta-peptide.

    PubMed

    Pak, Kirk J; Chan, Sic L; Mattson, Mark P

    2003-01-01

    Although damage to white matter occurs in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Recent findings suggest that individuals with elevated levels of homocysteine are at increased risk of AD. Here we show that oligodendrocytes from mice expressing a mutant form of presenilin-1 (PS1) that causes familial AD exhibit increased sensitivity to death induced by homocysteine compared to oligodendrocytes from wild-type control mice. Homocysteine also sensitized oligodendrocytes to the cytotoxicity of amyloid beta-peptide. Folate deficiency, which is known to result in elevated levels of homocysteine in vivo, also sensitized oligodendrocytes to the cell-death-promoting actions of mutant PS1 and amyloid beta-peptide. Inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and p53 protected oligodendrocytes against cell death induced by homocysteine and amyloid beta-peptide, consistent with a role for a DNA-damage response in the cell death process. These findings demonstrate an adverse effect of homocysteine on oligodendrocytes, and suggest roles for homocysteine and folate deficiency in the white matter damage in AD and related neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Dutch and arctic mutant peptides of {beta} amyloid{sub 1-40} differentially affect the FGF-2 pathway in brain endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Solito, Raffaella; Corti, Federico; Fossati, Silvia; Mezhericher, Emiliya; Donnini, Sandra; Ghiso, Jorge; Giachetti, Antonio; Rostagno, Agueda; Ziche, Marina

    2009-02-01

    Single point mutations of the amyloid precursor protein generate A{beta} variants bearing amino acid substitutions at positions 21-23. These mutants are associated with distinct hereditary phenotypes of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, manifesting varying degrees of tropism for brain vessels, and impaired microvessel remodeling and angiogenesis. We examined the differential effects of E22Q (Dutch), and E22G (Arctic) variants in comparison to WT A{beta} on brain endothelial cell proliferation, angiogenic phenotype expression triggered by fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), pseudo-capillary sprouting, and induction of apoptosis. E22Q exhibited a potent anti-angiogenic profile in contrast to E22G, which had a much weaker effect. Investigations on the FGF-2 signaling pathway revealed the greatest differences among the peptides: E22Q and WT peptides suppressed FGF-2 expression while E22G had barely any effect. Phosphorylation of the FGF-2 receptor, FGFR-1, and the survival signal Akt were abolished by E22Q and WT peptides, but not by E22G. The biological dissimilar effect of the mutant and WT peptides on cerebral EC cannot be assigned to a particular A{beta} structure, suggesting that the toxic effect of the A{beta} assemblies goes beyond mere multimerization.

  19. Metabolic changes may precede proteostatic dysfunction in a Drosophila model of amyloid beta peptide toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Stanislav; Vishnivetskaya, Anastasia; Malmendal, Anders; Crowther, Damian C.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is linked to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease; accordingly, aggregation-prone isoforms of Aβ, expressed in the brain, shorten the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lethal effects of Aβ are not apparent until after day 15. We used shibireTS flies that exhibit a temperature-sensitive paralysis phenotype as a reporter of proteostatic robustness. In this model, we found that increasing age but not Aβ expression lowered the flies' permissive temperature, suggesting that Aβ did not exert its lethal effects by proteostatic disruption. Instead, we observed that chemical challenges, in particular oxidative stressors, discriminated clearly between young (robust) and old (sensitive) flies. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis, we compared water-soluble metabolite profiles at various ages in flies expressing Aβ in their brains. We observed 2 genotype-linked metabolomic signals, the first reported the presence of any Aβ isoform and the second the effects of the lethal Arctic Aβ. Lethality was specifically associated with signs of oxidative respiration dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:27103517

  20. [Role of glycolysis and antioxidant enzymes in the toxicity of amyloid beta peptide Abeta25-35 to erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Kosenko, E A; Solomadin, I N; Marov, N V; Venediktova, N I; Pogosian, A S; Kaminskiĭ, Iu G

    2008-01-01

    The role of glycolysis and antioxidant enzymes in amyloid beta peptide Abeta(25-35) toxicity to human and rat erythrocytes was studied. The erythrotoxicity of Abeta(25-35) was shown to increase two- to fourfold both in the absence of glucose in the incubation medium and upon the addition of sodium fluoride, an enolase inhibitor. Potassium cyanide, a Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase inhibitor, abolishes the toxic effect of Abeta(25-35) to erythrocytes, whereas mercaptosuccinate, a glutathione peroxidase inhibitor, and ouabain, a Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitor, promote it. Sodium azide, a catalase inhibitor, did not affect the cell lysis under the action of Abeta(25-35) . The results support the hypothesis that H2O2, Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase are involved in the toxicity mechanism rather than superoxide radical. Glycolysis and Na+,K+-ATPase play a substantial protective role. Fullerene C(60) nanoparticles are toxic to erythrocytes of both types; their toxicity is not related to enhanced oxidative stress and the mechanism of toxicity differs from that of Abeta(25-35) .

  1. Ameliorative effect of 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester against amyloid beta peptide-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jung Choi, Soo; Kim, Mi Jeong; Jin Heo, Ho; Kim, Jae Kyeum; Jin Jun, Woo; Kim, Hye Kyung; Kim, Eun-Ki; Ok Kim, Myeong; Yon Cho, Hong; Hwang, Han-Joon; Jun Kim, Young; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2009-03-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta)-induced oxidative stress may be linked to neurodegenerative disease. Ethanol extracts of Rosa laevigata protected PC12 cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) reduction assays revealed a significant increase in cell viability when oxidatively stressed PC12 cells were treated with R. laevigata extract. The effect of R. laevigata on oxidative stress-induced cell death was further investigated by lactate dehydrogenase release assays and trypan blue exclusion assays. Administration of 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester from R. laevigata extract to mice infused with Abeta significantly reversed learning and memory impairment in behavioural tests. After behavioural testing, the mice were sacrificed and brains were collected for the examination of lipid peroxidation, catalase activity and acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity. These results suggest that 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester from R. laevigata extract may be able to reduce Abeta-induced neurotoxicity, possibly by reducing oxidative stress. Therefore, R. laevigata extract may be useful for the prevention of oxidative stress-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Global properties and propensity to dimerization of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment through the modeling of its monomer and dimer diffusion coefficients and electrophoretic mobilities.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2015-03-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused mainly by amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment (monomer) and its dimer are characterized at low pH through the modeling of their diffusion coefficients and effective electrophoretic mobilities. Translational diffusion coefficient experimental values of monomer and dimer analogs of this peptide fragment and monomer and dimer mixtures at thermodynamic equilibrium are used as reported in the literature for different monomer initial concentrations. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are employed to evaluate the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment propensity to dimerization through a thermodynamic theoretical framework. Therefore equilibrium constants are considered at pH 2.9 to elucidate one of the amyloidogenic mechanisms involving the central hydrophobic region LVFFA of the peptide spanning residues 17-21 associated with phenylalanine at positions 19 and 20 in the amino acid sequence of amyloid-beta peptides. An analysis demonstrating that peptide aggregation is a concentration-dependent process is provided, where both pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena become relevant. It is shown that the modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment is crucial to understand the effect of hydrophobic region LVFFA in the amyloidogenic process.

  3. Altered emotionality leads to increased pain tolerance in amyloid beta (Abeta1-40) peptide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Pamplona, Fabrício A; Pandolfo, Pablo; Duarte, Filipe S; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Prediger, Rui D S

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the decline in cognitive functions, but it is also related to emotional disturbances. Since pain experience results from a complex integration of sensory, cognitive and affective processes, it is not surprising that AD patients display a distinct pattern of pain responsivity. We evaluated whether mice treated with amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide-thought to be critical in the pathogenesis of AD-exhibit altered pain responses and its relation to altered emotionality. Mice received a single i.c.v. injection of vehicle (PBS) or Abeta fragment (1-40) (400pmol/mice) and after 30 days, they were evaluated in tests of pain (hotplate, footshock-sensitivity), learning/memory (water-maze), emotionality (elevated plus-maze, forced swim) and locomotion (open-field). Abeta(1-40)-treated mice presented similar latencies to the control group in the hotplate test and similar nociceptive flinch threshold in the footshock-sensitivity test. However, they presented an increased jump threshold in footshock-sensitivity, suggesting increased pain tolerance. Altered emotionality was observed in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and forced-swim tests (FST), suggesting anxiogenic-like and depressive-like states, respectively. A multifactorial principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that jump threshold of the footshock-sensitivity test falls within 'Emotionality' and 'Pain', showing moderate correlation with each one of the components of behavior. Acute treatment with the antidepressant desipramine (10mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the jump threshold (i.e. pain tolerance) and time of immobility in FST (i.e. depressive-like state). Flinch threshold (i.e. pain sensitivity), locomotion and anxiety were not altered with desipramine treatment. These results suggest that Abeta(1-40) peptide increases pain tolerance, but not pain sensitivity in mice, which seems to be linked to alterations in cognitive/emotional components of pain

  4. Memantine Lowers Amyloid-beta Peptide Levels in Neuronal Cultures and in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alley, George M.; Bailey, Jason A; Chen, DeMao; Ray, Balmiki; Puli, Lakshman K.; Tanila, Heikki; Banerjee, Pradeep K; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2009-01-01

    Memantine is a moderate-affinity, uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that stabilizes cognitive, functional, and behavioral decline in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In AD, the extracellular deposition of fibrillogenic amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) occurs due to aberrant processing of the full-length Aβ precursor protein (APP). Memantine protects neurons from the neurotoxic effects of Aβ and improves cognition in transgenic mice with high brain levels of Aβ. However, it is unknown how memantine protects cells against neurodegeneration and affects APP processing and Aβ production. We report the effects of memantine in three different systems. In human neuroblastoma cells, memantine, at therapeutically relevant concentrations (1-4 μM), decreased levels of secreted APP and Aβ1-40. Levels of the potentially amylodogenic Aβ1-42 were undetectable in these cells. In primary rat cortical neuronal cultures, memantine treatment lowered Aβ1-42 secretion. At the concentrations used, memantine treatment was not toxic to neuroblastoma or primary cultures and increased cell viability and/or metabolic activity under certain conditions. In APP/presenilin-1 (PS1) transgenic mice exhibiting high brain levels of Aβ1-42, oral dosing of memantine (20 mg/kg/day for 8 days) produced plasma drug concentration of 0.96 μM and significantly reduced the cortical levels of soluble Aβ1-42. The ratio of Aβ1-40/Aβ1-42 increased in treated mice, suggesting effects on the γ-secretase complex. Thus, memantine reduces the levels of Aβ peptides at therapeutic concentrations and may inhibit the accumulation of fibrillogenic Aβ in mammalian brains. Memantine’s ability to preserve neuronal cells against neurodegeneration, increase metabolic activity, and lower Aβ level has therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19642202

  5. Amyloid Beta as a Modulator of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Brewer, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is associated with synapse loss, memory dysfunction and pathological accumulation of amyloid beta in plaques. However, an exclusively pathological role for amyloid beta is being challenged by new evidence for an essential function of amyloid beta at the synapse. Amyloid beta protein exists in different assembly states in the central nervous system and plays distinct roles ranging from synapse and memory formation to memory loss and neuronal cell death. Amyloid beta is present in the brain of symptom-free people where it likely performs important physiological roles. New evidence indicates that synaptic activity directly evokes the release of amyloid beta at the synapse. At physiological levels, amyloid beta is a normal, soluble product of neuronal metabolism that regulates synaptic function beginning early in life. Monomeric amyloid beta 40 and 42 are the predominant forms required for synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. With age, some assemblies of amyloid beta are associated with synaptic failure and Alzheimer’s disease pathology, possibly targeting the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor through the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), mitochondrial amyloid-β alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) and cyclophilin D. But emerging data suggests a distinction between age effects on the target response in contrast to the assembly state or the accumulation of the peptide. Both aging and beta amyloid independently decrease neuronal plasticity. Our laboratory has reported that amyloid beta, glutamate and lactic acid are each increasingly toxic with neuron age. The basis of the age-related toxicity partly resides in age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and an oxidative shift in mitochondrial and cytoplasmic redox potential. In turn, signaling through phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (pERK) is affected along with an age-independent increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (p

  6. The extracellular domain of Bri2 (ITM2B) binds the ABri peptide (1-23) and amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta1-40): Implications for Bri2 effects on processing of amyloid precursor protein and Abeta aggregation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Siwei; Fitzen, Michael; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan

    2010-03-12

    In Alzheimer's disease the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) aggregates in brain tissue and arteries. Abeta is proteolytically cleaved out from amyloid precursor protein (APP) by different secretases. Recently, the transmembrane protein ITM2B/Bri2, which is expressed in neurons and associated with familial British and Danish dementia, was shown to inhibit APP processing in transfected cells as well as in transgenic mice. Several mechanisms by which Bri2 can interfere with Abeta production and aggregation have been proposed. Herein, we studied recombinant human Bri2 (residues 90-236) containing the extracellular Brichos domain without the ABri23 peptide. Bri2(90-236) binds to ABri23, which suggests that these two parts interact during Bri2 biosynthesis, in line with proposed functions of Brichos domains in other proteins. Moreover, Bri2(90-236) binds Abeta1-40 and inhibits its aggregation and fibril formation. These data suggest a model for how the processing of Bri2 and APP are interrelated. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Amyloid-beta peptide degradation in cell cultures by mycoplasma contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haitian; Dreses-Werringloer, Ute; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Cell cultures have become an indispensable tool in Alzheimer's disease research for studying amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolism. It is estimated that up to 35% of cell cultures in current use are infected with various mycoplasma species. In contrast with common bacterial and fungal infections, contaminations of cell cultures with mycoplasmas represent a challenging issue in terms of detectability and prevention. Mycoplasmas are the smallest and simplest self-replicating bacteria and the consequences of an infection for the host cells are variable, ranging from no apparent effect to induction of apoptosis. Findings Here we present evidence that mycoplasmas from a cell culture contamination are able to efficiently and rapidly degrade extracellular Aβ. As a result, we observed no accumulation of Aβ in the conditioned medium of mycoplasma-positive cells stably transfected with the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP). Importantly, eradication of the mycoplasma contaminant – identified as M. hyorhinis – by treatments with a quinolone-based antibiotic, restored extracellular Aβ accumulation in the APP-transfected cells. Conclusion These data show that mycoplasmas degrade Aβ and thus may represent a significant source of variability when comparing extracellular Aβ levels in different cell lines. On the basis of these results, we recommend assessment of mycoplasma contaminations prior to extracellular Aβ level measurements in cultured cells. PMID:18710491

  8. Effect of trehalose on amyloid beta (29-40)-membrane interaction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Allam S; Izmitli, Aslin; de Pablo, J J

    2009-08-28

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the interaction between amyloid beta peptide and lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer disease. Recent experimental evidence also suggests that trehalose, a simple disaccharide, reduces the toxicity of amyloid beta peptide. Molecular simulations are used to examine the effect of trehalose on the conformational stability of amyloid beta peptide in aqueous solution and its effect on the interaction between amyloid beta peptide and a model phospholipid bilayer membrane. It is found that, in aqueous solution, the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation but, in the presence of trehalose, it adopts an alpha helical conformation. It is then shown that the insertion of amyloid beta peptide into a membrane is more favorable when the peptide is folded into an alpha-helix than in a random coil conformation, thereby suggesting that trehalose promotes the insertion of alpha-helical amyloid beta into biological membranes.

  9. An improved method for high-level soluble expression and purification of recombinant amyloid-beta peptide for in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Gaurav; Pandey, Tripti; Chinta, Ramesh; Kumar, Awanish; Tripathi, Timir

    2015-10-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide mediates several neurodegenerative diseases. The 42 amino acid (Aβ1-42) is the predominant form of peptide found in the neuritic plaques and has been demonstrated to be neurotoxic in vivo and in vitro. The availability of large quantities of Aβ peptide will help in several biochemical and biophysical studies that may help in exploring the aggregation mechanism and toxicity of Aβ peptide. We report a convenient and economical method to obtain such a peptide biologically. Synthetic oligonucleotides encoding Aβ1-42 were constructed and amplified through the polymerase cycling assembly (also known as assembly PCR), followed by the amplification PCR. Aβ1-42 gene was cloned into pET41a(+) vector for expression. Interestingly, the addition of 3% (v/v) ethanol to the culture medium resulted in the production of large amounts of soluble Aβ fusion protein. The Aβ fusion protein was subjected to a Ni-NTA affinity chromatography followed by enterokinase digestion, and the Aβ peptide was purified using glutathione Sepharose affinity chromatography. The peptide yield was ∼15mg/L culture, indicating the utility of this method for high-yield production of soluble Aβ peptide. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting with anti-His antibody confirmed the identity of purified Aβ fusion protein and Aβ peptide. In addition, this method provides an advantage over the chemical synthesis and other conventional methods used for large-scale production of recombinant Aβ peptide.

  10. Antimicrobial Properties of Amyloid Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Bruce L.; Jang, Hyunbum; Capone, Ricardo; Arce, Fernando Teran; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Lal, Ratnesh; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    More than two dozen clinical syndromes known as amyloid diseases are characterized by the buildup of extended insoluble fibrillar deposits in tissues. These amorphous Congo red staining deposits known as amyloids exhibit a characteristic green birefringence and cross-β structure. Substantial evidence implicates oligomeric intermediates of amyloids as toxic species in the pathogenesis of these chronic disease states. A growing body of data has suggested that these toxic species form ion channels in cellular membranes causing disruption of calcium homeostasis, membrane depolarization, energy drainage, and in some cases apoptosis. Amyloid peptide channels exhibit a number of common biological properties including the universal U-shape β-strand-turn-β-strand structure, irreversible and spontaneous insertion into membranes, production of large heterogeneous single-channel conductances, relatively poor ion selectivity, inhibition by Congo red, and channel blockade by zinc. Recent evidence has suggested that increased amounts of amyloids are not only toxic to its host target cells but also possess antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, at least one human antimicrobial peptide, protegrin-1, which kills microbes by a channel-forming mechanism, has been shown to possess the ability to form extended amyloid fibrils very similar to those of classic disease-forming amyloids. In this paper, we will review the reported antimicrobial properties of amyloids and the implications of these discoveries for our understanding of amyloid structure and function. PMID:22081976

  11. Low molecular weight oligomers of amyloid peptides display beta-barrel conformations: a replica exchange molecular dynamics study in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Alfonso; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2010-04-28

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils is connected to over 40 pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and systemic amyloidosis. Diffusible, low molecular weight protein and peptide oligomers that form in the early steps of aggregation appear to be the harmful cytotoxic species in the molecular etiology of these diseases. So far, the structural characterization of these oligomers has remained elusive owing to their transient and dynamic features. We here address, by means of full atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, the energy landscape of heptamers of the amyloidogenic peptide NHVTLSQ from the beta-2 microglobulin protein. The simulations totaling 5 micros show that low molecular weight oligomers in explicit solvent consist of beta-barrels in equilibrium with amorphous states and fibril-like assemblies. The results, also accounting for the influence of the pH on the conformational properties, provide a strong evidence of the formation of transient beta-barrel assemblies in the early aggregation steps of amyloid-forming systems. Our findings are discussed in terms of oligomers cytotoxicity.

  12. Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response by the amyloid-beta 1-40 peptide in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Catarina R G; Ferreiro, Elisabete; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cardoso, Sandra M; Pereira, Cláudia F

    2013-12-01

    Neurovascular dysfunction arising from endothelial cell damage is an early pathogenic event that contributes to the neurodegenerative process occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are not fully elucidated, this study was aimed to explore the hypothesis that brain endothelial cell death is induced upon the sustained activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response by amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, which deposits in the cerebral vessels in many AD patients and transgenic mice. Incubation of rat brain endothelial cells (RBE4 cell line) with Aβ1-40 increased the levels of several markers of ER stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR), in a time-dependent manner, and affected the Ca(2+) homeostasis due to the release of Ca(2+) from this intracellular store. Finally, Aβ1-40 was shown to activate both mitochondria-dependent and -independent apoptotic cell death pathways. Enhanced release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and activation of the downstream caspase-9 were observed in cells treated with Aβ1-40 concomitantly with caspase-12 activation. Furthermore, Aβ1-40 activated the apoptosis effectors' caspase-3 and promoted the translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus demonstrating the involvement of caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms during Aβ-induced endothelial cell death. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that ER stress plays a significant role in Aβ1-40-induced apoptotic cell death in brain endothelial cells suggesting that ER stress-targeted therapeutic strategies might be useful in AD to counteract vascular defects and ultimately neurodegeneration.

  13. Low-dose intraperitoneal Freund's adjuvant: toxicity and immunogenicity in mice using an immunogen targeting amyloid-beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Oscherwitz, Jon; Hankenson, F C; Yu, Fen; Cease, Kemp B

    2006-04-05

    Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) is effective for potentiating immune responses in mice when administered subcutaneously, and is often more potent when given intraperitoneally (i.p.). However, the the potential toxicity of i.p. administration in mice has led investigators and Institutional Animal Care and Use committees to increasingly view the use of CFA i.p. with reservation. We evaluated whether an 80% reduction in the dose of CFA administered i.p. to mice, compared to the i.p. doses used in a previous analysis, could abrogate the untoward effects associated with its use, while still maintaining adjuvanticity. Using a novel immunogen targeting the N-terminus of the 42-amino acid amyloid-beta peptide, we compared low dose CFA administered i.p., with three other commonly used adjuvants given i.p.: alum, incomplete Freunds adjuvant (IFA) and monophoshoryl lipid A + trehalose dicorynomycolate (MPL + TDM). The results of the study showed that, though the reduction in intraperitoneal dose of CFA mitigated transient weight loss and leukocytosis observed previously with higher doses of i.p. CFA, all mice administered CFA or IFA i.p. developed abdominal adhesions and granulomatous peritonitis. Mice from all adjuvant groups, however, appeared to tolerate the respective adjuvants well and excellent comparative immunogenicity was observed in mice immunized with the Freunds and MPL + TDM adjuvants. Consequently, we conclude that though a high-titered, humoral response may be generated using low dose CFA administered i.p., the accompanying toxicity remains significant, and thus alternative adjuvants and/or routes should be considered.

  14. Protective effects of Lingguizhugan decoction on amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)-induced cell injury: Anti-inflammatory effects☆

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Feifei; Sang, Feng; Zhou, Chunxiang; Ling, Yun

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) and BV-2 microglia were treated with amyloidpeptide (25–35), as a model of Alzheimer’s disease, to evaluate the protective effects of 10-3–10-8 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction and to examine the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanism. Lingguizhugan decoction significantly enhanced the viability of SH-SY5Y cells with amyloidpeptide-induced injury, and lowered levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide in the culture supernatant of activated BV-2 microglia. The effects of 10-3 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction were more significant. These results suggest that Lingguizhugan decoction can protect SH-SY5Y cells against amyloidpeptide (25–35)-induced injury in a dose-dependent manner by inhibiting overexpression of inflammatory factors by activated microglia. PMID:25317138

  15. Mimotopes of conformational epitopes in fibrillar beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Petrushina, Irina; Manoutcharian, Karen; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Acero, Gonzalo; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Cribbs, David H; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2004-11-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) beta-amyloid peptide accumulates in the brain in different forms including fibrils. Amyloid fibrils could be recognized as foreign by the mature immune system since they are not present during its development. Thus, using mouse antisera raised against the fibrillar form of Abeta42, we have screened two phage peptide libraries for the presence of foreign conformational mimotopes of Abeta. Antisera from wild type animals recognized predominately peptides with the EFRH motif from Abeta42 sequence, whereas amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice recognized mainly phage clones that mimic epitopes (mimotopes) within the fibrillar Abeta42 but lack sequence homology with this peptide.

  16. Neuroprotective effects of anti-aging oriental medicine Lycium barbarum against beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man-Shan; Leung, Sarana Ka-Yan; Lai, Sau-Wan; Che, Chi-Ming; Zee, Sze-Yong; So, Kwok-Fai; Yuen, Wai-Hung; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2005-01-01

    As aged population dramatically increases in these decades, efforts should be made on the intervention for curing age-associated neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Natural plant extracts of Lycium barbarum are well-known to exhibit anti-aging effects. We therefore hypothesized that they exhibit neuroprotective effects against toxins in aging-related neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether extracts from L. barbarum have neuroprotective effects against toxicity of fibrillar Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(25-35) fragments. Primary rat cortical neurons exposed to Abeta peptides resulted in apoptosis and necrosis. Pre-treatment with extract isolated from L. barbarum significantly reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In addition, it attenuated Abeta peptide-activated caspases-3-like activity. The extract elicited a typical dose-dependent neuroprotective effect. Effective dosage of this extract was wider than that of a well-known western neuroprotective medicine lithium chloride (LiCl). We have further examined the underlying mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects. In agreement with other laboratories, Abeta peptides induce a rapid activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by phosphorylation. Pre-treatment of aqueous extract markedly reduced the phosphorylation of JNK-1 (Thr183/Tyr185) and its substrates c-Jun-I (Ser 73) and c-Jun-II (Ser 63). Taken together, we have proved our hypothesis by showing neuroprotective effects of the extract from L. barbarum. Study on anti-aging herbal medicine like L. barbarum may open a new therapeutic window for the prevention of AD.

  17. AN APOLIPOPROTEIN E4 FRAGMENT CAN PROMOTE INTRACELLULAR ACCUMULATION OF AMYLOID PEPTIDE BETA 42

    PubMed Central

    Dafnis, Ioannis; Stratikos, Efstratios; Tzinia, Athina; Tsilibary, Effie C.; Zannis, Vassilis I.; Chroni, Angeliki

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays a crucial role in lipid transport in circulation and the brain. The apoE4 isoform is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE4 is more susceptible to proteolysis than other apoE isoforms and apoE4 fragments have been found in brains of AD patients. These apoE4 fragments have been hypothesized to be involved in the pathogenesis of AD, although the mechanism is not clear. In this study we examined the effect of lipid-free apoE4 on amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. We discovered that a specific apoE4 fragment, apoE4[Δ(166-299)], can promote the cellular uptake of extracellular Aβ40 and Aβ42 either generated after APP transfection or added exogenously. A longer length fragment, apoE4[Δ(186-299)], or full-length apoE4 failed to elicit this effect. ApoE4[Δ(166-299)] effected a 20% reduction of cellular sphingomyelin levels, as well as changes in cellular membrane micro-fluidity. Following uptake, approximately 50% of Aβ42 remained within the cell for at least 24h, and led to increased formation of reactive oxygen species. Overall, our findings suggest a direct link between two early events in the pathogenesis of AD, apoE4 proteolysis and intraneuronal presence of Aβ. PMID:20412390

  18. Ovine colostrum nanopeptide affects amyloid beta aggregation.

    PubMed

    Janusz, Maria; Woszczyna, Mirosław; Lisowski, Marek; Kubis, Adriana; Macała, Józefa; Gotszalk, Teodor; Lisowski, Józef

    2009-01-05

    A colostral proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) consisting of over 30 peptides shows beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients when administered in the form of sublinqual tablets called Colostrinin. The aim of the present studies was to investigate whether nanopeptide fragment of PRP (NP) - one of the PRP complex components can affect aggregation of amyloid beta (Abeta1-42). The effect of NP on Abeta aggregation was studied using Thioflavin T (ThT) binding, atomic force microscopy, and analyzing circular dichroism spectra. Results presented suggest that NP can directly interact with amyloid beta, inhibit its aggregation and disrupt existing aggregates acting as a beta sheet breaker and reduce toxicity induced by aggregated forms of Abeta.

  19. Formation and seeding of amyloid fibrils from wild-type hen lysozyme and a peptide fragment from the beta-domain.

    PubMed

    Krebs, M R; Wilkins, D K; Chung, E W; Pitkeathly, M C; Chamberlain, A K; Zurdo, J; Robinson, C V; Dobson, C M

    2000-07-14

    Wild-type hen lysozyme has been converted from its soluble native state into highly organized amyloid fibrils. In order to achieve this conversion, conditions were chosen to promote partial unfolding of the native globular fold and included heating of low-pH solutions and addition of organic solvents. Two peptides derived from the beta-sheet region of hen lysozyme were also found to form fibrils very readily. The properties and morphologies of the amyloid fibrils formed by incubation either of the protein or the peptides are similar to those produced from the group of proteins associated with clinical amyloidoses. Fibril formation by hen lysozyme was substantially accelerated when aliquots of solutions in which fibrils of either one of the peptides or the full-length protein had previously formed were added to fresh solutions of the protein, revealing the importance of seeding in the kinetics of fibril formation. These findings support the proposition that the beta-domain is of particular significance in the formation of fibrils from the full-length protein and suggest similarities between the species giving rise to fibril formation and the intermediates formed during protein folding. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Transport of Alzheimer disease amyloid-beta-binding D-amino acid peptides across an in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongmei; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Willbold, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Previously, two D-enantiomeric amino acid peptides, D1 and D3, which specifically bind to the amyloid-beta peptide Abeta(1-42), were identified by phage display selection. To assess the diagnostic and therapeutic potentials of D1 and D3 for the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer disease, the blood-brain barrier transport of these D-peptides was quantitatively evaluated in vitro. Our results showed that the apical-to-basolateral transport of D3 was more efficient than that of D1. An active efflux transport mechanism seems to oppose the transport of D1, whereas D3 is likely to be transported through the blood-brain barrier via an adsorptive-mediated transcytosis mechanism.

  1. Interaction of PiB-derivative metal complexes with beta-amyloid peptides: selective recognition of the aggregated forms.

    PubMed

    Martins, André F; Dias, David M; Morfin, Jean-François; Lacerda, Sara; Laurents, Douglas V; Tóth, Éva; Geraldes, Carlos F G C

    2015-03-27

    Metal complexes are increasingly explored as imaging probes in amyloid peptide related pathologies. We report the first detailed study on the mechanism of interaction between a metal complex and both the monomer and the aggregated form of Aβ1-40 peptide. We have studied lanthanide(III) chelates of two PiB-derivative ligands (PiB=Pittsburgh compound B), L(1) and L(2), differing in the length of the spacer between the metal-complexing DO3A macrocycle (DO3A=1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid) and the peptide-recognition PiB moiety. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy revealed that they both bind to aggregated Aβ1-40 (KD =67-160 μM), primarily through the benzothiazole unit. HSQC NMR spectroscopy on the (15) N-labeled, monomer Aβ1-40 peptide indicates nonsignificant interaction with monomeric Aβ. Time-dependent circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM investigations of the secondary structure and of the aggregation of Aβ1-40 in the presence of increasing amounts of the metal complexes provide coherent data showing that, despite their structural similarity, the two complexes affect Aβ fibril formation distinctly. Whereas GdL(1), at higher concentrations, stabilizes β-sheets, GdL(2) prevents aggregation by promoting α-helical structures. These results give insight into the behavior of amyloid-targeted metal complexes in general and contribute to a more rational design of metal-based diagnostic and therapeutic agents for amyloid- associated pathologies.

  2. Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptides can activate the early components of complement classical pathway in a C1q-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschini, L; Canziani, S; Bottasso, B; Cugno, M; Braidotti, P; Agostoni, A

    1999-03-01

    beta-Amyloid (beta-A) accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is presumably involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, on account of its neurotoxicity and complement-activating ability. Although assembly of beta-A in particular aggregates seems to be crucial, soluble non-fibrillar beta-A may also be involved. Non-fibrillar beta-A does not bind C1q, so we investigated alternative mechanisms of beta-A-dependent complement activation in vitro. On incubation with normal human plasma, non-fibrillar beta-A 1-42, and truncated peptide 1-28, induced dose-dependent activation of C1s and C4, sparing C3, as assessed by densitometric analysis of immunostained membrane after SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The mechanism of C4 activation was not dependent on C1q, because non-fibrillar beta-A can still activate C1s and C4 in plasma genetically deficient in C1q (C1qd). In Factor XII-deficient plasma (F.XIId) the amount of cleaved C4 was about 5-10% less that in C1qd and in normal EDTA plasma; the reconstitution of F.XIId plasma with physiologic concentrations of F.XII resulted in an increased (8-15%) beta-A-dependent cleavage of C4. Thus our results indicate that the C1q-independent activation of C1 and C4 can be partially mediated by the activation products of contact system. Since the activation of contact system and of C4 leads to generation of several humoral inflammatory peptides, non-fibrillar beta-A might play a role in initiating the early inflammatory reactions leading to a multistep cascade contributing to neuronal and clinical dysfunction of AD brain.

  3. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghalebani, Leila; Wahlstroem, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Waermlaender, Sebastian K.T.S.; Graeslund, Astrid

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu(II) and Zn(II) display pH-dependent binding to the A{beta}(1-40) peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 7.4 both metal ions display residue-specific binding to the A{beta} peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 5.5 the binding specificity is lost for Zn(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding may help explain metal-induced AD toxicity. -- Abstract: Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled A{beta}(1-40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to A{beta} may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the A{beta} peptide under these conditions.

  4. Structural evolution and membrane interactions of Alzheimer's amyloid-beta peptide oligomers: new knowledge from single-molecule fluorescence studies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robin D; Steel, Duncan G; Gafni, Ari

    2014-07-01

    Amyloidpeptide (Aβ) oligomers may represent the proximal neurotoxin in Alzheimer's disease. Single-molecule microscopy (SMM) techniques have recently emerged as a method for overcoming the innate difficulties of working with amyloid-β, including the peptide's low endogenous concentrations, the dynamic nature of its oligomeric states, and its heterogeneous and complex membrane interactions. SMM techniques have revealed that small oligomers of the peptide bind to model membranes and cells at low nanomolar-to-picomolar concentrations and diffuse at rates dependent on the membrane characteristics. These methods have also shown that oligomers grow or dissociate based on the presence of specific inhibitors or promoters and on the ratio of Aβ40 to Aβ42. Here, we discuss several types of single-molecule imaging that have been applied to the study of Aβ oligomers and their membrane interactions. We also summarize some of the recent insights SMM has provided into oligomer behavior in solution, on planar lipid membranes, and on living cell membranes. A brief overview of the current limitations of the technique, including the lack of sensitive assays for Aβ-induced toxicity, is included in hopes of inspiring future development in this area of research. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  5. Structural evolution and membrane interactions of Alzheimer's amyloid-beta peptide oligomers: New knowledge from single-molecule fluorescence studies

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robin D; Steel, Duncan G; Gafni, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Amyloidpeptide (Aβ) oligomers may represent the proximal neurotoxin in Alzheimer's disease. Single-molecule microscopy (SMM) techniques have recently emerged as a method for overcoming the innate difficulties of working with amyloid-β, including the peptide's low endogenous concentrations, the dynamic nature of its oligomeric states, and its heterogeneous and complex membrane interactions. SMM techniques have revealed that small oligomers of the peptide bind to model membranes and cells at low nanomolar-to-picomolar concentrations and diffuse at rates dependent on the membrane characteristics. These methods have also shown that oligomers grow or dissociate based on the presence of specific inhibitors or promoters and on the ratio of Aβ40 to Aβ42. Here, we discuss several types of single-molecule imaging that have been applied to the study of Aβ oligomers and their membrane interactions. We also summarize some of the recent insights SMM has provided into oligomer behavior in solution, on planar lipid membranes, and on living cell membranes. A brief overview of the current limitations of the technique, including the lack of sensitive assays for Aβ-induced toxicity, is included in hopes of inspiring future development in this area of research. PMID:24753305

  6. Effect of ionic strength on the aggregation kinetics of the amidated amyloid beta peptide Aβ (1-40) in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Campos-Ramírez, Adriana; Márquez, Maripaz; Quintanar, Liliana; Rojas-Ochoa, Luis F

    2017-09-01

    In this work we study the effect of solution ionic strength on the structural evolution of amidated amyloid beta peptide Aβ (1-40) oligomers at the early stages of fibril formation. By light scattering, we follow the time evolution of the structure and short-time dynamics of peptide structures at low ionic strengths. Our results allow identifying initial oligomer structures as the effective building blocks in the amyloid fibrils formation and indicate that the oligomers growth pathway, from compact structures to flexible chain-like structures, becomes faster as the solution ionic strength is increased. Furthermore, we find no evidence of structural branching what suggests that elongation of amyloid fibrils is dominated by linear association. To describe our results we adapt a phenomenological model based on population balance equations and linear polymer growth, where the parameters required are obtained from the experiments. Model calculations are in good agreement with experimentally-obtained estimates for the radius of gyration of Aβ (1-40) oligomers, thus further supporting our findings. Additionally, we introduce a model for the effective interaction among initial Aβ structures that captures the dependence of the effective association rates on solution ionic strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Amyloid Beta Peptides Affect Pregnenolone and Pregnenolone Sulfate Levels in PC-12 and SH-SY5Y Cells Depending on Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Calan, Ozlem Gursoy; Akan, Pinar; Cataler, Aysenur; Dogan, Cumhur; Kocturk, Semra

    2016-07-01

    Increased amyloid beta (AB) peptide concentration is one of the initiating factors in the neurodegeneration process. It has been suggested that cholesterol induces the synthesis of AB peptide from amyloid precursor protein or facilitates the formation of amyloid plaque by lowering the aggregation threshold of the peptide. It is also shown that AB peptides may affect cholesterol metabolism and the synthesis of steroid hormones such as progesterone and estradiol. Pregnenolone (P) and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are the major steroids produced from cholesterol in neural tissue. In toxicity conditions, the effect of AB peptides on P and PS levels has not yet been determined. Furthermore, it has not been clearly defined how changes in cellular P and PS levels affect neuronal cell survival. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of AB peptides on cellular changes in P and PS levels depending on the level of their main precursor, cholesterol. Cholesterol and toxic concentrations of AB fragments (AB 25-35, AB 1-40 and AB 1-42) were applied to PC-12 and SH-SY5Y cells. Changes in cellular cholesterol, P and PS levels were determined simultaneously in a dose-and time-dependent manner. The cell viability and cell death types were also evaluated. AB peptides affected both cell viability and P/PS levels. Steroid levels were altered depending on AB fragment type and the cholesterol content of the cells. Treatment with each of the AB fragments alone increased P levels by twofold. However, combined treatment with AB peptides and cholesterol increased P levels by approximately sixfold, while PS levels were increased only about 2.5 fold in both cell lines. P levels in the groups treated with AB 25-35 were higher than those in AB 1-40 and AB 1-42 groups. The cell viabilities were significantly low in the group treated by AB and cholesterol (9 mM). The effect of AB peptides on P levels might be a result of cellular self-defense. On the other hand, the rate of P increase

  8. Wild-type amyloid beta 1-40 peptide induces vascular smooth muscle cell death independently from matrix metalloprotease activity.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Régis; Mateo, Véronique; Rouxel, Clotilde; Zaccarini, François; Glorian, Martine; Béréziat, Gilbert; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Limon, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of intracerebral hemorrhages in the elderly, characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulating in central nervous system blood vessels. Within the vessel walls, Aβ-peptide deposits [composed mainly of wild-type (WT) Aβ(1-40) peptide in sporadic forms] induce impaired adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to the extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with their degeneration. This process often results in a loss of blood vessel wall integrity and ultimately translates into cerebral ischemia and microhemorrhages, both clinical features of CAA. In this study, we decipher the molecular mechanism of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-2 activation in WT-Aβ(1-40) -treated VSMC and provide evidence that MMP activity, although playing a critical role in cell detachment disrupting ECM components, is not involved in the WT-Aβ(1-40) -induced degeneration of VSMCs. Indeed, whereas this peptide clearly induced VSMC apoptosis, neither preventing MMP-2 activity nor hampering the expression of membrane type1-MMP, or preventing tissue inhibitors of MMPs-2 (TIMP-2) recruitment (two proteins evidenced here as involved in MMP-2 activation), reduced the number of dead cells. Even the use of broad-range MMP inhibitors (GM6001 and Batimastat) did not affect WT-Aβ(1-40) -induced cell apoptosis. Our results, in contrast to those obtained using the Aβ(1-40) Dutch variant suggesting a link between MMP-2 activity, VSMC mortality and degradation of specific matrix components, indicate that the ontogenesis of the Dutch familial and sporadic forms of CAAs is different. ECM degradation and VSMC degeneration would be tightly connected in the Dutch familial form while being two independent processes in sporadic forms of CAA.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance evidence for the dimer formation of beta amyloid peptide 1-42 in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol.

    PubMed

    Shigemitsu, Yoshiki; Iwaya, Naoko; Goda, Natsuko; Matsuzaki, Mizuki; Tenno, Takeshi; Narita, Akihiro; Hoshi, Minako; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease involves accumulation of senile plaques in which filamentous aggregates of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides are deposited. Recent studies demonstrate that oligomerization pathways of Aβ peptides may be complicated. To understand the mechanisms of Aβ(1-42) oligomer formation in more detail, we have established a method to produce (15)N-labeled Aβ(1-42) suited for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. For physicochemical studies, the starting protein material should be solely monomeric and all Aβ aggregates must be removed. Here, we succeeded in fractionating a "precipitation-resistant" fraction of Aβ(1-42) from an "aggregation-prone" fraction by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), even from bacterially overexpressed Aβ(1-42). However, both Aβ(1-42) fractions after 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) treatment formed amyloid fibrils. This indicates that the "aggregation seed" was not completely monomerized during HFIP treatment. In addition, Aβ(1-42) dissolved in HFIP was found to display a monomer-dimer equilibrium, as shown by two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N NMR. We demonstrated that the initial concentration of Aβ during the HFIP pretreatment altered the kinetic profiles of Aβ fibril formation in a thioflavin T fluorescence assay. The findings described here should ensure reproducible results when studying the Aβ(1-42) peptide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Amyloid beta-peptide impairs ion-motive ATPase activities: evidence for a role in loss of neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis and cell death.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Hensley, K; Butterfield, D A; Mattson, M P

    1995-09-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) that accumulates as insoluble plaques in the brain in Alzheimer's disease can be directly neurotoxic and can increase neuronal vulnerability to excitotoxic insults. The mechanism of A beta toxicity is unclear but is believed to involve generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of calcium homeostasis. We now report that exposure of cultured rat hippocampal neurons to A beta 1-40 or A beta 25-35 causes a selective reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity which precedes loss of calcium homeostasis and cell degeneration. Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity was reduced within 30 min of exposure to A beta 25-35 and declined to less than 40% of basal level by 3 hr. A beta did not impair other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Experiments with ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase, demonstrated that impairment of this enzyme was sufficient to induce an elevation of [Ca2+]i and neuronal injury. Impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity appeared to be causally involved in the elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity since suppression of Na+ influx significantly reduced A beta- and ouabain-induced [Ca2+]i elevation and neuronal death. Neuronal degeneration induced by ouabain appeared to be of an apoptotic form as indicated by nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The antioxidant free radical scavengers vitamin E and propylgallate significantly attenuated A beta-induced impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity, elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity, suggesting a role for ROS. Finally, exposure of synaptosomes from postmortem human hippocampus to A beta resulted in a significant and specific reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities, without affecting other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These data suggest that impairment of ion-motive ATPases may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Simple detection method of amyloid-beta peptide using p-FET with optical filtering layer and magnetic particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Chang-Beom; Song, Ki-Bong

    2013-05-01

    This article describes a novel method for detection of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide that utilizes a photo-sensitive field-effect transistor (p-FET). According to a recent study, Aβ protein is known to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, we investigated the variation of photo current of the p-FET generated by the magnetic beads conjugated with Aβ peptides which are placed on the p-FET sensing areas. Additionally, in order to amplify the output signal, we used the lock-in amplifier (LIA) and confirmed the generating the photo current by a small incident light power under 100 μW. It means that it is possible to simply detect a certain protein using magnetic beads conjugated with Aβ peptide and fluorescent label located on the p-FET device. Therefore, in this paper, we suggest that our method could detect tiny amounts of Aβ peptide for early diagnosis of AD using the p-FET devices.

  12. Amyloid beta 42 peptide (Aβ42)-lowering compounds directly bind to Aβ and interfere with amyloid precursor protein (APP) transmembrane dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Luise; Munter, Lisa-Marie; Ness, Julia; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Dasari, Muralidhar; Unterreitmeier, Stephanie; Bulic, Bruno; Beyermann, Michael; Gust, Ronald; Reif, Bernd; Weggen, Sascha; Langosch, Dieter; Multhaup, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    Following ectodomain shedding by β-secretase, successive proteolytic cleavages within the transmembrane sequence (TMS) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) catalyzed by γ-secretase result in the release of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides of variable length. Aβ peptides with 42 amino acids appear to be the key pathogenic species in Alzheimer’s disease, as they are believed to initiate neuronal degeneration. Sulindac sulfide, which is known as a potent γ-secretase modulator (GSM), selectively reduces Aβ42 production in favor of shorter Aβ species, such as Aβ38. By studying APP–TMS dimerization we previously showed that an attenuated interaction similarly decreased Aβ42 levels and concomitantly increased Aβ38 levels. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which GSMs modulate Aβ production is still unclear. In this study, using a reporter gene-based dimerization assay, we found that APP–TMS dimers are destabilized by sulindac sulfide and related Aβ42-lowering compounds in a concentration-dependent manner. By surface plasmon resonance analysis and NMR spectroscopy, we show that sulindac sulfide and novel sulindac-derived compounds directly bind to the Aβ sequence. Strikingly, the attenuated APP–TMS interaction by GSMs correlated strongly with Aβ42-lowering activity and binding strength to the Aβ sequence. Molecular docking analyses suggest that certain GSMs bind to the GxxxG dimerization motif in the APP–TMS. We conclude that these GSMs decrease Aβ42 levels by modulating APP–TMS interactions. This effect specifically emphasizes the importance of the dimeric APP–TMS as a promising drug target in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:20679249

  13. Changes in molecular isoform distribution of acetylcholinesterase in rat cortex and cerebrospinal fluid after intracerebroventricular administration of amyloid beta-peptide.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Valero, Javier; de Ceballos, María L; Small, David H; de Felipe, Carmen

    2002-06-14

    Previous studies have shown that an abnormal salt-soluble form of G(1) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is increased in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. The aim of the present study was to examine changes in AChE activity in an in vivo model of beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) administration. Rats received intracerebroventricular injections of A beta(25-35) (20 microg/day for seven days). Levels of AChE were measured in cerebral cortex and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after two months. A beta(25-35) administration did not alter total AChE activity in the cerebral cortex or CSF. However, analysis of salt-extractable AChE isoforms revealed an increase in the proportion of G(1) in both cortex and CSF, similar to that previously observed in AD patients. The results support the view that changes in AChE isoform pattern in the AD brain are a direct consequence of A beta accumulation.

  14. Characterization of new polyclonal antibodies specific for 40 and 42 amino acid-long amyloid beta peptides: their use to examine the cell biology of presenilins and the immunohistochemistry of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy cases.

    PubMed Central

    Barelli, H.; Lebeau, A.; Vizzavona, J.; Delaere, P.; Chevallier, N.; Drouot, C.; Marambaud, P.; Ancolio, K.; Buxbaum, J. D.; Khorkova, O.; Heroux, J.; Sahasrabudhe, S.; Martinez, J.; Warter, J. M.; Mohr, M.; Checler, F.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the main histological lesion is a proteinaceous deposit, the senile plaque, which is mainly composed of a peptide called A beta. The aggregation process is thought to occur through enhanced concentration of A beta 40 or increased production of the more readily aggregating 42 amino acid-long A beta 42 species. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Specificity of the antibodies was assessed by dot blot, Western blot, ELISA, and immunoprecipitation procedures on synthetic and endogenous A beta produced by secreted HK293 cells. A beta and p3 production by wild-type and mutated presenilin 1-expressing cells transiently transfected with beta APP751 was monitored after metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation procedures. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on brains of sporadic and typical cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy (CAA) cases. RESULTS: Dot and Western blot analyses indicate that IgG-purified fractions of antisera recognize native and denaturated A beta s. FCA3340 and FCA 3542 display full specificity for A beta 40 and A beta 42, respectively. Antibodies immunoprecipitate their respective synthetic A beta species but also A beta s and their related p3 counterparts endogenously secreted by transfected human kidney 293 cells. This allowed us to show that mutations on presenilin 1 triggered similar increased ratios of A beta 42 and its p 342 counterpart over total A beta and p3. ELISA assays allow detection of about 25-50 pg/ml of A beta s and remain linear up to 750 to 1500 pg/ml without any cross-reactivity. FCA18 and FCA3542 label diffuse and mature plaques of a sporadic AD case whereas FCA3340 only reveals the mature lesions and particularly labels their central dense core. In a CAA case, FCA18 and FCA3340 reveal leptomeningeal and cortical arterioles whereas FCA3542 only faintly labels such structures. CONCLUSIONS: Polyclonal antibodies exclusively recognizing A beta 40 (FCA 3340) or A beta 42 (FCA3542) were obtained. These

  15. The effect of tachykinin neuropeptides on amyloid {beta} aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Flashner, Efrat; Raviv, Uri; Friedler, Assaf

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanistic explanation of how tachykinin neuropeptides reduce A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity. {yields} Biophysical studies suggest that tachykinins do not modulate the distribution of A{beta} oligomeric states, but rather may incorporate into the fibrils. {yields} A possible strategy to inhibit toxicity of amyloid fibrils. -- Abstract: A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is production of amyloid {beta} peptides resulting from aberrant cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Amyloid {beta} assembles into fibrils under physiological conditions, through formation of neurotoxic intermediate oligomers. Tachykinin peptides are known to affect amyloid {beta} neurotoxicity in cells. To understand the mechanism of this effect, we studied how tachykinins affect A{beta}(1-40) aggregation in vitro. Fibrils grown in the presence of tachykinins exhibited reduced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, while their morphology, observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), did not alter. Cross linking studies revealed that the distribution of low molecular weight species was not affected by tachykinins. Our results suggest that there may be a specific interaction between tachykinins and A{beta}(1-40) that allows them to co-assemble. This effect may explain the reduction of A{beta}(1-40) neurotoxicity in cells treated with tachykinins.

  16. ACAT inhibition and amyloid beta reduction.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Raja; Kovacs, Dora M

    2010-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Accumulation and deposition of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide generated from its larger amyloid precursor protein (APP) is one of the pathophysiological hallmarks of AD. Intracellular cholesterol was shown to regulate Abeta production. Recent genetic and biochemical studies indicate that not only the amount, but also the distribution of intracellular cholesterol is critical to regulate Abeta generation. Acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyl-transferase (ACAT) is a family of enzymes that regulates the cellular distribution of cholesterol by converting membrane cholesterol into hydrophobic cholesteryl esters for cholesterol storage and transport. Using pharmacological inhibitors and transgenic animal models, we and others have identified ACAT1 as a potential therapeutic target to lower Abeta generation and accumulation. Here we discuss data focusing on ACAT inhibition as an effective strategy for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  17. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses the toxic effects of amyloid-beta peptide (25–35)☆

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Min; Ba, Maowen; Liang, Hui; Shao, Peng; Yu, Tianxia; Wang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we treated PC12 cells with 0–20 μM amyloidpeptide (25–35) for 24 hours to induce cytotoxicity, and found that 5–20 μM amyloidpeptide (25–35) decreased PC12 cell viability, but adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel activator diazoxide suppressed the decrease in PC12 cell viability induced by amyloidpeptide (25–35). Diazoxide protected PC12 cells against amyloidpeptide (25–35)-induced increases in mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels. These protective effects were reversed by the selective mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate. An inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine, also protected PC12 cells from amyloidpeptide (25–35)-induced increases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels. However, the H2O2-degrading enzyme catalase could not reverse the amyloidpeptide (25–35)-induced increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species. A 24-hour exposure to amyloidpeptide (25–35) did not result in apoptosis or necrosis, suggesting that the increases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species levels preceded cell death. The data suggest that amyloidpeptide (25–35) cytotoxicity is associated with adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels and nitric oxide. Regulation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels suppresses PC12 cell cytotoxicity induced by amyloidpeptide (25–35). PMID:25206372

  18. Laser-induced propagation and destruction of amyloid beta fibrils.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisashi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Toru; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-06-18

    The amyloid deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD). Preventing the formation of amyloid deposits and removing preformed fibrils in tissues are important therapeutic strategies against AD. Previously, we reported the destruction of amyloid fibrils of beta(2)-microglobulin K3 fragments by laser irradiation coupled with the binding of amyloid-specific thioflavin T. Here, we studied the effects of a laser beam on Abeta fibrils. As was the case for K3 fibrils, extensive irradiation destroyed the preformed Abeta fibrils. However, irradiation during spontaneous fibril formation resulted in only the partial destruction of growing fibrils and a subsequent explosive propagation of fibrils. The explosive propagation was caused by an increase in the number of active ends due to breakage. The results not only reveal a case of fragmentation-induced propagation of fibrils but also provide insights into therapeutic strategies for AD.

  19. Induction of sestrin2 as an endogenous protective mechanism against amyloid beta-peptide neurotoxicity in primary cortical culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Chen, Shang-Der; Wu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Yang, Ding-I

    2014-03-01

    Accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in senile plaques, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been implicated in neurodegeneration. Recent studies suggested sestrin2 as a crucial mediator for reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and autophagy regulation that both play a pivotal role in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases. However, the potential link between sestrin2 and Aβ neurotoxicity has never been explored. The present study was therefore undertaken to test whether sestrin2 may be induced by Aβ and its possible role in modulating Aβ neurotoxicity. We showed that sestrin2 expression was elevated in primary rat cortical neurons upon Aβ exposure; a heightened extent of sestrin2 expression was also detected in the cortices of 12-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9 transgenic mice. Exposure of cortical neurons to Aβ led to formation of LC3B-II, an autophagic marker; an increased LC3B-II level was also observed in the cortices of 12-month-old AD transgenic mice. More importantly, downregulation of sestrin2 by siRNA abolished LC3B-II formation caused by Aβ that was accompanied by more severe neuronal death. Inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 also enhanced Aβ neurotoxicity. Together, these results indicate that sestrin2 induced by Aβ plays a protective role against Aβ neurotoxicity through, at least in part, regulation of autophagy.

  20. Intravenous immunoglobulin protects neurons against amyloid beta-peptide toxicity and ischemic stroke by attenuating multiple cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Widiapradja, Alexander; Vegh, Viktor; Lok, Ker Zhing; Manzanero, Silvia; Thundyil, John; Gelderblom, Mathias; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Pavlovski, Dale; Tang, Sung-Chun; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Magnus, Tim; Chan, Sic L; Sobey, Christopher G; Reutens, David; Basta, Milan; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2012-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) preparations obtained by fractionating blood plasma, are increasingly being used increasingly as an effective therapeutic agent in treatment of several inflammatory diseases. Its use as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of stroke and Alzheimer's disease has been proposed, but little is known about the neuroprotective mechanisms of IVIg. In this study, we investigated the effect of IVIg on downstream signaling pathways that are involved in neuronal cell death in experimental models of stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Treatment of cultured neurons with IVIg reduced simulated ischemia- and amyloid βpeptide (Aβ)-induced caspase 3 cleavage, and phosphorylation of the cell death-associated kinases p38MAPK, c-Jun NH2 -terminal kinase and p65, in vitro. Additionally, Aβ-induced accumulation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal was attenuated in neurons treated with IVIg. IVIg treatment also up-regulated the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl2 in cortical neurons under ischemia-like conditions and exposure to Aβ. Treatment of mice with IVIg reduced neuronal cell loss, apoptosis and infarct size, and improved functional outcome in a model of focal ischemic stroke. Together, these results indicate that IVIg acts directly on neurons to protect them against ischemic stroke and Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis by inhibiting cell death pathways and by elevating levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2.

  1. Accumulation of Exogenous Amyloid-Beta Peptide in Hippocampal Mitochondria Causes Their Dysfunction: A Protective Role for Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Acuna-Castroviejo, Dario; Tan, Dun Xian; López-Armas, Gabriela; Cruz-Ramos, José; Munoz, Rubén; Melnikov, Valery G.; Manchester, Lucien C.; Reiter, Russel J.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) pathology is related to mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by energy reduction and an elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Monomers and oligomers of Aβ have been found inside mitochondria where they accumulate in a time-dependent manner as demonstrated in transgenic mice and in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. We hypothesize that the internalization of extracellular Aβ aggregates is the major cause of mitochondrial damage and here we report that following the injection of fibrillar Aβ into the hippocampus, there is severe axonal damage which is accompanied by the entrance of Aβ into the cell. Thereafter, Aβ appears in mitochondria where it is linked to alterations in the ionic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. This effect is accompanied by disruption of subcellular structure, oxidative stress, and a significant reduction in both the respiratory control ratio and in the hydrolytic activity of ATPase. Orally administrated melatonin reduced oxidative stress, improved the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio, and ameliorated the energy imbalance. PMID:22666521

  2. beta-Amyloid1-40 increases expression of beta-amyloid precursor protein in neuronal hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Le, W; Xie, W J; Nyormoi, O; Ho, B K; Smith, R G; Appel, S H

    1995-11-01

    Studies of cell injury and death in Alzheimer's disease have suggested a prominent role for beta-amyloid peptide (beta-AP), a 40-43-amino-acid peptide derived from a larger membrane glycoprotein, beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP). Previous experiments have demonstrated that beta-AP induces cytotoxicity in a neuronal hybrid cell line (MES 23.5) in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that beta-APP mRNA content is increased 3.5-fold in 24 h after treatment with beta-AP1-40. Accompanying beta-AP1-40-induced cell injury, levels of cell-associated beta-APP and a C-terminal intermediate fragment are increased up to 15-fold, and levels of secreted forms of beta-APP and 12- and 4-kDa fragments are also increased. Application of beta-APP antisense oligodeoxynucleotide reduces both cytotoxicity and beta-APP expression. 6-Hydroxydopamine application or glucose deprivation causes extensive cell damage, but they do not increase beta-APP expression. These results suggest a selective positive feedback mechanism whereby beta-AP may induce cytotoxicity and increase levels of potentially neurotrophic as well as amyloidogenic fragments of beta-APP with the net consequence of further neuronal damage.

  3. Effect of metal chelators on the aggregation of beta-amyloid peptides in the presence of copper and iron.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebinia, Foozhan; Emadi, Saeed

    2017-04-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils and amorphous aggregates are found in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and are implicated in the etiology of AD. The metal imbalance is also among leading causes of AD, owing to the fact that Aβ aggregation takes place in the synaptic cleft where Aβ, Cu(II) and Fe(III) are found in abnormally high concentrations. Aβ40 and Aβ42 are the main components of plaques found in afflicted brains. Coordination of Cu(II) and Fe(III) ions to Aβ peptides have been linked to Aβ aggregation and production of reactive oxygen species, two key events in the development of AD pathology. Metal chelation was proposed as a therapy for AD on the basis that it might prevent Aβ aggregation. In this work, we first examined the formation of Aβ40 and Aβ42 aggregates in the presence of metal ions, i.e. Fe(III) and Cu(II), which were detected by fluorescence spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Second, we studied the ability of the two chelators, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline (clioquinol), to investigate their effect on the availability of these metal ions to interact with Aβ and thereby their effect on Aβ accumulation. Our findings show that Fe(III), but not Cu(II), promote aggregation of both Aβ40 and Aβ42. We also found that only clioquinol decreased significantly iron ion-induced aggregation of Aβ42. The presence of ions and/or chelators also affected the morphology of Aβ aggregates.

  4. Proposal for novel curcumin derivatives as potent inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease: Ab initio molecular simulations on the specific interactions between amyloid-beta peptide and curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Shintaro; Fujimori, Mitsuki; Ishimura, Hiromi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain is closely related with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, we propose novel curcumin derivatives and investigate their binding properties with the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations. Our proposed derivative (curcumin XIV) is found to have a large binding energy with APP and interacts strongly with the cleavage site Ala19 by secretase. It is thus expected that curcumin XIV can protect APP from the secretase attack and be a potent inhibitor against the production of Aβ peptides.

  5. Cysteine Cathepsins in the Secretory Vesicle Produce Active Peptides: Cathepsin L Generates Peptide Neurotransmitters and Cathepsin B Produces Beta-Amyloid of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Vivian; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Wegrzyn, Jill; Bark, Steven; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Recent new findings indicate significant biological roles of cysteine cathepsin proteases in secretory vesicles for production of biologically active peptides. Notably, cathepsin L in secretory vesicles has been demonstrated as a key protease for proteolytic processing of proneuropeptides (and prohormones) into active neuropeptides that are released to mediate cell-cell communication in the nervous system for neurotransmission. Moreover, cathepsin B in secretory vesicles has been recently identified as a β-secretase for production of neurotoxic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), participating as a notable factor in the severe memory loss in AD. These secretory vesicle functions of cathepsins L and B for production of biologically active peptides contrasts with the well-known role of cathepsin proteases in lysosomes for the degradation of proteins to result in their inactivation. The unique secretory vesicle proteome indicates proteins of distinct functional categories that provide the intravesicular environment for support of cysteine cathepsin function. Features of the secretory vesicle protein systems insure optimized intravesicular conditions that support the proteolytic activity of cathepsins. These new findings of recently discovered biological roles of cathepsins L and B indicate their significance in human health and disease. PMID:21925292

  6. [Preventive action of nobiletin, a constituent of AURANTII NOBILIS PERICARPIUM with anti-dementia activity, against amyloid-beta peptide-induced neurotoxicity expression and memory impairment].

    PubMed

    Yamakuni, Tohru; Nakajima, Akira; Ohizumi, Yasushi

    2010-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become a major health burden to society. However, no fundamentally therapeutic drugs for AD have been developed. Increasing evidence suggests that the elevation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in the brain is central to AD pathogenesis. Recently, in the course of our survey of substances having anti-dementia activity from natural resources, we have successfully found nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone contained in AURANTII NOBILIS PERICARPIUM which is a component of traditional Chinese medicines. In this review, we describe the beneficial effects of nobiletin on memory impairment and Abeta pathology in a transgenic mouse model introduced human "Swedish" and "London" mutant amyloid precursor protein. We also note the possible molecular mechanism underlying the protective action against Abeta-induced memory impairment provided by our studies using cultured hippocampal neurons. Namely, daily administration of nobiletin for four months rescued the memory impairment in fear conditioning, and decreased hippocampal Abeta deposit in the transgenic mice as analyzed by immunohistochemistry. PKA-dependent signaling and membrane trafficking of AMPA receptor subunit, GluR1, which are known to be required for long-term potentiation (LTP), have been demonstrated to be inhibited by a sublethal concentration of Abeta in cultured hippocampal neurons. Our in vitro studies evidently showed that a sublethal concentration of Abeta actually inhibited glutamate-induced increases in both PKA substrates phosphorylation and GluR1 membrane trafficking in cultured hippocampal neurons, whereas nobiletin reversed the Abeta-induced inhibition of such biochemical processes. The natural compound with these unique actions has thus potential to become a novel drug for fundamental treatment of AD.

  7. Chronic treatment with the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411,575 inhibits beta-amyloid peptide production and alters lymphopoiesis and intestinal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gwendolyn T; Manfra, Denise; Poulet, Frederique M; Zhang, Qi; Josien, Hubert; Bara, Thomas; Engstrom, Laura; Pinzon-Ortiz, Maria; Fine, Jay S; Lee, Hu-Jung J; Zhang, Lili; Higgins, Guy A; Parker, Eric M

    2004-03-26

    Inhibition of gamma-secretase, one of the enzymes responsible for the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) to produce the pathogenic beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides, is an attractive approach to the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In addition to APP, however, several other gamma-secretase substrates have been identified (e.g. Notch), and altered processing of these substrates by gamma-secretase inhibitors could lead to unintended biological consequences. To study the in vivo consequences of gamma-secretase inhibition, the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411,575 was administered to C57BL/6 and TgCRND8 APP transgenic mice for 15 days. Although most tissues were unaffected, doses of LY-411,575 that inhibited Abeta production had marked effects on lymphocyte development and on the intestine. LY-411,575 decreased overall thymic cellularity and impaired intrathymic differentiation at the CD4(-)CD8(-)CD44(+)CD25(+) precursor stage. No effects on peripheral T cell populations were noted following LY-411,575 treatment, but evidence for the altered maturation of peripheral B cells was observed. In the intestine, LY-411,575 treatment increased goblet cell number and drastically altered tissue morphology. These effects of LY-411,575 were not seen in mice that were administered LY-D, a diastereoisomer of LY-411,575, which is a very weak gamma-secretase inhibitor. These studies show that inhibition of gamma-secretase has the expected benefit of reducing Abeta in a murine model of Alzheimer disease but has potentially undesirable biological effects as well, most likely because of the inhibition of Notch processing.

  8. Selective intracellular release of copper and zinc ions from bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes reduces levels of Alzheimer disease amyloid-beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Paul S; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Du, Tai; Laughton, Katrina M; Volitakis, Irene; Cherny, Robert A; Sharples, Robyn A; Hill, Andrew F; Li, Qiao-Xin; Masters, Colin L; Barnham, Kevin J; White, Anthony R

    2008-02-22

    Copper and zinc play important roles in Alzheimer disease pathology with recent reports describing potential therapeutics based on modulation of metal bioavailability. We examined the ability of a range of metal bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes (MII(btsc), where M=CuII or ZnII) to increase intracellular metal levels in Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP-CHO) and the subsequent effect on extracellular levels of amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta). The CuII(btsc) complexes were engineered to be either stable to both a change in oxidation state and dissociation of metal or susceptible to intracellular reduction and dissociation of metal. Treatment of APP-CHO cells with stable complexes resulted in elevated levels of intracellular copper with no effect on the detected levels of Abeta. Treatment with complexes susceptible to intracellular reduction increased intracellular copper levels but also resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the levels of monomeric Abeta. Treatment with less stable ZnII(btsc) complexes increased intracellular zinc levels with a subsequent dose-dependent depletion of monomeric Abeta levels. The increased levels of intracellular bioavailable copper and zinc initiated a signaling cascade involving activation of phosphoinositol 3-kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Inhibition of these enzymes prevented Abeta depletion induced by the MII(btsc) complexes. Inhibition of metalloproteases also partially restored Abeta levels, implicating metal-driven metalloprotease activation in the extracellular monomeric Abeta depletion. However, a role for alternative metal-induced Abeta metabolism has not been ruled out. These studies demonstrate that MII(btsc) complexes have potential for Alzheimer disease therapy.

  9. Neurorescue activity, APP regulation and amyloid-beta peptide reduction by novel multi-functional brain permeable iron- chelating- antioxidants, M-30 and green tea polyphenol, EGCG.

    PubMed

    Avramovich-Tirosh, Yael; Reznichenko, Lydia; Mit, Tamar; Zheng, Hailin; Fridkin, Mati; Weinreb, Orly; Mandel, Silvia; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2007-09-01

    Accumulation of iron at sites where neurons degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to have a major role in oxidative stress induced process of neurodegeneration. The novel non-toxic lipophilic brain- permeable iron chelators, VK-28 (5- [4- (2- hydroxyethyl) piperazine-1-ylmethyl]- quinoline- 8- ol) and its multi-functional derivative, M-30 (5-[N-methyl-N-propargylaminomethyl]-8-hydroxyquinoline), as well as the main polyphenol constituent of green tea (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which possesses iron metal chelating, radical scavenging and neuroprotective properties, offer potential therapeutic benefits for these diseases. M-30 and EGCG decreased apoptosis of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells in a neurorescue, serum deprivation model, via multiple protection mechanisms including: reduction of the pro-apoptotic proteins, Bad and Bax, reduction of apoptosis-associated Ser139 phosphorylated H2A.X and inhibition of the cleavage and activation of caspase-3. M-30 and EGCG also promoted morphological changes, resulting in axonal growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) implicating neuronal differentiation. Both compounds significantly reduced the levels of cellular holo-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in SH-SY5Y cells. The ability of theses novel iron chelators and EGCG to regulate APP are in line with the presence of an iron-responsive element (IRE) in the 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) of APP. Also, EGCG reduced the levels of toxic amyloid-beta peptides in CHO cells over-expressing the APP "Swedish" mutation. The diverse molecular mechanisms and cell signaling pathways participating in the neuroprotective/neurorescue and APP regulation/processing actions of M-30 and EGCG, make these multifunctional compounds potential neuroprotective drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD, AD, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  10. IgG-assisted age-dependent clearance of Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide by the blood-brain barrier neonatal Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Deane, Rashid; Sagare, Abhay; Hamm, Katie; Parisi, Margaret; LaRue, Barbra; Guo, Huang; Wu, Zhenhua; Holtzman, David M; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2005-12-14

    The role of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport in clearance of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) by Abeta immunotherapy is not fully understood. To address this issue, we studied the effects of peripherally and centrally administered Abeta-specific IgG on BBB influx of circulating Abeta and efflux of brain-derived Abeta in APPsw(+/-) mice, a model that develops Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology, and wild-type mice. Our data show that anti-Abeta IgG blocks the BBB influx of circulating Abeta in APPsw(+/-) mice and penetrates into the brain to sequester brain Abeta. In young mice, Abeta-anti-Abeta complexes were cleared from brain to blood by transcytosis across the BBB via the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), whereas in older mice, there was an age-dependent increase in FcRn-mediated IgG-assisted Abeta BBB efflux and a decrease in LRP-mediated clearance of Abeta-anti-Abeta complexes. Inhibition of the FcRn pathway in older APPsw(+/-) mice blocked clearance of endogenous Abeta40/42 by centrally administered Abeta immunotherapy. Moreover, deletion of the FcRn gene in wild-type mice inhibited clearance of endogenous mouse Abeta40/42 by systemically administered anti-Abeta. Our data suggest that the FcRn pathway at the BBB plays a crucial role in IgG-assisted Abeta removal from the aging brain.

  11. Pyroglutamate formation influences solubility and amyloidogenicity of amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Schlenzig, Dagmar; Manhart, Susanne; Cinar, Yeliz; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Hause, Gerd; Willbold, Dieter; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-07-28

    N-Terminally truncated and pyroglutamate (pGlu) modified amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides are major constituents of amyloid deposits in sporadic and inherited Alzheimer's disease (AD). Formation of pGlu at the N-terminus confers resistance against cleavage by most aminopeptidases, increases toxicity of the peptides, and may seed Abeta aggregate formation. Similarly, the deposited amyloid peptides ABri and ADan, which cause a very similar histopathology in familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are N-terminally blocked by pGlu. Triggered by the coincidence of pGlu-modified amyloid peptides and similar pathology in AD, FBD, and FDD, we investigated the impact of N-terminal pGlu on biochemical and biophysical properties of Abeta, ABri, and ADan. N-Terminal pGlu increases the hydrophobicity and changes the pH-dependent solubility profile, rendering the pGlu-modified peptides less soluble in the basic pH range. The pGlu residue increases the aggregation propensity of all amyloid peptides as evidenced by ThT fluorescence assays and dynamic light scattering. The far-UV CD spectroscopic analysis points toward an enhanced beta-sheet structure of the pGlu-Abeta. Importantly, changes in fibril morphology are clearly caused by the N-terminal pGlu, resulting in the formation of short fibers, which are frequently arranged in bundles. The effect of pGlu on the morphology is virtually indistinguishable between ABri, ADan, and Abeta. The data provide evidence for a comparable influence of the pGlu modification on the aggregation process of structurally different amyloid peptides, thus likely contributing to the molecularly distinct neurodegenerative diseases AD, FBD, and FDD. The main driving force for the aggregation is apparently an increase in the hydrophobicity and thus an accelerated seed formation.

  12. Thermodynamics and dynamics of amyloid peptide oligomerization are sequence dependent.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Guo, Zhi; Mousseau, Normand; Wei, Guanghong

    2009-06-01

    Aggregation of the full-length amyloid-beta (Abeta) and beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) proteins is associated with Alzheimer's disease and dialysis-related amyloidosis, respectively. This assembly process is not restricted to full-length proteins, however, many short peptides also assemble into amyloid fibrils in vitro. Remarkably, the kinetics of amyloid-fibril formation of all these molecules is generally described by a nucleation-polymerization process characterized by a lag phase associated with the formation of a nucleus, after which fibril elongation occurs rapidly. In this study, we report using long molecular dynamics simulations with the OPEP coarse-grained force field, the thermodynamics and dynamics of the octamerization for two amyloid 7-residue peptides: the beta2m83-89 NHVTLSQ and Abeta16-22 KLVFFAE fragments. Based on multiple trajectories run at 310 K, totaling 2.2 mus (beta2m83-89) and 4.8 mus (Abeta16-22) and starting from random configurations and orientations of the chains, we find that the two peptides not only share common but also very different aggregation properties. Notably, an increase in the hydrophobic character of the peptide, as observed in Abeta16-22 with respect to beta2m83-89 impacts the thermodynamics by reducing the population of bilayer beta-sheet assemblies. Higher hydrophobicity is also found to slow down the dynamics of beta-sheet formation by enhancing the averaged lifetime of all configuration types (CT) and by reducing the complexity of the CT transition probability matrix. Proteins 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. The pathological cross talk between apolipoprotein E and amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer's disease: emerging gene-based therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Iurescia, Sandra; Fioretti, Daniela; Mangialasche, Francesca; Rinaldi, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays a key role in lipid transport in the plasma and in the central nervous system through its interaction with members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family. The three common isoforms of ApoE (ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4) differ in their ability to perform neuronal maintenance and repair functions and differentially affect the risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders. The ApoE4 isoform is a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Up-to-date knowledge about the structural and biophysical features of ApoE4 shed light on the molecular basis underlying the isoform-specific pathogenic role of ApoE4 and its contribution to AD pathology through several different mechanisms. ApoE4 impacts on amyloid-beta (Abeta) production, Abeta clearance, Abeta fibrillation, and tangle formation as well as on mitochondrial functions leading to neuronal toxicity and synaptic damage. This review summarizes the pathological cross talk between ApoE and Abeta peptide in Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we examine emerging gene-based therapeutic approaches encompassing the use of ApoE and their potential opportunities to preventing or treating Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  15. In vivo oxidative stress in brain of Alzheimer disease transgenic mice: Requirement for methionine 35 in amyloid beta-peptide of APP.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D Allan; Galvan, Veronica; Lange, Miranda Bader; Tang, Huidong; Sowell, Renã A; Spilman, Patricia; Fombonne, Joanna; Gorostiza, Olivia; Zhang, Junli; Sultana, Rukhsana; Bredesen, Dale E

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated oxidative damage in the central nervous system in subjects with Alzheimer disease and in animal models of this dementing disorder. In this study, we show that transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer disease-PDAPP mice with Swedish and Indiana mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein (APP)-develop oxidative damage in brain, including elevated levels of protein oxidation (indexed by protein carbonyls and 3-nitrotyrosine) and lipid peroxidation (indexed by protein-bound 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal). This oxidative damage requires the presence of a single methionine residue at position 35 of the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), because all indices of oxidative damage in brain were completely prevented in genetically and age-matched PDAPP mice with an M631L mutation in APP. No significant differences in the levels of APP, Abeta(1-42), and Abeta(1-40) or in the ratio Abeta(1-42)/Abeta(1-40) were found, suggesting that the loss of oxidative stress in vivo in the brain of PDAPP(M631L) mice results solely from the mutation of the Met35 residue to Leu in the Abeta peptide. However, a marked reduction in Abeta-immunoreactive plaques was observed in the M631L mice, which instead displayed small punctate areas of nonplaque immunoreactivity and a microglial response. In contrast to the requirement for Met at residue 35 of the Abeta sequence (M631 of APP) for oxidative damage, indices of spatial learning and memory were not significantly improved by the M631L substitution. Furthermore, a genetically matched line with a different mutation-PDAPP(D664A)-showed the reverse: no reduction in oxidative damage but marked improvement in memory. This is the first in vivo study to demonstrate the requirement for Abeta residue Met35 for oxidative stress in the brain of a mammalian model of Alzheimer disease. However, in this specific transgenic mouse model of AD, oxidative stress is neither required nor sufficient for memory abnormalities. Copyright 2009 Elsevier

  16. Different configurational states of beta-amyloid and their distributions relative to plaques and tangles in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Spillantini, M G; Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Klug, A

    1990-01-01

    Antibodies have been raised against synthetic peptides corresponding to different parts of the beta-amyloid sequence. These antibodies stain different kinds of amyloid distributions in the hippocampal formation in Alzheimer disease, suggesting the existence of different states of aggregation and/or folding of beta-amyloid molecules. An antibody directed against the middle region of beta-amyloid stained mostly amyloid plaques without cores, whereas an antibody directed against the carboxyl-terminal region of beta-amyloid stained only amyloid plaques with cores. An antiserum directed against the amino terminus of beta-amyloid stained numerous tangle-bearing cells and bodies, as well as the neuritic component of plaques and neuropil threads. These antibodies, in conjunction with anti-tau antibodies, were used to demonstrate a close spatial relationship between amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles. Images PMID:2111023

  17. Evidence for Novel [beta]-Sheet Structures in Iowa Mutant [beta]-Amyloid Fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Meredith, Stephen C.

    2009-07-24

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of {beta}-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-A{beta}40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1} and 1.07 x 10{sup -4} min{sup -1} for D23N-A{beta}40 and the wild-type peptide WT-A{beta}40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-{beta} pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 {angstrom} and a broad reflection at 9.4 {angstrom}, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-A{beta}40 fibrils (10.4 {angstrom}). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel {beta}-sheet structure commonly found in WT-A{beta}40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel {beta}-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through 13C-13C and 15N-13C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  18. Ferulic acid destabilizes preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-10-21

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that curcumin (Cur) inhibits fA{beta} formation from A{beta} and destabilizes preformed fA{beta} in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of ferulic acid (FA) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of FA with Cur, rifampicin, and tetracycline. Ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-peptide, as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. The overall activity of the molecules examined was in the order of: Cur > FA > rifampicin = tetracycline. FA could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  19. Effect of chloroquine and leupeptin on intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta (A beta) 1-42 peptide in a murine N9 microglial cell line.

    PubMed

    Chu, T; Tran, T; Yang, F; Beech, W; Cole, G M; Frautschy, S A

    1998-10-09

    Murine N9 microglia accumulated A beta from media containing 0.67 microM A beta within 6 h. In N9 and in primary rat microglia, chloroquine, which disrupts lysosomal pH, increased A beta-induced accumulation of A beta, particularly A beta1-42. Leupeptin similarly enhanced A beta accumulation. The scavenger receptor antagonist fucoidan did not affect acute chloroquine-dependent A beta1-42 accumulation, demonstrating uptake of non-aggregated A beta. After prolonged incubations, chloroquine enhanced A beta multimer (8-12 kDa) accumulation, an effect inhibited by fucoidan. Disruptions of the lysosomal system enhance A beta and its multimer formation. Despite negligible effects of fucoidan on initial A beta uptake, chronic exposure inhibits multimer accumulation, demonstrating a role for scavenger receptor in multimer accumulation.

  20. Amyloid-beta aggregation: selective inhibition of aggregation in mixtures of amyloid with different chain lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, S W; Ladror, U S; Wade, W S; Wang, G T; Barrett, L W; Matayoshi, E D; Huffaker, H J; Krafft, G A; Holzman, T F

    1994-01-01

    One of the clinical manifestations of Alzheimer's disease is the deposition of the 39-43 residue amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide in aggregated fibrils in senile plaques. Characterization of the aggregation behavior of A beta is one of the critical issues in understanding the role of A beta in the disease process. Using solution hydrodynamics, A beta was observed to form three types of species in phosphate-buffered saline: insoluble aggregates with sedimentation coefficients of approximately 50,000 S and molecular masses of approximately 10(9) Da, "soluble aggregates" with sedimentation coefficients of approximately 30 S and masses of approximately 10(6) Da, and monomer. When starting from monomer, the aggregation kinetics of A beta 1-40 (A beta 40) and A beta 1-42 (A beta 42), alone and in combination, reveal large differences in the tendency of these peptides to aggregate as a function of pH and other solution conditions. At pH 4.1 and 7.0-7.4, aggregation is significantly slower than at pH 5 and 6. Under all conditions, aggregation of the longer A beta 42 was more rapid than A beta 40. Oxidation of Met-35 to the sulfoxide in A beta 40 enhances the aggregation rate over that of the nonoxidized peptide. Aggregation was found to be dependent upon temperature and to be strongly dependent on peptide concentration and ionic strength, indicating that aggregation is driven by a hydrophobic effect. When A beta 40 and A beta 42 are mixed together, A beta 40 retards the aggregation of A beta 42 in a concentration-dependent manner. Shorter fragments have a decreasing ability to interfere with A beta 42 aggregation. Conversely, the rate of aggregation of A beta 40 can be significantly enhanced by seeding slow aggregating solutions with preformed aggregates of A beta 42. Taken together, the inhibition of A beta 42 aggregation by A beta 40, the seeding of A beta 40 aggregation by A beta 42 aggregates, and the chemical oxidation of A beta 40 suggest that the relative abundance and

  1. Degradation of soluble amyloid beta-peptides 1-40, 1-42, and the Dutch variant 1-40Q by insulin degrading enzyme from Alzheimer disease and control brains.

    PubMed

    Pérez, A; Morelli, L; Cresto, J C; Castaño, E M

    2000-02-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is a metalloprotease that has been involved in amyloid beta peptide (A(beta)) degradation in the brain. We analyzed the ability of human brain soluble fraction to degrade A(beta) analogs 1-40, 1-42 and the Dutch variant 1-40Q at physiological concentrations (1 nM). The rate of synthetic 125I-A(beta) degradation was similar among the A(beta) analogs, as demonstrated by trichloroacetic acid precipitation and SDS-PAGE. A 110 kDa protein, corresponding to the molecular mass of IDE, was affinity labeled with either 125I-insulin, 125I-Abeta 1-40 or 125I-A(beta) 1-42 and both A(beta) degradation and cross-linking were specifically inhibited by an excess of each peptide. Sensitivity to inhibitors was consistent with the reported inhibitor profile of IDE. Taken together, these results suggested that the degradation of A(beta) analogs was due to IDE or a closely related protease. The apparent Km, as determined using partially purified IDE from rat liver, were 2.2 +/- 0.4, 2.0 +/- 0.1 and 2.3 +/- 0.3 microM for A(beta) 1-40, A(beta) 1-42 and A(beta) 1-40Q, respectively. Comparison of IDE activity from seven AD brain cytosolic fractions and six age-matched controls revealed a significant decrease in A(beta) degrading activity in the first group, supporting the hypothesis that a reduced IDE activity may contribute to A(beta) accumulation in the brain.

  2. Effect of flavonoids rich extract of Capparis spinosa on inflammatory involved genes in amyloid-beta peptide injected rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mohebali, Nazanin; Shahzadeh Fazeli, Seyed Abolhassan; Ghafoori, Hossein; Farahmand, Zeinab; MohammadKhani, Elham; Vakhshiteh, Faezeh; Ghamarian, Abdolreza; Farhangniya, Mansoureh; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-10-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common forms of neurodegenerative diseases. Despite vast ongoing researches focusing on the area, little is known about novel treatments. In this study, we aimed to survey the effects of Capparis spinosa (C. spinosa) extract on amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ)-injected rat. For this purpose, hydroalcoholic extracts of caper leaf and fruit were prepared. Total phenolic content, DPPH, and FRAP assay were accomplished to determine antioxidant activity of C. spinosa. HPLC analysis was conducted to measure rutin and quercetin content of selected parts of the plant. Higher levels of flavonoids were observed in leaves of the plant. Twelve male Wistar Aβ-induced rats were randomly divided in four groups of (1) Aβ(-)/DW(+): Sham-operated group (2) Aβ(+)/DW(+): Aβ-injected group (3) Aβ(+)/RU(+): Standard rutin treatment (4) Aβ(+)/CS(+): C. spinosa extract treatment. After 6 weeks of oral administration, real-time qPCR were conducted to determine APP, BACE-1, PSEN-1, and PSEN-2 genes expression in the hippocampus of rats. HPLC analysis showed high levels of rutin and quercetin in leaves of Capparis. Rutin was 16939.2 ± 0.01 and quercetin was 908.93 ± 0.01 µg/g fresh weight. In fruit, 1019.52 ± 0.01 rutin and 97.86 ± 0.01 µg/g FW quercetin were measured. Expression of BACE-1, APP, PSEN-1, and PSEN-2 genes in comparison with the control group showed significant down regulation. Results of the study demonstrated that C. spinosa has the potential to down regulate inflammation-involved genes in AD, due to its high levels of flavonoids and could be beneficial as a dietary complement in AD patients.

  3. The ability of apolipoprotein E fragments to promote intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid beta peptide 42 is both isoform and size-specific

    PubMed Central

    Dafnis, Ioannis; Argyri, Letta; Sagnou, Marina; Tzinia, Athina; Tsilibary, Effie C.; Stratikos, Efstratios; Chroni, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein (apo) E4 isoform is the strongest risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). ApoE4 is more susceptible to proteolysis than apoE2 and apoE3 isoforms and carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms have been found in AD patients’ brain. We have previously shown that a specific apoE4 fragment, apoE4-165, promotes amyloid-peptide beta 42 (Aβ42) accumulation in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species formation, two events considered to occur early in AD pathogenesis. Here, we show that these effects are allele-dependent and absolutely require the apoE4 background. Furthermore, the exact length of the fragment is critical since longer or shorter length carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms do not elicit the same effects. Structural and thermodynamic analyses showed that apoE4-165 has a compact structure, in contrast to other carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms that are instead destabilized. Compared however to other allelic backgrounds, apoE4-165 is structurally distinct and less thermodynamically stable suggesting that the combination of a well-folded structure with structural plasticity is a unique characteristic of this fragment. Overall, our findings suggest that the ability of apoE fragments to promote Aβ42 intraneuronal accumulation is specific for both the apoE4 isoform and the particular structural and thermodynamic properties of the fragment. PMID:27476701

  4. Histamine H3 Inverse Agonist BF 2649 or Antagonist with Partial H4 Agonist Activity Clobenpropit Reduces Amyloid Beta Peptide-Induced Brain Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Ranjana; Sharma, Aruna; Skaper, Stephen D; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José Vicente; Castellani, Rudy J; Nozari, Ala; Sharma, Hari S

    2017-08-31

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the leading causes for disability and death affecting millions of people worldwide. Thus, novel therapeutic strategies are needed to reduce brain pathology associated with AD. In view of increasing awareness regarding involvement of histaminergic pathways in AD, we explored the role of one H3 receptor inverse agonist BF 2649 and one selective H3 receptor antagonist with partial H4 agonist activity in amyloid beta peptide (AβP) infusion-induced brain pathology in a rat model. AD-like pathology was produced by administering AβP (1-40) intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) in the left lateral ventricle (250 ng/10 μl, once daily) for 4 weeks. Control rats received saline. In separate group of rats, either BF 2649 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or clobenpropit (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered once daily for 1 week after 3 weeks of AβP administration. After 30 days, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, edema formation, neuronal, glial injuries, and AβP deposits were examined in the brain. A significant reduction in AβP deposits along with marked reduction in neuronal or glial reactions was seen in the drug-treated group. The BBB breakdown to Evans blue albumin and radioiodine in the cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum was also significantly reduced in these drug-treated groups. Clobenpropit showed superior effects than the BF2649 in reducing brain pathology in AD. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that blockade of H3 and stimulation of H4 receptors are beneficial for the treatment of AD pathology, not reported earlier.

  5. HLA-DR alleles in amyloid beta-peptide autoimmunity: a highly immunogenic role for the DRB1*1501 allele.

    PubMed

    Zota, Victor; Nemirovsky, Anna; Baron, Rona; Fisher, Yair; Selkoe, Dennis J; Altmann, Daniel M; Weiner, Howard L; Monsonego, Alon

    2009-09-01

    Active amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) immunization of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) caused meningoencephalitis in approximately 6% of immunized patients in a clinical trial. In addition, long-term studies of AD patients show varying degrees of Abeta Ab responses, which correlate with the extent of Abeta clearance from the brain. In this study, we examined the contribution of various HLA-DR alleles to these immune-response variations by assessing Abeta T cell reactivity, epitope specificity, and immunogenicity. Analysis of blood samples from 133 individuals disclosed that the abundant DR haplotypes DR15 (found in 36% of subjects), DR3 (in 18%), DR4 (12.5%), DR1 (11%), and DR13 (8%) were associated with Abeta-specific T cell responses elicited via distinct T cell epitopes within residues 15-42 of Abeta. Because the HLA-DRB1*1501 occurred most frequently, we examined the effect of Abeta challenge in humanized mice bearing this allele. The observed T cell response was remarkably strong, dominated by secretion of IFN-gamma and IL-17, and specific to the same T cell epitope as that observed in the HLA-DR15-bearing humans. Furthermore, following long-term therapeutic immunization of an AD mouse model bearing the DRB1*1501 allele, Abeta was effectively cleared from the brain parenchyma and brain microglial activation was reduced. The present study thus characterizes HLA-DR alleles directly associated with specific Abeta T cell epitopes and demonstrates the highly immunogenic properties of the abundant allele DRB1*1501 in a mouse model of AD. This new knowledge enables us to explore the basis for understanding the variations in naturally occurring Abeta-reactive T cells and Abeta immunogenicity among humans.

  6. Inhibitor of Differentiation-1 and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 Mediate Sonic Hedgehog Induction by Amyloid Beta-Peptide in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Hsing; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Tzu; Yin, Jiu-Haw; Hwang, Chi-Shin; Yang, Liang-Yo; Yang, Ding-I

    2016-03-01

    One major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of senile plaques mainly composed of neurotoxic amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) in the patients' brains. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is a morphogen critically involved in the embryonic development of the central nervous system (CNS). In the present study, we tested whether Aβ may induce SHH expression and explored its underlying mechanisms. We found that both Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-42 enhanced SHH expression in the primary cortical neurons derived from fetal rat brains. Immunohistochemistry revealed heightened expression of SHH in the cortex and hippocampus of aged (9 and 12 months old) AD transgenic mouse brains as compared to age-matched littermate controls. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated that Aβ25-35 enhanced binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) to the promoter of the Shh gene in primary cortical cultures; consistently, Aβ25-35 induction of SHH was abolished by HIF-1α small interfering RNA (siRNA). Aβ25-35 also time-dependently induced inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) that has been shown to stabilize HIF-1α; further, Aβ25-35-mediated induction of HIF-1α and SHH was both suppressed by Id1 siRNA. Pharmacological induction of HIF-1α by cobalt chloride and application of the cell-permeable recombinant Id1 proteins were both sufficient to induce SHH expression. Finally, both the SHH pathway inhibitor cyclopamine and its neutralizing antibody attenuated Aβ cytotoxicity, albeit to a minor extent. These results thus established a signaling cascade of "Aβ → Id1 → HIF-1 → SHH" in primary rat cortical cultures; furthermore, SHH may in part contribute to Aβ neurotoxicity.

  7. Identification and quantification of amyloid beta-related peptides in human plasma using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Naoki; YAMAMOTO, Rie; SATO, Taka-Aki

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase and γ-secretase leads to the generation and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). N-terminally or C-terminally truncated Aβ variants have been found in human cerebrospinal fluid and cultured cell media using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, the profile of plasma Aβ variants has not been revealed due to the difficulty of isolating Aβ from plasma. We present here for the first time studies of Aβ and related peptides in human plasma. Twenty-two Aβ-related peptides including novel peptides truncated before the β-secretase site were detected in human plasma and 20 of the peptides were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Using an internal standard, we developed a quantitative assay for the Aβ-related peptides and demonstrated plasma dilution linearity and the precision required for their quantitation. The present method should enhance the understanding of APP processing and clearance in AD progression. PMID:24621957

  8. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  9. Inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation by fluorescent dye labels

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, Mariana; Wellbrock, Thorben; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2014-02-10

    The fluorescence decay of beta-amyloid's (Aβ) intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine has been used for sensing the oligomer formation of dye-labelled Aβ monomers and the results compared with previously studied oligomerization of the non-labelled Aβ peptides. It has been demonstrated that two different sized, covalently bound probes 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carbonyl and Hilyte Fluor 488 (HLF), alter the rate and character of oligomerization to different extents. The ability of HLF to inhibit formation of highly ordered structures containing beta-sheets was also shown. The implications of our findings for using fluorescence methods in amyloidosis research are discussed and the advantages of this auto-fluorescence approach highlighted.

  10. Inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation by fluorescent dye labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Mariana; Wellbrock, Thorben; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2014-02-01

    The fluorescence decay of beta-amyloid's (Aβ) intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine has been used for sensing the oligomer formation of dye-labelled Aβ monomers and the results compared with previously studied oligomerization of the non-labelled Aβ peptides. It has been demonstrated that two different sized, covalently bound probes 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carbonyl and Hilyte Fluor 488 (HLF), alter the rate and character of oligomerization to different extents. The ability of HLF to inhibit formation of highly ordered structures containing beta-sheets was also shown. The implications of our findings for using fluorescence methods in amyloidosis research are discussed and the advantages of this auto-fluorescence approach highlighted.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of human islet amyloid polypeptides: an insight into amyloid peptides' connection with antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Jin-Chun; Cui, Yi-Xian; Zhou, Bing; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2012-07-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) shows an antimicrobial activity towards two types of clinically relevant bacteria. The potency of hIAPP varies with its aggregation states. Circular dichroism was employed to determine the interaction between hIAPP and bacteria lipid membrane mimic. The antimicrobial activity of each aggregate species is associated with their ability to induce membrane disruption. Our findings provide new evidence revealing the antimicrobial activity of amyloid peptide, which suggest a possible connection between amyloid peptides and antimicrobial peptides.

  12. Copper(II) ions and the Alzheimer's amyloidpeptide: Affinity and stoichiometry of binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõugu, Vello; Friedemann, Merlin; Tiiman, Ann; Palumaa, Peep

    2014-10-01

    Deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid plaques is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis this deposition is an early event and primary cause of the disease, however, the mechanisms that cause this deposition remain elusive. An increasing amount of evidence shows that the interactions of biometals can contribute to the fibrillization and amyloid formation by amyloidogenic peptides. From different anions the copper ions deserve the most attention since it can contribute not only toamyloid formation but also to its toxicity due to the generation of ROS. In this thesis we focus on the affinity and stoichiometry of copper(II) binding to the Aβ molecule.

  13. Statins promote the degradation of extracellular amyloid {beta}-peptide by microglia via stimulation of exosome-associated insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) secretion.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Irfan Y; Barth, Esther; Christian, Leonie; Siepmann, Martin; Kumar, Sathish; Singh, Sandesh; Tolksdorf, Karen; Heneka, Michael T; Lütjohann, Dieter; Wunderlich, Patrick; Walter, Jochen

    2010-11-26

    Epidemiological studies indicate that intake of statins decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer disease. Cellular and in vivo studies suggested that statins might decrease the generation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) from the β-amyloid precursor protein. Here, we show that statins potently stimulate the degradation of extracellular Aβ by microglia. The statin-dependent clearance of extracellular Aβ is mainly exerted by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) that is secreted in a nonconventional pathway in association with exosomes. Stimulated IDE secretion and Aβ degradation were also observed in blood of mice upon peripheral treatment with lovastatin. Importantly, increased IDE secretion upon lovastatin treatment was dependent on protein isoprenylation and up-regulation of exosome secretion by fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. These data demonstrate a novel pathway for the nonconventional secretion of IDE via exosomes. The modulation of this pathway could provide a new strategy to enhance the extracellular clearance of Aβ.

  14. XB51 isoforms mediate Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide production by X11L (X11-like protein)-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sumioka, Akio; Imoto, Seiyu; Martins, Ralph N; Kirino, Yutaka; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2003-08-15

    XB51 (derived from X11-like binding protein of clone number 51) was isolated by yeast two-hybrid cDNA screening using the N-terminal domain of X11L (X11-like protein) as a bait. X11L is a neuron-specific adaptor protein that is known to down-regulate APP (beta-amyloid precursor protein) metabolism by associating with the cytoplasmic domain of APP, but the detailed mechanisms are still unknown. Thus the X11L-associated protein XB51 is believed to regulate APP metabolism by modifying X11L function through its interaction with X11L. Here we report that the hXB51 (human XB51 ) gene can yield two transcripts, one with exon 9 spliced out (resulting in the hXB51beta isoform) and the other containing exon 9 (yielding the hXB51alpha isoform). hXB51alpha binds to X11L to form a tripartite complex composed of hXB51alpha, X11L and APP. Complex-formation results in blocking X11L's suppression of Abeta (beta-amyloid) generation from APP. hXB51beta associates with X11L and inhibits its interaction with APP. However, hXB51beta suppresses Abeta generation and secretion in an X11L-independent manner. Thus the hXB51 isoforms regulate Abeta generation differently, either enhancing it by modifying the association of X11L with APP or suppressing it in an X11L-independent manner. These observations advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating intracellular Abeta production and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Molecular basis for amyloid-[beta] polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Laganowsky, Arthur; Landau, Meytal; Zhao, Minglei; Soriaga, Angela B.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Flot, David; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberga, David

    2011-10-19

    Amyloid-beta (A{beta}) aggregates are the main constituent of senile plaques, the histological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. A{beta} molecules form {beta}-sheet containing structures that assemble into a variety of polymorphic oligomers, protofibers, and fibers that exhibit a range of lifetimes and cellular toxicities. This polymorphic nature of A{beta} has frustrated its biophysical characterization, its structural determination, and our understanding of its pathological mechanism. To elucidate A{beta} polymorphism in atomic detail, we determined eight new microcrystal structures of fiber-forming segments of A{beta}. These structures, all of short, self-complementing pairs of {beta}-sheets termed steric zippers, reveal a variety of modes of self-association of A{beta}. Combining these atomic structures with previous NMR studies allows us to propose several fiber models, offering molecular models for some of the repertoire of polydisperse structures accessible to A{beta}. These structures and molecular models contribute fundamental information for understanding A{beta} polymorphic nature and pathogenesis.

  16. How changes in the sequence of the peptide CLPFFD-NH2 can modify the conjugation and stability of gold nanoparticles and their affinity for beta-amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Ivonne; Araya, Eyleen; Sanz, Fausto; Medina, Elias; Arbiol, Jordi; Toledo, Pedro; Alvarez-Lueje, Alejandro; Giralt, Ernest; Kogan, Marcelo J

    2008-06-01

    In a previous work, we studied the interaction of beta-amyloid fibrils (Abeta) with gold nanoparticles (AuNP) conjugated with the peptide CLPFFD-NH2. Here, we studied the effect of changing the residue sequence of the peptide CLPFFD-NH2 on the efficiency of conjugation to AuNP, the stability of the conjugates, and the affinity of the conjugates to the Abeta fibrils. We conjugated the AuNP with CLPFFD-NH 2 isomeric peptides (CDLPFF-NH2 and CLPDFF-NH2) and characterized the resulting conjugates with different techniques including UV-Vis, TEM, EELS, XPS, analysis of amino acids, agarose gel electrophoresis, and CD. In addition, we determined the proportion of AuNP bonded to the Abeta fibrils by ICP-MS. AuNP-CLPFFD-NH2 was the most stable of the conjugates and presented more affinity for Abeta fibrils with respect to the other conjugates and bare AuNP. These findings help to better understand the way peptide sequences affect conjugation and stability of AuNP and their interaction with Abeta fibrils. The peptide sequence, the steric effects, and the charge and disposition of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues are crucial parameters when considering the design of AuNP peptide conjugates for biomedical applications.

  17. The peptide sequence Arg-Glu-Arg, present in the amyloid precursor protein, protects against memory loss caused by A beta and acts as a cognitive enhancer.

    PubMed

    Mileusnic, R; Lancashire, C L; Rose, S P R

    2004-04-01

    Amino acid sequences containing the palindromic tripeptide RER, matching amino acids 328-330 of the amyloid precursor protein APP, when injected intracerebrally prior to or just after training, protect against memory loss induced by amyloid-beta (A beta) in a one-trial passive avoidance task in the young chick. RER also acts as a cognitive enhancer, strengthening memory for a weak version of the task. N-terminal acylation of RER protects it against rapid degradation, and AcRER is effective in restoring memory if administered peripherally. Biotinylated RER binds to chick neuronal perikarya in an APP-displaceable manner via 66 and approximately 110 kDa neuronal cell membrane proteins. We suggest that RER binding is likely to exert effects on memory retention via receptor-mediated events that include activation of second messenger pathways. These findings suggest that RER and its derivatives may offer a novel approach to enhancing the neuroprotective effects of APP and alleviating the effects of memory loss in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Interaction between Alzheimer's amyloid-beta and amyloid-beta-metal complexes with cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    A number of observations indicate that the primary target of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide is the cellular membrane of neurons. In the context of these observations we investigated, using X-ray diffraction techniques, whether Abeta-metal complexes were able to affect lipid bilayers as a model of cell membranes. The binding of Al to Abeta gave particular conformational properties to the peptide that led to a marked alteration of the lipid bilayer representing phospholipids located in the outer monolayer of cell membranes. This effect was peculiar, since in our experimental conditions Abeta alone did not affect the lipid architecture, whereas the Al salt did, but only at concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than those of the Abeta-Al complex. In accordance with the effects observed with lipid bilayers, studies with human neuroblastoma cells demonstrated an impairment of cell functioning only in the presence of Abeta-Al complex. Our findings imply that Al, compared to the other Abeta-metal complexes tested, could have a specifically relevant effect in enhancing Abeta toxicity.

  19. Upregulated expression of purinergic P2X(7) receptor in Alzheimer disease and amyloid-beta peptide-treated microglia and in peptide-injected rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    McLarnon, James G; Ryu, Jae K; Walker, Douglas G; Choi, Hyun B

    2006-11-01

    The expression of the purinergic receptor subtype P2X(7)R, a nonselective cationic channel activated by high levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), has been studied in adult microglia obtained from Alzheimer disease (AD) and nondemented (ND) brains, in fetal human microglia exposed to Abeta(1-42) peptide and in vivo in Abeta(1-42)-injected rat hippocampus. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed enhanced expression (increase of 70%) of P2X(7)R in AD microglia compared with ND cells (analysis of 6 AD and 8 ND cases). Immunohistochemical analysis showed prominent P2X(7)R expression in association with Abeta plaques and localized to HLA-DR-immunoreactive microglia. In cultured fetal human microglia, cells exposed to Abeta(1-42) (5 microM for 18 hours) had significantly elevated levels of P2X(7)R (by 106%) compared with untreated cells. Amplitudes of Ca(2+) responses in these cells, induced by the selective P2X(7)R agonist BzATP, were increased by 145% with Abeta(1-42) pretreatment relative to control (no peptide pretreatment) and were largely blocked if the P2X(7)R inhibitor-oxidized ATP (oxATP) was added with peptide in pretreatment solution. In vivo, double immunostaining analysis showed considerable P2X(7)R colocalized with microglia after injection of Abeta(1-42) (1 nmol) into rat hippocampus. The overall results suggest roles of P2X(7)R in mediating microglial purinergic inflammatory responses in AD brain.

  20. Detection of Alzheimer's amyloid beta aggregation by capturing molecular trails of individual assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Vestergaard, Mun'delanji Hamada, Tsutomu; Saito, Masato; Yajima, Yoshifumi; Kudou, Monotori; Tamiya, Eiichi; Takagi, Masahiro

    2008-12-12

    Assembly of Amyloid beta (A{beta}) peptides, in particular A{beta}-42 is central to the formation of the amyloid plaques associated with neuro-pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Molecular assembly of individual A{beta}-42 species was observed using a simple fluorescence microscope. From the molecular movements (aka Brownian motion) of the individual peptide assemblies, we calculated a temporal evolution of the hydrodynamic radius (R{sub H}) of the peptide at physiological temperature and pH. The results clearly show a direct relationship between R{sub H} of A{beta}-42 and incubation period, corresponding to the previously reported peptide's aggregation kinetics. The data correlates highly with in solution-based label-free electrochemical detection of the peptide's aggregation, and A{beta}-42 deposited on a solid surface and analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis and characterisation of A{beta} aggregation based on capturing molecular trails of individual assemblies. The technique enables both real-time observation and a semi-quantitative distribution profile of the various stages of A{beta} assembly, at microM peptide concentration. Our method is a promising candidate for real-time observation and analysis of the effect of other pathologically-relevant molecules such as metal ions on pathways to A{beta} oligomerisation and aggregation. The method is also a promising screening tool for AD therapeutics that target A{beta} assembly.

  1. The Aβ peptide forms non-amyloid fibrils in the presence of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jinghui; Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.; Yu, Chien-Hung; Muhammad, Kamran; Gräslund, Astrid; Pieter Abrahams, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have specific properties that make them potentially useful in biomedicine and biotechnology. However, carbon nanotubes may themselves be toxic, making it imperative to understand how carbon nanotubes interact with biomolecules such as proteins. Here, we used NMR, CD, and ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy together with AFM imaging to study pH-dependent molecular interactions between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. The aggregation of the Aβ peptide, first into oligomers and later into amyloid fibrils, is considered to be the toxic mechanism behind Alzheimer's disease. We found that SWNTs direct the Aβ peptides to form a new class of β-sheet-rich yet non-amyloid fibrils.Carbon nanotubes have specific properties that make them potentially useful in biomedicine and biotechnology. However, carbon nanotubes may themselves be toxic, making it imperative to understand how carbon nanotubes interact with biomolecules such as proteins. Here, we used NMR, CD, and ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy together with AFM imaging to study pH-dependent molecular interactions between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. The aggregation of the Aβ peptide, first into oligomers and later into amyloid fibrils, is considered to be the toxic mechanism behind Alzheimer's disease. We found that SWNTs direct the Aβ peptides to form a new class of β-sheet-rich yet non-amyloid fibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00291a

  2. Mutations in amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 genes increase the basal oxidative stress in murine neuronal cells and lead to increased sensitivity to oxidative stress mediated by amyloid beta-peptide (1-42), HO and kainic acid: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mohmmad Abdul, Hafiz; Sultana, Rukhsana; Keller, Jeffrey N; St Clair, Daret K; Markesbery, William R; Butterfield, D Allan

    2006-03-01

    Oxidative stress is observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, including protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. One of the major pathological hallmarks of AD is the brain deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). This 42-mer peptide is derived from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and is associated with oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. Mutations in the PS-1 and APP genes, which increase production of the highly amyloidogenic amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta42), are the major causes of early onset familial AD. Several lines of evidence suggest that enhanced oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. In the present study, primary neuronal cultures from knock-in mice expressing mutant human PS-1 and APP were compared with those from wild-type mice, in the presence or absence of various oxidizing agents, viz, Abeta(1-42), H2O2 and kainic acid (KA). APP/PS-1 double mutant neurons displayed a significant basal increase in oxidative stress as measured by protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and 3-nitrotyrosine when compared with the wild-type neurons (p < 0.0005). Elevated levels of human APP, PS-1 and Abeta(1-42) were found in APP/PS-1 cultures compared with wild-type neurons. APP/PS-1 double mutant neuron cultures exhibited increased vulnerability to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis induced by Abeta(1-42), H2O2 and KA compared with wild-type neuronal cultures. The results are consonant with the hypothesis that Abeta(1-42)-associated oxidative stress and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress may contribute significantly to neuronal apoptosis and death in familial early onset AD.

  3. AMYLOIDPEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  4. Beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity of a hybrid septal cell line associated with increased tau phosphorylation and expression of beta-amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Le, W D; Xie, W J; Kong, R; Appel, S H

    1997-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that beta-amyloid peptide (beta-AP) may induce tau protein phosphorylation, resulting in loss of microtubule binding capacity and formation of paired helical filaments. The mechanism by which beta-AP increases tau phosphorylation, however, is unclear. Using a hybrid septal cell line, SN56, we demonstrate that aggregated beta-AP(1-40) treatment caused cell injury. Accompanying the cell injury, the levels of phosphorylated tau as well as total tau were enhanced as detected immunochemically by AT8, PHF-1, Tau-1, and Tau-5 antibodies. Alkaline phosphatase treatment abolished AT8 and PHF-1 immunoreactivity, confirming that the tau phosphorylation sites were at least at Ser(199/202) and Ser396. In association with the increase in tau phosphorylation, the immunoreactivity of cell-associated and secreted beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP) was markedly elevated. Application of antisense oligonucleotide to beta-APP reduced expression of beta-APP and immunoreactivity of phosphorylated tau. Control peptide beta-AP(1-28) did not produce significant effects on tau phosphorylation, although it slightly increased cell-associated beta-APP. These results suggest that betaAP(1-40)-induced tau phosphorylation may be associated with increased beta-APP expression in degenerated neurons.

  5. Alcadein cleavages by amyloid beta-precursor protein (APP) alpha- and gamma-secretases generate small peptides, p3-Alcs, indicating Alzheimer disease-related gamma-secretase dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hata, Saori; Fujishige, Sayaka; Araki, Yoichi; Kato, Naoko; Araseki, Masahiko; Nishimura, Masaki; Hartmann, Dieter; Saftig, Paul; Fahrenholz, Falk; Taniguchi, Miyako; Urakami, Katsuya; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Martins, Ralph N; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Maeda, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Tohru; Nakaya, Tadashi; Gandy, Sam; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2009-12-25

    Alcadeins (Alcs) constitute a family of neuronal type I membrane proteins, designated Alc(alpha), Alc(beta), and Alc(gamma). The Alcs express in neurons dominantly and largely colocalize with the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain. Alcs and APP show an identical function as a cargo receptor of kinesin-1. Moreover, proteolytic processing of Alc proteins appears highly similar to that of APP. We found that APP alpha-secretases ADAM 10 and ADAM 17 primarily cleave Alc proteins and trigger the subsequent secondary intramembranous cleavage of Alc C-terminal fragments by a presenilin-dependent gamma-secretase complex, thereby generating "APP p3-like" and non-aggregative Alc peptides (p3-Alcs). We determined the complete amino acid sequence of p3-Alc(alpha), p3-Alc(beta), and p3-Alc(gamma), whose major species comprise 35, 37, and 31 amino acids, respectively, in human cerebrospinal fluid. We demonstrate here that variant p3-Alc C termini are modulated by FAD-linked presenilin 1 mutations increasing minor beta-amyloid species Abeta42, and these mutations alter the level of minor p3-Alc species. However, the magnitudes of C-terminal alteration of p3-Alc(alpha), p3-Alc(beta), and p3-Alc(gamma) were not equivalent, suggesting that one type of gamma-secretase dysfunction does not appear in the phenotype equivalently in the cleavage of type I membrane proteins. Because these C-terminal alterations are detectable in human cerebrospinal fluid, the use of a substrate panel, including Alcs and APP, may be effective to detect gamma-secretase dysfunction in the prepathogenic state of Alzheimer disease subjects.

  6. [The influence of dipole modifiers on the channel-forming activity of amyloid and amyloid-like peptides in lipid bilayers].

    PubMed

    Efimova, S S; Zakharov, V V; Ostroumova, O S

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the steady-state transmembrane current induced by amyloid and amyloid-like peptides in lipid bilayers in the presence of dipole modifiers. It has been shown that the addition of dipole modifier, phloretin, to the membrane bathing solutions leads to an increase in the multichannel activity of amyloid beta-peptide fragment 25-35, [Gly35]-amyloid beta-peptide fragment 25--35, prion protein fragment 106-126 and amyloid-like peptides myr-BASP1 (1--13), myr-BASP1(1--19) and GAP-43(1--40). We have found that the effect of phloretin is not the result of dipole potential changes due to adsorption of this modifier on the membrane. Using the various fragments of amyloid beta-peptide, presenilin, prion protein and neuronal proteins BASP1 and GAP-43 allowes to conclude that the steady-state peptide-induced transmembrane current in the case of addition of phloretin is due to the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged channel-forming agents and negatively charged dipole modifier. The results obtained by electron microscopy have demonstrated that this interaction increases degree of peptide oligomerization.

  7. Induced dimerization of the amyloid precursor protein leads to decreased amyloid-beta protein production.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Simone; Midthune, Brea; Cottrell, Barbara; Koo, Edward H

    2009-10-16

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis because sequential cleavages by beta- and gamma-secretase lead to the generation of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, a key constituent in the amyloid plaques present in brains of AD individuals. In several studies APP has recently been shown to form homodimers, and this event appears to influence Abeta generation. However, these studies have relied on APP mutations within the Abeta sequence itself that may affect APP processing by interfering with secretase cleavages independent of dimerization. Therefore, the impact of APP dimerization on Abeta production remains unclear. To address this question, we compared the approach of constitutive cysteine-induced APP dimerization with a regulatable dimerization system that does not require the introduction of mutations within the Abeta sequence. To this end we generated an APP chimeric molecule by fusing a domain of the FK506-binding protein (FKBP) to the C terminus of APP. The addition of the synthetic membrane-permeant drug AP20187 induces rapid dimerization of the APP-FKBP chimera. Using this system we were able to induce up to 70% APP dimers. Our results showed that controlled homodimerization of APP-FKBP leads to a 50% reduction in total Abeta levels in transfected N2a cells. Similar results were obtained with the direct precursor of beta-secretase cleavage, C99/SPA4CT-FKBP. Furthermore, there was no modulation of different Abeta peptide species after APP dimerization in this system. Taken together, our results suggest that APP dimerization can directly affect gamma-secretase processing and that dimerization is not required for Abeta production.

  8. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

    PubMed Central

    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  9. Dissociation of ERK and Akt signaling in endothelial cell angiogenic responses to {beta}-amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Magrane, Jordi; Christensen, Rial A.; Rosen, Kenneth M.; Veereshwarayya, Vimal; Querfurth, Henry W. . E-mail: hquerf01@granite.tufts.edu

    2006-04-15

    Cerebrovascular deposits of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) peptides are found in Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy with stroke or dementia. Dysregulations of angiogenesis, the blood-brain barrier and other critical endothelial cell (EC) functions have been implicated in aggravating chronic hypoperfusion in AD brain. We have used cultured ECs to model the effects of {beta}-amyloid on the activated phosphorylation states of multifunctional serine/threonine kinases since these are differentially involved in the survival, proliferation and migration aspects of angiogenesis. Serum-starved EC cultures containing amyloid-{beta} peptides underwent a 2- to 3-fold increase in nuclear pyknosis. Under growth conditions with sublethal doses of {beta}-amyloid, loss of cell membrane integrity and inhibition of cell proliferation were observed. By contrast, cell migration was the most sensitive to A{beta} since inhibition was significant already at 1 {mu}M (P = 0.01, migration vs. proliferation). In previous work, intracellular A{beta} accumulation was shown toxic to ECs and Akt function. Here, extracellular A{beta} peptides do not alter Akt activation, resulting instead in proportionate decreases in the phosphorylations of the MAPKs: ERK1/2 and p38 (starting at 1 {mu}M). This inhibitory action occurs proximal to MEK1/2 activation, possibly through interference with growth factor receptor coupling. Levels of phospho-JNK remained unchanged. Addition of PD98059, but not LY294002, resulted in a similar decrease in activated ERK1/2 levels and inhibition of EC migration. Transfection of ERK1/2 into A{beta}-poisoned ECs functionally rescued migration. The marked effect of extracellular A{beta} on the migration component of angiogenesis is associated with inhibition of MAPK signaling, while Akt-dependent cell survival appears more affected by cellular A{beta}.

  10. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) - and amyloid beta 1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that the chemotactic G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR) formyl-peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL1) and the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE) play an important role in the inflammatory response involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Therefore, the expression and co-localisation of mouse formyl peptide receptor (mFPR) 1 and 2 as well as RAGE in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model using immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR were analysed. The involvement of rat or human FPR1/FPRL1 (corresponds to mFPR1/2) and RAGE in amyloid-β 1–42 (Aβ1-42)-induced signalling were investigated by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cAMP level in primary rat glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) and transfected HEK 293 cells was measured. Formyl peptide receptors and RAGE were inhibited by a small synthetic antagonist WRW4 and an inactive receptor variant delta-RAGE, lacking the intracytoplasmatic domains. Results We demonstrated a strong increase of mFPR1/2 and RAGE expression in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice co-localised to the glial cells. In addition, the Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction is dependant on FPRL1, but also on FPR1. For the first time, we have shown a functional interaction between FPRL1/FPR1 and RAGE in RAGE ligands S100B- or AGE-mediated signalling by ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement. In addition a possible physical interaction between FPRL1 as well as FPR1 and RAGE was shown with co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The results suggest that both formyl peptide receptors play an essential role in Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells. The interaction with RAGE could explain the broad ligand spectrum of formyl peptide receptors and their important role for inflammation and the host defence against infections. PMID:23164356

  11. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE)--and amyloid beta 1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Alexander; Merres, Julika; Elfgen, Anne; Jansen, Sandra; Mohr, Fabian; Wruck, Christoph J; Pufe, Thomas; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2012-11-20

    Recent studies suggest that the chemotactic G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR) formyl-peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL1) and the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE) play an important role in the inflammatory response involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD).Therefore, the expression and co-localisation of mouse formyl peptide receptor (mFPR) 1 and 2 as well as RAGE in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model using immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR were analysed. The involvement of rat or human FPR1/FPRL1 (corresponds to mFPR1/2) and RAGE in amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ1-42)-induced signalling were investigated by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cAMP level in primary rat glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) and transfected HEK 293 cells was measured. Formyl peptide receptors and RAGE were inhibited by a small synthetic antagonist WRW4 and an inactive receptor variant delta-RAGE, lacking the intracytoplasmatic domains. We demonstrated a strong increase of mFPR1/2 and RAGE expression in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice co-localised to the glial cells. In addition, the Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction is dependant on FPRL1, but also on FPR1. For the first time, we have shown a functional interaction between FPRL1/FPR1 and RAGE in RAGE ligands S100B- or AGE-mediated signalling by ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement. In addition a possible physical interaction between FPRL1 as well as FPR1 and RAGE was shown with co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy. The results suggest that both formyl peptide receptors play an essential role in Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells. The interaction with RAGE could explain the broad ligand spectrum of formyl peptide receptors and their important role for inflammation and the host defence against infections.

  12. Peroxisomal proliferation protects from beta-amyloid neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Santos, Manuel J; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A; Toro, Andrés; Grandy, Rodrigo; Dinamarca, Margarita C; Godoy, Juan A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2005-12-09

    Alzheimer disease is a neurodegenerative process that leads to severe cognitive impairment as a consequence of selective death of neuronal populations. The molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease involves the participation of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and oxidative stress. We report here that peroxisomal proliferation attenuated Abeta-dependent toxicity in hippocampal neurons. Pretreatment with Wy-14.463 (Wy), a peroxisome proliferator, prevent the neuronal cell death and neuritic network loss induced by the Abeta peptide. Moreover, the hippocampal neurons treated with this compound, showed an increase in the number of peroxisomes, with a concomitant increase in catalase activity. Additionally, we evaluate the Wy protective effect on beta-catenin levels, production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, cytoplasmic calcium uptake, and mitochondrial potential in hippocampal neurons exposed to H(2) O(2) and Abeta peptide. Results show that the peroxisomal proliferation prevents beta-catenin degradation, reactive oxygen species production, cytoplasmic calcium increase, and changes in mitochondrial viability. Our data suggest, for the first time, a direct link between peroxisomal proliferation and neuroprotection from Abeta-induced degenerative changes.

  13. Gotu Kola (Centella Asiatica) extract enhances phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein in neuroblastoma cells expressing amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanan; Cao, Zhiming; Khan, Ikhlas; Luo, Yuan

    2008-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that shows cognitive deficits and memory impairment. Extract from the leaves of Gotu Kola (Centella Asiatica) have been used as an alternative medicine for memory improvement in Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine for a long time. Although several studies have revealed its effect in ameliorating the cognitive impairment in rat models of AD and stimulating property on neuronal dendrites of hippocampal region, the molecular mechanism of Gotu Kola on neuroprotection still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we report that phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) is enhanced in both a neuroblastoma cell line expressing amyloid beta 1-42 (Abeta) and in rat embryonic cortical primary cell culture. In addition, the contribution of two major single components to the enhanced CREB phosphorylatioin was examined. Furthermore, inhibitors were applied in this study revealing that ERK/RSK signaling pathway might mediate this effect of Gotu Kola extract. Taken together, we provide a possible molecular mechanism for memory enhancing property of Gotu Kola extract for the first time.

  14. Cytotoxic amyloid peptides inhibit cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction by enhancing MTT formazan exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Schubert, D

    1997-12-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (A beta) neurotoxicity is believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. An early indicator of A beta toxicity is the inhibition of cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction to MTT formazan, a widely used assay for measuring cell viability. In this report we show that A beta and other cytotoxic amyloid peptides such as human amylin dramatically enhance MTT formazan exocytosis, resulting in the inhibition of cellular MTT reduction. Only the amyloid peptides that are known to be cytotoxic enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis. Basal MTT formazan exocytosis and amyloid peptide-enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis are blocked by several drugs with diverse known effects. These and other data suggest that MTT formazan exocytosis is a multistep process and that cytotoxic amyloid peptides enhance MTT formazan exocytosis through an intracellular signal transduction pathway.

  15. Propagating structure of alzheimer's {beta}-amyloid is parallel {beta}-sheet with residues in exact register.

    SciTech Connect

    Benzinger, T. L. S.; Gregory, D. M.; Burkoth, T. S.; Miller-Auer, H.; Lynn, D. G.; Botto, R. E.; Meredith, S. C.; Chemistry; Univ. of Chicago

    1998-11-10

    The pathognomonic plaques of Alzheimer's disease are composed primarily of the 39- to 43-aa {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) peptide. Crosslinking of A{beta} peptides by tissue transglutaminase (tTg) indicates that Gln15 of one peptide is proximate to Lys16 of another in aggregated A{beta}. Here we report how the fibril structure is resolved by mapping interstrand distances in this core region of the A{beta} peptide chain with solid-state NMR. Isotopic substitution provides the source points for measuring distances in aggregated A{beta}. Peptides containing a single carbonyl 13C label at Gln15, Lys16, Leu17, or Val18 were synthesized and evaluated by NMR dipolar recoupling methods for the measurement of interpeptide distances to a resolution of 0.2 Angstrom. Analysis of these data establish that this central core of A{beta} consists of a parallel {beta}-sheet structure in which identical residues on adjacent chains are aligned directly, i.e., in register. Our data, in conjunction with existing structural data, establish that the A{beta} fibril is a hydrogen-bonded, parallel {beta}-sheet defining the long axis of the A{beta} fibril propagation.

  16. pH-dependent amyloid and protofibril formation by the ABri peptide of familial British dementia.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Rekha; Jones, Eric M; Liu, Keqian; Ghiso, Jorge; Marchant, Roger E; Zagorski, Michael G

    2003-11-07

    The ABri is a 34 residue peptide that is the major component of amyloid deposits in familial British dementia. In the amyloid deposits, the ABri peptide adopts aggregated beta-pleated sheet structures, similar to those formed by the Abeta peptide of Alzheimer's disease and other amyloid forming proteins. As a first step toward elucidating the molecular mechanisms of the beta-amyloidosis, we explored the ability of the environmental variables (pH and peptide concentration) to promote beta-sheet fibril structures for synthetic ABri peptides. The secondary structures and fibril morphology were characterized in parallel using circular dichroism, atomic force microscopy, negative stain electron microscopy, Congo red, and thioflavin-T fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. As seen with other amyloid proteins, the ABri fibrils had characteristic binding with Congo red and thioflavin-T, and the relative amounts of beta-sheet and amyloid fibril-like structures are influenced strongly by pH. In the acidic pH range 3.1-4.3, the ABri peptide adopts almost exclusively random structure and a predominantly monomeric aggregation state, on the basis of analytical ultracentrifugation measurements. At neutral pH, 7.1-7.3, the ABri peptide had limited solubility and produced spherical and amorphous aggregates with predominantly beta-sheet secondary structure, whereas at slightly acidic pH, 4.9, spherical aggregates, intermediate-sized protofibrils, and larger-sized mature amyloid fibrils were detected by atomic force microscopy. With aging at pH 4.9, the protofibrils underwent further association and eventually formed mature fibrils. The presence of small amounts of aggregated peptide material or seeds encourage fibril formation at neutral pH, suggesting that generation of such seeds in vivo could promote amyloid formation. At slightly basic pH, 9.0, scrambling of the Cys5-Cys22 disulfide bond occurred, which could lead to the formation of covalently linked aggregates. The presence of

  17. Amyloid beta: structure, biology and structure-based therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo-Fang; Xu, Ting-Hai; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Yu-Ren; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2017-09-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is produced through the proteolytic processing of a transmembrane protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP), by β- and γ-secretases. Aβ accumulation in the brain is proposed to be an early toxic event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common form of dementia associated with plaques and tangles in the brain. Currently, it is unclear what the physiological and pathological forms of Aβ are and by what mechanism Aβ causes dementia. Moreover, there are no efficient drugs to stop or reverse the progression of Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, we review the structures, biological functions, and neurotoxicity role of Aβ. We also discuss the potential receptors that interact with Aβ and mediate Aβ intake, clearance, and metabolism. Additionally, we summarize the therapeutic developments and recent advances of different strategies for treating Alzheimer's disease. Finally, we will report on the progress in searching for novel, potentially effective agents as well as selected promising strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. These prospects include agents acting on Aβ, its receptors and tau protein, such as small molecules, vaccines and antibodies against Aβ; inhibitors or modulators of β- and γ-secretase; Aβ-degrading proteases; tau protein inhibitors and vaccines; amyloid dyes and microRNAs.

  18. Intracellular accumulation and resistance to degradation of the Alzheimer amyloid A4/beta protein.

    PubMed Central

    Knauer, M F; Soreghan, B; Burdick, D; Kosmoski, J; Glabe, C G

    1992-01-01

    The A4 or beta protein is a peptide that constitutes the major protein component of senile plaques in Alzheimer disease. The A4/beta protein is derived from a larger, transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). The putative abnormal processing events leading to amyloid accumulation are largely unknown. Here we report that a 42-residue synthetic peptide, beta 1-42, corresponding to one of the longer forms of the A4/beta protein, accumulates in cultured human skin fibroblasts and is stable for at least 3 days. The peptide appears to accumulate intracellularly, since it does not accumulate under conditions that prevent endocytosis and accumulation is correlated with the acquisition of resistance to removal by trypsin digestion. This intracellular accumulation is also correlated with the ability of the peptide to aggregate as determined by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At low concentrations of the beta 1-42 peptide, which favor the nonaggregated state, no accumulation is observed. Shorter peptide analogs (28 or 39 residues) that are truncated at the C terminus, which lack the ability to aggregate in SDS gels, fail to accumulate. The accumulated intracellular beta 1-42 peptide is in an aggregated state and is contained in a dense organellar compartment that overlaps the distribution of late endosomes or secondary lysosomes. Immunofluorescence of the internalized peptide in permeabilized cells reveals that it is contained in granular deposits, consistent with localization in late endosomes or secondary lysosomes. Sequence analysis indicates that some of the internalized peptide is subject to N-terminal trimming. These results suggest that the aggregated A4/beta protein may be resistant to degradation and suggest that the A4/beta protein may arise, at least in part, by endosomal or lysosomal processing of APP. Our results also suggest that relatively nonspecific proteolysis may be sufficient to generate the A4/beta protein if this part of APP is selectively

  19. Soluble amyloid beta-peptide and myelin basic protein strongly stimulate, alone and in synergism with combined proinflammatory cytokines, the expression of functional nitric oxide synthase-2 in normal adult human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Dal Pra, Ilaria; Menapace, Lia; Pacchiana, Raffaella; Whitfield, James F; Armato, Ubaldo

    2005-11-01

    The accumulation of amyloid beta (Abeta)-peptides and their collection in fibrillar plaques in the human brain are believed to be responsible for Alzheimer's disease. The major neuron killers in the Alzheimer brain include proinflammatory cytokines and NO made by NOS-2 (inducible nitric oxide synthase-2). We have determined the effect of a soluble Abeta peptide, Abeta(1-40), on the expression of NOS-2 in astrocytes using a novel model system consisting of pure cultures of cells from adult human brains that, after the first three passages in vitro, become stably locked into the normal astrocytic phenotype like their counterparts in the adult human brain. Abeta(1-40) alone stimulated quiescent astrocytes to start expressing functional NOS-2 and dumping NO into the culture medium during the next 4 days. But adding three of the proinflammatory cytokines commonly produced in the Alzheimer brain--IFN-gamma, IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha--along with Abeta(1-40) more than trebled NOS-2 expression and doubled NO production. In view of the possibility of myelin breakdown in the Alzheimer brain, we also tested the capability of myelin basic protein (MBP) to stimulate NO production using human astrocytes. We found that MBP mimicked the ability of Abeta(1-40) to induce cells to release NO and adding the cytokine triad along with MBP more than doubled NO production and release. Thus, it appears that Abeta peptides and MBP can join forces with proinflammatory cytokines to enhance the NO-mediated killing of neurons in the Alzheimer brain.

  20. Binding of fullerenes to amyloid beta fibrils: size matters.

    PubMed

    Huy, Pham Dinh Quoc; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-10-07

    Binding affinity of fullerenes C20, C36, C60, C70 and C84 for amyloid beta fibrils is studied by docking and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with the Amber force field and water model TIP3P. Using the molecular mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann surface area method one can demonstrate that the binding free energy linearly decreases with the number of carbon atoms of fullerene, i.e. the larger is the fullerene size, the higher is the binding affinity. Overall, fullerenes bind to Aβ9-40 fibrils stronger than to Aβ17-42. The number of water molecules trapped in the interior of 12Aβ9-40 fibrils was found to be lower than inside pentamer 5Aβ17-42. C60 destroys Aβ17-42 fibril structure to a greater extent compared to other fullerenes. Our study revealed that the van der Waals interaction dominates over the electrostatic interaction and non-polar residues of amyloid beta peptides play the significant role in interaction with fullerenes providing novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Investigation of thymol effect on learning and memory impairment induced by intrahippocampal injection of amyloid beta peptide in high fat diet- fed rats.

    PubMed

    Asadbegi, Masoumeh; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Salehi, Iraj; Komaki, Alireza; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2017-03-02

    Obesity and consumption of a high fat diet (HFD) are known to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we have examined the protective and therapeutic effects of thymol (main monoterpene phenol found in thyme essential oil) on a HFD-fed rat model of AD. Fourty adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups:(n = 8 rats/group): group 1, control, consumed an ordinary diet, group 2 consumed a HFD for 8 weeks, then received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) via intrahippocampal (IHP) injection, group 3 consumed HFD for 8 weeks, then received beta-amyloid (Aβ)1-42 via IHP injections to induce AD, group 4 consumed HFD for 8 weeks, then received Aβ1-42, and was treated by thymol (30 mg/kg in sunflower oil) daily for 4 weeks, and group 5 consumed HFD for 8 week, then received Aβ1-42 after what sunflower oil was administered by oral gavage daily for 4 weeks. Biochemical tests showed an impaired lipid profile and higher glucose levels upon consumption of HFD, which was ameliorated by thymol treatment. In behavioral results, spatial memory in group 3 was significantly impaired, but groups treated with thymol showed better spatial memory compared to group 3 (p ≤ 0.01). In histological results, formation of Aβ plaque in hippocampus of group 3 increased significantly compared to group 1 and group 2 (p ≤ 0.05), but group 4 showed decreased Aβ plaques compared to group 3 (p ≤ 0.01). In conclusion, thymol decreased the effects of Aβ on memory and could be considered as neuroprotective.

  2. Thermal response with exothermic effects of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils and fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Kenji; Yagi, Hisashi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2009-06-12

    Calorimetric measurements were carried out using a differential scanning calorimeter to characterize the thermal response of beta(2)-microglobulin amyloid fibrils, the deposition of which results in dialysis-related amyloidosis. The fibril solution showed a large decrease in heat capacity (exothermic effect) before the temperature-induced depolymerization of the fibrils, which was characterized by a definite dependence on heating rate. To understand the factors that determine the heating-rate-dependent thermal response, the concentration dependence of polyethylene glycol, which inhibits the association of amyloid fibrils with heating, on exothermic effect was examined in detail and showed a causal link between the exothermic effect and fibril association. The results suggest that the transient association driven by a spatial approach and the concomitant dehydration of hydrophobic areas of amyloid fibrils may be significant factors determining the thermal response with exothermic effect, which has not been observed in calorimetric studies of monomolecular globular proteins. The heating-rate-dependent thermal response with the exothermic effect was observed not only for other amyloid fibrils formed from amyloid beta-peptides but also during the processes of the temperature-induced conversion of beta(2)-microglobulin protofibrils and hen egg-white lysozyme into amyloid fibrils. These results highlight the physics related to the heating-rate-dependent behaviors of heat capacity in terms of interactions between the specific structures of amyloid fibrils and water molecules.

  3. Beta-Amyloid Impairs Reelin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Balmaceda, Valeria; Botella-López, Arancha; Rabano, Alberto; Avila, Jesus; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Reelin is a signaling protein increasingly associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease that relevantly modulates tau phosphorylation. We have previously demonstrated that β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) alters reelin expression. We have now attempted to determine whether abnormal reelin triggered by Aβ will result in signaling malfunction, contributing to the pathogenic process. Here, we show that reelin forms induced by β-amyloid are less capable of down-regulating tau phosphorylation via disabled-1 and GSK3β kinase. We also demonstrate that the scaffold protein 14-3-3 that increases tau phosphorylation by modulating GSK3β activity, is up-regulated during defective reelin signaling. Binding of reelin to its receptor, mainly ApoER2 in the brain, relays the signal into the cell. We associate the impaired reelin signaling with inefficiency of reelin in forming active homodimers and decreased ability to bind efficiently to its receptor, ApoER2. More remarkably, reelin from Alzheimer cortex shows a tendency to form large complexes instead of homodimers, the active form for signaling. Our results suggest that reelin expression is altered by Aβ leading to impaired reelin signaling. PMID:23951306

  4. Peptide Detection of Fungal Functional Amyloids in Infected Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sherman, Melissa C.; Lysak, Nataliya; Filonenko, Alexandra; Richards, Hazel; Sobonya, Richard E.; Klotz, Stephen A.; Lipke, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    Many fungal cell adhesion proteins form functional amyloid patches on the surface of adhering cells. The Candida albicans Agglutinin-like sequence (Als) adhesins are exemplars for this phenomenon, and have amyloid forming sequences that are conserved between family members. The Als5p amyloid sequence mediates amyloid fibril formation and is critical for cell adhesion and biofilm formation, and is also present in the related adhesins Als1p and Als3p. We have developed a fluorescent peptide probe containing the conserved Als amyloid-forming sequence. This peptide bound specifically to yeast expressing Als5p, but not to cells lacking the adhesin. The probe bound to both yeast and hyphal forms of C. albicans. Δals1/Δals3 single and double deletion strains exhibited reduced fluorescence, indicating that probe binding required expression of these proteins. Additionally, the Als peptide specifically stained fungal cells in abscesses in autopsy sections. Counterstaining with calcofluor white showed colocalization with the amyloid peptide. In addition, fungi in autopsy sections derived from the gastrointestinal tract showed colocalization of the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T and the fluorescent peptide. Collectively, our data demonstrate that we can exploit amyloid sequence specificity for detection of functional amyloids in situ. PMID:24465872

  5. Copernicus revisited: amyloid beta in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Joseph, J; Shukitt-Hale, B; Denisova, N A; Martin, A; Perry, G; Smith, M A

    2001-01-01

    The beta-amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has dominated the thinking and research in this area for over a decade and a half. While there has been a great deal of effort in attempting to prove its centrality in this devastating disease, and while an enormous amount has been learned about its properties (e.g., putative toxicity, processing and signaling), Abeta has not proven to be both necessary and sufficient for the development, neurotoxicity, and cognitive deficits associated with this disease. Instead, the few treatments that are available have emerged from aging research and are primarily directed toward modification of acetylcholine levels. Clearly, it is time to rethink this position and to propose instead that future approaches should focus upon altering the age-related sensitivity of the neuronal environment to insults involving such factors as inflammation and oxidative stress. In other words "solve the problems of aging and by extension those of AD will also be reduced." This review is being submitted as a rather Lutherian attempt to "nail an alternative thesis" to the gate of the Church of the Holy Amyloid to open its doors to the idea that aging is the most pervasive element in this disease and Abeta is merely one of the planets.

  6. De novo designed peptide-based amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    López De La Paz, Manuela; Goldie, Kenneth; Zurdo, Jesús; Lacroix, Emmanuel; Dobson, Christopher M; Hoenger, Andreas; Serrano, Luis

    2002-12-10

    Identification of therapeutic strategies to prevent or cure diseases associated with amyloid fibril deposition in tissue (Alzheimer's disease, spongiform encephalopathies, etc.) requires a rational understanding of the driving forces involved in the formation of these organized assemblies rich in beta-sheet structure. To this end, we used a computer-designed algorithm to search for hexapeptide sequences with a high propensity to form homopolymeric beta-sheets. Sequences predicted to be highly favorable on this basis were found experimentally to self-associate efficiently into beta-sheets, whereas point mutations predicted to be unfavorable for this structure inhibited polymerization. However, the property to form polymeric beta-sheets is not a sufficient requirement for fibril formation because, under the conditions used here, preformed beta-sheets from these peptides with charged residues form well defined fibrils only if the total net charge of the molecule is +/-1. This finding illustrates the delicate balance of interactions involved in the formation of fibrils relative to more disordered aggregates. The present results, in conjunction with x-ray fiber diffraction, electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared measurements, have allowed us to propose a detailed structural model of the fibrils.

  7. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1–40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1–40 peptide on the basis of their emission response. PMID:26419607

  8. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-09-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1-40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1-40 peptide on the basis of their emission response.

  9. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-09-30

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1-40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1-40 peptide on the basis of their emission response.

  10. ASP1 (BACE2) cleaves the amyloid precursor protein at the beta-secretase site.

    PubMed

    Hussain, I; Powell, D J; Howlett, D R; Chapman, G A; Gilmour, L; Murdock, P R; Tew, D G; Meek, T D; Chapman, C; Schneider, K; Ratcliffe, S J; Tattersall, D; Testa, T T; Southan, C; Ryan, D M; Simmons, D L; Walsh, F S; Dingwall, C; Christie, G

    2000-11-01

    Sequential proteolytic processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases generates the 4-kDa amyloid (A beta) peptide, a key component of the amyloid plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We and others have recently reported the identification and characterisation of an aspartic proteinase, Asp2 (BACE), as beta-secretase. Here we describe the characterization of a second highly related aspartic proteinase, Asp1 as a second beta-secretase candidate. Asp1 is expressed in brain as detected at the mRNA level and at the protein level. Transient expression of Asp1 in APP-expressing cells results in an increase in the level of beta-secretase-derived soluble APP and the corresponding carboxy-terminal fragment. Paradoxically there is a decrease in the level of soluble A beta secreted from the cells. Asp1 colocalizes with APP in the Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum compartments of cultured cells. Asp1, when expressed as an Fc fusion protein (Asp1-Fc), has the N-terminal sequence ALEP..., indicating that it has lost the prodomain. Asp1-Fc exhibits beta-secretase activity by cleaving both wild-type and Swedish variant (KM/NL) APP peptides at the beta-secretase site.

  11. Induction of murine AA amyloidosis by various homogeneous amyloid fibrils and amyloid-like synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Cui, D; Hoshii, Y; Kawano, H; Une, Y; Gondo, T; Ishihara, T

    2007-11-01

    We investigated amyloid-enhancing factor (AEF) activity of amyloid fibrils extracted from amyloid-laden livers of mice, cow, cheetah, cat and swan. All amyloid fibrils were confirmed to be amyloid protein A (AA) by an immunohistochemical analysis. We found that these fibrils accelerated the deposition of amyloid in an experimental mouse model of AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, the degree of deposition was dependent on the concentration of fibrils. When we compared the minimal concentration of amyloid fibrils needed to induce deposition, we found that these fibrils showed different efficiencies. Murine amyloid fibril induced amyloid deposition more efficiently than cow, cat, cheetah or swan amyloid fibrils. These data suggest that amyloid deposition is preferentially induced by amyloid fibrils with the same primary sequence as the endogenous amyloid protein. We then analysed the AEF activity of synthetic peptides, synthesized corresponding to amino acids 1-15 of mouse SAA (mSAA), 2-15 of cow SAA (bSAA), 1-15 of cat SAA (cSAA), which was the same as cheetah, and the common amino acids 33-45 of these four SAA (aSAA). We found that mSAA, bSAA and cSAA formed amyloid-like fibrils in morphology and showed similar AEF properties to those of native amyloid fibrils. Although aSAA also formed highly ordered amyloid-like fibrils, it showed weaker AEF activity than the other synthetic fibrils. Our results indicate that amyloidosis is transmissible between species under certain conditions; however, the efficiency of amyloid deposition is species-specific and appears to be related to the primary amino acid sequence, especially the N-terminal segment of the amyloid protein.

  12. Solution structures of {beta}-amyloid{sub 10-35} and {beta}-amyloid{sub 10-35} PEG3000 aggregates.

    SciTech Connect

    Benzinger, T. L. S.; Burkoth, T. S.; Gordon, D.; Lynn, D. G.; Meredith, S. C.; Morgan, D. M.; Seifert, S.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Urban, V.

    1999-07-02

    Small angle neutron and x-ray scattering (SANS/SAXS) studies were conducted on the structure of the aggregates formed from both the truncated model peptide {beta}-Amyloid(10-35) (A{beta}{sub 10-35}) and a block copolymer {beta}-Amyloid (10-35)-PEG3000 (A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG) in D{sub 2}O at pHs from 3.0 to 7.0. These studies indicate that A{beta}{sub 10-35} aggregates into rod-like particles (fibril) and their radii are strongly dependent on the Pm of the solution. The fibril-fibril association in A{beta}{sub 10-35} solutions is less of pH < 5.6, but becomes larger at higher pH. A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG also assembles into rod-like particles whose radius is larger by about 30 {angstrom} than that for A{beta}{sub 10-35} fibril at pH 4.2, while it is about 23 {angstrom} larger at higher pH. Contrast matching SAXS/SANS experiments that eliminate the coherent scattering from PEG reveal that PEG moiety is located at the periphery of the fibril. Also, the mass per unit length of the peptide portion is similar for both A{beta}{sub 10-35} and A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG fibrils at pH 5.6. The mass per unit length of the rods from SANS provides key information on the packing of A{beta}{sub 10-35} peptides in the fibril.

  13. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  14. beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease is found in cerebral and spinal cord vascular malformations.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, M. N.; Merz, P.; Bennett-Gray, J.; Menezes, A. H.; Goeken, J. A.; Schelper, R. L.; Wisniewski, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Congo/Red deposition with birefringence to polarized light was demonstrated focally in cerebrovascular malformations removed surgically from 4 older patients (ages 85, 74, 74, and 63), and in a spinal cord vascular malformation in a 76-year-old patient. Lesser degrees of Congophilic change were observed in cerebrovascular malformations screened from 4 of 10 patients between the ages of 30 and 59. No Congophilic change was seen in 10 cerebrovascular malformations removed from patients under 30 years of age. Congophilic areas in all cases decorated with W-2 and 85/45 polyclonal antibodies raised to peptide sequences of cerebrovascular beta-amyloid and beta-amyloid of senile plaques from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the amyloid in these vascular malformations is immunologically related to beta-amyloid protein. This finding provides another indication that vascular beta-amyloid deposition is not specific for Alzheimer's disease and suggests that an existing abnormality of vessels may be a predisposing factor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2A Figure 2B Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3293463

  15. Preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils are destabilized by coenzyme Q{sub 10} in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Naiki, Hironobu; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-04-29

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and wine-related polyphenol, myricetin (Myr), inhibit fA{beta} formation from A{beta} and destabilize preformed fA{beta} in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of coenzyme Q{sub 10} (CoQ{sub 10}) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of CoQ{sub 10} with NDGA and Myr. CoQ{sub 10} dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}), as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. The anti-amyloidogenic effects of CoQ{sub 10} were slightly weaker than those of NDGA and Myr. CoQ{sub 10} could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  16. Charge attraction and beta propensity are necessary for amyloid fibril formation from tetrapeptides.

    PubMed

    Tjernberg, Lars; Hosia, Waltteri; Bark, Niklas; Thyberg, Johan; Johansson, Jan

    2002-11-08

    Amyloid fibrils in which specific proteins have polymerized into a cross-beta-sheet structure are found in about 20 diseases. In contrast to the close structural similarity of fibrils formed in different amyloid diseases, the structures of the corresponding native proteins differ widely. We show here that peptides as short as 4 residues with the sequences KFFE or KVVE can form amyloid fibrils that are practically identical to fibrils formed in association with disease, as judged by electron microscopy and Congo red staining. In contrast, KLLE or KAAE do not form fibrils. The fibril-forming KFFE and KVVE show partial beta-strand conformation in solution, whereas the non-fibril-forming KLLE and KAAE show random structure only, suggesting that inherent propensity for beta-strand conformation promotes fibril formation. The peptides KFFK or EFFE do not form fibrils on their own but do so in an equimolar mixture. Thus, intermolecular electrostatic interactions, either between charged dipolar peptides or between complementary charges of co-fibrillating peptides favor fibril formation.

  17. Amyloidpeptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  18. AmyloidPeptide Binds to Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit 1

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1–42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1–42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1–42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD. PMID:22927926

  19. Bacterial enzymes effectively digest Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Yuliya Vasilyevna; Shagimardanova, Elena Ilyasovna; Margulis, Anna Borisovna; Toymentseva, Anna Aleksandrovna; Balaban, Nelly Pavlovna; Rudakova, Nataliya Leonidovna; Rizvanov, Albert Anatolyevich; Sharipova, Margarita Rashidovna; Palotás, András

    2014-09-01

    Aggregated β-amyloid peptides play key roles in the development of Alzheimer's disease, and recent evidence suggests that microbial particles, among others, can facilitate their polymerization. Bacterial enzymes, however, have been proved to be beneficial in degrading pathological fibrillar structures in clinical settings, such as strepto-kinases in resolving blood-clots. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of bacterial substances to effectively hydrolyze β-amyloid peptides. Degrading products of several proteinases from Bacillus pumilus were evaluated using MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry, and their toxicity was assessed in vitro using cell-culture assays and morphological studies. These enzymes have proved to be non-toxic and were demonstrated to cleave through the functional domains of β-amyloid peptide. By yielding inactive fragments, proteinases of Bacillus pumilus may be used as candidate anti-amyloid agents.

  20. Regulation of steady-state beta-amyloid levels in the brain by neprilysin and endothelin-converting enzyme but not angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Elizabeth A; Adams, Stephanie K; Troendle, Frederick J; Stodola, Becky A; Kahn, Murad A; Fauq, Abdul H; Xiao, Hong D; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Eckman, Christopher B

    2006-10-13

    The deposition of beta-amyloid in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD). Normally, the accumulation of beta-amyloid is prevented in part by the activities of several degradative enzymes, including the endothelin-converting enzymes, neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, and plasmin. Recent reports indicate that another metalloprotease, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), can degrade beta-amyloid in vitro and in cellular overexpression experiments. In addition, ACE gene variants are linked to AD risk in several populations. Angiotensin-converting enzyme, neprilysin and endothelin-converting enzyme function as vasopeptidases and are the targets of drugs designed to treat cardiovascular disorders, and ACE inhibitors are commonly prescribed. We investigated the potential physiological role of ACE in regulating endogenous brain beta-amyloid levels for two reasons: first, to determine whether beta-amyloid degradation might be the mechanism by which ACE is associated with AD, and second, to determine whether ACE inhibitor drugs might block beta-amyloid degradation in the brain and potentially increase the risk for AD. We analyzed beta-amyloid accumulation in brains from ACE-deficient mice and in mice treated with ACE inhibitors and found that ACE deficiency did not alter steady-state beta-amyloid concentration. In contrast, beta-amyloid levels are significantly elevated in endothelin-converting enzyme and neprilysin knock-out mice, and inhibitors of these enzymes cause a rapid increase in beta-amyloid concentration in the brain. The results of these studies do not support a physiological role for ACE in the degradation of beta-amyloid in the brain but confirm roles for endothelin-converting enzyme and neprilysin and indicate that reductions in these enzymes result in additive increases in brain amyloid beta-peptide levels.

  1. Alzheimer's disease. Beta-amyloid precursor protein expression in the nucleus basalis of Meynert.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, G. M.; Greenberg, B. D.; Ellis, W. G.; Forno, L. S.; Salamat, S. M.; Gonzalez-DeWhitt, P. A.; Lowery, D. E.; Tinklenberg, J. R.; Eng, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) was examined using immunocytochemistry for beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta APP) expression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In mild AD cases, light labeling of the cell body and proximal processes was observed, and small intracellular structures were labeled rarely. In the more severe cases, intense cytoplasmic beta APP labeling was seen, often along with small beta APP-positive structures. Double-labeling experiments demonstrated that in the more severe cases these small structures were also decorated by a neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) antiserum. Other neurons in the severe cases showed incorporation of beta APP into large inclusions, which were also labeled with the NFT antiserum. However, some large inclusions in the severe cases were labeled by the NFT antiserum but contained no beta APP. Extraneuronal NFTs did not show beta APP labeling and did not react with an antibody to the beta-amyloid peptide. These results suggest that increased expression of beta APP coincides with intracellular NFT formation in the nbM, but that the formation of extraneuronal NFTs results in a loss of beta APP immunoreactivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1386714

  2. Identification of a novel human islet amyloid polypeptide beta-sheet domain and factors influencing fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jaikaran, E T; Higham, C E; Serpell, L C; Zurdo, J; Gross, M; Clark, A; Fraser, P E

    2001-05-04

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) accumulates as pancreatic amyloid in type 2 diabetes and readily forms fibrils in vitro. Investigations into the mechanism of hIAPP fibril formation have focused largely on residues 20 to 29, which are considered to comprise a primary amyloidogenic domain. In rodents, proline substitutions within this region and the subsequent beta-sheet disruption, prevents fibril formation. An additional amyloidogenic fragment within the C-terminal sequence, residues 30 to 37, has been identified recently. We have extended these observations by examining a series of overlapping peptide fragments from the human and rodent sequences. Using protein spectroscopy (CD/FTIR), electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, a previously unrecognised amyloidogenic domain was localised within residues 8 to 20. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this region exhibited a transition from random coil to beta-sheet conformation and assembled into fibrils having a typical amyloid-like morphology. The comparable rat 8-20 sequence, which contains a single His18Arg substitution, was also capable of assembling into amyloid-like fibrils. Examination of peptide fragments corresponding to residues 1 to 13 revealed that the immediate N-terminal region is likely to have only a modulating influence on fibril formation or conformational conversion. The contributions of charged residues as they relate to the amyloid-forming 8-20 sequence were also investigated using IAPP fragments and by assessing the effects of pH and counterions. The identification of these principal amyloidogenic sequences and the effects of associated factors provide details on the IAPP aggregation pathway and structure of the peptide in its fibrillar state. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Thermodynamic selection of steric zipper patterns in the amyloid cross-beta spine.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyong; Kahng, Byungnam; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-09-01

    At the core of amyloid fibrils is the cross-beta spine, a long tape of beta-sheets formed by the constituent proteins. Recent high-resolution x-ray studies show that the unit of this filamentous structure is a beta-sheet bilayer with side chains within the bilayer forming a tightly interdigitating "steric zipper" interface. However, for a given peptide, different bilayer patterns are possible, and no quantitative explanation exists regarding which pattern is selected or under what condition there can be more than one pattern observed, exhibiting molecular polymorphism. We address the structural selection mechanism by performing molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the free energy of incorporating a peptide monomer into a beta-sheet bilayer. We test filaments formed by several types of peptides including GNNQQNY, NNQQ, VEALYL, KLVFFAE and STVIIE, and find that the patterns with the lowest binding free energy correspond to available atomistic structures with high accuracy. Molecular polymorphism, as exhibited by NNQQ, is likely because there are more than one most stable structures whose binding free energies differ by less than the thermal energy. Detailed analysis of individual energy terms reveals that these short peptides are not strained nor do they lose much conformational entropy upon incorporating into a beta-sheet bilayer. The selection of a bilayer pattern is determined mainly by the van der Waals and hydrophobic forces as a quantitative measure of shape complementarity among side chains between the beta-sheets. The requirement for self-complementary steric zipper formation supports that amyloid fibrils form more easily among similar or same sequences, and it also makes parallel beta-sheets generally preferred over anti-parallel ones. But the presence of charged side chains appears to kinetically drive anti-parallel beta-sheets to form at early stages of assembly, after which the bilayer formation is likely driven by energetics.

  4. Antiaggregation Potential of Padina gymnospora against the Toxic Alzheimer’s Beta-Amyloid Peptide 25–35 and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Property of Its Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Balakrishnan; Sheeja Malar, Dicson; Sathya, Sethuraman; Pandima Devi, Kasi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation in the cerebral cortex of the brain is a promising therapeutic and defensive strategy in identification of disease modifying agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since natural products are considered as the current alternative trend for the discovery of AD drugs, the present study aims at the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic potential of the marine seaweed Padina gymnospora. Prevention of aggregation and disaggregation of the mature fibril formation of Aβ 25–35 by acetone extracts of P. gymnospora (ACTPG) was evaluated in two phases by Thioflavin T assay. The results were further confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. The results of antiaggregation and disaggregation assay showed that the increase in fluorescence intensity of aggregated Aβ and the co-treatment of ACTPG (250 μg/ml) with Aβ 25–35, an extensive decrease in the fluorescence intensity was observed in both phases, which suggests that ACTPG prevents the oligomers formation and disaggregation of mature fibrils. In addition, ACTPG was subjected to column chromatography and the bioactivity was screened based on the cholinesterase inhibitory activity. Finally, the active fraction was subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for the identification of bioactive compounds. Overall, the results suggest that the bioactive compound alpha bisabolol present in the alga might be responsible for the observed cholinesterase inhibition with the IC50 value < 10 μg/ml for both AChE and BuChE when compared to standard drug donepezil (IC50 value < 6 μg/ml) and support its use for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:26536106

  5. Size-dependent neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid oligomers.

    PubMed

    Cizas, Paulius; Budvytyte, Rima; Morkuniene, Ramune; Moldovan, Radu; Broccio, Matteo; Lösche, Mathias; Niaura, Gediminas; Valincius, Gintaras; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2010-04-15

    The link between the size of soluble amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and their toxicity to rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) was investigated. Variation in conditions during in vitro oligomerization of Abeta(1-42) resulted in peptide assemblies with different particle size as measured by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Small oligomers of Abeta(1-42) with a mean particle z-height of 1-2 nm exhibited propensity to bind to phospholipid vesicles and they were the most toxic species that induced rapid neuronal necrosis at submicromolar concentrations whereas the bigger aggregates (z-height above 4-5 nm) did not bind vesicles and did not cause detectable neuronal death. A similar neurotoxic pattern was also observed in primary cultures of cortex neurons whereas Abeta(1-42) oligomers, monomers and fibrils were non-toxic to glial cells in CGC cultures or macrophage J774 cells. However, both oligomeric forms of Abeta(1-42) induced reduction of neuronal cell densities in the CGC cultures.

  6. Can Alzheimer disease be prevented by amyloid-beta immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Lemere, Cynthia A; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide has become a major therapeutic target in AD on the basis of pathological, biochemical and genetic evidence that supports a role for this molecule in the disease process. Active and passive Abeta immunotherapies have been shown to lower cerebral Abeta levels and improve cognition in animal models of AD. In humans, dosing in the phase II clinical trial of the AN1792 Abeta vaccine was stopped when approximately 6% of the immunized patients developed meningoencephalitis. However, some plaque clearance and modest clinical improvements were observed in patients following immunization. As a result of this study, at least seven passive Abeta immunotherapies are now in clinical trials in patients with mild to moderate AD. Several second-generation active Abeta vaccines are also in early clinical trials. On the basis of preclinical studies and the limited data from clinical trials, Abeta immunotherapy might be most effective in preventing or slowing the progression of AD when patients are immunized before or in the very earliest stages of disease onset. Biomarkers for AD and imaging technology have improved greatly over the past 10 years and, in the future, might be used to identify presymptomatic, at-risk individuals who might benefit from Abeta immunization.

  7. Candidate genes for Alzheimer’s disease are associated with individual differences in plasma levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schupf, Nicole; Lee, Annie; Park, Naeun; Dang, Lam-Ha; Pang, Deborah; Yale, Alexander; Oh, David Kyung-Taek; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Luchsinger, José A.; Zigman, Warren B.; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Kisselev, Sergey; Clark, Lorraine; Lee, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the contribution of candidate genes for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) on Chromosome 21 and other chromosomes to differences in Aβ peptide levels in a cohort of adults with DS, a population at high risk for AD. Participants were 254 non-demented adults with Down syndrome, 30–78 years of age. Genomic DNA was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate custom array. We used linear regression to examine differences in levels of Aβ peptides associated with the number of risk alleles, adjusting for age, sex, level of intellectual disability, race/ethnicity and the presence of the APOE ε4 allele. For Aβ42 levels, the strongest gene-wise association was found for a SNP on CAHLM1; for Aβ40 levels the strongest gene-wise associations were found for SNPs in IDE and SOD1, while the strongest gene-wise associations with levels of the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio were found for SNPs in SORCS1. Broadly classified, variants in these genes may influence APP processing (CALHM1, IDE), vesicular trafficking (SORCS1), and response to oxidative stress (SOD1). PMID:26166206

  8. [Beta amyloid in blood and cerebrospinal fluid is associated with high density lipoproteins].

    PubMed

    Kudinova, N V; Kudinov, A R; Berezov, T T

    1996-01-01

    Cerebrovascular and parenchymal amyloid deposits found in brains of Alzheimer's disease, Down's syndrome and normal aging are mainly composed of aggregated amyloid beta protein (A beta), a unique peptide 39 to 44 amino acids long. A similar but soluble A beta (s A beta) has been identified in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cell supernatants, indicating that it is a normal protein. We report here that s A beta in normal human plasma and CSF is complexed to high density lipoprotein (HDL) 3 and very high density lipoprotein (VHDL). Biotinylated synthetic peptide A beta 1-40 was traced in normal human plasma in in vitro experiments. Both tracer biotin-labeled A beta 1-40 and native s A beta were specifically recovered in HDL3 and VHDL as it was assessed in immunoprecipitation experiments of purified plasma lipoproteins and lipoprotein depleted plasma. This fact prompted us to ascertain whether the interaction of s A beta with HDL does occur in normal human CSF in vivo. For this purpose normals human CSF was fractionated by means of sequential flotation ultracentrifugation. The presence of s A beta in the resulting lipoprotein fractions as well as in the lipoprotein depleted CSF was analysed by immunoblot analysis, electron and immune-electron microscopy and native size exclusion chromatography. Immunoblot analysis with 6E10 monoclonal anti-A beta antibodies revealed s A beta association with all HDL subspecies of CSF, primarily HDL3 and VHDL and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed an association of s A beta with CSF-HDL particles of 16.8 + 3.2 nm. Native size exclusion chromatography followed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies against A beta and different apoliproproteins indicated an association of s A beta with HDL complexes of approximately 200 kDa molecular weight. Soluble A beta association with HDL3 and VHDL may be involved in maintaining the solubility of A beta in biological fluids and points to a possible role of lipoproteins and lipoprotein lipid

  9. Amyloid beta toxicity dependent upon endothelial cell state

    PubMed Central

    Balcells, Mercedes; Wallins, Joseph S.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), a peptide family produced and deposited in neurons and endothelial cells (EC), is found at subnanomolar concentrations in the plasma of healthy individuals. Simple conformational changes produce a form of Aβ Aβ42, which creates toxic plaque in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. Oxidative stress induced blood brain barrier degeneration has been proposed as a key factor for Aβ42 toxicity, but cannot account for lack of injury from the same peptide in healthy tissues. We hypothesized that cell state mediates Aβ effect. Thus, we examined the viability of aortic EC, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) and epithelial cells (EPI) in different states in the presence of Aβ secreted from transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Aβ was more toxic to all cell types when they were subconfluent. Subconfluent EC sprouted and SMC and EPI were inhibited by Aβ. Confluent EC were virtually resistant to Aβ and suppressed Aβ production by Aβ+CHO. Products of subconfluent EC overcame this resistant state, stimulating the production and toxicity of Aβ42. Confluent EC overgrew ~35% beyond their quiescent state in the presence of Aβ conditioned in media from subconfluent EC. These findings imply that Aβ42 may well be even more cytotoxic to cells in injured or growth states and potentially explain the variable and potent effects of this protein. One may now need to consider tissue and cell state in addition to local concentration of and exposure duration to Aβ. The specific interactions of Aβ and EC in a state-dependent fashion may help understand further the common and divergent forms of vascular and cerebral toxicity of Aβ and the spectrum of AD. PMID:18601976

  10. Cu K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Reveals Differential Copper Coordimation Within Amyloid-beta Oligomers Compared to Amyloid-beta Monomers

    SciTech Connect

    J Shearer; P Callan; T Tran; V Szalai

    2011-12-31

    The fatal neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been linked to the formation of soluble neurotoxic oligomers of amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptides. These peptides have high affinities for copper cations. Despite their potential importance in AD neurodegeneration few studies have focused on probing the Cu{sup 2+/1+} coordination environment within A{beta} oligomers. Herein we present a Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic study probing the copper-coordination environment within oligomers of A{beta}(42) (sequence: DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQKLVFFAEDVGSNKGAIIGLMVGGVVIA). We find that the Cu{sup 2+} cation is contained within a square planar mixed N/O ligand environment within A{beta}(42) oligomers, which is similar to the copper coordination environment of the monomeric forms of {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(16){r_brace}. Reduction of the Cu{sup 2+} cation within the A{beta}(42) oligomers to Cu{sup 1+} yields a highly dioxygen sensitive copper-species that contains Cu{sup 1+} in a tetrahedral coordination geometry. This can be contrasted with monomers of {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(16){r_brace}, which contain copper in a dioxygen inert linear bis-histidine ligand environment [Shearer and Szalai, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 17826]. The biological implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Amyloid fibrils composed of hexameric peptides attenuate neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Kurnellas, Michael P; Adams, Chris M; Sobel, Raymond A; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2013-04-03

    The amyloid-forming proteins tau, αB crystallin, and amyloid P protein are all found in lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous work established that amyloidogenic peptides from the small heat shock protein αB crystallin (HspB5) and from amyloid β fibrils, characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, were therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reflecting aspects of the pathology of MS. To understand the molecular basis for the therapeutic effect, we showed a set of amyloidogenic peptides composed of six amino acids, including those from tau, amyloid β A4, major prion protein (PrP), HspB5, amylin, serum amyloid P, and insulin B chain, to be anti-inflammatory and capable of reducing serological levels of interleukin-6 and attenuating paralysis in EAE. The chaperone function of the fibrils correlates with the therapeutic outcome. Fibrils composed of tau 623-628 precipitated 49 plasma proteins, including apolipoprotein B-100, clusterin, transthyretin, and complement C3, supporting the hypothesis that the fibrils are active biological agents. Amyloid fibrils thus may provide benefit in MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders.

  12. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloidpeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  13. Cholesterol potentiates beta-amyloid-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma cells: involvement of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, Patricia; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Silva-Aguilar, Martín; Valverde, Mahara; Arias, Clorinda

    2008-08-01

    Alterations in brain cholesterol concentration and metabolism seem to be involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In fact, several experimental studies have reported that modification of cholesterol content can influence the expression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) production. However, it remains to be determined if changes in neuronal cholesterol content may influence the toxicity of Abeta peptides and the mechanism involved. Aged mice, AD patients and neurons exposed to Abeta, show a significant increase in membrane-associated oxidative stress. Since Abeta is able to promote oxidative stress directly by catalytically producing H(2)O(2) from cholesterol, the present work analyzed the effect of high cholesterol incorporated into human neuroblastoma cells in Abeta-mediated neurotoxicity and the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Neuronal viability was studied also in the presence of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, the main cholesterol metabolite in brain, as well as the potential protective role of the lipophilic statin, lovastatin.

  14. Estrogen has anti-amyloidogenic effects on Alzheimer's {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Morinaga, Akiyoshi; Hirohata, Mie; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-03

    Inhibition of the assembly of amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) as well as the destabilization of preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}) in the central nervous system could be valuable therapeutics of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have indicated that estrogen therapy reduced the risk of developing AD in women. Here, we examined the effects of estrogen (estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3)) and related sexual steroids (androstenedione (AND) and testosterone (TES)) on the polymerization, extension and destabilization of fA{beta}(1-42) and fA{beta}(1-40) at pH 7.5 at 37 {sup o}C in vitro, using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies. E1, E2, and E3 dose-dependently inhibited the formation, as well as destabilization of fA{beta}s. The overall anti-amyloidogenic activity of these molecules was in the order of: E3 > E2 = E1 >>AND = TES. Estrogen could be a potential therapeutic agent to prevent or delay AD progression.

  15. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Família, Carlos; Dennison, Sarah R; Quintas, Alexandre; Phoenix, David A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea). Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html) capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation.

  16. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Família, Carlos; Dennison, Sarah R.; Quintas, Alexandre; Phoenix, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea). Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html) capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation. PMID:26241652

  17. Increased gene expression of Alzheimer disease beta-amyloid precursor protein in senescent cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Adler, M J; Coronel, C; Shelton, E; Seegmiller, J E; Dewji, N N

    1991-01-01

    The pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques in the brains of patients. Plaque cores contain a 4- to 5-kDa amyloid beta-protein fragment which is also found in the cerebral blood vessels of affected individuals. Since amyloid deposition in the brain increases with age even in normal people, we sought to establish whether the disease state bears a direct relationship with normal aging processes. As a model for biological aging, the process of cellular senescence in vitro was used. mRNA levels of beta-amyloid precursor protein associated with Alzheimer disease were compared in human fibroblasts in culture at early passage and when the same fibroblasts were grown to senescence after more than 52 population doublings. A dramatic increase in mRNA was observed in senescent IMR-90 fibroblasts compared with early-passage cells. Hybridization of mRNA from senescent and early proliferating fibroblasts with oligonucleotide probes specific for the three alternatively spliced transcripts of the gene gave similar results, indicating an increase during senescence of all three forms. A similar, though more modest, increase in message levels was also observed in early-passage fibroblasts made quiescent by serum deprivation; with repletion of serum, however, the expression returned to previous low levels. ELISAs were performed on cell extracts from senescent, early proliferating, and quiescent fibroblasts, and quiescent fibroblasts repleted with serum for over 48 hr, using polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide of the beta-amyloid precursor. The results confirmed that the differences in mRNA expression were partially reflected at the protein level. Regulated expression of beta-amyloid precursor protein may be an important determinant of growth and metabolic responses to serum and growth factors under physiological as well as pathological conditions.

  18. Specific interactions between amyloidpeptides in an amyloid-β hexamer with three-fold symmetry: Ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Tomioka, Shogo; Kadoya, Ryushi; Shimamura, Kanako; Okamoto, Akisumi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-03-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates in brain contributes to the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent structural analysis for the tissue obtained from AD patients revealed that Aβ aggregates have a single structure with three-fold symmetry. To explain why this structure possesses significant stability, we here investigated the specific interactions between Aβ peptides in the aggregate, using ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations. The results indicate that the interactions between the Aβ peptides of the stacked Aβ pair are stronger than those between the Aβ peptides of the trimer with three-fold symmetry and that the charged amino-acids are important.

  19. Alzheimer disease amyloid beta protein forms calcium channels in bilayer membranes: blockade by tromethamine and aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    Arispe, N; Rojas, E; Pollard, H B

    1993-01-01

    Amyloid beta protein (A beta P) is the 40- to 42-residue polypeptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have incorporated this peptide into phosphatidylserine liposomes and then fused the liposomes with a planar bilayer. When incorporated into bilayers the A beta P forms channels, which generate linear current-voltage relationships in symmetrical solutions. A permeability ratio, PK/PCl, of 11 for the open A beta P channel was estimated from the reversal potential of the channel current in asymmetrical KCl solutions. The permeability sequence for different cations, estimated from the reversal potential of the A beta P-channel current for each system of asymmetrical solutions, is Pcs > PLi > PCa > or = PK > PNa. A beta P-channel current (either CS+ or Ca2+ as charge carriers) is blocked reversibly by tromethamine (millimolar range) and irreversibly by Al3+ (micromolar range). The inhibition of the A beta P-channel current by these two substances depends on transmembrane potential, suggesting that the mechanism of blockade involves direct interaction between tromethamine (or Al3+) and sites within the A beta P channel. Hitherto, A beta P has been presumed to be neurotoxic. On the basis of the present data we suggest that the channel activity of the polypeptide may be responsible for some or all of its neurotoxic effects. We further propose that a useful strategy for drug discovery for treatment of Alzheimer disease may include screening compounds for their ability to block or otherwise modify A beta P channels. PMID:8380642

  20. Neuroprotective effect of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component from Cannabis sativa, on beta-amyloid-induced toxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Iuvone, Teresa; Esposito, Giuseppe; Esposito, Ramona; Santamaria, Rita; Di Rosa, Massimo; Izzo, Angelo A

    2004-04-01

    Abstract Alzheimer's disease is widely held to be associated with oxidative stress due, in part, to the membrane action of beta-amyloid peptide aggregates. Here, we studied the effect of cannabidiol, a major non-psychoactive component of the marijuana plant (Cannabis sativa) on beta-amyloid peptide-induced toxicity in cultured rat pheocromocytoma PC12 cells. Following exposure of cells to beta-amyloid peptide (1 micro g/mL), a marked reduction in cell survival was observed. This effect was associated with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and lipid peroxidation, as well as caspase 3 (a key enzyme in the apoptosis cell-signalling cascade) appearance, DNA fragmentation and increased intracellular calcium. Treatment of the cells with cannabidiol (10(-7)-10(-4)m) prior to beta-amyloid peptide exposure significantly elevated cell survival while it decreased ROS production, lipid peroxidation, caspase 3 levels, DNA fragmentation and intracellular calcium. Our results indicate that cannabidiol exerts a combination of neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic effects against beta-amyloid peptide toxicity, and that inhibition of caspase 3 appearance from its inactive precursor, pro-caspase 3, by cannabidiol is involved in the signalling pathway for this neuroprotection.

  1. Distribution of precursor amyloid-. beta. -protein messenger RNA in human cerebral cortex: relationship to neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; Higgins, G.A.; Young, W.G.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Wilson, M.C.; Morrison, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP), two neuropathological markers of Alzheimer disease, may both contain peptide fragments derived from the human amyloid ..beta.. protein. However, the nature of the relationship between NFT and NP and the source of the amyloid ..beta.. proteins found in each have remained unclear. The authors used in situ hybridization techniques to map the anatomical distribution of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA in the neocortex of brains from three subjects with no known neurologic disease and from five patients with Alzheimer disease. In brains from control subjects, positively hybridizing neurons were present in cortical regions and layers that contain a high density of neuropathological markers in Alzheimer disease, as well as in those loci that contain NP but few NFT. Quantitative analyses of in situ hybridization patterns within layers III and V of the superior frontal cortex revealed that the presence of high numbers of NFT in Alzheimer-diseased brains was associated with a decrease in the number of positively hybridizing neurons compared to controls and Alzheimer-diseased brains with few NFT. These findings suggest that the expression of precursor amyloid-..beta..-protein mRNA may be a necessary but is clearly not a sufficient prerequisite for NFT formation. In addition, these results may indicate that the amyloid ..beta.. protein, present in NP in a given region or layer of cortex, is not derived from the resident neuronal cell bodies that express the mRNA for the precursor protein.

  2. Emerging roles for the amyloid precursor protein and derived peptides in the regulation of cellular and systemic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Czeczor, Juliane K; McGee, Sean L

    2017-03-28

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that can be cleaved by proteases through two different pathways to yield a number of small peptides, each with distinct physiological properties and functions. It has been extensively studied in the context of Alzheimer's disease, with the APP-derived amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide being a major constituent of the amyloid plaques observed in this disease. It has been known for some time that APP can regulate neuronal metabolism, however this review will examine evidence that APP and its peptides can also regulate key metabolic processes such as insulin action, lipid synthesis and storage and mitochondrial function in peripheral tissues. This review will present a hypothesis that amyloidogenic processing of APP in peripheral tissues plays a key role in the response to nutrient excess and that this could contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Genes and mechanisms involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Steiner, H; Capell, A; Leimer, U; Haass, C

    1999-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the invariable accumulation of senile plaques that are predominantly composed of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). Abeta is generated by proteolytic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaAPP) involving the combined action of beta- and gamma-secretase. Cleavage within the Abeta domain by alpha-secretase prevents Abeta generation. In some very rare cases of familial AD (FAD), mutations have been identified within the betaAPP gene. These mutations are located close to or at the cleavage sites of the secretases and pathologically effect betaAPP processing by increasing Abeta production, specifically its highly amyloidogenic 42 amino acid variant (Abeta42). Most of the mutations associated with FAD have been identified in the two presenilin (PS) genes, particularly the PS1 gene. Like the mutations identified within the betaAPP gene, mutations in PS1 and PS2 cause the increased generation of Abeta42. PS1 has been shown to be functionally involved in Notch signaling, a key process in cellular differentation, and in betaAPP processing. A gene knock out of PS1 in mice leads to an embryonic lethal phenotype similar to that of mice lacking Notch. In addition, absence of PS1 results in reduced gamma-secretase cleavage and leads to an accumulation of betaAPP C-terminal fragments and decreased amounts of Abeta. Recent work may suggest that PS1 could be the gamma-secretase itself, exhibiting the properties of a novel aspartyl protease. Mutagenesis of either of two highly conserved intramembraneous aspartate residues of PS1 leads to reduced Abeta production as observed in the PS1 knockout. A corresponding mutation in PS2 interfered with betaAPP processing and Notch signaling suggesting a functional redundancy of both presenilins. In this issue, some of the recent work on the molecular mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as novel diagnostic approaches and risk factors for AD will be discussed. In the first

  4. The interaction of beta-amyloid protein fragment (12-28) with lipid environments.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, T. G.; Keire, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid protein (beta AP) fragments may be a result of their solution conformation, which is very sensitive to solution conditions. In this work we describe NMR and CD studies of the conformation of beta AP(12-28) in lipid (micelle) environments as a function of pH and lipid type. The interaction of beta AP(12-28) with zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles is weak and alters the conformation when compared to water solution alone. By contrast, the interaction of the peptide with anionic sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles is strong: beta AP(12-28) is mostly bound, is alpha-helical from K16 to V24, and aggregates slowly. The pH-dependent conformation changes of beta AP(12-28) in solution occur in the pH range at which the side-chain groups of E22, D23, H13, and H14 are deprotonated (pKas ca. 4 and 6.5); the interaction of beta AP(12-28) with SDS micelles alters the pH-dependent conformational transitions of the peptide whereas the weak interaction with DPC micelles causes little change. PMID:9070449

  5. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Eyleen; Olmedo, Ivonne; Bastus, Neus G.; Guerrero, Simón; Puntes, Víctor F.; Giralt, Ernest; Kogan, Marcelo J.

    2008-11-01

    Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ) amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  6. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ) amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid-induced amelioration on impairment of memory learning in amyloid beta-infused rats relates to the decreases of amyloid beta and cholesterol levels in detergent-insoluble membrane fractions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio; Hossain, Shahdat; Agdul, Haqu; Shido, Osamu

    2005-12-30

    We investigated the effects of dietary administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3) on the levels of amyloid beta (A beta) peptide (1-40) and cholesterol in the nonionic detergent Triton 100 x-insoluble membrane fractions (DIFs) of the cerebral cortex and, also, on learning-related memory in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats infused with A beta peptide (1-40) into the cerebral ventricle. The infusion increased the levels of A beta peptide and cholesterol in the DIFs concurrently with a significant increase in reference memory errors (measured by eight-arm radial-maze tasks) compared with those of vehicle rats. Conversely, the dietary administration of DHA to AD-model rats decreased the levels of A beta peptide and cholesterol in the DIFs, with the decrease being more prominent in the DHA-administered rats. Regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between A beta peptide and each of cholesterol, palmitic acid and stearic acid, and between the number of reference memory errors and each of cholesterol, palmitic, stearic and oleic acid; moreover, a significant negative correlation was observed between the number of reference memory errors and the molar ratio of DHA to palmitic plus stearic acid. These results suggest that DHA-induced protection of memory deficits in AD-model rats is related to the interactions of cholesterol, palmitic acid or stearic acid with A beta peptides in DIFs where DHA ameliorates these interactions.

  8. Proteolytic processing of the amyloid-beta protein precursor of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Janelle; Small, David H

    2002-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of the amyloid-beta protein precursor plays a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor may occur via two pathways, both of which involve the action of proteases called secretases. One pathway, involving beta- and gamma-secretase, liberates amyloid-beta protein, a protein associated with the neurodegeneration seen in Alzheimer's disease. The alternative pathway, involving alpha-secretase, precludes amyloid-beta protein formation. In this review, we describe the progress that has been made in identifying the secretases and their potential as therapeutic targets in the treatment or prevention of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. The metal loading ability of beta-amyloid N-terminus: a combined potentiometric and spectroscopic study of copper(II) complexes with beta-amyloid(1-16), its short or mutated peptide fragments, and its polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ylated analogue.

    PubMed

    Damante, Chiara A; Osz, Katalin; Nagy, Zoltán; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Grasso, Giulia; Impellizzeri, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Sóvágó, Imre

    2008-10-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming a rapidly growing health problem, as it is one of the main causes of dementia in the elderly. Interestingly, copper(II) (together with zinc and iron) ions are accumulated in amyloid deposits, suggesting that metal binding to Abeta could be involved in AD pathogenesis. In Abeta, the metal binding is believed to occur within the N-terminal region encompassing the amino acid residues 1-16. In this work, potentiometric, spectroscopic (UV-vis, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) approaches were used to investigate the copper(II) coordination features of a new polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated Abeta peptide fragment encompassing the 1-16 amino acid residues of the N-terminal region (Abeta(1-16)PEG). The high water solubility of the resulting metal complexes allowed us to obtain a complete complex speciation at different metal-to-ligand ratios ranging from 1:1 to 4:1. Potentiometric and ESI-MS data indicate that Abeta(1-16)PEG is able to bind up to four copper(II) ions. Furthermore, in order to establish the coordination environment at each metal binding site, a series of shorter peptide fragments of Abeta, namely, Abeta(1-4), Abeta(1-6), AcAbeta(1-6), and AcAbeta(8-16)Y10A, were synthesized, each encompassing a potential copper(II) binding site. The complexation properties of these shorter peptides were also comparatively investigated by using the same experimental approach.

  10. beta Sheet structure in amyloid beta fibrils and vibrational dipolar coupling.

    PubMed

    Paul, Cynthia; Axelsen, Paul H

    2005-04-27

    Fibrils formed by amyloid beta proteins were labeled with 13C at various positions and examined by infrared spectroscopy to detect vibrational dipolar coupling, implying close physical proximity. The results support key features of several recently proposed models for amyloid fibril structure, but they also add some important caveats. For instance, they support the conclusion that the beta structure is parallel; however, the coupling is not as strong as expected when residues are in register. This may be explained by out-of-register alignment of adjacent strands, or nonstandard parallel sheet structure that yields suboptimal alignment of labeled dipole moments. The data also point to a significant structural difference between fibrils formed by the 40-residue amyloid beta protein and fibrils formed by residues 10-35.

  11. TANGO-Inspired Design of Anti-Amyloid Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaomeng; Brickson, Claire R; Murphy, Regina M

    2016-09-21

    β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ) self-associates into oligomers and fibrils, in a process that is believed to directly lead to neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease. Compounds that bind to Aβ, and inhibit fibrillogenesis and neurotoxicity, are of interest as an anti-Alzheimer therapeutic strategy. Peptides are particularly attractive for this purpose, because they have advantages over small molecules in their ability to disrupt protein-protein interactions, yet they are amenable to tuning of their properties through chemical means, unlike antibodies. Self-complementation and peptide library screening are two strategies that have been employed in the search for peptides that bind to Aβ. We have taken a different approach, by designing Aβ-binding peptides using transthyretin (TTR) as a template. Previously, we demonstrated that a cyclic peptide, with sequence derived from the known Aβ-binding site on TTR, suppressed Aβ aggregation into fibrils and protected neurons against Aβ toxicity. Here, we searched for cyclic peptides with improved efficacy, by employing the algorithm TANGO, designed originally to identify amyloidogenic sequences in proteins. By using TANGO as a guide to predict the effect of sequence modifications on conformation and aggregation, we synthesized a significantly improved cyclic peptide. We demonstrate that the peptide, in binding to Aβ, redirects Aβ toward protease-sensitive, nonfibrillar aggregates. Cyclic peptides designed using this strategy have attractive solubility, specificity, and stability characteristics.

  12. The beta-amyloid domain is essential for axonal sorting of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tienari, P J; De Strooper, B; Ikonen, E; Simons, M; Weidemann, A; Czech, C; Hartmann, T; Ida, N; Multhaup, G; Masters, C L; Van Leuven, F; Beyreuther, K; Dotti, C G

    1996-01-01

    We have analysed the axonal sorting signals of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Wild-type and mutant versions of human APP were expressed in hippocampal neurons using the Semliki forest virus system. We show that wild-type APP and mutations implicated in Alzheimer's disease and another brain beta-amyloidosis are sorted to the axon. By analysis of deletion mutants we found that the membrane-inserted APP ectodomain but not the cytoplasmic tail is required for axonal sorting. Systematic deletions of the APP ectodomain identified two regions required for axonal delivery: one encoded by exons 11-15 in the carbohydrate domain, the other encoded by exons 16-17 in the juxtamembraneous beta-amyloid domain. Treatment of the cells with the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin induced missorting of wild-type APP, supporting the importance of glycosylation in axonal sorting of APP. The data revealed a hierarchy of sorting signals on APP: the beta-amyloid-dependent membrane proximal signal was the major contributor to axonal sorting, while N-glycosylation had a weaker effect. Furthermore, recessive somatodendritic signals, most likely in the cytoplasmic tail, directed the protein to the dendrites when the ectodomain was deleted. Analysis of detergent solubility of APP and another axonally delivered protein, hemagglutinin, demonstrated that only hemagglutinin formed CHAPS-insoluble complexes, suggesting distinct mechanisms of axonal sorting for these two proteins. This study is the first delineation of sorting requirements of an axonally targeted protein in polarized neurons and indicates that the beta-amyloid domain plays a major role in axonal delivery of APP. Images PMID:8895567

  13. Cross-interactions between the Alzheimer Disease AmyloidPeptide and Other Amyloid Proteins: A Further Aspect of the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghui; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Gräslund, Astrid; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2016-08-05

    Many protein folding diseases are intimately associated with accumulation of amyloid aggregates. The amyloid materials formed by different proteins/peptides share many structural similarities, despite sometimes large amino acid sequence differences. Some amyloid diseases constitute risk factors for others, and the progression of one amyloid disease may affect the progression of another. These connections are arguably related to amyloid aggregates of one protein being able to directly nucleate amyloid formation of another, different protein: the amyloid cross-interaction. Here, we discuss such cross-interactions between the Alzheimer disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and other amyloid proteins in the context of what is known from in vitro and in vivo experiments, and of what might be learned from clinical studies. The aim is to clarify potential molecular associations between different amyloid diseases. We argue that the amyloid cascade hypothesis in Alzheimer disease should be expanded to include cross-interactions between Aβ and other amyloid proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Impact of intracellular beta-amyloid in transgenic animals and cell models.

    PubMed

    Cuello, A Claudio; Canneva, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    The present commentary based on cell and animal models of intracellular beta-amyloid (iAbeta) expression indicates that low levels of microscopically undetectable iAbeta could have a physiological role in the modulation of the cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-dependent gene expression and, as a consequence, a positive influence on synaptic plasticity (the 'good' Abeta?). On the other hand, high levels of iAbeta resembling the pathological and microscopically visible accumulation of this amyloid peptide, akin to that observed in Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease, disrupt CRE-regulated gene expression, therefore compromising the protein synthesis-dependent component of long-term potentiation (the 'bad' Abeta?). Moreover, intracellular pathology would be independent and additive to the toxic effects of the extracellular Abeta burden. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Design and biological activity of {beta}-sheet breaker peptide conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Sandra Cardoso, Isabel; Boerner, Hans; Pereira, Maria Carmo; Saraiva, Maria Joao; Coelho, Manuel

    2009-03-06

    The sequence LPFFD (iA{beta}{sub 5}) prevents amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) fibrillogenesis and neurotoxicity, hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as previously demonstrated. In this study iA{beta}{sub 5} was covalently linked to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and the activity of conjugates was assessed and compared to the activity of the peptide alone by in vitro studies. The conjugates were characterized by MALDI-TOF. Competition binding assays established that conjugates retained the ability to bind A{beta} with similar strength as iA{beta}{sub 5}. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that iA{beta}{sub 5} conjugates inhibited amyloid fibril formation, which is in agreement with binding properties observed for the conjugates towards A{beta}. The conjugates were also able to prevent amyloid-induced cell death, as evaluated by activation of caspase 3. These results demonstrated that the biological activity of iA{beta}{sub 5} is not affected by the pegylation process.

  16. Development and characterization of a TAPIR-like mouse monoclonal antibody to amyloid-beta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Hara, Hideo; Makifuchi, Takao; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    Tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody was better related to the effect of immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) than ELISA antibody. Here we used a hybridoma technique to develop a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid-beta (Abeta) mouse monoclonal antibody. The obtained monoclonal antibody, 3.4A10, was an IgG2b isotype and recognized N-terminal portion of Abeta1-42 without binding denatured or native amyloid-beta protein precursor. It had higher affinity to Abeta1-42 than to Abeta1-40 by Biacore affinity analysis and stained preferably the peripheral part of senile plaques and recognized the plaque core less than 4G8. It inhibited the Abeta1-42 fibril formation as well as degraded pre-aggregated Abeta1-42 peptide in a thioflavin T fluorescence spectrophotometry assay. The in vivo studies showed that 3.4A10 treatment decreased amyloid burden compared to the control group and significantly reduced Abeta42 levels rather than Abeta40 levels in brain lysates as well as the Abeta*56 oligomer (12mer) in TBS fraction of the brain lysates. 3.4A10 entered brain and decorated some plaques, which is surrounded by more Iba1-positive microglia. 3.4A10 therapy did not induce lymphocytic infiltration and obvious increase in microhemorrhage. We conclude that 3.4A10 is a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid monoclonal antibody, and has a potential of therapeutic application for AD.

  17. The role of β-amyloid peptide in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, A V; Bystryak, S; Galzitskaya, O V

    2011-09-01

    Studies of neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs) are drawing more attention of researchers worldwide due to the high incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The pathophysiology of such disorders is, in part, characterized by the transition of a wild-type peptide from its native conformation into a very stable pathological isoform. Subsequently, these abnormal proteins form aggregates of amyloid fibrils that continuously increase in size. Changes in the metabolic processes of neurons (e.g. oxidative stress, hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein, and resulting secondary changes in the cell metabolism) ultimately lead to cell death. We hypothesize that extracellular deposition of β-amyloid peptide fibrils and neurofibrillary tangles represents the body's adaptation mechanism, aimed at preservation of autonomic functioning; while the cognitive decline is severe, the rest of the organ systems remain unaffected and continue to function. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that destruction of pathological plaques, fibrils, and tangles and the use of vaccines targeting β-amyloid result in undesirable side effects. To gain a better understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and to develop novel therapies, continued studies of the sporadic form of disease and the mechanisms triggering conformational changes in β-amyloid peptide fragments are essential. This review is focused on studies investigating the formation of amyloid fibrils and their role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, we discuss a related disorder--amyloidosis--where formation of fibrils, tangles, and plaques leads to neuronal death which may occur as a result of a failed adaptation process. Further in-depth investigation and comprehensive analysis of alterations in the metabolism of APP, β-amyloid, and tau protein, which have a pathological effect on cell membrane, alter phosphate exchange, and impair other key metabolic functions of the cell long before the

  18. Analysis of a compartmental model of amyloid beta production, irreversible loss and exchange in humans.

    PubMed

    Elbert, Donald L; Patterson, Bruce W; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, and in particular Aβ42, are found in senile plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. A compartmental model of Aβ production, exchange and irreversible loss was recently developed to explain the kinetics of isotope-labeling of Aβ peptides collected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following infusion of stable isotope-labeled leucine in humans. The compartmental model allowed calculation of the rates of production, irreversible loss (or turnover) and short-term exchange of Aβ peptides. Exchange of Aβ42 was particularly pronounced in amyloid plaque-bearing participants. In the current work, we describe in much greater detail the characteristics of the compartmental model to two distinct audiences: physician-scientists and biokineticists. For physician-scientists, we describe through examples the types of questions the model can and cannot answer, as well as correct some misunderstandings of previous kinetic analyses applied to this type of isotope labeling data. For biokineticists, we perform a system identifiability analysis and a sensitivity analysis of the kinetic model to explore the global and local properties of the model. Combined, these analyses motivate simplifications from a more comprehensive physiological model to the final model that was previously presented. The analyses clearly demonstrate that the current dataset and compartmental model allow determination with confidence a single 'turnover' parameter, a single 'exchange' parameter and a single 'delay' parameter. When combined with CSF concentration data for the Aβ peptides, production rates may also be obtained.

  19. Amyloid-beta-induced ion flux in artificial lipid bilayers and neuronal cells: resolving a controversy.

    PubMed

    Capone, Ricardo; Quiroz, Felipe Garcia; Prangkio, Panchika; Saluja, Inderjeet; Sauer, Anna M; Bautista, Mahealani R; Turner, Raymond S; Yang, Jerry; Mayer, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Understanding the pathogenicity of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides constitutes a major goal in research on Alzheimer's disease (AD). One hypothesis entails that Abeta peptides induce uncontrolled, neurotoxic ion flux through cellular membranes. The exact biophysical mechanism of this ion flux is, however, a subject of an ongoing controversy which has attenuated progress toward understanding the importance of Abeta-induced ion flux in AD. The work presented here addresses two prevalent controversies regarding the nature of transmembrane ion flux induced by Alphabeta peptides. First, the results clarify that Alphabeta can induce stepwise ion flux across planar lipid bilayers as opposed to a gradual increase in transmembrane current; they show that the previously reported gradual thinning of membranes with concomitant increase in transmembrane current arises from residues of the solvent hexafluoroisopropanol, which is commonly used for the preparation of amyloid samples. Second, the results provide additional evidence suggesting that Abeta peptides can induce ion channel-like ion flux in cellular membranes that is independent from the postulated ability of Alphabeta to modulate intrinsic cellular ion channels or transporter proteins.

  20. Solution structures of Alzheimer's amyloid Aβ13-23 peptide: NMR studies in solution and in SDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usachev, K. S.; Filippov, A. V.; Filippova, E. A.; Antzutkin, O. N.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    To be believed that interaction of amyloid peptides with the cellular membrane is one of the mechanisms for the neurotoxicity of Aβ. Therefore, structural studies of beta-amyloid in solution and in a "peptide-bio-membrane" complex are of intense interest. The aim of this study was to acquire a better understanding of the mechanism of "Aβ peptide-micelle surface" complex formation. Previous studies of Aβ peptides binding on the micelle surface show the presence of helical region between 15-24 residues and that fragment between 11-28 residues have a tendency to exit the hydrophobic environment of the micelle core and to bind to the micelle surface. In present paper we considered the fragment of Aβ from 13 to 23 residues and found that L17, F19 and F20 residues region play a great role in the process of binding of Aβ to the micelle surface.

  1. p75NTR Antagonistic Cyclic Peptide Decreases the Size of β Amyloid-Induced Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L.; Stewart, Kenneth B.; Qureshi, Nazer H.; Kowall, Neil W.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75NTR antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Aβ and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75NTR. In vivo injections of Aβ into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Aβ and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Aβ to p75NTR may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18807174

  2. Imaging beta-amyloid burden in aging and dementia.

    PubMed

    Rowe, C C; Ng, S; Ackermann, U; Gong, S J; Pike, K; Savage, G; Cowie, T F; Dickinson, K L; Maruff, P; Darby, D; Smith, C; Woodward, M; Merory, J; Tochon-Danguy, H; O'Keefe, G; Klunk, W E; Mathis, C A; Price, J C; Masters, C L; Villemagne, V L

    2007-05-15

    To compare brain beta-amyloid (Abeta) burden measured with [(11)C]Pittsburgh Compound B (PIB) PET in normal aging, Alzheimer disease (AD), and other dementias. Thirty-three subjects with dementia (17 AD, 10 dementia with Lewy bodies [DLB], 6 frontotemporal dementia [FTD]), 9 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 27 age-matched healthy control subjects (HCs) were studied. Abeta burden was quantified using PIB distribution volume ratio. Cortical PIB binding was markedly elevated in every AD subject regardless of disease severity, generally lower and more variable in DLB, and absent in FTD, whereas subjects with MCI presented either an "AD-like" (60%) or normal pattern. Binding was greatest in the precuneus/posterior cingulate, frontal cortex, and caudate nuclei, followed by lateral temporal and parietal cortex. Six HCs (22%) showed cortical uptake despite normal neuropsychological scores. PIB binding did not correlate with dementia severity in AD or DLB but was higher in subjects with an APOE-epsilon4 allele. In DLB, binding correlated inversely with the interval from onset of cognitive impairment to diagnosis. Pittsburgh Compound B PET findings match histopathologic reports of beta-amyloid (Abeta) distribution in aging and dementia. Noninvasive longitudinal studies to better understand the role of amyloid deposition in the course of neurodegeneration and to determine if Abeta deposition in nondemented subjects is preclinical AD are now feasible. Our findings also suggest that Abeta may influence the development of dementia with Lewy bodies, and therefore strategies to reduce Abeta may benefit this condition.

  3. Stability of amyloidpeptides in plasma and serum.

    PubMed

    Bibl, Mirko; Welge, Volker; Esselmann, Hermann; Wiltfang, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Plasma amyloidpeptide (Aβ) levels have been suggested as a biomarker candidate for detecting incipient AD. Aβ peptides are known to be sensitive to distinct preanalytical sample handling, which calls for standardised preanalytical procedures. We investigated serum and plasma samples of 19 patients with no clinical signs of dementia for different preanalytical sample handlings. Both serum and plasma were analysed by the one-dimensional Aβ-SDS-PAGE/immunoblot, either immediately or after storage at room temperature for 24 and 48 h, respectively. The panel of Aβ1-37/38/39/40/42 and Aβ2-40 was evaluated. In both analytical matrices, sample storage led to a significant loss of measurable peptide levels. This effect was most pronounced during the first 24 h of storage and stronger in serum than in plasma. There were no significant differences between the distinct analysed Aβ peptide species regarding these results. The ratios of peptides (e.g. Aβ1-42/Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42/Aβ1-38) displayed a higher stability under the influence of storage than each single peptide. In conclusion, plasma may be more appropriate than serum for analysing Aβ peptides for routine application. At least, the analysis should be done within 24 h and peptide ratios should be created to minimise artificial results.

  4. Abundant pyroglutamate-modified ABri and ADan peptides in extracellular and vascular amyloid deposits in familial British and Danish dementias.

    PubMed

    Saul, Anika; Lashley, Tammaryn; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice; Ghiso, Jorge A; Coomaraswamy, Janaky; Wirths, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    Familial British and familial Danish dementia (FDD) are progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by cerebral deposition of the amyloidogenic peptides ABri and ADan, respectively. These amyloid peptides start with an N-terminal glutamate residue, which can be posttranslationally converted into a pyroglutamate (pGlu) modified form, a mechanism which has been extensively described to be relevant for amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides in Alzheimer's disease. Like pGlu-Aβ peptides, pGlu-ABri peptides have an increased aggregation propensity and show higher toxicity on human neuroblastoma cells as their nonmodified counterparts. We have generated novel N-terminal specific antibodies detecting the pGlu-modified forms of ABri and ADan peptides. With these antibodies we were able to identify abundant extracellular amyloid plaques, vascular, and parenchymal deposits in human familial British dementia and FDD brain tissue, and in a mouse model for FDD. Double-stainings using C-terminal specific antibodies in human samples revealed that highly aggregated pGlu-ABri and pGlu-ADan peptides are mainly present in plaque cores and central vascular deposits, leading to the assumption that these peptides have seeding properties. Furthermore, in an FDD-mouse model ADan peptides were detected in presynaptic terminals of the hippocampus where they might contribute to impaired synaptic transmission. These similarities of ABri and ADan to Aβ in Alzheimer's disease suggest that the posttranslational pGlu-modification of amyloid peptides might represent a general pathological mechanism leading to increased aggregation and toxicity in these forms of degenerative dementias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cannabidiol promotes amyloid precursor protein ubiquitination and reduction of beta amyloid expression in SHSY5YAPP+ cells through PPARγ involvement.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, Caterina; Steardo, Luca; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The amyloidogenic cascade is regarded as a key factor at the basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. The aberrant cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) induces an increased production and a subsequent aggregation of beta amyloid (Aβ) peptide in limbic and association cortices. As a result, altered neuronal homeostasis and oxidative injury provoke tangle formation with consequent neuronal loss. Cannabidiol (CBD), a Cannabis derivative devoid of psychotropic effects, has attracted much attention because it may beneficially interfere with several Aβ-triggered neurodegenerative pathways, even though the mechanism responsible for such actions remains unknown. In the present research, the role of CBD was investigated as a possible modulating compound of APP processing in SHSY5Y(APP+) neurons. In addition, the putative involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) was explored as a candidate molecular site responsible for CBD actions. Results indicated the CBD capability to induce the ubiquitination of APP protein which led to a substantial decrease in APP full length protein levels in SHSY5Y(APP+) with the consequent decrease in Aβ production. Moreover, CBD promoted an increased survival of SHSY5Y(APP+) neurons, by reducing their long-term apoptotic rate. Obtained results also showed that all, here observed, CBD effects were dependent on the selective activation of PPARγ.

  6. BACE2, a beta -secretase homolog, cleaves at the beta site and within the amyloid-beta region of the amyloid-beta precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Farzan, M; Schnitzler, C E; Vasilieva, N; Leung, D; Choe, H

    2000-08-15

    Production of amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) is initiated by a beta-secretase that cleaves the Abeta precursor protein (APP) at the N terminus of Abeta (the beta site). A recently identified aspartyl protease, BACE, cleaves the beta site and at residue 11 within the Abeta region of APP. Here we show that BACE2, a BACE homolog, cleaves at the beta site and more efficiently at a different site within Abeta. The Flemish missense mutation of APP, implicated in a form of familial Alzheimer's disease, is adjacent to this latter site and markedly increases Abeta production by BACE2 but not by BACE. BACE and BACE2 respond identically to conservative beta-site mutations, and alteration of a common active site Arg inhibits beta-site cleavage but not cleavage within Abeta by both enzymes. These data suggest that BACE2 contributes to Abeta production in individuals bearing the Flemish mutation, and that selective inhibition of these highly similar proteases may be feasible and therapeutically advantageous.

  7. Beta-hairpin conformation of fibrillogenic peptides: structure and alpha-beta transition mechanism revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Simona, Fabio; Roccatano, Danilo; Broglia, Ricardo A; Tiana, Guido; Colombo, Giorgio; Di Nola, Alfredo

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the conformational transitions that trigger the aggregation and amyloidogenesis of otherwise soluble peptides at atomic resolution is of fundamental relevance for the design of effective therapeutic agents against amyloid-related disorders. In the present study the transition from ideal alpha-helical to beta-hairpin conformations is revealed by long timescale molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water solvent, for two well-known amyloidogenic peptides: the H1 peptide from prion protein and the Abeta(12-28) fragment from the Abeta(1-42) peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease. The simulations highlight the unfolding of alpha-helices, followed by the formation of bent conformations and a final convergence to ordered in register beta-hairpin conformations. The beta-hairpins observed, despite different sequences, exhibit a common dynamic behavior and the presence of a peculiar pattern of the hydrophobic side-chains, in particular in the region of the turns. These observations hint at a possible common aggregation mechanism for the onset of different amyloid diseases and a common mechanism in the transition to the beta-hairpin structures. Furthermore the simulations presented herein evidence the stabilization of the alpha-helical conformations induced by the presence of an organic fluorinated cosolvent. The results of MD simulation in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)/water mixture provide further evidence that the peptide coating effect of TFE molecules is responsible for the stabilization of the soluble helical conformation.

  8. Blockade of the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand death receptor DR5 prevents beta-amyloid neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Uberti, Daniela; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Bonini, Sara Anna; Sarnico, Ilenia; Benarese, Marina; Pizzi, Marina; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Spano, PierFranco; Facchetti, Fabio; Memo, Maurizio

    2007-04-01

    We originally suggested that inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) death pathway could be taken into consideration as a potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, because the critical role of TRAIL in immune surveillance, the neutralization of TRAIL protein by an antibody to prevent its binding to death receptors is definitely a risky approach. Here, we demonstrated that the blockade of the TRAIL death receptor DR5 with a specific antibody completely prevented amyloid beta peptide (A beta) neurotoxicity in both neuronal cell line and primary cortical neurons. DR5 was demonstrated to be a key factor in TRAIL death pathway. In fact, whereas TRAIL expression was enhanced dose-dependently by concentrations of beta amyloid ranging from 10 nM to 1 microM, only the highest toxic dose of A beta (25 microM) induced the increased expression of DR5 and neuronal cell death. In addition, the increased expression of DR5 receptor after beta amyloid treatment was sustained by p53 transcriptional activity, as demonstrated by the data showing that the p53 inhibitor Pifithrin alpha prevented both beta amyloid-induced DR5 induction and cell death. These data suggest a sequential activation of p53 and DR5 upon beta amyloid exposure. Further insight into the key role of DR5 in AD was suggested by data showing a significant increase of DR5 receptor in cortical slices of AD brain. Thus, these findings may give intracellular TRAIL pathway a role in AD pathophysiology, making DR5 receptor a possible candidate as a pharmacological target.

  9. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid β fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, M.; Morgado, I.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ► Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ► Aβ(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ► We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of Aβ(1–40) fibril formation. ► At high Aβ(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ► Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid β (Aβ) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. Aβ(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  10. Amyloid peptide regulates calcium homoeostasis and arrhythmogenesis in pulmonary vein cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Weerateerangkul, Punate; Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Huang, Jen-Hung; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid peptides modulate cardiac calcium homoeostasis and play an important role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. Pulmonary veins (PVs) are critical in the genesis of atrial fibrillation and contain abundant amyloid peptides. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate whether amyloid peptides may change the PV electrical activity through regulating calcium homoeostasis. The channel and calcium-handling protein expressions, intracellular calcium and ionic currents were studied in isolated rabbit PV cardiomyocytes in the presence and absence (control) of beta-amyloid (Aβ(25-35) ) for 4-6 h, using Western blot analysis, indo-1 fluorimetric ratio and whole-cell patch clamp techniques. Aβ(25-35) decreased the expressions of Ca(V) 1.2, total or Ser16-phosphorylated phospholamban (p-PLB), p-PLB/PLB ratio, sodium/calcium exchanger, but did not change ryanodine receptor, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) ATPase and K(+) channel proteins (Kir2.1, Kir2.3, Kv1.4, Kv1.5 and Kv4.2). Aβ(25-35) -treated cardiomyocytes had smaller calcium transient, SR calcium store, L-type calcium current and sodium/calcium exchanger current than control cardiomyocytes. Moreover, Aβ(25-35) -treated cardiomyocytes (n = 20) had shorter 90% of the action potential duration (82 ± 3 vs. 93 ± 5 ms, P < 0·05) than control cardiomyocytes (n = 16). Aβ(25-35) has direct electrophysiological effects on PV cardiomyocytes. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  11. Targeting the proper amyloid-beta neuronal toxins: a path forward for Alzheimer’s disease immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Levels of amyloid-beta monomer and deposited amyloid-beta in the Alzheimer’s disease brain are orders of magnitude greater than soluble amyloid-beta oligomer levels. Monomeric amyloid-beta has no known direct toxicity. Insoluble fibrillar amyloid-beta has been proposed to be an in vivo mechanism for removal of soluble amyloid-beta and exhibits relatively low toxicity. In contrast, soluble amyloid-beta oligomers are widely reported to be the most toxic amyloid-beta form, both causing acute synaptotoxicity and inducing neurodegenerative processes. None of the amyloid-beta immunotherapies currently in clinical development selectively target soluble amyloid-beta oligomers, and their lack of efficacy is not unexpected considering their selectivity for monomeric or fibrillar amyloid-beta (or both) rather than soluble amyloid-beta oligomers. Because they exhibit acute, memory-compromising synaptic toxicity and induce chronic neurodegenerative toxicity and because they exist at very low in vivo levels in the Alzheimer’s disease brain, soluble amyloid-beta oligomers constitute an optimal immunotherapeutic target that should be pursued more aggressively. PMID:25045405

  12. Pin1 promotes production of Alzheimer's amyloid {beta} from {beta}-cleaved amyloid precursor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Hirotada; Shin, Ryong-Woon; Uchida, Chiyoko; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Uchida, Takafumi . E-mail: uchidat@cir.tohoku.ac.jp

    2005-10-21

    Here we show that prolyl isomerase Pin1 is involved in the A{beta} production central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Enzyme immunoassay of brains of the Pin1-deficient mice revealed that production of A{beta}40 and A{beta}42 was lower than that of the wild-type mice, indicating that Pin1 promotes A{beta} production in the brain. GST-Pin1 pull-down and immunoprecipitation assay revealed that Pin1 binds phosphorylated Thr668-Pro of C99. In the Pin1 {sup -/-} MEF transfected with C99, Pin1 co-transfection enhanced the levels of A{beta}40 and A{beta}42 compared to that without Pin1 co-transfection. In COS7 cells transfected with C99, Pin1 co-transfection enhanced the generation of A{beta}40 and A{beta}42, and reduced the expression level of C99, facilitating the C99 turnover. Thus, Pin1 interacts with C99 and promotes its {gamma}-cleavage, generating A{beta}40 and A{beta}42. Further, GSK3 inhibitor lithium blocked Pin1 binding to C99 by decreasing Thr668 phosphorylation and attenuated A{beta} generation, explaining the inhibitory effect of lithium on A{beta} generation.

  13. Imaging of dialysis-related amyloid (AB-amyloid) deposits with sup 131 I-beta 2-microglobulin

    SciTech Connect

    Floege, J.; Burchert, W.; Brandis, A.; Gielow, P.; Nonnast-Daniel, B.; Spindler, E.; Hundeshagen, H.; Shaldon, S.; Koch, K.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The diagnosis of dialysis-related amyloid (AB-amyloid) has been based usually on clinical and radiological criteria. Following the discovery that beta 2-microglobulin was the major protein of this amyloid, we isolated and radiolabelled uremic plasma beta 2-microglobulin. After intravenous injection, gamma-camera images of selected joint areas were obtained from 42 patients who were on regular hemodialysis therapy. Positive scans involving the shoulder, hip, knee and carpal regions were found in 13 of 14 patients treated for more than 10 years and 10 of 16 patients treated for 5 to 10 years. Patients treated for less time had negative scans. Specificity was indicated by negative scans in non-amyloid inflammatory lesions in control hemodialysis patients. Up to 48-fold tracer enrichment was detected in excised AB-amyloid containing tissue as compared to amyloid-free tissue. These findings suggest that circulating radiolabelled beta 2-microglobulin is taken up by the amyloid deposits. This method may non-invasively detect tissue infiltrates of amyloid. It may also permit prospective evaluation of the efficacy of prophylactic dialysis strategies which are designed to prevent or delay the onset of this complication of long-term dialysis.

  14. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulate amyloid-beta plaque deposition and beta-secretase expression in Swedish mutant APP transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Kiyota, Tomomi; Horiba, Masahide; Buescher, James L; Walsh, Shannon M; Gendelman, Howard E; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2007-02-01

    Reactive astrocytes and microglia in Alzheimer's disease surround amyloid plaques and secrete proinflammatory cytokines that affect neuronal function. Relationship between cytokine signaling and amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) accumulation is poorly understood. Thus, we generated a novel Swedish beta-amyloid precursor protein mutant (APP) transgenic mouse in which the interferon (IFN)-gamma receptor type I was knocked out (APP/GRKO). IFN-gamma signaling loss in the APP/GRKO mice reduced gliosis and amyloid plaques at 14 months of age. Aggregated Abeta induced IFN-gamma production from co-culture of astrocytes and microglia, and IFN-gamma elicited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha secretion in wild type (WT) but not GRKO microglia co-cultured with astrocytes. Both IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha enhanced Abeta production from APP-expressing astrocytes and cortical neurons. TNF-alpha directly stimulated beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) expression and enhanced beta-processing of APP in astrocytes. The numbers of reactive astrocytes expressing BACE1 were increased in APP compared with APP/GRKO mice in both cortex and hippocampus. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha activation of WT microglia suppressed Abeta degradation, whereas GRKO microglia had no changes. These results support the idea that glial IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha enhance Abeta deposition through BACE1 expression and suppression of Abeta clearance. Taken together, these observations suggest that proinflammatory cytokines are directly linked to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

  15. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloidpeptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Conformation and topology of amyloid beta-protein adsorbed on a tethered artificial membrane probed by surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Haipeng; Ritz, Sandra; Knoll, Wolfgang; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2009-10-01

    Progressive depositions of cerebral amyloid are primary neuropathologic features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The amyloid is composed of a 39-42 amino acid peptide called the amyloid beta-protein (Abeta). Repeated investigation suggests that the conformational transition of Abeta from alpha-helix or random coil to beta-sheet structure plays a key role in the inappropriate accumulation of cerebral amyloid plaques. In this manuscript, we describe a fluorescence-based immunoassay technology to investigate the conformation and topology of Abeta peptides interacting with peptide-tethered planar lipid bilayers. Dual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) labelled with fluorophores were employed to recognise a linear N- and a beta-sheet C-terminus of Abeta peptides on the model membrane, respectively. Kinetics of antibody-Abeta binding were determined by surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The conformational transition of Abeta by melatonin, a defined beta-sheet breaker, was probed using paired monoclonal antibodies. The Abeta interaction with the membrane was evaluated by carefully analyzing the change in kinetic/affinity parameters in the presence or absence of melatonin. These results show that SPFS can be used to examine conformational transition of Abeta on an artificial membrane, providing a novel and versatile platform for conveniently monitoring protein-membrane interaction and screening for new beta-sheet breakers.

  17. Liquid crystal enabled early stage detection of beta amyloid formation on lipid monolayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Sadati, Monirosadat; Apik, Aslin Ismitli; Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-10-14

    Liquid crystals (LCs) can serve as sensitive reporters of interfacial events, and this property has been used for sensing of synthetic or biological toxins. Here it is demonstrated that LCs can distinguish distinct molecular motifs and exhibit a specific response to beta-sheet structures. That property is used to detect the formation of highly toxic protofibrils involved in neurodegenerative diseases, where it is crucial to develop methods that probe the early-stage aggregation of amyloidogenic peptides in the vicinity of biological membranes. In the proposed method, the amyloid fibrils formed at the lipid-decorated LC interface can change the orientation of LCs and form elongated and branched structures that are amplified by the mesogenic medium; however, nonamyloidogenic peptides form ellipsoidal domains of tilted LCs. Moreover, a theoretical and computational analysis is used to reveal the underlying structure of the LC, thereby providing a detailed molecular-level view of the interactions and mechanisms responsible for such motifs. The corresponding signatures can be detected at nanomolar concentrations of peptide by polarized light microscopy and much earlier than the ones that can be identified by fluorescence-based techniques. As such, it offers the potential for early diagnoses of neurodegenerative diseases and for facile testing of inhibitors of amyloid formation.

  18. Amyloid-beta fibrillogenesis: structural insight and therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Dasilva, Kevin A; Shaw, James E; McLaurin, Joanne

    2010-06-01

    Structural insight into the conformational changes associated with aggregation and assembly of fibrils has provided a number of targets for therapeutic intervention. Solid-state NMR, hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mutagenesis strategies have been used to probe the secondary and tertiary structure of amyloid fibrils and key intermediates. Rational design of peptide inhibitors directed against key residues important for aggregation and stabilization of fibrils has demonstrated effectiveness at inhibiting fibrillogenesis. Studies on the interaction between Abeta and cell membranes led to the discovery that inositol, the head group of phosphatidylinositol, inhibits fibrillogenesis. As a result, scyllo-inositol is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of AD. Additional small-molecule inhibitors, including polyphenolic compounds such as curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), and grape seed extract have been shown to attenuate Abeta aggregation through distinct mechanisms, and have shown effectiveness at reducing amyloid levels when administered to transgenic mouse models of AD. Although the results of ongoing clinical trials remain to be seen, these compounds represent the first generation of amyloid-based therapeutics, with the potential to alter the progression of AD and, when used prophylactically, alleviate the deposition of Abeta.

  19. Curcumin Binding to Beta Amyloid: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Praveen P N; Mohamed, Tarek; Teckwani, Karan; Tin, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Curcumin, a chemical constituent present in the spice turmeric, is known to prevent the aggregation of amyloid peptide implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. While curcumin is known to bind directly to various amyloid aggregates, no systematic investigations have been carried out to understand its ability to bind to the amyloid aggregates including oligomers and fibrils. In this study, we constructed computational models of (i) Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper β-sheet assembly and (ii) full-length Aβ fibril β-sheet assembly. Curcumin binding in these models was evaluated by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. In both the models, curcumin was oriented in a linear extended conformation parallel to fiber axis and exhibited better stability in the Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper model (Ebinding  = -10.05 kcal/mol) compared to full-length Aβ fibril model (Ebinding  = -3.47 kcal/mol). Analysis of MD trajectories of curcumin bound to full-length Aβ fibril shows good stability with minimum Cα-atom RMSD shifts. Interestingly, curcumin binding led to marked fluctuations in the (14) HQKLVFFA(21) region that constitute the fibril spine with RMSF values ranging from 1.4 to 3.6 Å. These results show that curcumin binding to Aβ shifts the equilibrium in the aggregation pathway by promoting the formation of non-toxic aggregates.

  20. Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides interact with DNA, as proved by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Barrantes, Alejandro; Camero, Sergio; Garcia-Lucas, Angel; Navarro, Pedro J; Benitez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2012-10-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, abnormal processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer's disease patients increases the production of β-amyloid toxic peptides, which, after forming highly aggregated fibrillar structures, lead to extracellular plaques formation, neuronal loss and dementia. However, a great deal of evidence has point to intracellular small oligomers of amyloid peptides, probably transient intermediates in the process of fibrillar structures formation, as the most toxic species. In order to study the amyloid-DNA interaction, we have selected here three different forms of the amyloid peptide: Aβ1-40, Aβ25-35 and a scrambled form of Aβ25-35. Surface Plasmon Resonance was used together with UV-visible spectroscopy, Electrophoresis and Electronic Microscopy to carry out this study. Our results prove that, similarly to the full length Aβ1-42, all conformations of toxic amyloid peptides, Aβ1-40 and Aβ25-35, may bind DNA. In contrast, the scrambled form of Aβ25-35, a non-aggregating and nontoxic form of this peptide, could not bind DNA. We conclude that although the amyloid-DNA interaction is closely related to the amyloid aggregation proneness, this cannot be the only factor which determines the interaction, since small oligomers of amyloid peptides may also bind DNA if their predominant negatively charged amino acid residues are previously neutralized.

  1. A peptide study of the relationship between the collagen triple-helix and amyloid.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Avanish S; Nunes, Ana Monica; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Type XXV collagen, or collagen-like amyloidogenic component, is a component of amyloid plaques, and recent studies suggest this collagen affects amyloid fibril elongation and has a genetic association with Alzheimer's disease. The relationship between the collagen triple helix and amyloid fibrils was investigated by studying peptide models, including a very stable triple helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)₁₀ , an amyloidogenic peptide GNNQQNY, and a hybrid peptide where the GNNQQNY sequence was incorporated between (GPO)(n) domains. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy showed the GNNQQNY peptide formed a random coil structure, whereas the hybrid peptide contained a central disordered GNNQQNY region transitioning to triple-helical ends. Light scattering confirmed the GNNQQNY peptide had a high propensity to form amyloid fibrils, whereas amyloidogenesis was delayed in the hybrid peptide. NMR data suggested the triple-helix constraints on the GNNQQNY sequence within the hybrid peptide may disfavor the conformational change necessary for aggregation. Independent addition of a triple-helical peptide to the GNNQQNY peptide under aggregating conditions delayed nucleation and amyloid fibril growth. The inhibition of amyloid nucleation depended on the Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequence and required the triple-helix conformation. The inhibitory effect of the collagen triple-helix on an amyloidogenic sequence, when in the same molecule or when added separately, suggests Type XXV collagen, and possibly other collagens, may play a role in regulating amyloid fibril formation.

  2. Structural Changes of Amyloid Beta in Hippocampus of Rats Exposed to Ozone: A Raman Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Arancibia, Selva; Rodríguez-Martínez, Erika; Badillo-Ramírez, Isidro; López-González, Ulises; Saniger, José M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of oxidative stress on the structural changes of the secondary peptide structure of amyloid beta 1–42 (Aβ 1–42), in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus of rats exposed to low doses of ozone. The animals were exposed to ozone-free air (control group) and 0.25 ppm ozone during 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days, respectively. The samples were studied by: (1) Raman spectroscopy to detect the global conformational changes in peptides with α-helix and β-sheet secondary structure, following the deconvolution profile of the amide I band; and (2) immunohistochemistry against Aβ 1–42. The results of the deconvolutions of the amide I band indicate that, ozone exposure causes a progressively decrease in the abundance percentage of α-helix secondary structure. Furthermore, the β-sheet secondary structure increases its abundance percentage. After 60 days of ozone exposure, the β-sheet band is identified in a similar wavenumber of the Aβ 1–42 peptide standard. Immunohistochemistry assays show an increase of Aβ 1–42 immunoreactivity, coinciding with the conformational changes observed in the Raman spectroscopy of Aβ 1–42 at 60 and 90 days. In conclusion, oxidative stress produces changes in the folding process of amyloid beta peptide structure in the dentate gyrus, leading to its conformational change in a final β-sheet structure. This is associated to an increase in Aβ 1–42 expression, similar to the one that happens in the brain of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) patients. PMID:28588448

  3. Short peptides self-assemble to produce catalytic amyloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufo, Caroline M.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Moroz, Olesia V.; Stöhr, Jan; Smith, Tyler A.; Hu, Xiaozhen; Degrado, William F.; Korendovych, Ivan V.

    2014-04-01

    Enzymes fold into unique three-dimensional structures, which underlie their remarkable catalytic properties. The requirement to adopt a stable, folded conformation is likely to contribute to their relatively large size (>10,000 Da). However, much shorter peptides can achieve well-defined conformations through the formation of amyloid fibrils. To test whether short amyloid-forming peptides might in fact be capable of enzyme-like catalysis, we designed a series of seven-residue peptides that act as Zn2+-dependent esterases. Zn2+ helps stabilize the fibril formation, while also acting as a cofactor to catalyse acyl ester hydrolysis. These results indicate that prion-like fibrils are able to not only catalyse their own formation, but they can also catalyse chemical reactions. Thus, they might have served as intermediates in the evolution of modern-day enzymes. These results also have implications for the design of self-assembling nanostructured catalysts including ones containing a variety of biological and non-biological metal ions.

  4. Autophagy is involved in oligodendroglial precursor-mediated clearance of amyloid peptide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulation of β-amyloid peptides is an important hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tremendous efforts have been directed to elucidate the mechanisms of β-amyloid peptides degradation and develop strategies to remove β-amyloid accumulation. In this study, we demonstrated that a subpopulation of oligodendroglial precursor cells, also called NG2 cells, were a new cell type that can clear β-amyloid peptides in the AD transgene mice and in NG2 cell line. Results NG2 cells were recruited and clustered around the amyloid plaque in the APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, which is Alzheimer’s disease mouse model. In vitro, NG2 cell line and primary NG2 cells engulfed β-amyloid peptides through the mechanisms of endocytosis in a time dependent manner. Endocytosis is divided into pinocytosis and phagocytosis. Aβ42 internalization by NG2 cells was mediated by actin-dependent macropinocytosis. The presence of β-amyloid peptides stimulated the autophagic pathway in NG2 cells. Once inside the cells, the β-amyloid peptides in NG2 cells were transported to lysosomes and degraded by autophagy. Conclusions Our findings suggest that NG2 cells are a new cell type that can clear β-amyloid peptides through endocytosis and autophagy. PMID:23938027

  5. NOVEL AMYLOID-BETA SPECIFIC scFv and VH ANTIBODY FRAGMENTS FROM HUMAN AND MOUSE PHAGE DISPLAY ANTIBODY LIBRARIES

    PubMed Central

    Medecigo, M.; Manoutcharian, K.; Vasilevko, V.; Govezensky, T.; Munguia, M. E.; Becerril, B.; Luz-Madrigal, A.; Vaca, L.; Cribbs, D. H.; Gevorkian, G.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-amyloid immunotherapy has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Significant efforts have been made towards the generation and assessment of antibody-based reagents capable of preventing and clearing amyloid aggregates as well as preventing their synaptotoxic effects. In this study, we selected a novel set of human anti-amyloid-beta peptide 1-42 (Aβ1-42) recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a single chain fragment variable (scFv) and a single domain (VH) formats. We demonstrated that these antibody fragments recognize in a specific manner amyloid beta deposits in APP/Tg mouse brains, inhibit toxicity of oligomeric Aβ1-42 in neuroblastoma cell cultures in a concentration-dependently manner and reduced amyloid deposits in APP/Tg2576 mice after intracranial administration. These antibody fragments recognize epitopes in the middle/C-terminus region of Aβ, which makes them strong therapeutic candidates due to the fact that most of the Aβ species found in the brains of AD patients display extensive N-terminus truncations/modifications. PMID:20451261

  6. Novel amyloid-beta specific scFv and VH antibody fragments from human and mouse phage display antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Medecigo, M; Manoutcharian, K; Vasilevko, V; Govezensky, T; Munguia, M E; Becerril, B; Luz-Madrigal, A; Vaca, L; Cribbs, D H; Gevorkian, G

    2010-06-01

    Anti-amyloid immunotherapy has been proposed as an appropriate therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Significant efforts have been made towards the generation and assessment of antibody-based reagents capable of preventing and clearing amyloid aggregates as well as preventing their synaptotoxic effects. In this study, we selected a novel set of human anti-amyloid-beta peptide 1-42 (Abeta1-42) recombinant monoclonal antibodies in a single chain fragment variable (scFv) and a single-domain (VH) format. We demonstrated that these antibody fragments recognize in a specific manner amyloid-beta deposits in APP/Tg mouse brains, inhibit toxicity of oligomeric Abeta1-42 in neuroblastoma cell cultures in a concentration-dependent manner and reduced amyloid deposits in APP/Tg2576 mice after intracranial administration. These antibody fragments recognize epitopes in the middle/C-terminus region of Abeta, which makes them strong therapeutic candidates due to the fact that most of the Abeta species found in the brains of AD patients display extensive N-terminus truncations/modifications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dimensionality of carbon nanomaterial impacting on the modulation of amyloid peptide assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, Z.; Bortolini, C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Amari, A.; Zhang, H. X.; Liu, L.; Dong, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of inorganic nanomaterials have been exploited so far for their great potential for biological applications. Some of these materials could be valid candidates to modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides, which is relevant to amyloid-related diseases. In this work, we reveal that a carbon nanomaterial can indeed modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides and, additionally, we show that this modulating effect is closely related to the dimensionality of the nanomaterials.

  8. Amyloid-beta oligomers impair fear conditioned memory in a calcineurin-dependent fashion in mice.

    PubMed

    Dineley, Kelly T; Kayed, Rakez; Neugebauer, Volker; Fu, Yu; Zhang, Wenru; Reese, Lindsay C; Taglialatela, Giulio

    2010-10-01

    Soluble oligomeric aggregates of the amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide are believed to be the most neurotoxic A beta species affecting the brain in Alzheimer disease (AD), a terminal neurodegenerative disorder involving severe cognitive decline underscored by initial synaptic dysfunction and later extensive neuronal death in the CNS. Recent evidence indicates that A beta oligomers are recruited at the synapse, oppose expression of long-term potentiation (LTP), perturb intracellular calcium balance, disrupt dendritic spines, and induce memory deficits. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these outcomes are only partially understood; achieving such insight is necessary for the comprehension of A beta-mediated neuronal dysfunction. We have investigated the role of the phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) in these pathological processes of AD. CaN is especially abundant in the CNS, where it is involved in synaptic activity, LTP, and memory function. Here, we describe how oligomeric A beta treatment causes memory deficits and depresses LTP expression in a CaN-dependent fashion. Mice given a single intracerebroventricular injection of A beta oligomers exhibited increased CaN activity and decreased pCREB, a transcription factor involved in proper synaptic function, accompanied by decreased memory in a fear conditioning task. These effects were reversed by treatment with the CaN inhibitor FK506. We further found that expression of hippocampal LTP in acutely cultured rodent brain slices was opposed by A beta oligomers and that this effect was also reversed by FK506. Collectively, these results indicate that CaN activation may play a central role in mediating synaptic and memory disruption induced by acute oligomeric A beta treatment in mice. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Non-conjugated small molecule FRET for differentiating monomers from higher molecular weight amyloid beta species.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chongzhao; Zhao, Wei; Moir, Robert D; Moore, Anna

    2011-04-29

    Systematic differentiation of amyloid (Aβ) species could be important for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In spite of significant progress, controversies remain regarding which species are the primary contributors to the AD pathology, and which species could be used as the best biomarkers for its diagnosis. These controversies are partially caused by the lack of reliable methods to differentiate the complicated subtypes of Aβ species. Particularly, differentiation of Aβ monomers from toxic higher molecular weight species (HrMW) would be beneficial for drug screening, diagnosis, and molecular mechanism studies. However, fast and cheap methods for these specific aims are still lacking. We demonstrated the feasibility of a non-conjugated FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) technique that utilized amyloid beta (Aβ) species as intrinsic platforms for the FRET pair assembly. Mixing two structurally similar curcumin derivatives that served as the small molecule FRET pair with Aβ40 aggregates resulted in a FRET signal, while no signal was detected when using Aβ40 monomer solution. Lastly, this FRET technique enabled us to quantify the concentrations of Aβ monomers and high molecular weight species in solution. We believe that this FRET technique could potentially be used as a tool for screening for inhibitors of Aβ aggregation. We also suggest that this concept could be generalized to other misfolded proteins/peptides implicated in various pathologies including amyloid in diabetes, prion in bovine spongiform encephalopathy, tau protein in AD, and α-synuclein in Parkinson disease.

  10. The soluble form of Alzheimer's amyloid beta protein is complexed to high density lipoprotein 3 and very high density lipoprotein in normal human plasma.

    PubMed

    Koudinov, A; Matsubara, E; Frangione, B; Ghiso, J

    1994-12-15

    The amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's neuritic plaques and cerebral blood vessels are mainly composed of aggregated forms of a 39 to 44 amino acids peptide, named amyloid beta (A beta). A similar although soluble form of A beta (sA beta) has been identified in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and cell culture supernatants, indicating that it is produced under physiologic conditions. We report here that sA beta in normal human plasma is associated with lipoprotein particles, in particular to the HDL3 and VHDL fractions where it is complexed to ApoJ and, to a lesser extent, to ApoAI. This was assessed by immunoprecipitation experiments of purified plasma lipoproteins and lipoprotein-depleted plasma and confirmed by means of amino acid sequence analysis. Moreover, biotinylated synthetic peptide A beta 1-40 was traced in normal human plasma in in vitro experiments. As in the case of sA beta, biotinylated A beta 1-40 was specifically recovered in the HDL3 and VHDL fractions. This data together with the previous demonstration that A beta 1-40 is taken up into the brain via a specific mechanism and possibly as an A beta 1-40-ApoJ complex indicate a role for HDL3- and VHDL-containing ApoJ in the transport of the peptide in circulation and suggest their involvement in the delivery of sA beta across the blood-brain barrier.

  11. Toxicity of substrate-bound amyloid peptides on vascular smooth muscle cells is enhanced by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Mok, Su San; Turner, Bradley J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Barrow, Colin J; Small, David H

    2002-06-01

    Tauhe main component of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in Alzheimer's disease is the amyloid-beta protein (Abeta), a 4-kDa polypeptide derived from the beta-amyloid protein precursor (APP). The accumulation of Abeta in the basement membrane has been implicated in the degeneration of adjacent vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). However, the mechanism of Abeta toxicity is still unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of substrate-bound Abeta on VSMC in culture. The use of substrate-bound proteins in cell culture mimics presentation of the proteins to cells as if bound to the basement membrane. Substrate-bound Abeta peptides were found to be toxic to the cells and to increase the rate of cell death. This toxicity was dependent on the length of time the peptide was allowed to 'age', a process by which Abeta is induced to aggregate over several hours to days. Oxidative stress via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release was not involved in the toxic effect, as no decrease in toxicity was observed in the presence of catalase. However, substrate-bound Abeta significantly reduced cell adhesion compared to cells grown on plastic alone, indicating that cell-substrate adhesion may be important in maintaining cell viability. Abeta also caused an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. This increase in apoptosis was accompanied by activation of caspase-3. Homocysteine, a known risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, increased Abeta-induced toxicity and caspase-3 activation in a dose-dependent manner. These studies suggest that Abeta may activate apoptotic pathways to cause loss of VSMC in CAA by inhibiting cell-substrate interactions. Our studies also suggest that homocysteine, a known risk factor for other cardiovascular diseases, could also be a risk factor for hemorrhagic stroke associated with CAA.

  12. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II does not process amyloidpeptide.

    PubMed

    Sedlák, František; Šácha, Pavel; Blechová, Miroslava; Březinová, Anna; Šafařík, Martin; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Konvalinka, Jan

    2013-07-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is thought to be a major causative mechanism of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ accumulation could be caused by dysregulated processing of amyloid precursor protein, yielding excessive amounts of Aβ, and/or by inefficient proteolytic degradation of the peptide itself. Several proteases have been described as Aβ degradation enzymes, most notably metalloendopeptidases, aspartic endopeptidases, and some exopeptidases. Recently a report suggested that another metallopeptidase, glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), can also cleave Aβ. GCPII is a zinc exopeptidase that cleaves glutamate from N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate in the central nervous system and from pteroylpoly-γ-glutamate in the jejunum. GCPII has been proposed as a promising therapeutic target for disorders caused by glutamate neurotoxicity. However, an Aβ-degrading activity of GCPII would compromise potential pharmaceutical use of GCPII inhibitors, because the enzyme inhibition might lead to increased Aβ levels and consequently to Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we analyzed the reported Aβ-degrading activity of GCPII using highly purified recombinant enzyme and synthetic Aβ. We did not detect any Aβ degradation activity of GCPII or its homologue even under prolonged incubation at a high enzyme to substrate ratio. These results are in good agreement with the current detailed structural understanding of the substrate specificity and enzyme-ligand interactions of GCPII.

  13. Neuronal membrane cholesterol loss enhances amyloid peptide generation

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Rodriguez, Jose; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Craessaerts, Katleen; Perga, Simona; Medina, Miguel; Delacourte, Andre; Dingwall, Colin; De Strooper, Bart; Dotti, Carlos G.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental and clinical retrospective studies support the view that reduction of brain cholesterol protects against Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, genetic and pharmacological evidence indicates that low brain cholesterol leads to neurodegeneration. This apparent contradiction prompted us to analyze the role of neuronal cholesterol in amyloid peptide generation in experimental systems that closely resemble physiological and pathological situations. We show that, in the hippocampus of control human and transgenic mice, only a small pool of endogenous APP and its β-secretase, BACE 1, are found in the same membrane environment. Much higher levels of BACE 1–APP colocalization is found in hippocampal membranes from AD patients or in rodent hippocampal neurons with a moderate reduction of membrane cholesterol. Their increased colocalization is associated with elevated production of amyloid peptide. These results suggest that loss of neuronal membrane cholesterol contributes to excessive amyloidogenesis in AD and pave the way for the identification of the cause of cholesterol loss and for the development of specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:15583033

  14. An amyloid beta-protein fragment, A beta[12-28], equipotently impairs post-training memory processing when injected into different limbic system structures.

    PubMed

    Flood, J F; Morley, J E; Roberts, E

    1994-11-14

    Previously, amyloid beta-protein (A beta) fragments 1-28, 12-28 and 12-20 were found to impair retention in mice when injected intracerebroventricularly after footshock active avoidance training. We now have measured the dose-dependence of amnestic effects of peptide 12-28 stereotactically injected into amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, mammillary bodies and septum, which limbic structures are known to be involved in memory processing and into the medial thalamus, which largely is involved in sensory processing during training. Peptide 12-28 impaired retention with remarkably similar efficacy when injected into limbic structures but was not at all amnestic upon thalamic injection. Present results together with those in the literature lead us to suggest that A beta may exert dysregulatory cognitive effects by incoordination of K(+)-channel function in neurons, glia and endothelial cells.

  15. Effect of initial stagger selection on the handedness of Amyloid beta helical fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Cheng, Xiaolin; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Various structural models for Amyloid $\\beta$ fibrils derived from a variety of experimental techniques are currently available. However, this data cannot differentiate between the relative position of the two arms of the $\\beta$ hairpin called the stagger. Amyloid fibrils of various heirarchical levels form left--handed helices composed of $\\beta$ sheets. However it is unclear if positive, negative and neutral staggers all form the macroscopic left--handed helices. Studying this is important since the success of computational approaches to develop drugs for amyloidic diseases will depend on selecting the physiologically relevant structure of the sheets. To address this issue we have conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations of Amyloid$\\beta$ sheets of various staggers and show that only negative staggers generate the experimentally observed left--handed helices while positive staggers generate the incorrect right--handed helices. The implications of this result extend in to all amyloidic--aggregation type diseases.

  16. Calnuc binds to Alzheimer's beta-amyloid precursor protein and affects its biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping; Li, Feng; Zhang, Yun-Wu; Huang, Haining; Tong, Gary; Farquhar, Marilyn Gist; Xu, Huaxi

    2007-03-01

    Calnuc, a Golgi calcium binding protein, plays a key role in the constitution of calcium storage. Abnormal calcium homeostasis has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Excessive production and/or accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides that are proteolytically derived from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) have been linked to the pathogenesis of AD. APP has also been indicated to play multiple physiological functions. In this study, we demonstrate that calnuc interacts with APP through direct binding to the carboxyl-terminal region of APP, possibly in a calcium-sensitive manner. Immunofluorescence study revealed that the two proteins co-localize in the Golgi in both cultured cells and mouse brains. Over-expression of calnuc in neuroblastoma cells significantly reduces the level of endogenous APP. Conversely, down-regulation of calnuc by siRNA increases cellular levels of APP. Additionally, we show that over-expression of calnuc down-regulates the APP mRNA level and inhibits APP biosynthesis, which in turn results in a parallel reduction of APP proteolytic metabolites, sAPP, CTFs and Abeta. Furthermore, we found that the level of calnuc was significantly decreased in the brain of AD patients as compared with that of age-matched non-AD controls. Our results suggest a novel function of calnuc in modulating the levels of APP and its proteolytic metabolites, which may further affect the patho/physiological functions of APP including AD pathogenesis.

  17. Heat shock treatment reduces beta amyloid toxicity in vivo by diminishing oligomers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanjue; Cao, Zhiming; Klein, William L; Luo, Yuan

    2010-06-01

    Heat shock response, mediated by heat shock proteins, is a highly conserved physiological process in multicellular organisms for reestablishment of cellular homeostasis. Expression of heat shock factors and subsequent heat shock protein plays a role in protection against proteotoxicity in invertebrate and vertebrate models. Proteotoxicity due to beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) oligomerization has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Previously, we demonstrated that progressive paralysis induced by expression of human Abeta(1-42) in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans was alleviated by Abeta oligomer inhibitors Ginkgo biloba extract and its constituents [Wu, Y., Wu, Z., Butko, P., Christen, Y., Lambert, M.P., Klein, W.L., Link, C.D., Luo, Y., 2006. Amyloid-beta-induced pathological behaviors are suppressed by Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 and ginkgolides in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans. J. Neurosci. 26(50): 13102-13113]. In this study, we apply a protective heat shock to the transgenic C. elegans and demonstrate: (1) a delay in paralysis, (2) increased expression of small heat shock protein HSP16.2, and (3) significant reduction of Abeta oligomers in a heat shock time-dependent manner. These results suggest that transient heat shock lessens Abeta toxicity by diminishing Abeta oligomerization, which provides a link between up regulation of endogenous chaperone proteins and protection against Abeta proteotoxicity in vivo.

  18. Altered cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid β and amyloid precursor-like protein 1 peptides in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Portelius, Erik; Hölttä, Mikko; Soininen, Hilkka; Bjerke, Maria; Zetterberg, Henrik; Westerlund, Anni; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Blennow, Kaj; Mattsson, Niklas

    2014-06-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) patients develop early Alzheimer's disease pathology with abundant cortical amyloid plaques, likely due to overproduction of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently leads to amyloid β (Aβ) aggregation. This is reflected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the 42-amino acid long Aβ peptide (Aβ1-42), which are increased in young DS patients and decreases with age. However, it is unclear whether DS also affects other aspects of Aβ metabolism, including production of shorter C- and N-terminal truncated Aβ peptides, and production of peptides from the amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1), which is related to APP, and cleaved by the same enzymatic processing machinery. APLP1-derived peptides may be surrogate markers for Aβ1-42 production in the brain. Here, we used hybrid immunoaffinity-mass spectrometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to monitor several Aβ and APLP1 peptides in CSF from DS patients (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 20). CSF levels of Aβ1-42 and three endogenous peptides derived from APLP1 (APL1β25, APL1β27 and APL1β28) were decreased in DS compared with controls, while a specific Aβ peptide, Aβ1-28, was increased in a majority of the DS individuals. This study indicates that DS causes previously unknown specific alterations of APP and APLP1 metabolism.

  19. A novel transgenic rat model with a full Alzheimer's-like amyloid pathology displays pre-plaque intracellular amyloid-beta-associated cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Leon, Wanda Carolina; Canneva, Fabio; Partridge, Vanessa; Allard, Simon; Ferretti, Maria Teresa; DeWilde, Arald; Vercauteren, Freya; Atifeh, Ramtin; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Klein, William; Szyf, Moshe; Alhonen, Leena; Cuello, A Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology in which amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide accumulates in different brain areas leading to deposition of plaques and a progressive decline of cognitive functions. After a decade in which a number of transgenic (Tg) mouse models mimicking AD-like amyloid-deposition pathology have been successfully generated, few rat models have been reported that develop intracellular and extracellular Abeta accumulation, together with impairment of cognition. The generation of a Tg rat reproducing the full AD-like amyloid pathology has been elusive. Here we describe the generation and characterization of a new transgenic rat line, coded McGill-R-Thy1-APP, developed to express the human amyloid-beta precursor protein (AbetaPP) carrying both the Swedish and Indiana mutations under the control of the murine Thy1.2 promoter. The selected mono-transgenic line displays an extended phase of intraneuronal Abeta accumulation, already apparent at 1 week after birth, which is widespread throughout different cortical areas and the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus). Homozygous Tg animals eventually produce extracellular Abeta deposits and, by 6 months of age, dense, thioflavine S-positive, amyloid plaques are detected, associated with glial activation and surrounding dystrophic neurites. The cognitive functions in transgenic McGill-R-Thy1-APP rats, as assessed using the Morris water maze task, were found already altered as early as at 3 months of age, when no CNS plaques are yet present. The spatial cognitive impairment becomes more prominent in older animals (13 months), where the behavioral performance of Tg rats positively correlates with the levels of soluble Abeta (trimers) measured in the cortex.

  20. Self-Assembly of a 9-Residue Amyloid-Forming Peptide Fragment of SARS Corona Virus E-protein: Mechanism of Self Aggregation and Amyloid-Inhibition of hIAPP

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Jyotsna; Bera, Supriyo; Midya, Anupam; Fierke, Carol A.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly, a phenomenon widely observed in nature, has been exploited through organic molecules, proteins, DNA and peptides to study complex biological systems. These self-assembly systems may also be used in understanding the molecular and structural biology which can inspire the design and synthesis of increasingly complex biomaterials. Specifically, use of these building blocks to investigate protein folding and misfolding has been of particular value since it can provide tremendous insights into peptide aggregation related to a variety of protein misfolding diseases, or amyloid diseases (e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, type-II diabetes). Herein, the self-assembly of TK9, a 9 residue peptide of the extra membrane C-terminal tail of the SARS Corona virus envelope, and its variants were characterized through biophysical, spectroscopic and simulated studies, and it was confirmed that the structure of these peptides influence their aggregation propensity, hence, mimicking amyloid proteins. TK9, which forms a beta-sheet rich fibril, contains a key sequence motif that may be critical for beta-sheet formation, thus making it an interesting system to study amyloid fibrillation. TK9 aggregates were further examined through simulations to evaluate the possible intra- and inter peptide interactions at the molecular level. These self-assembly peptides can also serve as amyloid inhibitors through hydrophobic and electrophilic recognition interactions. Our results show that TK9 inhibits the fibrillation of hIAPP, a 37 amino acid peptide implicated in the pathology of type-II diabetes. Thus, biophysical and NMR experimental results have revealed a molecular level understanding of peptide folding events, as well as the inhibition of amyloid-protein aggregation are reported. PMID:25785896

  1. Amyloid-beta colocalizes with apolipoprotein B in absorptive cells of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Susan; Takechi, Ryusuke; Pallebage-Gamarallage, Menuka M S; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Mamo, John C L

    2009-10-22

    Amyloid-beta is recognized as the major constituent of senile plaque found in subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, there is increasing evidence that in a physiological context amyloid-beta may serve as regulating apolipoprotein, primarily of the triglyceride enriched lipoproteins. To consider this hypothesis further, this study utilized an in vivo immunological approach to explore in lipogenic tissue whether amyloid-beta colocalizes with nascent triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. In murine absorptive epithelial cells of the small intestine, amyloid-beta had remarkable colocalization with chylomicrons (Manders overlap coefficient = 0.73 +/- 0.03 (SEM)), the latter identified as immunoreactive apolipoprotein B. A diet enriched in saturated fats doubled the abundance of both amyloid-beta and apo B and increased the overlap coefficient of the two proteins (0.87 +/- 0.02). However, there was no evidence that abundance of the two proteins was interdependent within the enterocytes (Pearson's Coefficient < 0.02 +/- 0.03), or in plasma (Pearson's Coefficient < 0.01). The findings of this study are consistent with the possibility that amyloid-beta is secreted by enterocytes as an apolipoprotein component of chylomicrons. However, secretion of amyloid-beta appears to be independent of chylomicron biogenesis.

  2. Microglia, neuroinflammation, and beta-amyloid protein in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiyou; Hussain, M Delwar; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Compelling evidence from basic molecular biology has demonstrated the dual roles of microglia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On one hand, microglia are involved in AD pathogenesis by releasing inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cytokines, complement components, chemokines, and free radicals that are all known to contribute to beta-amyloid (Aβ) production and accumulation. On the other hand, microglia are also known to play a beneficial role in generating anti-Aβ antibodies and stimulating clearance of amyloid plaques. Aβ itself, an inducer of microglia activation and neuroinflammation, has been considered as an underlying and unifying factor in the development of AD. A vicious cycle of inflammation has been formed between Aβ accumulation, activated microglia, and microglial inflammatory mediators, which enhance Aβ deposition and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the vicious cycle seems to be a promising treatment to restrain further development of AD. With increasing research efforts on microglia in AD, intervention of microglia activation and neuroinflammation in AD may provide a potential target for AD therapy in spite of the provisional failure of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in clinical trials.

  3. Natural Modulators of Amyloid-Beta Precursor Protein Processing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Can; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease and the primary cause of dementia, with no cure currently available. The pathogenesis of AD is believed to be primarily driven by Aβ, the principal component of senile plaques. Aβ is an ~4 kDa peptide generated from the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) through proteolytic secretases. Natural products, particularly those utilized in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), have a long history alleviating common clinical disorders, including dementia. However, the cell/molecular pathways mediated by these natural products are largely unknown until recently when the underlying molecular mechanisms of the disorders begin to be elucidated. Here, the mechanisms with which natural products modulate the pathogenesis of AD are discussed, in particular, by focusing on their roles in the processing of APP. PMID:22998566

  4. Identification of Core Segment of Amyloidal Peptide Mediated by Chaperone Molecules by using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2015-10-05

    We illustrate in this work that pristine assemblies of amyloidal peptides can be obtained by perturbations of reduced scanning bias, and show a broad distribution in peptide length. In contrast, the chaperone-mediated peptide co-assembly presents ordered lamellar structures with a homogeneous distribution in length, which could be attributed to the core segment of the peptide. The efforts are beneficial for gaining insight into the aggregation propensity of peptides and inter-peptide interactions.

  5. Emergence of Alternative Structures in Amyloid Beta 1-42 Monomeric Landscape by N-terminal Hexapeptide Amyloid Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Srirupa; Das, Payel

    2017-08-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into senile plaques in the brain. While most familial mutations are associated with early-onset AD, recent studies report the AD-protective nature of two genetic human Aβ variants, i.e. A2T and A2V, in the heterozygous state. The mixture of A2V Aβ1-6 (Aβ6) hexapeptide and WT Aβ1-42 (Αβ42) is also found neuroprotective. Motivated by these findings, in this study we investigate the effects of WT, A2V, and A2T Aβ6 hexapeptide binding on the monomeric WT Aβ42 landscape. For this purpose, we have performed extensive atomistic Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics simulations, elucidating preferential binding of Aβ42 with the A2V and A2T hexapeptides compared to WT Aβ6. A notable reorganization of the Aβ42 landscape is revealed due to hexapeptide association, as manifested by lowering of transient interactions between the central and C-terminal hydrophobic patches. Concurrently, Aβ6-bound Aβ42 monomer exhibits alternative structural features that are strongly dependent on the hexapeptide sequence. For example, a central helix is more frequently populated within the A2T-bound monomer, while A2V-bound Aβ42 is often enhanced in overall disorder. Taken together, the present simulations offer novel molecular insights onto the effect of the N-terminal hexapeptide binding on the Aβ42 monomer structure, which might help in explaining their reported amyloid inhibition properties.

  6. Stereotaxic Infusion of Oligomeric Amyloid-beta into the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Ying Y.; Baleriola, Jimena; Fà, Mauro; Hengst, Ulrich; Troy, Carol M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease affecting the aging population. A key neuropathological feature of the disease is the over-production of amyloid-beta and the deposition of amyloid-beta plaques in brain regions of the afflicted individuals. Throughout the years scientists have generated numerous Alzheimer’s disease mouse models that attempt to replicate the amyloid-beta pathology. Unfortunately, the mouse models only selectively mimic the disease features. Neuronal death, a prominent effect in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients, is noticeably lacking in these mice. Hence, we and others have employed a method of directly infusing soluble oligomeric species of amyloid-beta - forms of amyloid-beta that have been proven to be most toxic to neurons - stereotaxically into the brain. In this report we utilize male C57BL/6J mice to document this surgical technique of increasing amyloid-beta levels in a select brain region. The infusion target is the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus because this brain structure, along with the basal forebrain that is connected by the cholinergic circuit, represents one of the areas of degeneration in the disease. The results of elevating amyloid-beta in the dentate gyrus via stereotaxic infusion reveal increases in neuron loss in the dentate gyrus within 1 week, while there is a concomitant increase in cell death and cholinergic neuron loss in the vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca of the basal forebrain. These effects are observed up to 2 weeks. Our data suggests that the current amyloid-beta infusion model provides an alternative mouse model to address region specific neuron death in a short-term basis. The advantage of this model is that amyloid-beta can be elevated in a spatial and temporal manner. PMID:26132278

  7. Beta-amyloid protein-containing inclusions in skeletal muscle of apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, T. A.; Dutton, N. S.; Martins, R. N.; Roses, A. D.; Kakulas, B. A.; Papadimitriou, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The tibialis anterior muscle and soleus muscle of apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice were examined by light and electron microscopy. By light microscopy, sarcoplasmic inclusions were seen in tibialis anterior muscle and 40% of type 2 myofibers were affected in all animals over 8 months of age. These inclusions reacted for nonspecific esterase, cytochrome oxidase, and myoadenylate deaminase and were also periodic acid Schiff positive and stained basophilic with hematoxylin. Moreover, they reacted immunocytochemically with an antibody specific to fragment 17 to 24 of the published sequence of Alzheimer's cerebrovascular amyloid peptide. Immunoreactivity was lost when the antibody was adsorbed with the appropriate synthetic peptide. Ultrastructurally, the inclusions consisted of tubular arrays and were similar to those observed in human muscle in several pathological conditions. In type 1 myofibers of both tibialis anterior and soleus muscle, however, mitochondrial abnormalities including an increase in their number and size were detected, but tubular aggregates were not seen. These large mitochondria possessed an electron-dense inner chamber with an increased number of tightly packed cristae. The results obtained suggest that in these mice there is a disturbed lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle fibers that manifests itself with an accumulation of phospholipid in the form of sarcoplasmic reticulum tubules in the type 2 fibers and enlarged mitochondria with tightly packed cristae in the type 1 fibers. In addition, beta-amyloid protein was closely associated with the accumulated tubules and vesicles of sarcoplasmic reticulum and may represent dysregulation of amyloid precursor protein metabolism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9033257

  8. Proinflammatory cytokines released from microglia inhibit gap junctions in astrocytes: potentiation by beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Même, William; Calvo, Charles-Félix; Froger, Nicolas; Ezan, Pascal; Amigou, Edwige; Koulakoff, Annette; Giaume, Christian

    2006-03-01

    Brain inflammation is characterized by a reactive gliosis involving the activation of astrocytes and microglia. This process, common to many brain injuries and diseases, underlies important phenotypic changes in these two glial cell types. One characteristic feature of astrocytes is their high level of intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions. Previously, we have reported that astrocyte gap junctional communication (AGJC) and the expression of connexin 43 (Cx43), the main constitutive protein of gap junctions, are inhibited in microglia (MG)-astrocyte cocultures. Here, we report that bacterial lipopolysaccharide activation of microglia increases their inhibitory effect on Cx43 expression and AGJC. This inhibition is mimicked by treating astrocyte cultures with conditioned medium harvested from activated microglia. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were identified as being the main factors responsible for this conditioned medium-mediated activity. Interestingly, an inflammatory response characterized by MG activation and reactive astrocytes occurs in Alzheimer's disease, at sites of beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposits. We found that this peptide potentiates the inhibitory effect of a conditioned medium diluted at a concentration that is not effective per se. This potentiation is prevented by treating astrocytes with specific blockers of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha activities. Thus, the suppression of communication between astrocytes, induced by activated MG could contribute to the proposed role of reactive gliosis in this neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Identification of distinct physiochemical properties of toxic prefibrillar species formed by A{beta} peptide variants

    SciTech Connect

    Goeransson, Anna-Lena; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Kagedal, Katarina; Brorsson, Ann-Christin

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of toxic prefibrillar A{beta} species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence measurements using a combined set of fluorophores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology studies using transmission electron microscopy. -- Abstract: The formation of amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) aggregates at an early stage during the self-assembly process is an important factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The toxic effect is believed to be exerted by prefibrillar species of A{beta}. It is therefore important to identify which prefibrillar species are toxic and characterize their distinct properties. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro aggregation behavior of A{beta}-derived peptides possessing different levels of neurotoxic activity, using fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with transmission electron microscopy. The toxicity of various A{beta} aggregates was assessed by using cultures of human neuroblastoma cells. Through combined use of the fluorescence probe 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonate (ANS) and the novel luminescent probe pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid (p-FTAA), we were able to identify those A{beta} peptide-derived prefibrillar species which exhibited cellular toxicity. In particular, species, which formed early during the aggregation process and showed strong p-FTAA and ANS fluorescence, were the species that possessed toxic activities. Moreover, by manipulating the aggregation conditions, it was possible to change the capacity of the A{beta} peptide to form nontoxic versus toxic species.

  10. Nicotinic receptors, amyloid-beta, and synaptic failure in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jürgensen, Sofia; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2010-01-01

    Dysfunctional cholinergic transmission is thought to underlie, at least in part, memory impairment and cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is still unclear whether this is a consequence of the loss of cholinergic neurons and elimination of nicotinic acetycholine receptors (nAChRs) in AD brain or of a direct impact of molecular interactions of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide with nAChRs, leading to dysregulation of receptor function. This review examines recent progress in our understanding of the roles of nicotinic receptors in mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, molecular interactions of Abeta with nAChRs, and how Abeta-induced dysregulation of nicotinic receptor function may underlie synaptic failure in AD.

  11. Picomolar AmyloidPeptides Enhance Spontaneous Astrocyte Calcium Transients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Kosuri, Pallav; Arancio, Ottavio

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are constitutively produced in the brain throughout life via mechanisms that can be regulated by synaptic activity. Although Aβ has been extensively studied as the pathological plaque-forming protein species in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), little is known about the normal physiological function(s) and signaling pathway(s). We previously discovered that physiologically-relevant, low picomolar amounts of Aβ can enhance synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent cognition in mice. In this study, we demonstrated that astrocytes are cellular candidates for participating in this type of Aβ signaling. Using calcium imaging of primary astrocyte cultures, we observed that picomolar amounts of Aβ peptides can enhance spontaneous intracellular calcium transient signaling. After application of 200 pM Aβ42 peptides, the frequency and amplitude averages of spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients were significantly increased. These effects were dependent on α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs), as the enhancement effects were blocked by a pharmacological α7-nAChR inhibitor and in astrocytes from an α7 deficient mouse strain. We additionally examined evoked intercellular calcium wave signaling but did not detect significant picomolar Aβ-induced alterations in propagation parameters. Overall, these results indicate that at a physiologically-relevant low picomolar concentration, Aβ peptides can enhance spontaneous astrocyte calcium transient signaling via α7-nAChRs. Since astrocyte-mediated gliotransmission has been previously found to have neuromodulatory roles, Aβ peptides may have a normal physiological function in regulating neuron-glia signaling. Dysfunction of this signaling process may underlie glia-based aspects of AD pathogenesis. PMID:23948929

  12. Beta-amyloid 25 to 35 is intercalated in anionic and zwitterionic lipid membranes to different extents.

    PubMed Central

    Dante, Silvia; Hauss, Thomas; Dencher, Norbert A

    2002-01-01

    Neuronal plasma membranes are thought to be the primary target of the neurotoxic beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta) in the pathogenesis of the Alzheimer's disease. Histologically, Abeta peptides are observed as extracellular macroscopic senile plaques, and most biophysical techniques have indicated the presence of Abeta close to the lipid headgroup region but not in the core of the membrane bilayers. The focus of this study is an investigation of the interaction between Abeta and lipid bilayers from a structural point of view. Neutron diffraction with the use of selectively deuterated amino acids has allowed us to determine unambiguously the position of the neurotoxic fragment Abeta (25-35) in the membrane. Two populations of the peptide are detected, one in the aqueous vicinity of the membrane surface and the second inside the hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane. The location of the C terminus was studied in two different lipid compositions and was found to be dependent on the surface charge of the membrane. The localization of beta-amyloid peptides in cell membranes will offer new insights on their mechanism in the neurodegenerative process associated with Alzheimer's disease and might provide clues for therapeutic developments. PMID:12414694

  13. The conformations of the amyloid-beta (21-30) fragment can be described by three families in solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2006-08-28

    Alzheimer's disease has been linked to the self-assembly of the amyloid-beta protein of 40 and 42 residues. Although monomers are in equilibrium with higher-order species ranging from dimers to heptamers, structural knowledge of the monomeric amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides is an important issue. Recent experimental data have shown that the fragment (21-30) is protease-resistant within full-length Abeta peptides and displays two structural families in solution. Because the details of the Abeta(21-30) structures found using distinct force fields and protocols differ at various degrees from those of the NMR structures, we revisit the conformational space of this peptide using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) coupled with a coarse-grained force field (OPEP v.3.0). We find that although Abeta(21-30) does not have a secondary structure, it dominantly populates three structural families, with a loop spanning residues Val24-Lys28. The first two families, which differ in the nature of the electrostatic interactions, satisfy the five interproton rotating frame nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) distances and superpose well onto the NMR structures. The third family, which cannot be seen by ROESY NMR experiments, displays a more open structure. This numeric study complements the experimental results by providing a much more detailed description of the dominant structures. Moreover, it provides further evidence of the capability of ART OPEP in providing a reliable conformational picture of peptides in solution.

  14. Caffeine, through adenosine A3 receptor-mediated actions, suppresses amyloid beta precursor protein internalization and amyloid beta generation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Geiger, Nicholas H.; Soliman, Mahmoud L.; Hui, Liang; Geiger, Jonathan D.; Chen, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation and extracellular deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) protein continues to be implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), be it familial in origin or sporadic in nature. Aβ is generated intracellularly following endocytosis of amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP) and consequently factors that suppress AβPP internalization may decrease amyloidogenic processing of AβPP. Here we tested the hypothesis that caffeine decreases Aβ generation by suppressing AβPP internalization in primary cultured neurons. Caffeine concentration-dependently blocked LDL cholesterol internalization and a specific adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) antagonist as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs mimicked the effects of caffeine on neuronal internalization of LDL cholesterol. Further implicating A3Rs were findings that a specific A3R agonist increased neuronal internalization of LDL cholesterol. In addition, caffeine as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs blocked the ability of LDL cholesterol to increase Aβ levels. Furthermore, caffeine blocked LDL cholesterol-induced decreases in AβPP protein levels in neuronal plasma membranes, increased surface expression of AβPP on neurons, and the A3R antagonist as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs mimicked the effects of caffeine on AβPP surface expression. Moreover, the A3R agonist decreased neuronal surface expression of AβPP. Our findings suggest that caffeine exerts protective effects against amyloidogenic processing of AβPP at least in part by suppressing A3R-mediated internalization of AβPP. PMID:26402756

  15. AmyloidPeptide: Dr. Jekyll or Mr. Hyde?

    PubMed Central

    Puzzo, Daniela; Arancio, Ottavio

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidpeptide (Aβ) is considered a key protein in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because of its neurotoxicity and capacity to form characteristic insoluble deposits known as senile plaques. Aβ derives from amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), whose proteolytic processing generates several fragments including Aβ peptides of various lengths. The normal function of AβPP and its fragments remains poorly understood. While some fragments has been suggested to have a function in normal physiological cellular processes, Aβ has been widely considered as a “garbage” fragment that becomes toxic when it accumulates in the brain, resulting in impaired synaptic function and memory. Aβ is produced and released physiologically in the healthy brain during neuronal activity. In the last 10 years, we have been investigating whether Aβ plays a physiological role in the brain. We first demonstrated that picomolar concentrations of a human Aβ42 preparation enhanced synaptic plasticity and memory in mice. Next, we investigated the role of endogenous Aβ in healthy murine brains and found that treatment with a specific antirodent Aβ antibody and an siRNA against murine AβPP impaired synaptic plasticity and memory. The concurrent addition of human Aβ42 rescued these deficits, suggesting that in the healthy brain, physiological Aβ concentrations are necessary for normal synaptic plasticity and memory to occur. Furthermore, the effect of both exogenous and endogenous Aβ was seen to be mediated by modulation of neurotransmitter release and α7-nicotinic receptors. These findings need to be taken into consideration when designing novel therapeutic strategies for AD. PMID:22735675

  16. Amyloidpeptide: Dr. Jekyll or Mr. Hyde?

    PubMed

    Puzzo, Daniela; Arancio, Ottavio

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidpeptide (Aβ) is considered a key protein in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) because of its neurotoxicity and capacity to form characteristic insoluble deposits known as senile plaques. Aβ derives from amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), whose proteolytic processing generates several fragments including Aβ peptides of various lengths. The normal function of AβPP and its fragments remains poorly understood. While some fragments have been suggested to have a function in normal physiological cellular processes, Aβ has been widely considered as a "garbage" fragment that becomes toxic when it accumulates in the brain, resulting in impaired synaptic function and memory. Aβ is produced and released physiologically in the healthy brain during neuronal activity. In the last 10 years, we have been investigating whether Aβ plays a physiological role in the brain. We first demonstrated that picomolar concentrations of a human Aβ42 preparation enhanced synaptic plasticity and memory in mice. Next, we investigated the role of endogenous Aβ in healthy murine brains and found that treatment with a specific antirodent Aβ antibody and an siRNA against murine AβPP impaired synaptic plasticity and memory. The concurrent addition of human Aβ42 rescued these deficits, suggesting that in the healthy brain, physiological Aβ concentrations are necessary for normal synaptic plasticity and memory to occur. Furthermore, the effect of both exogenous and endogenous Aβ was seen to be mediated by modulation of neurotransmitter release and α7-nicotinic receptors. These findings need to be taken into consideration when designing novel therapeutic strategies for AD.

  17. Unwinding fibril formation of medin, the peptide of the most common form of human amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Annika; Soederberg, Linda; Westermark, Gunilla T.; Sletten, Knut; Engstroem, Ulla; Tjernberg, Lars O.; Naeslund, Jan; Westermark, Per

    2007-10-05

    Medin amyloid affects the medial layer of the thoracic aorta of most people above 50 years of age. The consequences of this amyloid are not completely known but the deposits may contribute to diseases such as thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection or to the general diminished elasticity of blood vessels seen in elderly people. We show that the 50-amino acid residue peptide medin forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. With the use of Congo red staining, Thioflavin T fluorescence, electron microscopy, and a solid-phase binding assay on different synthetic peptides, we identified the last 18-19 amino acid residues to constitute the amyloid-promoting region of medin. We also demonstrate that the two C-terminal phenylalanines, previously suggested to be of importance for amyloid formation, are not required for medin amyloid formation.

  18. Unwinding fibril formation of medin, the peptide of the most common form of human amyloid.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Annika; Söderberg, Linda; Westermark, Gunilla T; Sletten, Knut; Engström, Ulla; Tjernberg, Lars O; Näslund, Jan; Westermark, Per

    2007-10-05

    Medin amyloid affects the medial layer of the thoracic aorta of most people above 50 years of age. The consequences of this amyloid are not completely known but the deposits may contribute to diseases such as thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection or to the general diminished elasticity of blood vessels seen in elderly people. We show that the 50-amino acid residue peptide medin forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. With the use of Congo red staining, Thioflavin T fluorescence, electron microscopy, and a solid-phase binding assay on different synthetic peptides, we identified the last 18-19 amino acid residues to constitute the amyloid-promoting region of medin. We also demonstrate that the two C-terminal phenylalanines, previously suggested to be of importance for amyloid formation, are not required for medin amyloid formation.

  19. apl-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans gene encoding a protein related to the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, I; Li, C

    1993-01-01

    The major component of senile plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer disease patients is the beta-amyloid peptide, which is derived from a larger amyloid precursor protein (APP). Recently, a number of APP and APP-related proteins have been identified in different organisms and constitute the family of APP proteins. We have isolated several cDNAs encoding an APP-related protein in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and have designated the corresponding gene as apl-1. The apl-1 transcripts undergo two forms of posttranscriptional modification: trans-splicing and alternative polyadenylylation. In vitro translation of an apl-1 cDNA results in a protein of approximately the expected size. Similar to the Drosophila, human, and mouse APP-related proteins, APL-1 does not appear to contain the beta-amyloid peptide. Because APP-related proteins seem to be conserved through evolution, the apl-1 gene from C. elegans should be important for determining the normal function of human APP. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8265668

  20. Identification of a Novel Parallel β‐Strand Conformation within Molecular Monolayer of Amyloid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Xiaofeng; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Li, Jingyuan; Liu, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of protein properties and biological functions arises from the variation in the primary and secondary structure. Specifically, in abnormal assemblies of protein, such as amyloid peptide, the secondary structure is closely correlated with the stable ensemble and the cytotoxicity. In this work, the early Aβ33‐42 aggregates forming the molecular monolayer at hydrophobic interface are investigated. The molecular monolayer of amyloid peptide Aβ33‐42 consisting of novel parallel β‐strand‐like structure is further revealed by means of a quantitative nanomechanical spectroscopy technique with force controlled in pico‐Newton range, combining with molecular dynamic simulation. The identified parallel β‐strand‐like structure of molecular monolayer is distinct from the antiparallel β‐strand structure of Aβ33‐42 amyloid fibril. This finding enriches the molecular structures of amyloid peptide aggregation, which could be closely related to the pathogenesis of amyloid disease. PMID:27818898

  1. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-06-29

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca(2+)-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined "membrane therapy") targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein.

  2. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca2+-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined “membrane therapy”) targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. PMID:27352802

  3. Amyloid β Peptide-Induced Changes in Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Its Response to Hippocampal Input.

    PubMed

    Flores-Martínez, Ernesto; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function and abnormalities in its interactions with other brain areas (i.e., the hippocampus) have been related to Alzheimer Disease (AD). Considering that these malfunctions correlate with the increase in the brain's amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide production, here we looked for a causal relationship between these pathognomonic signs of AD. Thus, we tested whether or not Aβ affects the activity of the PFC network and the activation of this cortex by hippocampal input stimulation in vitro. We found that Aβ application to brain slices inhibits PFC spontaneous network activity as well as PFC activation, both at the population and at the single-cell level, when the hippocampal input is stimulated. Our data suggest that Aβ can contribute to AD by disrupting PFC activity and its long-range interactions throughout the brain.

  4. Amyloid β Peptide-Induced Changes in Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Its Response to Hippocampal Input

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Martínez, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function and abnormalities in its interactions with other brain areas (i.e., the hippocampus) have been related to Alzheimer Disease (AD). Considering that these malfunctions correlate with the increase in the brain's amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide production, here we looked for a causal relationship between these pathognomonic signs of AD. Thus, we tested whether or not Aβ affects the activity of the PFC network and the activation of this cortex by hippocampal input stimulation in vitro. We found that Aβ application to brain slices inhibits PFC spontaneous network activity as well as PFC activation, both at the population and at the single-cell level, when the hippocampal input is stimulated. Our data suggest that Aβ can contribute to AD by disrupting PFC activity and its long-range interactions throughout the brain. PMID:28127312

  5. Multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR investigation of the copper binding site of murine amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghun; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Sun Hee

    2015-01-26

    Copper-amyloid peptides are proposed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease, presumably by oxidative stress. However, mice do not produce amyloid plaques and thus do not suffer from Alzheimer's disease. Although much effort has been focused on the structural characterization of the copper- human amyloid peptides, little is known regarding the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid peptides. Thus, we investigated the structure of copper-murine amyloid peptides through multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with specific isotope labeling. Based on our pulsed EPR results, we found that Ala2, Glu3, His6, and His14 are directly coordinated with the copper ion in murine amyloid β peptides at pH 8.5. This is the first detailed structural characterization of the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid β peptides. This work may advance the knowledge required for developing inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Brain Accumulation of Amyloid-beta in Non-Alzheimer Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Primavera, James; Lu, Bing-Xun; Riskind, Peter J.; Iulian, Maria; De La Monte, Suzanne M.

    1999-10-01

    We report an unusual case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) marked by extensive cerebral amyloid-beta deposition in small and medium-size vessels, capillaries, and perivascular plaques in the cerebral cortex, and in most leptomeningeal vessels. Despite considerable cerebral amyloidosis, the patient remained cognitively intact until death. For comparison with other neuro-degenerative diseases and normal aging, we assessed the densities of amyloid-beta-immunoreactive cortical vessels and plaques in matched frontal and temporal lobe sections from archival uncomplicated cases of Alzheimer's disease (N=10), Pick's disease (PkD; N=4), Parkinson's disease (PD; N=6), Diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD; N=7), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP; N=5), multiple systems atrophy (MSA; N=4), ALS (N=7), or normal aging (N=10) by semi-quantitative grading (0 to 3+). Moderate (2+) or abundant (3+) cerebrovascular amyloid-beta immunoreactivity was detected in 8/10 AD, 3/7 DLBD, 3/6 PD, 1 each with PSP or PkD, and 2/10 controls. Moderate or abundant densities of amyloid-beta-immunoreactive diffuse plaques were detected in all cases of AD or DLBD, 4/6 with PD, 3/5 with PSP, and 2/10 controls. Moderate or abundant amyloid-beta-immunoreactive mature (dense core) plaques were present in all cases of AD or DLBD, and 3 each with PD or PSP. Importantly, amyloid-beta-immunoreactivity was not observed in the 4 MSA or 7 archival ALS cases. This study demonstrates that prominent amyloid-beta accumulation in cerebral vessels and plaques occurs frequently in AD, DLBD, PSP, and PD, but not in ALS or MSA, indicating that the case described is unique. The lack of cognitive impairment in the case presented argues against the idea that extensive amyloid-beta deposition in the brain causes dementia.

  7. The evolution of A beta peptide burden in the APP23 transgenic mice: implications for A beta deposition in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Y. M.; Beach, T. G.; Sue, L. I.; Scott, S.; Layne, K. J.; Kokjohn, T. A.; Kalback, W. M.; Luehrs, D. C.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Abramowski, D.; Sturchler-Pierrat, C.; Staufenbiel, M.; Weller, R. O.; Roher, A. E.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High levels of A beta in the cerebral cortex distinguish demented Alzheimer's disease (AD) from nondemented elderly individuals, suggesting that decreased amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide clearance from the brain is a key precipitating factor in AD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The levels of A beta in brain and plasma as well as apolipoprotein E (ApoE) in brain were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting at various times during the life span of the APP23 transgenic (Tg) and control mice. Histochemistry and immunocytochemistry were used to assess the morphologic characteristics of the brain parenchymal and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits and the intracellular amyloid precursor protein (APP) deposits in the APP23 Tg mice. RESULTS: No significant differences were found in the plasma levels of A beta between the APP23 Tg and control mice from 2-20 months of age. In contrast, soluble A beta levels in the brain were continually elevated, increasing 4-fold at 2 months and 33-fold in the APP23 Tg mice at 20 months of age when compared to the control mice. Soluble A beta42 was about 60% higher than A beta40. In the APP23 Tg mice, insoluble A beta40 remained at basal levels in the brain until 9 months and then rose to 680 microg/g cortex by 20 months. Insoluble A beta40 was negligible in non-Tg mice at all ages. Insoluble A beta42 in APP23 Tg mice rose to 60 microg/g cortex at 20 months, representing 24 times the control A beta42 levels. Elevated levels of ApoE in the brain were observed in the APP23 Tg mice at 2 months of age, becoming substantially higher by 20 months. ApoE colocalized with A beta in the plaques. Beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaAPP) deposits were detected within the neuronal cytoplasm from 4 months of age onward. Amyloid angiopathy in the APP23 Tg mice increased markedly with age, being by far more severe than in the Tg2576 mice. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the APP23 Tg mouse may develop an earlier blockage

  8. Viral-induced inflammation is accompanied by beta-amyloid plaque reduction in brains of amyloid precursor protein transgenic Tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Tobias; Reimers, Christine; Johne, Reimar; Schliebs, Reinhard; Seeger, Johannes

    2006-10-01

    Amyloid plaques, one of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, and their main constituent, the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), are triggers of the activation of innate inflammatory mechanisms involving the activation of microglia. To dissect the effects of a non-Abeta-specific microglial activation on the Abeta metabolism, we employed a viral infection-based model. Transgenic mice expressing a mutated form of the human amyloid precursor protein (Tg2576) were used. In preceding experiments, 2-week-old transgenic mice and non-transgenic littermates were infected intracerebrally with the neurotropic Borna disease virus and investigated at 2, 4 and 14 weeks post-infection. The Borna disease virus-inoculated mice showed a persisting, subclinical infection of cortical and limbic brain areas characterized by slight T-cell infiltrates, expression of cytokines and a massive microglial activation in the hippocampus and neocortex. Viral-induced effects reached their peak at 4 weeks post-infection. In 14-month-old Tg2576 mice, characterized by the deposition of diffuse and dense-core amyloid plaques in cortical brain regions, Borna disease virus-induced microglial activation in the vicinity of Abeta deposits was used to investigate the influence of a local inflammatory response on these deposits. At 4 weeks post-infection, histometric analyses employing Abeta immunohistochemistry revealed a decrease of the cortical and hippocampal Abeta-immunopositive area. This overall decrease was accompanied by a decrease of parenchymal thioflavin-S-positive amyloid deposits and an increase of such deposits in the walls of cerebral vessels, which indicates that the elicitation of a non-Abeta-specific microglial activation may contribute to a reduction of Abeta in the brain parenchyma.

  9. Low-power laser irradiation inhibits amyloid beta-induced cell apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Wu, Shengnan

    2011-03-01

    The deposition and accumulation of amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain are considered a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease(AD). Apoptosis is a contributing pathophysiological mechanism of AD. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI), a non-damage physical therapy, which has been used clinically for decades of years, is shown to promote cell proliferation and prevent apoptosis. Recently, low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been applied to moderate AD. In this study, Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells were treated with amyloid beta 25-35 (Aβ25-35) for induction of apoptosis before LPLI treatment. We measured cell viability with CCK-8 according to the manufacture's protocol, the cell viability assays show that low fluence of LPLI (2 J/cm2 ) could inhibit the cells apoptosis. Then using statistical analysis of proportion of apoptotic cells by flow cytometry based on Annexin V-FITC/PI, the assays also reveal that low fluence of LPLI (2 J/cm2 ) could inhibit the Aβ-induced cell apoptosis. Taken together, we demonstrated that low fluence of LPLI (2 J/cm2 ) could inhibit the Aβ-induced cell apoptosis, these results directly point to a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD through LPLI.

  10. Intraneuronal amyloid beta accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Tamaoki, Toshio; Tanaka, Koich; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Masao; Hayashi, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Shimohama, Shun; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2010-03-01

    In an analysis of amyloid pathology in Alzheimer disease, we used an in situ approach to identify amyloid-beta (Abeta) accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in postmortem brain tissue of the hippocampal formation from subjects with Alzheimer disease. When carboxyl-terminal-specific antibodies directed against Abeta40 and Abeta42 were used for immunocytochemical analyses, Abeta42 was especially apparent within the neuronal cytoplasm, at sites not detected by the antibody specific to Abeta-oligomer. In comparison to the Abeta42-positive neurons, neurons bearing oxidative damage to nucleic acids were more widely distributed in the hippocampus. Comparative density measurements of the immunoreactivity revealed that levels of intraneuronal Abeta42 were inversely correlated with levels of intraneuronal 8-hydroxyguanosine, an oxidized nucleoside (r=- 0.61, p<0.02). Together with recent evidence that the Abeta peptide can act as an antioxidant, these results suggest that intraneuronal accumulation of non-oligomeric Abeta may be a compensatory response in neurons to oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

  11. Key aromatic/hydrophobic amino acids controlling a cross-amyloid peptide interaction versus amyloid self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Bakou, Maria; Hille, Kathleen; Kracklauer, Michael; Spanopoulou, Anna; Frost, Christina V; Malideli, Eleni; Yan, Li-Mei; Caporale, Andrea; Zacharias, Martin; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of the intrinsically disordered polypeptide islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), which is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide modulates their self-assembly into amyloid fibrils and may link the pathogeneses of these two cell-degenerative diseases. However, the molecular determinants of this interaction remain elusive. Using a systematic alanine scan approach, fluorescence spectroscopy, and other biophysical methods, including heterocomplex pulldown assays, far-UV CD spectroscopy, the thioflavin T binding assay, transmission EM, and molecular dynamics simulations, here we identified single aromatic/hydrophobic residues within the amyloid core IAPP region as hot spots or key residues of its cross-interaction with Aβ40(42) peptide. Importantly, we also find that none of these residues in isolation plays a key role in IAPP self-assembly, whereas simultaneous substitution of four aromatic/hydrophobic residues with Ala dramatically impairs both IAPP self-assembly and hetero-assembly with Aβ40(42). Furthermore, our experiments yielded several novel IAPP analogs, whose sequences are highly similar to that of IAPP but have distinct amyloid self- or cross-interaction potentials. The identified similarities and major differences controlling IAPP cross-peptide interaction with Aβ40(42) versus its amyloid self-assembly offer a molecular basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms. We propose that these insights will aid in designing intervention strategies and novel IAPP analogs for the management of type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, or other diseases related to IAPP dysfunction or cross-amyloid interactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Proteasome-mediated degradation of the C-terminus of the Alzheimer's disease beta-amyloid protein precursor: effect of C-terminal truncation on production of beta-amyloid protein.

    PubMed

    Nunan, Janelle; Williamson, Nicholas A; Hill, Andrew F; Sernee, M Fleur; Masters, Colin L; Small, David H

    2003-11-01

    The beta-amyloid protein (Abeta) is derived by proteolytic processing of the amyloid protein precursor (APP). Cleavage of APP by beta-secretase generates a C-terminal fragment (APP-CTFbeta), which is subsequently cleaved by gamma-secretase to produce Abeta. Our previous studies have shown that the proteasome can cleave the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of APP. To identify proteasome cleavage sites in APP, two peptides homologous to the C-terminus of APP were incubated with recombinant 20S proteasome. Cleavage of the peptides was monitored by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Proteasome cleaved the APP C-terminal peptides at several sites, including a region around the sequence YENPTY that interacts with several APP-binding proteins. To examine the effect of this cleavage on Abeta production, APP-CTFbeta and mutant forms of APP-CTFbeta terminating on either side of the YENPTY sequence were expressed in CHO cells. Truncation of APP-CTFbeta on the N-terminal side of the YENPTY sequence at residue 677 significantly decreased the amount of Abeta produced, whereas truncation on the C-terminal side of residue 690 had little effect. The results suggest that proteasomal cleavage of the cytosolic domain of APP at the YENPTY sequence decreases gamma-secretase processing, and consequently inhibits Abeta production. Therefore, the proteasome-dependent trafficking pathway of APP may be a valid therapeutic target for altering Abeta production in the Alzheimer's disease brain.

  13. Mifepristone alters amyloid precursor protein processing to preclude amyloid beta and also reduces tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Baglietto-Vargas, David; Medeiros, Rodrigo; Martinez-Coria, Hilda; LaFerla, Frank M; Green, Kim N

    2013-09-01

    Increased circulating glucocorticoids are features of both aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and increased glucocorticoids accelerate the accumulation of AD pathologies. Here, we analyzed the effects of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist mifepristone (RU486) in the 3xTg-AD mouse model at an age where hippocampal damage leads to high circulating corticosterone levels. The effects of mifepristone were investigated in 3xTg-AD mice using a combination of biochemical, histological, and behavior analyses. Mifepristone treatment rescues the pathologically induced cognitive impairments and markedly reduces amyloid beta (Aβ)-load and levels, as well as tau pathologies. Analysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing revealed concomitant decreases in both APP C-terminal fragments C99 and C83 and the appearance of a larger 17-kDa C-terminal fragment. Hence, mifepristone induces a novel C-terminal cleavage of APP that prevents it being cleaved by α- or β-secretase, thereby precluding Aβ generation in the central nervous system; this cleavage and the production of the 17-kDa APP fragment was generated by a calcium-dependent cysteine protease. In addition, mifepristone treatment also reduced the phosphorylation and accumulation of tau, concomitant with reductions in p25. Notably, deficits in cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein signaling were restored with the treatment. These preclinical results point to a potential therapeutic role for mifepristone as an effective treatment for AD and further highlight the impact the glucocorticoid system has as a regulator of Aβ generation. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Centella asiatica extract selectively decreases amyloid beta levels in hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease animal model.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan; Holcomb, Leigh A; Hitt, Angie R; Tharakan, Binu; Porter, Jami W; Young, Keith A; Manyam, Bala V

    2009-01-01

    PSAPP mice expressing the 'Swedish' amyloid precursor protein and the M146L presenilin 1 mutations are a well-characterized model for spontaneous amyloid beta plaque formation. Centella asiatica has a long history of use in India as a memory enhancing drug in Ayurvedic literature. The study investigated whether Centella asiatica extract (CaE) can alter the amyloid pathology in PSAPP mice by administering CaE (2.5 or 5.0 g/kg/day) starting at 2 months of age prior to the onset of detectable amyloid deposition and continued for either 2 months or 8 months. A significant decrease in amyloid beta 1-40 and 1-42 was detectable by ELISA following an 8 month treatment with 2.5 mg/kg of CaE. A reduction in Congo Red stained fibrillar amyloid plaques was detected with the 5.0 mg/kg CaE dose and long-term treatment regimen. It was also confirmed that CaE functions as an antioxidant in vitro, scavenging free radicals, reducing lipid peroxidation and protecting against DNA damage. The data indicate that CaE can impact the amyloid cascade altering amyloid beta pathology in the brains of PSAPP mice and modulating components of the oxidative stress response that has been implicated in the neurodegenerative changes that occur with Alzheimer's disease. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Initial stages of beta-amyloid Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 oligomerization observed using fluorescence decay and molecular dynamics analyses of tyrosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Mariana; Kubiak-Ossowska, Karina; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2013-03-01

    The development of Alzheimer’s disease is associated with the aggregation of the beta-amyloid peptides Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. It is believed that the small oligomers formed during the early stages of the aggregation are neurotoxic and involved in the process of neurodegeneration. In this paper we use fluorescence decay measurements of beta-amyloid intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine (Tyr) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the early stages of oligomer formation for the Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides in vitro. We demonstrate that the lifetime distributions of the amyloid fluorescence decay efficiently describe changes in the complex Tyr photophysics during the peptide aggregation and highlight the differences in aggregation performance of the two amyloids. Tyr fluorescence decay is found to be a more sensitive sensor of Aβ1-40 aggregation than Aβ1-42 aggregation. The MD simulation of the peptide aggregation is compared with the experimental data and supports a four-rotamer model of Tyr.

  16. Effect of the disulfide bridge and the C-terminal extension on the oligomerization of the amyloid peptide ABri implicated in familial British dementia.

    PubMed

    El-Agnaf, O M; Sheridan, J M; Sidera, C; Siligardi, G; Hussain, R; Haris, P I; Austen, B M

    2001-03-27

    Familial British dementia (FBD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder and shares features with Alzheimer's disease, including amyloid plaque deposits, neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal loss, and progressive dementia. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis of plaques and vascular amyloid of FBD brains revealed that a 4 kDa peptide named ABri is the main component of the highly insoluble amyloid deposits. In FBD patients, the ABri peptide is produced as a result of a point mutation in the usual stop codon of the BRI gene. This mutation produces a BRI precursor protein 11 amino acids longer than the wild-type protein. Mutant and wild-type precursor proteins both undergo furin cleavage between residues 243 and 244, producing a peptide of 34 amino acids in the case of ABri and 23 amino acids in the case of the wild-type (WT) peptide. Here we demonstrate that the intramolecular disulfide bond in ABri and the C-terminal extension are required to elongate initially formed dimers to oligomers and fibrils. In contrast, the shorter WT peptide did not aggregate under the same conditions. Conformational analyses indicate that the disulfide bond and the C-terminal extension of ABri are required for the formation of beta-sheet structure. Soluble nonfibrillar ABri oligomers were observed prior to the appearance of mature fibrils. A molecular model of ABri containing three beta-strands, and two beta-hairpins annealed by a disulfide bond, has been constructed, and predicts a hydrophobic surface which is instrumental in promoting oligomerization.

  17. Coaccumulation of calcium and beta-amyloid in the thalamus after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Susanna; van Groen, Thomas; Clarke, Jared; Thornell, Anders; Corbett, Dale; Hiltunen, Mikko; Soininen, Hilkka; Jolkkonen, Jukka

    2008-02-01

    Transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) in rats leads to abnormal accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in the thalamus. This study investigated the chemical composition of these deposits. Adult male human beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) overexpressing (hAPP695) rats and their wild-type littermates were subjected to transient MCAO for 2 h or sham operation. After 26-week survival time, histological examination revealed an overlapping distribution pattern for rodent and human Abeta in the thalamus of hAPP695 rats subjected to MCAO. X-ray microanalysis showed that the deposits did not contain significant amount of iron, zinc, or copper typical to senile plaques. In contrast, the deposit both in hAPP695 and non-transgenic rats contained calcium and phosphorus in a ratio (1.28+/-0.15) characteristic to hydroxyapatites. Alizarin red staining confirmed that calcium coaccumulated in these Abeta deposits. It is suggested that APP expression is induced by ischemic insult in cortical neurons adjacent to infarct, which in turn is reflected as increased release of Abeta peptides by their corticothalamic axon endings. This together with insufficient clearance or atypical degradation of Abeta peptides lead to dysregulation of calcium homeostatis and coaccumulation in the thalamus.

  18. Atomistic MD simulations reveal the protective role of cholesterol in dimeric beta-amyloid induced disruptions in neuronal membrane mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Cheng, Sara; Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Interactions of oligomeric beta-amyloid peptides with neuronal membranes have been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The molecular details of the interactions of different lipid components, particularly cholesterol (CHOL), of the membranes with the peptides are not clear. Using an atomistic MD simulations approach, the water permeability barrier, structural geometry and order parameters of binary phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/CHOL lipid bilayers were examined from various 200 ns-simulation replicates. Our results suggest that the longer length dimer (2 x 42 residues) perturbs the membrane more than the shorter one (2 x 40 residues). In addition, we discovered a significant protective role of cholesterol in protein-induced disruptions of the membranes. The use of a new Monte-Carlo method in characterizing the structures of the conformal annular lipids in close proximity with the proteins will be introduced. We propose that the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide may be associated with the nanodomain or raft-like structures of the neuronal membranes in-vivo in the development of AD.

  19. Red mold rice ameliorates impairment of memory and learning ability in intracerebroventricular amyloid beta-infused rat by repressing amyloid beta accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Lin; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Wang, Jyh-Jye; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) damaged neurons and further resulted in dementia. Monascus-fermented red mold rice (RMR), a traditional Chinese medicine as well as health food, includes monacolins (with the same function as statins) and multifunctional metabolites. In this study, ethanol extract of RMR (RE) was used to evaluate neuroprotection against Abeta40 neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Furthermore, the effects of dietary administration of RMR on memory and learning abilities are confirmed in an animal model of AD rats infused with Abeta40 into the cerebral ventricle. During continuous Abeta40 infusion for 28 days, the rats of test groups were administered RMR or lovastatin. Memory and learning abilities were evaluated in the water maze and passive avoidance tasks. After sacrifice, cerebral cortex and hippocampus were collected for the examination of AD risk factors. The in vitro results clearly indicate that RE provides stronger neuroprotection in rescuing cell viability as well as repressing inflammatory response and oxidative stress. RMR administration potently reverses the memory deficit in the memory task. Abeta40 infusion increases acetylcholinesterase activity, reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation and decreases total antioxidant status and superoxide dismutase activity in brain, but these damages were potently reversed by RMR administration, and the protection was more significant than that with lovastatin administration. The protection provided by RMR is able to prevent Abeta fibrils from being formed and deposited in hippocampus and further decrease Abeta40 accumulation, even though Abeta40 solution was infused into brain continuously.

  20. Amyloid-beta: a crucial factor in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sadigh-Eteghad, Saeed; Sabermarouf, Babak; Majdi, Alireza; Talebi, Mahnaz; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Mahmoudi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia which affects people older than 60 years of age. In AD, the dysregulation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) level leads to the appearance of senile plaques which contain Aβ depositions. Aβ is a complex biological molecule which interacts with many types of receptors and/or forms insoluble assemblies and, eventually, its nonphysiological depositions alternate with the normal neuronal conditions. In this situation, AD signs appear and the patients experience marked cognitional disabilities. In general, intellect, social skills, personality, and memory are influenced by this disease and, in the long run, it leads to a reduction in quality of life and life expectancy. Due to the pivotal role of Aβ in the pathobiology of AD, a great deal of effort has been made to reveal its exact role in neuronal dysfunctions and to finding efficacious therapeutic strategies against its adverse neuronal outcomes. Hence, the determination of its different molecular assemblies and the mechanisms underlying its pathological effects are of interest. In the present paper, some of the well-established structural forms of Aβ, its interactions with various receptors and possible molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying its neurotoxicity are discussed. In addition, several Aβ-based rodent models of AD are reviewed.

  1. Amyloid beta precursor protein regulates male sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Ho; Bonthius, Paul J; Tsai, Houng-Wei; Bekiranov, Stefan; Rissman, Emilie F

    2010-07-28

    Sexual behavior is variable between individuals, ranging from celibacy to sexual addictions. Within normal populations of individual men, ranging from young to middle aged, testosterone levels do not correlate with libido. To study the genetic mechanisms that contribute to individual differences in male sexual behavior, we used hybrid B6D2F1 male mice, which are a cross between two common inbred strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J). Unlike most laboratory rodent species in which male sexual behavior is highly dependent upon gonadal steroids, sexual behavior in a large proportion of these hybrid male mice after castration is independent of gonadal steroid hormones and their receptors; thus, we have the ability to discover novel genes involved in this behavior. Gene expression arrays, validation of gene candidates, and transgenic mice that overexpress one of the genes of interest were used to reveal genes involved in maintenance of male sexual behavior. Several genes related to neuroprotection and neurodegeneration were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus of males that continued to mate after castration. Male mice overexpressing the human form of one of these candidate genes, amyloid beta precursor protein (APP), displayed enhanced sexual behavior before castration and maintained sexual activity for a longer duration after castration compared with controls. Our results reveal a novel and unexpected relationship between APP and male sexual behavior. We speculate that declining APP during normal aging in males may contribute to the loss of sexual function.

  2. Pharmacology of the intracellular pathways activated by amyloid beta protein.

    PubMed

    Balleza-Tapia, Hugo; Peña, Fernando

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a late-life cognitive disorder associated, among other things, to the presence of extracellular aggregates of fibrillar amyloid beta protein (Abeta). However, there is growing evidence that early stages of AD may be due to neuronal network dysfunction produced by the actions of soluble forms of Abeta. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat AD, at least during its first stages, may be focused on preventing or reversing, the deleterious effects that soluble Abeta exerts on neuronal circuit function. In order to do so, it is necessary to elucidate the pathophysiological processes involved in Abeta-induced neuronal network dysfunction and the molecular processes underlying such dysfunction. Over the last decades, there has been extensive research about the molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of Abeta as well as possible neuroprotective strategies against such effects. Here we are going to review some of the intracellular pathways triggered by Abeta, which involve membrane receptors such as nicotinic-R, NMDA-R, integrins, TNF-R1, RAGE, FPRL and p75NTR and their intracellular mediators such as GSK3, PKC, PI3K, Akt, FAK, MAPK family, Src family and cdk5. Several of these pathways may constitute therapeutic targets for the treatment of the Abeta-induced neuronal network dysfunction which is, at least in part, the basis for cognitive dysfunction in AD.

  3. Amyloid Beta-Protein and Neural Network Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms underlying brain dysfunction induced by amyloid beta-protein (Aβ) represents one of the major challenges for Alzheimer's disease (AD) research. The most evident symptom of AD is a severe decline in cognition. Cognitive processes, as any other brain function, arise from the activity of specific cell assemblies of interconnected neurons that generate neural network dynamics based on their intrinsic and synaptic properties. Thus, the origin of Aβ-induced cognitive dysfunction, and possibly AD-related cognitive decline, must be found in specific alterations in properties of these cells and their consequences in neural network dynamics. The well-known relationship between AD and alterations in the activity of several neural networks is reflected in the slowing of the electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Some features of the EEG slowing observed in AD, such as the diminished generation of different network oscillations, can be induced in vivo and in vitro upon Aβ application or by Aβ overproduction in transgenic models. This experimental approach offers the possibility to study the mechanisms involved in cognitive dysfunction produced by Aβ. This type of research may yield not only basic knowledge of neural network dysfunction associated with AD, but also novel options to treat this modern epidemic. PMID:26316994

  4. Neuro-inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide causes cognitive impairment through enhancement of beta-amyloid generation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Woong; Lee, Yong Kyung; Yuk, Dong Yeon; Choi, Dong Young; Ban, Sang Bae; Oh, Ki Wan; Hong, Jin Tae

    2008-08-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by extensive loss of neurons in the brain of AD patients. Intracellular accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) has also shown to occur in AD. Neuro-inflammation has been known to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. In this study, we investigated neuro-inflammation and amyloidogenesis and memory impairment following the systemic inflammation generated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using immunohistochemistry, ELISA, behavioral tests and Western blotting. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS, (250 microg/kg) induced memory impairment determined by passive avoidance and water maze tests in mice. Repeated injection of LPS (250 microg/kg, 3 or 7 times) resulted in an accumulation of Abeta1-42 in the hippocampus and cerebralcortex of mice brains through increased beta- and gamma-secretase activities accompanied with the increased expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP), 99-residue carboxy-terminal fragment of APP (C99) and generation of Abeta1-42 as well as activation of astrocytes in vivo. 3 weeks of pretreatment of sulindac sulfide (3.75 and 7.5 mg/kg, orally), an anti-inflammatory agent, suppressed the LPS-induced amyloidogenesis, memory dysfunction as well as neuronal cell death in vivo. Sulindac sulfide (12.5-50 microM) also suppressed LPS (1 microg/ml)-induced amyloidogenesis in cultured neurons and astrocytes in vitro. This study suggests that neuro-inflammatory reaction could contribute to AD pathology, and anti-inflammatory agent could be useful for the prevention of AD.

  5. Tunable assembly of amyloid-forming peptides into nanosheets as a retrovirus carrier.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Li, Dan; Xi, Wenhui; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Xiang; Zou, Man; Cao, Mi; Hu, Jun; Wang, Wenyuan; Wei, Guanghong; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cong

    2015-03-10

    Using and engineering amyloid as nanomaterials are blossoming trends in bionanotechnology. Here, we show our discovery of an amyloid structure, termed "amyloid-like nanosheet," formed by a key amyloid-forming segment of Alzheimer's Aβ. Combining multiple biophysical and computational approaches, we proposed a structural model for the nanosheet that is formed by stacking the amyloid fibril spines perpendicular to the fibril axis. We further used the nanosheet for laboratorial retroviral transduction enhancement and directly visualized the presence of virus on the nanosheet surface by electron microscopy. Furthermore, based on our structural model, we designed nanosheet-forming peptides with different functionalities, elucidating the potential of rational design for amyloid-based materials with novel architecture and function.

  6. Tunable assembly of amyloid-forming peptides into nanosheets as a retrovirus carrier

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bin; Li, Dan; Xi, Wenhui; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Xiang; Zou, Man; Cao, Mi; Hu, Jun; Wang, Wenyuan; Wei, Guanghong; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cong

    2015-01-01

    Using and engineering amyloid as nanomaterials are blossoming trends in bionanotechnology. Here, we show our discovery of an amyloid structure, termed “amyloid-like nanosheet,” formed by a key amyloid-forming segment of Alzheimer’s Aβ. Combining multiple biophysical and computational approaches, we proposed a structural model for the nanosheet that is formed by stacking the amyloid fibril spines perpendicular to the fibril axis. We further used the nanosheet for laboratorial retroviral transduction enhancement and directly visualized the presence of virus on the nanosheet surface by electron microscopy. Furthermore, based on our structural model, we designed nanosheet-forming peptides with different functionalities, elucidating the potential of rational design for amyloid-based materials with novel architecture and function. PMID:25713359

  7. {alpha}-Lipoic acid exhibits anti-amyloidogenicity for {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2006-03-24

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of {alpha}-lipoic acid (LA) and the metabolic product of LA, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 {sup o}C in vitro. LA and DHLA dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-protein, as well as their extension. Moreover, they destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. LA and DHLA could be key molecules for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  8. Reduced oligomeric and vascular amyloid-beta following immunization of TgCRND8 mice with an Alzheimer's DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Kevin A; Brown, Mary E; McLaurin, JoAnne

    2009-02-25

    Immunization with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide reduces amyloid load in animal studies and in humans; however clinical trials resulted in the development of a pro-inflammatory cellular response to Abeta. Apoptosis has been employed to stimulate humoral and Th2-biased cellular immune responses. Thus, we sought to investigate whether immunization using a DNA vaccine encoding Abeta in conjunction with an attenuated caspase generates therapeutically effective antibodies. Plasmids encoding Abeta and an attenuated caspase were less effective in reducing amyloid pathology than those encoding Abeta alone. Moreover, use of Abeta with an Arctic mutation (E22G) as an immunogen was less effective than wild-type Abeta in terms of improvements in pathology. Low levels of IgG and IgM were generated in response to immunization with a plasmid encoding wild-type Abeta. These antibodies decreased plaque load by as much as 36+/-8% and insoluble Abeta42 levels by 56+/-3%. Clearance of Abeta was most effective when antibodies were directed against N-terminal epitopes of Abeta. Moreover, immunization reduced CAA by as much as 69+/-12% in TgCRND8 mice. Finally, high-molecular-weight oligomers and Abeta trimers were significantly reduced with immunization. Thus, immunization with a plasmid encoding Abeta alone drives an attenuated immune response that is sufficient to clear amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-28

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.

  10. Amyloid β-peptide (1-42)-induced oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease: importance in disease pathogenesis and progression.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D Allan; Swomley, Aaron M; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2013-09-10

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease. AD is characterized by progressive cognitive impairment. One of the main histopathological hallmarks of AD brain is the presence of senile plaques (SPs) and another is elevated oxidative stress. The main component of SPs is amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) that is derived from the proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein. Recent studies are consistent with the notion that methionine present at 35 position of Aβ is critical to Aβ-induced oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Further, we also discuss the signatures of oxidatively modified brain proteins, identified using redox proteomics approaches, during the progression of AD. The exact relationships of the specifically oxidatively modified proteins in AD pathogenesis require additional investigation. Further studies are needed to address whether the therapies directed toward brain oxidative stress and oxidatively modified key brain proteins might help delay or prevent the progression of AD.

  11. Effects of injected Alzheimer beta-amyloid cores in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Frautschy, S A; Baird, A; Cole, G M

    1991-01-01

    Although amyloid deposits have long been known to accumulate in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain, their origin and significance remain speculative. Because of the lack of an in vivo model where amyloid deposits can be induced, the relationship of the extracellular beta-amyloid deposits to other AD pathology has never been directly investigated. Therefore, we injected SDS-isolated amyloid cores into rat cortex and hippocampus. Similarly isolated lipofuscin fractions from control human brains were injected on the contralateral side. Rats were perfused and brains were examined immunohistochemically at 2 days, 7 days, and 1 month after injection. Alz-50, a monoclonal antibody against abnormally phosphorylated tau proteins, stained neurons along the cortical needle track at 2 but not 7 days after injection of either amyloid or lipofuscin. At 1 month, however, ubiquitin, Alz-50 antigen, and silver-positive structures were observed only in response to amyloid. In 7 of 10 animals, there was considerable neuronal loss in the hippocampal layers. In each instance, these effects were in the immediate vicinity of beta-protein immunoreactive material. Marked neuronal loss was never observed at any time after lipofuscin injection. These results indicate a neuronal response to amyloid. When preparations of mature plaque amyloid isolated from the AD brain are injected into the rat brain, they exert neurotoxic effects and induce antigens found in the AD brain. Images PMID:1924295

  12. Aggregation Behavior of Amyloid β1-42 Peptide Studied Using 55 MHz Wireless-Electrodeless Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogi, Hirotsugu; Hatanaka, Kenichi; Fukunishi, Yuji; Nagai, Hironao; Hirao, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Masayoshi

    2009-07-01

    A homebuilt wireless-electrodeless high frequency quartz crystal microbalance is adopted for long-time monitoring of the aggregation behavior of amyloid β1-42 peptide in a flow-cell system. The monomer amyloid peptides are immobilized on both surfaces of the crystal, and an amyloid-β solution is injected. The monotonic frequency decrease indicates aggregation on the crystal, which yields aggregation rate. Aggregation is observed even at a peptide concentration as low as 550 nM.

  13. Microglial responses to amyloid β peptide opsonization and indomethacin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Strohmeyer, Ronald; Kovelowski, Carl J; Mastroeni, Diego; Leonard, Brian; Grover, Andrew; Rogers, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that passive or active immunization with anti-amyloid β peptide (Aβ) antibodies may enhance microglial clearance of Aβ deposits from the brain. However, in a human clinical trial, several patients developed secondary inflammatory responses in brain that were sufficient to halt the study. Methods We have used an in vitro culture system to model the responses of microglia, derived from rapid autopsies of Alzheimer's disease patients, to Aβ deposits. Results Opsonization of the deposits with anti-Aβ IgG 6E10 enhanced microglial chemotaxis to and phagocytosis of Aβ, as well as exacerbated microglial secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Indomethacin, a common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), had no effect on microglial chemotaxis or phagocytosis, but did significantly inhibit the enhanced production of IL-6 after Aβ opsonization. Conclusion These results are consistent with well known, differential NSAID actions on immune cell functions, and suggest that concurrent NSAID administration might serve as a useful adjunct to Aβ immunization, permitting unfettered clearance of Aβ while dampening secondary, inflammation-related adverse events. PMID:16111494

  14. De novo designed peptide-based amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    López de la Paz, Manuela; Goldie, Kenneth; Zurdo, Jesús; Lacroix, Emmanuel; Dobson, Christopher M.; Hoenger, Andreas; Serrano, Luis

    2002-01-01

    Identification of therapeutic strategies to prevent or cure diseases associated with amyloid fibril deposition in tissue (Alzheimer's disease, spongiform encephalopathies, etc.) requires a rational understanding of the driving forces involved in the formation of these organized assemblies rich in β-sheet structure. To this end, we used a computer-designed algorithm to search for hexapeptide sequences with a high propensity to form homopolymeric β-sheets. Sequences predicted to be highly favorable on this basis were found experimentally to self-associate efficiently into β-sheets, whereas point mutations predicted to be unfavorable for this structure inhibited polymerization. However, the property to form polymeric β-sheets is not a sufficient requirement for fibril formation because, under the conditions used here, preformed β-sheets from these peptides with charged residues form well defined fibrils only if the total net charge of the molecule is ±1. This finding illustrates the delicate balance of interactions involved in the formation of fibrils relative to more disordered aggregates. The present results, in conjunction with x-ray fiber diffraction, electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared measurements, have allowed us to propose a detailed structural model of the fibrils. PMID:12456886

  15. Multifunctional cholinesterase and amyloid Beta fibrillization modulators. Synthesis and biological investigation.

    PubMed

    Butini, Stefania; Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Maramai, Samuele; Guarino, Egeria; Panico, Alessandro; Saxena, Ashima; Chauhan, Ved; Colombo, Raffaella; Verga, Laura; De Lorenzi, Ersilia; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2013-12-12

    In order to identify novel Alzheimer's modifying pharmacological tools, we developed bis-tacrines bearing a peptide moiety for specific interference with surface sites of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) binding amyloid-beta (Aβ). Accordingly, compounds 2a-c proved to be inhibitors of hAChE catalytic and noncatalytic functions, binding the catalytic and peripheral sites, interfering with Aβ aggregation and with the Aβ self-oligomerization process (2a). Compounds 2a-c in complex with TcAChE span the gorge with the bis-tacrine system, and the peptide moieties bulge outside the gorge in proximity of the peripheral site. These moieties are likely responsible for the observed reduction of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation since they physically hamper Aβ binding to the enzyme surface. Moreover, 2a was able to significantly interfere with Aβ self-oligomerization, while 2b,c showed improved inhibition of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation.

  16. MD-simulations of Beta-Amyloid Protein Insertion Efficiency and Kinetics into Neuronal Membrane Mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kwan

    2011-03-01

    Early interaction events of beta-amyloid (A β) peptides with the neuronal membranes play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We have used all-atom MD simulations to study the protein insertion efficiency and kinetics of monomeric A β40 and A β42 into phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers (PC) with and without 40 mole% cholesterol (CHOL) that mimic the cholesterol-enriched and depleted lipid nanodomains of the neuronal plasma membranes. Independent replicates of 200-ns simulations of each protein pre-inserted in the upper lipid layer were generated. In PC bilayers, only 25% of A β40 and 50% of A β42 in the replicates showed complete insertion into the lower lipid layer, whereas the percentages increased to 50% and 100%, respectively, in PC/CHOL bilayers, providing evidence that cholesterol improves the protein insertion efficiency into the bilayers. The rate of protein insertion was proportional to the hydrophobic, transmembrane helix length of the inserted peptide and depended on the cholesterol content. We propose that the lysine snorkeling and C-terminus anchoring of A β to the PC headgroups at the upper and lower lipid/water interfaces represent the dual-transmembrane stabilization mechanisms of A β in the neuronal membrane domains.

  17. Trehalose differentially inhibits aggregation and neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid 40 and 42.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruitian; Barkhordarian, Hedieh; Emadi, Sharareh; Park, Chan Beum; Sierks, Michael R

    2005-10-01

    A key event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis is the conversion of the peptide beta-amyloid (Abeta) from its soluble monomeric form into various aggregated morphologies in the brain. Preventing aggregation of Abeta is being actively pursued as a primary therapeutic strategy for treating AD. Trehalose, a simple disaccharide, has been shown to be effective in preventing the deactivation of numerous proteins and in protecting cells against stress. Here, we show that trehalose is also effective in inhibiting aggregation of Abeta and reducing its cytotoxicity, although it shows differential effects toward Abeta40 and Abeta42. When co-incubated with Abeta40, trehalose inhibits formation of both fibrillar and oligomeric morphologies as determined by fluorescence staining and atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, when co-incubated with Abeta42, trehalose inhibits formation only of the fibrillar morphology, with significant oligomeric formation still present. When aggregated mixtures were incubated with SH-SY5Y cells, trehalose was shown to reduce the toxicity of Abeta40 mixtures, but not Abeta42. These results provide additional evidence that aggregation of Abeta into soluble oligomeric forms is a pathological step in AD and that Abeta42 in particular is more susceptible to forming these toxic oligomers than Abeta40. These results also suggest that the use of trehalose, a highly soluble, low-priced sugar, as part of a potential therapeutic cocktail to control Abeta peptide aggregation and toxicity warrants further study.

  18. Multifunctional Cholinesterase and Amyloid Beta Fibrillization Modulators. Synthesis and Biological Investigation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify novel Alzheimer’s modifying pharmacological tools, we developed bis-tacrines bearing a peptide moiety for specific interference with surface sites of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) binding amyloid-beta (Aβ). Accordingly, compounds 2a–c proved to be inhibitors of hAChE catalytic and noncatalytic functions, binding the catalytic and peripheral sites, interfering with Aβ aggregation and with the Aβ self-oligomerization process (2a). Compounds 2a–c in complex with TcAChE span the gorge with the bis-tacrine system, and the peptide moieties bulge outside the gorge in proximity of the peripheral site. These moieties are likely responsible for the observed reduction of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation since they physically hamper Aβ binding to the enzyme surface. Moreover, 2a was able to significantly interfere with Aβ self-oligomerization, while 2b,c showed improved inhibition of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation. PMID:24900626

  19. Molten globule precursor states are conformationally correlated to amyloid fibrils of human beta-2-microglobulin.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2010-07-14

    Misfolding intermediates play a key role in defining aberrant protein aggregation and amyloid formation in more than 15 different human diseases. However, their experimental characterization is challenging due to the transient nature and conformational heterogeneity of the involved states. Here, we demonstrate that direct carbon-detected NMR experiments allow observation, assignment, and structural analysis of molten globule amyloid intermediates that are severely broadened by conformational exchange. The method is used to characterize the structure and dynamics of partially unfolded intermediates of the 99-residue protein beta-2-microglobulin, which is the major component of insoluble aggregates occurring in dialysis-related amyloidosis. Comparison of the conformational properties of the molten globule-like intermediates with levels of deuterium incorporation into amyloid fibrils of beta-2-microglobulin revealed a close relationship between the conformational properties of the metastable intermediates and the beta-sheet-rich insoluble aggregates of beta-2-microglobulin.

  20. Absence of beta-amyloid in cortical cataracts of donors with and without Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Michael, Ralph; Rosandić, Jurja; Montenegro, Gustavo A; Lobato, Elvira; Tresserra, Francisco; Barraquer, Rafael I; Vrensen, Gijs F J M

    2013-01-01

    Eye lenses from human donors with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD) were studied to evaluate the presence of amyloid in cortical cataract. We obtained 39 lenses from 21 postmortem donors with AD and 15 lenses from age-matched controls provided by the Banco de Ojos para Tratamientos de la Ceguera (Barcelona, Spain). For 17 donors, AD was clinically diagnosed by general physicians and for 4 donors the AD diagnosis was neuropathologically confirmed. Of the 21 donors with AD, 6 had pronounced bilateral cortical lens opacities and 15 only minor or no cortical opacities. As controls, 7 donors with pronounced cortical opacities and 8 donors with almost transparent lenses were selected. All lenses were photographed in a dark field stereomicroscope. Histological sections were analyzed using a standard and a more sensitive Congo red protocol, thioflavin staining and beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry. Brain tissue from two donors, one with cerebral amyloid angiopathy and another with advanced AD-related changes and one cornea with lattice dystrophy were used as positive controls for the staining techniques. Thioflavin, standard and modified Congo red staining were positive in the control brain tissues and in the dystrophic cornea. Beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry was positive in the brain tissues but not in the cornea sample. Lenses from control and AD donors were, without exception, negative after Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid immunohistochemical staining. The results of the positive control tissues correspond well with known observations in AD, amyloid angiopathy and corneas with lattice dystrophy. The absence of staining in AD and control lenses with the techniques employed lead us to conclude that there is no beta-amyloid in lenses from donors with AD or in control cortical cataracts. The inconsistency with previous studies of Goldstein et al. (2003) and Moncaster et al. (2010), both of which demonstrated positive Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid

  1. Solid-state NMR analysis of the {beta}-strand orientation of the protofibrils of amyloid {beta}-protein

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Takashi; Masuda, Yuichi; Irie, Kazuhiro; Akagi, Ken-ichi; Monobe, Youko; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Takegoshi, K.

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supramolecular structure of A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by solid-state NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala-21 residue in the A{beta}42 protofibrils is included in a slightly disordered {beta}-strand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The A{beta}42 protofibrils do not form intermolecular in-register parallel {beta}-sheets. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by abnormal deposition (fibrillation) of a 42-residue amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}42) in the brain. During the process of fibrillation, the A{beta}42 takes the form of protofibrils with strong neurotoxicity, and is thus believed to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AD. To elucidate the supramolecular structure of the A{beta}42 protofibrils, the intermolecular proximity of the Ala-21 residues in the A{beta}42 protofibrils was analyzed by {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C rotational resonance experiments in the solid state. Unlike the A{beta}42 fibrils, an intermolecular {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation was not found in the A{beta}42 protofibrils. This result suggests that the {beta}-strands of the A{beta}42 protofibrils are not in an in-register parallel orientation. A{beta}42 monomers would assemble to form protofibrils with the {beta}-strand conformation, then transform into fibrils by forming intermolecular parallel {beta}-sheets.

  2. In situ hybridization of nucleus basalis neurons shows increased. beta. -amyloid mRNA in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.L.; Golde, T.E.; Usiak, M.F.; Younkin, L.H.; Younkin, S.G.

    1988-02-01

    To determine which cells within the brain produce ..beta..-amyloid mRNA and to assess expression of the ..beta..-amyloid gene in Alzheimer disease, the authors analyzed brain tissue from Alzheimer and control patients by in situ hybridization. The results demonstrate that ..beta..-amyloid mRNA is produced by neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and cerebral cortex and that nuclues basalis perikarya from Alzheimer patients consistently hybridize more ..beta..-amyloid probe than those from controls. These observations support the hypothesis that increased expression of the ..beta..-amyloid gene plays an important role in the deposition of amyloid in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease.

  3. CSF amyloid-β-peptides in Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson's disease dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mollenhauer, Brit; Esselmann, Hermann; Lewczuk, Piotr; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang; Sparbier, Katrin; Smirnov, Alexandr; Cepek, Lukas; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Rüther, Eckart; Kornhuber, Johannes; Otto, Markus; Wiltfang, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Abstract As the differential diagnosis of dementias based on established clinical criteria is often difficult, biomarkers for applicable diagnostic testing are currently under intensive investigation. Amyloid plaques deposited in the brain of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) mainly consist of carboxy-terminally elongated forms of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides, such as Aβ1–42. Absolute Aβ1–42 levels in CSF have shown diagnostic value for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, but the discrimination among Alzheimer's disease, DLB and PDD was poor. A recently established quantitative urea-based Aβ-sodium-dodecylsulphate–polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis with Western immunoblot (Aβ-SDS–PAGE/immunoblot) revealed a highly conserved Aβ peptide pattern of the carboxy-terminally truncated Aβ peptides 1–37, 1–38, 1–39 in addition to 1–40 and 1–42 in human CSF. We used the Aβ-SDS–PAGE/immunoblot to investigate the CSF of 23 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 21 with DLB, 21 with PDD and 23 non-demented disease controls (NDC) for disease-specific alterations of the Aβ peptide patterns in its absolute and relative quantities. The diagnostic groups were matched for age and severity of dementia. The present study is the first attempt to evaluate the meaning of Aβ peptide patterns in CSF for differential diagnosis of the three neurodegenerative diseases—Alzheimer's disease, DLB and PDD. The Aβ peptide patterns displayed disease-specific variations and the ratio of the differentially altered Aβ1–42 to the Aβ1–37 levels subsequently discriminated all diagnostic groups from each other at a highly significant level, except DLB from PDD. Additionally, a novel peptide with Aβ-like immunoreactivity was observed constantly in the CSF of all 88 investigated patients. The pronounced percentage increase of this peptide in DLB allowed a highly significant discrimination from

  4. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily B; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J; Wall, Jonathan S

    2013-06-21

    In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as therapeutics for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  5. Identification of the primary peptide contaminant that inhibits fibrillation and toxicity in synthetic amyloid-β42

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Daniel J.; Nemkov, Travis G.; Mayer, John P.; Old, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease has relied upon the use of amyloid peptides from a variety of sources, but most predominantly synthetic peptides produced using t-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc) or 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry. These synthetic methods can lead to minor impurities which can have profound effects on the biological activity of amyloid peptides. Here we used a combination of cytotoxicity assays, fibrillation assays and high resolution mass spectrometry (MS) to identify impurities in synthetic amyloid preparations that inhibit both cytotoxicity and aggregation. We identify the Aβ42Δ39 species as the major peptide contaminant responsible for limiting both cytotoxicity and fibrillation of the amyloid peptide. In addition, we demonstrate that the presence of this minor impurity inhibits the formation of a stable Aβ42 dimer observable by MS in very pure peptide samples. These results highlight the critical importance of purity and provenance of amyloid peptides in Alzheimer’s research in particular, and biological research in general. PMID:28792968

  6. Self-assembling peptide and protein amyloids: from structure to tailored function in nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gang; Su, Zhiqiang; Reynolds, Nicholas P; Arosio, Paolo; Hamley, Ian W; Gazit, Ehud; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2017-07-31

    Self-assembled peptide and protein amyloid nanostructures have traditionally been considered only as pathological aggregates implicated in human neurodegenerative diseases. In more recent times, these nanostructures have found interesting applications as advanced materials in biomedicine, tissue engineering, renewable energy, environmental science, nanotechnology and material science, to name only a few fields. In all these applications, the final function depends on: (i) the specific mechanisms of protein aggregation, (ii) the hierarchical structure of the protein and peptide amyloids from the atomistic to mesoscopic length scales and (iii) the physical properties of the amyloids in the context of their surrounding environment (biological or artificial). In this review, we will discuss recent progress made in the field of functional and artificial amyloids and highlight connections between protein/peptide folding, unfolding and aggregation mechanisms, with the resulting amyloid structure and functionality. We also highlight current advances in the design and synthesis of amyloid-based biological and functional materials and identify new potential fields in which amyloid-based structures promise new breakthroughs.

  7. The iA{beta}5p {beta}-breaker peptide regulates the A{beta}(25-35) interaction with lipid bilayers through a cholesterol-mediated mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Vitiello, Giuseppe; Grimaldi, Manuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; D'Errico, Gerardino

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer iA{beta}5p shows a significant tendency to deeply penetrates the hydrophobic core of lipid membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}(25-35) locates in the external region of the membrane causing a re-positioning of CHOL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer iA{beta}5p withholds cholesterol in the inner hydrophobic core of the lipid membrane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer iA{beta}5p prevents the A{beta}(25-35) release from the lipid membrane. -- Abstract: Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the deposition of aggregates of the {beta}-amyloid peptide (A{beta}) in the brain. A potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease is the use of synthetic {beta}-sheet breaker peptides, which are capable of binding A{beta} but unable to become part of a {beta}-sheet structure, thus inhibiting the peptide aggregation. Many studies suggest that membranes play a key role in the A{beta} aggregation; consequently, it is strategic to investigate the interplay between {beta}-sheet breaker peptides and A{beta} in the presence of lipid bilayers. In this work, we focused on the effect of the {beta}-sheet breaker peptide acetyl-LPFFD-amide, iA{beta}5p, on the interaction of the A{beta}(25-35) fragment with lipid membranes, studied by Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy, using spin-labeled membrane components (either phospholipids or cholesterol). The ESR results show that iA{beta}5p influences the A{beta}(25-35) interaction with the bilayer through a cholesterol-mediated mechanism: iA{beta}5p withholds cholesterol in the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayer, making the interfacial region more fluid and capable to accommodate A{beta}(25-35). As a consequence, iA{beta}5p prevents the A{beta}(25-35) release from the lipid membrane, which is the first step of the {beta}-amyloid aggregation process.

  8. Specific interactions between amyloidpeptide and curcumin derivatives: Ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Kadoya, Ryushi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Murakawa, Takeru; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, it is effective to inhibit the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases. However, because the secretases also play important roles to produce vital proteins for human body, inhibitors for the secretases may have side effects. To propose new agents for protecting the cleavage site of APP from the attacking of the γ-secretase, we have investigated here the specific interactions between a short APP peptide and curcumin derivatives, using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations.

  9. Insulin-degrading enzyme degrades amyloid peptides associated with British and Danish familial dementia.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Laura; Llovera, Ramiro E; Alonso, Leonardo G; Frangione, Blas; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo; Ghiso, Jorge; Castaño, Eduardo M

    2005-07-08

    Familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD) are autosomal dominant disorders characterized by cerebrovascular and parenchymal amyloid deposition and neurofibrillary degeneration. In both conditions, the genetic defects cause the loss of the normal stop codon in the precursor BRI, generating novel 34-residue peptides named ABri and ADan in FBD and FDD, respectively. ABri and ADan show a strong tendency to aggregate into non-fibrillar and fibrillar structures at neutral pH and this property seems to be directly related to neurotoxicity. Here we report that a recombinant insulin-degrading enzyme (rIDE) was capable of degrading monomeric ABri and ADan in vitro more efficiently than oligomeric species. These peptides showed high beta-structure content and were more resistant to proteolysis as compared to the BRI wild-type product of 23 amino acids. Specific sites of cleavage within the C-terminal pathogenic extensions raise the possibility that proteolysis of monomeric soluble precursors by IDE may delay ABri and ADan aggregation in vivo.

  10. Oligomerization of beta-amyloid of the Alzheimer's and the Dutch-cerebral-haemorrhage types.

    PubMed Central

    Sian, A K; Frears, E R; El-Agnaf, O M; Patel, B P; Manca, M F; Siligardi, G; Hussain, R; Austen, B M

    2000-01-01

    A novel ELISA has been developed which detects oligomerization of beta-amyloid (A beta). Oligomerization, fibrillization and neurotoxicity of native A beta associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) type has been compared with E22Q A beta (amyloid beta-protein containing residues 1--40 with the native Glu at residue 22 changed to Gln) implicated in Dutch cerebral haemorrhage disease. Solutions of A beta rapidly yield soluble oligomers in a concentration-dependent manner, which are detected by the ELISA, and by size-exclusion gel chromatography. Conformational changes from disordered to beta-sheet occur more slowly than oligomerization, and fibrils are produced after prolonged incubation. The E22Q A beta oligomerizes, changes conformation and fibrillizes more rapidly than the native form and produces shorter stubbier fibrils. Aged fibrillar preparations of E22Q A beta are more potent than aged fibrils of native A beta in inducing apoptotic changes and toxic responses in human neuroblastoma cell lines, whereas low-molecular-mass oligomers in briefly incubated solutions are much less potent. The differences in the rates of oligomerization of the two A beta forms, their conformational behaviour over a range of pH values, and NMR data reported elsewhere, are consistent with a molecular model of oligomerization in which strands of A beta monomers initially overcome charge repulsion to form dimers in parallel beta-sheet arrangement, stabilized by intramolecular hydrophobic interactions, with amino acids of adjacent chains in register. PMID:10861242

  11. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  12. Benzalkonium Chloride Accelerates the Formation of the Amyloid Fibrils of Corneal Dystrophy-associated Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies. PMID:23861389

  13. Benzalkonium chloride accelerates the formation of the amyloid fibrils of corneal dystrophy-associated peptides.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-08-30

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies.

  14. AmyloidPeptide Exacerbates the Memory Deficit Caused by Amyloid Precursor Protein Loss-of-Function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bourdet, Isabelle; Lampin-Saint-Amaux, Aurélie; Preat, Thomas; Goguel, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). APP can undergo two exclusive proteolytic pathways: cleavage by the α-secretase initiates the non-amyloidogenic pathway while cleavage by the β-secretase initiates the amyloidogenic pathway that leads, after a second cleavage by the γ-secretase, to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that can form toxic extracellular deposits, a hallmark of AD. The initial events leading to AD are still unknown. Importantly, aside from Aβ toxicity whose molecular mechanisms remain elusive, several studies have shown that APP plays a positive role in memory, raising the possibility that APP loss-of-function may participate to AD. We previously showed that APPL, the Drosophila APP ortholog, is required for associative memory in young flies. In the present report, we provide the first analysis of the amyloidogenic pathway’s influence on memory in the adult. We show that transient overexpression of the β-secretase in the mushroom bodies, the center for olfactory memory, did not alter memory. In sharp contrast, β-secretase overexpression affected memory when associated with APPL partial loss-of-function. Interestingly, similar results were observed with Drosophila Aβ peptide. Because Aβ overexpression impaired memory only when combined to APPL partial loss-of-function, the data suggest that Aβ affects memory through the APPL pathway. Thus, memory is altered by two connected mechanisms—APPL loss-of-function and amyloid peptide toxicity—revealing in Drosophila a functional interaction between APPL and amyloid peptide. PMID:26274614

  15. The tissue plasminogen activator-plasminogen proteolytic cascade accelerates amyloid-beta (Abeta) degradation and inhibits Abeta-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Melchor, Jerry P; Pawlak, Robert; Strickland, Sidney

    2003-10-01

    Accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide depends on both its generation and clearance. To better define clearance pathways, we have evaluated the role of the tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-plasmin system in Abeta degradation in vivo. In two different mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, chronically elevated Abeta peptide in the brain correlates with the upregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and inhibition of the tPA-plasmin system. In addition, Abeta injected into the hippocampus of mice lacking either tPA or plasminogen persists, inducing PAI-1 expression and causing activation of microglial cells and neuronal damage. Conversely, Abeta injected into wild-type mice is rapidly cleared and does not cause neuronal degeneration. Thus, the tPA-plasmin proteolytic cascade aids in the clearance of Abeta, and reduced activity of this system may contribute to the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. An intracellular protein that binds amyloidpeptide and mediates neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Yan, Shi; Fu, Jin; Soto, Claudio; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Huaijie; Al-Mohanna, Futwan; Collison, Kate; Zhu, Aiping; Stern, Eric; Saido, Takaomi; Tohyama, Masaya; Ogawa, Satoshi; Roher, Alex; Stern, David

    1997-10-01

    Amyloid-β is a neurotoxic peptide which is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. It binds an intracellular polypeptide known as ERAB, thought to be a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme, which is expressed in normal tissues, but is overexpressed in neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease. ERAB immunoprecipitates with amyloid-β, and when cell cultures are exposed to amyloid-β, ERAB inside the cell is rapidly redistributed to the plasma membrane. The toxic effect of amyloid-β on these cells is prevented by blocking ERAB and is enhanced by overexpression of ERAB. By interacting with intracellular amyloid-β, ERAB may therefore contribute to the neuronal dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Amyloidpeptide aggregation and the influence of carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Hui, Xi; Guang-Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Soluble peptides or proteins can self-aggregate into insoluble, ordered amyloid fibrils under appropriate conditions. These amyloid aggregates are the hallmarks of several human diseases ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to systemic amyloidoses. In this review, we first introduce the common structural features of amyloid fibrils and the amyloid fibrillation kinetics determined from experimental studies. Then, we discuss the structural models of Alzheimer’s amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils derived from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. On the computational side, molecular dynamics simulations can provide atomic details of structures and the underlying oligomerization mechanisms. We finally summarize recent progress in atomistic simulation studies on the oligomerization of Aβ (including full-length Aβ and its fragments) and the influence of carbon nanoparticles. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274075 and 91227102).

  18. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    SciTech Connect

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  19. [Development of anti-Alzheimer's disease drug based on beta-amyloid hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2010-04-01

    Currently, there are five anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs approved. These are tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine. The mechanism of the first four drugs is acetylcholinesterase inhibition, while memantine is an NMDA-receptor antagonist. However, these drugs do not cure Alzheimer's, but are only symptomatic treatments. Therefore, a cure for Alzheimer's disease is truly needed. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by cognitive deficits. The cause of the disease is not well understood, but research indicates that the aggregation of beta-amyloid is the fundamental cause. This theory suggests that beta-amyloid aggregation causes neurotoxicity. Therefore, development of the next anti-Alzheimer's disease drug is based on the beta-amyloid theory. We are now studying natural products, such as mulberry leaf extracts and curcumin derivatives, as potential cure for Alzheimer's disease. In this report, we describe some data about these natural products and derivatives.

  20. Driving force of binding of amyloid {beta}-protein to lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Keisuke; Matsuzaki, Katsumi

    2008-06-06

    Amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}) has been reported to interact with a variety of lipid species, although the thermodynamic driving force remains unclear. We investigated the binding of A{beta}s labeled with the dye diethylaminocoumarin (DAC-A{beta}s) to lipid bilayers under various conditions. DAC-A{beta}-(1-40) electrostatically bound to anionic and cationic lipids at acidic and alkaline interfacial pH, respectively. However, at neutral pH, electroneutral A{beta} did not bind to these lipids, indicating little hydrophobic interaction between A{beta}-(1-40) and the acyl chains of lipids. In contrast, DAC-A{beta} associated with glycolipids even under electroneutral conditions. These results suggested that hydrogen-bonding as well as hydrophobic interactions with sugar groups of glycolipids drive the membrane binding of A{beta}-(1-40)

  1. Oligomers of the amyloid-beta protein disrupt working memory: confirmation with two behavioral procedures.

    PubMed

    Poling, Alan; Morgan-Paisley, Kineta; Panos, John J; Kim, Eun-Mee; O'Hare, Eugene; Cleary, James P; Lesné, Sylvain; Ashe, Karen H; Porritt, Matthew; Baker, Lisa E

    2008-11-21

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that oligomers of amyloid-beta play a role in the cognitive impairment characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, but only three studies have provided experimental evidence of such impairment. To provide additional information about the effects of these oligomers on memory, the present study examined the memory of groups of rats exposed to ICV injections of the culture media (CM) of Chinese Hamster Ovary cells that were (7PA2) and were not (CHO-) transfected with a human mutation of amyloid precursor protein that appears to cause early-onset Alzheimer's disease. The 7PA2 CM, which contained concentrations of soluble amyloid-beta oligomers physiologically relevant to those found in human brain, significantly disrupted working memory in rats tested in a radial-arm maze. In contrast, CHO- CM, which did not contain such oligomers, had no effect on memory. The disruptive effects of 7PA2-derived amyloid-beta oligomers, evident 2h after exposure, disappeared within a day. These findings are compared to results from 7PA2 CM tested under a complex procedure thought to measure aspects of executive function. The results confirm the disruptive effects of low-n amyloid-beta oligomers and extend them to a well-established rat model of memory.

  2. In silico study of amyloid beta-protein folding relevant to Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam Ng, Alfonso Ramon

    Amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) folding is the initial step in the formation of the early toxic Abeta assemblies that are critically linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abeta exists in two main alloforms, Abeta40 and Abeta42, composed of 40 and 42 residues, respectively. Abeta42 aggregates faster, forms more toxic assemblies, and is linked more strongly to AD. Two amino acids of Abeta42, I41 and A42, profoundly affect the behavior of Abeta40 and Abeta42. To examine why this happens, I study Abeta40 and Abeta42 folding using discrete molecular dynamics and a four-bead protein model with backbone hydrogen bonding and residue-specific effective hydropathic and electrostatic interactions. In particular, I explore a range of values of the hydropathic (EHP) and electrostatic (ECH) potential energies. For each peptide, I create a hundred different initial conformations for each set of parameters (EHP,E CH). I investigate the Abeta40 and Abeta42 monomer folding in a wide temperature range and quantify the folded structures by calculating the secondary structure propensities and the intramolecular contact maps. For each set of parameters (EHP,ECH), I calculate an average beta-strand secondary structure propensity in the Abeta40 and Abeta42 monomers as a function of temperature. I compare these simulated results with experimental circular dichroism measurements and estimate the model physiological temperature and the model parameters (E HP,ECH) that best fit the experimental conditions. The results show that in the temperature range [278K,350K], the average beta-strand in Abeta42 is larger than that of Abeta40, which is in agreement with experiments. The model predicts that the average beta-strand propensity should decrease for T>350K. At low temperatures, both Abeta40 and Abeta42 adopt a predominantly collapsed-coil conformation with small amounts of an beta-helical secondary structure (<1%). At high temperatures, beta-strand rich structures are more prominent (19%). Also, the

  3. Beta-amyloid deposition in chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Montenigro, Philip H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Xia, Weiming; Crary, John F.; Tripodis, Yorghos; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Mez, Jesse; Solomon, Todd; Meng, Gaoyuan; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Meng, Steven; Babcock, Katharine; Kiernan, Patrick; Murphy, Lauren; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Martin, Brett; Dixon, Diane; Stern, Robert A.; Cantu, Robert C.; Kowall, Neil W.; McKee, Ann C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is defined pathologically by the abnormal accumulation of tau in a unique pattern that is distinct from other tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although trauma has been suggested to increase amyloid β peptide (Aβ) levels, the extent of Aβ deposition in CTE has not been thoroughly characterized. We studied a heterogeneous cohort of deceased athletes and military veterans with neuropathologically diagnosed CTE (n = 114, mean age at death = 60) to test the hypothesis that Aβ deposition is altered in CTE and associated with more severe pathology and worse clinical outcomes. We found that Aβ deposition, either as diffuse or neuritic plaques, was present in 52 % of CTE subjects. Moreover, Aβ deposition in CTE occurred at an accelerated rate and with altered dynamics in CTE compared to a normal aging population (OR = 3.8, p < 0.001). We also found a clear pathological and clinical dichotomy between those CTE cases with Aβ plaques and those without. Aβ deposition was significantly associated with the presence of the APOE ε4 allele (p = 0.035), older age at symptom onset (p < 0.001), and older age at death (p < 0.001). In addition, when controlling for age, neuritic plaques were significantly associated with increased CTE tauopathy stage (β = 2.43, p = 0.018), co-morbid Lewy body disease (OR = 5.01, p = 0.009), and dementia (OR = 4.45, p = 0.012). A subset of subjects met the diagnostic criteria for both CTE and AD, and in these subjects both Aβ plaques and total levels of Aβ1–40 were increased at the depths of the cortical sulcus compared to the gyral crests. Overall, these findings suggest that Aβ deposition is altered and accelerated in a cohort of CTE subjects compared to normal aging and that Aβ is associated with both pathological and clinical progression of CTE independent of age. PMID:25943889

  4. Beta-amyloid deposition in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stein, Thor D; Montenigro, Philip H; Alvarez, Victor E; Xia, Weiming; Crary, John F; Tripodis, Yorghos; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Mez, Jesse; Solomon, Todd; Meng, Gaoyuan; Kubilus, Caroline A; Cormier, Kerry A; Meng, Steven; Babcock, Katharine; Kiernan, Patrick; Murphy, Lauren; Nowinski, Christopher J; Martin, Brett; Dixon, Diane; Stern, Robert A; Cantu, Robert C; Kowall, Neil W; McKee, Ann C

    2015-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is defined pathologically by the abnormal accumulation of tau in a unique pattern that is distinct from other tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although trauma has been suggested to increase amyloid β peptide (Aβ) levels, the extent of Aβ deposition in CTE has not been thoroughly characterized. We studied a heterogeneous cohort of deceased athletes and military veterans with neuropathologically diagnosed CTE (n = 114, mean age at death = 60) to test the hypothesis that Aβ deposition is altered in CTE and associated with more severe pathology and worse clinical outcomes. We found that Aβ deposition, either as diffuse or neuritic plaques, was present in 52 % of CTE subjects. Moreover, Aβ deposition in CTE occurred at an accelerated rate and with altered dynamics in CTE compared to a normal aging population (OR = 3.8, p < 0.001). We also found a clear pathological and clinical dichotomy between those CTE cases with Aβ plaques and those without. Aβ deposition was significantly associated with the presence of the APOE ε4 allele (p = 0.035), older age at symptom onset (p < 0.001), and older age at death (p < 0.001). In addition, when controlling for age, neuritic plaques were significantly associated with increased CTE tauopathy stage (β = 2.43, p = 0.018), co-morbid Lewy body disease (OR = 5.01, p = 0.009), and dementia (OR = 4.45, p = 0.012). A subset of subjects met the diagnostic criteria for both CTE and AD, and in these subjects both Aβ plaques and total levels of Aβ1-40 were increased at the depths of the cortical sulcus compared to the gyral crests. Overall, these findings suggest that Aβ deposition is altered and accelerated in a cohort of CTE subjects compared to normal aging and that Aβ is associated with both pathological and clinical progression of CTE independent of age.

  5. Beta amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau deposits in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Miklossy, J.; Miller, L.; Qing, H.; Radenovic, A.; Kis, A.; Vileno, B.; Laszlo, F.; Martins, R.N.; Waeber, G.; Mooser, V.; Bosman, F.; Khalili, K.; Darbinian, N.; McGeer, P.L.

    2008-08-25

    Strong epidemiologic evidence suggests an association between Alzheimer disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes. To determine if amyloid beta (A{beta}) and hyperphosphorylated tau occurs in type 2 diabetes, pancreas tissues from 21 autopsy cases (10 type 2 diabetes and 11 controls) were analyzed. APP and tau mRNAs were identified in human pancreas and in cultured insulinoma beta cells (INS-1) by RT-PCR. Prominent APP and tau bands were detected by Western blotting in pancreatic extracts. Aggregated A{beta}, hyperphosphorylated tau, ubiquitin, apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein(a), IB1/JIP-1 and JNK1 were detected in Langerhans islets in type 2 diabetic patients. A{beta} was co-localized with amylin in islet amyloid deposits. In situ beta sheet formation of islet amyloid deposits was shown by infrared microspectroscopy (SIRMS). LPS increased APP in non-neuronal cells as well. We conclude that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau are also associated with type 2 diabetes, highlighting common pathogenetic features in neurodegenerative disorders, including AD and type 2 diabetes and suggesting that A{beta} deposits and hyperphosphorylated tau may also occur in other organs than the brain.

  6. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's A{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knuepfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Faendrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated A{beta}(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. {yields} A{beta}(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. {yields} NMR revealed that A{beta}(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of A{beta} peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of A{beta} and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of A{beta} peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of A{beta} fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of A{beta}(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  7. Methods for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles

    DOEpatents

    Barrio, Jorge R.; Petric, Andrej; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Small, Gary W.; Cole, Gregory M.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    A method for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in vivo and in vitro, comprises contacting a compound of formula (I): ##STR1## with mammalian tissue. In formula (I), R.sub.1 is selected from the group consisting of --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkyl, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkylenyl-R.sub.4 , ##STR2## R.sub.4 is a radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl and substituted aryl; R.sub.5, is a radical selected from the group consisting of --NH.sub.2, --OH, --SH, --NH-alkyl, --NHR.sub.4, --NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --O-alkyl, --O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --S-alkyl, and --S-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.6 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --CN, --COOH, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-halogen, --C(O)NH , --C(O)NH-alkyl, --C(O)NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.7 is a radical selected from the group consisting of O, NH, and S; and R.sub.8 is N, O or S. R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of alkyl and alkylenyl-R.sub.10, wherein R.sub.10 is selected from the group consisting of --OH, --OTs, halogen, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. Alternatively, R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 together form a heterocyclic ring, optionally substituted with at least one radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkoxy, OH, OTs, halogen, alkylenyl-R.sub.10, carbonyl, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. In the compounds of formula (I), one or more of the hydrogen, halogen or carbon atoms can, optionally, be replaced with a radiolabel.

  8. Methods for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles

    DOEpatents

    Barrio, Jorge R.; Petric, Andrej; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Small, Gary W.; Cole, Gregory M.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2003-12-09

    A method for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in vivo and in vitro, comprises contacting a compound of formula (I): ##STR1## with mammalian tissue. In formula (I), R.sub.1 is selected from the group consisting of --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkyl, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkylenyl-R.sub.4, ##STR2## R.sub.4 is a radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl and substituted aryl; R.sub.5 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --NH.sub.2, --OH, --SH, --NH-alkyl, --NHR.sub.4, --NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --O-alkyl, --O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --S-alkyl, and --S-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.6 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --CN, --COOH, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-halogen, --C(O)NH, --C(O)NH-alkyl, --C(O)NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.7 is a radical selected from the group consisting of O, NH, and S; and R.sub.8 is N, O or S. R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of alkyl and alkylenyl-R.sub.10, wherein R.sub.10 is selected from the group consisting of --OH, --OTs, halogen, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. Alternatively, R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 together form a heterocyclic ring, optionally substituted with at least one radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkoxy, OH, OTs, halogen, alkylenyl-R.sub.10, carbonyl, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. In the compounds of formula (I), one or more of the hydrogen, halogen or carbon atoms can, optionally, be replaced with a radiolabel.

  9. Compositions for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles

    DOEpatents

    Barrio, Jorge R.; Petric, Andrej; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Small, Gary W.; Cole, Gregory M.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2008-03-11

    Compositions useful for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are provided. The compositions comprises compounds of formula (I): ##STR00001## wherein R.sub.1 is selected from the group consisting of --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2-alkyl, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.4 is a radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl and substituted aryl; R.sub.5 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --NH.sub.2, --OH, --SH, --NH-alkyl, --NHR.sub.4, --NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --O-alkyl, --O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --S-alkyl, and --S-alkylenyl-R.sub.4; R.sub.6 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --CN, --COOH, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-halogen, --C(O)NH-alkyl, --C(O)NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 and --C(O)NH.sub.2; R.sub.7 is a radical selected from the group consisting of O, NH, and S; and R.sub.8 is N, O or S; and R.sub.2 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl and alkylenyl-R.sub.10 and R.sub.3 is alkylenyl-R.sub.10, wherein R.sub.10 is selected from the group consisting of --OH, --OTs, halogen, spiperone, spiperone ketal, and spiperone-3-yl, or R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 together form a heterocyclic ring, optionally substituted with at least one radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkoxy, OH, OTs, halogen, alkyl-R.sub.10, carbonyl, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl, and further wherein one or more of the hydrogen, halogen or carbon atoms are optionally replaced with a radiolabel.

  10. Inhibition by Aplidine of the aggregation of the prion peptide PrP 106-126 into beta-sheet fibrils.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Mar; Sadqi, Mourad; Muñoz, Victor; Avila, Jesús

    2003-10-15

    Aplidine, a cyclic peptide, from the tunicate Aplidium albican, prevents the in vitro aggregation into beta-sheet containing fibrils of the prion peptide 106-126 when co-incubated in a 1:1 molar ratio. The blocking of fibril formation induced by Aplidine has clear sequence specificity, being much stronger for the 106-126 prion peptide than for the beta-amyloid 25-35 peptide. In addition to the known ability of Aplidine to cross the plasmatic membrane, these results indicate that Aplidine is a potential leading compound for the development of therapeutic blockers of prion aggregation.

  11. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human beta-amyloid protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, D R; Martin-Morris, L; Luo, L Q; White, K

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human beta-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development. Images PMID:2494667

  12. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  13. Effects of stress and stress hormones on amyloid-beta protein and plaque deposition.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongxin; Csernansky, John G

    2009-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that physical and psychosocial stressors, in part acting through the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, may accelerate the process of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this review, we summarize recent research related to the effects of stress and stress hormones on the various disease process elements associated with AD. Specifically, we focus on the relationships among chronic stressors, HPA axis activity, amyloid-beta protein, and amyloid-beta plaque deposition in mouse models of AD. The potential mechanisms by which stress and stress-related components, especially corticotrophin-releasing factor and its receptors, influence the pathogenesis of AD are discussed.

  14. The Synthesis of Beta-Peptides Containing Guanidino Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Ke; Han, Hyunsoo; Hoffman, Timothy Z.; Janda, Kim D.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    2003-01-01

    The synthesis of the beta-peptide 1 by the postsynthetic modification of the corresponding amino-containing peptide 3 is described. The potential of 1 to act as a template for the ligation of complementary negatively-charged peptides is discussed.

  15. Pro-Cognitive Effects of Non-Peptide Analogues of Soluble Amyloid Peptide Precursor Fragment sAPP.

    PubMed

    Tiunova, A A; Komissarova, N V; Nenaidenko, V G; Makhmutova, A A; Beznosko, B K; Bachurin, S O; Anokhin, K V

    2016-08-01

    We studied pro-cognitive effect of two heterocyclic low-molecular-weight compounds that serve as non-peptide analogues of soluble fragment of amyloid peptide precursor (sAPP). Intracerebroventricular and systemic administration of peptide mimetics P2 and P5 improved weak memory on the model of passive avoidance in chicks and in the object location task in mice. Both compounds were effective if administered close to the moment of training or 4 h after it. The time windows and dose range for the pro-cognitive effects of the mimetics were similar to those observed in previous studies with sAPP peptide fragments.

  16. Trafficking of cell surface beta-amyloid precursor protein: retrograde and transcytotic transport in cultured neurons

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Amyloid beta-protein (A beta), the principal constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived by proteolysis from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta PP). The mechanism of A beta production in neurons, which are hypothesized to be a rich source of A beta in brain, remains to be defined. In this study, we describe a detailed localization of cell surface beta PP and its subsequent trafficking in primary cultured neurons. Full-length cell surface beta PP was present primarily on perikarya and axons, the latter with a characteristic discontinuous pattern. At growth cones, cell surface beta PP was inconsistently detected. By visualizing the distribution of beta PP monoclonal antibodies added to intact cultures, beta PP was shown to be internalized from distal axons or terminals and retrogradely transported back to perikarya in organelles which colocalized with fluid-phase endocytic markers. Retrograde transport of beta PP was shown in both hippocampal and peripheral sympathetic neurons, the latter using a compartment culture system that isolated cell bodies from distal axons and terminals. In addition, we demonstrated that beta PP from distal axons was transcytotically transported to the surface of perikarya from distal axons in sympathetic neurons. Indirect evidence of this transcytotic pathway was obtained in hippocampal neurons using antisense oligonucleotide to the kinesin heavy chain to inhibit anterograde beta PP transport. Taken together, these results demonstrate novel aspects of beta PP trafficking in neurons, including retrograde axonal transport and transcytosis. Moreover, the axonal predominance of cell surface beta PP is unexpected in view of the recent report of polarized sorting of beta PP to the basolateral domain of MDCK cells. PMID:7721945

  17. Macrocyclic beta-sheet peptides that mimic protein quaternary structure through intermolecular beta-sheet interactions.

    PubMed

    Khakshoor, Omid; Demeler, Borries; Nowick, James S

    2007-05-02

    This paper reports the design, synthesis, and characterization of a family of cyclic peptides that mimic protein quaternary structure through beta-sheet interactions. These peptides are 54-membered-ring macrocycles comprising an extended heptapeptide beta-strand, two Hao beta-strand mimics [JACS 2000, 122, 7654] joined by one additional alpha-amino acid, and two delta-linked ornithine beta-turn mimics [JACS 2003, 125, 876]. Peptide 3a, as the representative of these cyclic peptides, contains a heptapeptide sequence (TSFTYTS) adapted from the dimerization interface of protein NuG2 [PDB ID: 1mio]. 1H NMR studies of aqueous solutions of peptide 3a show a partially folded monomer in slow exchange with a strongly folded oligomer. NOE studies clearly show that the peptide self-associates through edge-to-edge beta-sheet dimerization. Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion coefficient measurements and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) studies establish that the oligomer is a tetramer. Collectively, these experiments suggest a model in which cyclic peptide 3a oligomerizes to form a dimer of beta-sheet dimers. In this tetrameric beta-sheet sandwich, the macrocyclic peptide 3a is folded to form a beta-sheet, the beta-sheet is dimerized through edge-to-edge interactions, and this dimer is further dimerized through hydrophobic face-to-face interactions involving the Phe and Tyr groups. Further studies of peptides 3b-3n, which are homologues of peptide 3a with 1-6 variations in the heptapeptide sequence, elucidate the importance of the heptapeptide sequence in the folding and oligomerization of this family of cyclic peptides. Studies of peptides 3b-3g show that aromatic residues across from Hao improve folding of the peptide, while studies of peptides 3h-3n indicate that hydrophobic residues at positions R3 and R5 of the heptapeptide sequence are important in oligomerization.

  18. De novo design of monomeric beta-hairpin and beta-sheet peptides.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Santiveri, Clara M; Jiménez, M Angeles

    2006-01-01

    Since the first report in 1993 (JACS 115, 5887-5888) of a peptide able to form a monomeric beta-hairpin structure in aqueous solution, the design of peptides forming either beta-hairpins (two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets) or three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets has become a field of intense interest. These studies have yielded great insights into the principles governing the stability and folding of beta-hairpins and antiparallel beta-sheets. This chapter reviews briefly those principles and describes a protocol for the de novo design of beta-sheet-forming peptides based on them. Criteria to select appropriate turn and strand residues and to avoid aggregation are provided. Because nuclear magnetic resonance is the most appropriate technique to check the success of new designs, the nuclear magnetic resonance parameters characteristic of beta-hairpins and three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets are given.

  19. Presenilin 1 transgene addition to amyloid precursor protein overexpressing transgenic rats increases amyloid beta 42 levels and results in loss of memory retention.

    PubMed

    Agca, Cansu; Klakotskaia, Diana; Schachtman, Todd R; Chan, Anthony W; Lah, James J; Agca, Yuksel

    2016-07-07

    We previously reported the production of transgenic rats (APP21 line) that over-express human amyloid precursor protein (APP) containing Swedish and Indiana mutations. In order to generate a better model for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the APP21 rat line was used to generate double transgenic line that over-expressed Presenilin 1 (PS1) with L166P mutation in addition to APP transgene (APP + PS1 line). Thirty-two double transgenic founders were generated and the ultimate transgenic founder was selected based on PS1 transgene copy number and level of amyloid-beta (Aβ)42 peptide. The APP + PS1 double transgenic rats had 38 times more PS1 in brains compared to APP rats. Behavioral assessment using Barnes maze showed that APP + PS1 rats exhibited a larger learning and memory deficit than APP21 rats. Double transgenic rats also produced more Aβ42. Histological examination of the brains showed that the APP21 rat line displayed neurofibrillary tangles and in contrast, the APP + PS1 line showed chromatolysis in hippocampal neurons and neuronal loss in CA3 region of hippocampus. Due to the separate segregation of APP and PS1 transgenes in APP + PS1 double transgenic rats, this transgenic line may be a valuable model for studying the effects of various levels of APP and PS1 transgenes on various aspects of brain pathologies associated with the AD phenotype.

  20. Is formaldehyde the missing link in AD pathology? The differential aggregation of amyloid-beta with APOE isoforms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rizak, Joshua D; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genetic variation and aging are the two most noted risk factors associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) related dementia. However, the relationship between these two pathological factors is not understood. Formaldehyde (FA) is an age related factor that has been found to be elevated in AD patients and is known to have protein cross-linking properties. FA forms cross-links with larger arginine, lysine and tryptophan residues but also has thiol reactivity. This study investigated the formation of protein aggregates between amyloid-beta (1-40) peptide (Aβ), the main component of amyloid plaques in AD, with APOE isoforms in vitro. APOE4 protein, the isoform with arginines at residue 112 and 158, was found to form aggregates with more Aβ (P < 0.001) and APOE (P < 0.05) protein content in 10 mM FA than aggregates formed with either APOE3 or APOE2 protein. This aggregation pattern reflected the trend of vulnerability conferred by the APOE genetic variation (APOE4 > APOE3 > APOE2) and suggested that FA may have a role in the differential pattern of amyloid plaque formation in people with differing APOE genetic backgrounds. All told, this finding adds to a growing body of evidence that FA has a role in AD progression as well as provides a novel link between aging and APOE risk factors; the cornerstones of one of the world's largest mental health concerns.

  1. The role of ABCB1 and ABCA1 in beta-amyloid clearance at the neurovascular unit in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    ElAli, Ayman; Rivest, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects elderly persons, evolving with age to reach severe cognitive impairment. Amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles constitute the main pathological hallmarks of AD. Amyloid deposits are initiated by the excessive production and accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the brain. The dysfunction of the Neurovascular Unit (NVU) has been proposed to be causative in AD development, due to an impaired clearance of Aβ from the brain. Cells forming the NVU express several Adenosine Triphosphate ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters, among which ABCB1 and ABCA1 play an important role in Aβ processing. The drug transporter ABCB1 directly transports Aβ from the brain into the blood circulation, whereas the cholesterol transporter ABCA1 neutralizes Aβ aggregation capacity in an Apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-dependent manner, facilitating Aβ subsequent elimination from the brain. In the present minireview, we will summarize the contribution of ABCB1, and ABCA1 at the NVU in Aβ clearance. Moreover, we will outline and discuss the possible collaboration of ABCB1, and ABCA1 at the NVU in mediating an efficient clearance of Aβ from the brain. PMID:23494712

  2. Beneficial effects of lysosome-modulating and other pharmacological and nanocarrier agents on amyloid-beta-treated cells.

    PubMed

    Kanazirska, Marie V; Fuchs, Philipp M; Chen, Liping; Lal, Sumit; Verma, Jyoti; Vassilev, Peter M

    2012-12-01

    The progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by disturbances of the endosome/lysosome (EL) system and there is accumulation of peptides of the AD-associated amyloid beta (Abeta) type in EL vesicles of affected neurons. EL modulating agents partially ameliorate the Abeta-mediated cell abnormalities. However, no extensive studies on the potential pharmaceutical applications of combinations of such agents and their synergistic effects have been performed. This study shows the beneficial anti-amyloid effects of several combinations of lysosomal modulators and other pharmacological and new nanobiotechnological agents. Some agents potentiated each other's action and some of them facilitated the anti-amyloid actions of memantine, a modifier of Ca2+-permeable channels involved in AD and one of the few drugs used for treatment of AD. Another compound used in nanobiotechnology ameliorated as a nanocarrier the beneficial effects of some of these potential pharmaceutical agents. They may be considered as additional drugs to improve the efficacy of the therapeutic approaches for AD and related neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Controlling {beta}-amyloid oligomerization by the use of naphthalene sulfonates: trapping low molecular weight oligomeric species.

    PubMed

    Ferrão-Gonzales, Astria D; Robbs, Bruno K; Moreau, Vitor Hugo; Ferreira, Aricéle; Juliano, Luiz; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fabio C L; Silva, Jerson L; Foguel, Debora

    2005-10-14

    Aggregation of proteins and peptides has been shown to be responsible for several diseases known as amyloidoses, which include Alzheimer disease (AD), prion diseases, among several others. AD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused primarily by the aggregation of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta). Here we describe the stabilization of small oligomers of Abeta by the use of sulfonated hydrophobic molecules such as AMNS (1-amino-5-naphthalene sulfonate); 1,8-ANS (1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate) and bis-ANS (4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-binaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonate). The experiments were performed with either Abeta-1-42 or with Abeta-13-23, a shorter version of Abeta that is still able to form amyloid fibrils in vitro and contains amino acid residues 16-20, previously shown to be essential to peptide-peptide interaction and fibril formation. All sulfonated molecules tested were able to prevent Abeta aggregation in a concentration dependent fashion in the following order of efficacy: 1,8-ANS < AMNS < bis-ANS. Size exclusion chromatography revealed that in the presence of bis-ANS, Abeta forms a heterogeneous population of low molecular weight species that proved to be toxic to cell cultures. Since the ANS compounds all have apolar rings and negative charges (sulfonate groups), both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions may contribute to interpeptide contacts that lead to aggregation. We also performed NMR experiments to investigate the structure of Abeta-13-23 in SDS micelles and found features of an alpha-helix from Lys(16) to Phe(20). 1H TOCSY spectra of Abeta-13-23 in the presence of AMNS displayed a chemical-shift dispersion quite similar to that observed in SDS, which suggests that in the presence of AMNS this peptide might adopt a conformation similar to that reported in the presence of SDS. Taken together, our studies provide evidence for the crucial role of small oligomers and their stabilization by sulfonate hydrophobic compounds.

  4. A mathematical model of the kinetics of beta-amyloid fibril growth from the denatured state.

    PubMed Central

    Pallitto, M M; Murphy, R M

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous conversion of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) from soluble monomer to insoluble fibril may underlie the neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease. A complete description of Abeta self-association kinetics requires identification of the oligomeric species present and the pathway of association, as well as quantitation of rate constants and reaction order. Abeta was rendered monomeric and denatured by dissolution in 8 M urea, pH 10. "Refolding" and fibrillization were initiated by rapid dilution into phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4. The kinetics of growth were followed at three different concentrations, using size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and static light scattering. A multi-step pathway for fibril formation and growth was postulated. This pathway included 1) rapid commitment to either stable monomer/dimer or unstable intermediate, 2) cooperative association of intermediate into a multimeric "nucleus," 3) elongation of the "nucleus" into filaments via addition of intermediate, 4) lateral aggregation of filaments into fibrils, and 5) fibril elongation via end-to-end association. Differential and algebraic equations describing this kinetic pathway were derived, and model parameters were determined by fitting the data. The utility of the model for identifying toxic Abeta oligomeric specie(s) is demonstrated. The model should prove useful for designing compounds that inhibit Abeta aggregation and/or toxicity. PMID:11509390

  5. Dementia of the eye: the role of amyloid beta in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ratnayaka, J A; Serpell, L C; Lotery, A J

    2015-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the most common causes of irreversible blindness affecting nearly 50 million individuals globally. The disease is characterised by progressive loss of central vision, which has significant implications for quality of life concerns in an increasingly ageing population. AMD pathology manifests in the macula, a specialised region of the retina, which is responsible for central vision and perception of fine details. The underlying pathology of this complex degenerative disease is incompletely understood but includes both genetic as well as epigenetic risk factors. The recent discovery that amyloid beta (Aβ), a highly toxic and aggregate-prone family of peptides, is elevated in the ageing retina and is associated with AMD has opened up new perspectives on the aetiology of this debilitating blinding disease. Multiple studies now link Aβ with key stages of AMD progression, which is both exciting and potentially insightful, as this identifies a well-established toxic agent that aggressively targets cells in degenerative brains. Here, we review the most recent findings supporting the hypothesis that Aβ may be a key factor in AMD pathology. We describe how multiple Aβ reservoirs, now reported in the ageing eye, may target the cellular physiology of the retina as well as associated layers, and propose a mechanistic pathway of Aβ-mediated degenerative change leading to AMD.

  6. Epicatechin and catechin in cocoa inhibit amyloid beta protein induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Heo, Ho Jin; Lee, Chang Yong

    2005-03-09

    To elucidate additional health benefits of cocoa phytochemicals on the neurotoxicity induced by amyloid beta protein (Abeta), PC12 cells were treated with toxic peptide (Abeta(25)(-)(35)) and the effects of epicatechin, catechin, and cocoa were studied using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and trypan blue exclusion methods. Significant increase in neuronal cell death was observed on PC12 cells treated with Abeta(25)(-)(35) (25 microM), while epicatechin and catechin and their mixture prevented the Abeta-induced neuronal cell death. Abeta treatment also led to the increased membrane instability of PC12 cells. The membrane protective effects of the phenolics determined by LDH release and trypan blue exclusion assays demonstrated that epicatechin, catechin, and their mixture protect cellular membrane from Abeta-induced cytotoxicity. In these three different cell viability assays, the mixture of epicatechin and catechin showed the highest protective effect and synergistic activity. The present results showed that the major flavonoids of cocoa, epicatechin and catechin, protect PC12 cells from Abeta-induced neurotoxicity, and suggest that cocoa may have anti-neurodegenerative effect in addition to other known chemopreventive effects.

  7. Glycoprotein quality control-related proteins effectively inhibit fibrillation of amyloid beta 1-42.

    PubMed

    Kitauchi, Kenta; Sakono, Masafumi

    2016-12-09

    Formation of amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregates is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Accumulation of Aβ aggregates on the cell surface causes oxidative stress, and ultimately results in cell death. Consequently, inhibition of aggregate formation is predicted to be beneficial. Recently, translocation of glycoprotein quality control-related (GPQC) proteins such as chaperones and protein disulfide-isomerase (PDI) family members was reported under oxidative stress conditions. Therefore, it is possible that GPQC proteins contact Aβ peptides on the cell membrane during stress conditions. Here, we examined the effect of ER resident proteins on Aβ aggregation. Our results show that minimal expression of GPQC proteins enables Aβ to effectively avoid aggregation. Moreover, further analyses show that Aβ structure remains in the monomer state in the presence of ER proteins. Thus, our findings show that GPQC proteins have strong affinity for Aβ monomers, and suggests that the interaction between them repeatedly associates and dissociates in a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dementia of the eye: the role of amyloid beta in retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayaka, J A; Serpell, L C; Lotery, A J

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the most common causes of irreversible blindness affecting nearly 50 million individuals globally. The disease is characterised by progressive loss of central vision, which has significant implications for quality of life concerns in an increasingly ageing population. AMD pathology manifests in the macula, a specialised region of the retina, which is responsible for central vision and perception of fine details. The underlying pathology of this complex degenerative disease is incompletely understood but includes both genetic as well as epigenetic risk factors. The recent discovery that amyloid beta (Aβ), a highly toxic and aggregate-prone family of peptides, is elevated in the ageing retina and is associated with AMD has opened up new perspectives on the aetiology of this debilitating blinding disease. Multiple studies now link Aβ with key stages of AMD progression, which is both exciting and potentially insightful, as this identifies a well-established toxic agent that aggressively targets cells in degenerative brains. Here, we review the most recent findings supporting the hypothesis that Aβ may be a key factor in AMD pathology. We describe how multiple Aβ reservoirs, now reported in the ageing eye, may target the cellular physiology of the retina as well as associated layers, and propose a mechanistic pathway of Aβ-mediated degenerative change leading to AMD. PMID:26088679

  9. Amyloid Beta: Multiple Mechanisms of Toxicity and Only Some Protective Effects?

    PubMed Central

    Colín-Barenque, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) is a peptide of 39–43 amino acids found in large amounts and forming deposits in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). For this reason, it has been implicated in the pathophysiology of damage observed in this type of dementia. However, the role of Aβ in the pathophysiology of AD is not yet precisely understood. Aβ has been experimentally shown to have a wide range of toxic mechanisms in vivo and in vitro, such as excitotoxicity, mitochondrial alterations, synaptic dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, and so forth. In contrast, Aβ has also shown some interesting neuroprotective and physiological properties under certain experimental conditions, suggesting that both physiological and pathological roles of Aβ may depend on several factors. In this paper, we reviewed both toxic and protective mechanisms of Aβ to further explore what their potential roles could be in the pathophysiology of AD. The complete understanding of such apparently opposed effects will also be an important guide for the therapeutic efforts coming in the future. PMID:24683437

  10. Amyloid beta: multiple mechanisms of toxicity and only some protective effects?

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Luna, Rogelio; Colín-Barenque, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) is a peptide of 39-43 amino acids found in large amounts and forming deposits in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). For this reason, it has been implicated in the pathophysiology of damage observed in this type of dementia. However, the role of Aβ in the pathophysiology of AD is not yet precisely understood. Aβ has been experimentally shown to have a wide range of toxic mechanisms in vivo and in vitro, such as excitotoxicity, mitochondrial alterations, synaptic dysfunction, altered calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, and so forth. In contrast, Aβ has also shown some interesting neuroprotective and physiological properties under certain experimental conditions, suggesting that both physiological and pathological roles of Aβ may depend on several factors. In this paper, we reviewed both toxic and protective mechanisms of Aβ to further explore what their potential roles could be in the pathophysiology of AD. The complete understanding of such apparently opposed effects will also be an important guide for the therapeutic efforts coming in the future.

  11. Insulin-degrading enzyme rapidly removes the beta-amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (AICD).

    PubMed

    Edbauer, Dieter; Willem, Michael; Lammich, Sven; Steiner, Harald; Haass, Christian

    2002-04-19

    The intramembranous gamma-secretase cleavage of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) is dependent on biologically active presenilins (PS). Notch also undergoes a similar PS-dependent gamma-secretase-like cleavage, resulting in the liberation of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which is critically required for developmental signal transduction. gamma-Secretase processing of APP results in the production of a similar fragment called AICD (APP intracellular domain), which may function in nuclear signaling as well. AICD, like NICD, is rapidly removed. By using a battery of protease inhibitors we demonstrate that AICD, in contrast to NICD, is degraded by a cytoplasmic metalloprotease. In vitro degradation of AICD can be reconstituted with cytoplasmic fractions obtained from neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Taking into account the inhibition profile and the cytoplasmic localization, we identified three candidate enzymes (neurolysin, thimet oligopeptidase, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), also known as insulysin), which all are involved in the degradation of bioactive peptides in the brain. When insulin, a well characterized substrate of IDE, was added to the in vitro degradation assay, removal of AICD was efficiently blocked. Moreover, overexpression of IDE resulted in enhanced degradation of AICD, whereas overexpression of the inactive IDE E111Q mutant did not affect AICD degradation. Finally, immunodepletion of IDE significantly reduced the AICD degrading activity. Therefore our data demonstrate that IDE, which is one of the proteases implicated in the removal of extracellular Abeta, also removes the cytoplasmic product of gamma-secretase cleaved APP.

  12. Nano-biosensors to detect beta-amyloid for Alzheimer’s disease management

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Tiwari, Sneham; Vashist, Arti; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (β-A) peptides are potential biomarkers to monitor Alzheimer’s diseases (AD) for diagnostic purposes. Increased β-A level is neurotoxic and induces oxidative stress in brain resulting in neurodegeneration and causes dementia. As of now, no sensitive and inexpensive method is available for β-A detection under physiological and pathological conditions. Although, available methods such as neuroimaging, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detect β-A, but they are not yet extended at point-of-care (POC) due to sophisticated equipments, need of high expertise, complicated operations, and challenge of low detection limit. Recently, β-A antibody based electrochemical immuno-sensing approach has been explored to detect β-A at pM levels within 30–40 minutes compared to 6–8 hours of ELISA test. The introduction of nano-enabling electrochemical sensing technology could enable rapid detection of β-A at POC and may facilitate fast personalized health care delivery. This review explores recent advancements in nano-enabling electrochemical β-A sensing technologies towards POC application to AD management. These analytical tools can serve as an analytical tool for AD management program to obtain bio-informatics needed to optimize therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases diagnosis management PMID:26851586

  13. Diversity of Amyloid-beta Proteoforms in the Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

    PubMed

    Wildburger, Norelle C; Esparza, Thomas J; LeDuc, Richard D; Fellers, Ryan T; Thomas, Paul M; Cairns, Nigel J; Kelleher, Neil L; Bateman, Randall J; Brody, David L

    2017-08-25

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but little is known about the proteoforms present in AD brain. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to analyze intact Aβ from soluble aggregates and insoluble material in brains of six cases with severe dementia and pathologically confirmed AD. The soluble aggregates are especially relevant because they are believed to be the most toxic form of Aβ. We found a diversity of Aβ peptides, with 26 unique proteoforms including various N- and C-terminal truncations. N- and C-terminal truncations comprised 73% and 30%, respectively, of the total Aβ proteoforms detected. The Aβ proteoforms segregated between the soluble and more insoluble aggregates with N-terminal truncations predominating in the insoluble material and C- terminal truncations segregating into the soluble aggregates. In contrast, canonical Aβ comprised the minority of the identified proteoforms (15.3%) and did not distinguish between the soluble and more insoluble aggregates. The relative abundance of many truncated Aβ proteoforms did not correlate with post-mortem interval, suggesting they are not artefacts. This heterogeneity of Aβ proteoforms deepens our understanding of AD and offers many new avenues for investigation into pathological mechanisms of the disease, with implications for therapeutic development.

  14. Detection of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-beta plaque deposition by deep brain impedance profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Fraering, Patrick C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Toxic brain amyloid-beta (Aß) aggregates and ensuing cell death are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we investigated if we could monitor the presence of these aggregates by performing in situ electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in AD model mice brains. Approach. In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed post-mortem in APPPS1 transgenic mice brains. This transgenic model is commonly used to study amyloidogenesis, a pathological hallmark of AD. We used flexible probes with embedded micrometric electrodes array to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting senile plaques composed of Aß peptides by localized impedance measurements. Main results. We particularly focused on deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus. Ex vivo experiments using brains from young and old APPPS1 mice lead us to show that impedance measurements clearly correlate with the percentage of Aβ plaque load in the brain tissues. We could monitor the effects of aging in the AD APPPS1 mice model. Significance. We demonstrated that a localized electrical impedance measurement constitutes a valuable technique to monitor the presence of Aβ-plaques, which is complementary with existing imaging techniques. This method does not require prior Aβ staining, precluding the risk of variations in tissue uptake of dyes or tracers, and consequently ensuring reproducible data collection.

  15. Nano-biosensors to detect beta-amyloid for Alzheimer's disease management.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Tiwari, Sneham; Vashist, Arti; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-06-15

    Beta-amyloid (β-A) peptides are potential biomarkers to monitor Alzheimer's diseases (AD) for diagnostic purposes. Increased β-A level is neurotoxic and induces oxidative stress in brain resulting in neurodegeneration and causes dementia. As of now, no sensitive and inexpensive method is available for β-A detection under physiological and pathological conditions. Although, available methods such as neuroimaging, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detect β-A, but they are not yet extended at point-of-care (POC) due to sophisticated equipments, need of high expertize, complicated operations, and challenge of low detection limit. Recently, β-A antibody based electrochemical immuno-sensing approach has been explored to detect β-A at pM levels within 30-40 min compared to 6-8h of ELISA test. The introduction of nano-enabling electrochemical sensing technology could enable rapid detection of β-A at POC and may facilitate fast personalized health care delivery. This review explores recent advancements in nano-enabling electrochemical β-A sensing technologies towards POC application to AD management. These analytical tools can serve as an analytical tool for AD management program to obtain bio-informatics needed to optimize therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases diagnosis management.

  16. A kinetic model for beta-amyloid adsorption at the air/solution interface and its implication to the beta-amyloid aggregation process.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dianlu; Dinh, Kim Lien; Ruthenburg, Travis C; Zhang, Yi; Su, Lei; Land, Donald P; Zhou, Feimeng

    2009-03-12

    At the air/buffer solution interface the kinetics of adsorption of amyloid beta peptide, Abeta(1-42), whose bulk concentration (submicromolar) is more than 2 orders of magnitude lower than that typically used in other in vitro aggregation studies, has been studied using a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. The pressure-time curves exhibit a lag phase, wherein the surface pressure essentially remains at zero, and a rising phase, corresponding to the Abeta adsorption at the interface. The duration of the lag phase was found to be highly dependent on both the Abeta bulk concentration and the solution temperature. A large activation energy (62.2 +/- 4.1 KJ/mol) was determined and the apparent adsorption rate constant was found to be linearly dependent on the Abeta bulk concentration. Attenuated total reflection-IR spectra of the adsorbed Abeta transferred to a solid substrate and circular dichroism measurements of Abeta in the solution layer near the interface reveal that the natively unstructured Abeta in the bulk undergo a conformation change (folding) to mainly the alpha-helical structure. The results suggest that, prior to the adsorption step, an equilibrium between Abeta conformations is established within the subsurface. The kinetic equation derived from this model confirms that the overall Abeta adsorption is kinetically controlled and the apparent rate constant is proportional to the Abeta bulk concentration. This model also indicates that interfaces such as cell membranes and lipid bilayers may facilitate Abeta aggregation/ fibrillation by providing a thin hydrophobic layer adjacent to the interface for the initial A/beta conformation change (misfolding) and accumulation. Such a preconcentration effect offers a plausible explanation of the fact that Abeta fibrillation occurs in vivo at nanomolar concentrations. Another important biological implication from our work is that Abeta misfolding may occur before its adsorption onto a cell membrane. This general kinetic model

  17. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We

  18. Designed beta-hairpin peptides with defined tight turn stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Das, C; Naganagowda, G A; Karle, I L; Balaram, P

    2001-03-01

    The conformational analysis of two synthetic octapeptides, Boc-Leu-Val-Val-D-Pro-L-Ala-Leu-Val-Val-OMe (1) and Boc-Leu-Val-Val-D-Pro-D-Ala-Leu-Val-Val-OMe (2) has been carried out in order to investigate the effect of beta-turn stereochemistry on designed beta-hairpin structures. Five hundred megahertz (1)H NMR studies establish that both peptides 1 and 2 adopt predominantly beta-hairpin conformations in methanol solution. Specific nuclear Overhauser effects provide evidence for a type II' beta-turn conformation for the D-Pro-L-Ala segment in 1, while the NMR data suggest that the type I' D-Pro-D-Ala beta-turn conformation predominates in peptide 2. Evidence for a minor conformation in peptide 2, in slow exchange on the NMR time scale, is also presented. Interstrand registry is demonstrated in both peptides 1 and 2. The crystal structure of 1 reveals two independent molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit, both of which adopt beta-hairpin conformations nucleated by D-Pro-L-Ala type II' beta-turns and are stabilized by three cross-strand hydrogen bonds. CD spectra for peptides 1 and 2 show marked differences, presumably as a consequence of the superposition of spectral bands arising from both beta-turn and beta-strand conformations. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Homocysteine metabolism is associated with cerebrospinal fluid levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and amyloid beta.

    PubMed

    Oikonomidi, Aikaterini; Lewczuk, Piotr; Kornhuber, Johannes; Smulders, Yvo; Linnebank, Michael; Semmler, Alexander; Popp, Julius

    2016-10-01

    Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between cerebral amyloid production and both blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of the homocysteine metabolism. We assessed CSF concentrations of soluble APPα, soluble APPβ, and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42), as well as plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcys), total vitamin B12, and folate, and CSF concentrations of homocysteine (Hcys-CSF), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in 59 subjects with normal cognition. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between homocysteine metabolism parameters and amyloid production. The study was approved by the Ethical Committee of the University of Bonn. After controlling for age, gender, APOEe4 status, and albumin ratio (Qalb), higher Aβ1-42 CSF levels were associated with high Hcys and low vitamin B12 plasma levels as well as with high Hcys, high SAH, and low 5-MTHF CSF levels. Higher CSF concentrations of sAPPα and sAPPβ were associated with high SAH levels. The results suggest that disturbed homocysteine metabolism is related to increased CSF levels of sAPP forms and Aβ1-42, and may contribute to the accumulation of amyloid pathology in the brain. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. We found associations between CSF levels of soluble APP forms and Aβ1-42, and markers of the homocysteine metabolism in both plasma and CSF in adults with normal cognition. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may represent a target for preventive and early disease-modifying interventions in Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Rationally designed mutations convert de novo amyloid-like fibrils into monomeric beta-sheet proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixun; Hecht, Michael H

    2002-03-05

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative maladies including Alzheimer's disease and the prion diseases. The structures of amyloid fibrils are composed of beta-strands oriented orthogonal to the fibril axis ("cross beta" structure). We previously reported the design and characterization of a combinatorial library of de novo beta-sheet proteins that self-assemble into fibrillar structures resembling amyloid. The libraries were designed by using a "binary code" strategy, in which the locations of polar and nonpolar residues are specified explicitly, but the identities of these residues are not specified and are varied combinatorially. The initial libraries were designed to encode proteins containing amphiphilic beta-strands separated by reverse turns. Each beta-strand was designed to be seven residues long, with polar (open circle) and nonpolar (shaded circle) amino acids arranged with an alternating periodicity ([see text]). The initial design specified the identical polar/nonpolar pattern for all of the beta-strands; no strand was explicitly designated to form the edges of the resulting beta-sheets. With all beta-strands preferring to occupy interior (as opposed to edge) locations, intermolecular oligomerization was favored, and the proteins assembled into amyloid-like fibrils. To assess whether explicit design of edge-favoring strands might tip the balance in favor of monomeric beta-sheet proteins, we have now redesigned the first and/or last beta-strands of several sequences from the original library. In the redesigned beta-strands, the binary pattern is changed from [see text] (K denotes lysine). The presence of a lysine on the nonpolar face of a beta-strand should disfavor fibrillar structures because such structures would bury an uncompensated charge. The nonpolar right arrow lysine mutations, therefore, would be expected to favor mono