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Sample records for amyloid fibril growth

  1. Amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Rambaran, Roma N

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid refers to the abnormal fibrous, extracellular, proteinaceous deposits found in organs and tissues. Amyloid is insoluble and is structurally dominated by β-sheet structure. Unlike other fibrous proteins it does not commonly have a structural, supportive or motility role but is associated with the pathology seen in a range of diseases known as the amyloidoses. These diseases include Alzheimer's, the spongiform encephalopathies and type II diabetes, all of which are progressive disorders with associated high morbidity and mortality. Not surprisingly, research into the physicochemical properties of amyloid and its formation is currently intensely pursued. In this chapter we will highlight the key scientific findings and discuss how the stability of amyloid fibrils impacts on bionanotechnology. PMID:19158505

  2. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general. PMID:26496385

  3. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  4. Mechanism of amyloidfibril elongation.

    PubMed

    Gurry, Thomas; Stultz, Collin M

    2014-11-11

    Amyloid-β is an intrinsically disordered protein that forms fibrils in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. To explore factors that affect the process of fibril growth, we computed the free energy associated with disordered amyloid-β monomers being added to growing amyloid fibrils using extensive molecular dynamics simulations coupled with umbrella sampling. We find that the mechanisms of Aβ40 and Aβ42 fibril elongation have many features in common, including the formation of an obligate on-pathway β-hairpin intermediate that hydrogen bonds to the fibril core. In addition, our data lead to new hypotheses for how fibrils may serve as secondary nucleation sites that can catalyze the formation of soluble oligomers, a finding in agreement with recent experimental observations. These data provide a detailed mechanistic description of amyloidfibril elongation and a structural link between the disordered free monomer and the growth of amyloid fibrils and soluble oligomers.

  5. Polymorph-specific kinetics and thermodynamics of β-amyloid fibril growth

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Wei; Kelley, Kevin; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils formed by the 40-residue β-amyloid peptide (Aβ1–40) are highly polymorphic, with molecular structures that depend on the details of growth conditions. Underlying differences in physical properties are not well understood. Here, we investigate differences in growth kinetics and thermodynamic stabilities of two Aβ1–40 fibril polymorphs for which detailed structural models are available from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Rates of seeded fibril elongation in the presence of excess soluble Aβ1–40 and shrinkage in the absence of soluble Aβ1–40 are determined with atomic force microscopy (AFM). From these rates, we derive polymorph-specific values for the soluble Aβ1–40 concentration at quasi-equilibrium, from which relative stabilities can be derived. The AFM results are supported by direct measurements by ultraviolet absorbance, using a novel dialysis system to establish quasi-equilibrium. At 24° C, the two polymorphs have significantly different elongation and shrinkage kinetics but similar thermodynamic stabilities. At 37° C, differences in kinetics are reduced, and thermodynamic stabilities are increased significantly. Fibril length distributions in AFM images provide support for an intermittent growth model, in which fibrils switch randomly between an "on" state (capable of elongation) and an "off" state (incapable of elongation). We also monitor interconversion between polymorphs at 24° C by solid state NMR, showing that the two-fold symmetric "agitated" () polymorph is more stable than the three-fold symmetric "quiescent" polymorph. Finally, we show that the two polymorphs have significantly different rates of fragmentation in the presence of shear forces, a difference that helps explain the observed predominance of the structure when fibrils are grown in agitated solutions. PMID:23627695

  6. A mathematical model of the kinetics of beta-amyloid fibril growth from the denatured state.

    PubMed Central

    Pallitto, M M; Murphy, R M

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous conversion of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) from soluble monomer to insoluble fibril may underlie the neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease. A complete description of Abeta self-association kinetics requires identification of the oligomeric species present and the pathway of association, as well as quantitation of rate constants and reaction order. Abeta was rendered monomeric and denatured by dissolution in 8 M urea, pH 10. "Refolding" and fibrillization were initiated by rapid dilution into phosphate-buffered saline, pH 7.4. The kinetics of growth were followed at three different concentrations, using size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and static light scattering. A multi-step pathway for fibril formation and growth was postulated. This pathway included 1) rapid commitment to either stable monomer/dimer or unstable intermediate, 2) cooperative association of intermediate into a multimeric "nucleus," 3) elongation of the "nucleus" into filaments via addition of intermediate, 4) lateral aggregation of filaments into fibrils, and 5) fibril elongation via end-to-end association. Differential and algebraic equations describing this kinetic pathway were derived, and model parameters were determined by fitting the data. The utility of the model for identifying toxic Abeta oligomeric specie(s) is demonstrated. The model should prove useful for designing compounds that inhibit Abeta aggregation and/or toxicity. PMID:11509390

  7. Structural evolution of Iowa-mutant β-amyloid fibrils from polymorphic to homogeneous states under repeated seeded growth

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Wei; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Structural variations in β-amyloid fibrils are potentially important to the toxicity of these fibrils in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We describe a repeated seeding protocol that selects a homogeneous fibril structure from a polymorphic initial state in the case of 40-residue β-amyloid fibrils with the Asp23-to-Asn, or Iowa, mutation (D23N-Aβ1-40). We use thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to track the evolution of fibril structure through multiple generations under this protocol. The data show that: (i) repeated seeding selectively amplifies a single D23NAβ1-40 fibril structure that can be a minor component of the initial polymorphic state; (ii) the final structure is highly sensitive to growth conditions, including pH, temperature, and agitation; (iii) although the initial state can include fibrils that contain both antiparallel and parallel β-sheets, the final structures contain only parallel β-sheets, suggesting that antiparallel β-sheet structures are thermodynamically and kinetically metastable. Additionally, our data demonstrate that ThT fluorescence enhancements, which are commonly used to monitor amyloid fibril formation, vary strongly with structural variations, even among fibrils comprised of the same polypeptide. Finally, we present a simple mathematical model that describes the structural evolution of fibril samples under repeated seeding. PMID:21355554

  8. Gold-Induced Fibril Growth: The Mechanism of Surface-Facilitated Amyloid Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gladytz, Anika; Abel, Bernd; Risselada, Herre Jelger

    2016-09-01

    The question of how amyloid fibril formation is influenced by surfaces is crucial for a detailed understanding of the process in vivo. We applied a combination of kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate how (model) surfaces influence fibril formation of the amyloid-forming sequences of prion protein SUP35 and human islet amyloid polypeptide. The kinetic data suggest that structural reorganization of the initial peptide corona around colloidal gold nanoparticles is the rate-limiting step. The molecular dynamics simulations reveal that partial physisorption to the surface results in the formation of aligned monolayers, which stimulate the formation of parallel, critical oligomers. The general mechanism implies that the competition between the underlying peptide-peptide and peptide-surface interactions must strike a balance to accelerate fibril formation. PMID:27513605

  9. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E.; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  10. Investigation of the growth mechanisms of diglyme plasma polymers on amyloid fibril networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yali; Reynolds, Nicholas P.; Styan, Katie E.; Muir, Benjamin W.; Forsythe, John S.; Easton, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Within the area of biomaterials research, the ability to tailor a materials surface chemistry while presenting a biomimetic topography is a useful tool for studying cell-surface and cell-cell interactions. For the study reported here we investigated the deposition of diglyme plasma polymer films (DGpp) onto amyloid fibril networks (AFNs), which have morphologies that mimic the extracellular matrix. We extend our previous work to observe that the nanoscale contours of the AFNs are well preserved even under thick layers of DGpp. The width of the surface features is positively correlated to the DGpp thickness. DGpp film growth conformed to the underlying fibril features, with a gradual smoothing out of the resultant surface topography. Further, to understand how the films grow on top of AFNs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling was employed to determine the elemental composition within the coating, perpendicular to the plane of the substrate. It was found that AFNs partially fragment during the initial stage of plasma polymerisation, and these fragments then mix with the growing DGpp to form an intermixed interface region above the AFN. The findings in this study are likely applicable to situations where plasma polymerisation is used to apply an overcoat to adsorbed organic and/or biological molecules.

  11. Metastable Amyloid Phases and their Conversion to Mature Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschol, Martin; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Schmit, Jeremy

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils plays a key role in both functional biological responses and pathogenic disorders which include Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Amyloid fibril assembly frequently generates compact oligomeric and curvilinear polymeric intermediates which are implicated to be toxic to cells. Yet, the relation between these early-stage oligomeric aggregates and late-stage rigid fibrils, which are the hallmark structure of amyloid plaques, has remained unclear. Our measurements indicate that lysozyme amyloid oligomers and their curvilinear fibrils only form after crossing a salt and protein concentration dependent threshold. These oligomeric aggregates are structurally distinct from rigid fibrils and are metastable against nucleation and growth of rigid fibrils. Our experimental transition boundaries match well with colloidal model predictions accounting for salt-modulated charge repulsion. We also report our preliminary findings on the mechanism by which these metastable oligomeric phases are converted into stable amyloid fibrils.

  12. Shear flow promotes amyloid-{beta} fibrilization.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, Dave E; Hamilton-Brown, Paul; Asimakis, Peter; Ducker, William; Bertolini, Joseph

    2009-12-01

    The rate of formation of amyloid fibrils in an aqueous solution of amyloid-beta (Abeta) is greatly increased when the solution is sheared. When Abeta solution is stirred with a magnetic stirrer bar at 37 degrees C, a rapid increase in thioflavin T fluorescence is observed. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images show the formation of aggregates, the growth of fibrils and the intertwining of the fibrils with time. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of samples taken after stirring shows a transition from random coil to alpha-helix to beta-sheet secondary structure over 20 h at 37 degrees C. The fluorescence, AFM and CD measurements are all consistent with the formation of amyloid fibrils. Quiescent, non-stirred solutions incubated at 37 degrees C showed no evidence of amyloid formation over a period of 3 days. Couette flow was found to accelerate the formation of amyloid fibrils demonstrating that the primary effect of stirring is not mixing but shearing. Only very small shear forces are applied to individual molecules in our experiments. Simple calculation suggests that the force is too small to support a hypothesis that shearing promotes partial unfolding of the protein as is observed. PMID:19850675

  13. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweers, K. K. M.; Bennink, M. L.; Subramaniam, V.

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils.

  14. Kinetic theory of amyloid fibril templating.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Jeremy D

    2013-05-14

    The growth of amyloid fibrils requires a disordered or partially unfolded protein to bind to the fibril and adapt the same conformation and alignment established by the fibril template. Since the H-bonds stabilizing the fibril are interchangeable, it is inevitable that H-bonds form between incorrect pairs of amino acids which are either incorporated into the fibril as defects or must be broken before the correct alignment can be found. This process is modeled by mapping the formation and breakage of H-bonds to a one-dimensional random walk. The resulting microscopic model of fibril growth is governed by two timescales: the diffusion time of the monomeric proteins, and the time required for incorrectly bound proteins to unbind from the fibril. The theory predicts that the Arrhenius behavior observed in experiments is due to off-pathway states rather than an on-pathway transition state. The predicted growth rates are in qualitative agreement with experiments on insulin fibril growth rates as a function of protein concentration, denaturant concentration, and temperature. These results suggest a templating mechanism where steric clashes due to a single mis-aligned molecule prevent the binding of additional molecules.

  15. Direct Correlation Between Ligand-Induced α-Synuclein Oligomers and Amyloid-like Fibril Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nors Perdersen, Martin; Foderà, Vito; Horvath, Istvan; van Maarschalkerweerd, Andreas; Nørgaard Toft, Katrine; Weise, Christoph; Almqvist, Fredrik; Wolf-Watz, Magnus; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins into amyloid deposits is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The suggestion that intermediate oligomeric species may be cytotoxic has led to intensified investigations of pre-fibrillar oligomers, which are complicated by their transient nature and low population. Here we investigate alpha-synuclein oligomers, enriched by a 2-pyridone molecule (FN075), and the conversion of oligomers into fibrils. As probed by leakage assays, the FN075 induced oligomers potently disrupt vesicles in vitro, suggesting a potential link to disease related degenerative activity. Fibrils formed in the presence and absence of FN075 are indistinguishable on microscopic and macroscopic levels. Using small angle X-ray scattering, we reveal that FN075 induced oligomers are similar, but not identical, to oligomers previously observed during alpha-synuclein fibrillation. Since the levels of FN075 induced oligomers correlate with the amounts of fibrils among different FN075:protein ratios, the oligomers appear to be on-pathway and modeling supports an ‘oligomer stacking model’ for alpha-synuclein fibril elongation. PMID:26020724

  16. Review: history of the amyloid fibril.

    PubMed

    Sipe, J D; Cohen, A S

    2000-06-01

    Rudolph Virchow, in 1854, introduced and popularized the term amyloid to denote a macroscopic tissue abnormality that exhibited a positive iodine staining reaction. Subsequent light microscopic studies with polarizing optics demonstrated the inherent birefringence of amyloid deposits, a property that increased intensely after staining with Congo red dye. In 1959, electron microscopic examination of ultrathin sections of amyloidotic tissues revealed the presence of fibrils, indeterminate in length and, invariably, 80 to 100 A in width. Using the criteria of Congophilia and fibrillar morphology, 20 or more biochemically distinct forms of amyloid have been identified throughout the animal kingdom; each is specifically associated with a unique clinical syndrome. Fibrils, also 80 to 100 A in width, have been isolated from tissue homogenates using differential sedimentation or solubility. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the fibrils to be ordered in the beta pleated sheet conformation, with the direction of the polypeptide backbone perpendicular to the fibril axis (cross beta structure). Because of the similar dimensions and tinctorial properties of the fibrils extracted from amyloid-laden tissues and amyloid fibrils in tissue sections, they have been assumed to be identical. However, the spatial relationship of proteoglycans and amyloid P component (AP), common to all forms of amyloid, to the putative protein only fibrils in tissues, has been unclear. Recently, it has been suggested that, in situ, amyloid fibrils are composed of proteoglycans and AP as well as amyloid proteins and thus resemble connective tissue microfibrils. Chemical and physical definition of the fibrils in tissues will be needed to relate the in vitro properties of amyloid protein fibrils to the pathogenesis of amyloid fibril formation in vivo. PMID:10940217

  17. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  18. Amyloid at the nanoscale: AFM and single-molecule investigations of early steps of aggregation and mature fibril growth, structure, and mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Vinod

    2013-03-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of proteins into nanometer-scale fibrillar assemblies is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. We have investigated the self-assembly of the human intrinsically disordered protein alpha-synuclein, involved in Parkinson's disease, into amyloid fibrils. A particularly relevant question is the role of early oligomeric aggregates in modulating the dynamics of protein nucleation and aggregation. We have used single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize conformational transitions of alpha-synuclein, and to gain insights into the structure and composition of oligomeric aggregates of alpha-synuclein. Quantitative atomic force microscopy and nanomechanical investigations provide information on amyloid fibril polymorphism and on nanoscale mechanical properties of mature fibrillar species, while conventional optical and super-resolution imaging have yielded insights into the growth of fibrils and into the assembly of suprafibrillar structures. We thank the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), and the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology for support.

  19. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils. PMID:26453215

  20. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  1. Fibril Fragmentation Enhances Amyloid Cytotoxicity*♦

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gosal, Walraj S.; Homans, Steve W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:19808677

  2. Multimodal Spectroscopic Study of Amyloid Fibril Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    VandenAkker, Corianne C; Schleeger, Michael; Bruinen, Anne L; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Velikov, Krassimir P; Heeren, Ron M A; Deckert, Volker; Bonn, Mischa; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a large class of self-assembled protein aggregates that are formed from unstructured peptides and unfolded proteins. The fibrils are characterized by a universal β-sheet core stabilized by hydrogen bonds, but the molecular structure of the peptide subunits exposed on the fibril surface is variable. Here we show that multimodal spectroscopy using a range of bulk- and surface-sensitive techniques provides a powerful way to dissect variations in the molecular structure of polymorphic amyloid fibrils. As a model system, we use fibrils formed by the milk protein β-lactoglobulin, whose morphology can be tuned by varying the protein concentration during formation. We investigate the differences in the molecular structure and composition between long, straight fibrils versus short, wormlike fibrils. We show using mass spectrometry that the peptide composition of the two fibril types is similar. The overall molecular structure of the fibrils probed with various bulk-sensitive spectroscopic techniques shows a dominant contribution of the β-sheet core but no difference in structure between straight and wormlike fibrils. However, when probing specifically the surface of the fibrils with nanometer resolution using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), we find that both fibril types exhibit a heterogeneous surface structure with mainly unordered or α-helical structures and that the surface of long, straight fibrils contains markedly more β-sheet structure than the surface of short, wormlike fibrils. This finding is consistent with previous surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopic results ( VandenAkker et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. , 2011 , 133 , 18030 - 18033 , DOI: 10.1021/ja206513r ). In conclusion, only advanced vibrational spectroscopic techniques sensitive to surface structure such as TERS and VSFG are able to reveal the difference in structure that underlies the distinct morphology and rigidity of different amyloid

  3. Molecular structures of amyloid and prion fibrils: consensus versus controversy.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-07-16

    Many peptides and proteins self-assemble into amyloid fibrils. Examples include mammalian and fungal prion proteins, polypeptides associated with human amyloid diseases, and proteins that may have biologically functional amyloid states. To understand the propensity for polypeptides to form amyloid fibrils and to facilitate rational design of amyloid inhibitors and imaging agents, it is necessary to elucidate the molecular structures of these fibrils. Although fibril structures were largely mysterious 15 years ago, a considerable body of reliable structural information about amyloid fibril structures now exists, with essential contributions from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. This Account reviews results from our laboratories and discusses several structural issues that have been controversial. In many cases, the amino acid sequences of amyloid fibrils do not uniquely determine their molecular structures. Self-propagating, molecular-level polymorphism complicates the structure determination problem and can lead to apparent disagreements between results from different laboratories, particularly when different laboratories study different polymorphs. For 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ₁₋₄₀) fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, we have developed detailed structural models from solid state NMR and electron microscopy data for two polymorphs. These polymorphs have similar peptide conformations, identical in-register parallel β-sheet organizations, but different overall symmetry. Other polymorphs have also been partially characterized by solid state NMR and appear to have similar structures. In contrast, cryo-electron microscopy studies that use significantly different fibril growth conditions have identified structures that appear (at low resolution) to be different from those examined by solid state NMR. Based on solid state NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, the in-register parallel β-sheet organization

  4. Structural complexity of a composite amyloid fibril

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Józef R.; van der Wel, Patrick C.A.; Rigney, Mike; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular structure of amyloid fibrils and the mechanism of their formation are of substantial medical and biological importance, but present an ongoing experimental and computational challenge. An early high-resolution view of amyloid-like structure was obtained on amyloid-like crystals of a small fragment of the yeast prion protein Sup35p: the peptide GNNQQNY. As GNNQQNY also forms amyloid-like fibrils under similar conditions, it has been theorized that the crystal's structural features are shared by the fibrils. Here we apply magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR to examine the structure and dynamics of these fibrils. Previously multiple NMR signals were observed for such samples, seemingly consistent with the presence of polymorphic fibrils. Here we demonstrate that peptides with these three distinct conformations instead assemble together into composite protofilaments. Electron-microscopy (EM) of the ribbon-like fibrils indicates that these protofilaments combine in differing ways to form striations of variable widths, presenting another level of structural complexity. Structural and dynamical NMR data reveal the presence of highly restricted side chain conformations involved in interfaces between differently structured peptides, likely comprising interdigitated steric zippers. We outline molecular interfaces that are consistent with the observed EM and NMR data. The rigid and uniform structure of the GNNQQNY crystals is found to contrast distinctly with the more complex structural and dynamic nature of these “composite” amyloid fibrils. These results provide insight into the fibril-crystal distinction and also indicate a necessary caution with respect to the extrapolation of crystal structures to the study of fibril structure and formation. PMID:21766841

  5. Biomimetic topography and chemistry control cell attachment to amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Nicholas P; Charnley, Mirren; Bongiovanni, Marie N; Hartley, Patrick G; Gras, Sally L

    2015-05-11

    Networks of nanoscale fibrous coatings made from self-assembled peptides are promising candidates for biomaterials that can promote the growth of mammalian cells. One particularly attractive feature is the possibility of adding biofunctional sequences to peptides to promote cell attachment. We deconvolute the topographic and chemical effects of nanoscale fibrils on cells by depositing a plasma polymer film on TTR1-based fibrils decorated with a range of cell adhesive chemistries (RGD and cycloRGDfK), producing a surface that retains the nanoscale fibrous topography of surface-bound fibrils but lacks the fibril surface chemistry. The surface topography was found to influence cell toxicity and spreading, and the fibril surface chemistry influenced cell attachment and spreading. This study highlights the importance of considering both the chemical and physical features of novel biomaterials and illustrates the use of plasma polymer deposition as a tool for examining the relationship between amyloid fibril structure and function. PMID:25871317

  6. Compressive deformation of ultralong amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Involved in various neurodegenerative diseases, amyloid fibrils and plaques feature a hierarchical structure, ranging from the atomistic to the micrometer scale. At the atomistic level, a dense and organized hydrogen bond network is resembled in a beta-sheet rich secondary structure, which drives a remarkable stiffness in the range of 10-20GPa, larger than many other biological nanofibrils, a result confirmed by both experiment and theory. However, the understanding of how these exceptional mechanical properties transfer from the atomistic to the nanoscale remains unknown. Here we report a multiscale analysis that, from the atomistic-level structure of a single fibril, extends to the mesoscale level, reaching size scales of hundreds of nanometers. We use parameters directly derived from full atomistic simulations of A β (1-40) amyloid fibrils to parameterize a mesoscopic coarse-grained model, which is used to reproduce the elastic properties of amyloid fibrils. We then apply our mesoscopic model in an analysis of the buckling behavior of amyloid fibrils with different lengths and report a comparison with predictions from continuum beam theory. An important implication of our results is a severe reduction of the effective modulus due to buckling, an effect that could be important to interpret experimental results of ultra-long amyloid fibrils. Our model represents a powerful tool to mechanically characterize molecular structures on the order of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers on the basis of the underlying atomistic behavior. The work provides insight into structural and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and may enable further analysis of larger-scale assemblies such as amyloidogenic bundles or plaques as found in disease states.

  7. Structural polymorphism of amyloid oligomers and fibrils underlies different fibrillization pathways: immunogenicity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Massimo

    2010-08-01

    The past fifteen years have led to a profound re-consideration of the molecular and cellular basis of amyloid diseases. Since the formulation of the amyloid hypothesis in 1991-1992, increasing interest was initially focused at amyloid fibrils and, subsequently, at their precursors, oligomers and pre-fibrillar aggregates as main culprits of cell impairment and demise, particularly in neurodegenerative diseases with amyloid deposition. In 2002, this concept was generalized by the demonstration that pre-fibrillar aggregates were toxic even when they were grown from proteins not associated with amyloid disease. Presently, the general structural features and polymorphism of amyloid fibrils grown from a range of different peptides and proteins are rather well known; however, in spite of the growing interest in amyloid oligomers as the main source of amyloid toxicity, a better definition of their structural features remains elusive due to their transient nature, remarkable instability, high flexibility and structural heterogeneity possibly resulting in the appearance of polymorphic assemblies. Nevertheless, recent studies have started to unravel this key topic by providing significant insights into some general structural features and conformational polymorphism of amyloid oligomers and the higher order structures they generate. Important clues into the structure-toxicity relation of amyloids, the role performed by natural surfaces in oligomer growth and the molecular basis of oligomer-membrane interaction are also emerging. PMID:20423295

  8. Alzheimer's Aβ(1-40) Amyloid Fibrils Feature Size-Dependent Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiping; Paparcone, Raffaella; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-01-01

    , suggesting that simple Euler-Bernoulli beam models fail to describe the mechanics of amyloid fibrils appropriately. Our studies reveal the importance of size effects in elucidating the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils. This issue is of great importance for comparing experimental and simulation results, and gaining a general understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying the growth of ectopic amyloid materials. PMID:20483312

  9. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-14

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer's disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27585675

  10. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-14

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer's disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Laser-induced propagation and destruction of amyloid beta fibrils.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisashi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Toru; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-06-18

    The amyloid deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD). Preventing the formation of amyloid deposits and removing preformed fibrils in tissues are important therapeutic strategies against AD. Previously, we reported the destruction of amyloid fibrils of beta(2)-microglobulin K3 fragments by laser irradiation coupled with the binding of amyloid-specific thioflavin T. Here, we studied the effects of a laser beam on Abeta fibrils. As was the case for K3 fibrils, extensive irradiation destroyed the preformed Abeta fibrils. However, irradiation during spontaneous fibril formation resulted in only the partial destruction of growing fibrils and a subsequent explosive propagation of fibrils. The explosive propagation was caused by an increase in the number of active ends due to breakage. The results not only reveal a case of fragmentation-induced propagation of fibrils but also provide insights into therapeutic strategies for AD.

  13. Immunoprecipitation of Amyloid Fibrils by the Use of an Antibody that Recognizes a Generic Epitope Common to Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Erin R.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Palhano, Fernando L.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with many maladies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The isolation of amyloids from natural materials is very challenging because the extreme structural stability of amyloid fibrils makes it difficult to apply conventional protein science protocols to their purification. A protocol to isolate and detect amyloids is desired for the diagnosis of amyloid diseases and for the identification of new functional amyloids. Our aim was to develop a protocol to purify amyloid from organisms, based on the particular characteristics of the amyloid fold, such as its resistance to proteolysis and its capacity to be recognized by specific conformational antibodies. We used a two-step strategy with proteolytic digestion as the first step followed by immunoprecipitation using the amyloid conformational antibody LOC. We tested the efficacy of this method using as models amyloid fibrils produced in vitro, tissue extracts from C. elegans that overexpress Aβ peptide, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients diagnosed with AD. We were able to immunoprecipitate Aβ1–40 amyloid fibrils, produced in vitro and then added to complex biological extracts, but not α-synuclein and gelsolin fibrils. This method was useful for isolating amyloid fibrils from tissue homogenates from a C. elegans AD model, especially from aged worms. Although we were able to capture picogram quantities of Aβ1–40 amyloid fibrils produced in vitro when added to complex biological solutions, we could not detect any Aβ amyloid aggregates in CSF from AD patients. Our results show that although immunoprecipitation using the LOC antibody is useful for isolating Aβ1–40 amyloid fibrils, it fails to capture fibrils of other amyloidogenic proteins, such as α-synuclein and gelsolin. Additional research might be needed to improve the affinity of these amyloid conformational antibodies for an array of amyloid fibrils without compromising their selectivity before application of this

  14. Mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bumjoon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Sang Woo; Eom, Kilho

    2015-01-14

    Amyloid fibrils have recently received attention due to their remarkable mechanical properties, which are highly correlated with their biological functions. We have studied the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils as a function of their length scales by using atomistic simulations. It is shown that the length of amyloid fibrils plays a role in their deformation and fracture mechanisms in such a way that the competition between shear and bending deformations is highly dependent on the fibril length, and that as the fibril length increases, so does the bending strength of the fibril while its shear strength decreases. The dependence of rupture force for amyloid fibrils on their length is elucidated using the Bell model, which suggests that the rupture force of the fibril is determined from the hydrogen bond rupture mechanism that critically depends on the fibril length. We have measured the toughness of amyloid fibrils, which is shown to depend on the fibril length. In particular, the toughness of the fibril with its length of ∼3 nm is estimated to be ∼30 kcal mol(-1) nm(-3), comparable to that of a spider silk crystal with its length of ∼2 nm. Moreover, we have shown the important effect of the pulling rate on the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibril. It is found that as the pulling rate increases, so does the contribution of the shear effect to the elastic deformation of the amyloid fibril with its length of <10 nm. However, we found that the deformation mechanism of the amyloid fibril with its length of >15 nm is almost independent of the pulling rate. Our study sheds light on the role of the length scale of amyloid fibrils and the pulling rate in their mechanical behaviors and properties, which may provide insights into how the excellent mechanical properties of protein fibrils can be determined. PMID:25426573

  15. Fibril structure of human islet amyloid polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Bedrood, Sahar; Li, Yiyu; Isas, J Mario; Hegde, Balachandra G; Baxa, Ulrich; Haworth, Ian S; Langen, Ralf

    2012-02-17

    Misfolding and amyloid fibril formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, but the structures of the misfolded forms remain poorly understood. Here we developed an approach that combines site-directed spin labeling with continuous wave and pulsed EPR to investigate local secondary structure and to determine the relative orientation of the secondary structure elements with respect to each other. These data indicated that individual hIAPP molecules take up a hairpin fold within the fibril. This fold contains two β-strands that are much farther apart than expected from previous models. Atomistic structural models were obtained using computational refinement with EPR data as constraints. The resulting family of structures exhibited a left-handed helical twist, in agreement with the twisted morphology observed by electron microscopy. The fibril protofilaments contain stacked hIAPP monomers that form opposing β-sheets that twist around each other. The two β-strands of the monomer adopt out-of-plane positions and are staggered by about three peptide layers (∼15 Å). These results provide a mechanism for hIAPP fibril formation and could explain the remarkable stability of the fibrils. Thus, the structural model serves as a starting point for understanding and preventing hIAPP misfolding. PMID:22187437

  16. Strain-specific morphologies of yeast prion amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Avalos, Ruben; King, Chih-Yen; Wall, Joseph; Simon, Martha; Caspar, Donald L. D.

    2005-01-01

    Mass per length (mpl) measurements on single amyloid fibrils that specifically propagate the [VH], [VK], and [VL] strains of the yeast prion [PSI] reveal unanticipated differences in their structures. Many fibrils have ≈1.0 prion molecule per 4.7-Å cross-β repeat period, which is consistent with a self-replicating model built by parallel β-sheet hydrogen-bonding of like prion peptide segments, but other fibrils are definitely heavier. The predominantly straight fibrils of the dominant [VH] strain have a bimodal mpl distribution, corresponding to components with ≈1.0 and 1.2 prions per repeat. Fibrils of the weaker [VK] strain, which are almost all wavy, have a monodisperse mpl distribution with a mean of 1.15 prions per repeat. The recessive [VL] strain sample has ≈1.05 prions per repeat in single fibrils and includes ≈10% double fibrils, which are rare in the duplicate [VH] and [VK] samples. All of these samples were assembled from purified recombinant Sup35 prion protein by seeded growth on nuclei extracted from yeast bearing the three [PSI] strains. Infectious and noninfectious spontaneously assembled fibrils of the recombinant prion protein also display different heterogeneous morphologies. The strain-specific morphological differences we have observed directly confirm the structural prediction of the protein-only prion theory but do not have an obvious molecular explanation. PMID:16006506

  17. Universal Behavior in the Mesoscale Properties of Amyloid Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assenza, Salvatore; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele; De Los Rios, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ubiquitous proteinaceous aggregates occurring in vivo and in vitro, with an invariant structural fingerprint at the molecular length scale. However, interpretation of their mesoscopic architectures is complicated by diverse observable polymorphic states. We here present a constitutive model for amyloid fibrils based on the minimization of the total energy per fibril. The model is benchmarked on real amyloid fibrils studied by atomic force microscopy. We use multistranded β -lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils as a model system exhibiting a rich polymorphism. The constitutive model quantitatively recapitulates the main mesoscopic topological features of amyloid fibrils, that is, the evolution of fibril periodicity as a function of the ionic strength of the solution and of the fibril width. A universal mesoscopic structural signature of the fibrils emerges from this picture, predicting a general, parameter-free law for the periodicity of the fibrils, that depends solely on the number of protofilaments per fibril. These predictions are validated experimentally and conclusively highlight the role of competing electrostatic and elastic contributions as the main players in the establishment of amyloid fibrils structure.

  18. Inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation by cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Keisuke; Misumi, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Hayashi, Yuya; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Obayashi, Konen; Yamashita, Taro; Jono, Hirofumi; Arima, Hidetoshi; Ando, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Localized insulin-derived amyloid masses occasionally form at the site of repeated insulin injections in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes and cause subcutaneous insulin resistance. Various kinds of insulin including porcine insulin, human insulin, and insulin analogues reportedly formed amyloid fibrils in vitro and in vivo, but the impact of the amino acid replacement in insulin molecules on amyloidogenicity is largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated the difference in amyloid fibril formation kinetics of human insulin and insulin analogues, which suggests an important role of the C-terminal domain of the insulin B chain in nuclear formation of amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, we determined that cyclodextrins, which are widely used as drug carriers in the pharmaceutical field, had an inhibitory effect on the nuclear formation of insulin amyloid fibrils. These findings have significant implications for the mechanism underlying insulin amyloid fibril formation and for developing optimal additives to prevent this subcutaneous adverse effect.

  19. Preparation of Amyloid Fibrils Seeded from Brain and Meninges.

    PubMed

    Scherpelz, Kathryn P; Lu, Jun-Xia; Tycko, Robert; Meredith, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Seeding of amyloid fibrils into fresh solutions of the same peptide or protein in disaggregated form leads to the formation of replicate fibrils, with close structural similarity or identity to the original fibrillar seeds. Here we describe procedures for isolating fibrils composed mainly of β-amyloid (Aβ) from human brain and from leptomeninges, a source of cerebral blood vessels, for investigating Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We also describe methods for seeding isotopically labeled, disaggregated Aβ peptide solutions for study using solid-state NMR and other techniques. These methods should be applicable to other types of amyloid fibrils, to Aβ fibrils from mice or other species, tissues other than brain, and to some non-fibrillar aggregates. These procedures allow for the examination of authentic amyloid fibrils and other protein aggregates from biological tissues without the need for labeling the tissue.

  20. Molecular structure of β-amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer’s disease brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun-Xia; Qiang, Wei; Yau, Wai-Ming; Schwieters, Charles D.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In vitro, β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides form polymorphic fibrils, with molecular structures that depend on growth conditions, plus various oligomeric and protofibrillar aggregates. Detailed structural information about Aβ assemblies in the human brain has been lacking. Here, we investigate structures of brain-derived Aβ fibrils, using seeded fibril growth from brain extract and data from solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and electron microscopy. Experiments on tissue from two Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients with distinct clinical histories indicate a single predominant 40-residue Aβ (Aβ40) fibril structure in each patient, but different structures in the two patients. A molecular structural model developed for Aβ40 fibrils from one patient reveals features that distinguish in vivo from in vitro fibrils. The data suggest that fibrils in the brain may spread from a single nucleation site, that structural variations may correlate with variations in AD, and that structure-specific amyloid imaging agents may be an important future goal. PMID:24034249

  1. Amyloid fibril formation by macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuel, Hilal A. . E-mail: hilal.lashuel@epfl.ch; Aljabari, Bayan; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Metz, Christine N.; Leng Lin; Callaway, David J.E.; Bucala, Richard

    2005-12-16

    We demonstrate herein that human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed in the brain and not previously considered to be amyloidogenic, forms amyloid fibrils similar to those derived from the disease associated amyloidogenic proteins {beta}-amyloid and {alpha}-synuclein. Acid denaturing conditions were found to readily induce MIF to undergo amyloid fibril formation. MIF aggregates to form amyloid-like structures with a morphology that is highly dependent on pH. The mechanism of MIF amyloid formation was probed by electron microscopy, turbidity, Thioflavin T binding, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and analytical ultracentrifugation. The fibrillar structures formed by MIF bind Congo red and exhibit the characteristic green birefringence under polarized light. These results are consistent with the notion that amyloid fibril formation is not an exclusive property of a select group of amyloidogenic proteins, and contribute to a better understanding of the factors which govern protein conformational changes and amyloid fibril formation in vivo.

  2. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina; Melnikova, Lucia; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea; Garamus, Vasil M.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Gazova, Zuzana

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  3. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Meenakshi; Vats, Abhishek; Taneja, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization) disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils) in amyloid cascade are also described. PMID:26019408

  4. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Reeba S; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K

    2016-03-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  5. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled. PMID:26592772

  6. Self-assembled amyloid fibrils with controllable conformational heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Lee, Chang Young; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and exhibit a conformational diversity that governs their pathological functions. Despite recent findings concerning the pathological role of their conformational diversity, the way in which the heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils can be formed has remained elusive. Here, we show that microwave-assisted chemistry affects the self-assembly process of amyloid fibril formation, which results in their conformational heterogeneity. In particular, microwave-assisted chemistry allows for delicate control of the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process, which enabled us to tune the molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils. The heterogeneous conformations of amyloid fibrils, which can be tuned with microwave-assisted chemistry, are attributed to the microwave-driven thermal energy affecting the electrostatic interaction during the self-assembly process. Our study demonstrates how microwave-assisted chemistry can be used to gain insight into the origin of conformational heterogeneity of amyloid fibrils as well as the design principles showing how the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils can be controlled. PMID:26592772

  7. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Foster, Carmen M.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  8. PMEL Amyloid Fibril Formation: The Bright Steps of Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bissig, Christin; Rochin, Leila; van Niel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In pigment cells, melanin synthesis takes place in specialized organelles, called melanosomes. The biogenesis and maturation of melanosomes is initiated by an unpigmented step that takes place prior to the initiation of melanin synthesis and leads to the formation of luminal fibrils deriving from the pigment cell-specific pre-melanosomal protein (PMEL). In the lumen of melanosomes, PMEL fibrils optimize sequestration and condensation of the pigment melanin. Interestingly, PMEL fibrils have been described to adopt a typical amyloid-like structure. In contrast to pathological amyloids often associated with neurodegenerative diseases, PMEL fibrils represent an emergent category of physiological amyloids due to their beneficial cellular functions. The formation of PMEL fibrils within melanosomes is tightly regulated by diverse mechanisms, such as PMEL traffic, cleavage and sorting. These mechanisms revealed increasing analogies between the formation of physiological PMEL fibrils and pathological amyloid fibrils. In this review we summarize the known mechanisms of PMEL fibrillation and discuss how the recent understanding of physiological PMEL amyloid formation may help to shed light on processes involved in pathological amyloid formation. PMID:27589732

  9. PMEL Amyloid Fibril Formation: The Bright Steps of Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bissig, Christin; Rochin, Leila; van Niel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In pigment cells, melanin synthesis takes place in specialized organelles, called melanosomes. The biogenesis and maturation of melanosomes is initiated by an unpigmented step that takes place prior to the initiation of melanin synthesis and leads to the formation of luminal fibrils deriving from the pigment cell-specific pre-melanosomal protein (PMEL). In the lumen of melanosomes, PMEL fibrils optimize sequestration and condensation of the pigment melanin. Interestingly, PMEL fibrils have been described to adopt a typical amyloid-like structure. In contrast to pathological amyloids often associated with neurodegenerative diseases, PMEL fibrils represent an emergent category of physiological amyloids due to their beneficial cellular functions. The formation of PMEL fibrils within melanosomes is tightly regulated by diverse mechanisms, such as PMEL traffic, cleavage and sorting. These mechanisms revealed increasing analogies between the formation of physiological PMEL fibrils and pathological amyloid fibrils. In this review we summarize the known mechanisms of PMEL fibrillation and discuss how the recent understanding of physiological PMEL amyloid formation may help to shed light on processes involved in pathological amyloid formation. PMID:27589732

  10. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Foster, James S.; Hackenbrack, Nicole; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Donohoe, Dallas; Williams, Angela; Macy, Sallie; Wooliver, Craig; Wortham, Dale; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; et al

    2015-09-22

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presencemore » of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. Ultimately, these data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.« less

  11. Mapping the surface charge distribution of amyloid fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Wonseok; Lee, Hyungbeen; Woo Lee, Sang; Sung Yoon, Dae; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2012-07-01

    It is of high importance to measure and map the surface charge distribution of amyloids, since electrostatic interaction between amyloidogenic proteins and biomolecules plays a vital role in amyloidogenesis. In this work, we have measured and mapped the surface charge distributions of amyloids (i.e., β-lactoglobulin fibril) using Kelvin probe force microscopy. It is shown that the surface charge distribution is highly dependent on the conformation of amyloids (e.g., the helical pitch of amyloid fibrils) as well as the pH of a solvent.

  12. Solid-State NMR Studies of Amyloid Fibril Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Current interest in amyloid fibrils stems from their involvement in neurodegenerative and other diseases and from their role as an alternative structural state for many peptides and proteins. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the unique capability of providing detailed structural constraints for amyloid fibrils, sufficient for the development of full molecular models. In this article, recent progress in the application of solid-state NMR to fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease, prion fibrils, and related systems is reviewed, along with relevant developments in solid-state NMR techniques and technology.

  13. Amyloid-Like Fibril Elongation Follows Michaelis-Menten Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Milto, Katazyna; Botyriute, Akvile; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2013-01-01

    A number of proteins can aggregate into amyloid-like fibrils. It was noted that fibril elongation has similarities to an enzymatic reaction, where monomers or oligomers would play a role of substrate and nuclei/fibrils would play a role of enzyme. The question is how similar these processes really are. We obtained experimental data on insulin amyloid-like fibril elongation at the conditions where other processes which may impact kinetics of fibril formation are minor and fitted it using Michaelis-Menten equation. The correlation of the fit is very good and repeatable. It speaks in favour of enzyme-like model of fibril elongation. In addition, obtained and values at different conditions may help in better understanding influence of environmental factors on the process of fibril elongation. PMID:23874721

  14. Microfluidic self-assembly of insulin monomers into amyloid fibrils on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seok; Um, Eujin; Park, Je-Kyun; Park, Chan Beum

    2008-07-15

    We report the self-assembly of insulin monomers into amyloid fibrils within microchannels. To demonstrate the microfluidic amyloid formation and fibril growth on a solid surface, we seeded the internal surfaces of the microchannels with insulin monomers via N-hydroxysuccinimide ester activation and continuously flushed a fresh insulin solution through the microchannels. According to our analysis using optical and fluorescence microscopy, insulin amyloid preferentially formed in the center of the microchannels and, after reaching a certain density, spread to the side walls of the microchannels. By using ex situ atomic force microscopy, we observed the growth of amyloid fibrils inside the microchannels, which occurred at a much higher rate than that in bulk systems. After 12 h of incubation, insulin formed amyloid spherulites having "Maltese cross" extinction patterns within the microchannels according to the polarized microscopic analysis. Microfluidic amyloid formation enabled low consumption of reagents, reduction of incubation time, and simultaneous observation of amyloid formation under different conditions. This work will contribute to the rapid analysis of amyloid formation associated with many protein misfolding diseases.

  15. Effect of agitation on the peptide fibrillization: Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide 1-42 but not amylin and insulin fibrils can grow under quiescent conditions.

    PubMed

    Tiiman, Ann; Noormägi, Andra; Friedemann, Merlin; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Palumaa, Peep; Tõugu, Vello

    2013-06-01

    Many peptides and proteins can form fibrillar aggregates in vitro, but only a limited number of them are forming pathological amyloid structures in vivo. We studied the fibrillization of four peptides--Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ) 1-40 and 1-42, amylin and insulin. In all cases, intensive mechanical agitation of the solution initiated fast fibrillization. However, when the mixing was stopped during the fibril growth phase, the fibrillization of amylin and insulin was practically stopped, and the rate for Aβ40 substantially decreased, whereas the fibrillization of Aβ42 peptide continued to proceed with almost the same rate as in the agitated conditions. The reason for the different sensitivity of the in vitro fibrillization of these peptides towards agitation in the fibril growth phase remains elusive. PMID:23609985

  16. Dynamic behavior of small heat shock protein inhibition on amyloid fibrillization of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Dong; Dong, Xiao; Deng, Wei; Lai, Luhua

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of small heat shock protein inhibition on fibril formation was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peptide SSTSAA with modified ends was used for amyloid fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRET signal was followed during the fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 inhibits fibril formation when introduced in the lag phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 slows down fibril formation when introduced after the lag phase. -- Abstract: Small heat shock proteins, a class of molecular chaperones, are reported to inhibit amyloid fibril formation in vitro, while the mechanism of inhibition remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which Mj HSP16.5 inhibits amyloid fibril formation of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A. A model peptide (dansyl-SSTSAA-W) was designed by introducing a pair of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes into the peptide, allowing for the monitoring of fibril formation by this experimental model. Mj HSP16.5 completely inhibited fibril formation of the model peptide at a molar ratio of 1:120. The dynamic process of fibril formation, revealed by FRET, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy, showed a lag phase of about 2 h followed by a fast growth period. The effect of Mj HSP16.5 on amyloid fibril formation was investigated by adding it into the incubation solution during different growth phases. Adding Mj HSP16.5 to the incubating peptide before or during the lag phase completely inhibited fibril formation. However, introducing Mj HSP16.5 after the lag phase only slowed down the fibril formation process by adhering to the already formed fibrils. These findings provide insight into the inhibitory roles of small heat shock proteins on amyloid fibril formation at the molecular level.

  17. Analysis of amyloid fibrils in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Bergström, Joakim; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Une, Yumi; Sun, Xuguo; Misumi, Shogo; Shoji, Shozo; Ando, Yukio

    2006-06-01

    Recently, a high prevalence of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis has been documented among captive cheetahs worldwide. Biochemical analysis of amyloid fibrils extracted from the liver of a Japanese captive cheetah unequivocally showed that protein AA was the main fibril constituent. Further characterization of the AA fibril components by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis revealed three main protein AA bands with approximate molecular weights of 8, 10 and 12 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 12-kDa component observed in SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed the molecular weight of a 12,381-Da peak. Our finding of a 12-kDa protein AA component provides evidence that the cheetah SAA sequence is longer than the previously reported 90 amino acid residues (approximately 10 kDa), and hence SAA is part of the amyloid fibril.

  18. Cold denaturation of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ikenoue, Tatsuya; Lee, Young-Ho; Kardos, József; Saiki, Miyu; Yagi, Hisashi; Kawata, Yasushi; Goto, Yuji

    2014-07-21

    Although amyloid fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies, their conformational stability remains largely unclear. Herein, we probe the thermal stability of various amyloid fibrils. α-Synuclein fibrils cold-denatured to monomers at 0-20 °C and heat-denatured at 60-110 °C. Meanwhile, the fibrils of β2-microglobulin, Alzheimer's Aβ1-40/Aβ1-42 peptides, and insulin exhibited only heat denaturation, although they showed a decrease in stability at low temperature. A comparison of structural parameters with positive enthalpy and heat capacity changes which showed opposite signs to protein folding suggested that the burial of charged residues in fibril cores contributed to the cold denaturation of α-synuclein fibrils. We propose that although cold-denaturation is common to both native proteins and misfolded fibrillar states, the main-chain dominated amyloid structures may explain amyloid-specific cold denaturation arising from the unfavorable burial of charged side-chains in fibril cores.

  19. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid β fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, M.; Morgado, I.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ► Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ► Aβ(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ► We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of Aβ(1–40) fibril formation. ► At high Aβ(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ► Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid β (Aβ) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. Aβ(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  20. On the adsorption of magnetite nanoparticles on lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Majorosova, Jozefina; Petrenko, Viktor I; Siposova, Katarina; Timko, Milan; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Garamus, Vasil M; Koralewski, Marceli; Avdeev, Mikhail V; Leszczynski, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan; Gazova, Zuzana; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Kopcansky, Peter

    2016-10-01

    An adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) from electrostatically stabilized aqueous ferrofluids on amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in 2mg/mL acidic dispersions have been detected for the MNP concentration range of 0.01-0.1vol.%. The association of the MNP with amyloid fibrils has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and magneto-optical measurements. It has been observed that the extent of adsorption is determined by the MNP concentration. When increasing the MNP concentration the formed aggregates of magnetic particles repeat the general rod-like structure of the fibrils. The effect is not observed when MNP are mixed with the solution of lysozyme monomers. The adsorption has been investigated with the aim to clarify previously found disaggregation activity of MNP in amyloid fibrils dispersions and to get deeper insight into interaction processes between amyloids and MNP. The observed effect is also discussed with respect to potential applications for ordering lysozyme amyloid fibrils in a liquid crystal phase under external magnetic fields. PMID:27451367

  1. Molecular structural basis for polymorphism in Alzheimer's β-amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Paravastu, Anant K.; Leapman, Richard D.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We describe a full structural model for amyloid fibrils formed by the 40-residue β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease (Aβ1–40), based on numerous constraints from solid state NMR and electron microscopy. This model applies specifically to fibrils with a periodically twisted morphology, with twist period equal to 120 ± 20 nm (defined as the distance between apparent minima in fibril width in negatively stained transmission electron microscope images). The structure has threefold symmetry about the fibril growth axis, implied by mass-per-length data and the observation of a single set of 13C NMR signals. Comparison with a previously reported model for Aβ1–40 fibrils with a qualitatively different, striated ribbon morphology reveals the molecular basis for polymorphism. At the molecular level, the 2 Aβ1–40 fibril morphologies differ in overall symmetry (twofold vs. threefold), the conformation of non-β-strand segments, and certain quaternary contacts. Both morphologies contain in-register parallel β-sheets, constructed from nearly the same β-strand segments. Because twisted and striated ribbon morphologies are also observed for amyloid fibrils formed by other polypeptides, such as the amylin peptide associated with type 2 diabetes, these structural variations may have general implications. PMID:19015532

  2. Complexation of amyloid fibrils with charged conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dhiman; Dutta, Paulami; Chakraborty, Chanchal; Singh, Pradeep K; Anoop, A; Jha, Narendra Nath; Jacob, Reeba S; Mondal, Mrityunjoy; Mankar, Shruti; Das, Subhadeep; Malik, Sudip; Maji, Samir K

    2014-04-01

    It has been suggested that conjugated charged polymers are amyloid imaging agents and promising therapeutic candidates for neurological disorders. However, very less is known about their efficacy in modulating the amyloid aggregation pathway. Here, we studied the modulation of Parkinson's disease associated α-synuclein (AS) amyloid assembly kinetics using conjugated polyfluorene polymers (PF, cationic; PFS, anionic). We also explored the complexation of these charged polymers with the various AS aggregated species including amyloid fibrils and oligomers using multidisciplinary biophysical techniques. Our data suggests that both polymers irrespective of their different charges in the side chains increase the fibrilization kinetics of AS and also remarkably change the morphology of the resultant amyloid fibrils. Both polymers were incorporated/aligned onto the AS amyloid fibrils as evident from electron microscopy (EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the resultant complexes were structurally distinct from their pristine form of both polymers and AS supported by FTIR study. Additionally, we observed that the mechanism of interactions between the polymers with different species of AS aggregates were markedly different.

  3. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Amyloid fibrils nucleated and organized by DNA origami constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomprasert, Anuttara; Bongiovanni, Marie N.; Sha, Ruojie; Sherman, William B.; Wang, Tong; Arora, Paramjit S.; Canary, James W.; Gras, Sally L.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered, insoluble protein aggregates that are associated with neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The fibrils have a common rod-like core structure, formed from an elongated stack of β-strands, and have a rigidity similar to that of silk (Young's modulus of 0.2-14 GPa). They also exhibit high thermal and chemical stability and can be assembled in vitro from short synthetic non-disease-related peptides. As a result, they are of significant interest in the development of self-assembled materials for bionanotechnology applications. Synthetic DNA molecules have previously been used to form intricate structures and organize other materials such as metal nanoparticles and could in principle be used to nucleate and organize amyloid fibrils. Here, we show that DNA origami nanotubes can sheathe amyloid fibrils formed within them. The fibrils are built by modifying the synthetic peptide fragment corresponding to residues 105-115 of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin and a DNA origami construct is used to form 20-helix DNA nanotubes with sufficient space for the fibrils inside. Once formed, the fibril-filled nanotubes can be organized onto predefined two-dimensional platforms via DNA-DNA hybridization interactions.

  5. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  6. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  7. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-25

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  8. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  9. Tanshinones inhibit amyloid aggregation by amyloid-β peptide, disaggregate amyloid fibrils, and protect cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuming; Yu, Xiang; Patal, Kunal; Hu, Rundong; Chuang, Steven; Zhang, Ge; Zheng, Jie

    2013-06-19

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils is regarded as one of the causative events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tanshinones extracted from Chinese herb Danshen (Salvia Miltiorrhiza Bunge) were traditionally used as anti-inflammation and cerebrovascular drugs due to their antioxidation and antiacetylcholinesterase effects. A number of studies have suggested that tanshinones could protect neuronal cells. In this work, we examine the inhibitory activity of tanshinone I (TS1) and tanshinone IIA (TS2), the two major components in the Danshen herb, on the aggregation and toxicity of Aβ1-42 using atomic force microscopy (AFM), thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence assay, cell viability assay, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. AFM and ThT results show that both TS1 and TS2 exhibit different inhibitory abilities to prevent unseeded amyloid fibril formation and to disaggregate preformed amyloid fibrils, in which TS1 shows better inhibitory potency than TS2. Live/dead assay further confirms that introduction of a very small amount of tanshinones enables protection of cultured SH-SY5Y cells against Aβ-induced cell toxicity. Comparative MD simulation results reveal a general tanshinone binding mode to prevent Aβ peptide association, showing that both TS1 and TS2 preferentially bind to a hydrophobic β-sheet groove formed by the C-terminal residues of I31-M35 and M35-V39 and several aromatic residues. Meanwhile, the differences in binding distribution, residues, sites, population, and affinity between TS1-Aβ and TS2-Aβ systems also interpret different inhibitory effects on Aβ aggregation as observed by in vitro experiments. More importantly, due to nonspecific binding mode of tanshinones, it is expected that tanshinones would have a general inhibitory efficacy of a wide range of amyloid peptides. These findings suggest that tanshinones, particularly TS1 compound, offer promising lead compounds with dual

  10. Shear-induced amyloid fibrillization: the role of inertia.

    PubMed

    McBride, Samantha A; Sanford, Sean P; Lopez, Juan M; Hirsa, Amir H

    2016-04-14

    Agitation of protein is known to induce deleterious effects on protein stability and structure, with extreme agitation sometimes resulting in complete aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Many mechanisms have been proposed to explain how protein becomes unstable when subjected to flow, including alignment of protein species, shear-induced unfolding, simple mixing, or fragmentation of existing fibrils to create new seeds. Here a shearing flow was imposed on a solution of monomeric human insulin via a rotating Couette device with a small hydrophobic fluid interface. The results indicate that even very low levels of shear are capable of accelerating amyloid fibril formation. Simulations of the flow suggest that the shear enhances fibrillization kinetics when flow inertia is non-negligible and the resulting meridional circulation allows for advection of bulk protein to the hydrophobic interface.

  11. Shear-induced amyloid fibrillization: the role of inertia.

    PubMed

    McBride, Samantha A; Sanford, Sean P; Lopez, Juan M; Hirsa, Amir H

    2016-04-14

    Agitation of protein is known to induce deleterious effects on protein stability and structure, with extreme agitation sometimes resulting in complete aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Many mechanisms have been proposed to explain how protein becomes unstable when subjected to flow, including alignment of protein species, shear-induced unfolding, simple mixing, or fragmentation of existing fibrils to create new seeds. Here a shearing flow was imposed on a solution of monomeric human insulin via a rotating Couette device with a small hydrophobic fluid interface. The results indicate that even very low levels of shear are capable of accelerating amyloid fibril formation. Simulations of the flow suggest that the shear enhances fibrillization kinetics when flow inertia is non-negligible and the resulting meridional circulation allows for advection of bulk protein to the hydrophobic interface. PMID:26956731

  12. Polymorphism complexity and handedness inversion in serum albumin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Usov, Ivan; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-12-23

    Protein-based amyloid fibrils can show a great variety of polymorphic structures within the same protein precursor, although the origins of these structural homologues remain poorly understood. In this work we investigate the fibrillation of bovine serum albumin--a model globular protein--and we follow the polymorphic evolution by a statistical analysis of high-resolution atomic force microscopy images, complemented, at larger length scales, by concepts based on polymer physics formalism. We identify six distinct classes of coexisting amyloid fibrils, including flexible left-handed twisted ribbons, rigid right-handed helical ribbons and nanotubes. We show that the rigid fibrils originate from flexible fibrils through two diverse polymorphic transitions, first, via a single-fibril transformation when the flexible left-handed twisted ribbons turn into the helical left-handed ribbons, to finally evolve into nanotube-like structures, and second, via a double-fibril transformation when two flexible left-handed twisted ribbons wind together resulting in a right-handed twisted ribbon, followed by a rigid right-handed helical ribbon polymorphic conformation. Hence, the change in handedness occurs with an increase in the level of the fibril's structural organization. PMID:24171389

  13. Scaling Behavior in Twisted, Helical and Undulating Lysozyme Amyloid Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Lara, Cecile; Adamcik, Jozef; Usov, Ivan; Jordens, Sophia

    2012-02-01

    We combine atomic force microscopy single-molecule statistical analysis with polymer physics concepts to study the molecular conformations of lysozyme amyloid fibrils. We use different denaturation conditions to yield amyloid fibrils of different types. At 90 C and pH2, highly laminated twisted and helical ribbons are found, in which as many as 17 protofilaments pack laterally for a total width approaching 180 nm. In the case of 60 C and pH2, we find thin, wavy fibrils, in which the scaling behavior varies at multiple length scales. We use bond and pair correlation functions, end-to-end distribution and worm-like chain model to identify 3 characteristic length scales. At short length scales there is a first bending transition of the fibrils, corresponding to a bending length Lb. At slightly larger length scales (>2Lb), the fibrils become pseudoperiodic and start to undulate. Finally, at length scales larger than the persistence length Lp, the fibrils become flexible and are well described by a 2D self-avoiding random walk. We interpret these results in terms of the periodic fluctuations of the cross-section orientation of the fibrils (twisting) and the impact these have on the area moment of inertia and the corresponding propensity of the fibrils to bend.

  14. Amyloid-like Fibril Formation by Trypsin in Aqueous Ethanol. Inhibition of Fibrillation by PEG.

    PubMed

    Kotormán, Márta; Simon, Mária L; Borics, Attila; Szabó, Márton Richárd; Szabó, Kitti; Szögi, Titanilla; Fülöp, Lívia

    2015-01-01

    The formation of amyloid-like fibrils was studied by using the well-known serine protease trypsin as a model protein in the presence of ethanol as organic solvent. Trypsin forms amyloid-like fibrils in aqueous ethanol at pH = 7.0. The dye Congo red (CR) was used to detect the presence of amyloid-like fibrils in the samples. The binding of CR to fibrils led to an increase in absorption intensity and a red shift in the absorption band of CR. Thioflavin T (ThT) and 8-anilino-1- naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) binding assays were employed to characterize amyloid-like fibril formation. The ThT binding assay revealed that the protein exhibited maximum aggregation in 60% (v/v) ethanol after incubation for 24 h at 24 (o)C. The ANS binding results indicated that the hydrophobic residues were more exposed to the solvent in the aggregated form of the protein. The effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the formation of amyloid-like fibrils was studied in vitro. The aggregation of trypsin was followed via the kinetics of aggregation, the far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the presence and absence of PEG. The CD measurements indicated that the protein aggregates have a cross-beta structure in 60% ethanol. TEM revealed that trypsin forms fibrils with a thread-like structure. The inhibitory effect of PEG on the aggregation of trypsin increased with rising PEG concentration. PEG therefore inhibits the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of trypsin in aqueous ethanol. PMID:26428300

  15. In vitro fibrillization of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide (1-42)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiiman, Ann; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Palumaa, Peep; Tõugu, Vello

    2015-09-01

    The amyloid deposition in the form of extracellular fibrillar aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effects of environmental factors on the kinetics of Aβ fibrillization in vitro. The effects of Aβ42 peptide concentration, temperature, pH, added solvents and the ratio of Aβ40 and Aβ42 on the peptide fibrillization under agitated conditions was studied. The analysis show that the rate of fibril growth by monomer addition is not limited by diffusion but by rearrangement in the monomer structure, which is enhanced by low concentrations of fluorinated alcohols and characterized by the activation energy of 12 kcal/mol. Fibrillization rate decreases at pH values below 7.0 where simultaneous protonation of His 13 and 14 inhibits fibril formation. The lag period for Aβ42 was only twofold shorter and the fibril growth rate twofold faster than those of Aβ40. Lag period was shortened and the fibrillization rate was increased only at 90% content of Aβ42.

  16. Atomic Resolution Structure of Monomorphic Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Ni, Qing Zhe; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan; Rosay, Melanie; Donovan, Kevin J; Michael, Brian; Wall, Joseph; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a 39-42 residue protein produced by the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently aggregates to form cross-β amyloid fibrils that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most prominent forms of Aβ are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, which differ by two amino acids (I and A) at the C-terminus. However, Aβ42 is more neurotoxic and essential to the etiology of AD. Here, we present an atomic resolution structure of a monomorphic form of AβM01-42 amyloid fibrils derived from over 500 (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N distance and backbone angle structural constraints obtained from high field magic angle spinning NMR spectra. The structure (PDB ID: 5KK3 ) shows that the fibril core consists of a dimer of Aβ42 molecules, each containing four β-strands in a S-shaped amyloid fold, and arranged in a manner that generates two hydrophobic cores that are capped at the end of the chain by a salt bridge. The outer surface of the monomers presents hydrophilic side chains to the solvent. The interface between the monomers of the dimer shows clear contacts between M35 of one molecule and L17 and Q15 of the second. Intermolecular (13)C-(15)N constraints demonstrate that the amyloid fibrils are parallel in register. The RMSD of the backbone structure (Q15-A42) is 0.71 ± 0.12 Å and of all heavy atoms is 1.07 ± 0.08 Å. The structure provides a point of departure for the design of drugs that bind to the fibril surface and therefore interfere with secondary nucleation and for other therapeutic approaches to mitigate Aβ42 aggregation. PMID:27355699

  17. Atomic Resolution Structure of Monomorphic Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Ni, Qing Zhe; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan; Rosay, Melanie; Donovan, Kevin J; Michael, Brian; Wall, Joseph; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a 39-42 residue protein produced by the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently aggregates to form cross-β amyloid fibrils that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most prominent forms of Aβ are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, which differ by two amino acids (I and A) at the C-terminus. However, Aβ42 is more neurotoxic and essential to the etiology of AD. Here, we present an atomic resolution structure of a monomorphic form of AβM01-42 amyloid fibrils derived from over 500 (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N distance and backbone angle structural constraints obtained from high field magic angle spinning NMR spectra. The structure (PDB ID: 5KK3 ) shows that the fibril core consists of a dimer of Aβ42 molecules, each containing four β-strands in a S-shaped amyloid fold, and arranged in a manner that generates two hydrophobic cores that are capped at the end of the chain by a salt bridge. The outer surface of the monomers presents hydrophilic side chains to the solvent. The interface between the monomers of the dimer shows clear contacts between M35 of one molecule and L17 and Q15 of the second. Intermolecular (13)C-(15)N constraints demonstrate that the amyloid fibrils are parallel in register. The RMSD of the backbone structure (Q15-A42) is 0.71 ± 0.12 Å and of all heavy atoms is 1.07 ± 0.08 Å. The structure provides a point of departure for the design of drugs that bind to the fibril surface and therefore interfere with secondary nucleation and for other therapeutic approaches to mitigate Aβ42 aggregation.

  18. Amyloid fibrils trigger the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), causing fibril fragmentation by NET-associated elastase.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Estefania P C; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B; Torezani, Guilherme S; Braga, Carolina A; Palhano, Fernando L; Kelly, Jeffery W; Saraiva, Elvira M; Foguel, Debora

    2012-10-26

    The accumulation of amyloid fibrils is a feature of amyloid diseases, where cell toxicity is due to soluble oligomeric species that precede fibril formation or are formed by fibril fragmentation, but the mechanism(s) of fragmentation is still unclear. Neutrophil-derived elastase and histones were found in amyloid deposits from patients with different systemic amyloidoses. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are key players in a death mechanism in which neutrophils release DNA traps decorated with proteins such as elastase and histones to entangle pathogens. Here, we asked whether NETs are triggered by amyloid fibrils, reasoning that because proteases are present in NETs, protease digestion of amyloid may generate soluble, cytotoxic species. We show that amyloid fibrils from three different sources (α-synuclein, Sup35, and transthyretin) induced NADPH oxidase-dependent NETs in vitro from human neutrophils. Surprisingly, NET-associated elastase digested amyloid fibrils into short species that were cytotoxic for BHK-21 and HepG2 cells. In tissue sections from patients with primary amyloidosis, we also observed the co-localization of NETs with amyloid deposits as well as with oligomers, which are probably derived from elastase-induced fibril degradation (amyloidolysis). These data reveal that release of NETs, so far described to be elicited by pathogens, can also be triggered by amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the involvement of NETs in amyloidoses might be crucial for the production of toxic species derived from fibril fragmentation.

  19. Imaging and quantification of amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Arnhold, Florian; Scharf, Andrea; von Mikecz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Xenobiotics, as well as intrinsic processes such as cellular aging, contribute to an environment that constantly challenges nuclear organization and function. While it becomes increasingly clear that proteasome-dependent proteolysis is a major player, the topology and molecular mechanisms of nuclear protein homeostasis remain largely unknown. We have shown previously that (1) proteasome-dependent protein degradation is organized in focal microenvironments throughout the nucleoplasm and (2) heavy metals as well as nanoparticles induce nuclear protein fibrillation with amyloid characteristics. Here, we describe methods to characterize the landscape of intranuclear amyloid on the global and local level in different systems such as cultures of mammalian cells and the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Application of discrete mathematics to imaging data is introduced as a tool to develop pattern recognition of intracellular protein fibrillation. Since stepwise fibrillation of otherwise soluble proteins to insoluble amyloid-like protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative protein-misfolding disorders including Alzheimer's disease, CAG repeat diseases, and the prion encephalopathies, investigation of intracellular amyloid may likewise aid to a better understanding of the pathomechanisms involved. We consider aggregate profiling as an important experimental approach to determine if nuclear amyloid has toxic or protective roles in various disease processes.

  20. Imaging and quantification of amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Arnhold, Florian; Scharf, Andrea; von Mikecz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Xenobiotics, as well as intrinsic processes such as cellular aging, contribute to an environment that constantly challenges nuclear organization and function. While it becomes increasingly clear that proteasome-dependent proteolysis is a major player, the topology and molecular mechanisms of nuclear protein homeostasis remain largely unknown. We have shown previously that (1) proteasome-dependent protein degradation is organized in focal microenvironments throughout the nucleoplasm and (2) heavy metals as well as nanoparticles induce nuclear protein fibrillation with amyloid characteristics. Here, we describe methods to characterize the landscape of intranuclear amyloid on the global and local level in different systems such as cultures of mammalian cells and the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Application of discrete mathematics to imaging data is introduced as a tool to develop pattern recognition of intracellular protein fibrillation. Since stepwise fibrillation of otherwise soluble proteins to insoluble amyloid-like protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative protein-misfolding disorders including Alzheimer's disease, CAG repeat diseases, and the prion encephalopathies, investigation of intracellular amyloid may likewise aid to a better understanding of the pathomechanisms involved. We consider aggregate profiling as an important experimental approach to determine if nuclear amyloid has toxic or protective roles in various disease processes. PMID:25311131

  1. Microcin Amyloid Fibrils A Are Reservoir of Toxic Oligomeric Species

    PubMed Central

    Shahnawaz, Mohammad; Soto, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Microcin E492 (Mcc), a low molecular weight bacteriocin produced by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492, has been shown to exist in two forms: soluble forms that are believed to be toxic to the bacterial cell by forming pores and non-toxic fibrillar forms that share similar biochemical and biophysical properties with amyloids associated with several human diseases. Here we report that fibrils polymerized in vitro from soluble forms sequester toxic species that can be released upon changing environmental conditions such as pH, ionic strength, and upon dilution. Our results indicate that basic pH (≥8.5), low NaCl concentrations (≤50 mm), and dilution (>10-fold) destabilize Mcc fibrils into more soluble species that are found to be toxic to the target cells. Additionally, we also found a similar conversion of non-toxic fibrils into highly toxic oligomers using Mcc aggregates produced in vivo. Moreover, the soluble protein released from fibrils is able to rapidly polymerize into amyloid fibrils under fibril-forming conditions and to efficiently seed aggregation of monomeric Mcc. Our findings indicate that fibrillar forms of Mcc constitute a reservoir of toxic oligomeric species that is released into the medium upon changing the environmental conditions. These findings may have substantial implications to understand the dynamic process of interconversion between toxic and non-toxic aggregated species implicated in protein misfolding diseases. PMID:22337880

  2. Microcin amyloid fibrils A are reservoir of toxic oligomeric species.

    PubMed

    Shahnawaz, Mohammad; Soto, Claudio

    2012-04-01

    Microcin E492 (Mcc), a low molecular weight bacteriocin produced by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492, has been shown to exist in two forms: soluble forms that are believed to be toxic to the bacterial cell by forming pores and non-toxic fibrillar forms that share similar biochemical and biophysical properties with amyloids associated with several human diseases. Here we report that fibrils polymerized in vitro from soluble forms sequester toxic species that can be released upon changing environmental conditions such as pH, ionic strength, and upon dilution. Our results indicate that basic pH (≥8.5), low NaCl concentrations (≤50 mm), and dilution (>10-fold) destabilize Mcc fibrils into more soluble species that are found to be toxic to the target cells. Additionally, we also found a similar conversion of non-toxic fibrils into highly toxic oligomers using Mcc aggregates produced in vivo. Moreover, the soluble protein released from fibrils is able to rapidly polymerize into amyloid fibrils under fibril-forming conditions and to efficiently seed aggregation of monomeric Mcc. Our findings indicate that fibrillar forms of Mcc constitute a reservoir of toxic oligomeric species that is released into the medium upon changing the environmental conditions. These findings may have substantial implications to understand the dynamic process of interconversion between toxic and non-toxic aggregated species implicated in protein misfolding diseases. PMID:22337880

  3. Aggregate Geometry in Amyloid Fibril Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irbäck, Anders; Jónsson, Sigurður Æ.; Linnemann, Niels; Linse, Björn; Wallin, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    We present and study a minimal structure-based model for the self-assembly of peptides into ordered β-sheet-rich fibrils. The peptides are represented by unit-length sticks on a cubic lattice and interact by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity forces. Using Monte Carlo simulations with >105 peptides, we show that fibril formation occurs with sigmoidal kinetics in the model. To determine the mechanism of fibril nucleation, we compute the joint distribution in length and width of the aggregates at equilibrium, using an efficient cluster move and flat-histogram techniques. This analysis, based on simulations with 256 peptides in which aggregates form and dissolve reversibly, shows that the main free-energy barriers that a nascent fibril has to overcome are associated with changes in width.

  4. Fibril Structure of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide*♦

    PubMed Central

    Bedrood, Sahar; Li, Yiyu; Isas, J. Mario; Hegde, Balachandra G.; Baxa, Ulrich; Haworth, Ian S.; Langen, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Misfolding and amyloid fibril formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, but the structures of the misfolded forms remain poorly understood. Here we developed an approach that combines site-directed spin labeling with continuous wave and pulsed EPR to investigate local secondary structure and to determine the relative orientation of the secondary structure elements with respect to each other. These data indicated that individual hIAPP molecules take up a hairpin fold within the fibril. This fold contains two β-strands that are much farther apart than expected from previous models. Atomistic structural models were obtained using computational refinement with EPR data as constraints. The resulting family of structures exhibited a left-handed helical twist, in agreement with the twisted morphology observed by electron microscopy. The fibril protofilaments contain stacked hIAPP monomers that form opposing β-sheets that twist around each other. The two β-strands of the monomer adopt out-of-plane positions and are staggered by about three peptide layers (∼15 Å). These results provide a mechanism for hIAPP fibril formation and could explain the remarkable stability of the fibrils. Thus, the structural model serves as a starting point for understanding and preventing hIAPP misfolding. PMID:22187437

  5. Hydrostatic Pressure Increases the Catalytic Activity of Amyloid Fibril Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Luong, Trung Quan; Erwin, Nelli; Neumann, Matthias; Schmidt, Andreas; Loos, Cornelia; Schmidt, Volker; Fändrich, Marcus; Winter, Roland

    2016-09-26

    We studied the combined effects of pressure (0.1-200 MPa) and temperature (22, 30, and 38 °C) on the catalytic activity of designed amyloid fibrils using a high-pressure stopped-flow system with rapid UV/Vis absorption detection. Complementary FT-IR spectroscopic data revealed a remarkably high pressure and temperature stability of the fibrillar systems. High pressure enhances the esterase activity as a consequence of a negative activation volume at all temperatures (about -14 cm(3)  mol(-1) ). The enhancement is sustained in the whole temperature range covered, which allows a further acceleration of the enzymatic activity at high temperatures (activation energy 45-60 kJ mol(-1) ). Our data reveal the great potential of using both pressure and temperature modulation to optimize the enzyme efficiency of catalytic amyloid fibrils.

  6. Hydrostatic Pressure Increases the Catalytic Activity of Amyloid Fibril Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Luong, Trung Quan; Erwin, Nelli; Neumann, Matthias; Schmidt, Andreas; Loos, Cornelia; Schmidt, Volker; Fändrich, Marcus; Winter, Roland

    2016-09-26

    We studied the combined effects of pressure (0.1-200 MPa) and temperature (22, 30, and 38 °C) on the catalytic activity of designed amyloid fibrils using a high-pressure stopped-flow system with rapid UV/Vis absorption detection. Complementary FT-IR spectroscopic data revealed a remarkably high pressure and temperature stability of the fibrillar systems. High pressure enhances the esterase activity as a consequence of a negative activation volume at all temperatures (about -14 cm(3)  mol(-1) ). The enhancement is sustained in the whole temperature range covered, which allows a further acceleration of the enzymatic activity at high temperatures (activation energy 45-60 kJ mol(-1) ). Our data reveal the great potential of using both pressure and temperature modulation to optimize the enzyme efficiency of catalytic amyloid fibrils. PMID:27573584

  7. Functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and their pH-responsive hydrogels with amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoxu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2012-07-10

    New biocompatible, pH-responsive, and fully fibrous hydrogels have been prepared based on amyloid fibrils hybridized and gelled by functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) far below the gelling concentration of amyloid fibrils. Sulfonic functional groups were introduced on the surfaces of MWNTs either by a covalent diazonium reaction or by physical π-π interactions. The presence of the isoelectric point of amyloid fibrils allows a reversible gelling behavior through ionic interactions with functionalized MWNTs.

  8. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  9. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy to study amyloid fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahou, Pierre; Curry, Nathan; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele; Kaminski, Clemens

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation of misfolded proteins is a characteristic hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. The ability to observe these aggregation processes and the corresponding structures formed in vitro or in situ is therefore a key requirement to understand the molecular mechanisms of these diseases. We report here on the implementation and application of Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy to visualize the formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro.

  10. Engineering amyloid fibrils from β-solenoid proteins for biomaterials applications.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Maria D R; Karsai, Arpad; Ngo, Alice; Sierra, Catherine; Fong, Kai T; Hayre, Natha Robert; Mirzaee, Nima; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar Mayuram; Kluber, Alexander J; Chen, Xi; Liu, Gang-yu; Toney, Michael D; Singh, Rajiv R; Cox, Daniel Lee

    2015-01-27

    Nature provides numerous examples of self-assembly that can potentially be implemented for materials applications. Considerable attention has been given to one-dimensional cross-β or amyloid structures that can serve as templates for wire growth or strengthen materials such as glue or cement. Here, we demonstrate controlled amyloid self-assembly based on modifications of β-solenoid proteins. They occur naturally in several contexts (e.g., antifreeze proteins, drug resistance proteins) but do not aggregate in vivo due to capping structures or distortions at their ends. Removal of these capping structures and regularization of the ends of the spruce budworm and rye grass antifreeze proteins yield micron length amyloid fibrils with predictable heights, which can be a platform for biomaterial-based self-assembly. The design process, including all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, purification, and self-assembly procedures are described. Fibril formation with the predicted characteristics is supported by evidence from thioflavin-T fluorescence, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. Additionally, we find evidence for lateral assembly of the modified spruce budworm antifreeze fibrils with sufficient incubation time. The kinetics of polymerization are consistent with those for other amyloid formation reactions and are relatively fast due to the preformed nature of the polymerization nucleus.

  11. Engineering amyloid fibrils from β-solenoid proteins for biomaterials applications.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Maria D R; Karsai, Arpad; Ngo, Alice; Sierra, Catherine; Fong, Kai T; Hayre, Natha Robert; Mirzaee, Nima; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar Mayuram; Kluber, Alexander J; Chen, Xi; Liu, Gang-yu; Toney, Michael D; Singh, Rajiv R; Cox, Daniel Lee

    2015-01-27

    Nature provides numerous examples of self-assembly that can potentially be implemented for materials applications. Considerable attention has been given to one-dimensional cross-β or amyloid structures that can serve as templates for wire growth or strengthen materials such as glue or cement. Here, we demonstrate controlled amyloid self-assembly based on modifications of β-solenoid proteins. They occur naturally in several contexts (e.g., antifreeze proteins, drug resistance proteins) but do not aggregate in vivo due to capping structures or distortions at their ends. Removal of these capping structures and regularization of the ends of the spruce budworm and rye grass antifreeze proteins yield micron length amyloid fibrils with predictable heights, which can be a platform for biomaterial-based self-assembly. The design process, including all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, purification, and self-assembly procedures are described. Fibril formation with the predicted characteristics is supported by evidence from thioflavin-T fluorescence, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. Additionally, we find evidence for lateral assembly of the modified spruce budworm antifreeze fibrils with sufficient incubation time. The kinetics of polymerization are consistent with those for other amyloid formation reactions and are relatively fast due to the preformed nature of the polymerization nucleus. PMID:25562726

  12. Does Thioflavin-T Detect Oligomers Formed During Amyloid Fibril Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichilli, Christopher; Hill, Shannon E.; Mast, Jason; Muschol, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Recent results have shown that oligomeric intermediates of amyloid fibril assembly represent the main toxic species in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Thioflavin-T (ThT) is among the most commonly used indicator dyes for mature amyloid fibrils in vitro. We used ThT to monitor amyloid fibril formation of lysozyme (HEWL), and correlated ThT fluorescence to concurrent dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. Specifically, we tested the ability of ThT to discern among oligomer-free vs. oligomeric fibril assembly pathways. We found that ThT fluorescence did not detect oligomer growth; however, fluorescence increases did coincide with the formation of monomeric filaments in the oligomer-free assembly pathway. This implies that ThT fluorescence is not generally suitable for the detection of oligomeric intermediates. The results further suggest different internal structures for oligomeric vs. monomeric filaments. This research was supported, in part, by funding through the Byrd Alzheimer's Institute (ARG-2007-22) and the BITT-Florida Center of Excellence for M.M., an NSF-REU grant (DMR-1004873) for C. P. and an NSF-IGERT fellowship for S.H.

  13. Binding of fullerenes to amyloid beta fibrils: size matters.

    PubMed

    Huy, Pham Dinh Quoc; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-10-01

    Binding affinity of fullerenes C20, C36, C60, C70 and C84 for amyloid beta fibrils is studied by docking and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with the Amber force field and water model TIP3P. Using the molecular mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann surface area method one can demonstrate that the binding free energy linearly decreases with the number of carbon atoms of fullerene, i.e. the larger is the fullerene size, the higher is the binding affinity. Overall, fullerenes bind to Aβ9-40 fibrils stronger than to Aβ17-42. The number of water molecules trapped in the interior of 12Aβ9-40 fibrils was found to be lower than inside pentamer 5Aβ17-42. C60 destroys Aβ17-42 fibril structure to a greater extent compared to other fullerenes. Our study revealed that the van der Waals interaction dominates over the electrostatic interaction and non-polar residues of amyloid beta peptides play the significant role in interaction with fullerenes providing novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Self-Assembly of Amyloid Fibrils That Display Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Entwistle, Aiman; Zhang, Hong; Jackson, Antony P; Mason, Thomas O; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Smith, Andrew T; Sawyer, Elizabeth B; Perrett, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme immobilization is an important strategy to enhance the stability and recoverability of enzymes and to facilitate the separation of enzymes from reaction products. However, enzyme purification followed by separate chemical steps to allow immobilization on a solid support reduces the efficiency and yield of the active enzyme. Here we describe polypeptide constructs that self-assemble spontaneously into nanofibrils with fused active enzyme subunits displayed on the amyloid fibril surface. We measured the steady-state kinetic parameters for the appended enzymes in situ within fibrils and compare these with the identical protein constructs in solution. Finally, we demonstrated that the fibrils can be recycled and reused in functional assays both in conventional batch processes and in a continuous-flow microreactor. PMID:25937845

  15. Tensile deformation and failure of amyloid and amyloid-like protein fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-03-01

    Here we report a series of full atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of six amyloid or amyloid-like protein fibrils in order to systematically understand the effect of different secondary structure motifs on the mechanical tensile and failure response of cross-\\beta protein fibrils. We find a similar failure behavior across the six structures; an initial failure event occurs at small strains involving cooperative rupture of a group of hydrogen bonds, followed by a slow one-by-one hydrogen bond rupture process as the remaining \\beta -sheets peel off with very low applied stress. We also find that the ultimate tensile strength of the protein fibrils investigated scales directly with the number of hydrogen bonds per unit area which break in the initial rupture event. Our results provide insights into structure-property relationships in protein fibrils important for disease and engineering applications and lay the groundwork for the development of materials selection criteria for the design of de novo amyloid-based functional biomaterials.

  16. Toward a Molecular Theory of Early and Late Events in Monomer to Amyloid Fibril Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, John E.; Thirumalai, D.

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative understanding of the kinetics of fibril formation and the molecular mechanism of transition from monomers to fibrils is needed to obtain insights into the growth of amyloid fibrils and more generally self-assembly multisubunit protein complexes. Significant advances using computations of protein aggregation in a number of systems have established generic and sequence-specific aspects of the early steps in oligomer formation. Theoretical considerations, which view oligomer and fibril growth as diffusion in a complex energy landscape, and computational studies, involving minimal lattice and coarse-grained models, have revealed general principles governing the transition from monomeric protein to ordered fibrillar aggregates. Detailed atomistic calculations have explored the early stages of the protein aggregation pathway for a number of amyloidogenic proteins, most notably amyloid β- (Aβ-) protein and fragments from proteins linked to various diseases. These computational studies have provided insights into the role of sequence, role of water, and specific interatomic interactions underlying the thermodynamics and dynamics of elementary kinetic steps in the aggregation pathway. Novel methods are beginning to illustrate the structural basis for the production of Aβ-peptides through interactions with secretases in the presence of membranes. We show that a variety of theoretical approaches, ranging from scaling arguments to minimal models to atomistic simulations, are needed as a complement to experimental studies probing the principles governing protein aggregation.

  17. Molecular structure of amyloid fibrils: insights from solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2006-02-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have made major contributions to our understanding of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils, including fibrils formed by the beta-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, by proteins associated with fungal prions, and by a variety of other polypeptides. Because solid-state NMR techniques can be used to determine interatomic distances (both intramolecular and intermolecular), place constraints on backbone and side-chain torsion angles, and identify tertiary and quaternary contacts, full molecular models for amyloid fibrils can be developed from solid-state NMR data, especially when supplemented by lower-resolution structural constraints from electron microscopy and other sources. In addition, solid-state NMR data can be used as experimental tests of various proposals and hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of amyloid formation, the nature of intermediate structures, and the common structural features within amyloid fibrils. This review introduces the basic experimental and conceptual principles behind solid-state NMR methods that are applicable to amyloid fibrils, reviews the information about amyloid structures that has been obtained to date with these methods, and discusses how solid-state NMR data provide insights into the molecular interactions that stabilize amyloid structures, the generic propensity of polypeptide chains to form amyloid fibrils, and a number of related issues that are of current interest in the amyloid field.

  18. Force generation by the growth of amyloid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Herling, Therese W; Garcia, Gonzalo A; Michaels, Thomas C T; Grentz, Wolfgang; Dean, James; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Gang, Hongze; Müller, Thomas; Kav, Batuhan; Terentjev, Eugene M; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2015-08-01

    The generation of mechanical forces are central to a wide range of vital biological processes, including the function of the cytoskeleton. Although the forces emerging from the polymerization of native proteins have been studied in detail, the potential for force generation by aberrant protein polymerization has not yet been explored. Here, we show that the growth of amyloid fibrils, archetypical aberrant protein polymers, is capable of unleashing mechanical forces on the piconewton scale for individual filaments. We apply microfluidic techniques to measure the forces released by amyloid growth for two systems: insulin and lysozyme. The level of force measured for amyloid growth in both systems is comparable to that observed for actin and tubulin, systems that have evolved to generate force during their native functions and, unlike amyloid growth, rely on the input of external energy in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis for maximum force generation. Furthermore, we find that the power density released from growing amyloid fibrils is comparable to that of high-performance synthetic polymer actuators. These findings highlight the potential of amyloid structures as active materials and shed light on the criteria for regulation and reversibility that guide molecular evolution of functional polymers.

  19. Force generation by the growth of amyloid aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Herling, Therese W.; Garcia, Gonzalo A.; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Grentz, Wolfgang; Dean, James; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Gang, Hongze; Müller, Thomas; Kav, Batuhan; Terentjev, Eugene M.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of mechanical forces are central to a wide range of vital biological processes, including the function of the cytoskeleton. Although the forces emerging from the polymerization of native proteins have been studied in detail, the potential for force generation by aberrant protein polymerization has not yet been explored. Here, we show that the growth of amyloid fibrils, archetypical aberrant protein polymers, is capable of unleashing mechanical forces on the piconewton scale for individual filaments. We apply microfluidic techniques to measure the forces released by amyloid growth for two systems: insulin and lysozyme. The level of force measured for amyloid growth in both systems is comparable to that observed for actin and tubulin, systems that have evolved to generate force during their native functions and, unlike amyloid growth, rely on the input of external energy in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis for maximum force generation. Furthermore, we find that the power density released from growing amyloid fibrils is comparable to that of high-performance synthetic polymer actuators. These findings highlight the potential of amyloid structures as active materials and shed light on the criteria for regulation and reversibility that guide molecular evolution of functional polymers. PMID:26195762

  20. Fibpredictor: a computational method for rapid prediction of amyloid fibril structures.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei Ghomi, Hamed; Topp, Elizabeth M; Lill, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are important in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and are also a common instability in peptide and protein drug products. Despite their importance, experimental structures of amyloid fibrils in atomistic detail are rare. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel, rapid computational method to predict amyloid fibril structures (Fibpredictor). The method combines β-sheet model building, β-sheet replication, and symmetry operations with side-chain prediction and statistical scoring functions. When applied to nine amyloid fibrils with experimentally determined structures, the method predicted the correct structures of amyloid fibrils and enriched those among the top-ranked structures. These models can be used as the initial heuristic structures for more complicated computational studies. Fibpredictor is available at http://nanohub.org/resources/fibpredictor .

  1. Fibpredictor: a computational method for rapid prediction of amyloid fibril structures.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei Ghomi, Hamed; Topp, Elizabeth M; Lill, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are important in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and are also a common instability in peptide and protein drug products. Despite their importance, experimental structures of amyloid fibrils in atomistic detail are rare. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel, rapid computational method to predict amyloid fibril structures (Fibpredictor). The method combines β-sheet model building, β-sheet replication, and symmetry operations with side-chain prediction and statistical scoring functions. When applied to nine amyloid fibrils with experimentally determined structures, the method predicted the correct structures of amyloid fibrils and enriched those among the top-ranked structures. These models can be used as the initial heuristic structures for more complicated computational studies. Fibpredictor is available at http://nanohub.org/resources/fibpredictor . PMID:27502172

  2. Appearance of annular ring-like intermediates during amyloid fibril formation from human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Arya, Shruti; Kumari, Arpana; Dalal, Vijit; Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2015-09-21

    The self-assembly of proteins triggered by a conformational switch into highly ordered β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils has captivated burgeoning interest in recent years due to the involvement of amyloids in a variety of human diseases and a diverse range of biological functions. Here, we have investigated the mechanism of fibrillogenesis of human serum albumin (HSA), an all-α-helical protein, using an array of biophysical tools that include steady-state as well as time-resolved fluorescence, circular dichroism and Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Investigations into the temporal evolution of nanoscale morphology using AFM revealed the presence of ring-like intermediates that subsequently transformed into worm-like fibrils presumably by a ring-opening mechanism. Additionally, a multitude of morphologically-diverse oligomers were observed on the pathway to amyloid formation. Kinetic analysis using multiple structural probes in-tandem indicated that HSA amyloid assembly is a concerted process encompassing a major structural change that is primarily mediated by hydrophobic interactions between thermally-induced disordered segments originating in various domains. A slower growth kinetics of aggregates suggested that the protein structural reorganization is a prerequisite for fibril formation. Moreover, time-dependent Raman spectroscopic studies of HSA aggregation provided key molecular insights into the conformational transitions occurring within the protein amide backbone and at the residue-specific level. Our data revealed the emergence of conformationally-diverse disulfides as a consequence of structural reorganization and sequestration of tyrosines into the hydrophobic amyloid core comprising antiparallel cross β-sheets.

  3. Localization microscopy for the study of amyloid fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; Rees, Eric; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2013-09-01

    Super-resolution microscopy has emerged as a powerful and non-invasive tool for the study of molecular processes both in vitro, but also as they occur in live cells. Here we present the application of direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), a super-resolution technique based on single molecule localization, to determine the morphology of protein aggregates and of small extra- and intracellular structures. The technique reveals details down to 20 nm providing information on scales much smaller than the wavelength of the probing light. We use dSTORM in the study of amyloid fibril self-assembly processes associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We show that the aggregation process can be followed kinetically and observe the emergence of amyloid structures in time as they occur in vitro. As an all optical technique, there is translation potential from studies in vitro to in vivo applications.

  4. Structural Characterization of GNNQQNY Amyloid Fibrils by Magic Angle Spinning NMR. †

    PubMed Central

    van der Wel, Patrick C.A.; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Several human diseases are associated with the formation of amyloid aggregates, but experimental characterization of these amyloid fibrils and their oligomeric precursors has remained challenging. Experimental and computational analysis of simpler model systems has therefore been necessary, for instance on the peptide fragment GNNQQNY7-13 of yeast prion protein Sup35p. Expanding on a previous publication, we report here a detailed structural characterization of GNNQQNY fibrils using magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Based on additional chemical shift assignments we confirm the coexistence of three distinct peptide conformations within the fibrillar samples, as reflected in substantial chemical shift differences. Backbone torsion angle measurements indicate that the basic structure of these co-existing conformers is an extended β-sheet. We structurally characterize a previously identified localized distortion of the β-strand backbone specific to one of the conformers. Intermolecular contacts are consistent with each of the conformers being present in its own parallel and in-register sheet. Overall the MAS NMR data indicate a substantial difference between the structure of the fibrillar and crystalline forms of these peptides, with a clear increased complexity in the GNNQQNY fibril structure. These experimental data can provide guidance for future work, both experimental and theoretical, and provide insights into the distinction between fibril growth and crystal formation. PMID:20695483

  5. The Surprising Role of Amyloid Fibrils in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Laura M; Shorter, James

    2012-01-01

    Despite its discovery over 30 years ago, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to threaten public health worldwide. Semen is the principal vehicle for the transmission of this retrovirus and several endogenous peptides in semen, including fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286 and PAP85-120) and semenogelins (SEM1 and SEM2), assemble into amyloid fibrils that promote HIV infection. For example, PAP248-286 fibrils, termed SEVI (Semen derived Enhancer of Viral Infection), potentiate HIV infection by up to 105-fold. Fibrils enhance infectivity by facilitating virion attachment and fusion to target cells, whereas soluble peptides have no effect. Importantly, the stimulatory effect is greatest at low viral titers, which mimics mucosal transmission of HIV, where relatively few virions traverse the mucosal barrier. Devising a method to rapidly reverse fibril formation (rather than simply inhibit it) would provide an innovative and urgently needed preventative strategy for reducing HIV infection via the sexual route. Targeting a host-encoded protein conformer represents a departure from traditional microbicidal approaches that target the viral machinery, and could synergize with direct antiviral approaches. Here, we review the identification of these amyloidogenic peptides, their mechanism of action, and various strategies for inhibiting their HIV-enhancing effects.

  6. Quantification of amyloid fibrils using size exclusion chromatography coupled with online fluorescence and ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Randrianjatovo-Gbalou, Irina; Marcato-Romain, Claire-Emmanuelle; Girbal-Neuhauser, Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    An amyloid fibrils investigation within biofilm samples requires distinguishing the amyloid β-sheet structure of these proteins and quantifying them. In this study, the property of amyloids to incorporate the fluorescent dye Thioflavin T has been exploited to propose a method of quantification. The experimental protocol includes the preparation of amyloids from commercial κ-casein (κCN) and their fractionation through size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to provide calibration curves from fluorescence and absorbance signals. Finally, a bacterial biofilm extract was injected into SEC, and the amyloid fibrils could be expressed as equivalent κCN, representing approximately 21% of the total proteins.

  7. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  8. Looking for a generic inhibitor of amyloid-like fibril formation among flavone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Šneideris, Tomas; Baranauskienė, Lina; Cannon, Jonathan G.; Rutkienė, Rasa; Meškys, Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    A range of diseases is associated with amyloid fibril formation. Despite different proteins being responsible for each disease, all of them share similar features including beta-sheet-rich secondary structure and fibril-like protein aggregates. A number of proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, resembling structural features of disease-related amyloids. Given these generic structural properties of amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, generic inhibitors of fibril formation would be of interest for treatment of amyloid diseases. Recently, we identified five outstanding inhibitors of insulin amyloid-like fibril formation among the pool of 265 commercially available flavone derivatives. Here we report testing of these five compounds and of epi-gallocatechine-3-gallate (EGCG) on aggregation of alpha-synuclein and beta-amyloid. We used a Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, relying on halftimes of aggregation as the measure of inhibition. This method avoids large numbers of false positive results. Our data indicate that four of the five flavones and EGCG inhibit alpha-synuclein aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. However none of these derivatives were able to increase halftimes of aggregation of beta-amyloid. PMID:26421240

  9. Morphology and mechanical properties of multi-stranded amyloid fibrils probed by atomistic and coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Myeongsang; Kim, Kyungwoo; In Kim, Jae; Chang, Hyun Joon; Baek, Inchul; Eom, Kilho; Na, Sungsoo

    2015-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils are responsible for pathogenesis of various diseases and exhibit the structural feature of an ordered, hierarchical structure such as multi-stranded helical structure. As the multi-strandedness of amyloid fibrils has recently been found to be highly correlated with their toxicity and infectivity, it is necessary to study how the hierarchical (i.e. multi-stranded) structure of amyloid fibril is formed. Moreover, although it has recently been reported that the nanomechanics of amyloid proteins plays a key role on the amyloid-induced pathogenesis, a critical role that the multi-stranded helical structure of the fibrils plays in their nanomechanical properties has not fully characterized. In this work, we characterize the morphology and mechanical properties of multi-stranded amyloid fibrils by using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation and elastic network model. It is shown that the helical pitch of multi-stranded amyloid fibril is linearly proportional to the number of filaments comprising the amyloid fibril, and that multi-strandedness gives rise to improving the bending rigidity of the fibril. Moreover, we have also studied the morphology and mechanical properties of a single protofilament (filament) in order to understand the effect of cross-β structure and mutation on the structures and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils. Our study sheds light on the underlying design principles showing how the multi-stranded amyloid fibril is formed and how the structure of amyloid fibrils governs their nanomechanical properties.

  10. Toward the molecular mechanism(s) by which EGCG treatment remodels mature amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Palhano, Fernando L; Lee, Jiyong; Grimster, Neil P; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2013-05-22

    Protein misfolding and/or aggregation has been implicated as the cause of several human diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and familial amyloid polyneuropathy. These maladies are referred to as amyloid diseases, named after the cross-β-sheet amyloid fibril aggregates or deposits common to these disorders. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the principal polyphenol present in green tea, has been shown to be effective at preventing aggregation and is able to remodel amyloid fibrils comprising different amyloidogenic proteins, although the mechanistic underpinnings are unclear. Herein, we work toward an understanding of the molecular mechanism(s) by which EGCG remodels mature amyloid fibrils made up of Aβ(1-40), IAPP(8-24), or Sup35NM(7-16). We show that EGCG amyloid remodeling activity in vitro is dependent on auto-oxidation of the EGCG. Oxidized and unoxidized EGCG binds to amyloid fibrils, preventing the binding of thioflavin T. This engagement of the hydrophobic binding sites in Aβ(1-40), IAPP(8-24), or Sup35NM(Ac7-16) Y→F amyloid fibrils seems to be sufficient to explain the majority of the amyloid remodeling observed by EGCG treatment, although how EGCG oxidation drives remodeling remains unclear. Oxidized EGCG molecules react with free amines within the amyloid fibril through the formation of Schiff bases, cross-linking the fibrils, which may prevent dissociation and toxicity, but these aberrant post-translational modifications do not appear to be the major driving force for amyloid remodeling by EGCG treatment. These insights into the molecular mechanism of action of EGCG provide boundary conditions for exploring amyloid remodeling in more detail. PMID:23611538

  11. EGCG remodels mature α-synuclein and amyloidfibrils and reduces cellular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bieschke, Jan; Russ, Jenny; Friedrich, Ralf P.; Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E.; Wobst, Heike; Neugebauer, Katja; Wanker, Erich E.

    2010-01-01

    Protein misfolding and formation of β-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils or aggregates is related to cellular toxicity and decay in various human disorders including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Recently, we demonstrated that the polyphenol (-)-epi-gallocatechine gallate (EGCG) inhibits α-synuclein and amyloid-β fibrillogenesis. It associates with natively unfolded polypeptides and promotes the self-assembly of unstructured oligomers of a new type. Whether EGCG disassembles preformed amyloid fibrils, however, remained unclear. Here, we show that EGCG has the ability to convert large, mature α-synuclein and amyloidfibrils into smaller, amorphous protein aggregates that are nontoxic to mammalian cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that the compound directly binds to β-sheet-rich aggregates and mediates the conformational change without their disassembly into monomers or small diffusible oligomers. These findings suggest that EGCG is a potent remodeling agent of mature amyloid fibrils. PMID:20385841

  12. Infrared Probe Technique Reveals a Millipede-like Structure for Aβ(8-28) Amyloid Fibril.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yachao; Zou, Ye; Ma, Yan; Wang, Dan; Sun, Ying; Ma, Gang

    2016-02-01

    Amyloid fibrils are unique fibrous polypeptide aggregates. They have been associated with more than 20 serious human diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Besides their pathological significance, amyloid fibrils are also gaining increasing attention as emerging nanomaterials with novel functions. Structural characterization of amyloid fibril is no doubt fundamentally important for the development of therapeutics for amyloid-related diseases and for the rational design of amyloid-based materials. In this study, we explored to use side-chain-based infrared (IR) probe to gain detailed structural insights into the amyloid fibril by a 21-residue model amyloidogenic peptide, Aβ(8-28). We first proposed an approach to incorporate thiocyanate (SCN) IR probe in a site-specific manner into amyloidogenic peptide using 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate as cyanylating agent. Using this approach, we obtained three Aβ(8-28) variants, labeled with SCN probe at three different positions. We then showed with thioflavin T fluorescence assay, Congo red assay, and atomic force microscopy that the three labeled Aβ(8-28) peptides can quickly form amyloid fibrils under high concentration and high salt conditions. Finally, we performed a detailed IR spectral analysis of the Aβ(8-28) fibril in both amide I and probe regions and proposed a millipede-like structure for the Aβ(8-28) fibril.

  13. Human Hsp70 Disaggregase Reverses Parkinson’s-Linked α-Synuclein Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xuechao; Carroni, Marta; Nussbaum-Krammer, Carmen; Mogk, Axel; Nillegoda, Nadinath B.; Szlachcic, Anna; Guilbride, D. Lys; Saibil, Helen R.; Mayer, Matthias P.; Bukau, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Summary Intracellular amyloid fibrils linked to neurodegenerative disease typically accumulate in an age-related manner, suggesting inherent cellular capacity for counteracting amyloid formation in early life. Metazoan molecular chaperones assist native folding and block polymerization of amyloidogenic proteins, preempting amyloid fibril formation. Chaperone capacity for amyloid disassembly, however, is unclear. Here, we show that a specific combination of human Hsp70 disaggregase-associated chaperone components efficiently disassembles α-synuclein amyloid fibrils characteristic of Parkinson’s disease in vitro. Specifically, the Hsc70 chaperone, the class B J-protein DNAJB1, and an Hsp110 family nucleotide exchange factor (NEF) provide ATP-dependent activity that disassembles amyloids within minutes via combined fibril fragmentation and depolymerization. This ultimately generates non-toxic α-synuclein monomers. Concerted, rapid interaction cycles of all three chaperone components with fibrils generate the power stroke required for disassembly. This identifies a powerful human Hsp70 disaggregase activity that efficiently disassembles amyloid fibrils and points to crucial yet undefined biology underlying amyloid-based diseases. PMID:26300264

  14. Inhibition of amyloid fibrillation and cytotoxicity of lysozyme fibrillation products by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Shariatizi, Sajad; Meratan, Ali Akbar; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen

    2015-09-01

    An increasing number of studies conducted under in vitro and in vivo conditions, have concluded that polyphenols, compounds frequently occurring in many herbs with antioxidant properties, prevent and reverse amyloid fibril formation. However, the mechanisms by which these natural products modulate the protein aggregation process are poorly understood. Herein, a range of techniques including thioflavin T (ThT) and ANS fluorescence assays, electron microscopy and circular dichroism have been employed to determine the efficacy of rosmarinic acid (RA) and resveratrol (Res) on the inhibition/reversion of fibrillogenesis and hindering cytotoxicity induced by protofibrils and amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). Results demonstrated that both polyphenols effectively inhibit fibrillogenesis and destabilize preformed fibrils of HEWL in a concentration-dependent manner. Cytotoxicity protection on PC12 cells was also observed using the MTT assay, ROS production assay, and phase-contrast microscopy. It is suggested that the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of RA and Res is to prevent hydrophobic interactions between HEWL amyloidogenic prefibrillar species, although additional studies is needed to elucidate the detailed mechanisms involved. A combination of antioxidative and anti-amyloidogenic properties of these molecules may provide them with the described neuroprotective capacities. PMID:26102331

  15. High molecular weight glycosaminoglycans in AA type amyloid fibril extracts from human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Magnus, J H; Kolset, S O; Husby, G

    1991-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans have previously been identified in extracts of AA type hepatic amyloid fibril from a patient with amyloidosis associated with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The macromolecular properties of these polysaccharides are described here in more detail. By gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography glycosaminoglycans in the form of high molecular weight free chains were shown to coisolate with water extracted amyloid fibrils. About 60% of these were characterised as galactosamines (chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate), whereas the remaining 40% consisted of N-sulphated glucosamines (heparin/heparan sulphate). The amyloid associated glycosaminoglycans were not part of intact proteoglycans in the fibril extracts. PMID:1888198

  16. A setup for simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and light scattering signals: Watching amyloid fibrils grow from intact proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Maurer, Jürgen; Roth, Andreas; Vogel, Vitali; Winter, Ernst; Mäntele, Werner

    2014-08-15

    A setup for the simultaneous measurement of mid-infrared spectra and static light scattering is described that can be used for the analysis of the formation of nanoscale and microscopic aggregates from smaller molecules to biopolymers. It can be easily integrated into sample chambers of infrared spectrometers or combined with laser beams from tunable infrared lasers. Here, its use for the analysis of the formation of amyloid fibrils from intact proteins is demonstrated. The formation of amyloid fibrils or plaques from proteins is a widespread and pathogenetic relevant process, and a number of diseases are caused and correlated with the deposition of amyloid fibrils in cells and tissues. The molecular mechanisms of these transformations, however, are still unclear. We report here the simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and static light scattering for the analysis of fibril formation from egg-white lysozyme. The transformation of the native form into non-native forms rich in β-sheet structure is measured by analysis of the amide I spectral region in the infrared spectra, which is sensitive for local structures. At the same time, light scattering signals at forward direction as well as the forward/backward ratio, which are sensitive for the number of scattering centers and their approximate sizes, respectively, are collected for the analysis of fibril growth. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters as well as mechanistic information are deduced from the combination of the two complementary techniques.

  17. Atomic models of de novo designed cc beta-Met amyloid-like fibrils.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Michel O; Gattin, Zrinka; Verel, Rene; Ciani, Barbara; Stromer, Thusnelda; Green, Janelle M; Tittmann, Peter; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Gross, Heinz; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Meier, Beat H; Serpell, Louise C; Müller, Shirley A; Kammerer, Richard A

    2008-02-22

    The common characteristics of amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils from disease- and non-disease-associated proteins offer the prospect that well-defined model systems can be used to systematically dissect the driving forces of amyloid formation. We recently reported the de novo designed cc beta peptide model system that forms a native-like coiled-coil structure at low temperatures and which can be switched to amyloid-like fibrils by increasing the temperature. Here, we report a detailed molecular description of the system in its fibrillar state by characterizing the cc beta-Met variant using several microscopic techniques, circular dichroism spectroscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and molecular dynamics calculations. We show that cc beta-Met forms amyloid-like fibrils of different morphologies on both the macroscopic and atomic levels, which can be controlled by variations of assembly conditions. Interestingly, heterogeneity is also observed along single fibrils. We propose atomic models of the cc beta-Met amyloid-like fibril, which are in good agreement with all experimental data. The models provide a rational explanation why oxidation of methionine residues completely abolishes cc beta-Met amyloid fibril formation, indicating that a small number of site-specific hydrophobic interactions can play a major role in the packing of polypeptide-chain segments within amyloid fibrils. The detailed structural information available for the cc beta model system provides a strong molecular basis for understanding the influence and relative contribution of hydrophobic interactions on native-state stability, kinetics of fibril formation, fibril packing, and polymorphism.

  18. The emergence of superstructural order in insulin amyloid fibrils upon multiple rounds of self-seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Babenko, Viktoria; Dec, Robert; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-08-01

    Typically, elongation of an amyloid fibril entails passing conformational details of the mother seed to daughter generations of fibrils with high fidelity. There are, however, several factors that can potentially prevent such transgenerational structural imprinting from perpetuating, for example heterogeneity of mother seeds or so-called conformational switching. Here, we examine phenotypic persistence of bovine insulin amyloid ([BI]) upon multiple rounds of self-seeding under quiescent conditions. According to infrared spectroscopy, with the following passages of homologous seeding, daughter fibrils gradually depart from the mother seed’s spectral characteristics. We note that this transgenerational structural drift in [BI] amyloid leads toward fibrils with infrared, chiroptical, and morphological traits similar to those of the superstructural variant of fibrils which normally forms upon strong agitation of insulin solutions. However, in contrast to agitation-induced insulin amyloid, the superstructural assemblies of daughter fibrils isolated through self-seeding are sonication-resistant. Our results suggest that formation of single amyloid fibrils is not a dead-end of the amyloidogenic self-assembly. Instead, the process appears to continue toward the self-assembly of higher-order structures although on longer time-scales. From this perspective, the fast agitation-induced aggregation of insulin appears to be a shortcut to amyloid superstructures whose formation under quiescent conditions is slow.

  19. The emergence of superstructural order in insulin amyloid fibrils upon multiple rounds of self-seeding

    PubMed Central

    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Babenko, Viktoria; Dec, Robert; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Typically, elongation of an amyloid fibril entails passing conformational details of the mother seed to daughter generations of fibrils with high fidelity. There are, however, several factors that can potentially prevent such transgenerational structural imprinting from perpetuating, for example heterogeneity of mother seeds or so-called conformational switching. Here, we examine phenotypic persistence of bovine insulin amyloid ([BI]) upon multiple rounds of self-seeding under quiescent conditions. According to infrared spectroscopy, with the following passages of homologous seeding, daughter fibrils gradually depart from the mother seed’s spectral characteristics. We note that this transgenerational structural drift in [BI] amyloid leads toward fibrils with infrared, chiroptical, and morphological traits similar to those of the superstructural variant of fibrils which normally forms upon strong agitation of insulin solutions. However, in contrast to agitation-induced insulin amyloid, the superstructural assemblies of daughter fibrils isolated through self-seeding are sonication-resistant. Our results suggest that formation of single amyloid fibrils is not a dead-end of the amyloidogenic self-assembly. Instead, the process appears to continue toward the self-assembly of higher-order structures although on longer time-scales. From this perspective, the fast agitation-induced aggregation of insulin appears to be a shortcut to amyloid superstructures whose formation under quiescent conditions is slow. PMID:27558445

  20. Carnosine's Effect on Amyloid Fibril Formation and Induced Cytotoxicity of Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Josephine W.; Liu, Kuan-Nan; How, Su-Chun; Chen, Wei-An; Lai, Chia-Min; Liu, Hwai-Shen; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Wang, Steven S. -S.

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine, a common dipeptide in mammals, has previously been shown to dissemble alpha-crystallin amyloid fibrils. To date, the dipeptide's anti-fibrillogensis effect has not been thoroughly characterized in other proteins. For a more complete understanding of carnosine's mechanism of action in amyloid fibril inhibition, we have investigated the effect of the dipeptide on lysozyme fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our study demonstrates a positive correlation between the concentration and inhibitory effect of carnosine against lysozyme fibril formation. Molecular docking results show carnosine's mechanism of fibrillogenesis inhibition may be initiated by binding with the aggregation-prone region of the protein. The dipeptide attenuates the amyloid fibril-induced cytotoxicity of human neuronal cells by reducing both apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths. Our study provides solid support for carnosine's amyloid fibril inhibitory property and its effect against fibril-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The additional insights gained herein may pave way to the discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effects against amyloid fibril formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24349167

  1. Inhibitory mechanism of pancreatic amyloid fibril formation: formation of the complex between tea catechins and the fragment of residues 22-27.

    PubMed

    Kamihira-Ishijima, Miya; Nakazawa, Hiromi; Kira, Atsushi; Naito, Akira; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2012-12-21

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is a major component of pancreatic amyloid deposits associated with type 2 diabetes. Polyphenols contained in plant foods have been found to inhibit amyloid fibril formation of proteins and/or peptides. However, the inhibition mechanism is not clear for a variety of systems. Here the inhibition mechanism of green tea polyphenols, catechins, on amyloid fibril formation of the IAPP fragment (IAPP22-27), which is of sufficient length for formation of β-sheet-containing amyloid fibrils, was investigated by means of kinetic analysis. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) determined that the association constants of gallate-type catechins [epicatechin 3-gallate (ECg) and epigallocatechin 3-gallate] for binding to IAPP22-27 immobilized on the gold plate in QCM were 1 order of magnitude larger than those of the free IAPP22-27 peptide, and also those of epicatechin and epigallocatechin. Kinetic analysis using a two-step autocatalytic reaction mechanism revealed that ECg significantly reduced the rate constants of the first nucleation step of amyloid fibril formation, while the rate of autocatalytic growth was less retarded. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance studies clarified that a IAPP22-27/ECg complex clearly forms as viewed from the (1)H chemical shift changes and line broadening. Our study suggests that tea catechins specifically inhibit the early stages of amyloid fibril formation to form amyloid nuclei by interacting with the unstructured peptide and that this inhibition mechanism is of great therapeutic value because stabilization of the native state could delay the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases and also the toxicity of the small oligomer (protofibril) is reported to be greater than that of the mature fibril. PMID:23205879

  2. Spatial Extent of Charge Repulsion Regulates Assembly Pathways for Lysozyme Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Shannon E.; Miti, Tatiana; Richmond, Tyson; Muschol, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Formation of large protein fibrils with a characteristic cross β-sheet architecture is the key indicator for a wide variety of systemic and neurodegenerative amyloid diseases. Recent experiments have strongly implicated oligomeric intermediates, transiently formed during fibril assembly, as critical contributors to cellular toxicity in amyloid diseases. At the same time, amyloid fibril assembly can proceed along different assembly pathways that might or might not involve such oligomeric intermediates. Elucidating the mechanisms that determine whether fibril formation proceeds along non-oligomeric or oligomeric pathways, therefore, is important not just for understanding amyloid fibril assembly at the molecular level but also for developing new targets for intervening with fibril formation. We have investigated fibril formation by hen egg white lysozyme, an enzyme for which human variants underlie non-neuropathic amyloidosis. Using a combination of static and dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and circular dichroism, we find that amyloidogenic lysozyme monomers switch between three different assembly pathways: from monomeric to oligomeric fibril assembly and, eventually, disordered precipitation as the ionic strength of the solution increases. Fibril assembly only occurred under conditions of net repulsion among the amyloidogenic monomers while net attraction caused precipitation. The transition from monomeric to oligomeric fibril assembly, in turn, occurred as salt-mediated charge screening reduced repulsion among individual charged residues on the same monomer. We suggest a model of amyloid fibril formation in which repulsive charge interactions are a prerequisite for ordered fibril assembly. Furthermore, the spatial extent of non-specific charge screening selects between monomeric and oligomeric assembly pathways by affecting which subset of denatured states can form suitable intermolecular bonds and by altering the energetic and entropic

  3. Competition between Primary Nucleation and Autocatalysis in Amyloid Fibril Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Eden, Kym; Morris, Ryan; Gillam, Jay; MacPhee, Cait E.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic measurements of the self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils are often used to make inferences about molecular mechanisms. In particular, the lag time—the quiescent period before aggregates are detected—is often found to scale with the protein concentration as a power law, whose exponent has been used to infer the presence or absence of autocatalytic growth processes such as fibril fragmentation. Here we show that experimental data for lag time versus protein concentration can show signs of kinks: clear changes in scaling exponent, indicating changes in the dominant molecular mechanism determining the lag time. Classical models for the kinetics of fibril assembly suggest that at least two mechanisms are at play during the lag time: primary nucleation and autocatalytic growth. Using computer simulations and theoretical calculations, we investigate whether the competition between these two processes can account for the kinks which we observe in our and others’ experimental data. We derive theoretical conditions for the crossover between nucleation-dominated and growth-dominated regimes, and analyze their dependence on system volume and autocatalysis mechanism. Comparing these predictions to the data, we find that the experimentally observed kinks cannot be explained by a simple crossover between nucleation-dominated and autocatalytic growth regimes. Our results show that existing kinetic models fail to explain detailed features of lag time versus concentration curves, suggesting that new mechanistic understanding is needed. More broadly, our work demonstrates that care is needed in interpreting lag-time scaling exponents from protein assembly data. PMID:25650930

  4. Ferulic acid destabilizes preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-10-21

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that curcumin (Cur) inhibits fA{beta} formation from A{beta} and destabilizes preformed fA{beta} in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of ferulic acid (FA) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of FA with Cur, rifampicin, and tetracycline. Ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-peptide, as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. The overall activity of the molecules examined was in the order of: Cur > FA > rifampicin = tetracycline. FA could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  5. N-terminal Domains Elicit Formation of Functional Pmel17 Amyloid Fibrils*

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Brenda; van Niel, Guillaume; Fowler, Douglas M.; Hurbain, Ilse; Luk, Kelvin C.; Stayrook, Steven E.; Lemmon, Mark A.; Raposo, Graça; Shorter, James; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Marks, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Pmel17 is a transmembrane protein that mediates the early steps in the formation of melanosomes, the subcellular organelles of melanocytes in which melanin pigments are synthesized and stored. In melanosome precursor organelles, proteolytic fragments of Pmel17 form insoluble, amyloid-like fibrils upon which melanins are deposited during melanosome maturation. The mechanism(s) by which Pmel17 becomes competent to form amyloid are not fully understood. To better understand how amyloid formation is regulated, we have defined the domains within Pmel17 that promote fibril formation in vitro. Using purified recombinant fragments of Pmel17, we show that two regions, an N-terminal domain of unknown structure and a downstream domain with homology to a polycystic kidney disease-1 repeat, efficiently form amyloid in vitro. Analyses of fibrils formed in melanocytes confirm that the polycystic kidney disease-1 domain forms at least part of the physiological amyloid core. Interestingly, this same domain is also required for the intracellular trafficking of Pmel17 to multivesicular compartments within which fibrils begin to form. Although a domain of imperfect repeats (RPT) is required for fibril formation in vivo and is a component of fibrils in melanosomes, RPT is not necessary for fibril formation in vitro and in isolation is unable to adopt an amyloid fold in a physiologically relevant time frame. These data define the structural core of Pmel17 amyloid, imply that the RPT domain plays a regulatory role in timing amyloid conversion, and suggest that fibril formation might be physically linked with multivesicular body sorting. PMID:19840945

  6. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, C; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Wang, C; Besenbacher, F; Dong, M

    2015-05-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils. PMID:25839069

  7. Endocytosed β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibrils Induce Necrosis and Apoptosis of Rabbit Synovial Fibroblasts by Disrupting Endosomal/Lysosomal Membranes: A Novel Mechanism on the Cytotoxicity of Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Okoshi, Tadakazu; Yamaguchi, Itaru; Ozawa, Daisaku; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Naiki, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    Dialysis-related amyloidosis is a major complication in long-term hemodialysis patients. In dialysis-related amyloidosis, β2-microglobulin (β2-m) amyloid fibrils deposit in the osteoarticular tissue, leading to carpal tunnel syndrome and destructive arthropathy with cystic bone lesions, but the mechanism by which these amyloid fibrils destruct bone and joint tissue is not fully understood. In this study, we assessed the cytotoxic effect of β2-m amyloid fibrils on the cultured rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Under light microscopy, the cells treated with amyloid fibrils exhibited both necrotic and apoptotic changes, while the cells treated with β2-m monomers and vehicle buffer exhibited no morphological changes. As compared to β2-m monomers and vehicle buffer, β2-m amyloid fibrils significantly reduced cellular viability as measured by the lactate dehydrogenase release assay and the 3-(4,5-di-methylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assay and significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells as measured by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. β2-m amyloid fibrils added to the medium adhered to cell surfaces, but did not disrupt artificial plasma membranes as measured by the liposome dye release assay. Interestingly, when the cells were incubated with amyloid fibrils for several hours, many endosomes/lysosomes filled with amyloid fibrils were observed under confocal laser microscopy and electron microscopy, Moreover, some endosomal/lysosomal membranes were disrupted by intravesicular fibrils, leading to the leakage of the fibrils into the cytosol and adjacent to mitochondria. Inhibition of actin-dependent endocytosis by cytochalasin D attenuated the toxicity of amyloid fibrils. These results suggest that endocytosed β2-m amyloid fibrils induce necrosis and apoptosis by disrupting endosomal/lysosomal membranes, and this novel mechanism on the cytotoxicity of amyloid fibrils is described

  8. Thioflavin T-Silent Denaturation Intermediates Support the Main-Chain-Dominated Architecture of Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Noda, Sayaka; So, Masatomo; Adachi, Masayuki; Kardos, József; Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Goto, Yuji

    2016-07-19

    Ultrasonication is considered one of the most effective agitations for inducing the spontaneous formation of amyloid fibrils. When we induced the ultrasonication-dependent fibrillation of β2-microglobulin and insulin monitored by amyloid-specific thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, both proteins showed a significant decrease in ThT fluorescence after the burst-phase increase. The decrease in ThT fluorescence was accelerated when the ultrasonic power was stronger, suggesting that this decrease was caused by the partial denaturation of preformed fibrils. The possible intermediates of denaturation retained amyloid-like morphologies, secondary structures, and seeding potentials. Similar denaturation intermediates were also observed when fibrils were denatured by guanidine hydrochloride or sodium dodecyl sulfate. The presence of these denaturation intermediates is consistent with the main-chain-dominated architecture of amyloid fibrils. Moreover, in the three types of denaturation experiments conducted, insulin fibrils were more stable than β2-microglobulin fibrils, suggesting that the relative stability of various fibrils is independent of the method of denaturation. PMID:27345358

  9. Aβ(1–40) forms five distinct amyloid structures whose β-sheet contents and fibril stabilities are correlated

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Ravindra; Williams, Angela D.; Chemuru, Saketh; Wetzel, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The ability of a single polypeptide sequence to grow into multiple stable amyloid fibrils sets these aggregates apart from most native globular proteins. The existence of multiple amyloid forms is the basis for strain effects in yeast prion biology, and may also contribute to variations in Alzheimer’s disease pathology. However, the structural basis for amyloid polymorphism is poorly understood. We report here five structurally distinct fibrillar aggregates of the Alzheimer’s plaque peptide Aβ(1–40), as well as a non-fibrillar aggregate induced by Zn+2. Each of these conformational forms exhibits a unique profile of physical properties, and all the fibrillar forms “breed true” in elongation reactions at a common set of growth conditions. Consistent with their defining cross-β structure, we find that in this series the amyloid fibrils containing more extensive β-sheet exhibit greater stability. At the same time, side chain packing outside of the β-sheet regions also contributes to stability, and to stability differences between polymorphic forms. Stability comparison is facilitated by the unique feature that the free energy of the monomer (equivalent to the unfolded state in a protein folding reaction) does not vary, and hence can be ignored, in the comparison of ΔG° of elongation values for each polymorphic fibril obtained at a single set of conditions. PMID:20600131

  10. Time-lapse atomic force microscopy in the characterization of amyloid-like fibril assembly and oligomeric intermediates.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire; Green, Janelle

    2005-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) images the topography of biological structures adsorbed to surfaces with nanometer to angstrom scale resolution. Amyloid-like fibrils and oligomers can be imaged in buffer solutions, allowing the samples to retain physiological-like properties while temporal changes in structure are monitored, e.g., the elongation of fibrils or the growth of single oligomers. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, i.e., electron microscopy (EM). However, AFM is limited in that the specimen must be firmly attached to a solid support for measurement and that time-lapse imaging of individual assemblies can thus only be achieved for fibrils and oligomers growing on this support. Nevertheless, AFM has provided several insights into the in vitro assembly mechanism and structures of amyloid-like fibrils. The first section of this chapter provides a methodological introduction to AFM, whilst the second details the application of this technique to the investigation of amyloidogenic proteins, specifically amylin and amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides. PMID:15980598

  11. Amyloid fibril formation at a uniformly sheared air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is a process by which protein molecules in solution form nuclei and aggregate into fibrils. Amyloid fibrils have long been associated with several common diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. More recently, fibril protein deposition has been implicated in uncommon disorders leading to the failure of various organs including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Fibrillization can also play a detrimental role in biotherapeutic production. Results from previous studies show that a hydrophobic interface, such air/water, can accelerate fibrillization. Studies also show that agitation accelerates fibrillization. When attempting to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of fibrillization and distinguish the effects of interfaces and flow, it can be helpful to experiment with uniformly sheared interfaces. A new Taylor-Couette device is introduced for in situ, real-time high resolution microscopy. With a sub-millimeter annular gap, surface tension acts as the channel floor, permitting a stable meniscus to be placed arbitrarily close to a microscope to study amyloid fibril formation over long periods.

  12. Measurement of intrinsic properties of amyloid fibrils by the peak force QNM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamcik, Jozef; Lara, Cecile; Usov, Ivan; Jeong, Jae Sun; Ruggeri, Francesco S.; Dietler, Giovanni; Lashuel, Hilal A.; Hamley, Ian W.; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2012-07-01

    We report the investigation of the mechanical properties of different types of amyloid fibrils by the peak force quantitative nanomechanical (PF-QNM) technique. We demonstrate that this technique correctly measures the Young's modulus independent of the polymorphic state and the cross-sectional structural details of the fibrils, and we show that values for amyloid fibrils assembled from heptapeptides, α-synuclein, Aβ(1-42), insulin, β-lactoglobulin, lysozyme, ovalbumin, Tau protein and bovine serum albumin all fall in the range of 2-4 GPa.

  13. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-28

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.

  14. Inhibition of fibril formation in beta-amyloid peptide by a novel series of benzofurans.

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, D R; Perry, A E; Godfrey, F; Swatton, J E; Jennings, K H; Spitzfaden, C; Wadsworth, H; Wood, S J; Markwell, R E

    1999-01-01

    A series of benzofuran derivatives have been identified as inhibitors of fibril formation in the beta-amyloid peptide. The activity of these compounds has been assessed by a novel fibril-formation-specific immunoassay and for their effects on the production of a biologically active fibril product. The inhibition afforded by the compounds seems to be associated with their binding to beta-amyloid, as identified by scintillation proximity binding assay. Binding assays and NMR studies also indicate that the inhibition is associated with self-aggregation of the compounds. There is a close correlation between the activity of the benzofurans as inhibitors of fibril formation and their ability to bind to beta-amyloid. Non-benzofuran inhibitors of the fibril formation process do not seem to bind to the same site on the beta-amyloid molecule as the benzofurans. Thus a specific recognition site might exist for benzofurans on beta-amyloid, binding to which seems to interfere with the ability of the peptide to form fibrils. PMID:10229684

  15. Influence of dendrimer's structure on its activity against amyloid fibril formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klajnert, B. . E-mail: aklajn@biol.uni.lodz.pl; Cortijo-Arellano, M.; Cladera, J.; Bryszewska, M.

    2006-06-23

    Inhibition of fibril assembly is a potential therapeutic strategy in neurodegenerative disorders such as prion and Alzheimer's diseases. Highly branched, globular polymers-dendrimers-are novel promising inhibitors of fibril formation. In this study, the effect of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (generations 3rd, 4th, and 5th) on amyloid aggregation of the prion peptide PrP 185-208 and the Alzheimer's peptide A{beta} 1-28 was examined. Amyloid fibrils were produced in vitro and their formation was monitored using the dye thioflavin T (ThT). Fluorescence studies were complemented with electron microscopy. The results show that the higher the dendrimer generation, the larger the degree of inhibition of the amyloid aggregation process and the more effective are dendrimers in disrupting the already existing fibrils. A hypothesis on dendrimer-peptide interaction mechanism is presented based on the dendrimers' molecular structure.

  16. Fluorescent Filter-Trap Assay for Amyloid Fibril Formation Kinetics in Complex Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are the most distinct components of the plaques associated with various neurodegenerative diseases. Kinetic studies of amyloid fibril formation shed light on the microscopic mechanisms that underlie this process as well as the contributions of internal and external factors to the interplay between different mechanistic steps. Thioflavin T is a widely used noncovalent fluorescent probe for monitoring amyloid fibril formation; however, it may suffer from limitations due to the unspecific interactions between the dye and the additives. Here, we present the results of a filter-trap assay combined with the detection of fluorescently labeled amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. The filter-trap assay separates formed aggregates based on size, and the fluorescent label attached to Aβ allows for their detection. The times of half completion of the process (t1/2) obtained by the filter-trap assay are comparable to values from the ThT assay. High concentrations of human serum albumin (HSA) and carboxyl-modified polystyrene nanoparticles lead to an elevated ThT signal, masking a possible fibril formation event. The filter-trap assay allows fibril formation to be studied in the presence of those substances and shows that Aβ fibril formation is kinetically inhibited by HSA and that the amount of fibrils formed are reduced. In contrast, nanoparticles exhibit a dual-behavior governed by their concentration. PMID:25946560

  17. The Effect of Milk Constituents and Crowding Agents on Amyloid Fibril Formation by κ-Casein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jihua; Dehle, Francis C; Liu, Yanqin; Bahraminejad, Elmira; Ecroyd, Heath; Thorn, David C; Carver, John A

    2016-02-17

    When not incorporated into the casein micelle, κ-casein, a major milk protein, rapidly forms amyloid fibrils at physiological pH and temperature. In this study, the effects of milk components (calcium, lactose, lipids, and heparan sulfate) and crowding agents on reduced and carboxymethylated (RCM) κ-casein fibril formation was investigated using far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, thioflavin T binding assays, and transmission electron microscopy. Longer-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids, which form the lining of milk ducts and milk fat globules, enhanced RCM κ-casein fibril formation irrespective of whether the lipids were in a monomeric or micellar state, whereas shorter-chain phospholipids and triglycerides had little effect. Heparan sulfate, a component of the milk fat globule membrane and catalyst of amyloid deposition in extracellular tissue, had little effect on the kinetics of RCM κ-casein fibril formation. Major nutritional components such as calcium and lactose also had no significant effect. Macromolecular crowding enhances protein-protein interactions, but in contrast to other fibril-forming species, the extent of RCM κ-casein fibril formation was reduced by the presence of a variety of crowding agents. These data are consistent with a mechanism of κ-casein fibril formation in which the rate-determining step is dissociation from the oligomer to give the highly amyloidogenic monomer. We conclude that the interaction of κ-casein with membrane-associated phospholipids along its secretory pathway may contribute to the development of amyloid deposits in mammary tissue. However, the formation of spherical oligomers such as casein micelles is favored over amyloid fibrils in the crowded environment of milk, within which the occurrence of amyloid fibrils is low. PMID:26807595

  18. Amyloid Fibrils as Building Blocks for Natural and Artificial Functional Materials.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Tuomas P J; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    Proteinaceous materials based on the amyloid core structure have recently been discovered at the origin of biological functionality in a remarkably diverse set of roles, and attention is increasingly turning towards such structures as the basis of artificial self-assembling materials. These roles contrast markedly with the original picture of amyloid fibrils as inherently pathological structures. Here we outline the salient features of this class of functional materials, both in the context of the functional roles that have been revealed for amyloid fibrils in nature, as well as in relation to their potential as artificial materials. We discuss how amyloid materials exemplify the emergence of function from protein self-assembly at multiple length scales. We focus on the connections between mesoscale structure and material function, and demonstrate how the natural examples of functional amyloids illuminate the potential applications for future artificial protein based materials.

  19. Effect of initial stagger selection on the handedness of Amyloid beta helical fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Cheng, Xiaolin; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Various structural models for Amyloid $\\beta$ fibrils derived from a variety of experimental techniques are currently available. However, this data cannot differentiate between the relative position of the two arms of the $\\beta$ hairpin called the stagger. Amyloid fibrils of various heirarchical levels form left--handed helices composed of $\\beta$ sheets. However it is unclear if positive, negative and neutral staggers all form the macroscopic left--handed helices. Studying this is important since the success of computational approaches to develop drugs for amyloidic diseases will depend on selecting the physiologically relevant structure of the sheets. To address this issue we have conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulations of Amyloid$\\beta$ sheets of various staggers and show that only negative staggers generate the experimentally observed left--handed helices while positive staggers generate the incorrect right--handed helices. The implications of this result extend in to all amyloidic--aggregation type diseases.

  20. Conjugated Quantum Dots Inhibit the Amyloid β (1–42) Fibrillation Process

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Garima; Micic, Miodrag; Yang, Yuehai; Li, Wenzhi; Movia, Dania; Giordani, Silvia; Zhang, Hongzhou; Leblanc, Roger M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles have enormous potential in diagnostic and therapeutic studies. We have demonstrated that the amyloid beta mixed with and conjugated to dihydrolipoic acid- (DHLA) capped CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) of size approximately 2.5 nm can be used to reduce the fibrillation process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used as tools for analysis of fibrillation. There is a significant change in morphology of fibrils when amyloid β (1–42) (Aβ (1–42)) is mixed or conjugated to the QDs. The length and the width of the fibrils vary under modified conditions. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence supports the decrease in fibril formation in presence of DHLA-capped QDs. PMID:21423556

  1. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H.

    2015-10-01

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  2. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Viet, Man; Roland, Christopher Sagui, Celeste; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  3. Analysis of Toxic Amyloid Fibril Interactions at Natively Derived Membranes by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A. S.; Nabok, Aleksey; Blakeman, Ben J. F.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Abell, Benjamin; Smith, David P.

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the culprits of cytotoxicity associated with amyloid disorders. Although small pre-fibrillar amyloid oligomers have been implicated as the primary toxic species, the fibrillar amyloid material itself can also induce cytotoxicity. To investigate membrane disruption and cytotoxic effects associated with intact and fragmented fibrils, the novel in situ spectroscopic technique of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE) was used. Fibril lipid interactions were monitored using natively derived whole cell membranes as a model of the in vivo environment. We show that fragmented fibrils have an increased ability to disrupt these natively derived membranes by causing a loss of material from the deposited surface when compared with unfragmented fibrils. This effect was corroborated by observations of membrane disruption in live cells, and by dye release assay using synthetic liposomes. Through these studies we demonstrate the use of TIRE for the analysis of protein-lipid interactions on natively derived lipid surfaces, and provide an explanation on how amyloid fibrils can cause a toxic gain of function, while entangled amyloid plaques exert minimal biological activity. PMID:26172440

  4. Insulin amyloid fibrillation studied by terahertz spectroscopy and other biophysical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rui; He, Mingxia; Su, Rongxin; Yu, Yanjun; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2010-01-01

    Assembly and fibrillation of amyloid proteins are believed to play a key role in the etiology of various human diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and type II diabetes. Insights into conformational changes and formation processes during amyloid fibrillation are essential for the clinical diagnosis and drug discovery. To study the changes in secondary, tertiary, quaternary structures, and the alteration in the collective vibrational mode density of states during the amyloid fibrillation, bovine insulin in 20% acetic acid was incubated at 60 {sup o}C, and its multi-level structures were followed by various biophysical techniques, including circular dichroism (CD), thioflavin T fluorescence (ThT), dynamic light scattering (DLS), electron microscopy, and terahertz (THz) absorption spectroscopy. The experimental data demonstrated a transformation of {alpha}-helix into {beta}-sheet starting at 26 h. This was followed by the aggregation of insulin, as shown by ThT binding, with a transition midpoint at 41 h, and by the bulk formation of mature aggregates after about 71 h. THz is a quick and non-invasive technique, which has the advantage of allowing the study of the conformational state of biomolecules and tissues. We first applied THz spectroscopy to study the amyloid fibrillation. At the terahertz frequency range of 0.2-2.0 THz, there was an apparent increase in both the absorbance and refractive index in THz spectra. Thus, THz is expected to provide a new way of looking into amyloid fibrillation.

  5. Analysis of Toxic Amyloid Fibril Interactions at Natively Derived Membranes by Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A S; Nabok, Aleksey; Blakeman, Ben J F; Xue, Wei-Feng; Abell, Benjamin; Smith, David P

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the culprits of cytotoxicity associated with amyloid disorders. Although small pre-fibrillar amyloid oligomers have been implicated as the primary toxic species, the fibrillar amyloid material itself can also induce cytotoxicity. To investigate membrane disruption and cytotoxic effects associated with intact and fragmented fibrils, the novel in situ spectroscopic technique of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE) was used. Fibril lipid interactions were monitored using natively derived whole cell membranes as a model of the in vivo environment. We show that fragmented fibrils have an increased ability to disrupt these natively derived membranes by causing a loss of material from the deposited surface when compared with unfragmented fibrils. This effect was corroborated by observations of membrane disruption in live cells, and by dye release assay using synthetic liposomes. Through these studies we demonstrate the use of TIRE for the analysis of protein-lipid interactions on natively derived lipid surfaces, and provide an explanation on how amyloid fibrils can cause a toxic gain of function, while entangled amyloid plaques exert minimal biological activity.

  6. Effect of sequence variation on the mechanical response of amyloid fibrils probed by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Ndlovu, Hlengisizwe; Ashcroft, Alison E; Radford, Sheena E; Harris, Sarah A

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical failure of mature amyloid fibers produces fragments that act as seeds for the growth of new fibrils. Fragmentation may also be correlated with cytotoxicity. We have used steered atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanical failure of fibrils formed by the amyloidogenic fragment of human amylin hIAPP20-29 subjected to force applied in a variety of directions. By introducing systematic variations to this peptide sequence in silico, we have also investigated the role of the amino-acid sequence in determining the mechanical stability of amyloid fibrils. Our calculations show that the force required to induce mechanical failure depends on the direction of the applied stress and upon the degree of structural order present in the β-sheet assemblies, which in turn depends on the peptide sequence. The results have implications for the importance of sequence-dependent mechanical properties on seeding the growth of new fibrils and the role of breakage events in cytotoxicity.

  7. Beta-amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's disease: pathologically altered, basement membrane-associated microfibrils?

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Kisilevsky, R

    2001-01-01

    Beta amyloid fibrils were examined in situ in the cerebral cortex of brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease using high resolution ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The main body of the fibril was identical with that of microfibrils and was made up of a core containing amyloid P component (AP), and a surface layer. Beta amyloid protein (Abeta) in the form of 1 nm wide flexible filaments was associated with the external surface of the microfibril. In cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy the fibrils were formed at the outer surface of the vascular basement membrane. Overproduction of microfibrils has been reported at the basement membrane of "leaky" capillaries including the glomerular capillary in disease or leaky alveolar-capillary walls of normal lungs. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease overproduction of microfibril-like beta amyloid fibrils in amyloid angiopathy coincided with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier of the cerebromicrovasculature. Thus, in the above three locations, the presence of abundant microfibrils, or microfibril-like structures, may be related to plasma which leaks out of the circulation into the adjoining vascular basement membrane. AP is an essential constituent of microfibrils and since the only site where AP is available in the cerebral cortex is in leaky microvasculature, a chronic, steady supply of AP into perivascular areas may be the cause of overproduction of microfibrils. Brain "microfibrils" may further be altered pathologically into beta amyloid fibrils by the addition of Abeta. The origin of the fibrils in senile plaques may also be the microvasculature since in the area of the plaques no source of AP is apparent.

  8. Combined thioflavin T-Congo red fluorescence assay for amyloid fibril detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girych, Mykhailo; Gorbenko, Galyna; Maliyov, Ivan; Trusova, Valeriya; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most powerful tools for the detection and structural characterization of the pathogenic protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils. The traditional approaches to the identification and quantification of amyloid fibrils are based on monitoring the fluorescence changes of the benzothiazole dye thioflavin T (ThT) and absorbance changes of the azo dye Congo red (CR). In routine screening it is usually sufficient to perform only the ThT and CR assays, but both of them, when used separately, could give false results. Moreover, fibrillization kinetics can be measured only by ThT fluorescence, while the characteristic absorption spectra and birefringence of CR represent more rigid criteria for the presence of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, it seemed reasonable to use both these dyes simultaneously, combining the advantages of each technique. To this end, we undertook a detailed analysis of the fluorescence spectral behavior of these unique amyloid tracers upon their binding to amyloid fibrils from lysozyme, insulin and an N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I with Iowa mutation. The fluorescence measurements revealed several criteria for distinguishing between fibrillar and monomeric protein states: (i) a common drastic increase in ThT fluorescence intensity; (ii) a sharp decrease in ThT fluorescence upon addition of CR; (iii) an appearance of the maximum at 535-540 nm in the CR excitation spectra; (iv) increase in CR fluorescence intensity at 610 nm. Based on these findings we designed a novel combined ThT-CR fluorescence assay for amyloid identification. Such an approach not only strengthens the reliability of the ThT assay, but also provides new opportunities for structural characterization of amyloid fibrils.

  9. Combined thioflavin T–Congo red fluorescence assay for amyloid fibril detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girych, Mykhailo; Gorbenko, Galyna; Maliyov, Ivan; Trusova, Valeriya; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most powerful tools for the detection and structural characterization of the pathogenic protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils. The traditional approaches to the identification and quantification of amyloid fibrils are based on monitoring the fluorescence changes of the benzothiazole dye thioflavin T (ThT) and absorbance changes of the azo dye Congo red (CR). In routine screening it is usually sufficient to perform only the ThT and CR assays, but both of them, when used separately, could give false results. Moreover, fibrillization kinetics can be measured only by ThT fluorescence, while the characteristic absorption spectra and birefringence of CR represent more rigid criteria for the presence of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, it seemed reasonable to use both these dyes simultaneously, combining the advantages of each technique. To this end, we undertook a detailed analysis of the fluorescence spectral behavior of these unique amyloid tracers upon their binding to amyloid fibrils from lysozyme, insulin and an N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I with Iowa mutation. The fluorescence measurements revealed several criteria for distinguishing between fibrillar and monomeric protein states: (i) a common drastic increase in ThT fluorescence intensity; (ii) a sharp decrease in ThT fluorescence upon addition of CR; (iii) an appearance of the maximum at 535–540 nm in the CR excitation spectra; (iv) increase in CR fluorescence intensity at 610 nm. Based on these findings we designed a novel combined ThT–CR fluorescence assay for amyloid identification. Such an approach not only strengthens the reliability of the ThT assay, but also provides new opportunities for structural characterization of amyloid fibrils.

  10. Beta-amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's disease: pathologically altered, basement membrane-associated microfibrils?

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Kisilevsky, R

    2001-01-01

    Beta amyloid fibrils were examined in situ in the cerebral cortex of brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease using high resolution ultrastructural and immunohistochemical techniques. The main body of the fibril was identical with that of microfibrils and was made up of a core containing amyloid P component (AP), and a surface layer. Beta amyloid protein (Abeta) in the form of 1 nm wide flexible filaments was associated with the external surface of the microfibril. In cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy the fibrils were formed at the outer surface of the vascular basement membrane. Overproduction of microfibrils has been reported at the basement membrane of "leaky" capillaries including the glomerular capillary in disease or leaky alveolar-capillary walls of normal lungs. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease overproduction of microfibril-like beta amyloid fibrils in amyloid angiopathy coincided with breakdown of the blood-brain barrier of the cerebromicrovasculature. Thus, in the above three locations, the presence of abundant microfibrils, or microfibril-like structures, may be related to plasma which leaks out of the circulation into the adjoining vascular basement membrane. AP is an essential constituent of microfibrils and since the only site where AP is available in the cerebral cortex is in leaky microvasculature, a chronic, steady supply of AP into perivascular areas may be the cause of overproduction of microfibrils. Brain "microfibrils" may further be altered pathologically into beta amyloid fibrils by the addition of Abeta. The origin of the fibrils in senile plaques may also be the microvasculature since in the area of the plaques no source of AP is apparent. PMID:11730002

  11. The Aβ peptide forms non-amyloid fibrils in the presence of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jinghui; Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.; Yu, Chien-Hung; Muhammad, Kamran; Gräslund, Astrid; Pieter Abrahams, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have specific properties that make them potentially useful in biomedicine and biotechnology. However, carbon nanotubes may themselves be toxic, making it imperative to understand how carbon nanotubes interact with biomolecules such as proteins. Here, we used NMR, CD, and ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy together with AFM imaging to study pH-dependent molecular interactions between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. The aggregation of the Aβ peptide, first into oligomers and later into amyloid fibrils, is considered to be the toxic mechanism behind Alzheimer's disease. We found that SWNTs direct the Aβ peptides to form a new class of β-sheet-rich yet non-amyloid fibrils.Carbon nanotubes have specific properties that make them potentially useful in biomedicine and biotechnology. However, carbon nanotubes may themselves be toxic, making it imperative to understand how carbon nanotubes interact with biomolecules such as proteins. Here, we used NMR, CD, and ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy together with AFM imaging to study pH-dependent molecular interactions between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. The aggregation of the Aβ peptide, first into oligomers and later into amyloid fibrils, is considered to be the toxic mechanism behind Alzheimer's disease. We found that SWNTs direct the Aβ peptides to form a new class of β-sheet-rich yet non-amyloid fibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00291a

  12. Granular assembly of alpha-synuclein leading to the accelerated amyloid fibril formation with shear stress.

    PubMed

    Bhak, Ghibom; Lee, Jung-Ho; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Paik, Seung R

    2009-01-01

    alpha-Synuclein participates in the Lewy body formation of Parkinson's disease. Elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism of the amyloid fibril formation is crucial not only to develop a controlling strategy toward the disease, but also to apply the protein fibrils for future biotechnology. Discernable homogeneous granules of alpha-synuclein composed of approximately 11 monomers in average were isolated in the middle of a lag phase during the in vitro fibrillation process. They were demonstrated to experience almost instantaneous fibrillation during a single 12-min centrifugal membrane-filtration at 14,000 x g. The granular assembly leading to the drastically accelerated fibril formation was demonstrated to be a result of the physical influence of shear force imposed on the preformed granular structures by either centrifugal filtration or rheometer. Structural rearrangement of the preformed oligomomeric structures is attributable for the suprastructure formation in which the granules act as a growing unit for the fibril formation. To parallel the prevailing notion of nucleation-dependent amyloidosis, we propose a double-concerted fibrillation model as one of the mechanisms to explain the in vitro fibrillation of alpha-synuclein, in which two consecutive concerted associations of monomers and subsequent oligomeric granular species are responsible for the eventual amyloid fibril formation. PMID:19137068

  13. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolini, C.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Wang, C.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils.Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology

  14. A molecular model for self-assembly of amyloid fibrils: Immunoglobulin light chains

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.; Myatt, E.A.; Westholm, F.A.

    1995-08-29

    The formation and pathological deposition of amyloid fibrils are defining features of many acquired and inherited disorders, including primary or light-chain-associated amyloidosis, Alzheimer`s disease, and adult-onset diabetes. No pharmacological methods exist to block this process or to effect the removal of fibrils from tissue, and thus, little can be done to prevent organ failure and ultimate death that result from deposition of amyloid. Knowledge of the pathogenesis, treatment, or prevention of these presently incurable diseases is limited due to the relative paucity of information regarding the biophysical basis of amyloid formation. Antibody light chains of different amino acid sequence show differential amyloid-forming tendencies and, as such, can provide insight into the structural organization of amyloid fibrils as well as into basic mechanisms of protein self-assembly. We have compared primary structures of 180 human monoclonal light chains and have identified particular residues and positions within the variable domain that differentiate amyloid-from nonamyloid-associated proteins. We propose a molecular model that accounts for amyloid formation by antibody light chains and might also have implications for other forms of amyloidosis. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Small Liposomes Accelerate the Fibrillation of Amyloid β (1–40)*

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Mayu S.; Yagi, Hisashi; Adachi, Masayuki; Lee, Young-Ho; Goto, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease. Aβ peptides were previously considered to interact specifically with ganglioside-containing membranes. Several studies have suggested that Aβ peptides also bind to phosphatidylcholine membranes, which lead to deformation of membranes and fibrillation of Aβ. Moreover, the role of membrane curvature, one type of deformation produced by binding of proteins to a membrane, in the binding and fibrillation of Aβ remains unclear. To clearly understand the relationship between the binding, consequent membrane deformation, and fibrillation of Aβ, we examined the amyloid fibrillation of Aβ-(1–40) in the presence of liposomes of various sizes. Membrane curvature increased with a decrease in the size of the liposomes. We used liposomes made of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine to eliminate electrostatic effects. The results obtained showed that liposomes of smaller sizes (≤50 nm) significantly accelerated the nucleation step, thereby shortening the lag time of fibrillation. On the other hand, liposomes of larger sizes decreased the amount of fibrils but did not notably affect the lag time. The morphologies of fibrils, which were monitored by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, revealed that the length of Aβ-(1–40) fibrils became shorter and the amount of amorphous aggregates became larger as liposomes increased in size. These results suggest that the curvature of membranes coupled with an increase in water-accessible hydrophobic regions is important for binding and concentrating Aβ monomers, leading to amyloid nucleation. Furthermore, amyloid fibrillation on membranes may compete with non-productive binding to produce amorphous aggregates. PMID:25406316

  16. Curcumin Reduces Amyloid Fibrillation of Prion Protein and Decreases Reactive Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Fen; Yu, Kun-Hua; Jheng, Cheng-Ping; Chung, Raymond; Lee, Cheng-I

    2013-01-01

    Misfolding and aggregation into amyloids of the prion protein (PrP) is responsible for the development of fatal transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. Various studies on curcumin demonstrate promise for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and inhibition of PrPres accumulation. To evaluate the effect of curcumin on amyloid fibrillation of prion protein, we first investigated the effect of curcumin on mouse prion protein (mPrP) in a cell-free system. Curcumin reduced the prion fibril formation significantly. Furthermore, we monitored the change in apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level upon curcumin treatment in mouse neuroblastoma cells (N2a). Curcumin effectively rescues the cells from apoptosis and decreases the ROS level caused by subsequent co-incubation with prion amyloid fibrils. The assays in cell-free mPrP and in N2a cells of this work verified the promising effect of curcumin on the prevention of transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25437204

  17. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We

  18. Structural Transformation and Aggregation of cc-beta Peptides Into Amyloid Proto-fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Yuba; Steckmann, Timothy; Chapagain, Prem; Gerstman, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    The study of amyloid fibrils has important implications in understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. During the formation of amyloid fibrils, peptide polymers manifest fascinating physical behavior by undergoing complicated structural transformations. We examine the behavior of a small engineered peptide called cc-beta, that was designed to mimic the structural changes of the much larger, naturally occurring amyloid beta proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to uncover the underlying physics that is responsible for the large scale structural transformations. By using implicit solvent replica exchange MD simulations, we examined the behavior of 12 peptides, initially arranged in four different cc-beta alpha helix trimers. We observed various intermediate stages of aggregation, as well as an organized proto-fibril beta aggregate. We discuss the time evolution and the various interactions involved in the structural transformation.

  19. Insight into the stability of cross-β amyloid fibril from VEALYL short peptide with molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Chen, Yue; Wang, Wei; Yu, Qingfen; Li, Yixue; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are found in many fatal neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes, and prion disease. The VEALYL short peptide from insulin has been confirmed to aggregate amyloid-like fibrils. However, the aggregation mechanism of amyloid fibril is poorly understood. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulation to analyse the stability of VEALYL hexamer. The statistical results indicate that hydrophobic residues play key roles in stabilizing VEALYL hexamer. Single point and two linkage mutants confirmed that Val1, Leu4, and Tyr5 of VEALYL are key residues. The consistency of the results for the VEALYL oligomer suggests that the intermediate states might be trimer (3-0) and pentamer(3-2). These results can help us to obtain an insight into the aggregation mechanism of amyloid fibril. These methods can be used to study the stability of amyloid fibril from other short peptides.

  20. Unwinding fibril formation of medin, the peptide of the most common form of human amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Annika; Soederberg, Linda; Westermark, Gunilla T.; Sletten, Knut; Engstroem, Ulla; Tjernberg, Lars O.; Naeslund, Jan; Westermark, Per

    2007-10-05

    Medin amyloid affects the medial layer of the thoracic aorta of most people above 50 years of age. The consequences of this amyloid are not completely known but the deposits may contribute to diseases such as thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection or to the general diminished elasticity of blood vessels seen in elderly people. We show that the 50-amino acid residue peptide medin forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. With the use of Congo red staining, Thioflavin T fluorescence, electron microscopy, and a solid-phase binding assay on different synthetic peptides, we identified the last 18-19 amino acid residues to constitute the amyloid-promoting region of medin. We also demonstrate that the two C-terminal phenylalanines, previously suggested to be of importance for amyloid formation, are not required for medin amyloid formation.

  1. Conversion of non-fibrillar {beta}-sheet oligomers into amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptide aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Benseny-Cases, Nuria; Cocera, Mercedes; Cladera, Josep

    2007-10-05

    A{beta}(1-40) is one of the main components of the fibrils found in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. It is known that prior to the formation of amyloid fibrils in which the peptide adopts a well-ordered intermolecular {beta}-sheet structure, peptide monomers associate forming low and high molecular weight oligomers. These oligomers have been previously described in electron microscopy, AFM, and exclusion chromatography studies. Their specific secondary structures however, have not yet been well established. A major problem when comparing aggregation and secondary structure determinations in concentration-dependent processes such as amyloid aggregation is the different concentration range required in each type of experiment. In the present study we used the dye Thioflavin T (ThT), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron microscopy in order to structurally characterize the different aggregated species which form during the A{beta}(1-40) fibril formation process. A unique sample containing 90 {mu}M peptide was used. The results show that oligomeric species which form during the lag phase of the aggregation kinetics are a mixture of unordered, helical, and intermolecular non-fibrillar {beta}-structures. The number of oligomers and the amount of non-fibrillar {beta}-structures grows throughout the lag phase and during the elongation phase these non-fibrillar {beta}-structures are transformed into fibrillar (amyloid) {beta}-structures, formed by association of high molecular weight intermediates.

  2. Photo-induced inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrillation on online laser measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Rui; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} We compare the structures of insulin upon heating with or without laser irradiation. {yields} Laser irradiation inhibits insulin fibrillation and may be of insert for mechanistic disease studies. {yields} Online laser measurements should be carefully used in the study of amyloid proteins. -- Abstract: Protein aggregation and amyloid fibrillation can lead to several serious diseases and protein drugs ineffectiveness; thus, the detection and inhibition of these processes have been of great interest. In the present study, the inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrillation by laser irradiation was investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), far-UV circular dichroism (far-UV CD), and thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. During heat-induced aggregation, the size distribution of two insulin solutions obtained by online and offline dynamic light scattering were different. The laser-on insulin in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl exhibited fewer fibrils than the laser-off insulin, whereas no insulin fibril under laser irradiation was observed in the absence of 0.1 M NaCl for 45 h incubation. Moreover, our CD results showed that the laser-irradiated insulin solution maintained mainly an {alpha}-helical conformation, but the laser-off insulin solution formed bulk fibrils followed by a significant increase in {beta}-sheet content for 106 h incubation. These findings provide an inhibition method for insulin amyloid fibrillation using the laser irradiation and demonstrate that the online long-time laser measurements should be carefully used in the study of amyloid proteins because they may change the original results.

  3. The bond survival time variation of polymorphic amyloid fibrils in the mechanical insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myeongsang; Baek, Inchul; Chang, Hyun Joon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-04-01

    The structure-property relationships of biological materials such as amyloid fibrils are important to developing therapeutic strategies for amyloid-related diseases. The mechanical characterization of biological materials can provide insight into such relationships. In this study, polymorphic human islet polypeptide (hIAPP) fibrils were constructed with molecular modeling, and a constant-force bending simulation was performed to characterize the different mechanical behaviors of polymorphic hIAPP protofibrils. Our simulation results showed that, owing to their different intramolecular interactions, the fracture times of polymorphic hIAPP protofibrils depend on polymorphic structures.

  4. Destruction of {alpha}-synuclein based amyloid fibrils by a low temperature plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Karakas, Erdinc; Laroussi, Mounir; Munyanyi, Agatha; Greene, Lesley

    2010-10-04

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered beta-sheet aggregates that are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. At present, there is no cure for these progressive and debilitating diseases. Here we report initial studies that indicate that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma can break amyloid fibrils into smaller units in vitro. The plasma was generated by the 'plasma pencil', a device capable of emitting a long, low temperature plasma plume/jet. This avenue of research may facilitate the development of a plasma-based medical treatment.

  5. Destruction of α-synuclein based amyloid fibrils by a low temperature plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Munyanyi, Agatha; Greene, Lesley; Laroussi, Mounir

    2010-10-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered beta-sheet aggregates that are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. At present, there is no cure for these progressive and debilitating diseases. Here we report initial studies that indicate that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma can break amyloid fibrils into smaller units in vitro. The plasma was generated by the "plasma pencil," a device capable of emitting a long, low temperature plasma plume/jet. This avenue of research may facilitate the development of a plasma-based medical treatment.

  6. Depolymerization of insulin amyloid fibrils by albumin-modified magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siposova, Katarina; Kubovcikova, Martina; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Koneracka, Martina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Antosova, Andrea; Kopcansky, Peter; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Gazova, Zuzana

    2012-02-01

    Pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases is associated with the presence of protein amyloid deposits. Insulin amyloids have been reported in a patient with diabetes undergoing treatment by injection of insulin and causes problems in the production and storage of this drug and in application of insulin pumps. We have studied the interference of insulin amyloid fibrils with a series of 18 albumin magnetic fluids (MFBSAs) consisting of magnetite nanoparticles modified by different amounts of bovine serum albumin (w/w BSA/Fe3O4 from 0.005 up to 15). We have found that MFBSAs are able to destroy amyloid fibrils in vitro. The extent of fibril depolymerization was affected by nanoparticle physical-chemical properties (hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and isoelectric point) determined by the BSA amount present in MFBSAs. The most effective were MFBSAs with lower BSA/Fe3O4 ratios (from 0.005 to 0.1) characteristic of about 90% depolymerizing activity. For the most active magnetic fluids (ratios 0.01 and 0.02) the DC50 values were determined in the range of low concentrations, indicating their ability to interfere with insulin fibrils at stoichiometric concentrations. We assume that the present findings represent a starting point for the application of the active MFBSAs as therapeutic agents targeting insulin amyloidosis.

  7. The interplay between carbon nanomaterials and amyloid fibrils in bio-nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chaoxu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in bio-nanotechnology have not only rapidly broadened the applications and scope of hybrid nanomaterials in biological fields, but also greatly enriched the examples of ordered materials based on supramolecular self-assembly. Among eminent examples of functional nanostructured materials of undisputed impact in nanotechnology and biological environments, carbon nanomaterials (such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene) and amyloid fibrils have attracted great attention because of their unique architectures and exceptional physical properties. Nonetheless, combination of these two classes of nanomaterials into functional hybrids is far from trivial. For example, the presence of carbon nanomaterials can offer either an inhibitory effect or promotion of amyloid fibrillation, depending on the structural architectures of carbon nanomaterials and the starting amyloid proteins/peptides considered. To date, numerous studies have been devoted to evaluating both the biological toxicity of carbon nanomaterials and their use in developing therapies for amyloidosis. At the same time, hybridization of these two classes of nanomaterials offers new possibilities for combining some of their desirable properties into nanocomposites of possible use in electronics, actuators, sensing, biomedicine and structural materials. This review describes recent developments in the hybridization of carbon nanomaterials and amyloid fibrils and discusses the current state of the art on the application of carbon nanomaterial-amyloid fibril hybrids in bio-nanotechnology.

  8. pH-induced molecular shedding drives the formation of amyloid fibril-derived oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Tipping, Kevin W.; Karamanos, Theodoros K.; Jakhria, Toral; Iadanza, Matthew G.; Goodchild, Sophia C.; Tuma, Roman; Ranson, Neil A.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid disorders cause debilitating illnesses through the formation of toxic protein aggregates. The mechanisms of amyloid toxicity and the nature of species responsible for mediating cellular dysfunction remain unclear. Here, using β2-microglobulin (β2m) as a model system, we show that the disruption of membranes by amyloid fibrils is caused by the molecular shedding of membrane-active oligomers in a process that is dependent on pH. Using thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, NMR, EM and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), we show that fibril disassembly at pH 6.4 results in the formation of nonnative spherical oligomers that disrupt synthetic membranes. By contrast, fibril dissociation at pH 7.4 results in the formation of nontoxic, native monomers. Chemical cross-linking or interaction with hsp70 increases the kinetic stability of fibrils and decreases their capacity to cause membrane disruption and cellular dysfunction. The results demonstrate how pH can modulate the deleterious effects of preformed amyloid aggregates and suggest why endocytic trafficking through acidic compartments may be a key factor in amyloid disease. PMID:25902516

  9. Nanoscale Heterogeneity of the Molecular Structure of Individual hIAPP Amyloid Fibrils Revealed with Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    vandenAkker, Corianne C; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Schleeger, Michael; Velikov, Krassimir P; Deckert, Volker; Bonn, Mischa; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by the pathological deposition of fibrillized protein, known as amyloids. It is thought that oligomers and/or amyloid fibrils formed from human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) cause cell death by membrane damage. The molecular structure of hIAPP amyloid fibrils is dominated by β-sheet structure, as probed with conventional infrared and Raman vibrational spectroscopy. However, with these techniques it is not possible to distinguish between the core and the surface structure of the fibrils. Since the fibril surface crucially affects amyloid toxicity, it is essential to know its structure. Here the surface molecular structure and amino acid residue composition of hIAPP fibrils are specifically probed with nanoscale resolution using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The fibril surface mainly contains unordered or α-helical structures, in contrast to the β-sheet-rich core. This experimentally validates recent models of hIAPP amyloids based on NMR measurements. Spatial mapping of the surface structure reveals a highly heterogeneous surface structure. Finally, TERS can probe fibrils formed on a lipid interface, which is more representative of amyloids in vivo.

  10. Measurement of amyloid fibril mass-per-length by tilted-beam transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Thurber, Kent R.; Shewmaker, Frank; Wickner, Reed B.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that accurate values of mass-per-length (MPL), which serve as strong constraints on molecular structure, can be determined for amyloid fibrils by quantification of intensities in dark-field electron microscope images obtained in the tilted-beam mode of a transmission electron microscope. MPL values for fibrils formed by residues 218–289 of the HET-s fungal prion protein, for 2-fold- and 3-fold-symmetric fibrils formed by the 40-residue β-amyloid peptide, and for fibrils formed by the yeast prion protein Sup35NM are in good agreement with previous results from scanning transmission electron microscopy. Results for fibrils formed by the yeast prion protein Rnq1, for which the MPL value has not been previously reported, support an in-register parallel β-sheet structure, with one Rnq1 molecule per 0.47-nm β-sheet repeat spacing. Since tilted-beam dark-field images can be obtained on many transmission electron microscopes, this work should facilitate MPL determination by a large number of research groups engaged in studies of amyloid fibrils and similar supramolecular assemblies. PMID:19706519

  11. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J.; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  12. Dynamic Assembly and Disassembly of Functional β-Endorphin Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Nespovitaya, Nadezhda; Gath, Julia; Barylyuk, Konstantin; Seuring, Carolin; Meier, Beat H; Riek, Roland

    2016-01-27

    Neuropeptides and peptide hormones are stored in the amyloid state in dense-core vesicles of secretory cells. Secreted peptides experience dramatic environmental changes in the secretory pathway, from the endoplasmic reticulum via secretory vesicles to release into the interstitial space or blood. The molecular mechanisms of amyloid formation during packing of peptides into secretory vesicles and amyloid dissociation upon release remain unknown. In the present work, we applied thioflavin T binding, tyrosine intrinsic fluorescence, fluorescence anisotropy measurements, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy to study the influence of physiologically relevant environmental factors on the assembly and disassembly of β-endorphin amyloids in vitro. We found that β-endorphin aggregation and dissociation occur in vitro on relatively short time scales, comparable to times required for protein synthesis and the rise of peptide concentration in the blood, respectively. Both assembly and disassembly of amyloids strongly depend on the presence of salts of polyprotic acids (such as phosphate and sulfate), while salts of monoprotic acids are not effective in promoting aggregation. A steep increase of the peptide aggregation rate constant upon increase of solution pH from 5.0 to 6.0 toward the isoelectric point as well as more rapid dissociation of β-endorphin amyloid fibrils at lower pH indicate the contribution of ion-specific effects into dynamics of the amyloid. Several low-molecular-weight carbohydrates exhibit the same effect on β-endorphin aggregation as phosphate. Moreover, no structural difference was detected between the phosphate- and carbohydrate-induced fibrils by solid-state NMR. In contrast, β-endorphin amyloid fibrils obtained in the presence of heparin demonstrated distinctly different behavior, which we attributed to a dramatic change of the amyloid structure. Overall, the presented results support the hypothesis that packing of peptide hormones/neuropeptides in

  13. Evidence for Novel [beta]-Sheet Structures in Iowa Mutant [beta]-Amyloid Fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Meredith, Stephen C.

    2009-07-24

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of {beta}-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-A{beta}40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1} and 1.07 x 10{sup -4} min{sup -1} for D23N-A{beta}40 and the wild-type peptide WT-A{beta}40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-{beta} pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 {angstrom} and a broad reflection at 9.4 {angstrom}, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-A{beta}40 fibrils (10.4 {angstrom}). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel {beta}-sheet structure commonly found in WT-A{beta}40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel {beta}-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through 13C-13C and 15N-13C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  14. Evidence for novel beta-sheet structures in Iowa mutant beta-amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Meredith, Stephen C

    2009-07-01

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of beta-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-Abeta40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 1.07 x 10(-4) min(-1) for D23N-Abeta40 and the wild-type peptide WT-Abeta40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-beta pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 A and a broad reflection at 9.4 A, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-Abeta40 fibrils (10.4 A). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel beta-sheet structure commonly found in WT-Abeta40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel beta-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(13)C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  15. Protein corona composition of gold nanoparticles/nanorods affects amyloid beta fibrillation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirsadeghi, Somayeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Zohreh; Hajipour, Mohammad Javad; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ghavami, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades, nanoparticles (NPs) were recognized as one of the most promising tools for inhibiting the progress of the disease by controlling the fibrillation kinetic process; for instance, gold NPs have a strong capability to inhibit Aβ fibrillations. It is now well understood that a layer of biomolecules would cover the surface of NPs (so called ``protein corona'') upon the interaction of NPs with protein sources. Due to the fact that the biological species (e.g., cells and amyloidal proteins) ``see'' the protein corona coated NPs rather than the pristine coated particles, one should monitor the fibrillation process of amyloidal proteins in the presence of corona coated NPs (and not pristine coated ones). Therefore, the previously obtained data on NPs effects on the fibrillation process should be modified to achieve a more reliable and predictable in vivo results. Herein, we probed the effects of various gold NPs (with different sizes and shapes) on the fibrillation process of Aβ in the presence and absence of protein sources (i.e., serum and plasma). We found that the protein corona formed a shell at the surface of gold NPs, regardless of their size and shape, reducing the access of Aβ to the gold inhibitory surface and, therefore, affecting the rate of Aβ fibril formation. More specifically, the anti-fibrillation potencies of various corona coated gold NPs were strongly dependent on the protein source and their concentrations (10% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vitro milieu) and 100% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vivo milieu)).Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades

  16. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily B; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J; Wall, Jonathan S

    2013-06-21

    In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as therapeutics for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  17. Large Proteins Have a Great Tendency to Aggregate but a Low Propensity to Form Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Ramshini, Hassan; Parrini, Claudia; Relini, Annalisa; Zampagni, Mariagioia; Mannini, Benedetta; Pesce, Alessandra; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of soluble proteins into ordered fibrillar aggregates with cross-β structure is an essential event of many human diseases. The polypeptides undergoing aggregation are generally small in size. To explore if the small size is a primary determinant for the formation of amyloids under pathological conditions we have created two databases of proteins, forming amyloid-related and non-amyloid deposits in human diseases, respectively. The size distributions of the two protein populations are well separated, with the systems forming non-amyloid deposits appearing significantly larger. We have then investigated the propensity of the 486-residue hexokinase-B from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YHKB) to form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. This size is intermediate between the size distributions of amyloid and non-amyloid forming proteins. Aggregation was induced under conditions known to be most effective for amyloid formation by normally globular proteins: (i) low pH with salts, (ii) pH 5.5 with trifluoroethanol. In both situations YHKB aggregated very rapidly into species with significant β-sheet structure, as detected using circular dichroism and X-ray diffraction, but a weak Thioflavin T and Congo red binding. Moreover, atomic force microscopy indicated a morphology distinct from typical amyloid fibrils. Both types of aggregates were cytotoxic to human neuroblastoma cells, as indicated by the MTT assay. This analysis indicates that large proteins have a high tendency to form toxic aggregates, but low propensity to form regular amyloid in vivo and that such a behavior is intrinsically determined by the size of the protein, as suggested by the in vitro analysis of our sample protein. PMID:21249193

  18. Self-assembly of Amyloid Fibrils in One, Two and Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are protein aggregates, which occur in-vivo in the case of neurodegenerative diseases and in-vitro in the design of advanced functional materials of relevance in nanotechnology and nanosciences. At length scales above the well-established atomistic fingerprint of amyloid fibrils, these colloidal aggregates exhibit mesoscopic properties comparable to those of natural polyelectrolytes, yet with persistence lengths several orders of magnitude beyond the Debye length. This intrinsic rigidity, together with their chiral, polar and charged nature, provides these systems with some unique physical behavior in one, two and three dimensions. In this talk I will discuss our current understanding on the mesoscopic properties of amyloid fibrils at the single molecule level, the implication of their semiflexible nature on their liquid crystalline properties, and I will illustrate how this information proves useful in understanding their collective behavior in bulk and when adsorbed at liquid interfaces. By the careful exploitation of the physical properties of amyloid fibrils, the design of advanced materials with unprecedented physical properties becomes possible, and I will give a few examples on how these systems can ideally suit the design of biosensors and biomaterials.

  19. Quantum dots induce charge-specific amyloid-like fibrillation of insulin at physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, Alyona; Poly, Simon; Shemetov, Anton; Nabiev, Igor R.

    2012-10-01

    Agglomeration of some proteins may give rise to aggregates that have been identified as the main cause of amyloid diseases. For example, fibrillation of insulin is related to diabetes mellitus. Quantum dots (QDs) are of special interest as tagging agents for diagnostic and therapeutic studies due to their broad absorption spectra, narrow emission spectra, and high photostability. In this study, PEGylated CdSe/ZnS QDs have been shown to induce the formation of amyloid-like fibrils of human insulin under physiological conditions, this process being dependent on the variation of the surface charge of the nanoparticles (NPs) used. Circular dichroism (CD), protein secondary structure analysis, thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, and the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique have been used for comparative analysis of different stages of the fibrillation process. In particular, insulin secondary structure remodelling accompanied by a considerable increase in the rate of amyloid fiber formation have been observed after insulin was mixed with PEGylated QDs. Nanoparticles may significantly influence the rate of protein fibrillation and induce new mechanisms of amyloid diseases, as well as offer opportunities for their treatment.

  20. Copper abolishes the beta-sheet secondary structure of preformed amyloid fibrils of amyloid-beta(42).

    PubMed

    House, Emily; Mold, Matthew; Collingwood, Joanna; Baldwin, Alex; Goodwin, Steven; Exley, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The observation of the co-deposition of metals and amyloid-beta(42) (Abeta(42)) in brain tissue in Alzheimer's disease prompted myriad investigations into the role played by metals in the precipitation of this peptide. Copper is bound by monomeric Abeta(12) and upon precipitation of the copper-peptide complex thereby prevents Abeta(42) from adopting a beta-sheet secondary structure. Copper is also bound by beta-sheet conformers of Abeta(42), and herein we have investigated how this interaction affects the conformation of the precipitated peptide. Copper significantly reduced the thioflavin T fluorescence of aged, fibrillar Abeta(42) with, for example, a 20-fold excess of the metal resulting in a ca 90% reduction in thioflavin T fluorescence. Transmission electron microscopy showed that copper significantly reduced the quantities of amyloid fibrils while Congo red staining and polarized light demonstrated a copper-induced abolition of apple-green birefringence. Microscopy under cross-polarized light also revealed the first observation of spherulites of Abeta(42). The size and appearance of these amyloid structures were found to be very similar to spherulites identified in Alzheimer's disease tissue. The combined results of these complementary methods strongly suggested that copper abolished the beta-sheet secondary structure of pre-formed, aged amyloid fibrils of Abeta(42). Copper may protect against the presence of beta-sheets of Abeta(42) in vivo, and its binding by fibrillar Abeta(42) could have implications for Alzheimer's disease therapy. PMID:19749401

  1. Quantifying amyloid fibrils in protein mixtures via infrared attenuated-total-reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Bohr, Wilhelm; Otto, Markus; Danzer, Karin M; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2015-05-01

    Amyloid aggregation of proteins is usually associated with amyloid diseases. A distinct feature of protein aggregation is the increase of crossed β-sheet structures. Infrared attenuated-total-reflectance (IR-ATR) spectroscopy is a sensitive optical technique that has the potential to provide secondary structure characteristics of proteins even in complex biological samples. In this study we report the analysis of secondary structures of proteins, using the amide I band for the detection and quantification of amyloid fibrils in protein mixtures by use of IR-ATR techniques, at comparatively low sample concentrations. From the experimental results, an analytical model of the relationship between the IR spectra of protein mixtures and the individual mixture components was established using spectral-deconvolution procedures and curve-fitting methods. On the basis of this model, four ratios were shown to provide direct information on amyloid aggregated fibrils via the increase of crossed β-sheet structures in protein-mixture samples. In conclusion, this study confirms the utility of IR spectroscopy for analyzing protein mixtures and for identifying amyloid fibril information within such complex multi-component samples.

  2. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins. PMID:26444976

  3. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins.

  4. Islet amyloid polypeptide and high hydrostatic pressure: towards an understanding of the fibrillization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, D. H. J.; Smirnovas, V.; Winter, R.

    2008-07-01

    Type II Diabetes Mellitus is a disease which is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance coupled with a progressive loss of insulin secretion that is associated with a decrease in pancreatic islet β-cell mass and the deposition of amyloid in the extracellular matrix of β-cells, which lead to islet cell death. The principal component of the islet amyloid is a pancreatic hormone called islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). High-pressure coupled with FT-IR, CD, ThT fluorescence spectroscopic and AFM studies were carried out to reveal information on the aggregation pathway as well as the aggregate structure of IAPP. Our data indicate that IAPP pre-formed fibrils exhibit a strong polymorphism with heterogeneous structures very sensitive to high hydrostatic pressure, indicating a high percentage of ionic and hydrophobic interactions being responsible for the stability the IAPP fibrils.

  5. The Aβ peptide forms non-amyloid fibrils in the presence of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghui; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Yu, Chien-Hung; Muhammad, Kamran; Gräslund, Astrid; Pieter Abrahams, Jan

    2014-06-21

    Carbon nanotubes have specific properties that make them potentially useful in biomedicine and biotechnology. However, carbon nanotubes may themselves be toxic, making it imperative to understand how carbon nanotubes interact with biomolecules such as proteins. Here, we used NMR, CD, and ThT/fluorescence spectroscopy together with AFM imaging to study pH-dependent molecular interactions between single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. The aggregation of the Aβ peptide, first into oligomers and later into amyloid fibrils, is considered to be the toxic mechanism behind Alzheimer's disease. We found that SWNTs direct the Aβ peptides to form a new class of β-sheet-rich yet non-amyloid fibrils.

  6. C-terminal sequence of amyloid-resistant type F apolipoprotein A-II inhibits amyloid fibril formation of apolipoprotein A-II in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sawashita, Jinko; Zhang, Beiru; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Mori, Masayuki; Naiki, Hironobu; Kametani, Fuyuki; Higuchi, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    In murine senile amyloidosis, misfolded serum apolipoprotein (apo) A-II deposits as amyloid fibrils (AApoAII) in a process associated with aging. Mouse strains carrying type C apoA-II (APOA2C) protein exhibit a high incidence of severe systemic amyloidosis. Previously, we showed that N- and C-terminal sequences of apoA-II protein are critical for polymerization into amyloid fibrils in vitro. Here, we demonstrate that congenic mouse strains carrying type F apoA-II (APOA2F) protein, which contains four amino acid substitutions in the amyloidogenic regions of APOA2C, were absolutely resistant to amyloidosis, even after induction of amyloidosis by injection of AApoAII. In vitro fibril formation tests showed that N- and C-terminal APOA2F peptides did not polymerize into amyloid fibrils. Moreover, a C-terminal APOA2F peptide was a strong inhibitor of nucleation and extension of amyloid fibrils during polymerization. Importantly, after the induction of amyloidosis, we succeeded in suppressing amyloid deposition in senile amyloidosis-susceptible mice by treatment with the C-terminal APOA2F peptide. We suggest that the C-terminal APOA2F peptide might inhibit further extension of amyloid fibrils by blocking the active ends of nuclei (seeds). We present a previously unidentified model system for investigating inhibitory mechanisms against amyloidosis in vivo and in vitro and believe that this system will be useful for the development of novel therapies. PMID:25675489

  7. α-Synuclein Amyloid Fibrils with Two Entwined, Asymmetrically Associated Protofibrils.

    PubMed

    Dearborn, Altaira D; Wall, Joseph S; Cheng, Naiqian; Heymann, J Bernard; Kajava, Andrey V; Varkey, Jobin; Langen, Ralf; Steven, Alasdair C

    2016-01-29

    Parkinson disease and other progressive neurodegenerative conditions are characterized by the intracerebral presence of Lewy bodies, containing amyloid fibrils of α-synuclein. We used cryo-electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to study in vitro-assembled fibrils. These fibrils are highly polymorphic. Focusing on twisting fibrils with an inter-crossover spacing of 77 nm, our reconstructions showed them to consist of paired protofibrils. STEM mass per length data gave one subunit per 0.47 nm axial rise per protofibril, consistent with a superpleated β-structure. The STEM images show two thread-like densities running along each of these fibrils, which we interpret as ladders of metal ions. These threads confirmed the two-protofibril architecture of the 77-nm twisting fibrils and allowed us to identify this morphotype in STEM micrographs. Some other, but not all, fibril morphotypes also exhibit dense threads, implying that they also present a putative metal binding site. We propose a molecular model for the protofibril and suggest that polymorphic variant fibrils have different numbers of protofibrils that are associated differently.

  8. α-Synuclein Amyloid Fibrils with Two Entwined, Asymmetrically Associated Protofibrils.

    PubMed

    Dearborn, Altaira D; Wall, Joseph S; Cheng, Naiqian; Heymann, J Bernard; Kajava, Andrey V; Varkey, Jobin; Langen, Ralf; Steven, Alasdair C

    2016-01-29

    Parkinson disease and other progressive neurodegenerative conditions are characterized by the intracerebral presence of Lewy bodies, containing amyloid fibrils of α-synuclein. We used cryo-electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to study in vitro-assembled fibrils. These fibrils are highly polymorphic. Focusing on twisting fibrils with an inter-crossover spacing of 77 nm, our reconstructions showed them to consist of paired protofibrils. STEM mass per length data gave one subunit per 0.47 nm axial rise per protofibril, consistent with a superpleated β-structure. The STEM images show two thread-like densities running along each of these fibrils, which we interpret as ladders of metal ions. These threads confirmed the two-protofibril architecture of the 77-nm twisting fibrils and allowed us to identify this morphotype in STEM micrographs. Some other, but not all, fibril morphotypes also exhibit dense threads, implying that they also present a putative metal binding site. We propose a molecular model for the protofibril and suggest that polymorphic variant fibrils have different numbers of protofibrils that are associated differently. PMID:26644467

  9. Replica exchange molecular dynamics of the thermodynamics of fibril growth of Alzheimer's Aβ42 peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ming; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2011-08-01

    The growth of amyloid fibrils is studied by replica exchange molecular dynamics in an implicit solvent. Our data indicate that extremely long simulation times (at least a few hundred ns) are necessary to study the thermodynamics of fibril elongation in detail. However some aspects of the aggregation process are already accessible on the time scales available in the present study. A peak in the specific heat indicates a docking temperature of Tdock ≈ 320 K. Irreversible locking requires lower temperatures with the locking temperature estimated as Tlock ≈ 280 K. In our simulation the fibril grows from both sides with the C-terminal of the incoming monomer attaching to the C-terminal of the peptides in the fibril forming a β-sheet on the fibril edge. Our simulation indicates that the C-terminal is crucial for aggregation.

  10. Rapid amyloid fibril formation by a winter flounder antifreeze protein requires specific interaction with ice.

    PubMed

    Dubé, André; Leggiadro, Cindy; Ewart, Kathryn Vanya

    2016-05-01

    A typically α-helical antifreeze protein (wflAFP-6) from winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, forms amyloid fibrils during freezing. In this study, the effects of distinct components of the freezing process were examined. Freezing of wflAFP-6 in the presence of template ice was shown to be necessary for rapid conversion to an amyloid conformation. Neither subfreezing temperature nor phase change was sufficient. Thus, specific interaction with the ice surface was essential. The ice-induced formation of amyloid appeared to be unique to this helical antifreeze, it required high concentrations of protein and it occurred over a range of pH values. These results define a method for rapid formation of amyloid by wflAFP-6 on demand under physiological conditions. PMID:27086686

  11. pH-Driven Polymorphism of Insulin Amyloid-Like Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Sneideris, Tomas; Darguzis, Domantas; Botyriute, Akvile; Grigaliunas, Martynas; Winter, Roland; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    Prions are infective proteins, which can self-assemble into different strain conformations, leading to different disease phenotypes. An increasing number of studies suggest that prion-like self-propagation may be a common feature of amyloid-like structures. Thus it is important to unravel every possible factor leading to the formation of different amyloid strains. Here we report on the formation of two types of insulin amyloid-like fibrils with distinct infrared spectroscopic features grown under slightly different pH conditions. Similar to prion strains, both insulin fibril types are able to self-propagate their conformational template under conditions, favoring spontaneous formation of different type fibrils. The low-pH-induced insulin amyloid strain is structurally very similar to previously reported strains formed either in the presence of 20% ethanol, or by modification of the amino acid sequence of insulin. A deeper analysis of literature data in the context of our current findings suggests a shift of the monomer-dimer equilibrium of insulin as a possible factor controlling the formation of different strains. PMID:26313643

  12. pH-Driven Polymorphism of Insulin Amyloid-Like Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sneideris, Tomas; Darguzis, Domantas; Botyriute, Akvile; Grigaliunas, Martynas; Winter, Roland; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    Prions are infective proteins, which can self-assemble into different strain conformations, leading to different disease phenotypes. An increasing number of studies suggest that prion-like self-propagation may be a common feature of amyloid-like structures. Thus it is important to unravel every possible factor leading to the formation of different amyloid strains. Here we report on the formation of two types of insulin amyloid-like fibrils with distinct infrared spectroscopic features grown under slightly different pH conditions. Similar to prion strains, both insulin fibril types are able to self-propagate their conformational template under conditions, favoring spontaneous formation of different type fibrils. The low-pH-induced insulin amyloid strain is structurally very similar to previously reported strains formed either in the presence of 20% ethanol, or by modification of the amino acid sequence of insulin. A deeper analysis of literature data in the context of our current findings suggests a shift of the monomer-dimer equilibrium of insulin as a possible factor controlling the formation of different strains. PMID:26313643

  13. Mechanism of IAPP amyloid fibril formation involves an intermediate with a transient β-sheet.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Lauren E; Dunkelberger, Emily B; Tran, Huong Q; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; Cao, Ping; Raleigh, Daniel P; de Pablo, Juan J; Nowick, James S; Zanni, Martin T

    2013-11-26

    Amyloid formation is implicated in more than 20 human diseases, yet the mechanism by which fibrils form is not well understood. We use 2D infrared spectroscopy and isotope labeling to monitor the kinetics of fibril formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) that is associated with type 2 diabetes. We find that an oligomeric intermediate forms during the lag phase with parallel β-sheet structure in a region that is ultimately a partially disordered loop in the fibril. We confirm the presence of this intermediate, using a set of homologous macrocyclic peptides designed to recognize β-sheets. Mutations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the intermediate is on pathway. Disrupting the oligomeric β-sheet to form the partially disordered loop of the fibrils creates a free energy barrier that is the origin of the lag phase during aggregation. These results help rationalize a wide range of previous fragment and mutation studies including mutations in other species that prevent the formation of amyloid plaques.

  14. The Role of Initial Oligomers in Amyloid Fibril Formation by Human Stefin B

    PubMed Central

    Taler-Verčič, Ajda; Kirsipuu, Tiina; Friedemann, Merlin; Noormägi, Andra; Polajnar, Mira; Smirnova, Julia; Žnidarič, Magda Tušek; Žganec, Matjaž; Škarabot, Miha; Vilfan, Andrej; Staniforth, Rosemary A.; Palumaa, Peep; Žerovnik, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Oligomers are commonly observed intermediates at the initial stages of amyloid fibril formation. They are toxic to neurons and cause decrease in neural transmission and long-term potentiation. We describe an in vitro study of the initial steps in amyloid fibril formation by human stefin B, which proved to be a good model system. Due to relative stability of the initial oligomers of stefin B, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) could be applied in addition to size exclusion chromatography (SEC). These two techniques enabled us to separate and detect distinguished oligomers from the monomers: dimers, trimers, tetramers, up to decamers. The amyloid fibril formation process was followed at different pH and temperatures, including such conditions where the process was slow enough to detect the initial oligomeric species at the very beginning of the lag phase and those at the end of the lag phase. Taking into account the results of the lower-order oligomers transformations early in the process, we were able to propose an improved model for the stefin B fibril formation. PMID:24013380

  15. Charge-pairing mechanism of phosphorylation effect upon amyloid fibrillation of human tau core peptide.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masafumi; Hirata, Akiyoshi; Tainaka, Kazuki; Morii, Takashi; Konno, Takashi

    2008-11-11

    Phosphorylation of a fibrillogenic protein, human tau, is believed to play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. For elucidating molecular mechanisms of the phosphorylation effect on tau fibrillation, we synthesized a peptide, VQIVY 310K (PHF6) and its phosphorylated derivative (PHF6pY). PHF6 is a partial peptide surrounding a plausible in vivo phosphorylation site Tyr310 and forms amyloid-type fibrils similar to those generated by full-length tau. Fibrillation of PHF6 and PHF6pY were studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods, and the critical concentration of the fibrillation was determined for comparing the fibril stability. The results showed that the phosphorylation strongly influenced the fibrillation propensity of PHF6 by changing its dependency on pH and ionic strength. On the basis of the observations, we suggested that charged sites on the phosphate group and its electrostatic pairing with the neighboring charged residues were physical origins of the phosphorylation effect. To verify this charge-pairing mechanism, we conducted experiments using a series of PHF6 derivatives with non-native charge distributions. The electrostatic interaction in an intermolecular mode was also demonstrated by the system composed of two different peptide species, which found that fibrillation of nonphosphorylated PHF6 was drastically enhanced when a trace amount of phosphorylated PHF6 molecules coexisted. A simulation analysis utilizing crystal coordinates of the PHF6 fibril was also performed for interpreting the experimental results in a molecular level. The present study using the model peptide system gave us a microscopically insightful view on the roles of tau phosphorylation in amyloid-related diseases.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Alzheimer's Biomarker FDDNP Binding to Aβ Amyloid Fibril.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Niyati D; Klimov, Dmitri K

    2015-09-01

    Using isobaric-isothermal replica exchange molecular dynamics and the all-atom explicit water model, we examined the binding of FDDNP biomarkers to the Aβ amyloid fibril fragment. Our results can be summarized as follows. First, FDDNP ligands bind with high affinity to the Aβ fibril, and the hydrophobic effect together with π-stacking interactions are the dominant factors governing FDDNP binding. In comparison, electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding play a minor role. Second, our simulations reveal a strong tendency of bound FDDNP molecules for self-aggregation. Accordingly, about two-thirds of all bound ligands form aggregated clusters of various sizes, and ligand-ligand interactions make considerable contribution to FDDNP binding. Third, FDDNP ligands bind to two distinct sites on the Aβ fibril. Primary binding sites (NT) are located at the N-terminals of Aβ10-40 peptides, whereas secondary ones (CE) occur on the concave fibril edge near fibril channels. The NT sites are characterized by strong hydrophobic and π-stacking interactions, favorable binding entropy resulting from multiple FDDNP binding orientations and propensity for self-aggregation but relatively weak van der Waals interactions. In contrast, the CE sites offer stronger van der Waals binding interactions but weaker hydrophobic and aromatic interactions and less favorable binding entropy. By comparing our data with previous studies, we suggest that the primary binding locations identified by us are likely to occur in other Aβ fibril polymorphic structures. We also show that FDDNP binds via distinct mechanisms to Aβ fibrils and monomers. We argue that FDDNP binds with stronger affinity to benign Aβ monomers than to the fibrils, raising questions about the ability of FDDNP to selectively label amyloid deposits. PMID:26237080

  17. ADS-J1 inhibits semen-derived amyloid fibril formation and blocks fibril-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Xun, Tianrong; Li, Wenjuan; Chen, Jinquan; Yu, Fei; Xu, Wei; Wang, Qian; Yu, Ruizhe; Li, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Xuefeng; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo; Li, Lin; Tan, Suiyi; Liu, Shuwen

    2015-09-01

    Semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) is composed of amyloid fibrils that can greatly enhance HIV-1 infectivity. By its cationic property, SEVI promotes viral sexual transmission by facilitating the attachment and internalization of HIV-1 to target cells. Therefore, semen-derived amyloid fibrils are potential targets for microbicide design. ADS-J1 is an anionic HIV-1 entry inhibitor. In this study, we explored an additional function of ADS-J1: inhibition of SEVI fibril formation and blockage of SEVI-mediated enhancement of viral infection. We found that ADS-J1 bound to an amyloidogenic peptide fragment (PAP248-286, comprising amino acids 248 to 286 of the enzyme prostatic acid phosphatase), thereby inhibiting peptide assembly into amyloid fibrils. In addition, ADS-J1 binds to mature amyloid fibrils and antagonizes fibril-mediated enhancement of viral infection. Unlike cellulose sulfate, a polyanion that failed in clinical trial to prevent HIV-1 sexual transmission, ADS-J1 shows no ability to facilitate fibril formation. More importantly, the combination of ADS-J1 with several antiretroviral drugs exhibited synergistic effects against HIV-1 infection in semen, with little cytotoxicity to vaginal epithelial cells. Our results suggest that ADS-J1 or a derivative may be incorporated into a combination microbicide for prevention of the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

  18. On the Heat Stability of Amyloid-Based Biological Activity: Insights from Thermal Degradation of Insulin Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Malka, Iwona; Bożycki, Łukasz; Nieznańska, Hanna; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Formation of amyloid fibrils in vivo has been linked to disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and prion-associated transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. One of the characteristic features of amyloid fibrils is the high thermodynamic stability relative both to native and disordered states which is also thought to underlie the perplexingly remarkable heat resistance of prion infectivity. Here, we are comparing high-temperature degradation of native and fibrillar forms of human insulin. Decomposition of insulin amyloid has been studied under helium atmosphere and in the temperature range from ambient conditions to 750°C using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry coupled to mass spectrometry. While converting native insulin into amyloid does upshift onset of thermal decomposition by ca. 75°C, fibrils remain vulnerable to covalent degradation at temperatures below 300°C, as reflected by mass spectra of gases released upon heating of amyloid samples, as well as morphology and infrared spectra of fibrils subjected to incubation at 250°C. Mass spectra profiles of released gases indicate that degradation of fibrils is much more cooperative than degradation of native insulin. The data show no evidence of water of crystallization trapped within insulin fibrils. We have also compared untreated and heated amyloid samples in terms of capacity to seed daughter fibrils. Kinetic traces of seed-induced insulin fibrillation have shown that the seeding potency of amyloid samples decreases significantly already after exposure to 200°C, even though corresponding electron micrographs indicated persisting fibrillar morphology. Our results suggest that amyloid-based biological activity may not survive extremely high temperature treatments, at least in the absence of other stabilizing factors. PMID:24466022

  19. Gallic Acid Is an Antagonist of Semen Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    LoRicco, Josephine G; Xu, Changmingzi Sherry; Neidleman, Jason; Bergkvist, Magnus; Greene, Warner C; Roan, Nadia R; Makhatadze, George I

    2016-07-01

    Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that amyloid fibrils found in semen from healthy and HIV-infected men, as well as semen itself, can markedly enhance HIV infection rates. Semen fibrils are made up of multiple naturally occurring peptide fragments derived from semen. The best characterized of these fibrils are SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection), made up of residues 248-286 of prostatic acidic phosphatase, and the SEM1 fibrils, made up of residues 86-107 of semenogelin 1. A small molecule screen for antagonists of semen fibrils identified four compounds that lowered semen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity. One of the four, gallic acid, was previously reported to antagonize other amyloids and to exert anti-inflammatory effects. To better understand the mechanism by which gallic acid modifies the properties of semen amyloids, we performed biophysical measurements (atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, thioflavin T and Congo Red fluorescence assays, zeta potential measurements) and quantitative assays on the effects of gallic acid on semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and inflammation. Our results demonstrate that gallic acid binds to both SEVI and SEM1 fibrils and modifies their surface electrostatics to render them less cationic. In addition, gallic acid decreased semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection but did not decrease the inflammatory response induced by semen. Together, these observations identify gallic acid as a non-polyanionic compound that inhibits semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and suggest the potential utility of incorporating gallic acid into a multicomponent microbicide targeting both the HIV virus and host components that promote viral infection.

  20. Engineered polymer nanoparticles containing hydrophobic dipeptide for inhibition of amyloidfibrillation.

    PubMed

    Skaat, Hadas; Chen, Ravit; Grinberg, Igor; Margel, Shlomo

    2012-09-10

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. Engineered nanoparticles have emerged as a potential approach to alter the kinetics of protein fibrillation process. Yet, there are only a few reports describing the use of nanoparticles for inhibition of amyloid-β 40 (Aβ(40)) peptide aggregation, involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we designed new uniform biocompatible amino-acid-based polymer nanoparticles containing hydrophobic dipeptides in the polymer side chains. The dipeptide residues were designed similarly to the hydrophobic core sequence of Aβ. Poly(N-acryloyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) (polyA-FF-ME) nanoparticles of 57 ± 6 nm were synthesized by dispersion polymerization of the monomer A-FF-ME in 2-methoxy ethanol, followed by precipitation of the obtained polymer in aqueous solution. Cell viability assay confirmed that no significant cytotoxic effect of the polyA-FF-ME nanoparticles on different human cell lines, e.g., PC-12 and SH-SY5Y, was observed. A significantly slow secondary structure transition from random coil to β-sheets during Aβ(40) fibril formation was observed in the presence of these nanoparticles, resulting in significant inhibition of Aβ(40) fibrillation kinetics. However, the polyA-FF-ME analogous nanoparticles containing the L-alanyl-L-alanine (AA) dipeptide in the polymer side groups, polyA-AA-ME nanoparticles, accelerate the Aβ(40) fibrillation kinetics. The polyA-FF-ME nanoparticles and the polyA-AA-ME nanoparticles may therefore contribute to a mechanistic understanding of the fibrillation process, leading to the development of therapeutic strategies against amyloid-related diseases. PMID:22897679

  1. [beta subsccript 2]-microglobulin forms three-dimensional domain-swapped amyloid fibrils with disulfide linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-08-09

    {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}-m) is the light chain of the type I major histocompatibility complex. It deposits as amyloid fibrils within joints during long-term hemodialysis treatment. Despite the devastating effects of dialysis-related amyloidosis, full understanding of how fibrils form from soluble {beta}{sub 2}-m remains elusive. Here we show that {beta}{sub 2}-m can oligomerize and fibrillize via three-dimensional domain swapping. Isolating a covalently bound, domain-swapped dimer from {beta}{sub 2}-m oligomers on the pathway to fibrils, we were able to determine its crystal structure. The hinge loop that connects the swapped domain to the core domain includes the fibrillizing segment LSFSKD, whose atomic structure we also determined. The LSFSKD structure reveals a class 5 steric zipper, akin to other amyloid spines. The structures of the dimer and the zipper spine fit well into an atomic model for this fibrillar form of {beta}{sub 2}-m, which assembles slowly under physiological conditions.

  2. Amyloid Oligomers and Mature Fibrils Prepared from an Innocuous Protein Cause Diverging Cellular Death Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Harte, Níal P; Klyubin, Igor; McCarthy, Eoin K; Min, Soyoung; Garrahy, Sarah Ann; Xie, Yongjing; Davey, Gavin P; Boland, John J; Rowan, Michael J; Mok, K Hun

    2015-11-20

    Despite significant advances, the molecular identity of the cytotoxic species populated during in vivo amyloid formation crucial for the understanding of neurodegenerative disorders is yet to be revealed. In this study lysozyme prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils in both mature and sonicated states have been isolated through an optimized ultrafiltration/ultracentrifugation method and characterized with various optical spectroscopic techniques, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. We examined their level and mode of toxicity on rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells in both differentiated and undifferentiated states. We find that oligomers and fibrils display cytotoxic capabilities toward cultured cells in vitro, with oligomers producing elevated levels of cellular injury toward undifferentiated PC12 cells (PC12(undiff)). Furthermore, dual flow cytometry staining experiments demonstrate that the oligomers and mature fibrils induce divergent cellular death pathways (apoptosis and secondary necrosis, respectively) in these PC12 cells. We have also shown that oligomers but not sonicated mature fibrils inhibit hippocampal long term potentiation, a form of synaptic plasticity implicated in learning and memory, in vivo. We conclude that our in vitro and in vivo findings confer a level of resistance toward amyloid fibrils, and that the PC 12-based comparative cytotoxicity assay can provide insights into toxicity differences between differently aggregated protein species.

  3. Dynamics of water in the amphiphilic pore of amyloid β fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GhattyVenkataKrishna, Pavan K.; Mostofian, Barmak

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimers disease related amyloid peptide, Aβ, forms a fibrillar structure through aggregation. The aggregate is stabilized by a salt bridge that is responsible for the formation of an amphiphilic pore that can accommodate water molecules. None of the reported structures of Aβ, however, contain water. We present results from molecular dynamics simulations on dimeric Aβ fibrils solvated in water. Water penetrates and fills the amphiphilic pore increasing its volume. We observe a thick wire of water that is translationally and rotationally stiff in comparison to bulk water and may be essential for the stabilization of the amyloid Aβ protein.

  4. Atomic-resolution 3D structure of amyloid β fibrils: The Osaka mutation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schutz, Anne K.; Wall, Joseph; Vagt, Toni; Huber, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Oxana Y.; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Guntert, Peter; Bockmann, Anja; Glockshuber, Rudi; Meier, Beat H.

    2014-11-13

    Despite its central importance for understanding the molecular basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), high-resolution structural information on amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils, which are intimately linked with AD, is scarce. We report an atomic-resolution fibril structure of the Aβ 1-40 peptide with the Osaka mutation (E22Δ), associated with early-onset AD. The structure, which differs substantially from all previously proposed models, is based on a large number of unambiguous intra- and intermolecular solid-state NMR distance restraints

  5. Copper Abolishes the β-Sheet Secondary Structure of Preformed Amyloid Fibrils of Amyloid-β42

    PubMed Central

    House, Emily; Mold, Matthew; Collingwood, Joanna; Baldwin, Alex; Goodwin, Steven; Exley, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The observation of the co-deposition of metals and amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) in brain tissue in Alzheimer’s disease prompted myriad investigations into the role played by metals in the precipitation of this peptide. Copper is bound by monomeric Aβ42 and upon precipitation of the copper-peptide complex thereby prevents Aβ42 from adopting a β-sheet secondary structure. Copper is also bound by β-sheet conformers of Aβ42, and herein we have investigated how this interaction affects the conformation of the precipitated peptide. Copper significantly reduced the thioflavin T fluorescence of aged, fibrillar Aβ42 with, for example, a 20-fold excess of the metal resulting in a ca 90% reduction in thioflavin T fluorescence. Transmission electron microscopy showed that copper significantly reduced the quantities of amyloid fibrils while Congo red staining and polarized light demonstrated a copper-induced abolition of apple-green birefringence. Microscopy under cross-polarized light also revealed the first observation of spherulites of Aβ42. The size and appearance of these amyloid structures were found to be very similar to spherulites identified in Alzheimer’s disease tissue. The combined results of these complementary methods strongly suggested that copper abolished the β-sheet secondary structure of pre-formed, aged amyloid fibrils of Aβ42. Copper may protect against the presence of β-sheets of Aβ42 in vivo, and its binding by fibrillar Aβ42 could have implications for Alzheimer’s disease therapy. PMID:19749401

  6. Amyloid formation of growth hormone in presence of zinc: Relevance to its storage in secretory granules

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; Das, Subhadeep; Ghosh, Saikat; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Khan, Tuhin; Singru, Praful; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are cross-β-sheet fibrillar aggregates, associated with various human diseases and native functions such as protein/peptide hormone storage inside secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. In the current study, using amyloid detecting agents, we show that growth hormone (GH) could be stored as amyloid in the pituitary of rat. Moreover, to demonstrate the formation of GH amyloid in vitro, we studied various conditions (solvents, glycosaminoglycans, salts and metal ions) and found that in presence of zinc metal ions (Zn(II)), GH formed short curvy fibrils. The amyloidogenic nature of these fibrils was examined by Thioflavin T binding, Congo Red binding, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our biophysical studies also suggest that Zn(II) initiates the early oligomerization of GH that eventually facilitates the fibrillation process. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence study of pituitary tissue, we show that GH in pituitary significantly co-localizes with Zn(II), suggesting the probable role of zinc in GH aggregation within secretory granules. We also found that GH amyloid formed in vitro is capable of releasing monomers. The study will help to understand the possible mechanism of GH storage, its regulation and monomer release from the somatotrophs of anterior pituitary. PMID:27004850

  7. Synthetic peptide homologous to beta protein from Alzheimer disease forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, D A; Inouye, H; Duffy, L K; Sinclair, A; Lind, M; Selkoe, D J

    1987-01-01

    Progressive amyloid deposition in senile plaques and cortical blood vessels may play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have used x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to study the molecular organization and morphology of macromolecular assemblies formed by three synthetic peptides homologous to beta protein of brain amyloid: beta-(1-28), residues 1-28 of the beta protein; [Ala16]beta-(1-28), beta-(1-28) with alanine substituted for lysine at position 16; and beta-(18-28), residues 18-28 of the beta protein. beta-(1-28) readily formed fibrils in vitro that were similar in ultrastructure to the in vivo amyloid and aggregated into large bundles resembling those of senile plaque cores. X-ray patterns from partially dried, oriented pellets showed a cross-beta-conformation. A series of small-angle, equatorial maxima were consistent with a tubular fibril having a mean diameter of 86 A and a wall composed of pairs of cross-beta-pleated sheets. The data may also be consistent with pairs of cross-beta-sheets that are centered 71-A apart. [Ala16]beta-(1-28) formed beta-pleated sheet assemblies that were dissimilar to in vivo fibrils. The width of the 10-A spacing indicated stacks of about six sheets. Thus, substitution of the uncharged alanine for the positively charged lysine in the beta-strand region enhances the packing of the sheets and dramatically alters the type of macromolecular aggregate formed. beta-(18-28) formed assemblies that had even a greater number of stacked sheets, approximately equal to 24 per diffracting domain as indicated by the sharp intersheet reflection. Our findings on these homologous synthetic assemblies help to define the specific sequence that is required to form Alzheimer-type amyloid fibrils, thus providing an in vitro model of age-related cerebral amyloidogenesis. Images PMID:3477820

  8. Higher Order Amyloid Fibril Structure by MAS NMR and DNP Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T.; Caporini, Marc A.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Rosay, Melanie; MacPhee, Cait E.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide β-strands into β-sheets but also the β-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The β-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the side-chains buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  9. Accurate Determination of Interstrand Distances and Alignment in Amyloid Fibrils by Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Caporini, Marc A.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Veshtort, Mikhail; Fitzpatrick, Anthony; MacPhee, Cait E; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are structurally ordered aggregates of proteins whose formation is associated with many neurodegenerative and other diseases. For that reason, their high resolution structures are of considerable interest and have been studied using a wide range of techniques, notably electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. Because of the excellent resolution in the spectra, MAS NMR is uniquely capable of delivering site-specific, atomic resolution information about all levels of amyloid structure: (1) the monomer, which packs into several (2) protofilaments that in turn associate to form a (3) fibril. Building upon our high resolution structure of the monomer of an amyloid-forming peptide from transthyretin (TTR105-115), we introduce single 1-13C labeled amino acids at seven different sites in the peptide and measure intermolecular carbonyl-carbonyl distances with an accuracy of ~0.11 A. Our results conclusively establish a parallel, in register, topology for the packing of this peptide into a β-sheet and provide constraints essential for the determination of an atomic resolution structure of the fibril. Furthermore, the approach we employ, based on a combination of a double-quantum filtered variant of the DRAWS recoupling sequence and multispin numerical simulations in SPINEVOLUTION, is general and should be applicable to a wide range of systems. PMID:20925357

  10. Atomic-resolution structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) amyloid fibril.

    PubMed

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Ravotti, Francesco; Arai, Hiromi; Glabe, Charles G; Wall, Joseph S; Böckmann, Anja; Güntert, Peter; Meier, Beat H; Riek, Roland

    2016-08-23

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is present in humans as a 39- to 42-amino acid residue metabolic product of the amyloid precursor protein. Although the two predominant forms, Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42), differ in only two residues, they display different biophysical, biological, and clinical behavior. Aβ(1-42) is the more neurotoxic species, aggregates much faster, and dominates in senile plaque of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Although small Aβ oligomers are believed to be the neurotoxic species, Aβ amyloid fibrils are, because of their presence in plaques, a pathological hallmark of AD and appear to play an important role in disease progression through cell-to-cell transmissibility. Here, we solved the 3D structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) fibril polymorph, combining data from solid-state NMR spectroscopy and mass-per-length measurements from EM. The 3D structure is composed of two molecules per fibril layer, with residues 15-42 forming a double-horseshoe-like cross-β-sheet entity with maximally buried hydrophobic side chains. Residues 1-14 are partially ordered and in a β-strand conformation, but do not display unambiguous distance restraints to the remainder of the core structure. PMID:27469165

  11. Tabersonine inhibits amyloid fibril formation and cytotoxicity of Aβ(1-42).

    PubMed

    Kai, Tianhan; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xiaoying; Jing, Aihua; Zhao, Bingqing; Yu, Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Feimeng

    2015-06-17

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils are key events in the amyloid cascade hypothesis for the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence assay, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, size exclusion chromatography, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and cytotoxicity tests, we demonstrate that tabersonine, an ingredient extracted from the bean of Voacanga africana, disrupts Aβ(1-42) aggregation and ameliorates Aβ aggregate-induced cytotoxicity. A small amount of tabersonine (e.g., 10 μM) can effectively inhibit the formation of Aβ(1-42) (e.g., 80 μM) fibrils or convert mature fibrils into largely innocuous amorphous aggregates. SPR results indicate that tabersonine binds to Aβ(1-42) oligomers in a dose-dependent way. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further confirm that tabersonine can bind to oligomers such as the pentamer of Aβ(1-42). Tabersonine preferentially interact with the β-sheet grooves of Aβ(1-42) containing aromatic and hydrophobic residues. The various binding sites and modes explain the diverse inhibitory effects of tabersonine on Aβ aggregation. Given that tabersonine is a natural product and a precursor for vincristine used in cancer chemotherapy, the biocompatibility and small size essential for permeating the blood-brain barrier make it a potential therapeutic drug candidate for treating AD.

  12. Insight into the stability of cross-beta amyloid fibril from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; He, Yong-Jie; Wu, Maoying; Yan, Guanwen; Li, Yixue; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are considered to play causal roles in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes mellitus, the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and prion disease. The mechanism of fibril formation is still hotly debated and remains an important open question. In this study, we utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to analyze the stability of hexamer for eight class peptides. The MD results suggest that VEALYL and MVGGVV-1 are the most stable ones, then SNQNNY, followed by LYQLEN, MVGGVV-2, VQIVYK, SSTSAA, and GGVVIA. The statistics result indicates that hydrophobic residues play a key role in stabilizing the zipper interface. Single point and two linkage mutants of MVGGVV-1 confirmed that both Met1 and Val2 are key hydrophobic residues. This is consistent with the statistics analysis. The stability results of oligomer for MVGGVV-1 suggest that the intermediate state should be trimer (3-0) and tetramer (2-2). These methods can be used in stabilization study of other amyloid fibril.

  13. Atomic-resolution structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1–42) amyloid fibril

    PubMed Central

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Ravotti, Francesco; Arai, Hiromi; Glabe, Charles G.; Wall, Joseph S.; Böckmann, Anja; Güntert, Peter; Meier, Beat H.; Riek, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is present in humans as a 39- to 42-amino acid residue metabolic product of the amyloid precursor protein. Although the two predominant forms, Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42), differ in only two residues, they display different biophysical, biological, and clinical behavior. Aβ(1–42) is the more neurotoxic species, aggregates much faster, and dominates in senile plaque of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Although small Aβ oligomers are believed to be the neurotoxic species, Aβ amyloid fibrils are, because of their presence in plaques, a pathological hallmark of AD and appear to play an important role in disease progression through cell-to-cell transmissibility. Here, we solved the 3D structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1–42) fibril polymorph, combining data from solid-state NMR spectroscopy and mass-per-length measurements from EM. The 3D structure is composed of two molecules per fibril layer, with residues 15–42 forming a double-horseshoe–like cross–β-sheet entity with maximally buried hydrophobic side chains. Residues 1–14 are partially ordered and in a β-strand conformation, but do not display unambiguous distance restraints to the remainder of the core structure. PMID:27469165

  14. Atomic-resolution structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) amyloid fibril.

    PubMed

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Ravotti, Francesco; Arai, Hiromi; Glabe, Charles G; Wall, Joseph S; Böckmann, Anja; Güntert, Peter; Meier, Beat H; Riek, Roland

    2016-08-23

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is present in humans as a 39- to 42-amino acid residue metabolic product of the amyloid precursor protein. Although the two predominant forms, Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42), differ in only two residues, they display different biophysical, biological, and clinical behavior. Aβ(1-42) is the more neurotoxic species, aggregates much faster, and dominates in senile plaque of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Although small Aβ oligomers are believed to be the neurotoxic species, Aβ amyloid fibrils are, because of their presence in plaques, a pathological hallmark of AD and appear to play an important role in disease progression through cell-to-cell transmissibility. Here, we solved the 3D structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) fibril polymorph, combining data from solid-state NMR spectroscopy and mass-per-length measurements from EM. The 3D structure is composed of two molecules per fibril layer, with residues 15-42 forming a double-horseshoe-like cross-β-sheet entity with maximally buried hydrophobic side chains. Residues 1-14 are partially ordered and in a β-strand conformation, but do not display unambiguous distance restraints to the remainder of the core structure.

  15. Self healing hydrogels composed of amyloid nano fibrils for cell culture and stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Reeba S; Ghosh, Dhiman; Singh, Pradeep K; Basu, Santanu K; Jha, Narendra Nath; Das, Subhadeep; Sukul, Pradip K; Patil, Sachin; Sathaye, Sadhana; Kumar, Ashutosh; Chowdhury, Arindam; Malik, Sudip; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K

    2015-06-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered protein/peptide aggregates associated with human diseases as well as various native biological functions. Given the diverse range of physiochemical properties of amyloids, we hypothesized that higher order amyloid self-assembly could be used for fabricating novel hydrogels for biomaterial applications. For proof of concept, we designed a series of peptides based on the high aggregation prone C-terminus of Aβ42, which is associated with Alzheimer's disease. These Fmoc protected peptides self assemble to β sheet rich nanofibrils, forming hydrogels that are thermoreversible, non-toxic and thixotropic. Mechanistic studies indicate that while hydrophobic, π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding drive amyloid network formation to form supramolecular gel structure, the exposed hydrophobic surface of amyloid fibrils may render thixotropicity to these gels. We have demonstrated the utility of these hydrogels in supporting cell attachment and spreading across a diverse range of cell types. Finally, by tuning the stiffness of these gels through modulation of peptide concentration and salt concentration these hydrogels could be used as scaffolds that can drive differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Taken together, our results indicate that small size, ease of custom synthesis, thixotropic nature makes these amyloid-based hydrogels ideally suited for biomaterial/nanotechnology applications. PMID:25907043

  16. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A. B.; Singh, Pushkar; Lednev, Igor K.; Deckert, Volker

    2016-09-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact with the physiological environment in vivo and plays a decisive role in biological activity and associated toxicity. Recent studies reveal that the inherent sensitivity and specificity of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) renders this technique a compelling method for fibril surface analysis at the single-particle level. Here, the reproducibility of TERS is demonstrated, indicating its relevance for detecting molecular variations. Consequently, individual fibrils are systematically investigated at nanometer spatial resolution. Spectral parameters were obtained by band-fitting, particularly focusing on the identification of the secondary structure via the amide III band and the differentiation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains on the surface. In addition multivariate data analysis, specifically the N-FINDR procedure, was employed to generate structure-specific maps. The ability of TERS to localize specific structural domains on fibril surfaces shows promise to the development of new fibril dissection strategies and can be generally applied to any (bio)chemical surface when structural variations at the nanometer level are of interest.

  17. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A B; Singh, Pushkar; Lednev, Igor K; Deckert, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact with the physiological environment in vivo and plays a decisive role in biological activity and associated toxicity. Recent studies reveal that the inherent sensitivity and specificity of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) renders this technique a compelling method for fibril surface analysis at the single-particle level. Here, the reproducibility of TERS is demonstrated, indicating its relevance for detecting molecular variations. Consequently, individual fibrils are systematically investigated at nanometer spatial resolution. Spectral parameters were obtained by band-fitting, particularly focusing on the identification of the secondary structure via the amide III band and the differentiation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains on the surface. In addition multivariate data analysis, specifically the N-FINDR procedure, was employed to generate structure-specific maps. The ability of TERS to localize specific structural domains on fibril surfaces shows promise to the development of new fibril dissection strategies and can be generally applied to any (bio)chemical surface when structural variations at the nanometer level are of interest. PMID:27650589

  18. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A. B.; Singh, Pushkar; Lednev, Igor K.; Deckert, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact with the physiological environment in vivo and plays a decisive role in biological activity and associated toxicity. Recent studies reveal that the inherent sensitivity and specificity of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) renders this technique a compelling method for fibril surface analysis at the single-particle level. Here, the reproducibility of TERS is demonstrated, indicating its relevance for detecting molecular variations. Consequently, individual fibrils are systematically investigated at nanometer spatial resolution. Spectral parameters were obtained by band-fitting, particularly focusing on the identification of the secondary structure via the amide III band and the differentiation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains on the surface. In addition multivariate data analysis, specifically the N-FINDR procedure, was employed to generate structure-specific maps. The ability of TERS to localize specific structural domains on fibril surfaces shows promise to the development of new fibril dissection strategies and can be generally applied to any (bio)chemical surface when structural variations at the nanometer level are of interest. PMID:27650589

  19. Positional effects of phosphorylation on the stability and morphology of tau-related amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masafumi; Konno, Takashi; Tainaka, Kazuki; Nakata, Eiji; Yoshida, Hiro-O; Morii, Takashi

    2012-02-21

    Hyperphosphorylated forms of tau protein are the main component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. To understand the effect of phosphorylation on the fibrillation of tau, we utilized tau-derived phosphorylated peptides. The V(306)QIVYK(311) sequence (PHF6) in the microtubule-binding domain is known to play a key role in the fibrillation of tau, and the short peptide corresponding to the PHF6 sequence forms amyloid-type fibrils similar to those generated by full-length tau. We focused on the amino acid residue located at the N-terminus of the PHF6 sequence, serine or lysine in the native isoform of tau, and synthesized the PHF6 derivative peptides with serine or lysine at the N-terminus of PHF6. Peptides phosphorylated at serine and/or tyrosine were synthesized to mimic the possible phosphorylation at these positions. The critical concentrations of the fibrillation of peptides were determined to quantitatively assess fibril stability. The peptide with the net charge of near zero tended to form stable fibrils. Interestingly, the peptide phosphorylated at the N-terminal serine residue exhibited remarkably low fibrillation propensity as compared to the peptide possessing the same net charge. Transmission electron microscopy measurements of the fibrils visualized the paired helical or straight fibers and segregated masses of the fibers or heterogeneous rodlike fibers depending on the phosphorylation status. Further analyses of the fibrils by the X-ray fiber diffraction method and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements indicated that all the peptides shared a common cross-β structure. In addition, the phosphoserine-containing peptides showed the characteristics of β-sandwiches that could interact with both faces of the β-sheet. On the basis of these observations, possible protofilament models with four β-sheets were constructed to consider the positional effects of the serine and

  20. Structural motif of polyglutamine amyloid fibrils discerned with mixed-isotope infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Lauren E; Carr, Joshua K; Fluitt, Aaron M; Hoganson, Andrew J; Moran, Sean D; de Pablo, Juan J; Skinner, James L; Zanni, Martin T

    2014-04-22

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) sequences are found in a variety of proteins, and mutational expansion of the polyQ tract is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. We study the amyloid fibril structure and aggregation kinetics of K2Q24K2W, a model polyQ sequence. Two structures have been proposed for amyloid fibrils formed by polyQ peptides. By forming fibrils composed of both (12)C and (13)C monomers, made possible by protein expression in Escherichia coli, we can restrict vibrational delocalization to measure 2D IR spectra of individual monomers within the fibrils. The spectra are consistent with a β-turn structure in which each monomer forms an antiparallel hairpin and donates two strands to a single β-sheet. Calculated spectra from atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations of the two proposed structures confirm the assignment. No spectroscopically distinct intermediates are observed in rapid-scan 2D IR kinetics measurements, suggesting that aggregation is highly cooperative. Although 2D IR spectroscopy has advantages over linear techniques, the isotope-mixing strategy will also be useful with standard Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. PMID:24550484

  1. A structural model for Alzheimer's -amyloid fibrils based on experimental constraints from solid state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Aneta T.; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Balbach, John J.; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Leapman, Richard D.; Delaglio, Frank; Tycko, Robert

    2002-12-01

    We present a structural model for amyloid fibrils formed by the 40-residue -amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease (A1-40), based on a set of experimental constraints from solid state NMR spectroscopy. The model additionally incorporates the cross- structural motif established by x-ray fiber diffraction and satisfies constraints on A1-40 fibril dimensions and mass-per-length determined from electron microscopy. Approximately the first 10 residues of A1-40 are structurally disordered in the fibrils. Residues 12-24 and 30-40 adopt -strand conformations and form parallel -sheets through intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Residues 25-29 contain a bend of the peptide backbone that brings the two -sheets in contact through sidechain-sidechain interactions. A single cross- unit is then a double-layered -sheet structure with a hydrophobic core and one hydrophobic face. The only charged sidechains in the core are those of D23 and K28, which form salt bridges. Fibrils with minimum mass-per-length and diameter consist of two cross- units with their hydrophobic faces juxtaposed.

  2. Nucleation process of a fibril precursor in the C-terminal segment of amyloid-β.

    PubMed

    Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Pietrucci, Fabio; Biarnés, Xevi; Laio, Alessandro

    2013-04-19

    By extended atomistic simulations in explicit solvent and bias-exchange metadynamics, we study the aggregation process of 18 chains of the C-terminal segment of amyloid-β, an intrinsically disordered protein involved in Alzheimer's disease and prone to form fibrils. Starting from a disordered aggregate, we are able to observe the formation of an ordered nucleus rich in beta sheets. The rate limiting step in the nucleation pathway involves crossing a barrier of approximately 40 kcal/mol and is associated with the formation of a very specific interdigitation of the side chains belonging to different sheets. This structural pattern is different from the one observed experimentally in a microcrystal of the same system, indicating that the structure of a "nascent" fibril may differ from the one of an "extended" fibril.

  3. Nucleation Process of a Fibril Precursor in the C-Terminal Segment of Amyloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Pietrucci, Fabio; Biarnés, Xevi; Laio, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    By extended atomistic simulations in explicit solvent and bias-exchange metadynamics, we study the aggregation process of 18 chains of the C-terminal segment of amyloid-β, an intrinsically disordered protein involved in Alzheimer’s disease and prone to form fibrils. Starting from a disordered aggregate, we are able to observe the formation of an ordered nucleus rich in beta sheets. The rate limiting step in the nucleation pathway involves crossing a barrier of approximately 40kcal/mol and is associated with the formation of a very specific interdigitation of the side chains belonging to different sheets. This structural pattern is different from the one observed experimentally in a microcrystal of the same system, indicating that the structure of a “nascent” fibril may differ from the one of an “extended” fibril.

  4. Inhibiting and reversing amyloid-β peptide (1-40) fibril formation with gramicidin S and engineered analogues.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghui; Otero, José M; Yu, Chien-Hung; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Gräslund, Astrid; Overhand, Mark; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2013-12-16

    In Alzheimer's disease, amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides aggregate into extracellular fibrillar deposits. Although these deposits may not be the prime cause of the neurodegeneration that characterizes this disease, inhibition or dissolution of amyloid fibril formation by Aβ peptides is likely to affect its development. ThT fluorescence measurements and AFM images showed that the natural antibiotic gramicidin S significantly inhibited Aβ amyloid formation in vitro and could dissolve amyloids that had formed in the absence of the antibiotic. In silico docking suggested that gramicidin S, a cyclic decapeptide that adopts a β-sheet conformation, binds to the Aβ peptide hairpin-stacked fibril through β-sheet interactions. This may explain why gramicidin S reduces fibril formation. Analogues of gramicidin S were also tested. An analogue with a potency that was four-times higher than that of the natural product was identified.

  5. Amyloid fibrils activate B-1a lymphocytes to ameliorate inflammatory brain disease.

    PubMed

    Kurnellas, Michael Phillip; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Schartner, Jill M; Baker, Jeanette; Rothbard, Jesse J; Negrin, Robert S; Herzenberg, Leonore A; Fathman, C Garrison; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2015-12-01

    Amyloid fibrils composed of peptides as short as six amino acids are therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reducing paralysis and inflammation, while inducing several pathways of immune suppression. Intraperitoneal injection of fibrils selectively activates B-1a lymphocytes and two populations of resident macrophages (MΦs), increasing IL-10 production, and triggering their exodus from the peritoneum. The importance of IL-10-producing B-1a cells in this effective therapy was established in loss-of-function experiments where neither B-cell-deficient (μMT) nor IL10(-/-) mice with EAE responded to the fibrils. In gain-of-function experiments, B-1a cells, adoptively transferred to μMT mice with EAE, restored their therapeutic efficacy when Amylin 28-33 was administered. Stimulation of adoptively transferred bioluminescent MΦs and B-1a cells by amyloid fibrils resulted in rapid (within 60 min of injection) trafficking of both cell types to draining lymph nodes. Analysis of gene expression indicated that the fibrils activated the CD40/B-cell receptor pathway in B-1a cells and induced a set of immune-suppressive cell-surface proteins, including BTLA, IRF4, and Siglec G. Collectively, these data indicate that the fibrils activate B-1a cells and F4/80(+) MΦs, resulting in their migration to the lymph nodes, where IL-10 and cell-surface receptors associated with immune-suppression limit antigen presentation and T-cell activation. These mechanisms culminate in reduction of paralytic signs of EAE. PMID:26621719

  6. Understanding amyloid fibril nucleation and aβ oligomer/drug interactions from computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2014-02-18

    Evolution has fine-tuned proteins to accomplish a variety of tasks. Yet, with aging, some proteins assemble into harmful amyloid aggregates associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), which presents a complex and costly challenge to our society. Thus, far, drug after drug has failed to slow the progression of AD, characterized by the self-assembly of the 39-43 amino acid β-amyloid (Aβ) protein into extracellular senile plaques that form a cross-β structure. While there is experimental evidence that the Aβ small oligomers are the primary toxic species, standard tools of biology have failed to provide structures of these transient, inhomogeneous assemblies. Despite extensive experimental studies, researchers have not successfully characterized the nucleus ensemble, the starting point for rapid fibril formation. Similarly scientists do not have atomic data to show how the compounds that reduce both fibril formation and toxicity in cells bind to Aβ42 oligomers. In this context, computer simulations are important tools for gaining insights into the self-assembly of amyloid peptides and the molecular mechanism of inhibitors. This Account reviews what analytical models and simulations at different time and length scales tell us about the dynamics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of amyloid fibril formation and, notably, the nucleation process. Though coarse-grained and mesoscopic protein models approximate atomistic details by averaging out unimportant degrees of freedom, they provide generic features of amyloid formation and insights into mechanistic details of the self-assembly process. The thermodynamics and kinetics vary from linear peptides adopting straight β-strands in fibrils to longer peptides adopting in parallel U shaped conformations in fibrils. In addition, these properties change with the balance between electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and the intrinsic disorder of the system. However, simulations suggest that

  7. How do membranes initiate Alzheimer's Disease? Formation of toxic amyloid fibrils by the amyloid β-protein on ganglioside clusters.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Katsumi

    2014-08-19

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a severe neurodegenerative disorder, causes more than half of dementia cases. According to the popular "Aβ hypothesis" to explain the mechanism of this disease, amyloid β-peptides (Aβ) of 39-43 amino acid residues aggregate and deposit onto neurons, igniting the neurotoxic cascade of the disease. Therefore, researchers studying AD would like to elucidate the mechanisms by which essentially water-soluble but hydrophobic Aβ aggregates under pathological conditions. Most researchers have investigated the aggregation of Aβ in aqueous solution, and they concluded that the final aggregation product, the amyloid fibrils, were less toxic than the component peptide oligomers. They consequently shifted their interests to more toxic "soluble oligomers", structures that form as intermediates or off-pathway products during the aggregation process. Some researchers have also investigated artificial oligomers prepared under nonphysiological conditions. In contrast to these "in solution" studies, we have focused on "membrane-mediated" amyloidogenesis. In an earlier study, other researchers identified a specific form of Aβ that was bound to monosialoganglioside GM1, a sugar lipid, in brains of patients who exhibited the early pathological changes associated with AD. This Account summarizes 15 years of our research on this topic. We have found that Aβ specifically binds to GM1 that occurs in clusters, but not when it is uniformly distributed. Clustering is facilitated by cholesterol. Upon binding, Aβ changes its conformation from a random coil to an α-helix-rich structure. A CH-π interaction between the aromatic side chains of Aβ and carbohydrate moieties appended to GM1 appears to be important for binding. In addition, as Aβ accumulates and reaches its first threshold concentration (Aβ/GM1 = ∼0.013), aggregated β-sheets of ∼15 molecules appear and coexist with the helical form. However, this β-structure is stable and does not form larger

  8. Structural Polymorphism of Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Fibrils as Controlled by an E22 Switch: A Solid-State NMR Study.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Matthew R; Wang, Tuo; Nick, Mimi; Jo, Hyunil; Lemmin, Thomas; Prusiner, Stanley B; DeGrado, William F; Stöhr, Jan; Hong, Mei

    2016-08-10

    The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide of Alzheimer's disease (AD) forms polymorphic fibrils on the micrometer and molecular scales. Various fibril growth conditions have been identified to cause polymorphism, but the intrinsic amino acid sequence basis for this polymorphism has been unclear. Several single-site mutations in the center of the Aβ sequence cause different disease phenotypes and fibrillization properties. The E22G (Arctic) mutant is found in familial AD and forms protofibrils more rapidly than wild-type Aβ. Here, we use solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the structure, dynamics, hydration and morphology of Arctic E22G Aβ40 fibrils. (13)C, (15)N-labeled synthetic E22G Aβ40 peptides are studied and compared with wild-type and Osaka E22Δ Aβ40 fibrils. Under the same fibrillization conditions, Arctic Aβ40 exhibits a high degree of polymorphism, showing at least four sets of NMR chemical shifts for various residues, while the Osaka and wild-type Aβ40 fibrils show a single or a predominant set of chemical shifts. Thus, structural polymorphism is intrinsic to the Arctic E22G Aβ40 sequence. Chemical shifts and inter-residue contacts obtained from 2D correlation spectra indicate that one of the major Arctic conformers has surprisingly high structural similarity with wild-type Aβ42. (13)C-(1)H dipolar order parameters, (1)H rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation times and water-to-protein spin diffusion experiments reveal substantial differences in the dynamics and hydration of Arctic, Osaka and wild-type Aβ40 fibrils. Together, these results strongly suggest that electrostatic interactions in the center of the Aβ peptide sequence play a crucial role in the three-dimensional fold of the fibrils, and by inference, fibril-induced neuronal toxicity and AD pathogenesis. PMID:27414264

  9. Early aggregation preceding the nucleation of insulin amyloid fibrils as monitored by small angle X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Chatani, Eri; Inoue, Rintaro; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Masaaki; Kato, Minoru; Yamamoto, Masahide; Nishida, Koji; Kanaya, Toshiji

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation event of amyloid fibrils is one of the most crucial processes that dictate the timing and rate of the pathology of diseases; however, information regarding how protein molecules associate to produce fibril nuclei is currently limited. In order to explore this issue in more detail, we performed time-resolved small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements on insulin fibrillation, in combination with additional multidirectional analyses of thioflavin T fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, light scattering, and light transmittance, during the fibrillation process of bovine insulin. SAXS monitoring revealed that insulin molecules associated into rod-like prefibrillar aggregates in the very early stage of the reaction. After the formation of these early aggregates, they appeared to further coalesce mutually to form larger clusters, and the SAXS profiles subsequently showed the further time evolution of conformational development towards mature amyloid fibrils. Distinct types of structural units in terms of shape in a nano-scale order, cross-β content, and thioflavin T fluorescence intensity were observed in a manner that was dependent on the fibrillation pathways. These results suggest the presence of diverse substructures that characterize various fibrillation pathways, and eventually, manifest polymorphisms in mature amyloid fibrils. PMID:26503463

  10. Evaluation of protease resistance and toxicity of amyloid-like food fibrils from whey, soy, kidney bean, and egg white.

    PubMed

    Lassé, Moritz; Ulluwishewa, Dulantha; Healy, Jackie; Thompson, Dion; Miller, Antonia; Roy, Nicole; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2016-02-01

    The structural properties of amyloid fibrils combined with their highly functional surface chemistry make them an attractive new food ingredient, for example as highly effective gelling agents. However, the toxic role of amyloid fibrils in disease may cause some concern about their food safety because it has not been established unequivocally if consumption of food fibrils poses a health risk to consumers. Here we present a study of amyloid-like fibrils from whey, kidney bean, soy bean, and egg white to partially address this concern. Fibrils showed varied resistance to proteolytic digestion in vitro by either Proteinase K, pepsin or pancreatin. The toxicity of mature fibrils was measured in vitro and compared to native protein, early-stage-fibrillar protein, and sonicated fibrils in two immortalised human cancer cell lines, Caco-2 and Hec-1a. There was no reduction in the viability of either Caco-2 or Hec-1a cells after treatment with a fibril concentration of up to 0.25 mg/mL.

  11. Synthetic peptide homologous to. beta. protein from Alzheimer's disease forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, D.A.; Inouye, H.; Duffy, L.K.; Sinclair, A.; Lind, M.; Selkoe, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    Progressive amyloid deposition in senile plaques and cortical blood vessels may play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The authors have used x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to study the molecular organization and morphology of macromolecular assemblies formed by three synthetic peptides homologous to ..beta.. protein of brain amyloid: ..beta..-(1-28), residues 1-28 of the ..beta.. protein; (Ala/sup 1 -/..beta..-(1-28), ..beta..-(1-28) with alanine substituted for lysine at position 16; and ..beta..-(18-28), residues 18-28 of the ..beta.. protein. ..beta..-(1-28) readily formed fibrils in vitro that were similar in ultrastructure to the in vivo amyloid and aggregated into large bundles resembling those of senile plaque cores. X-ray patterns from partially dried, oriented pellets showed a cross-..beta..-conformation. (Ala/sup 16/)..beta..-(1-28) formed ..beta..-pleated sheet assemblies that were dissimilar to in vivo fibrils. The width of the 10-A spacing indicated stacks of about six sheets. Thus, substitution of the uncharged alanine for the positively charged lysine in the ..beta..-strand region enhances the packing of the sheets and dramatically alters the type of macromolecular aggregate formed. BETA-(18-28) formed assemblies that had even a greater number of stacked sheets. The findings on these homologous synthetic assemblies help to define the specific sequence that is required to form Alzheimer's-type amyloid fibrils, thus providing an in vitro model of age-related cerebral amyloidogenesis.

  12. Flavone Derivatives as Inhibitors of Insulin Amyloid-Like Fibril Formation

    PubMed Central

    Malisauskas, Ricardas; Botyriute, Akvile; Cannon, Jonathan G.; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    Several natural and synthetic flavone derivatives have been reported to inhibit formation of amyloid fibrils or to remodel existing fibrils. These studies suggest that the numbers and positions of hydroxyl groups on the flavone rings determine their effectiveness as amyloid inhibitors. In many studies the primary method for determining the effectiveness of inhibition is measuring Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. This method demonstrably results in a number of false positives for inhibition. We studied the effects of 265 commercially available flavone derivatives on insulin fibril formation. We enhanced the effectiveness of ThT fluorescence measurements by fitting kinetic curves to obtain halftime of aggregation (t50). Maximal values of ThT fluorescence varied two fold or more in one third of all cases, but this did not correlate with changes in t50. Changes in t50 values were more accurate measures of inhibition of amyloid formation. We showed that without a change in an assay, but just by observing complete kinetic curves it is possible to eliminate numbers of false positive and sometimes even false negative results. Examining the data from all 265 flavones we confirmed previous observations that identified the importance of hydroxyl groups for inhibition. Our evidence suggests the importance of hydroxyl groups at locations 5, 6, 7, and 4’, and the absence of a hydroxyl group at location 3, for inhibiting amyloid formation. However, the main conclusion is that the positions are not additive. The structures and their effects must be thought of in the context of the whole molecule. PMID:25799281

  13. Effect of tetracyclines on the dynamics of formation and destructuration of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Sofia; Raimondi, Sara; Pagano, Katiuscia; Relini, Annalisa; Bucciantini, Monica; Corazza, Alessandra; Fogolari, Federico; Codutti, Luca; Salmona, Mario; Mangione, Palma; Colombo, Lino; De Luigi, Ada; Porcari, Riccardo; Gliozzi, Alessandra; Stefani, Massimo; Esposito, Gennaro; Bellotti, Vittorio; Stoppini, Monica

    2011-01-21

    The discovery of methods suitable for the conversion in vitro of native proteins into amyloid fibrils has shed light on the molecular basis of amyloidosis and has provided fundamental tools for drug discovery. We have studied the capacity of a small library of tetracycline analogues to modulate the formation or destructuration of β2-microglobulin fibrils. The inhibition of fibrillogenesis of the wild type protein was first established in the presence of 20% trifluoroethanol and confirmed under a more physiologic environment including heparin and collagen. The latter conditions were also used to study the highly amyloidogenic variant, P32G. The NMR analysis showed that doxycycline inhibits β2-microglobulin self-association and stabilizes the native-like species through fast exchange interactions involving specific regions of the protein. Cell viability assays demonstrated that the drug abolishes the natural cytotoxic activity of soluble β2-microglobulin, further strengthening a possible in vivo therapeutic exploitation of this drug. Doxycycline can disassemble preformed fibrils, but the IC(50) is 5-fold higher than that necessary for the inhibition of fibrillogenesis. Fibril destructuration is a dynamic and time-dependent process characterized by the early formation of cytotoxic protein aggregates that, in a few hours, convert into non-toxic insoluble material. The efficacy of doxycycline as a drug against dialysis-related amyloidosis would benefit from the ability of the drug to accumulate just in the skeletal system where amyloid is formed. In these tissues, the doxycycline concentration reaches values several folds higher than those resulting in inhibition of amyloidogenesis and amyloid destructuration in vitro. PMID:21068391

  14. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the complex behavior of an amyloid fibril inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Chiu, Chi-cheng; Singh, Sadanand; Woys, Ann Marie; de Pablo, Juan J.; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-01-01

    While amyloid formation has been implicated in the pathology of over twenty human diseases, the rational design of amyloid inhibitors is hampered by a lack of structural information about amyloid-inhibitor complexes. We use isotope labeling and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to obtain a residue-specific structure for the complex of human amylin, the peptide responsible for islet amyloid formation in type 2 diabetes, with a known inhibitor, rat amylin. Based on its sequence, rat amylin should block formation of the C-terminal β-sheet, but at 8 hours after mixing rat amylin blocks the N-terminal β-sheet instead. At 24 hours after mixing, rat amylin blocks neither β-sheet and forms its own β-sheet most likely on the outside of the human fibrils. This is striking because rat amylin is natively disordered and not previously known to form amyloid β-sheets. The results show that even seemingly intuitive inhibitors may function by unforeseen and complex structural processes. PMID:22522254

  15. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy reveals the complex behaviour of an amyloid fibril inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Chris T.; Marek, Peter; Cao, Ping; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; Singh, Sadanand; Woys, Ann Marie; de Pablo, Juan J.; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2012-05-01

    Amyloid formation has been implicated in the pathology of over 20 human diseases, but the rational design of amyloid inhibitors is hampered by a lack of structural information about amyloid-inhibitor complexes. We use isotope labelling and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to obtain a residue-specific structure for the complex of human amylin (the peptide responsible for islet amyloid formation in type 2 diabetes) with a known inhibitor (rat amylin). Based on its sequence, rat amylin should block formation of the C-terminal β-sheet, but at 8 h after mixing, rat amylin blocks the N-terminal β-sheet instead. At 24 h after mixing, rat amylin blocks neither β-sheet and forms its own β-sheet, most probably on the outside of the human fibrils. This is striking, because rat amylin is natively disordered and not previously known to form amyloid β-sheets. The results show that even seemingly intuitive inhibitors may function by unforeseen and complex structural processes.

  16. Chitosan Oligosaccharides Inhibit/Disaggregate Fibrils and Attenuate Amyloid β-Mediated Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xueling; Hou, Wanqi; Sun, Yaxuan; Gao, Zhaolan; Zhu, Shigong; Jiang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a large number of amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in the brain. Therefore, inhibiting Aβ aggregation or destabilizing preformed aggregates could be a promising therapeutic target for halting/slowing the progression of AD. Chitosan oligosaccharides (COS) have previously been reported to exhibit antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. Recent study shows that COS could markedly decrease oligomeric Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat hippocampal neurons. However, the potential mechanism that COS reduce Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity remains unclear. In the present study, our findings from circular dichroism spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope and thioflavin T fluorescence assay suggested that COS act as an inhibitor of Aβ aggregation and this effect shows dose-dependency. Moreover, data from thioflavin T assay indicated that COS could significantly inhibit fibrils formation and disrupt preformed fibrils in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of COS attenuated Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity in rat cortical neurons. Taken together, our results demonstrated for the first time that COS could inhibit Aβ1-42 fibrils formation and disaggregate preformed fibrils, suggesting that COS may have anti-Aβ fibrillogenesis and fibril-destabilizing properties. These findings highlight the potential role of COS as novel therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of AD. PMID:26006224

  17. Physical basis for the ofloxacin-induced acceleration of lysozyme aggregation and polymorphism in amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Muthu, Shivani A; Mothi, Nivin; Shiriskar, Sonali M; Pissurlenkar, Raghuvir R S; Kumar, Anil; Ahmad, Basir

    2016-02-15

    Aggregation of globular proteins is an intractable problem which generally originates from partially folded structures. The partially folded structures first collapse non-specifically and then reorganize into amyloid-like fibrils via one or more oligomeric intermediates. The fibrils and their on/off pathway intermediates may be toxic to cells and form toxic deposits in different human organs. To understand the basis of origins of the aggregation diseases, it is vital to study in details the conformational properties of the amyloidogenic partially folded structures of the protein. In this work, we examined the effects of ofloxacin, a synthetic fluoroquinolone compound on the fibrillar aggregation of hen egg-white lysozyme. Using two aggregation conditions (4M GuHCl at pH 7.0 and 37 °C; and pH 1.7 at 65 °C) and a number of biophysical techniques, we illustrate that ofloxacin accelerates fibril formation of lysozyme by binding to partially folded structures and modulating their secondary, tertiary structures and surface hydrophobicity. We also demonstrate that Ofloxacin-induced fibrils show polymorphism of morphology, tinctorial properties and hydrophobic surface exposure. This study will assist in understanding the determinant of fibril formation and it also indicates that caution should be exercised in the use of ofloxacin in patients susceptible to various aggregation diseases.

  18. Real-time monitoring of amyloid growth in a rigid gel matrix.

    PubMed

    Dalpadado, Roshan C; Maat, Hendrik; Carver, John A; Hall, Damien

    2016-10-15

    We demonstrate the real-time monitoring of the growth of amyloid-protein aggregates in a semi-rigid gel environment constructed from a 5% w/v gelatin solution. The kinetics of amyloid fibril growth from reduced and carboxy-methylated κ-casein occurring in the gel medium was contrasted against that obtained in a regular solution assay. Aggregation kinetics were recorded using Thioflavin T fluorescence. Transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm the aggregates' existence and morphology. The current demonstration of controlled amyloid growth in a gel environment represents the first step towards development of an experimental model for investigating the role of spatial and medium factors in the kinetics of aggregation-based proteopathies.

  19. Real-time monitoring of amyloid growth in a rigid gel matrix.

    PubMed

    Dalpadado, Roshan C; Maat, Hendrik; Carver, John A; Hall, Damien

    2016-10-15

    We demonstrate the real-time monitoring of the growth of amyloid-protein aggregates in a semi-rigid gel environment constructed from a 5% w/v gelatin solution. The kinetics of amyloid fibril growth from reduced and carboxy-methylated κ-casein occurring in the gel medium was contrasted against that obtained in a regular solution assay. Aggregation kinetics were recorded using Thioflavin T fluorescence. Transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm the aggregates' existence and morphology. The current demonstration of controlled amyloid growth in a gel environment represents the first step towards development of an experimental model for investigating the role of spatial and medium factors in the kinetics of aggregation-based proteopathies. PMID:27477869

  20. Preparation of amyloid-like fibrils containing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Effect of protein aggregation on proton relaxivity

    SciTech Connect

    Viktor Andersson, B.; Skoglund, Caroline; Uvdal, Kajsa; Solin, Niclas

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Preparation of amyloid materials labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterization of amyloid materials by electron tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of protein aggregation on the magnetic nanoparticle properties. -- Abstract: A method to prepare amyloid-like fibrils functionalized with magnetic nanoparticles has been developed. The amyloid-like fibrils are prepared in a two step procedure, where insulin and magnetic nanoparticles are mixed simply by grinding in the solid state, resulting in a water soluble hybrid material. When the hybrid material is heated in aqueous acid, the insulin/nanoparticle hybrid material self assembles to form amyloid-like fibrils incorporating the magnetic nanoparticles. This results in magnetically labeled amyloid-like fibrils which has been characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and electron tomography. The influence of the aggregation process on proton relaxivity is investigated. The prepared materials have potential uses in a range of bio-imaging applications.

  1. A new trend in the experimental methodology for the analysis of the thioflavin T binding to amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Irina M; Sulatskaya, Anna I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2012-06-01

    The studies on the determination of the characteristics of the amyloid fibril interaction with the dye were based on the analysis of the dependence of the ThT fluorescence intensity on its concentration in the solution containing the amyloid fibrils. In the present work, we revealed that this intuitive approach provided erroneous data. We propose a new approach which provides a means for characterizing the interaction of thioflavin T (ThT) with amyloid fibrils and for determining the binding stoichiometry and binding constants, absorption spectrum, molar extinction coefficient, and fluorescence quantum yield of the ThT bound to the sites of different binding modes of fibrils. The key point of this approach is sample preparation by equilibrium microdialysis. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated via the examination of the ThT binding to insulin and Aβ42 fibrils as well as to the native form of the Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase. We show that the peculiarities of ThT interaction with amyloid fibrils depend on the amyloidogenic protein and on the binding mode. This approach is universal and can be used for the analysis of binding mechanism of any dye that interacts with its receptor. Therefore, the proposed approach represents an important addition to the existing arsenal of means for the diagnostics and therapy of the neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Development of a new distyrylbenzene-derivative amyloid-β-aggregation and fibril formation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hideharu; Ishigami, Akihito; Orimoto, Ayako; Matsuyama, Akihiro; Handa, Setsuko; Maruyama, Naoki; Yokoyama, Yuusaku; Okuno, Hiroaki; Nakakoshi, Masamichi

    2012-01-01

    Several new amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation inhibitors were synthesized according to our theory that a hydrophilic moiety could be attached to the Aβ-recognition unit for the purpose of preventing amyloid plaque formation. A distyrylbenzene-derivative, DSB(EEX)(3), which consider the Aβ recognition unit (DSB, 1,4-distyrylbenzene) and expected to bind to amyloid fibrils (β-sheet structure), was combined with the hydrophilic aggregation disrupting element (EEX) (E, Glu; X, 2-(2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethoxy)acetic acid). This DSB(EEX)(3) compound, compared to several others synthesized similarly, was found to be the most active for reducing Aβ toxicity toward IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cells. Moreover, its inhibition of Aβ-aggregation or fibril formation was directly confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. These results suggest that the Aβ aggregation inhibitor DSB(EEX)(3) disrupts clumps of Aβ protein and is a likely candidate for drug development to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Gu, Zonglin; Li, Haotian; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-12-14

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP{sub 22-28}) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp{sup 2} hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π–π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  4. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sulatskaya, Anna I; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Belousov, Mikhail V; Bondarev, Stanislav A; Zhouravleva, Galina A; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered.

  5. Heme stabilization of α-Synuclein oligomers during amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Eric Y.; Kaur, Prerna; Williams, Thomas L.; Matsui, Hiroshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-Synuclein (αSyn), which forms amyloid fibrils, is linked to the neuronal pathology of Parkinson’s disease, as it is the major fibrillar component of Lewy bodies, the inclusions that are characteristic of the disease. Oligomeric structures, common to many neurodegenerative disease-related proteins, may in fact be the primary toxic species, while the amyloid fibrils exist as either a less toxic dead-end species, or even as a beneficial mechanism to clear damaged proteins. In order to alter the progression of the aggregation and gain insights into the pre-fibrillar structures, the effect of heme on αSyn oligomerization was determined by several different techniques including native (non-denaturing) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, thioflavin T fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism and membrane permeation using a calcein release assay. During aggregation, heme is able to bind the αSyn in a specific fashion, stabilizing distinct oligomeric conformations and promoting the formation of αSyn into annular structures, thereby delaying and/or inhibiting the fibrillation process. These results indicate that heme may play a regulatory role in the progression of Parkinson’s disease; in addition, they provide insights of how the aggregation process may be altered, which may be applicable to the understanding of many neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26161848

  6. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Li, Haotian; Gu, Zonglin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-12-01

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP22-28) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp2 hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π-π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  7. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Sulatskaya, Anna I.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Belousov, Mikhail V.; Bondarev, Stanislav A.; Zhouravleva, Galina A.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered. PMID:27228180

  8. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Li, Haotian; Gu, Zonglin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-12-14

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP22-28) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp(2) hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π-π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  9. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sulatskaya, Anna I; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Belousov, Mikhail V; Bondarev, Stanislav A; Zhouravleva, Galina A; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered. PMID:27228180

  10. A monomer-trimer model supports intermittent glucagon fibril growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Cordsen, Pia; Kyrsting, Anders; Otzen, Daniel E.; Oddershede, Lene B.; Jensen, Mogens H.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate in vitro fibrillation kinetics of the hormone peptide glucagon at various concentrations using confocal microscopy and determine the glucagon fibril persistence length 60μm. At all concentrations we observe that periods of individual fibril growth are interrupted by periods of stasis. The growth probability is large at high and low concentrations and is reduced for intermediate glucagon concentrations. To explain this behavior we propose a simple model, where fibrils come in two forms, one built entirely from glucagon monomers and one entirely from glucagon trimers. The opposite building blocks act as fibril growth blockers, and this generic model reproduces experimental behavior well.

  11. Acetylcholinesterase accelerates assembly of amyloid-beta-peptides into Alzheimer's fibrils: possible role of the peripheral site of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, N C; Alvarez, A; Pérez, C A; Moreno, R D; Vicente, M; Linker, C; Casanueva, O I; Soto, C; Garrido, J

    1996-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an important component of cholinergic synapses, colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits of Alzheimer's brain. We report here that bovine brain AChE, as well as the human and mouse recombinant enzyme, accelerates amyloid formation from wild-type A beta and a mutant A beta peptide, which alone produces few amyloid-like fibrils. The action of AChE was independent of the subunit array of the enzyme, was not affected by edrophonium, an active site inhibitor, but it was affected by propidium, a peripheral anionic binding site ligand. Butyrylcholinesterase, an enzyme that lacks the peripheral site, did not affect amyloid formation. Furthermore, AChE is a potent amyloid-promoting factor when compared with other A beta-associated proteins. Thus, in addition to its role in cholinergic synapses, AChE may function by accelerating A beta formation and could play a role during amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's brain.

  12. The polyphenol Oleuropein aglycone hinders the growth of toxic transthyretin amyloid assemblies.

    PubMed

    Leri, Manuela; Nosi, Daniele; Natalello, Antonino; Porcari, Riccardo; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Chiti, Fabrizio; Bellotti, Vittorio; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Stefani, Massimo; Bucciantini, Monica

    2016-04-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is involved in a subset of familial or sporadic amyloid diseases including senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA), familial amyloid polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy (FAP/FAC) for which no effective therapy has been found yet. These conditions are characterized by extracellular deposits primarily found in the heart parenchyma and in peripheral nerves whose main component are amyloid fibrils, presently considered the main culprits of cell sufferance. The latter are polymeric assemblies grown from misfolded TTR, either wt or carrying one out of many identified mutations. The recent introduction in the clinical practice of synthetic TTR-stabilizing molecules that reduce protein aggregation provides the rationale to search natural effective molecules able to interfere with TTR amyloid aggregation by hindering the appearance of toxic species or by favoring the growth of harmless aggregates. Here we carried out an in depth biophysical and morphological study on the molecular features of the aggregation of wt- and L55P-TTR involved in SSA or FAP/FAC, respectively, and on the interference with fibril aggregation, stability and toxicity to cardiac HL-1 cells to demonstrate the ability of Oleuropein aglycone (OleA), the main phenolic component of the extra virgin olive oil. We describe the molecular basis of such interference and the resulting reduction of TTR amyloid aggregate cytotoxicity. Our data offer the possibility to validate and optimize the use of OleA or its molecular scaffold to rationally design promising drugs against TTR-related pathologies that could enter a clinical experimental phase. PMID:27012632

  13. {alpha}-Lipoic acid exhibits anti-amyloidogenicity for {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hirohata, Mie; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2006-03-24

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of {alpha}-lipoic acid (LA) and the metabolic product of LA, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 {sup o}C in vitro. LA and DHLA dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-protein, as well as their extension. Moreover, they destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. LA and DHLA could be key molecules for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  14. Patterning nanofibrils through the templated growth of multiple modified amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Ken; Kudoh, Fuki; Kamada, Rui; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the patterning of functionalized nanowires because of the potential applications of these materials to the construction of nanodevices. A variety of biomolecular building blocks containing amyloid peptides have been used to functionalize nanowires. However, the patterning of self-assembled nanowires can be challenging because of the difficulties associated with controlling the self-assembly of these functionalized building blocks. Herein, we present a versatile approach for the patterning of nanowires based on the combination of templated fibril growth with a versatile functionalization method using our structure-controllable amyloid peptides (SCAPs). Using this approach, we have succeeded in the formation of multi-type nanowires with tandem domain structures in high yields. Given that the mixing-SCAP method can lead to the formation of tandem fibrils, it is noteworthy that our method allowed us to control the initiation of fibril formation from the gold nanoparticles, which were attached to a short fibril as initiation points. This approach could be used to prepare a wide variety of fibril patterns, and therefore holds great potential for the development of novel self-assembled nanodevices. PMID:27559011

  15. Patterning nanofibrils through the templated growth of multiple modified amyloid peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Ken; Kudoh, Fuki; Kamada, Rui; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable interest in the patterning of functionalized nanowires because of the potential applications of these materials to the construction of nanodevices. A variety of biomolecular building blocks containing amyloid peptides have been used to functionalize nanowires. However, the patterning of self-assembled nanowires can be challenging because of the difficulties associated with controlling the self-assembly of these functionalized building blocks. Herein, we present a versatile approach for the patterning of nanowires based on the combination of templated fibril growth with a versatile functionalization method using our structure-controllable amyloid peptides (SCAPs). Using this approach, we have succeeded in the formation of multi-type nanowires with tandem domain structures in high yields. Given that the mixing-SCAP method can lead to the formation of tandem fibrils, it is noteworthy that our method allowed us to control the initiation of fibril formation from the gold nanoparticles, which were attached to a short fibril as initiation points. This approach could be used to prepare a wide variety of fibril patterns, and therefore holds great potential for the development of novel self-assembled nanodevices.

  16. Patterning nanofibrils through the templated growth of multiple modified amyloid peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Ken; Kudoh, Fuki; Kamada, Rui; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the patterning of functionalized nanowires because of the potential applications of these materials to the construction of nanodevices. A variety of biomolecular building blocks containing amyloid peptides have been used to functionalize nanowires. However, the patterning of self-assembled nanowires can be challenging because of the difficulties associated with controlling the self-assembly of these functionalized building blocks. Herein, we present a versatile approach for the patterning of nanowires based on the combination of templated fibril growth with a versatile functionalization method using our structure-controllable amyloid peptides (SCAPs). Using this approach, we have succeeded in the formation of multi-type nanowires with tandem domain structures in high yields. Given that the mixing-SCAP method can lead to the formation of tandem fibrils, it is noteworthy that our method allowed us to control the initiation of fibril formation from the gold nanoparticles, which were attached to a short fibril as initiation points. This approach could be used to prepare a wide variety of fibril patterns, and therefore holds great potential for the development of novel self-assembled nanodevices. PMID:27559011

  17. Double-Layer Mediated Electromechanical Response of Amyloid Fibrils in Liquid Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Maxim; Thompson, G. L.; Reukov, Vladimir V; Jesse, Stephen; Guo, Senli; Rodriguez, Brian; Seal, Katyayani; Vertegel, Alexey; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    Harnessing electrical bias-induced mechanical motion on the nanometer and molecular scale is a critical step toward understanding the fundamental mechanisms of redox processes and implementation of molecular electromechanical machines. Probing these phenomena in biomolecular systems requires electromechanical measurements be performed in liquid environments. Here we demonstrate the use of band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for probing electromechanical coupling in amyloid fibrils. The approaches for separating the elastic and electromechanical contributions based on functional fits and multivariate statistical analysis are presented. We demonstrate that in the bulk of the fibril the electromechanical response is dominated by double-layer effects (consistent with shear piezoelectricity of biomolecules), while a number of electromechanically active hot spots possibly related to structural defects are observed.

  18. Deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy of β-sheet amyloid fibrils: a QM/MM simulation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hao; Jiang, Jun; Mukamel, Shaul

    2011-12-01

    We present a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics study of the deep ultraviolet ππ* resonance Raman spectra of β-sheet amyloid fibrils Aβ(34-42) and Aβ(1-40). Effects of conformational fluctuations are described using a Ramachandran angle map, thus avoiding repeated ab initio calculations. Experimentally observed effects of hydrogen-deuterium exchange are reproduced. We propose that the AmIII band redshift upon deuteration is caused by the loss of coupling between C(α)-H bending and N-D bending modes, rather than by peptide bond hydration.

  19. Reflection-mode TERS on Insulin Amyloid Fibrils with Top-Visual AFM Probes.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Manola; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Descrovi, Emiliano; Das, Gobind; Leoncini, Marco; Liberale, Carlo; De Angelis, Francesco; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2013-03-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy provides chemical information while raster scanning samples with topographical detail. The coupling of atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy in top illumination optical setup is a powerful configuration to resolve nanometer structures while collecting reflection mode backscattered signal. Here, we theoretically calculate the field enhancement generated by TER spectroscopy with top illumination geometry and we apply the technique to the characterization of insulin amyloid fibrils. We experimentally confirm that this technique is able to enhance the Raman signal of the polypeptide chain by a factor of 10(5), thus revealing details down to few molecules resolution.

  20. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    SciTech Connect

    García-González, Victor; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  1. An anti-Aβ (amyloid β) single-chain variable fragment prevents amyloid fibril formation and cytotoxicity by withdrawing Aβ oligomers from the amyloid pathway.

    PubMed

    Marín-Argany, Marta; Rivera-Hernández, Geovanny; Martí, Joaquim; Villegas, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    Aβ (amyloid β) immunotherapy has been revealed as a possible tool in Alzheimer's disease treatment. In contrast with complete antibodies, the administration of scFvs (single-chain variable fragments) produces neither meningoencephalitis nor cerebral haemorrhage. In the present study, the recombinant expression of scFv-h3D6, a derivative of an antibody specific for Aβ oligomers, is presented, as well as the subsequent proof of its capability to recover the toxicity induced by the Aβ1-42 peptide in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. To gain insight into the conformational changes underlying the prevention of Aβ toxicity by this antibody fragment, the conformational landscape of scFv-h3D6 upon temperature perturbation is also described. Heating the native state does not lead to any extent of unfolding, but rather directly to a β-rich intermediate state which initiates an aggregation pathway. This aggregation pathway is not an amyloid fibril pathway, as is that followed by the Aβ peptide, but rather a worm-like fibril pathway which, noticeably, turns out to be non-toxic. On the other hand, this pathway is thermodynamically and kinetically favoured when the scFv-h3D6 and Aβ1-42 oligomers form a complex in native conditions, explaining how the scFv-h3D6 withdraws Aβ1-42 oligomers from the amyloid pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a conformational mechanism by which a scFv prevents Aβ-oligomer cytotoxicity.

  2. Assembly of amyloid β peptides in the presence of fibril seeds: one-pot coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Chen, Yonggang; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2014-08-01

    The identification of a secondary nucleation pathway in the early aggregation of amyloid peptides suggests that the generation of toxic oligomers involves both monomers and preformed fibril seeds. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism, a set of one-pot coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations was performed to investigate the self-assembly of amyloid β peptides in the presence of fibril seeds. It was observed that fibril seeds alone randomly assemble into an elongated protofibril, whereas monomers alone form an elongated globular oligomer with various morphologies. In the mixture of monomers and fibril seeds, both the self-assembly of monomers into small oligomers and the association of monomers and oligomers on the surface of fibril seeds are primarily driven by hydrophobic interactions. The cooperativity of conformational selection and competition leads to different binding propensity of two hydrophobic surfaces of fibril seeds. The molecular architecture of the final aggregate shows that the fibril seeds establish the elongated framework, and oligomers cover them. Oligomers exposed to the solvent are less compact and unstable and can be disassociated from the fibril seeds, providing an origin for oligomers generated from the secondary nucleation pathway.

  3. Structural Characterization of Semen Coagulum-Derived SEM1(86–107) Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SEM1(86–107) is a 22-residue peptide corresponding to residues 86–107 in the semenogelin I protein. SEM1(86–107) is an abundant component of freshly liquefied semen and forms amyloid fibrils capable of enhancing HIV infection. To probe the factors affecting fibril formation and gain a better understanding of how differences in pH between semen and vaginal fluid affect fibril stability, this study determined the effect of pH on SEM1(86–107) fibril formation and dissociation. The SEM1(86–107) fibril structure (i.e., residues that comprise the fibrillar core) was also probed using hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) and hydroxyl radical-mediated protein modification. The average percent exposure to hydroxyl radical-mediated modification in the SEM1(86–107) fibrils was determined without requiring tandem mass spectrometry spectral acquisition or complete separation of modified peptides. It was found that the residue exposures calculated from HDXMS and hydroxyl radical-mediated modification were similar. These techniques demonstrated that three regions of SEM1(86–107) comprise the amyloid fibril core and that positively charged residues are exposed, suggesting that electrostatic interactions between SEM1(86–107) and HIV or the cell surface may be responsible for mediating HIV infection enhancement by the SEM1(86–107) fibrils. PMID:24811874

  4. Neuronal fibrillogenesis: amyloid fibrils from primary neuronal cultures impair long-term memory in the crab Chasmagnathus.

    PubMed

    Romano, Arturo; Serafino, Annalucia; Krasnowska, Ewa; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Calissano, Pietro; Ruberti, Francesca; Galli, Cinzia

    2003-12-17

    Amyloid beta protein (Abeta) fibrillogenesis is considered one of the crucial steps of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. The effect of endogenous neuronal amyloid fibrils on memory processes is unknown. To investigate this issue, we first characterised the Abeta fibrillar aggregates secreted by cerebellar granule cells and then we evaluated the effect of neuronal fibrils on an invertebrate model of memory. An increase of fibril formation, assessed by Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, was observed in the conditioned medium of apoptotic neurons during 48 h of the apoptotic process. Moreover, the depolarisation-stimulated secretion of cerebellar granule cells contains monomers of endogenous Abeta, which undergo cell-free fibrillogenesis over several days of incubation. The pattern of single endogenous fibrils, examined by electron microscopy, was similar to that of synthetic Abeta while a tighter and more complex interfibrillar organization was observed in endogenous fibrils. The biological effect of neuronal fibrils was studied in a long-term memory (LTM) paradigm, namely the context-signal learning of the crab Chasmagnathus. Pre-training injection of neuronal fibril extract (protein concentration, 1 microg/ml) induced amnesia in a dose-dependent manner. On the contrary, no effect on retention was observed with the administration of two orders higher doses (100 microg/ml) of synthetic Abeta1-40. These results indicate that only naturally secreted fibrils, but not synthetic Abeta, clearly interfere with memory process.

  5. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloidfibril models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  6. Frequency distribution of the amide-I vibration sorted by residues in Amyloid fibrils revealed by 2D-IR measurements and simulations

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, Cyril; Zhuang, Wei; Kim, Yung Sam; Axelsen, Paul H.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    The infrared optical response of Amyloid Fibrils Aβ1–40 is investigated. Simulations of two models corresponding to different protonation states are compared with experiment. The simulations reveal that vibrational frequency distributions inside the fibrils are dominated by sidechain fluctuations. We further confirm earlier suggestions based on 2D-IR measurements that water molecules can be trapped inside the fibrils. PMID:22338639

  7. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Langkilde, Annette E.; Morris, Kyle L.; Serpell, Louise C.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-04-01

    The aggregation process and the fibril state of an amyloidogenic peptide suggest monomer addition to be the prevailing mechanism of elongation and a model of the peptide packing in the fibrils has been obtained. Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods.

  8. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Amyloid-β peptide fibrils induce nitro-oxidative stress in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Ill-Raga, Gerard; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Guix, Francesc X; Tajes, Marta; Bosch-Morató, Mónica; Palomer, Ernest; Godoy, Juan; Belmar, Sebastián; Cerpa, Waldo; Simpkins, James W; Inestrosa And, Nibaldo C; Muñoz, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    Different mechanisms including oxidative stress are proposed for amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) neurotoxicity, and here we contribute to demonstrate that nitro-oxidative stress is playing a key role. Yeasts are a well-known model for H2O2 toxicity. Interestingly, yeast cell wall prevents interaction of Aβ fibrils with membrane receptors or calcium channels and we found a significant viability reduction in yeasts when challenged with Aβ fibrils. Furthermore, iron and copper chelators, as well as the antioxidants glutathione and trolox, were neuroprotective on neuroblastoma cells and mouse hippocampal neurons challenged with Aβ fibrils. Glutathione prevents the oxidation, glycation and nitrotyrosination of cell proteins induced by Aβ. Trolox protected neurons in cell viability studies, maintaining the vesicular transport integrity and preventing the trigger of apoptotic mechanisms. Interestingly, we have also found that brain derived neuronal factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) were able to protect mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons against H2O2 and Aβ fibrils. Considering that superoxide anion, produced by Aβ cell damage, and nitric oxide, whose production is altered in AD, react to form the highly reactive peroxynitrite anion, we studied the role of trolox to ameliorate the peroxynitrite cell damage. Finally, one of the major proteins to be nitrotyrosinated in AD, the triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) was assayed searching for a denitrase activity that could reverse intracellular nitrotyrosination. We have found that human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells express a constitutive denitrase activity that partially denitrated nitro-TPI. Altogether, our results support a key role of nitro-oxidative stress in the neuronal damage induced by Aβ fibrils. PMID:20858976

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Curcumin-Cu(II) and Curcumin-Zn(II) Complexes on Amyloid-Beta Peptide Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear complexes of Curcumin with Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized and, characterized and their effects on the fibrillization and aggregation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide have been studied. FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations demonstrate that the complexes can inhibit the transition from less structured oligomers to β-sheet rich protofibrils which act as seeding factors for further fibrillization. The metal complexes also impart more improved inhibitory effects than Curcumin on peptide fibrillization. PMID:25147492

  11. Degeneration of amyloidfibrils caused by exposure to low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Eisuke; Ohashi, Gai; Yoshida, Tomonori; Margareta Sörgjerd, Karin; Zako, Tamotsu; Maeda, Mizuo; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma was applied to degenerate amyloid-ß (Aß) fibrils, which are a major component of neuritic plaque associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We showed that an Aß fibril exposed to a low-frequency (LF) plasma jet in aqueous solution retained its morphology, molecular weight, and cytotoxicity, but, intriguingly, decreased in protease resistance and ß-sheet content. These results suggested that an LF plasma jet could be utilized for the treatment of AD to eliminate neuritic plaque by accelerating the proteolysis of Aß fibrils.

  12. Structural model of the amyloid fibril formed by beta(2)-microglobulin #21-31 fragment based on vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu; Goto, Yuji; Naiki, Hironobu; Kitagawa, Teizo

    2005-06-01

    A structural model of amyloid fibril formed by the #21-31 fragment of beta2-microglobulin is proposed from microscope IR measurements on specifically 13C-labeled peptide fibrils and Raman spectra of the dispersed fibril solution. The 13C-shifted amide frequency indicated the secondary structure of the labeled residues. The IR spectra have demonstrated that the region between F22 and V27 forms the core part with the extended beta-sheet structure. Raman spectra indicated the formation of a dimer with a disulfide bridge between C25 residues.

  13. Hydrophobic tail length plays a pivotal role in amyloid beta (25-35) fibril-surfactant interactions.

    PubMed

    Bag, Sudipta; Chaudhury, Susmitnarayan; Pramanik, Dibyendu; DasGupta, Sunando; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2016-09-01

    The amyloid β-peptide fragment comprising residues 25-35 (Aβ25-35 ) is known to be the most toxic fragment of the full length Aβ peptide which undergoes fibrillation very rapidly. In the present work, we have investigated the effects of the micellar environment (cationic, anionic, and nonionic) on preformed Aβ25-35 fibrils. The amyloid fibrils have been prepared and characterized by several biophysical and microscopic techniques. Effects of cationic dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and nonionic polyoxyethyleneoctyl phenyl ether (Triton X-100 or TX) on fibrils have been studied by Thioflavin T fluorescence, UV-vis spectroscopy based turbidity assay and microscopic analyses. Interestingly, DTAB and SDS micelles were observed to disintegrate prepared fibrils to some extent irrespective of their charges. CTAB micelles were found to break down the fibrillar assembly to a greater extent. On the other hand, the nonionic surfactant TX was found to trigger the fibrillation process. The presence of a longer hydrophobic tail in case of CTAB is assumed to be a reason for its higher fibril disaggregating efficacy, the premise of their formation being largely attributed to hydrophobic interactions. Proteins 2016; 84:1213-1223. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Microscopic factors that control beta-sheet registry in amyloid fibrils formed by fragment 11-25 of amyloid beta peptide: insights from computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Baumketner, Andrij

    2009-06-26

    Short fragments of amyloidogenic proteins are widely used as model systems in studies of amyloid formation. Fragment 11-25 of the amyloid beta protein involved in Alzheimer's disease (Abeta11-25) was recently shown to form amyloid fibrils composed of anti-parallel beta-sheets. Interestingly, fibrils grown under neutral and acidic conditions were seen to possess different registries of their inter-beta-strand hydrogen bonds. In an effort to explain the microscopic origin of this pH dependence, we studied Abeta11-25 fibrils using methods of theoretical modeling. Several structural models were built for fibrils at low and neutral pH levels and these were examined in short molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water. The models that displayed the lowest free energy, as estimated using an implicit solvent model, were selected as representative of the true fibrillar structure. It was shown that the registry of these models agrees well with the experimental results. At neutral pH, the main contribution to the free energy difference between the two registries comes from the electrostatic interactions. The charge group of the carboxy terminus makes a large contribution to these interactions and thus appears to have a critical role in determining the registry.

  15. Class I Hydrophobin Vmh2 Adopts Atypical Mechanisms to Self-Assemble into Functional Amyloid Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Gravagnuolo, Alfredo Maria; Longobardi, Sara; Luchini, Alessandra; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; De Stefano, Luca; Notomista, Eugenio; Paduano, Luigi; Giardina, Paola

    2016-03-14

    Hydrophobins are fungal proteins whose functions are mainly based on their capability to self-assemble into amphiphilic films at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (HHI). It is widely accepted that class I hydrophobins form amyloid-like structures, named rodlets, which are hundreds of nanometers long, packed into ordered lateral assemblies and do not exhibit an overall helical structure. We studied the self-assembly of the Class I hydrophobin Vmh2 from Pleurotus ostreatus in aqueous solutions by dynamic light scattering (DLS), thioflavin T (ThT), fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD), cryogenic trasmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and TEM. Vmh2 does not form fibrillar aggregates at HHI. It exhibits spherical and fibrillar assemblies whose ratio depends on the protein concentration when freshly solubilized at pH ≥ 7. Moreover, it spontaneously self-assembles into isolated, micrometer long, and twisted amyloid fibrils, observed for the first time in fungal hydrophobins. This process is promoted by acidic pH, temperature, and Ca(2+) ions. A model of self-assembly into amyloid-like structures has been proposed. PMID:26828412

  16. Insights on the binding of thioflavin derivative markers to amyloid fibril models and Aβ{sub 1-40} fibrils from computational approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Alí-Torres, Jorge; Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Rodriguez-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2014-10-06

    The present contribution analyzes the binding of ThT and neutral ThT derivatives to a β-sheet model by means of quantum chemical calculations. In addition, we study the properties of four molecules: (2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBX), 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (HBT) and their respective iodinated compounds, HBXI and HBTI, in binding to amyloid fibril models and Aβ{sub 1-40}fibrils by using a combination of docking, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations.

  17. Multiple Substitutions of Methionine 129 in Human Prion Protein Reveal Its Importance in the Amyloid Fibrillation Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Sofie; Mishra, Rajesh; Hornemann, Simone; Aguzzi, Adriano; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Hammarström, Per

    2012-01-01

    The role of the polymorphism Met or Val in position 129 in the human prion protein is well documented regarding disease susceptibility and clinical manifestations. However, little is known about the molecular background to this phenomenon. We investigated herein the conformational stability, amyloid fibrillation kinetics, and seeding propensity of different 129 mutants, located in β-strand 1 of PrP (Met129 (WT), M129A, M129V, M129L, M129W, M129P, M129E, M129K, and M129C) in HuPrP(90–231). The mutations M129V, M129L, M129K, and M129C did not affect stability (midpoints of thermal denaturation, Tm = 65–66 °C), whereas the mutants M129A and M129E and the largest side chain M129W were destabilized by 3–4 °C. The most destabilizing substitution was M129P, which lowered the Tm by 7.2 °C. All mutants, except for M129C, formed amyloid-like fibrils within hours during fibril formation under near physiological conditions. Fibril-forming mutants showed a sigmoidal kinetic profile and showed shorter lag times during seeding with preformed amyloid fibrils implicating a nucleated polymerization reaction. In the spontaneous reactions, the lag time of fibril formation was rather uniform for the mutants M129A, M129V, and M129L resembling the wild type. When the substituted amino acid had a distinct feature discriminating it from the wild type, such as size (M129W), charge (M129E, M129K), or rotational constraint (M129P), the fibrillation was impeded. M129C did not form ThT/Congo red-positive fibrils, and non-reducing SDS-PAGE of M129C during fibrillation conditions at different time points revealed covalent dimer formation already 15 min after fibrillation reaction initiation. Position 129 appears to be a key site for dictating PrP receptiveness toward recruitment into the amyloid state. PMID:22669942

  18. Structural Characterization of the Partially Folded Intermediates of An Immunoglobulin Light Chain Leading to Amyloid Fibrillation And Amorphous Aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Z.; Hu, D.; Zhu, M.; Fink, A.L.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-07-12

    Immunoglobulin light chain deposition diseases involve various types of extracellular deposition of light chain variable domains, including amyloid fibrils and amorphous deposits. The decreased thermodynamic stability of the light chain is believed to be the major factor leading to fibrillation. However, the differences in the nature of the deposits among the light chain deposition diseases raise the question of whether the mechanisms leading to fibrillar or amorphous aggregation is different. In this study, we generated two partially folded intermediates of the light chain variable domain SMA in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) and characterized their conformations. The more unfolded intermediate formed fibrils most rapidly, while the more native-like intermediate predominantly led to amorphous deposits. The results also show that the monomeric, rather than the dimeric state, was critical for fibrillation. The data also indicate that fibril elongation involves addition of a partially unfolded intermediate, rather than the native state. We postulate that a more highly unfolded intermediate is more suited to undergo the topological rearrangements necessary to form amyloid fibrils than a more structured one and that this also correlates with increased destabilization. In the case of light chain aggregation, it appears that more native-like intermediate conformations are more prone to form amorphous deposits.

  19. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langkilde, Annette E; Morris, Kyle L; Serpell, Louise C; Svergun, Dmitri I; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-04-01

    Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods. PMID:25849399

  20. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloid-β peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  1. Capturing a reactive state of amyloid aggregates: NMR-based characterization of copper-bound Alzheimer disease amyloid β-fibrils in a redox cycle.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Yoo, Brian; McElheny, Dan; Tay, William; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of redox-active copper ions with misfolded amyloid β (Aβ) is linked to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which has been associated with oxidative stress and neuronal damages in Alzheimer disease. Despite intensive studies, it is still not conclusive how the interaction of Cu(+)/Cu(2+) with Aβ aggregates leads to ROS production even at the in vitro level. In this study, we examined the interaction between Cu(+)/Cu(2+) and Aβ fibrils by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) and other spectroscopic methods. Our photometric studies confirmed the production of ~60 μM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from a solution of 20 μM Cu(2+) ions in complex with Aβ(1-40) in fibrils ([Cu(2+)]/[Aβ] = 0.4) within 2 h of incubation after addition of biological reducing agent ascorbate at the physiological concentration (~1 mM). Furthermore, SSNMR (1)H T1 measurements demonstrated that during ROS production the conversion of paramagnetic Cu(2+) into diamagnetic Cu(+) occurs while the reactive Cu(+) ions remain bound to the amyloid fibrils. The results also suggest that O2 is required for rapid recycling of Cu(+) bound to Aβ back to Cu(2+), which allows for continuous production of H2O2. Both (13)C and (15)N SSNMR results show that Cu(+) coordinates to Aβ(1-40) fibrils primarily through the side chain Nδ of both His-13 and His-14, suggesting major rearrangements from the Cu(2+) coordination via Nε in the redox cycle. (13)C SSNMR chemical shift analysis suggests that the overall Aβ conformations are largely unaffected by Cu(+) binding. These results present crucial site-specific evidence of how the full-length Aβ in amyloid fibrils offers catalytic Cu(+) centers.

  2. Evaluation of β-Amyloid Peptides Fibrillation Induced by Nanomaterials Based on Molecular Dynamics and Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yafei; Li, Pengfei; Zhou, Hongjian; Zhu, Xiaoli; Chen, Haifeng; Lee, Jaebeom; Koh, Kwangnak; Shen, Zhongming; Chen, Hongxia

    2015-02-01

    This report investigated the effect of carbon nanomaterials, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and graphene oxide, on fibrillation of β-amyloid 40 (Aβ40) based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and molecular dynamics (MD). MD simulations are carried out in order to reveal the molecular mechanisms of the interaction between nanomaterials and Aβ40. The strong interaction between Aβ40 and nanomaterials is related to Van der Waals forces and the Coulomb force, inducing delicate manipulation of the main bonding energy for fibrillation of Aβ40. The interaction energy between the Aβ peptide and graphene is higher than that of SWCNT. Experimental results show both carbon nanomaterials enhance the appearance of a critical nucleus for nucleation of peptide fibrils. Graphene is more beneficial to assist the nucleation process than SWCNT. Combination of SPR and molecular dynamics could be a high-throughput method to screen protein fibrillation.

  3. Extrusion of amyloid fibrils to the extracellular space in experimental mesangial AL-amyloidosis: transmission and scanning electron microscopy studies and correlation with renal biopsy observations.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jiamin; Turbat-Herrera, Elba A; Herrera, Guillermo A

    2014-04-01

    In vitro studies have provided much information regarding the process of glomerular AL-amyloidogenesis. Research efforts have been successful in deciphering how glomerulopathic light chains interact with mesangial cells. The sequential steps involved in the genesis of amyloid fibrils include interactions with surface caveolae in mesangial cells and internalization of the monoclonal light chains through a clathrin-mediated process followed by trafficking in the mesangial cells to the mature lysosomal compartment where fibrils are formed. This manuscript focuses on how mesangial cells, once amyloid has been formed, deliver the fibrils to the extracellular matrix. The delivery of amyloid fibrils to the outside of the cells is carried out by lysosomes, which abut the mesangial cell membranes and extrude their contents into the extracellular space. This final step responsible for the fibrils to be present predominantly in the extracellular space is well demonstrated with scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Estrogen has anti-amyloidogenic effects on Alzheimer's {beta}-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Morinaga, Akiyoshi; Hirohata, Mie; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-03

    Inhibition of the assembly of amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) as well as the destabilization of preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}) in the central nervous system could be valuable therapeutics of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have indicated that estrogen therapy reduced the risk of developing AD in women. Here, we examined the effects of estrogen (estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3)) and related sexual steroids (androstenedione (AND) and testosterone (TES)) on the polymerization, extension and destabilization of fA{beta}(1-42) and fA{beta}(1-40) at pH 7.5 at 37 {sup o}C in vitro, using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies. E1, E2, and E3 dose-dependently inhibited the formation, as well as destabilization of fA{beta}s. The overall anti-amyloidogenic activity of these molecules was in the order of: E3 > E2 = E1 >>AND = TES. Estrogen could be a potential therapeutic agent to prevent or delay AD progression.

  5. Preformed {beta}-amyloid fibrils are destabilized by coenzyme Q{sub 10} in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Naiki, Hironobu; Yamada, Masahito . E-mail: m-yamada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2005-04-29

    Inhibition of the formation of {beta}-amyloid fibrils (fA{beta}), as well as the destabilization of preformed fA{beta} in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and wine-related polyphenol, myricetin (Myr), inhibit fA{beta} formation from A{beta} and destabilize preformed fA{beta} in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of coenzyme Q{sub 10} (CoQ{sub 10}) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fA{beta} at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of CoQ{sub 10} with NDGA and Myr. CoQ{sub 10} dose-dependently inhibited fA{beta} formation from amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}), as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fA{beta}s. The anti-amyloidogenic effects of CoQ{sub 10} were slightly weaker than those of NDGA and Myr. CoQ{sub 10} could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD.

  6. Protein engineering as a strategy to avoid formation of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, V.; Zurdo, J.; Filimonov, V. V.; Avilés, F. X.; Dobson, C. M.; Serrano, L.

    2000-01-01

    The activation domain of human procarboxypeptidase A2 (ADA2h) aggregates following thermal or chemical denaturation at acidic pH. The aggregated material contains well-defined ordered structures with all the characteristics of the fibrils associated with amyloidotic diseases. Variants of ADA2h containing a series of mutations designed to increase the local stability of each of the two helical regions of the protein have been found to have a substantially reduced propensity to form fibrils. This arises from a reduced tendency of the denatured species to aggregate rather than from a change in the overall stability of the native state. The reduction in aggregation propensity may result from an increase in the stability of local relative to longer range interactions within the polypeptide chain. These findings show that the intrinsic ability of a protein to form amyloid can be altered substantially by protein engineering methods without perturbing significantly its overall stability or activity. This suggests new strategies for combating diseases associated with the formation of aggregated proteins and for the design of novel protein or peptide therapeutics. PMID:11045616

  7. Conformational Stability of Mammalian Prion Protein Amyloid Fibrils Is Dictated by a Packing Polymorphism within the Core Region*

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Nathan J.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Chen, Shugui; Smirnovas, Vytautas; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian prion strains are believed to arise from the propagation of distinct conformations of the misfolded prion protein PrPSc. One key operational parameter used to define differences between strains has been conformational stability of PrPSc as defined by resistance to thermal and/or chemical denaturation. However, the structural basis of these stability differences is unknown. To bridge this gap, we have generated two strains of recombinant human prion protein amyloid fibrils that show dramatic differences in conformational stability and have characterized them by a number of biophysical methods. Backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments revealed that, in sharp contrast to previously studied strains of infectious amyloid formed from the yeast prion protein Sup35, differences in β-sheet core size do not underlie differences in conformational stability between strains of mammalian prion protein amyloid. Instead, these stability differences appear to be dictated by distinct packing arrangements (i.e. steric zipper interfaces) within the amyloid core, as indicated by distinct x-ray fiber diffraction patterns and large strain-dependent differences in hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics for histidine side chains within the core region. Although this study was limited to synthetic prion protein amyloid fibrils, a similar structural basis for strain-dependent conformational stability may apply to brain-derived PrPSc, especially because large strain-specific differences in PrPSc stability are often observed despite a similar size of the PrPSc core region. PMID:24338015

  8. Fibril growth and seeding capacity play key roles in α-synuclein-mediated apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Mahul-Mellier, A-L; Vercruysse, F; Maco, B; Ait-Bouziad, N; De Roo, M; Muller, D; Lashuel, H A

    2015-12-01

    The role of extracellular α-synuclein (α-syn) in the initiation and the spreading of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been studied extensively over the past 10 years. However, the nature of the α-syn toxic species and the molecular mechanisms by which they may contribute to neuronal cell loss remain controversial. In this study, we show that fully characterized recombinant monomeric, fibrillar or stabilized forms of oligomeric α-syn do not trigger significant cell death when added individually to neuroblastoma cell lines. However, a mixture of preformed fibrils (PFFs) with monomeric α-syn becomes toxic under conditions that promote their growth and amyloid formation. In hippocampal primary neurons and ex vivo hippocampal slice cultures, α-syn PFFs are capable of inducing a moderate toxicity over time that is greatly exacerbated upon promoting fibril growth by addition of monomeric α-syn. The causal relationship between α-syn aggregation and cellular toxicity was further investigated by assessing the effect of inhibiting fibrillization on α-syn-induced cell death. Remarkably, our data show that blocking fibril growth by treatment with known pharmacological inhibitor of α-syn fibrillization (Tolcapone) or replacing monomeric α-syn by monomeric β-synuclein in α-syn mixture composition prevent α-syn-induced toxicity in both neuroblastoma cell lines and hippocampal primary neurons. We demonstrate that exogenously added α-syn fibrils bind to the plasma membrane and serve as nucleation sites for the formation of α-syn fibrils and promote the accumulation and internalization of these aggregates that in turn activate both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic cell death pathways in our cellular models. Our results support the hypothesis that ongoing aggregation and fibrillization of extracellular α-syn play central roles in α-syn extracellular toxicity, and suggest that inhibiting fibril growth and seeding capacity constitute a viable

  9. Hybrid nanocomposites of gold single-crystal platelets and amyloid fibrils with tunable fluorescence, conductivity, and sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoxu; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-07-19

    Gold single-crystal platelets with high aspect ratio are combined with amyloid fibrils to design a new class of hybrid nanocomposites. The films gather physical properties from both constituents, for example, plasmon resonance, fluorescence, and water-dependent conductivities ranging from insulating to metallic levels, yet mirroring gold within a broad range of composition, and can serve multiple purposes such as sensors, diagnostic, printed electronics, micromechanical, and biological devices.

  10. High-resolution molecular structure of a peptide in an amyloid fibril determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Macphee, Cait E.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; McMahon, Michael T.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2004-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are self-assembled filamentous structures associated with protein deposition conditions including Alzheimer's disease and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Despite the immense medical importance of amyloid fibrils, no atomic-resolution structures are available for these materials, because the intact fibrils are insoluble and do not form diffraction-quality 3D crystals. Here we report the high-resolution structure of a peptide fragment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin, TTR(105-115), in its fibrillar form, determined by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. The structure resolves not only the backbone fold but also the precise conformation of the side chains. Nearly complete 13C and 15N resonance assignments for TTR(105-115) formed the basis for the extraction of a set of distance and dihedral angle restraints. A total of 76 self-consistent experimental measurements, including 41 restraints on 19 backbone dihedral angles and 35 13C-15N distances between 3 and 6 Å were obtained from 2D and 3D NMR spectra recorded on three fibril samples uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled in consecutive stretches of four amino acids and used to calculate an ensemble of peptide structures. Our results indicate that TTR(105-115) adopts an extended -strand conformation in the amyloid fibrils such that both the main- and side-chain torsion angles are close to their optimal values. Moreover, the structure of this peptide in the fibrillar form has a degree of long-range order that is generally associated only with crystalline materials. These findings provide an explanation of the unusual stability and characteristic properties of this form of polypeptide assembly.

  11. Double-stranded DNA stereoselectively promotes aggregation of amyloid-like fibrils and generates peptide/DNA matrices.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masanori; Hara, Sachiko; Yamada, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2014-11-01

    An amyloidogenic LAM-L peptide (AASIKVAVSADR, all-L configuration) derived from laminin promoted cell adhesion, neurite outgrowth, and angiogenesis. Here, we prepared novel matrices using double-stranded DNA and the LAM-L peptide. Double-stranded DNA promoted aggregation of amyloid-like fibrils and generated a LAM-L/DNA matrix through electrostatic interactions between the phosphate groups of DNA and the amino groups of LAM-L. This formation of peptide/DNA matrix depends on the Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val (IKVAV) sequence in the peptide, since LAM-RM peptide (AASVVIAKSADR), which is scrambled peptide of LAM-L, did not form a matrix with DNA. Further, LAM-D (all-D configuration of LAM-L), which forms amyloid-like fibrils and promotes similar biological activities as LAM-L, did not form amyloid-like fibrils with DNA, suggesting that DNA selectively interacts with the L-configured peptide. Moreover, the LAM-L/DNA matrices showed stronger cell attachment activity compared with LAM-L alone, suggesting the LAM-L/DNA matrices have potential for use as a novel biomaterial in tissue engineering.

  12. Disaggregation-induced fluorescence enhancement of NIAD-4 for the optical imaging of amyloidfibrils.

    PubMed

    Peccati, Francesca; Hernando, Jordi; Blancafort, Lluís; Solans-Monfort, Xavier; Sodupe, Mariona

    2015-08-14

    The main hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates in the brain. An early diagnosis of the disease requires a fast and accurate detection of such aggregates in vivo. NIAD-4 is one of the most promising in vivo markers developed due to its high emission at λ > 600 nm and its ability to rapidly cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and target Aβ deposits. Furthermore, it shows a dramatic fluorescence enhancement upon binding to amyloid fibrils, which is essential for attaining good imaging contrast. Aiming at establishing novel design concepts for the preparation of optimized optical probes, the current work rationalizes the excellent performance of NIAD-4 by using a pool of computational (TD-DFT and CASPT2 calculations, ab initio molecular dynamics and protein energy landscape exploration) and spectroscopic techniques. Unlike other markers operating as molecular rotors or polarity-sensitive dyes, we uncover herein that the high fluorescence imaging contrast observed upon NIAD-4 binding to amyloid fibrils results from reversible aggregation. NIAD-4 forms non-emissive assemblies in aqueous solution already at very low concentrations, which convert into the highly fluorescent monomeric species by diffusion into the hydrophobic voids of Aβ deposits. This result paves the way to exploit aggregation-induced processes as a new strategy towards advanced fluorescence markers for amyloid detection. PMID:26123993

  13. Disaggregation-induced fluorescence enhancement of NIAD-4 for the optical imaging of amyloidfibrils.

    PubMed

    Peccati, Francesca; Hernando, Jordi; Blancafort, Lluís; Solans-Monfort, Xavier; Sodupe, Mariona

    2015-08-14

    The main hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates in the brain. An early diagnosis of the disease requires a fast and accurate detection of such aggregates in vivo. NIAD-4 is one of the most promising in vivo markers developed due to its high emission at λ > 600 nm and its ability to rapidly cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and target Aβ deposits. Furthermore, it shows a dramatic fluorescence enhancement upon binding to amyloid fibrils, which is essential for attaining good imaging contrast. Aiming at establishing novel design concepts for the preparation of optimized optical probes, the current work rationalizes the excellent performance of NIAD-4 by using a pool of computational (TD-DFT and CASPT2 calculations, ab initio molecular dynamics and protein energy landscape exploration) and spectroscopic techniques. Unlike other markers operating as molecular rotors or polarity-sensitive dyes, we uncover herein that the high fluorescence imaging contrast observed upon NIAD-4 binding to amyloid fibrils results from reversible aggregation. NIAD-4 forms non-emissive assemblies in aqueous solution already at very low concentrations, which convert into the highly fluorescent monomeric species by diffusion into the hydrophobic voids of Aβ deposits. This result paves the way to exploit aggregation-induced processes as a new strategy towards advanced fluorescence markers for amyloid detection.

  14. Purification and Refolding to Amyloid Fibrils of (His)6-tagged Recombinant Shadoo Protein Expressed as Inclusion Bodies in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaojing; Richard, Charles-Adrien; Moudjou, Mohammed; Vidic, Jasmina

    2015-12-19

    The Escherichia coli expression system is a powerful tool for the production of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. We use it to produce Shadoo, a protein belonging to the prion family. A chromatographic method for the purification of (His)6-tagged recombinant Shadoo expressed as inclusion bodies is described. The inclusion bodies are solubilized in 8 M urea and bound to a Ni(2+)-charged column to perform ion affinity chromatography. Bound proteins are eluted by a gradient of imidazole. Fractions containing Shadoo protein are subjected to size exclusion chromatography to obtain a highly purified protein. In the final step purified Shadoo is desalted to remove salts, urea and imidazole. Recombinant Shadoo protein is an important reagent for biophysical and biochemical studies of protein conformation disorders occurring in prion diseases. Many reports demonstrated that prion neurodegenerative diseases originate from the deposition of stable, ordered amyloid fibrils. Sample protocols describing how to fibrillate Shadoo into amyloid fibrils at acidic and neutral/basic pHs are presented. The methods on how to produce and fibrillate Shadoo can facilitate research in laboratories working on prion diseases, since it allows for production of large amounts of protein in a rapid and low cost manner.

  15. A structural model for Alzheimer's β-amyloid fibrils based on experimental constraints from solid state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Petkova, Aneta T.; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Balbach, John J.; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Leapman, Richard D.; Delaglio, Frank; Tycko, Robert

    2002-01-01

    We present a structural model for amyloid fibrils formed by the 40-residue β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease (Aβ1–40), based on a set of experimental constraints from solid state NMR spectroscopy. The model additionally incorporates the cross-β structural motif established by x-ray fiber diffraction and satisfies constraints on Aβ1–40 fibril dimensions and mass-per-length determined from electron microscopy. Approximately the first 10 residues of Aβ1–40 are structurally disordered in the fibrils. Residues 12–24 and 30–40 adopt β-strand conformations and form parallel β-sheets through intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Residues 25–29 contain a bend of the peptide backbone that brings the two β-sheets in contact through sidechain-sidechain interactions. A single cross-β unit is then a double-layered β-sheet structure with a hydrophobic core and one hydrophobic face. The only charged sidechains in the core are those of D23 and K28, which form salt bridges. Fibrils with minimum mass-per-length and diameter consist of two cross-β units with their hydrophobic faces juxtaposed. PMID:12481027

  16. Continuous Paranematic Ordering of Rigid and Semiflexible Amyloid-Fe3O4 Hybrid Fibrils in an External Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianguo; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Isabettini, Stéphane; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Adamcik, Jozef; Fischer, Peter; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    External magnetic field is a powerful approach to induce orientational order in originally disordered suspensions of magneto-responsive anisotropic particles. By small angle neutron scattering and optical birefringence measurement technology, we investigated the effect of magnetic field on the spatial ordering of hybrid amyloid fibrils with different aspect ratios (length-to-diameter) and flexibilities decorated by spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles. A continuous paranematic ordering from an initially isotropic suspension was observed upon increasing magnetic field strength, with spatial orientation increasing with colloidal volume fraction. At constant dimensionless concentration, stiff hybrid fibrils with varying aspect ratios and volume fractions, fall on the same master curve, with equivalent degrees of ordering at identical magnetic fields. However, the semiflexible hybrid fibrils with contour length close to persistence length exhibit a lower degree of alignment. This is consistent with Khokhlov-Semenov theoretical predictions. These findings sharpen the experimental toolbox to design colloidal systems with controllable degree of orientational ordering. PMID:27304090

  17. Formation and growth of oligomers: a Monte Carlo study of an amyloid tau fragment.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Wei; Mohanty, Sandipan; Irbäck, Anders; Huo, Shuanghong

    2008-12-01

    Small oligomers formed early in the process of amyloid fibril formation may be the major toxic species in Alzheimer's disease. We investigate the early stages of amyloid aggregation for the tau fragment AcPHF6 (Ac-VQIVYK-NH2) using an implicit solvent all-atom model and extensive Monte Carlo simulations of 12, 24, and 36 chains. A variety of small metastable aggregates form and dissolve until an aggregate of a critical size and conformation arises. However, the stable oligomers, which are beta-sheet-rich and feature many hydrophobic contacts, are not always growth-ready. The simulations indicate instead that these supercritical oligomers spend a lengthy period in equilibrium in which considerable reorganization takes place accompanied by exchange of chains with the solution. Growth competence of the stable oligomers correlates with the alignment of the strands in the beta-sheets. The larger aggregates seen in our simulations are all composed of two twisted beta-sheets, packed against each other with hydrophobic side chains at the sheet-sheet interface. These beta-sandwiches show similarities with the proposed steric zipper structure for PHF6 fibrils but have a mixed parallel/antiparallel beta-strand organization as opposed to the parallel organization found in experiments on fibrils. Interestingly, we find that the fraction of parallel beta-sheet structure increases with aggregate size. We speculate that the reorganization of the beta-sheets into parallel ones is an important rate-limiting step in the formation of PHF6 fibrils.

  18. Molecular conformation and dynamics of the Y145Stop variant of human prion protein in amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Helmus, Jonathan J.; Surewicz, Krystyna; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Surewicz, Witold K.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    A C-terminally truncated Y145Stop variant of the human prion protein (huPrP23–144) is associated with a hereditary amyloid disease known as PrP cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Previous studies have shown that recombinant huPrP23–144 can be efficiently converted in vitro to the fibrillar amyloid state, and that residues 138 and 139 play a critical role in the amyloidogenic properties of this protein. Here, we have used magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy to provide high-resolution insight into the protein backbone conformation and dynamics in fibrils formed by 13C,15N-labeled huPrP23–144. Surprisingly, we find that signals from ≈100 residues (i.e., ≈80% of the sequence) are not detected above approximately −20°C in conventional solid-state NMR spectra. Sequential resonance assignments revealed that signals, which are observed, arise exclusively from residues in the region 112–141. These resonances are remarkably narrow, exhibiting average 13C and 15N linewidths of ≈0.6 and 1 ppm, respectively. Altogether, the present findings indicate the existence of a compact, highly ordered core of huPrP23–144 amyloid encompassing residues 112–141. Analysis of 13C secondary chemical shifts identified likely β-strand segments within this core region, including β-strand 130–139 containing critical residues 138 and 139. In contrast to this relatively rigid, β-sheet-rich amyloid core, the remaining residues in huPrP23–144 amyloid fibrils under physiologically relevant conditions are largely unordered, displaying significant conformational dynamics. PMID:18436646

  19. Characterization of intermolecular structure of β(2)-microglobulin core fragments in amyloid fibrils by vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectroscopy and circular dichroism theory.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Koichi; Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu; Gekko, Kunihiko; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Woody, Robert W

    2014-03-20

    Intermolecular structures are important factors for understanding the conformational properties of amyloid fibrils. In this study, vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD) spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) theory were used for characterizing the intermolecular structures of β2-microglobulin (β2m) core fragments in the amyloid fibrils. The VUVCD spectra of β2m20-41, β2m21-31, and β2m21-29 fragments in the amyloid fibrils exhibited characteristic features, but they were affected not only by the backbone conformations but also by the aromatic side-chain conformations. To estimate the contributions of aromatic side-chains to the spectra, the theoretical spectra were calculated from the simulated structures of β2m21-29 amyloid fibrils with various types of β-sheet stacking (parallel or antiparallel) using CD theory. We found that the experimental spectrum of β2m21-29 fibrils is largely affected by aromatic-backbone couplings, which are induced by the interaction between transitions within the aromatic and backbone chromophores, and these couplings are sensitive to the type of stacking among the β-sheets of the fibrils. Further theoretical analyses of simulated structures incorporating mutated aromatic residues suggested that the β2m21-29 fibrils are composed of amyloid accumulations in which the parallel β-sheets stack in an antiparallel manner and that the characteristic Phe-Tyr interactions among the β-sheet stacks affect the aromatic-backbone coupling. These findings indicate that the coupling components, which depend on the characteristic intermolecular structures, induce the spectral differences among three fragments in the amyloid fibrils. These advanced spectral analyses using CD theory provide a useful method for characterizing the intermolecular structures of protein and peptide fragment complexes.

  20. Dispersible amyloid β-protein oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils represent diffusible but not soluble aggregates: their role in neurodegeneration in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rijal Upadhaya, Ajeet; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Kosterin, Irina; Abramowski, Dorothee; Kumar, Sathish; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Walter, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf

    2012-11-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) aggregates have been identified in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Dispersed Aβ aggregates in the brain parenchyma are different from soluble, membrane-associated and plaque-associated solid aggregates. They are in mixture with the extra- or intracellular fluid but can be separated from soluble proteins by ultracentrifugation. To clarify the role of dispersible Aβ aggregates for neurodegeneration we analyzed 2 different amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic mouse models. APP23 mice overexpress human mutant APP with the Swedish mutation. APP51/16 mice express high levels of human wild type APP. Both mice develop Aβ-plaques. Dendritic degeneration, neuron loss, and loss of asymmetric synapses were seen in APP23 but not in APP51/16 mice. The soluble and dispersible fractions not separated from one another were received as supernatant after centrifugation of native forebrain homogenates at 14,000 × g. Subsequent ultracentrifugation separated the soluble, i.e., the supernatant, from the dispersible fraction, i.e., the resuspended pellet. The major biochemical difference between APP23 and APP51/16 mice was that APP23 mice exhibited higher levels of dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils precipitated with oligomer (A11) and protofibril/fibril (B10AP) specific antibodies than APP51/16 mice. These differences, rather than soluble Aβ and Aβ plaque pathology were associated with dendritic degeneration, neuron, and synapse loss in APP23 mice in comparison with APP51/16 mice. Immunoprecipitation of dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils revealed that they were associated with APP C-terminal fragments (APP-CTFs). These results indicate that dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils represent an important pool of Aβ aggregates in the brain that critically interact with membrane-associated APP C-terminal fragments. The concentration of dispersible Aβ aggregates, thereby, presumably determines

  1. Mechanisms of Ultrasonically Induced Fibrillation of Amyloid β1-40 Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesugi, Kentaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Fukushima, Masahiko; So, Masatomo; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji; Hirao, Masahiko

    2013-07-01

    We systematically study the relationship between the ultrasonically induced aggregation behavior of amyloid β1-40 peptide and acoustic pressures to clarify the dominant mechanism of the aggregation. With ultrasonic irradiation, the thioflavin-T (ThT) level of the Aβ solution rises after a lag time, takes a maximum at ˜5 h, and remains unchanged or decreases. Thus, we monitor the ThT level at 5 h to evaluate the progress of the β-sheet structure and investigate its correlation with the acoustic pressures of fundamental and harmonics waves. The second-harmonics-wave amplitude shows the highest correlation with the ThT level, indicating the dominant contribution of cavitation bubbles to the fibrillation phenomenon. The influence of solution pH and Ar gas are investigated to identify the aggregation mechanism. As a result, local condensation of the peptide due to the high affinity of hydrophobic residues to the bubble-solution interface causes a highly supersaturated solution, leading to precipitation of β-sheet-rich nuclei.

  2. RuvbL1 and RuvbL2 enhance aggresome formation and disaggregate amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Zaarur, Nava; Xu, Xiaobin; Lestienne, Patrick; Meriin, Anatoli B; McComb, Mark; Costello, Catherine E; Newnam, Gary P; Ganti, Rakhee; Romanova, Nina V; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Silva, Sara TN; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Matias, Pedro M; Lobachev, Kirill S; Lednev, Igor K; Chernoff, Yury O; Sherman, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    The aggresome is an organelle that recruits aggregated proteins for storage and degradation. We performed an siRNA screen for proteins involved in aggresome formation and identified novel mammalian AAA+ protein disaggregases RuvbL1 and RuvbL2. Depletion of RuvbL1 or RuvbL2 suppressed aggresome formation and caused buildup of multiple cytoplasmic aggregates. Similarly, downregulation of RuvbL orthologs in yeast suppressed the formation of an aggresome-like body and enhanced the aggregate toxicity. In contrast, their overproduction enhanced the resistance to proteotoxic stress independently of chaperone Hsp104. Mammalian RuvbL associated with the aggresome, and the aggresome substrate synphilin-1 interacted directly with the RuvbL1 barrel-like structure near the opening of the central channel. Importantly, polypeptides with unfolded structures and amyloid fibrils stimulated the ATPase activity of RuvbL. Finally, disassembly of protein aggregates was promoted by RuvbL. These data indicate that RuvbL complexes serve as chaperones in protein disaggregation. PMID:26303906

  3. Magnetic-responsive hybrids of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils and nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Vallooran, Jijo J; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-07-23

    We report on the synthesis and magnetic-responsive behavior of hybrids formed by dispersing negatively charged iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles in positively charged β-lactoglobulin protein solutions at acidic pH, followed by heating at high temperatures. Depending on the pH used, different hybrid aggregates can be obtained, such as nanoparticle-modified amyloid fibrils (pH 3) and spherical nanoclusters (pH 4.5). We investigate the effect of magnetic fields of varying strengths (0-5 T) on the alignment of these Fe3O4-modified amyloid fibrils and spherical nanoclusters using a combination of scattering, birefringence and microscopic techniques and we find a strong alignment of the hybrids upon increasing the intensity of the magnetic field, which we quantify via 2D and 3D order parameters. We also demonstrate the possibility of controlling magnetically the sol-gel behavior of these hybrids: addition of salt (NaCl, 150 mM) to a solution containing nanoparticles modified with β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils (2 wt % fibrils modified with 0.6 wt % Fe3O4 nanoparticles) induces first the formation of a reversible gel, which can then be converted back to solution upon application of a moderate magnetic field of 1.1 T. These hybrids offer a new appealing functional colloidal system in which the aggregation, orientational order and rheological behavior can be efficiently controlled in a purely noninvasive way by external magnetic fields of weak intensity.

  4. Effect of Tetracyclines on the Dynamics of Formation and Destructuration of β2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibrils*♦

    PubMed Central

    Giorgetti, Sofia; Raimondi, Sara; Pagano, Katiuscia; Relini, Annalisa; Bucciantini, Monica; Corazza, Alessandra; Fogolari, Federico; Codutti, Luca; Salmona, Mario; Mangione, Palma; Colombo, Lino; De Luigi, Ada; Porcari, Riccardo; Gliozzi, Alessandra; Stefani, Massimo; Esposito, Gennaro; Bellotti, Vittorio; Stoppini, Monica

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of methods suitable for the conversion in vitro of native proteins into amyloid fibrils has shed light on the molecular basis of amyloidosis and has provided fundamental tools for drug discovery. We have studied the capacity of a small library of tetracycline analogues to modulate the formation or destructuration of β2-microglobulin fibrils. The inhibition of fibrillogenesis of the wild type protein was first established in the presence of 20% trifluoroethanol and confirmed under a more physiologic environment including heparin and collagen. The latter conditions were also used to study the highly amyloidogenic variant, P32G. The NMR analysis showed that doxycycline inhibits β2-microglobulin self-association and stabilizes the native-like species through fast exchange interactions involving specific regions of the protein. Cell viability assays demonstrated that the drug abolishes the natural cytotoxic activity of soluble β2-microglobulin, further strengthening a possible in vivo therapeutic exploitation of this drug. Doxycycline can disassemble preformed fibrils, but the IC50 is 5-fold higher than that necessary for the inhibition of fibrillogenesis. Fibril destructuration is a dynamic and time-dependent process characterized by the early formation of cytotoxic protein aggregates that, in a few hours, convert into non-toxic insoluble material. The efficacy of doxycycline as a drug against dialysis-related amyloidosis would benefit from the ability of the drug to accumulate just in the skeletal system where amyloid is formed. In these tissues, the doxycycline concentration reaches values several folds higher than those resulting in inhibition of amyloidogenesis and amyloid destructuration in vitro. PMID:21068391

  5. Characterization of the oligomeric states of insulin in self-assembly and amyloid fibril formation by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Nettleton, E J; Tito, P; Sunde, M; Bouchard, M; Dobson, C M; Robinson, C V

    2000-01-01

    The self-assembly and aggregation of insulin molecules has been investigated by means of nanoflow electrospray mass spectrometry. Hexamers of insulin containing predominantly two, but up to four, Zn(2+) ions were observed in the gas phase when solutions at pH 4.0 were examined. At pH 3.3, in the absence of Zn(2+), dimers and tetramers are observed. Spectra obtained from solutions of insulin at millimolar concentrations at pH 2.0, conditions under which insulin is known to aggregate in solution, showed signals from a range of higher oligomers. Clusters containing up to 12 molecules could be detected in the gas phase. Hydrogen exchange measurements show that in solution these higher oligomers are in rapid equilibrium with monomeric insulin. At elevated temperatures, under conditions where insulin rapidly forms amyloid fibrils, the concentration of soluble higher oligomers was found to decrease with time yielding insoluble high molecular weight aggregates and then fibrils. The fibrils formed were examined by electron microscopy and the results show that the amorphous aggregates formed initially are converted to twisted, unbranched fibrils containing several protofilaments. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows that both the soluble form of insulin and the initial aggregates are predominantly helical, but that formation of beta-sheet structure occurs simultaneously with the appearance of well-defined fibrils. PMID:10920035

  6. A Synchrotron-Based Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils and Prefibrillar Intermediates with Residue-Specific Resolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structural models of the fibrils formed by the 40-residue amyloid-β (Aβ40) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease typically consist of linear polypeptide segments, oriented approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the fibril, and joined together as parallel in-register β-sheets to form filaments. However, various models differ in the number of filaments that run the length of a fibril, and in the topological arrangement of these filaments. In addition to questions about the structure of Aβ40 monomers in fibrils, there are important unanswered questions about their structure in prefibrillar intermediates, which are of interest because they may represent the most neurotoxic form of Aβ40. To assess different models of fibril structure and to gain insight into the structure of prefibrillar intermediates, the relative solvent accessibility of amino acid residue side chains in fibrillar and prefibrillar Aβ40 preparations was characterized in solution by hydroxyl radical footprinting and structural mass spectrometry. A key to the application of this technology was the development of hydroxyl radical reactivity measures for individual side chains of Aβ40. Combined with mass-per-length measurements performed by dark-field electron microscopy, the results of this study are consistent with the core filament structure represented by two- and three-filament solid state nuclear magnetic resonance-based models of the Aβ40 fibril (such as 2LMN, 2LMO, 2LMP, and 2LMQ), with minor refinements, but they are inconsistent with the more recently proposed 2M4J model. The results also demonstrate that individual Aβ40 fibrils exhibit structural heterogeneity or polymorphism, where regions of two-filament structure alternate with regions of three-filament structure. The footprinting approach utilized in this study will be valuable for characterizing various fibrillar and nonfibrillar forms of the Aβ peptide. PMID:25382225

  7. A Synchrotron-Based Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils and Prefibrillar Intermediates with Residue-Specific Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, Alexandra L.; Kiselar, Janna; Ilchenko, Serguei; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Chance, Mark R.; Axelsen, Paul H.

    2014-11-09

    The structural models of the fibrils formed by the 40-residue amyloid-β (Aβ40) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease typically consist of linear polypeptide segments, oriented approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the fibril, and joined together as parallel in-register β-sheets to form filaments. However, various models differ in the number of filaments that run the length of a fibril, and in the topological arrangement of these filaments. In addition to questions about the structure of Aβ40 monomers in fibrils, there are important unanswered questions about their structure in prefibrillar intermediates, which are of interest because they may represent the most neurotoxic form of Aβ40. To assess different models of fibril structure and to gain insight into the structure of prefibrillar intermediates, the relative solvent accessibility of amino acid residue side chains in fibrillar and prefibrillar Aβ40 preparations was characterized in solution by hydroxyl radical footprinting and structural mass spectrometry. A key to the application of this technology was the development of hydroxyl radical reactivity measures for individual side chains of Aβ40. When we combined mass-per-length measurements performed by dark-field electron microscopy, we determined that the results of our study were consistent with the core filament structure represented by two- and three-filament solid state nuclear magnetic resonance-based models of the Aβ40 fibril (such as 2LMN, 2LMO, 2LMP, and 2LMQ), with minor refinements, but they are inconsistent with the more recently proposed 2M4J model. Our results also demonstrate that individual Aβ40 fibrils exhibit structural heterogeneity or polymorphism, where regions of two-filament structure alternate with regions of three-filament structure. The footprinting approach utilized in this study will be valuable for characterizing various fibrillar and nonfibrillar forms of the Aβ peptide.

  8. Mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to the amide I band for converting insoluble amyloid-like protein fibrils into the soluble monomeric form.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Fujioka, Jun; Imai, Takayuki; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is operated as a pulsed and linearly polarized laser with tunable wavelengths within infrared region. Although the FEL can ablate soft tissues with minimum collateral damage in surgery, the potential of FEL for dissecting protein aggregates is not fully understood. Protein aggregates such as amyloid fibrils are in some cases involved in serious diseases. In our previous study, we showed that amyloid-like lysozyme fibrils could be disaggregated into the native form with FEL irradiation specifically tuned to the amide I band (1,620 cm(-1)). Here, we show further evidence for the FEL-mediated disaggregation of amyloid-like fibrils using insulin fibrils. Insulin fibrils were prepared in acidic solution and irradiated by the FEL, which was tuned to either 1,620 or 2,000 cm(-1) prior to the experiment. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrum after irradiation with the FEL at 1,620 cm(-1) indicated that the broad peak (1,630-1,660 cm(-1)) became almost a single peak (1,652 cm(-1)), and the β-sheet content was reduced to 25 from 40% in the fibrils, while that following the irradiation at 2,000 cm(-1) remained at 38%. The Congo Red assay as well as transmission electron microscopy observation confirmed that the number of fibrils was reduced by FEL irradiation at the amide I band. Size-exclusion chromatography analysis indicated that the disaggregated form of fibrils was the monomeric form. These results confirm that FEL irradiation at the amide I band can dissect amyloid-like protein fibrils into the monomeric form in vitro.

  9. Heterologous Stacking of Prion Protein Peptides Reveals Structural Details of Fibrils and Facilitates Complete Inhibition of Fibril GrowthS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Boshuizen, Ronald S.; Schulz, Veronica; Morbin, Michela; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Meloen, Rob H.; Langedijk, Johannes P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils play an important role in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis; however, the underlying mechanisms of the growth process and the structural details of fibrils are poorly understood. Crucial in the fibril formation of prion proteins is the stacking of PrP monomers. We previously proposed that the structure of the prion protein fibril may be similar as a parallel left-handed β-helix. The β-helix is composed of spiraling rungs of parallel β-strands, and in the PrP model residues 105–143 of each PrP monomer can contribute two β-helical rungs to the growing fibril. Here we report data to support this model. We show that two cyclized human PrP peptides corresponding to residues 105–124 and 125–143, based on two single rungs of the left-handed β-helical core of the human PrPSc fibril, show spontaneous cooperative fibril growth in vitro by heterologous stacking. Because the structural model must have predictive value, peptides were designed based on the structure rules of the left-handed β-helical fold that could stack with prion protein peptides to stimulate or to block fibril growth. The stimulator peptide was designed as an optimal left-handed β-helical fold that can serve as a template for fibril growth initiation. The inhibiting peptide was designed to bind to the exposed rung but frustrate the propagation of the fibril growth. The single inhibitory peptide hardly shows inhibition, but the combination of the inhibitory with the stimulatory peptide showed complete inhibition of the fibril growth of peptide huPrP-(106–126). Moreover, the unique strategy based on stimulatory and inhibitory peptides seems a powerful new approach to study amyloidogenic fibril structures in general and could prove useful for the development of therapeutics. PMID:19304665

  10. Polyglutamine Amyloid Core Boundaries and Flanking Domain Dynamics in Huntingtin Fragment Fibrils Determined by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In Huntington’s disease, expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) domain in the huntingtin (htt) protein leads to misfolding and aggregation. There is much interest in the molecular features that distinguish monomeric, oligomeric, and fibrillar species that populate the aggregation pathway and likely differ in cytotoxicity. The mechanism and rate of aggregation are greatly affected by the domains flanking the polyQ segment within exon 1 of htt. A “protective” C-terminal proline-rich flanking domain inhibits aggregation by inducing polyproline II structure (PPII) within an extended portion of polyQ. The N-terminal flanking segment (httNT) adopts an α-helical structure as it drives aggregation, helps stabilize oligomers and fibrils, and is seemingly integral to their supramolecular assembly. Via solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR), we probe how, in the mature fibrils, the htt flanking domains impact the polyQ domain and in particular the localization of the β-structured amyloid core. Using residue-specific and uniformly labeled samples, we find that the amyloid core occupies most of the polyQ domain but ends just prior to the prolines. We probe the structural and dynamical features of the remarkably abrupt β-sheet to PPII transition and discuss the potential connections to certain htt-binding proteins. We also examine the httNT α-helix outside the polyQ amyloid core. Despite its presumed structural and demonstrated stabilizing roles in the fibrils, quantitative ssNMR measurements of residue-specific dynamics show that it undergoes distinct solvent-coupled motion. This dynamical feature seems reminiscent of molten-globule-like α-helix-rich features attributed to the nonfibrillar oligomeric species of various amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:25280367

  11. Two-dimensional near-ultraviolet spectroscopy of aromatic residues in amyloid fibrils: a first principles study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Mukamel, Shaul

    2011-02-14

    We report a first principles study of two dimensional electronic spectroscopy of aromatic side chain transitions in the 32-residue β-amyloid (Aβ(9-40)) fibrils in the near ultraviolet (250-300 nm). An efficient exciton Hamiltonian with electrostatic fluctuations (EHEF) algorithm is used to compute the electronic excitations in the presence of environmental fluctuations. The through-space inter- and intra-molecular interactions are calculated with high level quantum mechanics (QM) approaches, and interfaced with molecular mechanics (MM) simulations. Distinct two dimensional near ultraviolet (2DNUV) spectroscopic signatures are identified for different aromatic transitions, and the couplings between them. 2DNUV signals associated with the transition couplings are shown to be very sensitive to the change of residue-residue interactions induced by residue mutations. Our simulations suggest that 2DNUV spectra could provide a useful local probe for the structure and kinetics of fibrils.

  12. Solution Conditions Affect the Ability of the K30D Mutation To Prevent Amyloid Fibril Formation by Apolipoprotein C-II: Insights from Experiments and Theoretical Simulations.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yu; Todorova, Nevena; Zlatic, Courtney O; Gooley, Paul R; Griffin, Michael D W; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Yarovsky, Irene

    2016-07-12

    Apolipoproteins form amphipathic helical structures that bind lipid surfaces. Paradoxically, lipid-free apolipoproteins display a strong propensity to form cross-β structure and self-associate into disease-related amyloid fibrils. Studies of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) amyloid fibrils suggest that a K30-D69 ion pair accounts for the dual abilities to form helix and cross-β structure. Consistent with this is the observation that a K30D mutation prevents fibril formation under standard fibril forming conditions. However, we found that fibril formation by K30D apoC-II proceeded readily at low pH and a higher salt or protein concentration. Structural analysis demonstrated that K30D apoC-II fibrils at pH 7 have a structure similar to that of the wild-type fibrils but are less stable. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type apoC-II fibril model at pH 7 and 3 showed that the loss of charge on D69 at pH 3 leads to greater separation between residues K30 and D69 within the fibril with a corresponding reduction in β-strand content around residue 30. In contrast, in simulations of the K30D mutant model at pH 7 and 3, residues D30 and D69 moved closer at pH 3, accompanied by an increase in β-strand content around residue 30. The simulations also demonstrated a strong dominance of inter- over intramolecular contacts between ionic residues of apoC-II and suggested a cooperative mechanism for forming favorable interactions between the individual strands under different conditions. These observations demonstrate the important role of the buried K30-D69 ion pair in the stability and solution properties of apoC-II amyloid fibrils. PMID:27311794

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of spontaneous fibril formation by random-coil peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Hall, Carol K.

    2004-11-01

    Assembly of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is a cause or associated symptom of numerous human disorders, including Alzheimer's and the prion diseases. We report molecular-level simulation of spontaneous fibril formation. Systems containing 12-96 model polyalanine peptides form fibrils at temperatures greater than a critical temperature that decreases with peptide concentration and exceeds the peptide's folding temperature, consistent with experimental findings. Formation of small amorphous aggregates precedes ordered nucleus formation and subsequent rapid fibril growth through addition of -sheets laterally and monomeric peptides at fibril ends. The fibril's structure is similar to that observed experimentally. amyloid | protein aggregation

  14. Bacoside-A, an anti-amyloid natural substance, inhibits membrane disruption by the amyloidogenic determinant of prion protein through accelerating fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Malishev, Ravit; Nandi, Sukhendu; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Shaham-Niv, Shira; Gazit, Ehud; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-09-01

    Bacosides, class of compounds extracted from the Bacopa monniera plant, exhibit interesting therapeutic properties, particularly enhancing cognitive functions and putative anti-amyloid activity. We show that bacoside-A exerted significant effects upon fibrillation and membrane interactions of the amyloidogenic fragment of the prion protein [PrP(106-126)]. Specifically, when co-incubated with PrP(106-126), bacoside-A accelerated fibril formation in the presence of lipid bilayers and in parallel inhibited bilayer interactions of the peptide aggregates formed in solution. These interesting phenomena were studied by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, which suggest that bacoside A-promoted fibrillation reduced the concentration of membrane-active pre-fibrillar species of the prion fragment. This study suggests that induction of fibril formation and corresponding inhibition of membrane interactions are likely the underlying factors for ameliorating amyloid protein toxicity by bacoside-A.

  15. Bacoside-A, an anti-amyloid natural substance, inhibits membrane disruption by the amyloidogenic determinant of prion protein through accelerating fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Malishev, Ravit; Nandi, Sukhendu; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Shaham-Niv, Shira; Gazit, Ehud; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-09-01

    Bacosides, class of compounds extracted from the Bacopa monniera plant, exhibit interesting therapeutic properties, particularly enhancing cognitive functions and putative anti-amyloid activity. We show that bacoside-A exerted significant effects upon fibrillation and membrane interactions of the amyloidogenic fragment of the prion protein [PrP(106-126)]. Specifically, when co-incubated with PrP(106-126), bacoside-A accelerated fibril formation in the presence of lipid bilayers and in parallel inhibited bilayer interactions of the peptide aggregates formed in solution. These interesting phenomena were studied by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, which suggest that bacoside A-promoted fibrillation reduced the concentration of membrane-active pre-fibrillar species of the prion fragment. This study suggests that induction of fibril formation and corresponding inhibition of membrane interactions are likely the underlying factors for ameliorating amyloid protein toxicity by bacoside-A. PMID:27365272

  16. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange and Molecular Dynamics Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils Formed by a D69K Charge-Pair Mutant of Human Apolipoprotein C-II.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yu; Zlatic, Courtney O; Griffin, Michael D W; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Todorova, Nevena; Yarovsky, Irene; Gooley, Paul R

    2015-08-11

    Plasma apolipoproteins form amphipathic α helices in lipid environments but in the lipid-free state show a high propensity to form β structure and self-associate into amyloid fibrils. The widespread occurrence of apolipoproteins in amyloid plaques suggests disease-related roles, specifically in atherosclerosis. To reconcile the dual abilities of apolipoproteins to form either α helices or cross-β sheet structures, we examined fibrils formed by human apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II). A structural model for apoC-II fibrils shows a cross-β core with parallel β strands, including a buried K30-D69 charge pair. We investigated the effect of abolishing this charge pair in mutant D69K apoC-II. Fluorescence studies indicated more rapid fibril formation and less solvent accessibility of tryptophan (W26) in D69K apoC-II fibrils than in wild-type (WT) fibrils. X-ray diffraction data of aligned D69K apoC-II fibrils yielded a typical cross-β structure with increased β sheet spacing compared to that of WT fibrils. Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange patterns were similar for D69K apoC-II fibrils compared to WT fibrils, albeit with an overall reduction in the level of slow H/D exchange, particularly around residues 29-32. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated reduced β strand content for a model D69K apoC-II tetramer compared to the WT tetramer and confirmed an expansion of the cross-β spacing that contributed to the formation of a stable charge pair between K69 and E27. The results highlight the importance of charge-pair interactions within the apoC-II fibril core, which together with numerous salt bridges in the flexible connecting loop play a major role in the ability of lipid-free apoC-II to form stable cross-β fibrils.

  17. Polyanionic Candidate Microbicides Accelerate the Formation of Semen-Derived Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Suiyi; Lu, Lu; Li, Lin; Liu, Jixiang; Oksov, Yelena; Lu, Hong; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen

    2013-01-01

    Polyanionic candidate microbicides, including cellulose sulfate, carrageenan, PRO 2000, were proven ineffective in preventing HIV-1 transmission and even cellulose sulfate showed increased risk of HIV acquisition in the Phase III efficacy trials. Semen plays critical roles in HIV-1 sexual transmission. Specifically, amyloid fibrils formed by fragments of prostatic acidic phosphatase (PAP) in semen termed semen-derived enhancer of virus infection (SEVI) could drastically enhance HIV-1 infection. Here we investigated the interaction between polyanions and PAP248-286, a prototype peptide of SEVI, to understand the possible cause of polyanionic candidate microbicides to fail in clinical trials. We found anionic polymers could efficiently promote SEVI fibril formation, most likely mediated by the natural electrostatic interaction between polyanions and PAP248-286, as revealed by acid native PAGE and Western blot. The overall anti-HIV-1 activity of polyanions in the presence or absence of PAP248-286 or semen was evaluated. In the viral infection assay, the supernatants of polyanions/PAP248-286 or polyanions/semen mixtures containing the free, unbound polyanionic molecules showed a general reduction in antiviral efficacy, while the pellets containing amyloid fibrils formed by the polyanion-bound PAP248-286 showed aggravated enhancement of viral infection. Collectively, from the point of drug-host protein interaction, our study revealed that polyanions facilitate SEVI fibril formation to promote HIV-1 infection, thus highlighting a molecular mechanism underlying the failure of polyanions in clinical trials and the importance of drug-semen interaction in evaluating the anti-HIV-1 efficacy of candidate microbicides. PMID:23544097

  18. Polymorphism of amyloid fibrils formed by a peptide from the yeast prion protein Sup35: AFM and Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Zhang, Yuliang; Deckert, Volker; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-06-01

    Aggregation of prion proteins is the cause of various prion related diseases. The infectious form of prions, amyloid aggregates, exist as multiple strains. The strains are thought to represent structurally different prion protein molecules packed into amyloid aggregates, but the knowledge on the structure of different types of aggregates is limited. Here we report on the use of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and TERS (Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering) to study morphological heterogeneity and access underlying conformational features of individual amyloid aggregates. Using AFM we identified the morphology of amyloid fibrils formed by the peptide (CGNNQQNY) from the yeast prion protein Sup35 that is critically involved in the aggregation of the full protein. TERS results demonstrate that morphologically different amyloid fibrils are composed of a distinct set of conformations. Fibrils formed at pH 5.6 are composed of a mixture of peptide conformations (β-sheets, random coil and α-helix) while fibrils formed in pH~2 solution primarily have β-sheets. Additionally, peak positions in the amide III region of the TERS spectra suggested that peptides have parallel arrangement of β-sheets for pH~2 fibrils and antiparallel arrangement for fibrils formed at pH 5.6. We also developed a methodology for detailed analysis of the peptide secondary structure by correlating intensity changes of Raman bands in different regions of TERS spectra. Such correlation established that structural composition of peptides is highly localized with large contribution of unordered secondary structures on a fibrillar surface. PMID:27060278

  19. The membrane-active amphibian peptide caerin 1.8 inhibits fibril formation of amyloid β1-42.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanqin; Wang, Tianfang; Calabrese, Antonio N; Carver, John A; Cummins, Scott F; Bowie, John H

    2015-11-01

    The amphibian host-defense peptide caerin 1.8 [(1)GLFKVLGSV(10)AKHLLPHVVP(20)VIAEKL(NH2)] inhibits fibril formation of amyloid β 1-42 [(1)DAEFRHDSG(10)YEVHHQKLVF(20)FAEDVGSNKG(30)AIIGLMVGGV(40)VIA] [Aβ42] (the major precursor of the extracellular fibrillar deposits of Alzheimer's disease). Some truncated forms of caerin 1.8 also inhibit fibril formation of Aβ42. For example, caerin 1.8 (1-13) [(1)GLFKVLGSV(10)AKHL(NH2) and caerin 1.8 (22-25) [KVLGSV(10)AKHLLPHVVP(20)VIAEKL(NH2)] show 85% and 75% respectively of the inhibition activity of the parent caerin 1.8. The synthetic peptide KLVFFKKKKKK is a known inhibitor of Aβ42 fibril formation, and was used as a standard in this study. Caerin 1.8 is the more effective fibril inhibitor. IC50 values (± 15%) are caerin 1.8 (75 μM) and KLVFFKKKKKK (370 μM). MALDI mass spectrometry shows the presence of a small peak corresponding to a protonated 1:1 adduct [caerin 1.8/Aβ42]H(+). Molecular dynamics simulation suggests that both hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions between Aβ42 and caerin 1.8 facilitate the formation of a 1:1 complex in water. Fibril formation from Aβ42 has been proposed to be based around the (16)KLVF(20)F region of Aβ42; this region in the 1:1 complex is partially blocked from attachment of a further molecule of Aβ42.

  20. Fullerenol C60(OH)16 prevents amyloid fibrillization of Aβ40-in vitro and in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Bednarikova, Zuzana; Huy, Pham Dinh Quoc; Mocanu, Maria-Magdalena; Fedunova, Diana; Li, Mai Suan; Gazova, Zuzana

    2016-07-28

    The generation of Aβ amyloid aggregates in the form of senile plaques in the brain is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is no cure for AD and one of the recent treatment strategies is focused on the inhibition of amyloid fibrillization of Aβ peptide. Fullerene C60 has been proposed as a candidate for destroying Aβ aggregates but it is not soluble in water and its toxicity to cells remains largely ambiguous. To overcome these drawbacks, we synthesized and studied the effect of water-soluble fullerenol C60(OH)16 (fullerene C60 carrying 16 hydroxyl groups) on the amyloid fibrillization of Aβ40 peptide in vitro. Using a Thioflavin T fluorescent assay and atomic force microscopy it was found that C60(OH)16 effectively reduces the formation of amyloid fibrils. The IC50 value is in the low range (μg ml(-1)) suggesting that fullerenol interferes with Aβ40 aggregation at stoichiometric concentrations. The in silico calculations supported the experimental data. It was revealed that fullerenol tightly binds to monomer Aβ40 and polar, negatively charged amino acids play a key role. Electrostatic interactions dominantly contribute to the binding propensity via interaction of the oxygen atoms from the COO(-) groups of side chains of polar, negatively charged amino acids with the OH groups of fullerenol. This stabilizes contact with either the D23 or K28 of the salt bridge. Due to the lack of a well-defined binding pocket fullerenol is also inclined to locate near the central hydrophobic region of Aβ40 and can bind to the hydrophobic C-terminal of the peptide. Upon fullerenol binding the salt bridge becomes flexible, inhibiting Aβ aggregation. In order to assess the toxicity of fullerenol, we found that exposure of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells to fullerenol caused no significant changes in viability after 24 h of treatment. These results suggest that fullerenol C60(OH)16 represents a promising candidate as a therapeutic for Alzheimer

  1. Investigation of the Binding Profiles of AZD2184 and Thioflavin T with Amyloid-β(1-42) Fibril by Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Methods.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Guanglin; Murugan, N Arul; Tu, Yaoquan; Nordberg, Agneta; Ågren, Hans

    2015-09-01

    Detecting deposits of amyloid β fibrils in the brain is of paramount importance for an early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. A number of PET tracers have been developed for amyloid imaging, but many suffer from poor specificity and large signal to background ratio. Design of tracers with specificity and improved binding affinity requires knowledge about various potential binding sites in the amyloid β fibril available for the tracers and the nature of the local microenvironment of these sites. In this study we investigate the local structure of fibrils using two important probes, namely, thioflavin T (a fluorescent probe) and AZD2184 (a PET tracer). The target structures for amyloid-β(1-42) fibril are based on reported NMR solution models. By explicitly considering the effect of fibril flexibility on the available binding sites for all these models, the binding affinity of these probes has been investigated. The binding profiles of AZD2184 and thioflavin T were studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods. The two compounds were found to bind at the same sites of the fibril: three of which are within the fibril, and one is on the two sides of the Met35 residue on the surface. The binding affinity of AZD2184 and thioflavin T is found to be higher at the core sites than on the surface due to more contact residues. The binding affinity of AZD2184 is much higher than that of thioflavin T at every site due to electrostatic interaction and spatial restriction, which is in good agreement with experimental observation. However, the structural change of thioflavin T is much more significant than that of AZD2184, which is the chemical basis for its usage as a fluorescent probe. The ramifications of these results for the design and optimization of PET radioligands and fluorescent probes are briefly discussed.

  2. Acidic pH retards the fibrillization of human islet amyloid polypeptide due to electrostatic repulsion of histidines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Xu, Weixin; Mu, Yuguang; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major constituent of amyloid deposits in pancreatic islets of type-II diabetes. IAPP is secreted together with insulin from the acidic secretory granules at a low pH of approximately 5.5 to the extracellular environment at a neutral pH. The increased accumulation of extracellular hIAPP in diabetes indicates that changes in pH may promote amyloid formation. To gain insights and underlying mechanisms of the pH effect on hIAPP fibrillogenesis, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model were performed to study the structural properties of five hIAPP protofibrillar oligomers, under acidic and neutral pH, respectively. In consistent with experimental findings, simulation results show that acidic pH is not conducive to the structural stability of these oligomers. This provides a direct evidence for a recent experiment [L. Khemtemourian, E. Domenech, J. P. F. Doux, M. C. Koorengevel, and J. A. Killian, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 15598 (2011)], 10.1021/ja205007j, which suggests that acidic pH inhibits the fibril formation of hIAPP. In addition, a complementary coarse-grained simulation shows the repulsive electrostatic interactions among charged His18 residues slow down the dimerization process of hIAPP by twofold. Besides, our all-atom simulations reveal acidic pH mainly affects the local structure around residue His18 by destroying the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, due to the repulsive interactions between protonated interchain His18 residues at acidic pH. It is also disclosed that the local interactions nearby His18 operating between adjacent β-strands trigger the structural transition, which gives hints to the experimental findings that the rate of hIAPP fibril formation and the morphologies of the fibrillar structures are strongly pH-dependent.

  3. Cooperative Hydrogen Bonding in Amyloid Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsemekhman, Kiril L.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Eisenberg, Dvaid; Baker, David

    2007-04-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's and prion diseases, are each associated with unbranched protein fibrils. Each fibril is made of a particular protein, yet they share common properties. One such property is nucleation-dependent fibril growth. Monomers of amyloid-forming proteins can remain in dissolved form for long periods, before rapidly assembly into fibrils. The lag before growth has been attributed to slow kinetics of formation of a nucleus, on which other molecules can deposit to form the fibril. We have explored the energetics of fibril formation, based on the known molecular structure of a fibril-forming peptide from the yeast prion, Sup35, using both classical and quantum (density functional theory) methods. We find that the energetics of fibril formation for the first three layers are cooperative using both methods. This cooperativity is consistent with the observation that formation of amyloid fibrils involves slow nucleation and faster growth.

  4. Amyloid fibril formation propensity is inherent into the hexapeptide tandemly repeating sequence of the central domain of silkmoth chorion proteins of the A-family.

    PubMed

    Iconomidou, Vassiliki A; Chryssikos, Georgios D; Gionis, Vassilis; Galanis, Athanassios S; Cordopatis, Paul; Hoenger, Andreas; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2006-12-01

    Peptide-analogues of the A and B families of silkmoth chorion proteins form amyloid fibrils under a variety of conditions [Iconomidou, V.A., Vriend, G. Hamodrakas, S.J. 2000. Amyloids protect the silkmoth oocyte and embryo. FEBS Lett. 479, 141-145; Iconomidou,V.A., Chryssikos, G.D.,Gionis, V., Vriend, G., Hoenger, A., Hamodrakas, S.J., 2001. Amyloid-like fibrils from an 18-residue peptide-analogue of a part of the central domain of the B-family of silkmoth chorion protein. FEBS Lett. 499, 268-273; Hamodrakas, S.J. Hoenger, A., Iconomidou, V. A., 2004 . Amyloid fibrillogenesis of silkmoth chorion protein peptide-analogues via a liquid crystalline intermediate phase. J. Struct. Biol. 145, 226-235.], which led us to propose that silkmoth chorion is a natural protective amyloid. In this study, we designed and synthesized two mutant peptide-analogues of the central conservative domain of the A family: (a) one, cA_m1, with a length half of that of the central domain of the A family, which folds and self-assembles, in various conditions, into amyloid fibrils very similar in properties and structure to the fibrils formed by the cA peptide, which corresponds to the entire length of the A family central domain [Iconomidou, V.A., Vriend, G. Hamodrakas, S.J. 2000. Amyloids protect the silkmoth oocyte and embryo. FEBS Lett. 479, 141-145.], in full support of our previous proposal, (b) the second, cA_m2, differing from cA_m1 at three positions, where three glutamates have replaced two valines and one alanine residues, does not form amyloid fibrils in any conditions. It appears that (a) the amyloidogenic properties of silkmoth chorion peptides are encoded into the tandemly repeating hexapeptides comprising the central domain of silkmoth chorion proteins, and, that (b) suitable mutations, properly and carefully designed, greatly affect the strong amyloidogenic properties inherent in certain aminoacid sequences and may inhibit amyloid formation. PMID:17056273

  5. Fracture and Growth Are Competing Forces Determining the Fate of Conformers in Tau Fibril Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Virginia; Holden, Michael R.; Weismiller, Hilary A.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Margittai, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Tau fibrils are pathological aggregates that can transfer between neurons and then recruit soluble Tau monomers by template-assisted conversion. The propagation of different fibril polymorphs is thought to be a contributing factor to phenotypic diversity in Alzheimer disease and other Tauopathies. We found that a homogeneous population of Tau fibrils composed of the truncated version K18 (residues 244–372) gradually converted to a new set of fibril conformers when subjected to multiple cycles of seeding and growth. Using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we observed that the distances between spin labels at positions 311 and 328 in the fibril core progressively decreased. The findings were corroborated by changes in turbidity, morphology, and protease sensitivity. Fibrils that were initially formed under stirring conditions exhibited an increased fragility compared with fibrils formed quiescently after multiple cycles of seeding. The quiescently formed fibrils were marked by accelerated growth. The difference in fragility and growth between the different conformers explains how the change in incubation condition could lead to the amplification of a minor subpopulation of fibrils. Under quiescent conditions where fibril breakage is minimal, faster growing fibrils have a selective advantage. The findings are of general importance as they suggest that changes in selective pressures during fibril propagation in the human brain could result in the emergence of new fibril conformers with varied clinicopathological consequences. PMID:27080260

  6. Cannabinoid effects on β amyloid fibril and aggregate formation, neuronal and microglial-activated neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Janefjord, Emelie; Mååg, Jesper L V; Harvey, Benjamin S; Smid, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid (CB) ligands have demonstrated neuroprotective properties. In this study we compared the effects of a diverse set of CB ligands against β amyloid-mediated neuronal toxicity and activated microglial-conditioned media-based neurotoxicity in vitro, and compared this with a capacity to directly alter β amyloid (Aβ) fibril or aggregate formation. Neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells were exposed to Aβ1-42 directly or microglial (BV-2 cells) conditioned media activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence of the CB1 receptor-selective agonist ACEA, CB2 receptor-selective agonist JWH-015, phytocannabinoids Δ(9)-THC and cannabidiol (CBD), the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide or putative GPR18/GPR55 ligands O-1602 and abnormal-cannabidiol (Abn-CBD). TNF-α and nitrite production was measured in BV-2 cells to compare activation via LPS or albumin with Aβ1-42. Aβ1-42 evoked a concentration-dependent loss of cell viability in SH-SY5Y cells but negligible TNF-α and nitrite production in BV-2 cells compared to albumin or LPS. Both albumin and LPS-activated BV-2 conditioned media significantly reduced neuronal cell viability but were directly innocuous to SH-SY5Y cells. Of those CB ligands tested, only 2-AG and CBD were directly protective against Aβ-evoked SH-SY5Y cell viability, whereas JWH-015, THC, CBD, Abn-CBD and O-1602 all protected SH-SY5Y cells from BV-2 conditioned media activated via LPS. While CB ligands variably altered the morphology of Aβ fibrils and aggregates, there was no clear correlation between effects on Aβ morphology and neuroprotective actions. These findings indicate a neuroprotective action of CB ligands via actions at microglial and neuronal cells.

  7. Few-layer bismuth selenides exfoliated by hemin inhibit amyloid-β1-42 fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jian; Xiong, Yunjing; Lin, Zhiqin; Sun, Liping; Weng, Jian

    2015-05-01

    Inhibiting amyloid-β (Aβ) fibril formation is the primary therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease. Several small molecules and nanomaterials have been used to inhibit Aβ fibril formation. However, insufficient inhibition efficiency or poor metabolization limits their further applications. Here, we used hemin to exfoliate few-layer Bi2Se3 in aqueous solution. Then we separated few-layer Bi2Se3 with different sizes and thicknesses by fractional centrifugation, and used them to attempt to inhibit Aβ1-42 aggregation. The results show that smaller and thinner few-layer Bi2Se3 had the highest inhibition efficiency. We further investigated the interaction between few-layer Bi2Se3 and Aβ1-42 monomers. The results indicate that the inhibition effect may be due to the high adsorption capacity of few-layer Bi2Se3 for Aβ1-42 monomers. Few-layer Bi2Se3 also decreased Aβ-mediated peroxidase-like activity and cytotoxicity according to in vitro neurotoxicity studies under physiological conditions. Therefore, our work shows the potential for applications of few-layer Bi2Se3 in the biomedical field.

  8. Few-layer bismuth selenides exfoliated by hemin inhibit amyloid-β1–42 fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jian; Xiong, Yunjing; Lin, Zhiqin; Sun, Liping; Weng, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Inhibiting amyloid-β (Aβ) fibril formation is the primary therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease. Several small molecules and nanomaterials have been used to inhibit Aβ fibril formation. However, insufficient inhibition efficiency or poor metabolization limits their further applications. Here, we used hemin to exfoliate few-layer Bi2Se3 in aqueous solution. Then we separated few-layer Bi2Se3 with different sizes and thicknesses by fractional centrifugation, and used them to attempt to inhibit Aβ1-42 aggregation. The results show that smaller and thinner few-layer Bi2Se3 had the highest inhibition efficiency. We further investigated the interaction between few-layer Bi2Se3 and Aβ1-42 monomers. The results indicate that the inhibition effect may be due to the high adsorption capacity of few-layer Bi2Se3 for Aβ1−42 monomers. Few-layer Bi2Se3 also decreased Aβ-mediated peroxidase-like activity and cytotoxicity according to in vitro neurotoxicity studies under physiological conditions. Therefore, our work shows the potential for applications of few-layer Bi2Se3 in the biomedical field. PMID:26018135

  9. Concentration-dependent inhibitory effects of apolipoprotein E on Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibril formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Naiki, H; Gejyo, F; Nakakuki, K

    1997-05-20

    Recently, many research groups have examined the effect of apolipoprotein E (apoE) on beta-amyloid fibril (betaAf) formation in vitro. However, their data were somewhat controversial and no exact kinetic assessment of the role of apoE has thus far been available. We examined the effect of human apoE on betaAf formation in vitro, starting with various concentrations of freshly prepared beta-amyloid(1-40) (beta1-40) and using fluorescence spectroscopy with thioflavine T. When 50 microM of beta1-40 was incubated with a 1:1000 to 1:100 molar ratio of apoE, a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of apoE was observed. Both the nucleation and extension phases of betaAf formation in vitro were inhibited by apoE. On the other hand, when 300 microM of beta1-40 was incubated with a 1:100 molar ratio of apoE, the inhibitory effect of apoE was completely abolished. We then focused our study on the kinetics of the inhibitory effect of apoE on the extension phase of betaAf formation in vitro, utilizing the recently established first-order kinetic model of betaAf extension in vitro [Naiki, H., & Nakakuki, K. (1996) Lab. Invest. 74, 374-383]. The mathematical treatment of the data suggests that apoE inhibits the extension of betaAf in vitro, by making a complex with beta1-40, thus eliminating free beta1-40 from the reaction mixture. The equilibrium association constant with beta1-40 was practically the same among the three major recombinant apoE isoforms. These results indicate that the effects of apoE on betaAf formation in vitro is differential and could settle some of the controversy about beta-amyloid-apoE interaction in vitro.

  10. Molecular-Level Examination of Cu2+ Binding Structure for Amyloid Fibrils of 40-Residue Alzheimer’s β by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Long, Fei; Miller, Yifat; Xiao, Yiling; McElheny, Dan; Thurber, Kent; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2011-01-01

    Cu2+ binding to Alzheimer’s β (Aβ) peptides in amyloid fibrils has attracted broad attention, as it was shown that Cu ion concentration elevates in Alzheimer’s senile plaque and such association of Aβ with Cu2+ triggers the production of neurotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2. However, detailed binding sites and binding structures of Cu2+ to Aβ are still largely unknown for Aβ fibrils or other aggregates of Aβ. In this work, we examined molecular details of Cu2+ binding to amyloid fibrils by detecting paramagnetic signal quenching in 1D and 2D high-resolution 13C SSNMR for full-length 40-residue Aβ(1–40). Selective quenching observed in 13C SSNMR of Cu2+-bound Aβ(1–40) suggested that primary Cu2+ binding sites in Aβ(1–40) fibrils include Nε in His-13 and His-14, and carboxyl groups in Val-40 as well as in Glu side chains (Glu-3, Glu-11, and/or Glu-22). 13C chemical shift analysis demonstrated no major structural changes upon Cu2+ binding in the hydrophobic core regions (residues 18–25 and 30–36). Although the ROS production via oxidization of Met-35 in the presence of Cu2+ has been long suspected, our SSNMR analysis of 13CεH3-S- in M35 showed little changes after Cu2+ binding, excluding the possibility of Met-35 oxidization by Cu2+ alone. Preliminary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on Cu2+-Aβ complex in amyloid fibrils confirmed binding sites suggested by the SSNMR results and the stabilities of such bindings. The MD simulations also indicate the coexistence of a variety of Cu2+-binding modes unique in Aβ fibril, which are realized by both intra- and inter-molecular contacts and highly concentrated coordination sites due to the in-register parallel β-sheet arrangements. PMID:21341665

  11. Structural Characterization of Fibrils from Recombinant Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide by Solid-State NMR: The Central FGAILS Segment Is Part of the β-Sheet Core

    PubMed Central

    Weirich, Franziska; Gremer, Lothar; Mirecka, Ewa A.; Schiefer, Stephanie; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Heise, Henrike

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid deposits formed from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) are a hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus and are known to be cytotoxic to pancreatic β-cells. The molecular structure of the fibrillar form of IAPP is subject of intense research, and to date, different models exist. We present results of solid-state NMR experiments on fibrils of recombinantly expressed and uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled human IAPP in the non-amidated, free acid form. Complete sequential resonance assignments and resulting constraints on secondary structure are shown. A single set of chemical shifts is found for most residues, which is indicative of a high degree of homogeneity. The core region comprises three to four β-sheets. We find that the central 23-FGAILS-28 segment, which is of critical importance for amyloid formation, is part of the core region and forms a β-strand in our sample preparation. The eight N-terminal amino acid residues of IAPP, forming a ring-like structure due to a disulfide bridge between residues C2 and C7, appear to be well defined but with an increased degree of flexibility. This study supports the elucidation of the structural basis of IAPP amyloid formation and highlights the extent of amyloid fibril polymorphism. PMID:27607147

  12. Structural Characterization of Fibrils from Recombinant Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide by Solid-State NMR: The Central FGAILS Segment Is Part of the β-Sheet Core.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Franziska; Gremer, Lothar; Mirecka, Ewa A; Schiefer, Stephanie; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Heise, Henrike

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid deposits formed from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) are a hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus and are known to be cytotoxic to pancreatic β-cells. The molecular structure of the fibrillar form of IAPP is subject of intense research, and to date, different models exist. We present results of solid-state NMR experiments on fibrils of recombinantly expressed and uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled human IAPP in the non-amidated, free acid form. Complete sequential resonance assignments and resulting constraints on secondary structure are shown. A single set of chemical shifts is found for most residues, which is indicative of a high degree of homogeneity. The core region comprises three to four β-sheets. We find that the central 23-FGAILS-28 segment, which is of critical importance for amyloid formation, is part of the core region and forms a β-strand in our sample preparation. The eight N-terminal amino acid residues of IAPP, forming a ring-like structure due to a disulfide bridge between residues C2 and C7, appear to be well defined but with an increased degree of flexibility. This study supports the elucidation of the structural basis of IAPP amyloid formation and highlights the extent of amyloid fibril polymorphism. PMID:27607147

  13. Dissecting ion-specific from electrostatic salt effects on amyloid fibrillation: A case study of insulin.

    PubMed

    Kutsch, Miriam; Hortmann, Pascal; Herrmann, Christian; Weibels, Sebastian; Weingärtner, Hermann

    2016-03-01

    Diseases like Alzheimer, type II diabetes mellitus, and others go back to fibril formation of partially unfolded proteins. The impact of sodium, potassium, choline, guanidinium, and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride on the fibrillation kinetics of insulin in an acid-denaturing solvent environment is studied by fluorescence spectroscopy using thioflavin T as a fibril-specific stain. The fibrillation kinetics reveal a sigmoidal behavior, characterized by the lag time τlag and the maximum elongation rate k of the fibrils. Up to ionic strengths of about 70 mM, the elongation rate increases with salt concentration. This increase is nonspecific with regard to the salts. Below ionic strengths of ∼50 mM, it can be explained by a Debye-Hückel type model, indicating a dominant role of Coulomb interactions between the charged reactants and products screened by the ionic environment. At higher ionic strength, the elongation rates pass maxima, followed by a Hofmeister type ion-specific decrease. There is a correlation between the lag time τlag and the inverse elongation rate k, which can be described by a power law of the form τlag ∝  aτ(α) with a sublinear exponent α ≅ 1/2. PMID:26843409

  14. Differential effects of amyloid-beta 1-40 and 1-42 fibrils on 5-HT1A serotonin receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Verdurand, Mathieu; Chauveau, Fabien; Daoust, Alexia; Morel, Anne-Laure; Bonnefoi, Frédéric; Liger, François; Bérod, Anne; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Evidence accumulates suggesting a complex interplay between neurodegenerative processes and serotonergic neurotransmission. We have previously reported an overexpression of serotonin 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT(1A)R) after intrahippocampal injections of amyloid-beta 1-40 (Aβ40) fibrils in rats. This serotonergic reactivity paralleled results from clinical positron emission tomography studies with [(18)F]MPPF revealing an overexpression of 5-HT(1A)R in the hippocampus of patients with mild cognitive impairment. Because Aβ40 and Aβ42 isoforms are found in amyloid plaques, we tested in this study the hypothesis of a peptide- and region-specific 5-HT(1A)R reactivity by injecting them, separately, into the hippocampus or striatum of rats. [(18)F]MPPF in vitro autoradiography revealed that Aβ40 fibrils, but not Aβ42, were triggering an overexpression of 5-HT(1A)R in the hippocampus and striatum of rat brains after 7 days. Immunohistochemical approaches targeting neuronal precursor cells, mature neurons, and astrocytes showed that Aβ42 fibrils caused more pathophysiological damages than Aβ40 fibrils. The mechanisms of Aβ40 fibrils-induced 5-HT(1A)R expression remains unknown, but hypotheses including neurogenesis, glial expression, and axonal sprouting are discussed. PMID:26973100

  15. Yeast red pigment modifies Amyloid beta growth in Alzheimer disease models in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Nevzglyadova, Olga V; Mikhailova, Ekaterina V; Amen, Triana R; Zenin, Valeriy V; Artemov, Alexey V; Kostyleva, Elena I; Mezhenskaya, Daria A; Rodin, Dmitry I; Saifitdinova, Alsu F; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail A; Sarantseva, Svetlana V; Soidla, Tonu R

    2015-01-01

    The effect of yeast red pigment on amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation and fibril growth was studied in yeasts, fruit flies and in vitro. Yeast strains accumulating red pigment (red strains) contained less amyloid and had better survival rates compared to isogenic strains without red pigment accumulation (white strains). Confocal and fluorescent microscopy was used to visualise fluorescent Aβ-GFP aggregates. Yeast cells containing less red pigment had more Aβ-GFP aggregates despite the lower level of overall GFP fluorescence. Western blot analysis with anti-GFP, anti-Aβ and A11 antibodies also revealed that red cells contained a considerably lower amount of Aβ GFP aggregates as compared to white cells. Similar results were obtained with exogenous red pigment that was able to penetrate yeast cells. In vitro experiments with thioflavine and TEM showed that red pigment effectively decreased Aβ fibril growth. Transgenic flies expressing Aβ were cultivated on medium containing red and white isogenic yeast strains. Flies cultivated on red strains had a significant decrease in Aβ accumulation levels and brain neurodegeneration. They also demonstrated better memory and learning indexes and higher locomotor ability.

  16. Entacapone and Tolcapone, Two Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors, Block Fibril Formation of α-Synuclein and β-Amyloid and Protect against Amyloid-induced Toxicity*

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Saviana; Eleuteri, Simona; Paleologou, Katerina E.; Yin, Guowei; Zweckstetter, Markus; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease (AD). There is considerable consensus that the increased production and/or aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of PD and related synucleinopathies. Current therapeutic strategies for treating PD offer mainly transient symptomatic relief and aim at the restitution of dopamine levels to counterbalance the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, the identification and development of drug-like molecules that block α-synuclein aggregation and prevent the loss of dopaminergic neurons are desperately needed to treat or slow the progression of PD. Here, we show that entacapone and tolcapone are potent inhibitors of α-syn and β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomerization and fibrillogenesis, and they also protect against extracellular toxicity induced by the aggregation of both proteins. Comparison of the anti-aggregation properties of entacapone and tolcapone with the effect of five other catechol-containing compounds, dopamine, pyrogallol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, and quercetin on the oligomerization and fibrillization of α-syn and Aβ, demonstrate that the catechol moiety is essential for the anti-amyloidogenic activity. Our findings present the first characterization of the anti-amyloidogenic properties of tolcapone and entacapone against both α-synuclein and Aβ42 and highlight the potential of this class of nitro-catechol compounds as anti-amyloidogenic agents. Their inhibitory properties, mode of action, and structural properties suggest that they constitute promising lead compounds for further optimization. PMID:20150427

  17. Entacapone and tolcapone, two catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitors, block fibril formation of alpha-synuclein and beta-amyloid and protect against amyloid-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Saviana; Eleuteri, Simona; Paleologou, Katerina E; Yin, Guowei; Zweckstetter, Markus; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Lashuel, Hilal A

    2010-05-14

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer disease (AD). There is considerable consensus that the increased production and/or aggregation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of PD and related synucleinopathies. Current therapeutic strategies for treating PD offer mainly transient symptomatic relief and aim at the restitution of dopamine levels to counterbalance the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Therefore, the identification and development of drug-like molecules that block alpha-synuclein aggregation and prevent the loss of dopaminergic neurons are desperately needed to treat or slow the progression of PD. Here, we show that entacapone and tolcapone are potent inhibitors of alpha-syn and beta-amyloid (Abeta) oligomerization and fibrillogenesis, and they also protect against extracellular toxicity induced by the aggregation of both proteins. Comparison of the anti-aggregation properties of entacapone and tolcapone with the effect of five other catechol-containing compounds, dopamine, pyrogallol, gallic acid, caffeic acid, and quercetin on the oligomerization and fibrillization of alpha-syn and Abeta, demonstrate that the catechol moiety is essential for the anti-amyloidogenic activity. Our findings present the first characterization of the anti-amyloidogenic properties of tolcapone and entacapone against both alpha-synuclein and Abeta42 and highlight the potential of this class of nitro-catechol compounds as anti-amyloidogenic agents. Their inhibitory properties, mode of action, and structural properties suggest that they constitute promising lead compounds for further optimization. PMID:20150427

  18. Synthesis and characterization of fluorinated magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaat, Hadas; Belfort, Georges; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-06-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 ± 2.1 nm are formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Uniform magnetic γ-Fe2O3/poly (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate) (γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA) core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by emulsion polymerization of the fluorinated monomer 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) in the presence of the maghemite nanoparticles. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA core-shell nanoparticles are elucidated. A significant direct slow transition from α-helix to β-sheets during insulin fibril formation is observed in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA nanoparticles. This is in contradiction to our previous manuscript, which illustrated that the γ-Fe2O3 core nanoparticles do not affect the kinetics of the formation of the insulin fibrils, and to other previous publications that describe acceleration of the fibrillation process by using various types of nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles may therefore be also useful for the inhibition of conformational changes of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow and prion diseases.

  19. Suppression of amyloid fibrils using the GroEL apical domain.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Bimlesh; Fukui, Naoya; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-08-04

    In E. coli cells, rescue of non-native proteins and promotion of native state structure is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL. An important key to this activity lies in the structure of the apical domain of GroEL (GroEL-AD) (residue 191-376), which recognizes and binds non-native protein molecules through hydrophobic interactions. In this study, we investigated the effects of GroEL-AD on the aggregation of various client proteins (α-Synuclein, Aβ42, and GroES) that lead to the formation of distinct protein fibrils in vitro. We found that GroEL-AD effectively inhibited the fibril formation of these three proteins when added at concentrations above a critical threshold; the specific ratio differed for each client protein, reflecting the relative affinities. The effect of GroEL-AD in all three cases was to decrease the concentration of aggregate-forming unfolded client protein or its early intermediates in solution, thereby preventing aggregation and fibrillation. Binding affinity assays revealed some differences in the binding mechanisms of GroEL-AD toward each client. Our findings suggest a possible applicability of this minimal functioning derivative of the chaperonins (the "minichaperones") as protein fibrillation modulators and detectors.

  20. Suppression of amyloid fibrils using the GroEL apical domain

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Bimlesh; Fukui, Naoya; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    In E. coli cells, rescue of non-native proteins and promotion of native state structure is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL. An important key to this activity lies in the structure of the apical domain of GroEL (GroEL-AD) (residue 191–376), which recognizes and binds non-native protein molecules through hydrophobic interactions. In this study, we investigated the effects of GroEL-AD on the aggregation of various client proteins (α-Synuclein, Aβ42, and GroES) that lead to the formation of distinct protein fibrils in vitro. We found that GroEL-AD effectively inhibited the fibril formation of these three proteins when added at concentrations above a critical threshold; the specific ratio differed for each client protein, reflecting the relative affinities. The effect of GroEL-AD in all three cases was to decrease the concentration of aggregate-forming unfolded client protein or its early intermediates in solution, thereby preventing aggregation and fibrillation. Binding affinity assays revealed some differences in the binding mechanisms of GroEL-AD toward each client. Our findings suggest a possible applicability of this minimal functioning derivative of the chaperonins (the “minichaperones”) as protein fibrillation modulators and detectors. PMID:27488469

  1. Structural and Material Properties of Amyloid Aβ40/42 Fibrils.

    PubMed

    Dong, Mingyan; Paul, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Zachary; Chan, Kwaichow; Hu, Dingkun; Ai, Hongqi; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2016-08-18

    In this study, structural and mechanical properties of a series of models of Aβ42 (one- and two-fold) and Aβ40 (two- and three-fold) fibrils have been computed by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Based on calculations of the twist angle (θ) and periodicity (v=360d/θ), oligomers formed by 20, 11, and 13 monomers were found to be the smallest realistic models of three-fold Aβ40 , one-fold Aβ42 , and two-fold Aβ42 fibrils, respectively. Our results predict that the Aβ40 fibrils initially exist in two staggered conformations [STAG(+2) and STAG(+1)] and then undergo a [STAG(+2)→STAG(+1)] transformation in a size-dependent manner. The length of the loop region consisting of the residues 23-29 shrinks with the elongation of both Aβ40 and Aβ42 fibrils. A comparison of the computed potential energy suggests that a two-fold Aβ40 aggregate is more stable than its three-fold counterpart, and that Aβ42 oligomers can exist only in one-fold conformation for aggregates of more than 11 monomers in length. The computed Young's modulus and yield strengths of 50 GPa and 0.95 GPa, respectively, show that these aggregates possess excellent material properties.

  2. Zn(II)- and Cu(II)-induced non-fibrillar aggregates of amyloid-beta (1-42) peptide are transformed to amyloid fibrils, both spontaneously and under the influence of metal chelators.

    PubMed

    Tõugu, Vello; Karafin, Ann; Zovo, Kairit; Chung, Roger S; Howells, Claire; West, Adrian K; Palumaa, Peep

    2009-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides is a central phenomenon in Alzheimer's disease. Zn(II) and Cu(II) have profound effects on Abeta aggregation; however, their impact on amyloidogenesis is unclear. Here we show that Zn(II) and Cu(II) inhibit Abeta(42) fibrillization and initiate formation of non-fibrillar Abeta(42) aggregates, and that the inhibitory effect of Zn(II) (IC(50) = 1.8 micromol/L) is three times stronger than that of Cu(II). Medium and high-affinity metal chelators including metallothioneins prevented metal-induced Abeta(42) aggregation. Moreover, their addition to preformed aggregates initiated fast Abeta(42) fibrillization. Upon prolonged incubation the metal-induced aggregates also transformed spontaneously into fibrils, that appear to represent the most stable state of Abeta(42). H13A and H14A mutations in Abeta(42) reduced the inhibitory effect of metal ions, whereas an H6A mutation had no significant impact. We suggest that metal binding by H13 and H14 prevents the formation of a cross-beta core structure within region 10-23 of the amyloid fibril. Cu(II)-Abeta(42) aggregates were neurotoxic to neurons in vitro only in the presence of ascorbate, whereas monomers and Zn(II)-Abeta(42) aggregates were non-toxic. Disturbed metal homeostasis in the vicinity of zinc-enriched neurons might pre-dispose formation of metal-induced Abeta aggregates, subsequent fibrillization of which can lead to amyloid formation. The molecular background underlying metal-chelating therapies for Alzheimer's disease is discussed in this light. PMID:19619132

  3. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  4. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1–40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1–40 peptide on the basis of their emission response. PMID:26419607

  5. Structural diversity of Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β dimers and their role in oligomerization and fibril formation.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Sharikov, Yuriy; Kouznetsova, Valentina L; Greenberg, Jerry P; Wrasidlo, Wolfgang; Gonzalez, Tania; Desplats, Paula; Michael, Sarah E; Trejo-Morales, Margarita; Overk, Cassia R; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the formation of toxic amyloid-β (Aβ)42 oligomers, and recent evidence supports a role for Aβ dimers as building blocks for oligomers. Molecular dynamics simulation studies have identified clans for the dominant conformations of Aβ42 forming dimers; however, it is unclear if a larger spectrum of dimers is involved and which set(s) of dimers might evolve to oligomers verse fibrils. Therefore, for this study we generated multiple structural conformations of Aβ42, using explicit all-atom molecular dynamics, and then clustering the different structures based on key conformational similarities. Those matching a selection threshold were then used to model a process of oligomerization. Remarkably, we showed a greater diversity in Aβ dimers than previously described. Depending on the clan family, different types of Aβ dimers were obtained. While some had the tendency to evolve into oligomeric rings, others formed fibrils of diverse characteristics. Then we selected the dimers that would evolve to membranephilic annular oligomers. Nearly one third of the 28 evaluated annular oligomers had the dimer interfaces between the neighboring Aβ42 monomers with possible salt bridges between the residue K28 from one side and either residue E22 or D23 on the other. Based on these results, key amino acids were identified for point mutations that either enhanced or suppressed the formation and toxicity of oligomer rings. Our studies suggest a greater diversity of Aβ dimers. Understanding the structure of Aβ dimers might be important for the rationale design of small molecules that block formation of toxic oligomers.

  6. Dry amyloid fibril assembly in a yeast prion peptide is mediated by long-lived structures containing water wires

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Govardhan; Straub, John E.; Thirumalai, D.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid-like fibrils from a number of small peptides that are unrelated by sequence adopt a cross-β-spine in which the two sheets fully interdigitate to create a dry interface. Formation of such a dry interface is usually associated with self-assembly of extended hydrophobic surfaces. Here we investigate how a dry interface is created in the process of protofilament formation in vastly different sequences using two amyloidogenic peptides, one a polar sequence from the N terminus of the yeast prion Sup35 and the other a predominantly hydrophobic sequence from the C terminus of Aβ-peptide. Using molecular dynamics simulations with three force fields we show that spontaneous formation of two ordered one-dimensional water wires in the pore between the two sheets of the Sup35 protofilaments results in long-lived structures, which are stabilized by a network of hydrogen bonds between the water molecules in the wires and the polar side chains in the β-sheet. Upon decreasing the stability of the metastable structures, water molecules are expelled resulting in a helically twisted protofilament in which side chains from a pair of β-strands in each sheet pack perfectly resulting in a dry interface. Although drying in hydrophobically dominated interfaces is abrupt, resembling a liquid to vapor transition, we find that discrete transitions between the liquid to one-dimensional ordered water in the nanopore enclosed by the two β-sheets to dry interface formation characterizes protofilament assembly in the yeast prions. Indeed, as the two sheets of the hydrophobic Aβ-sequence approach each other, fibril formation and expulsion of water molecules occur rapidly and nearly simultaneously. PMID:21098298

  7. Growth of sea cucumber collagen fibrils occurs at the tips and centers in a coordinated manner.

    PubMed

    Trotter, J A; Chapman, J A; Kadler, K E; Holmes, D F

    1998-12-18

    Collagen fibrils are the principle source of mechanical strength in the mutable dermis of the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa. To obtain information about the mechanism by which collagen molecules self-assemble into fibrils, we have isolated single intact fibrils with lengths in the range 14-444 microm. These fibrils have been studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy, yielding data that show how cross-sectional mass, and hence the number of molecules in the cross-section, depend on axial location. In an individual fibril, the two ends always display similar mass distributions. The two tips of each fibril must therefore maintain identity in shape and size throughout growth. The linear relationship between cross-sectional mass and distance from the adjacent end shows that a growing tip is (like the tip of a vertebrate collagen fibril) paraboloidal in shape. Comparison of data from many different fibrils, over a wide range of lengths, however, revealed that the paraboloidal tip becomes blunter as the fibril grows in length. In contrast to vertebrate fibrils, those from C. frondosa do not have a central shaft region of constant cross-sectional mass. Rather, the cross-sectional mass increases to a maximum in the center of each fibril. The maximum cross-sectional mass of the fibrils increases exponentially with increasing fibril length. The centrosymmetry, the paraboloidal shape of the tips, and the hyperbolic increase in maximum cross-sectional mass with fibril length, is evidence for a co-ordinated regulation of length and diameter, which differs from the kind of regulation that gives rise to collagen fibrils in vertebrates (chickens and mice).

  8. Role of aromatic residues in amyloid fibril formation of human calcitonin by solid-state 13C NMR and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Itoh-Watanabe, Hikari; Kamihira-Ishijima, Miya; Javkhlantugs, Namsrai; Inoue, Ryozo; Itoh, Yuki; Endo, Hiroshi; Tuzi, Satoru; Saitô, Hazime; Ueda, Kazuyoshi; Naito, Akira

    2013-06-21

    Calcitonin (CT) is an amyloid fibril forming peptide. Since salmon calcitonin (sCT), having Leu residues (Leu12, Leu16 or Leu19) instead of Tyr12, Phe16 or Phe19 for human calcitonin (hCT), is known to form the fibrils much slower than hCT, hCTs mutated to Leu residues at the position of 16 (F16L-hCT), 19 (F19L-hCT), and 12, 16 and 19 (TL-hCT) were examined to reveal the role of aromatic side-chains on amyloid fibrillation using solid-state (13)C NMR. The detailed kinetics were analyzed using a two-step reaction mechanism such as nucleation and fibril elongation with the rate constants of k1 and k2, respectively. The k2 values of hCT mutants were significantly slower than that of hCT at a neutral pH, although they were almost the same at an acidic pH. The (13)C chemical shifts of the labeled sites showed that the conformations of monomeric hCT mutants take α-helices as viewed from the Gly10 moiety. The hCT mutants formed fibrils and during the fibril formation, the α-helix around Gly10-Phe22 changed to the β-sheet, and the major structures around Ala26-Ala31 were random coil in the fibrils. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed for the β-sheet system of hCT9-23 and its mutants F16L-hCT9-23, F19L-hCT9-23 and TL-hCT9-23. In one of the stable fibril structures, Phe16 of hCT interacts with Phe19 of the next strand alternatively. In the hCT mutants, lack of Phe16 and Phe19 interaction causes significant instability as compared with the hCT fibril, leading to the reduction of k2 values, as observed experimentally in the hCT mutants at a neutral pH.

  9. Fluorescence molecular probes for sensitive point detection of amyloid fibrils and protofibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Mikael; Jonsson, Per; Sörgjerd, Karin; Hammarström, Per

    2005-10-01

    Protein based infections such as prion diseases have lately attracted a large amount of interest, primarily due to the Mad Cow Epidemic in Great Britain, and the increase of Alzheimer's disease and related diseases in the ageing Western society. Infective proteins are very stable and almost untraceable prior to infection making them ideal as biological weapons. Particularly if the used agent is of human origin, the immunoresponse can be avoided, leaving no trace of the infectious agent. The transient nature of infectious oligomeric intermediates of misfolded proteins or peptide fragments that later matures into fibrillar aggregates makes them hard to study, and methods to detect and study these species are sparse. There exist a number of fluorescent probes that bind specifically to protein amyloidic structures. Thioflavins (ThT, ThS), Congo and Nile red, 4-(dicyanovinyl)-julolidine (DCVJ), as well as derivatives amino-8-naphtalene sulphonate (ANS, Bis-ANS) which are known to bind to the fibrillar or pre-fibrillar states with dissociation constants of typically 1 - 20 μM. Here, transthyretin (TTR), insulin and lysozyme were used as model proteins to detect different amyloid precursor states for diseases such as senile systemic amyloidosis, familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) and iatrogenic amyloidosis. Specifically, the probes were employed in static assays to characterize protofibrillar and mature amyloid fibrillar states using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. Particularly, we investigate and report on the possibility to detect protofibrillar states at low concentration levels using modern fluorescence array detector systems in conjunction with lasers operating in the blue or ultraviolett wavelengths as excitation source. Results of ANS, ThT and a ThT analogue (abbreviated ThC) are discussed.

  10. Stable, Metastable, and Kinetically Trapped Amyloid Aggregate Phases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils plays a key role in a multitude of human disorders that range from Alzheimer’s disease to type II diabetes. Compact oligomeric species, observed early during amyloid formation, are reported as the molecular entities responsible for the toxic effects of amyloid self-assembly. However, the relation between early-stage oligomeric aggregates and late-stage rigid fibrils, which are the hallmark structure of amyloid plaques, has remained unclear. We show that these different structures occupy well-defined regions in a peculiar phase diagram. Lysozyme amyloid oligomers and their curvilinear fibrils only form after they cross a salt and protein concentration-dependent threshold. We also determine a boundary for the onset of amyloid oligomer precipitation. The oligomeric aggregates are structurally distinct from rigid fibrils and are metastable against nucleation and growth of rigid fibrils. These experimentally determined boundaries match well with colloidal model predictions that account for salt-modulated charge repulsion. The model also incorporates the metastable and kinetic character of oligomer phases. Similarities and differences of amyloid oligomer assembly to metastable liquid–liquid phase separation of proteins and to surfactant aggregation are discussed. PMID:25469942

  11. Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome: sharing of a unique cerebrovascular amyloid fibril protein.

    PubMed

    Glenner, G G; Wong, C W

    1984-08-16

    The cerebrovascular amyloid protein from a case of adult Down's syndrome was isolated and purified. Amino acid sequence analysis showed it to be homologous to that of the beta protein of Alzheimer's disease. This is the first chemical evidence of a relationship between Down's syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. It suggests that Down's syndrome may be a predictable model for Alzheimer's disease. Assuming the beta protein is a human gene product, it also suggests that the genetic defect in Alzheimer's disease is localized on chromosome 21.

  12. Soluble Beta-Amyloid Peptides, but Not Insoluble Fibrils, Have Specific Effect on Neuronal MicroRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing Jing; Dolios, Georgia; Wang, Rong; Liao, Francesca-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that soluble β-amyloid (sAβ) oligomers, rather than their fibrillar aggregates, contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), though the mechanisms of their neurotoxicity are still elusive. Here, we demonstrate that sAβ derived from 7PA2 cells exert a much stronger effect on the regulation of a set of functionally validated microRNAs (miRNAs) in primary cultured neurons than the synthetic insoluble Aβ fibrils (fAβ). Synthetic sAβ peptides at a higher concentration present comparable effect on these miRNAs in our neuronal model. Further, the sAβ-induced miR-134, miR-145 and miR-210 expressions are fully reversed by two selective N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibitors, but are neither reversed by insulin nor by forskolin, suggesting an NMDA receptor-dependent, rather than PI3K/AKT or PKA/CREB signaling dependent regulatory mechanism. In addition, the repression of miR-107 expression by the sAβ containing 7PA2 CM is likely involved multiple mechanisms and multiple players including NMDA receptor, N-terminally truncated Aβ and reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:24595404

  13. Conversion of amyloid fibrils of cytochrome c to mature nanorods through a honeycomb morphology.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Sil, Pallabi; Thangamuniyandi, Muruganandan; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2015-04-14

    Amyloid species with various morphologies have been found for different proteins and disease systems. In this article, we aim to ask if these morphologies are unique to a particular protein or if they convert from one to another. Using a heme protein containing iron as the transition-metal activator of aggregation and a negatively charged surfactant, partial unfolding of the protein and its aggregation have been induced. In the pathway of aggregation, we have observed the formation of several morphological structures of a single protein, which were visualized directly using atomic force microscopy (AFM). These structures have been found to appear and disappear with time, and their formation could be monitored under normal buffer conditions and at room temperature without requiring any sophisticated chemical or biological methodologies. In addition, we have observed the formation of honeycomb-shaped morphology, which may serve as an intermediate. These amyloid-based nanostructures may have the potential to be explored in therapeutics delivery and other biomedical applications.

  14. β-Amyloid Fibrils in Alzheimer Disease Are Not Inert When Bound to Copper Ions but Can Degrade Hydrogen Peroxide and Generate Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Jennifer; Tinker-Mill, Claire; Kolosov, Oleg; Zhang, Hao; Tabner, Brian J.; Allsop, David

    2014-01-01

    According to the “amyloid cascade” hypothesis of Alzheimer disease, the formation of Aβ fibrils and senile plaques in the brain initiates a cascade of events leading to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neurodegeneration, and the symptom of dementia. Recently, however, emphasis has shifted away from amyloid fibrils as the predominant toxic form of Aβ toward smaller aggregates, referred to as “soluble oligomers.” These oligomers have become one of the prime suspects for involvement in the early oxidative damage that is evident in this disease. This raises the question whether or not Aβ fibrils are actually “inert tombstones” present at the end of the aggregation process. Here we show that, when Aβ(1–42) aggregates, including fibrils, are bound to Cu(II) ions, they retain their redox activity and are able to degrade hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with the formation of hydroxyl radicals and the consequent oxidation of the peptide (detected by formation of carbonyl groups). We find that this ability increases as the Cu(II):peptide ratio increases and is accompanied by changes in aggregate morphology, as determined by atomic force microscopy. When aggregates are prepared in the copresence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, the ratio of Cu(II):Zn(II) becomes an important factor in the degeneration of H2O2, the formation of carbonyl groups in the peptide, and in aggregate morphology. We believe, therefore, that Aβ fibrils can destroy H2O2 and generate damaging hydroxyl radicals and, so, are not necessarily inert end points. PMID:24619420

  15. Atomic Force Fluorescence Microscopy in the Characterization of Amyloid Fibril Assembly and Oligomeric Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Ostapchenko, Valeriy; Gasset, Maria; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a conventional tool for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of protein aggregation and, specifically, for analysis of assembly pathways, architecture, aggregation state, and heterogencity of oligomeric intermediates or mature fibrils. AFM imaging provides useful information about particle dimensions, shape, and substructure with nanometer resolution. Conventional AFM methods have been very helpful in the analysis of polymorphic assemblies formed in vitro from homogeneous proteins or peptides. However, AFM imaging on its own provides limited insight into conformation or composition of assemblies produced in the complex environment of a cell, or prepared from a mixture of proteins as a result of cross-seeding. In these cases, its combination with fluorescence microscopy (AFFM) increases its resolution. PMID:22528089

  16. Molecular Insight into Human Lysozyme and Its Ability to Form Amyloid Fibrils in High Concentrations of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate: A View from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Majid; Mehrnejad, Faramarz

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the tertiary structure of proteins and the resultant fibrillary aggregation could result in fatal heredity diseases, such as lysozyme systemic amyloidosis. Human lysozyme is a globular protein with antimicrobial properties with tendencies to fibrillate and hence is known as a fibril-forming protein. Therefore, its behavior under different ambient conditions is of great importance. In this study, we conducted two 500000 ps molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of human lysozyme in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at two ambient temperatures. To achieve comparative results, we also performed two 500000 ps human lysozyme MD simulations in pure water as controls. The aim of this study was to provide further molecular insight into all interactions in the lysozyme-SDS complexes and to provide a perspective on the ability of human lysozyme to form amyloid fibrils in the presence of SDS surfactant molecules. SDS, which is an anionic detergent, contains a hydrophobic tail with 12 carbon atoms and a negatively charged head group. The SDS surfactant is known to be a stabilizer for helical structures above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) [1]. During the 500000 ps MD simulations, the helical structures were maintained by the SDS surfactant above its CMC at 300 K, while at 370 K, human lysozyme lost most of its helices and gained β-sheets. Therefore, we suggest that future studies investigate the β-amyloid formation of human lysozyme at SDS concentrations above the CMC and at high temperatures. PMID:27768744

  17. Synthesis of fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents for amyloid-beta fibrils detection and removal by a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Skaat, Hadas; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-09-01

    Early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease (AD), before the onset of marked clinical symptoms, is critical in preventing the irreversible neuronal damage that eventually leads to dementia and ultimately death. Therefore, there is an urgent need for in vivo imaging agents, which are valuable as specific biomarkers to demonstrate the location and density of amyloid plaques in the living human brain. The present manuscript describes a novel method for selective marking of Abeta(40) fibrils by non-fluorescent gamma-Fe(2)O(3) and fluorescent-magnetic gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-rhodamine or gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-Congo red nanoparticles, and the complete removal of the magnetized fibrils from the aqueous continuous phase by a magnetic field. These fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents have a great advantage due to the combination of the magnetic and fluorescence imaging into one nanostructured system. This hybrid system, which selectively marks Abeta(40) fibrils, might enable the early detection of plaques using both MRI and fluorescence microscopy, and therefore may be applied in in vivo AD diagnosis studies. These fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles may also be useful as selective biomarkers to detect the location and the removal of other amyloid plaques derived from different amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow, and prion diseases. PMID:19559008

  18. RNA Binds to Tau Fibrils and Sustains Template-Assisted Growth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tau fibrils are the main proteinacious components of neurofibrillary lesions in Alzheimer disease. Although RNA molecules are sequestered into these lesions, their relationship to Tau fibrils is only poorly understood. Such understanding, however, is important, as short fibrils can transfer between neurons and nonproteinacious factors including RNA could play a defining role in modulating the latter process. Here, we used sedimentation assays combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence, and absorbance spectroscopy to determine the effects of RNA on Tau fibril structure and growth. We observe that, in the presence of RNA, three-repeat (3R) and four-repeat (4R) Tau form fibrils with parallel, in-register arrangement of β-strands and exhibit an asymmetric seeding barrier in which 4R Tau grows onto 3R Tau seeds but not vice versa. These structural features are similar to those previously observed for heparin-induced fibrils, indicating that basic conformational properties are conserved, despite their being molecular differences of the nucleating agents. Furthermore, RNA sustains template-assisted growth and binds to the fibril surface and can be exchanged by heparin. These findings suggest that, in addition to mediating fibrillization, cofactors decorating the surface of Tau fibrils may modulate biological interactions and thereby influence the spreading of Tau pathology in the human brain. PMID:26177386

  19. Design of LVFFARK and LVFFARK-functionalized nanoparticles for inhibiting amyloid β-protein fibrillation and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Neng; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Fu-Feng; Sun, Yan

    2015-03-18

    Aggregation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) into amyloid oligomers and fibrils is pathologically linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hence, the inhibition of Aβ aggregation is essential for the prevention and treatment of AD, but the development of potent agents capable of inhibiting Aβ fibrillogenesis has posed significant challenges. Herein, we designed Ac-LVFFARK-NH2 (LK7) by incorporating two positively charged residues, R and K, into the central hydrophobic fragment of Aβ17-21 (LVFFA) and examined its inhibitory effect on Aβ42 aggregation and cytotoxicity by extensive physical, biophysical, and biological analyses. LK7 was observed to inhibit Aβ42 fibrillogenesis in a dose-dependent manner, but its strong self-assembly characteristic also resulted in high cytotoxicity. In order to prevent the cytotoxicity that resulted from the self-assembly of LK7, the peptide was then conjugated to the surface of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) to fabricate a nanosized inhibitor, LK7@PLGA-NPs. It was found that LK7@PLGA-NPs had little cytotoxicity because the self-assembly of the LK7 conjugated on the NPs was completely inhibited. Moreover, the NPs-based inhibitor showed remarkable inhibitory capability against Aβ42 aggregation and significantly alleviated its cytotoxicity at a low LK7@PLGA-NPs concentration of 20 μg/mL. At the same peptide concentration, free LK7 showed little inhibitory effect. It is considered that several synergetic effects contributed to the strong inhibitory ability of LK7@PLGA-NPs, including the enhanced interactions between Aβ42 and LK7@PLGA-NPs brought on by inhibiting LK7 self-assembly, restricting conformational changes of Aβ42, and thus redirecting Aβ42 aggregation into unstructured, off-pathway aggregates. The working mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of LK7 and LK7@PLGA-NPs on Aβ42 aggregation were proposed based on experimental observations. This work provides new insights into the design and development of

  20. Trimethine cyanine dyes as fluorescent probes for amyloid fibrils: The effect of N,N'-substituents.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Marina V; Chernii, Svitlana V; Losytskyy, Mykhaylo Yu; Kryvorotenko, Dmytro V; Derevyanko, Nadiya O; Slominskii, Yurii L; Kovalska, Vladyslava B; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M

    2015-09-01

    The effect of various N,N'-substituents in the molecule of benzothiazole trimethine cyanine dye on its ability to sense the amyloid aggregates of protein was studied. The dyes are low fluorescent when free and in the presence of monomeric proteins, but their emission intensity sharply increases in complexes with aggregated insulin and lysozyme, with the fluorescence quantum yield reaching up to 0.42. The dyes carrying butyl, hydroxyalkyl, and phenylalkyl groups as N,N'-substituents possess the increased fluorescent sensitivity to fibrillar lysozyme, whereas the ones carrying quaternary amino groups are preferably sensitive to fibrillar insulin. This fluorescent sensitivity preference provided by the N,N'-functional groups could be explained by the interaction between these groups and protein side chains. The strongest fluorescent response (up to 70times) and the same sensitivity to aggregates of both proteins were exhibited by the dye D-51 carrying N-sulfoalkyl group. The studied cyanines allow the detection of fibrillar aggregates in the wide range up to 0.8 to 300μg/ml and permit monitoring the protein aggregation kinetics with high reproducibility. The modification of trimethine cyanine dyes by functional substituents in N,N'-positions is suggested as a tool for the design of fluorescent molecules with the enhanced fluorescent sensitivity to the fibrillar aggregates of proteins. PMID:25963892

  1. Steady-state and time-resolved Thioflavin-T fluorescence can report on morphological differences in amyloid fibrils formed by Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42)

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, David J.; Wranne, Moa S.; Gilbert Gatty, Mélina; Westerlund, Fredrik; Esbjörner, Elin K.

    2015-03-06

    Thioflavin-T (ThT) is one of the most commonly used dyes for amyloid detection, but the origin of its fluorescence enhancement is not fully understood. Herein we have characterised the ThT fluorescence response upon binding to the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) variants of the Alzheimer's-related peptide amyloid-β, in order to explore how the photophysical properties of this dye relates to structural and morphological properties of two amyloid fibril types formed by peptides with a high degree of sequence homology. We show that the steady-state ThT fluorescence is 1.7 times more intense with Aβ(1-40) compared to Aβ(1-42) fibrils in concentration matched samples prepared under quiescent conditions. By measuring the excited state lifetime of bound ThT, we also demonstrate a distinct difference between the two fibril isoforms, with Aβ(1-42) fibrils producing a longer ThT fluorescence lifetime compared to Aβ(1-40). The substantial steady-state intensity difference is therefore not explained by differences in fluorescence quantum yield. Further, we find that the ThT fluorescence intensity, but not the fluorescence lifetime, is dependent on the fibril preparation method (quiescent versus agitated conditions). We therefore propose that the fluorescence lifetime is inherent to each isoform and sensitively reports on fibril microstructure in the protofilament whereas the total fluorescence intensity relates to the amount of exposed β-sheet in the mature Aβ fibrils and hence to differences in their morphology. Our results highlight the complexity of ThT fluorescence, and demonstrate its extended use in amyloid fibril characterisation. - Highlights: • ThT emission is more intense with Aβ(1-40) fibrils than with Aβ(1-42) fibrils. • Aβ(1-42) fibrils induce longer ThT fluorescence lifetimes and higher quantum yield. • ThT emission intensity in Aβ fibril samples reports on fibril morphology. • The ThT fluorescence lifetime is a characteristic feature of each A

  2. Amyloid-like fibrils from an 18-residue peptide analogue of a part of the central domain of the B-family of silkmoth chorion proteins.

    PubMed

    Iconomidou, V A; Chryssikos, G D; Gionis, V; Vriend, G; Hoenger, A; Hamodrakas, S J

    2001-06-22

    Chorion is the major component of silkmoth eggshell. More than 95% of its dry mass consists of the A and B families of low molecular weight structural proteins, which have remarkable mechanical and chemical properties, and protect the oocyte and the developing embryo from the environment. We present data from negative staining, Congo red binding, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-Raman, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and modelling studies of a synthetic peptide analogue of a part of the central domain of the B family of silkmoth chorion proteins, indicating that this peptide folds and self-assembles, forming amyloid-like fibrils. These results support further our proposal, based on experimental data from a synthetic peptide analogue of the central domain of the A family of chorion proteins, that silkmoth chorion is a natural, protective amyloid [Iconomidou et al., FEBS Lett. 479 (2000) 141-145]. PMID:11423129

  3. Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation of human amylin by N-alkylated amino acid and alpha-hydroxy acid residue containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Rijkers, Dirk T S; Höppener, Jo W M; Posthuma, George; Lips, Cornelis J M; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2002-09-16

    Amyloid deposits are formed as a result of uncontrolled aggregation of (poly)peptides or proteins. Today several diseases are known, for example Alzheimer's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mad cow disease, in which amyloid formation is involved. Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of beta-pleated sheets and here a general method is described to introduce molecular mutations in order to achieve disruption of beta-sheet formation. Eight backbone-modified amylin derivatives, an amyloidogenic peptide involved in maturity onset diabetes, were synthesized. Their beta-sheet forming properties were studied by IR spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Modification of a crucial amide NH by an alkyl chain led to a complete loss of the beta-sheet forming capacity of amylin. The resulting molecular mutated amylin derivative could be used to break the beta-sheet thus retarding beta-sheet formation of unmodified amylin. Moreover, it was found that the replacement of this amide bond by an ester moiety suppressed fibrillogenesis significantly. Introduction of N-alkylated amino acids and/or ester functionalities-leading to depsipeptides-into amyloidogenic peptides opens new avenues towards novel peptidic beta-sheet breakers for inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation. PMID:12298020

  4. In Sup35p filaments (the [PSI+] prion), the globular C-terminal domains are widely offset from the amyloid fibril backbone

    SciTech Connect

    Baxa, U.; Wall, J.; Keller, P. W.; Cheng, N.; Steven, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In yeast cells infected with the [PSI+] prion, Sup35p forms aggregates and its activity in translation termination is downregulated. Transfection experiments have shown that Sup35p filaments assembled in vitro are infectious, suggesting that they reproduce or closely resemble the prion. We have used several EM techniques to study the molecular architecture of filaments, seeking clues as to the mechanism of downregulation. Sup35p has an N-terminal 'prion' domain; a highly charged middle (M-)domain; and a C-terminal domain with the translation termination activity. By negative staining, cryo-EM and scanning transmission EM (STEM), filaments of full-length Sup35p show a thin backbone fibril surrounded by a diffuse 65-nm-wide cloud of globular C-domains. In diameter ({approx}8 nm) and appearance, the backbones resemble amyloid fibrils of N-domains alone. STEM mass-per-unit-length data yield -1 subunit per 0.47 nm for N-fibrils, NM-filaments and Sup35p filaments, further supporting the fibril backbone model. The 30 nm radial span of decorating C-domains indicates that the M-domains assume highly extended conformations, offering an explanation for the residual Sup35p activity in infected cells, whereby the C-domains remain free enough to interact with ribosomes.

  5. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Pashley, Clare L; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-13

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70% identical in sequence and share 88% sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation. PMID:26780548

  6. Influence of protein hydrolysis on the growth kinetics of β-lg fibrils.

    PubMed

    Kroes-Nijboer, Ardy; Venema, Paul; Bouman, Jacob; van der Linden, Erik

    2011-05-17

    Recently it was found that protein hydrolysis is an important step in the formation of β-lactoglobulin fibrils at pH 2 and elevated temperatures. The objective of the present study was to further investigate the influence of hydrolysis on the kinetics of fibril formation. Both the hydrolysis of β-lactoglobulin and the growth of the fibrils were followed as a function of time and temperature, using SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a Thioflavin T fluorescence assay. As an essential extension to existing models, the quantification of the effect of the hydrolysis on the fibrillar growth was established by a simple polymerization model including a hydrolysis step.

  7. Template-directed deposition of amyloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Chanki

    The formation of amyloid plaques in tissue is a pathological feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. Amyloid deposition, the process of amyloid plaque growth by the association of individual soluble amyloid molecules with a pre-existing amyloid template (i.e. plaque), is known to be critical for amyloid formation in vivo. In order to characterize amyloid deposition, we developed novel, synthetic amyloid templates like amyloid plaques in the human Alzheimer's brain by attaching amyloid seeds covalently onto an N-hydroxysuccinimide-activated surface. Amyloid plaques with a characteristic beta-sheet structure formed through a conformational rearrangement of soluble insulin or Abeta monomers upon interaction with the template. The amyloid deposition rate followed saturation kinetics with respect to insulin concentration in the solution. According to visualization of temporal evolution of Abeta plaque deposition on a template, it was found that mature amyloid plaques serve as a sink of soluble Abeta in a solution as well as a reservoir of small aggregates such as oligomers and protofibrils. Quantitative analysis of seeding efficiencies of three different Abeta species revealed that oligomeric forms of Abeta act more efficiently as seeds than monomers or fibrils do. Furthermore, studies on the interaction between Abeta40 and 42 showed an important role of Abeta42 in amyloid deposition. A slightly acidic condition was found to be unfavorable for amyloid plaque formation. Effects of metal ions on amyloid deposition indicated that Fe3+, but not Cu3 and Zn2+, is important for the deposition of amyloid plaques. The binding of Fe3+ to Abeta42 peptide was confirmed by using SIMS analysis. Zn2+ induced nonfibrillar amorphous aggregates, but the release of Zn2+ from Abeta42 deposits by Fe3+ triggered the formation of amyloid fibers. Effects or metal ion chelators such as ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, deferoxamine, and clioquinol on amyloid deposition were tested to

  8. Protein Folding and Aggregation into Amyloid: The Interference by Natural Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Massimo; Rigacci, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation is a hallmark of several degenerative diseases affecting the brain or peripheral tissues, whose intermediates (oligomers, protofibrils) and final mature fibrils display different toxicity. Consequently, compounds counteracting amyloid aggregation have been investigated for their ability (i) to stabilize toxic amyloid precursors; (ii) to prevent the growth of toxic oligomers or speed that of fibrils; (iii) to inhibit fibril growth and deposition; (iv) to disassemble preformed fibrils; and (v) to favor amyloid clearance. Natural phenols, a wide panel of plant molecules, are one of the most actively investigated categories of potential amyloid inhibitors. They are considered responsible for the beneficial effects of several traditional diets being present in green tea, extra virgin olive oil, red wine, spices, berries and aromatic herbs. Accordingly, it has been proposed that some natural phenols could be exploited to prevent and to treat amyloid diseases, and recent studies have provided significant information on their ability to inhibit peptide/protein aggregation in various ways and to stimulate cell defenses, leading to identify shared or specific mechanisms. In the first part of this review, we will overview the significance and mechanisms of amyloid aggregation and aggregate toxicity; then, we will summarize the recent achievements on protection against amyloid diseases by many natural phenols. PMID:23765219

  9. Amyloid fibril formation by bovine α1-acid glycoprotein in a reducing environment: The role of disulfide bridges on the observed aggregation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Maggiore, Beatrice; Scirè, Andrea; Tanfani, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Bovine α1-acid glycoprotein (bAGP), a thermostable counterpart of its human homologue, is a positive acute phase protein involved in binding and transportation of a large number of bio-active molecules and drugs across the body. We have investigated the effect of low pH and reducing conditions on the structure of the protein and found that it aggregates at high temperatures. The aggregates show a fibrillar structure when observed with electron microscopy. Aggregation assays using the amyloid-specific dye Thioflavin T show the presence of a lag phase which was neither abolished nor shortened when seeds were added. A priori reduction of the two disulfide bridges of bAGP, on the other hand, abolished the lag phase and reveals a connection between the kinetics of reduction and aggregation. We provide a kinetic interpretation and the corresponding rate laws allowing to model the process of fibril formation by bAGP under reducing conditions. Our interpretation allows to assess the role of disulfide bridges on the fibrillation kinetics of bAGP and can provide a more accurate interpretation of the fibrillation kinetics of other amyloidogenic proteins containing disulfide bridges.

  10. SEVI, the semen enhancer of HIV infection along with fragments from its central region, form amyloid fibrils that are toxic to neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Elias, Abigail K; Scanlon, Denis; Musgrave, Ian F; Carver, John A

    2014-09-01

    Semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) is the term given to the amyloid fibrils formed by a 39-amino acid fragment (PAP248-286) of prostatic acidic phosphatase (PAP) found in human semen. SEVI enhances human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity by four to five orders of magnitude (Münch et al., 2007). Here, we show by various biophysical techniques including Thioflavin T fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy that fragments encompassing the central region of SEVI, i.e. PAP248-271 and PAP257-267, form fibrils of similar morphology to SEVI. Our results show that the central region, residues PAP267-271, is crucially important in promoting SEVI fibril formation. Furthermore, SEVI and fibrillar forms of these peptide fragments are toxic to neuronal pheochromocytoma 12 cells but not to epithelial colon carcinoma cells. These findings imply that although SEVI assists in the attachment of HIV-1 to immune cells, it may not facilitate HIV entry by damaging the epithelial cell layer that presents a barrier to the HIV.

  11. Plasticity of amyloid fibrils†

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Ronald; Shivaprasad, Shankaramma; Williams, Angela D.

    2008-01-01

    In experiments designed to characterize the basis of amyloid fibril stability through mutational analysis of the Aβ(1-40) molecule, fibrils exhibit consistent, significant structural malleability. In these results, and in other properties, amyloid fibrils appear to more resemble plastic materials generated from synthetic polymers than they do globular proteins. Thus, like synthetic polymers and plastics, amyloid fibrils exhibit both polymorphism, the ability of one polypeptide to form aggregates of different morphologies, and isomorphism, the ability of different polypeptides to grow into a fibrillar amyloid morphology. This view links amyloid with the prehistorical and 20th Century use of proteins as starting materials to make films, fibers, and plastics, and with the classic protein fiber stretching experiments of the Astbury group. Viewing amyloid from the point of view of the polymer chemist may shed new light on issues such as the role of protofibrils in the mechanism of amyloid formation, the biological potency of fibrils, and the prospects for discovering inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:17198370

  12. In vivo multiphoton imaging reveals gradual growth of newborn amyloid plaques over weeks.

    PubMed

    Burgold, Steffen; Bittner, Tobias; Dorostkar, Mario M; Kieser, Daniel; Fuhrmann, Martin; Mitteregger, Gerda; Kretzschmar, Hans; Schmidt, Boris; Herms, Jochen

    2011-03-01

    The kinetics of amyloid plaque formation and growth as one of the characteristic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are fundamental issues in AD research. Especially the question how fast amyloid plaques grow to their final size after they are born remains controversial. By long-term two-photon in vivo imaging we monitored individual methoxy-X04-stained amyloid plaques over 6 weeks in 12 and 18 months old Tg2576 mice. We found that in 12 months old mice, newly appearing amyloid plaques were initially small in volume and subsequently grew over time. The growth rate of plaques was inversely proportional to their volume; thus amyloid plaques that were already present at the first imaging time point grew over time but slower compared to new plaques. Additionally, we analyzed 18 months old Tg2576 mice in which we neither found newly appearing plaques nor a significant growth of pre-existing plaques over 6 weeks of imaging. In conclusion, newly appearing amyloid plaques are initially small in size but grow over time until plaque growth can not be detected anymore in aged mice. These results suggest that drugs that target plaque formation should be most effective early in the disease, when plaques are growing.

  13. Amyloid beta-peptide possesses a transforming growth factor-beta activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, S S; Huang, F W; Xu, J; Chen, S; Hsu, C Y; Huang, J S

    1998-10-16

    Amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) of 39-42 amino acid residues is a major constituent of Alzheimer's disease neurite plaques. Abeta aggregates (fibrils) are believed to be responsible for neuronal damage and dysfunction, as well as microglia and astrocyte activation in disease lesions by multiple mechanisms. Since Abeta aggregates possess the multiple valencies of an FAED motif (20th to 23rd amino acid residues), which resembles the putative transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) active site motif, we hypothesize that Abeta monomers and Abeta aggregates may function as TGF-beta antagonists and partial agonists, analogous to previously described monovalent and multivalent TGF-beta peptide antagonists and agonists (Huang, S. S., Liu, Q., Johnson, F. E., Konish, Y., and Huang, J. S. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 27155-27159). Here, we report that the Abeta monomer, Abeta-(1-40) and its fragment, containing the motif inhibit radiolabeled TGF-beta binding to cell-surface TGF-beta receptors in mink lung epithelial cells (Mv1Lu cells). Abeta-(1-40)-bovine serum albumin conjugate (Abeta-(1-40)-BSA), a multivalent synthetic analogue of Abeta aggregates, exhibited cytotoxicity toward bovine cerebral endothelial cells and rat post-mitotic differentiated hippocampal neuronal cells (H19-7 cells) and inhibitory activities of radiolabeled TGF-beta binding to TGF-beta receptors and TGF-beta-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression, that were approximately 100-670 times more potent than those of Abeta-(1-40) monomers. At less than micromolar concentrations, Abeta-(1-40)-BSA but not Abeta-(1-40) monomers inhibited proliferation of Mv1Lu cells. Since TGF-beta is an organizer of responses to neurodegeneration and is also found in neurite plaques, the TGF-beta antagonist and partial agonist activities of Abeta monomers and aggregates may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  14. In silico and in vitro studies to elucidate the role of Cu2+ and galanthamine as the limiting step in the amyloid beta (1-42) fibrillation process.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Benitez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Rosales-Hernández, Martha C

    2013-10-01

    The formation of fibrils and oligomers of amyloid beta (Aβ) with 42 amino acid residues (Aβ 1-42 ) is the most important pathophysiological event associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The formation of Aβ fibrils and oligomers requires a conformational change from an α-helix to a β-sheet conformation, which is encouraged by the formation of a salt bridge between Asp 23 or Glu 22 and Lys 28. Recently, Cu(2+) and various drugs used for AD treatment, such as galanthamine (Reminyl(®) ), have been reported to inhibit the formation of Aβ fibrils. However, the mechanism of this inhibition remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explore how Cu(2+) and galanthamine prevent the formation of Aβ1-42 fibrils using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (20 ns) and in vitro studies using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. The MD simulations revealed that Aβ1-42 acquires a characteristic U-shape before the α-helix to β-sheet conformational change. The formation of a salt bridge between Asp 23 and Lys 28 was also observed beginning at 5 ns. However, the MD simulations of Aβ 1-42 in the presence of Cu(2+) or galanthamine demonstrated that both ligands prevent the formation of the salt bridge by either binding to Glu 22 and Asp 23 (Cu(2+) ) or to Lys 28 (galanthamine), which prevents Aβ 1-42 from adopting the U-characteristic conformation that allows the amino acids to transition to a β-sheet conformation. The docking results revealed that the conformation obtained by the MD simulation of a monomer from the 1Z0Q structure can form similar interactions to those obtained from the 2BGE structure in the oligomers. The in vitro studies demonstrated that Aβ remains in an unfolded conformation when Cu(2+) and galanthamine are used. Then, ligands that bind Asp 23 or Glu 22 and Lys 28 could therefore be used to prevent β turn formation and, consequently, the formation of Aβ fibrils.

  15. In silico and in vitro studies to elucidate the role of Cu2+ and galanthamine as the limiting step in the amyloid beta (1–42) fibrillation process

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Benitez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Rosales-Hernández, Martha C

    2013-01-01

    The formation of fibrils and oligomers of amyloid beta (Aβ) with 42 amino acid residues (Aβ1–42) is the most important pathophysiological event associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The formation of Aβ fibrils and oligomers requires a conformational change from an α-helix to a β-sheet conformation, which is encouraged by the formation of a salt bridge between Asp 23 or Glu 22 and Lys 28. Recently, Cu2+ and various drugs used for AD treatment, such as galanthamine (Reminyl®), have been reported to inhibit the formation of Aβ fibrils. However, the mechanism of this inhibition remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explore how Cu2+ and galanthamine prevent the formation of Aβ1–42 fibrils using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (20 ns) and in vitro studies using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. The MD simulations revealed that Aβ1–42 acquires a characteristic U-shape before the α-helix to β-sheet conformational change. The formation of a salt bridge between Asp 23 and Lys 28 was also observed beginning at 5 ns. However, the MD simulations of Aβ1−42 in the presence of Cu2+ or galanthamine demonstrated that both ligands prevent the formation of the salt bridge by either binding to Glu 22 and Asp 23 (Cu2+) or to Lys 28 (galanthamine), which prevents Aβ1−42 from adopting the U-characteristic conformation that allows the amino acids to transition to a β-sheet conformation. The docking results revealed that the conformation obtained by the MD simulation of a monomer from the 1Z0Q structure can form similar interactions to those obtained from the 2BGE structure in the oligomers. The in vitro studies demonstrated that Aβ remains in an unfolded conformation when Cu2+ and galanthamine are used. Then, ligands that bind Asp 23 or Glu 22 and Lys 28 could therefore be used to prevent β turn formation and, consequently, the formation of Aβ fibrils. PMID:23904252

  16. Antibody-conjugated, dual-modal, near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles for antiamyloidgenic activity and specific detection of amyloidfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Skaat, Hadas; Corem-Slakmon, Enav; Grinberg, Igor; Last, David; Goez, David; Mardor, Yael; Margel, Shlomo

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is the main fibrillar component of plaque deposits found in brains affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and is related to the pathogenesis of AD. Passive anti-Aβ immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach for the therapy of AD, based on the administration of specific anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (aAβmAbs) to delay Aβ aggregation in the brain. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is the required readministration of the aAβmAbs at frequent intervals. There are only a few reports describing in vitro study for the immobilization of aAβmAbs to nanoparticles as potential targeting agents of Aβ aggregates. In this article, we report the immobilization of the aAβmAb clone BAM10 to near-infrared fluorescent maghemite nanoparticles for the inhibition of Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics and the specific detection of Aβ40 fibrils. The BAM10-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles were well-characterized, including their immunogold labeling and cytotoxic effect on PC-12 (pheochromocytoma cell line). Indeed, these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly inhibit the Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics compared with the same concentration, or even five times higher, of the free BAM10. This inhibitory effect was confirmed by different assays such as the photo-induced crosslinking of unmodified proteins combined with sodium dodecyl sulfate– polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A cell viability assay also confirmed that these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly reduced the Aβ40-induced cytotoxicity to PC-12 cells. Furthermore, the selective labeling of the Aβ40 fibrils with the BAM10-conjugated near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles enabled specific detection of Aβ40 fibrils ex vivo by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence imaging. This study highlights the immobilization of the aAβmAb to dual-modal nanoparticles as a potential approach for aAβmAb delivery, eliminating the issue of readministration

  17. Keampferol-3-O-rhamnoside abrogates amyloid beta toxicity by modulating monomers and remodeling oligomers and fibrils to non-toxic aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggregation of soluble, monomeric β- amyloid (Aβ) to oligomeric and then insoluble fibrillar Aβ is a key pathogenic feature in development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Increasing evidence suggests that toxicity is linked to diffusible Aβ oligomers, rather than to insoluble fibrils. The use of naturally occurring small molecules for inhibition of Aβ aggregation has recently attracted significant interest for development of effective therapeutic strategies against the disease. A natural polyphenolic flavone, Kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside (K-3-rh), was utilized to investigate its effects on aggregation and cytotoxic effects of Aβ42 peptide. Several biochemical techniques were used to determine the conformational changes and cytotoxic effect of the peptide in the presence and absence of K-3-rh. Results K-3-rh showed a dose-dependent effect against Aβ42 mediated cytotoxicity. Anti-amyloidogenic properties of K-3-rh were found to be efficient in inhibiting fibrilogenesis and secondary structural transformation of the peptide. The consequence of these inhibitions was the accumulation of oligomeric structural species. The accumulated aggregates were smaller, soluble, non-β-sheet and non-toxic aggregates, compared to preformed toxic Aβ oligomers. K-3-rh was also found to have the remodeling properties of preformed soluble oligomers and fibrils. Both of these conformers were found to remodel into non-toxic aggregates. The results showed that K-3-rh interacts with different Aβ conformers, which affects fibril formation, oligomeric maturation and fibrillar stabilization. Conclusion K-3-rh is an efficient molecule to hinder the self assembly and to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of Aβ42 peptide. Hence, K-3-rh and small molecules with similar structure might be considered for therapeutic development against AD. PMID:23259691

  18. Influence of the Physiochemical Properties of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Amyloid β Protein Fibrillation in Solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are recognized as promising nanodiagnostic materials due to their biocompatibility, unique magnetic properties, and their application as multimodal contrast agents. As coated SPIONs have potential use in the diagnosis and treatment of various brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, a comprehensive understanding of their interactions with Aβ and other amyloidogenic proteins is essential prior to their clinical application. Here we demonstrate the effect of thickness and surface charge of the coating layer of SPIONs on the kinetics of fibrillation of Aβ in aqueous solution. A size and surface area dependent “dual” effect on Aβ fibrillation was observed. While lower concentrations of SPIONs inhibited fibrillation, higher concentrations increased the rate of Aβ fibrillation. With respect to coating charge, it is evident that the positively charged SPIONs are capable of promoting fibrillation at significantly lower particle concentrations compared with negatively charged or uncharged SPIONs. This suggests that in addition to the presence of particles, which affect the concentration of monomeric protein in solution (and thereby the nucleation time), there are also effects of binding on the protein conformation. PMID:23509983

  19. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  20. An Auto-Catalytic Surface for Conformational Replication of Amyloid Fibrils—Genesis of an Amyloid World?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammarström, Per; Ali, Malik M.; Mishra, Rajesh; Salagic, Belma; Svensson, Samuel; Tengvall, Pentti; Lundström, Ingemar

    2011-08-01

    Amyloid fibrils are composed of self assembled stacked peptide or protein molecules folded and trapped in a stable cross-beta-sheet conformation. The amyloid fibrillation mechanism represents an intriguing self-catalyzed process rendering replication of a molecular conformational memory of interest for prebiotic chemistry. Herein we describe how a solid surface can be rendered auto-catalytic for fibrillation of a protein solution. We have discovered that a hydrophobic silicon or glass surface can be made to continuously fibrillate solutions of insulin monomers under stressed conditions (pH 1.6, 65°C). It was found that the surface acts as a platform for the formation of nascent seeds that induce fibril replication on and at the surface. This autocatalytic effect stems from a layer a few insulin molecules thick representing an oligomeric layer of misfolded, conformationally trapped, insulin molecules that rapidly through epitaxial growth catalyze the rate determining step (nucleation) during fibril replication. This autocatalytic layer is generated by the protein-solid surface interaction and conformational changes of the adsorbed protein during exposure at the air-water interface. The resulting autocatalytic surface thus both initiates local conformational molecular self-replication and acts as a reservoir for fibril seeds budding off into solution spreading fibril replication entities to the surrounding medium. The possibility of catalysis of the conformational replication process by minute amounts of nucleation sites located on a recruiting surface can evade the issue of dramatic concentration dependence of amyloidogenesis.

  1. Tracking the Mechanism of Fibril Assembly by Simulated Two-Dimensional Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lam, A. R.; Rodriguez, J. J.; Rojas, A.; Scheraga, H.A; Mukamel, S.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of plaque deposits in the human brain. The main component of these plaques consists of highly ordered structures called amyloid fibrils, formed by the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). The mechanism connecting Aβ and AD is yet undetermined. In a previous study, a coarse-grained united-residue model and molecular dynamics simulations were used to model the growth mechanism of A β amyloid fibrils. Based on these simulations, a dock/lock mechanism was proposed, in which Aβ fibrils grow by adding monomers at either end of an amyloid fibril template. To examine the structures in the early time-scale formation and growth of amyloid fibrils, simulated two-dimensional ultraviolet spectroscopy is used. These early structures are monitored in the far ultraviolet regime (λ = 190–250 nm) in which the computed signals originate from the backbone nπ* and ππ* transitions. These signals show distinct cross-peak patterns that can be used, in combination with molecular dynamics, to monitor local dynamics and conformational changes in the secondary structure of Aβ-peptides. The protein geometry-correlated chiral xxxy signal and the non-chiral combined signal xyxy- xyyx were found to be sensitive to, and in agreement with, a dock/lock pathway. PMID:23214934

  2. High-speed atomic force microscopy reveals structural dynamics of amyloid β1-42 aggregates.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Itami, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Teplow, David B; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-05-24

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins into insoluble amyloid fibrils is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. This process involves protein assembly into oligomeric intermediates and fibrils with highly polymorphic molecular structures. These structural differences may be responsible for different disease presentations. For this reason, elucidation of the structural features and assembly kinetics of amyloidogenic proteins has been an area of intense study. We report here the results of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) studies of fibril formation and elongation by the 42-residue form of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ1-42), a key pathogenetic agent of Alzheimer's disease. Our data demonstrate two different growth modes of Aβ1-42, one producing straight fibrils and the other producing spiral fibrils. Each mode depends on initial fibril nucleus structure, but switching from one growth mode to another was occasionally observed, suggesting that fibril end structure fluctuated between the two growth modes. This switching phenomenon was affected by buffer salt composition. Our findings indicate that polymorphism in fibril structure can occur after fibril nucleation and is affected by relatively modest changes in environmental conditions. PMID:27162352

  3. Tuning calcium carbonate growth through physical confinement and templating with amyloid-like polypeptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaco, Martin Francis

    that this methodology does not extend to three-dimensional confined systems, as the water has no method of escape. Through the addition of an insoluble hydroscopic polymer to our microreactors, amorphous calcium carbonate of controllable sizes can be grown. However, crystalline calcium carbonate cannot be grown without some type of templating. Studies of calcium carbonate templating have predominantly been performed on SAMs or in poorly characterized gels or protein films. The use of ordered protein or polypeptide aggregates for templating permits both geometry and charge surface density to be varied. We have studied the kinetics and final morphology of ordered aggregates of poly-L-glutamic acid and a copolymer of glutamic acid and alanine through experiments and simulations. Electrostatics, not structure, of the monomer appeared to be the dominating factor in the aggregation, as pH and salt concentration changes led to dramatic changes in the kinetics. Examining our experimental with existing models provided inconsistent results, so we developed a new model that yielded physically realistic rate constants, while generating better fits with longer lag phases and faster growths. However, despite the similarity of aggregation conditions, the two polypeptides yielded vastly different morphologies, with the PEA forming typical amyloid-like fibrils and PE forming larger, twisted lamellar aggregates. Templating with these aggregates also yielded dramatically different patterns. Polycrystalline rhombohedral calcite with smooth faces and edges grew on PEA fibrils, with minimal templating in evidence. However, on PE, numerous calcite crystals with triangular projections tracked the surface of the aggregate. The PE lamellae are characterized by extensive beta-sheet structure. In this conformation, the glutamic acid spacings on the surface of the aggregates can mimic the spacings of the carboxylates in the calcite lattice. In addition, the high negative charge density on the

  4. The repeat domain of the melanosome fibril protein Pmel17 forms the amyloid core promoting melanin synthesis

    PubMed Central

    McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Shewmaker, Frank; McPhie, Peter; Monterroso, Begoña; Thurber, Kent; Wickner, Reed B.

    2009-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte protein necessary for eumelanin deposition 1 in mammals and found in melanosomes in a filamentous form. The luminal part of human Pmel17 includes a region (RPT) with 10 copies of a partial repeat sequence, pt.e.gttp.qv., known to be essential in vivo for filament formation. We show that this RPT region readily forms amyloid in vitro, but only under the mildly acidic conditions typical of the lysosome-like melanosome lumen, and the filaments quickly become soluble at neutral pH. Under the same mildly acidic conditions, the Pmel filaments promote eumelanin formation. Electron diffraction, circular dichroism, and solid-state NMR studies of Pmel17 filaments show that the structure is rich in beta sheet. We suggest that RPT is the amyloid core domain of the Pmel17 filaments so critical for melanin formation. PMID:19666488

  5. Monitoring disappearance of monomers and generation of resistance to proteolysis during the formation of the activation domain of human procarboxypeptidase A2 (ADA2h) amyloid fibrils by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight-MS.

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Josep; Villegas, Virtudes; Querol, Enrique; Avilés, Francesc X; Serrano, Luis

    2003-01-01

    The term 'amyloidosis' is used to represent a group of protein misfolding diseases characterized by the polymerization of normally innocuous and soluble proteins or peptides into insoluble proteinaceous deposits. One of the several questions that remain unclear regarding the process of amyloid fibril formation is related to the status of the protein when such a process begins. Protein engineering is one of the selected approaches to study amyloidosis. Characterization of many variants of a protein can give information about why a soluble protein aggregates to form fibrils. In the present study, we report information on the conformational changes that precede the formation of fibrils, monitored by the complementary use of exoproteolysis and matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight-MS. This is a novel application of an easy and fast approach. In addition, we used it to evaluate the ability of the model protein ADA2h (activation domain of human procarboxypeptidase A2) and their mutants to generate amyloid fibrils. It could be a useful test to screen protein variants and to study to what extent some physicochemical parameters affect fibrillogenesis. PMID:12765547

  6. A brief overview of amyloids and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ow, Sian-Yang; Dunstan, Dave E

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are self-assembled fibrous protein aggregates that are associated with a number of presently incurable diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Millions of people worldwide suffer from amyloid diseases. This review summarizes the unique cross-β structure of amyloid fibrils, morphological variations, the kinetics of amyloid fibril formation, and the cytotoxic effects of these fibrils and oligomers. Alzheimer’s disease is also explored as an example of an amyloid disease to show the various approaches to treat these amyloid diseases. Finally, this review investigates the nanotechnological and biological applications of amyloid fibrils; as well as a summary of the typical biological pathways involved in the disposal of amyloid fibrils and their precursors. PMID:25042050

  7. A continuum model for hierarchical fibril assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lith, B. S.; Muntean, A.; Storm, C.

    2014-06-01

    Most of the biological polymers that make up our cells and tissues are hierarchically structured. For biopolymers ranging from collagen, to actin, to fibrin and amyloid fibrils this hierarchy provides vitally important versatility. The structural hierarchy must be encoded in the self-assembly process, from the earliest stages onward, in order to produce the appropriate substructures. In this letter, we explore the kinetics of multistage self-assembly processes in a model system which allows comparison to bulk probes such as light scattering. We apply our model to recent turbidimetry data on the self-assembly of collagen fibrils. Our analysis suggests a connection between diffusion-limited aggregation kinetics and fibril growth, supported by slow, power-law growth at very long time scales.

  8. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Estefania P; Rochael, Natalia C; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M; Palhano, Fernando L; Foguel, Debora

    2015-09-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation.

  9. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Estefania P.; Rochael, Natalia C.; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B.; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S.; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M.; Palhano, Fernando L.; Foguel, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation. PMID:26198639

  10. Amyloid fibrils in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Icelandic type is a variant of gamma-trace basic protein (cystatin C).

    PubMed Central

    Ghiso, J; Jensson, O; Frangione, B

    1986-01-01

    A gamma-trace variant protein is the major constituent of the amyloid fibrils in patients from Iceland with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis. The protein consists of 110 residues and is similar to human urinary gamma-trace basic protein (or cystatin C) beginning at its 11th amino-terminal residue. It has an amino acid substitution (glutamine for leucine) at position 58 (position 68 in gamma-trace numbering), which is near the proposed active site of related proteins--namely, cysteine protease inhibitors and kininogens. It is postulated that a point mutation has occurred, leading to the production of an unusual protein that is abnormally degraded, bound, and/or precipitated. Alternatively, gamma-trace basic protein may be genetically polymorphic, and the variant described here may represent an as-yet-undiscovered isotype or an allelic form that is linked to, but not responsible for, the deposition disease. Our data on the structure of a gamma-trace variant protein suggests that its gene expresses a polyprotein precursor in which active peptides are flanked by basic amino acid residues that permit cleavage to liberate small internal peptides. It is likely that the nucleotide sequence coding for Arg-Xaa and Lys-Xaa repeated several times in the molecule may function as alternative splicing sites for mRNA processing. Images PMID:3517880

  11. A Multi-Pathway Perspective on Protein Aggregation: Implications for Control of the Rate and Extent of Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Damien; Kardos, József; Edskes, Herman; Carver, John A.; Goto, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The nucleation-growth model has been used extensively for characterizing in vitro amyloid fibril formation kinetics and for simulating the relationship between amyloid and disease. In the majority of studies amyloid has been considered as the dominant, or sole, aggregation end product, with the presence of other competing non-amyloid aggregation processes, for example amorphous aggregate formation, being largely ignored. Here, we examine possible regulatory effects that off-pathway processes might exert on the rate and extent of amyloid formation – in particular their potential for providing false positives and negatives in the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic agents. Furthermore, we investigate how such competing reactions might influence the standard interpretation of amyloid aggregation as a two-state system. We conclude by discussing our findings in terms of the general concepts of supersaturation and system metastability – providing some mechanistic insight as to how these empirical phenomena may manifest themselves in the amyloid arena. PMID:25647034

  12. Nomenclature of amyloid and amyloidosis. WHO-IUIS Nomenclature Sub-Committee.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    This classification of amyloid and amyloidosis is based on the amyloid fibril proteins, followed by a designation of the fibril protein precursor. Additional information includes the protein type or variant (where applicable) and the clinical diagnosis. PMID:8440029

  13. Surface plasmon resonance for the label-free detection of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Pasquale; Aura, Angela M; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid peptide oligomers and fibrils are studied as targets for therapy and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. They are usually detected by amyloid incubation, but such method is necessarily associated with Aβ1-42 depletion and dye binding or conjugation, which have a complex influence on fibril growth, provide information about fibril elongation over long time periods only, and might lead to false-positive results in amyloid inhibition assay. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is used to study with no labelling and in real time the aggregation of Aβ1-42 amyloid on specific antibodies. SPR data show, for the first time by using SPR, a multi-phase association behavior for Aβ1-42 oligomers accounting for a sigmoidal growth of amyloid as a function of time, with two antibody-dependent aggregation patterns. The new method represents an advantageous alternative to traditional procedures for investigating amyloid self-assembly and inhibition from early-stage oligomer association, on the time scale of seconds to minutes, to long-term polymerization, on the time scale of hours to days. PMID:26558762

  14. Amyloid β-Protein Assembly and Alzheimer's Disease: Dodecamers of Aβ42, but Not of Aβ40, Seed Fibril Formation.

    PubMed

    Economou, Nicholas J; Giammona, Maxwell J; Do, Thanh D; Zheng, Xueyun; Teplow, David B; Buratto, Steven K; Bowers, Michael T

    2016-02-17

    Evidence suggests that oligomers of the 42-residue form of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), Aβ42, play a critical role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we use high resolution atomic force microscopy to directly image populations of small oligomers of Aβ42 that occur at the earliest stages of aggregation. We observe features that can be attributed to a monomer and to relatively small oligomers, including dimers, hexamers, and dodecamers. We discovered that Aβ42 hexamers and dodecamers quickly become the dominant oligomers after peptide solubilization, even at low (1 μM) concentrations and short (5 min) incubation times. Soon after (≥10 min), dodecamers are observed to seed the formation of extended, linear preprotofibrillar β-sheet structures. The preprotofibrils are a single Aβ42 layer in height and can extend several hundred nanometers in length. To our knowledge this is the first report of structures of this type. In each instance the preprotofibril is associated off center with a single layer of a dodecamer. Protofibril formation continues at longer times, but is accompanied by the formation of large, globular aggregates. Aβ40, by contrast, does not significantly form the hexamer or dodecamer but instead produces a mixture of smaller oligomers. These species lead to the formation of a branched chain-like network rather than discrete structures. PMID:26839237

  15. Amyloid Polymorphism: Structural Basis and Neurobiological Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Our understanding of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases, of mechanisms by which disease-associated peptides and proteins aggregate into fibrils, and of structural properties of aggregation intermediates has advanced considerably in recent years. Detailed molecular structural models for certain fibrils and aggregation intermediates are now available. It is now well established that amyloid fibrils are generally polymorphic at the molecular level, with a given peptide or protein being capable of forming a variety of distinct, self-propagating fibril structures. Recent results from structural studies and from studies involving cell cultures, transgenic animals, and human tissue provide initial evidence that molecular structural variations in amyloid fibrils and related aggregates may correlate with or even produce variations in disease development. This article reviews our current knowledge of the structural and mechanistic aspects of amyloid formation, as well as current evidence for the biological relevance of structural variations. PMID:25950632

  16. Graphene oxide inhibits hIAPP amyloid fibrillation and toxicity in insulin-producing NIT-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Gurzov, Esteban N; Chen, Pengyu; Pilkington, Emily H; Stanley, William J; Litwak, Sara A; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) aggregation is directly associated with pancreatic β-cell death and subsequent insulin deficiency in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Since no cure is currently available for T2D, it is of great benefit to devise new anti-aggregation molecules, which protect β-cells against hIAPP aggregation-induced toxicity. Engineered nanoparticles have been recently exploited as anti-aggregation nanomedicines. In this work, we studied graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets for their potential for hIAPP aggregation inhibition by combining computational modeling, biophysical characterization and cell toxicity measurements. Using discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) simulations and in vitro studies, we showed that GO exhibited an inhibitory effect on hIAPP aggregation. DMD simulations indicated that the strong binding of hIAPP to GO nanosheets was driven by hydrogen bonding and aromatic stacking and that the strong peptide-GO binding efficiently inhibited hIAPP self-association and aggregation on the nanosheet surface. Secondary structural changes of hIAPP upon GO binding derived from DMD simulations were consistent with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy measurements. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the reduction of hIAPP aggregation in the presence of GO. Furthermore, we carried out a cell toxicity assay and found that these nanosheets protected insulin-secreting NIT-1 pancreatic β-cells against hIAPP-induced toxicity. Our multidisciplinary study suggests that GO nanosheets have the potential to be utilized as an anti-aggregation nanomedicine itself in addition to a biosensor or delivery vehicle for the mitigation of T2D progression. PMID:26625841

  17. Nanomaterials: amyloids reflect their brighter side

    PubMed Central

    Mankar, Shruti; Anoop, A.; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils belong to the group of ordered nanostructures that are self-assembled from a wide range of polypeptides/proteins. Amyloids are highly rigid structures possessing a high mechanical strength. Although amyloids have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, growing evidence indicates that amyloids may also perform native functions in host organisms. Discovery of such amyloids, referred to as functional amyloids, highlight their possible use in designing novel nanostructure materials. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of amyloids for the development of nanomaterials and prospective applications of such materials in nanotechnology and biomedicine. PMID:22110868

  18. Early Events in the Amyloid Formation of the A546T Mutant of Transforming Growth Factor β-Induced Protein in Corneal Dystrophies Compared to the Nonfibrillating R555W and R555Q Mutants.

    PubMed

    Koldsø, Heidi; Andersen, Ole Juul; Nikolajsen, Camilla Lund; Scavenius, Carsten; Sørensen, Charlotte S; Underhaug, Jarl; Runager, Kasper; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Enghild, Jan J; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-09-15

    The human transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) is involved in several types of corneal dystrophies where protein aggregation and amyloid fibril formation severely impair vision. Most disease-causing mutations are located in the last of four homologous fasciclin-1 (FAS1) domains of the protein, and it has been shown that when isolated, the fourth FAS1 domain (FAS1-4) mimics the behavior of full-length TGFBIp. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and principal component analysis to study the wild-type FAS1-4 domain along with three disease-causing mutations (R555W, R555Q, and A546T) to decipher any internal difference in dynamical properties of the domains that may explain their varied stabilities and aggregation properties. In addition, we use a protein-protein docking method in combination with chemical cross-linking experiments and mass spectrometry of the cross-linked species to obtain information about interaction faces between identical FAS1-4 domains. The results show that the pathogenic mutations A546T and R555W affect the packing in the hydrophobic core of FAS1-4 in different directions. We further show that the FAS1-4 monomers associate using their β-rich regions, consistent with peptides observed to be part of the amyloid fibril core in lattice corneal dystrophy patients.

  19. Thermodynamics of amyloid formation and the role of intersheet interactions.

    PubMed

    Irbäck, Anders; Wessén, Jonas

    2015-09-14

    The self-assembly of proteins into β-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils has been observed to occur with sigmoidal kinetics, indicating that the system initially is trapped in a metastable state. Here, we use a minimal lattice-based model to explore the thermodynamic forces driving amyloid formation in a finite canonical (NVT) system. By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo techniques and a semi-analytical method, the thermodynamic properties of this model are investigated for different sets of intersheet interaction parameters. When the interactions support lateral growth into multi-layered fibrillar structures, an evaporation/condensation transition is observed, between a supersaturated solution state and a thermodynamically distinct state where small and large fibril-like species exist in equilibrium. Intermediate-size aggregates are statistically suppressed. These properties do not hold if aggregate growth is one-dimensional.

  20. Thermodynamics of amyloid formation and the role of intersheet interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Irbäck, Anders Wessén, Jonas

    2015-09-14

    The self-assembly of proteins into β-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils has been observed to occur with sigmoidal kinetics, indicating that the system initially is trapped in a metastable state. Here, we use a minimal lattice-based model to explore the thermodynamic forces driving amyloid formation in a finite canonical (NVT) system. By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo techniques and a semi-analytical method, the thermodynamic properties of this model are investigated for different sets of intersheet interaction parameters. When the interactions support lateral growth into multi-layered fibrillar structures, an evaporation/condensation transition is observed, between a supersaturated solution state and a thermodynamically distinct state where small and large fibril-like species exist in equilibrium. Intermediate-size aggregates are statistically suppressed. These properties do not hold if aggregate growth is one-dimensional.

  1. SOLID STATE NMR AS A PROBE OF AMYLOID STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has developed into one of the most informative and direct experimental approaches to the characterization of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease. In this article, essential aspects of solid state NMR methods are described briefly and results obtained to date regarding the supramolecular organization of amyloid fibrils and the conformations of peptides within amyloid fibrils are reviewed. PMID:16515450

  2. Structural Polymorphism in Amyloids

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Eric M.; Wu, Bo; Surewicz, Krystyna; Nadaud, Philippe S.; Helmus, Jonathan J.; Chen, Shugui; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminally-truncated human prion protein variant Y145Stop (or PrP23–144), associated with a familial prion disease, provides a valuable model for studying the fundamental properties of protein amyloids. In previous solid-state NMR experiments, we established that the β-sheet core of the PrP23–144 amyloid is composed of two β-strand regions encompassing residues ∼113–125 and ∼130–140. The former segment contains a highly conserved hydrophobic palindrome sequence, 113AGAAAAGA120, which has been considered essential to PrP conformational conversion. Here, we examine the role of this segment in fibrillization of PrP23–144 using a deletion variant, Δ113–120 PrP23–144, in which the palindrome sequence is missing. Surprisingly, we find that deletion of the palindrome sequence affects neither the amyloidogenicity nor the polymerization kinetics of PrP23–144, although it does alter amyloid conformation and morphology. Using two-dimensional and three-dimensional solid-state NMR methods, we find that Δ113–120 PrP23–144 fibrils contain an altered β-core extended N-terminally to residue ∼106, encompassing residues not present in the core of wild-type PrP23–144 fibrils. The C-terminal β-strand of the core, however, is similar in both fibril types. Collectively, these data indicate that amyloid cores of PrP23–144 variants contain “essential” (i.e. nucleation-determining) and “nonessential” regions, with the latter being “movable” in amino acid sequence space. These findings reveal an intriguing new mechanism for structural polymorphism in amyloids and suggest a potential means for modulating the physicochemical properties of amyloid fibrils without compromising their polymerization characteristics. PMID:22002245

  3. Increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation secondary to atrial fibrosis in transgenic goats expressing transforming growth factor - B1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in people with significant morbidity and mortality. There is a strong association between atrial fibrosis and AF. Transforming growth factor B1 (TGF-B1) is an essential mediator of atrial fibrosis in animal models and human pat...

  4. Quantitative analysis of the flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones in the extract of Ginkgo biloba and evaluation of their inhibitory activity towards fibril formation of β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyan; Wang, Jing-Rong; Yau, Lee-Fong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Liang; Han, Quan-Bin; Zhao, Zhongzhen; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-04-10

    The standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761) is used clinically in Europe for the symptomatic treatment of impaired cerebral function in primary degenerative dementia syndromes, and the results of numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have supported such clinical use. The abnormal production and aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and the deposition of fibrils in the brain are regarded as key steps in the onset of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and the inhibition of Aβ aggregation and destabilization of the preformed fibrils represent viable approaches for the prevention and treatment of AD. Flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones (TTLs) are the two main components of EGb761 which represent 24 and 6% of the overall content, respectively. In our research, seven abundant flavonoid glycosides 1-7 were isolated from the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves and characterized by spectroscopic analysis. Furthermore, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography method was established for the simultaneous quantification of these seven flavonoids. The inhibitory activities of these flavonoids, as well as four TTLs, i.e., ginkgolides A, B, and C and bilobalide (compounds 8-11), were evaluated towards Aβ42 fibril formation using a thioflavin T fluorescence assay. It was found that three flavonoids 1, 3 and 4 exhibited moderate inhibitory activities, whereas the other four flavonoids 2, 5, 6 and 7, as well as the four terpene trilactones, showed poor activity. This is the first report of the inhibition of Aβ fibril formation of two characteristic acylated flavonoid glycosides 6, 7 in Ginkgo leaves, on the basis of which the structure-activity relationship of these flavonoids 1-7 was discussed.

  5. The glaucoma-associated olfactomedin domain of myocilin forms polymorphic fibrils that are constrained by partial unfolding and peptide sequence

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Shannon E.; Donegan, Rebecca K.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2014-01-01

    The glaucoma-associated olfactomedin domain of myocilin (myoc-OLF) is a recent addition to the growing list of disease-associated amyloidogenic proteins. Inherited, diseasecausing myocilin variants aggregate intracellularly instead of being secreted to the trabecular meshwork (TM), which is a scenario toxic to TM cells and leads to early onset of ocular hypertension, the major risk factor for glaucoma. Here we systematically structurally and biophysically dissected myoc-OLF to better understand its amyloidogenesis. Under mildly destabilizing conditions, wild-type myoc-OLF adopts non-native structures that readily fibrillize when incubated at a temperature just below the transition for tertiary unfolding. With buffers at physiological pH, two main end-point fibril morphologies are observed: (a) straight fibrils common to many amyloids and (b) unique micron-length, ~300 nm or larger diameter species that lasso oligomers, which also exhibit classical spectroscopic amyloid signatures. Three disease-causing variants investigated herein exhibit non-native tertiary structures under physiological conditions, leading to accelerated growth rates and a variety of fibril morphologies. In particular, the well-documented D380A variant, which lacks calcium, forms large circular fibrils. Two amyloid forming peptide stretches have been identified, one for each of the main fibril morphologies observed. Our study places myoc-OLF within the larger landscape of the amylome and provides insight into the diversity of myoc-OLF aggregation that plays a role in glaucoma pathogenesis. PMID:24333014

  6. Role of water in Protein Aggregation and Amyloid Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, D.; Reddy, Govardhan; Straub, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus The link between oligomers and amyloid fibrils and a variety of neurodegenerative diseases raises the need to decipher the principles governing protein aggregation. Mechanisms of in vivo amyloid formation involve a number of coconspirators and complex interactions with membranes. Nevertheless, it is believed that understanding the biophysical basis of in vitro amyloid formation in well-defined systems is important in discovering ligands that preferentially bind to regions that harbor amyloidogenic tendencies. Determination of structures of fibrils of a variety of peptides has set the stage for probing the dynamics of oligomer formation and amyloid growth using computer simulations. Most experimental and simulation studies have been interpreted largely from the perspective of proteins without much consideration of the role of solvent in enabling or inhibiting oligomer formation and assembly to protofilaments and amyloid fibrils. Here, we provide a perspective on how interactions with water affect folding landscapes of Aβ monomers, oligomer formation in Aβ16–22 fragment, protofilament formation in a peptide from yeast prion Sup35. Explicit molecular dynamics simulations of these systems illustrate how water controls the self-assembly of higher order structures and provide a structural basis for understanding the kinetics of oligomer and fibril growth. Simulations show that monomers of Aβ-peptides sample a number of compact conformations. Population of aggregation-prone structures (N*) with salt-bridge, which bear a striking similarity to the peptide structure in the fibril, requires overcoming a high desolvation barrier. In general, sequences for which N* structures are not significantly populated are unlikely to aggregate. Generically oligomers and fibrils form in two steps. In the first stage water is expelled from the region between peptides rich in hydrophobic residues (for example Aβ16–22) resulting in the disordered oligomers. In the second

  7. Insights into the variability of nucleated amyloid polymerization by a minimalistic model of stochastic protein assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugène, Sarah; Xue, Wei-Feng; Robert, Philippe; Doumic, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid aggregates is an important biological phenomenon associated with human diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid fibrils also have potential applications in nano-engineering of biomaterials. The kinetics of amyloid assembly show an exponential growth phase preceded by a lag phase, variable in duration as seen in bulk experiments and experiments that mimic the small volumes of cells. Here, to investigate the origins and the properties of the observed variability in the lag phase of amyloid assembly currently not accounted for by deterministic nucleation dependent mechanisms, we formulate a new stochastic minimal model that is capable of describing the characteristics of amyloid growth curves despite its simplicity. We then solve the stochastic differential equations of our model and give mathematical proof of a central limit theorem for the sample growth trajectories of the nucleated aggregation process. These results give an asymptotic description for our simple model, from which closed form analytical results capable of describing and predicting the variability of nucleated amyloid assembly were derived. We also demonstrate the application of our results to inform experiments in a conceptually friendly and clear fashion. Our model offers a new perspective and paves the way for a new and efficient approach on extracting vital information regarding the key initial events of amyloid formation.

  8. A role for helical intermediates in amyloid formation by natively unfolded polypeptides?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini, Andisheh; Raleigh, Daniel P.

    2009-03-01

    Amyloid formation and aberrant protein aggregation have been implicated in more than 15 different human diseases and an even wider range of proteins form amyloid in vitro. From a structural perspective the proteins which form amyloid can be divided into two classes: those which adopt a compact globular fold and must presumably at least partially unfold to form amyloid and those which are unstructured in their monomeric state. Important examples of the latter include the Aβ peptide of Alzheimer's disease, atrial natriuretic factor, calcitonin, pro-calcitonin, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, amylin), α-synuclein and the medin polypeptide. The kinetics of amyloid assembly are complex and typically involve a lag phase during which little or no fibril material is formed, followed by a rapid growth stage leading to the β-sheet-rich amyloid structure. Increasing evidence suggests that some natively unfolded polypeptides populate a helical intermediate during the lag phase. We propose a model in which early oligomerization is linked to helix formation and is promoted by helix-helix association. Recent work has highlighted the potential importance of polypeptide membrane interactions in amyloid formation and helical intermediates appear to play an important role here as well. Characterization of helical intermediates is experimentally challenging but new spectroscopic techniques are emerging which hold considerable promise and even have the potential to provide residue specific information.

  9. Catechins and procyanidins of Ginkgo biloba show potent activities towards the inhibition of β-amyloid peptide aggregation and destabilization of preformed fibrils.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyan; Wang, Jing-Rong; Yau, Lee-Fong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Liang; Han, Quan-Bin; Zhao, Zhongzhen; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-04-22

    Catechins and procyanidins, together with flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones, are three important categories of components in the standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761). In this research, catechins and proanthocyanidins were found to exist in both the extract of Ginkgo leaves and Ginkgo products. By comparing with reference compounds, six of them were identified as (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (-)-gallocatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin and procyanidins B1 and B3. The activities of these polyphenols in the inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and the destabilization of preformed fibrils were evaluated using biochemical assays, which showed that all six of the polyphenols, as well as a fraction of the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb) containing catechins and procyanidins, exerted potent inhibitory activities towards Aβ42 aggregation and could also destabilize the performed fibrils. Catechins and procyanidins can therefore be regarded as the potent active constituents of EGb761 in terms of their inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and destabilization of the fibrils. Although quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis revealed that the catechins and procyanidins are only present in low concentrations in EGb761, these components should be studied in greater detail because of their potent inhibitory effects towards Aβ42 aggregation and their ability to destabilize preformed fibrils, especially during the quality control of Ginkgo leaves and the manufacture of Ginkgo products.

  10. Amyloid Templated Gold Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Gustav; Fernández-Ronco, María P; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mazzotti, Marco; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-01-20

    Amyloid fibril-based ultralow-density aerogels are designed by functionalization with gold nanoparticles and microcrystals, leading to hybrids of unprecedented lightness and functionality. By changing the colloidal gold shape, size, and concentration, the gold composition can be tuned to reach contents ≥20 kt equivalent, yet at densities ≈10(3) lighter than any equivalent gold alloys, and combining unique features such as porosity, catalytic properties, pressure sensing, and autofluorescence.

  11. All-atom Simulation of Amyloid Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Alred, Erik J.; Bernhardt, Nathan A.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    Molecular simulations are now commonly used to complement experiments in the investigation of amyloid formation and their role in human diseases. While various simulations based on enhanced sampling techniques are used in amyloid formation simulations, this article will focus on those using standard atomistic simulations to evaluate the stability of fibril models. Such studies explore the limitations that arise from the choice of force field or polymorphism; and explore the stability of in vivo and in vitro forms of Aβ fibril aggregates, and the role of heterologous seeding as a link between different amyloid diseases.

  12. Solvent effects on self-assembly of beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C L; Murphy, R M

    1995-01-01

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) is the primary protein component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Synthetic A beta spontaneously assembles into amyloid fibrils and is neurotoxic to cortical cultures. Neurotoxicity has been associated with the degree of peptide aggregation, yet the mechanism of assembly of A beta into amyloid fibrils is poorly understood. In this work, A beta was dissolved in several different solvents commonly used in neurotoxicity assays. In pure dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), A beta had no detectable beta-sheet content; in 0.1% trifluoroacetate, the peptide contained one-third beta-sheet; and in 35% acetonitrile/0.1% trifluoroacetate, A beta was two-thirds beta-sheet, equivalent to the fibrillar peptide in physiological buffer. Stock solutions of peptide were diluted into phosphate-buffered saline, and fibril growth was followed by static and dynamic light scattering. The growth rate was substantially faster when the peptide was predissolved in 35% acetonitrile/0.1% trifluoroacetate than in 0.1% trifluoroacetate, 10% DMSO, or 100% DMSO. Differences in growth rate were attributed to changes in the secondary structure of the peptide in the stock solvent. These results suggest that formation of an intermediate with a high beta-sheet content is a controlling step in A beta self-assembly. PMID:8527678

  13. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  14. Amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Kung-Ta; Wang, Jung-Hao; Lee, Lily Y-L; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2009-01-28

    More than 20 unrelated proteins can form amyloid fibrils in vivo which are related to various diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, prion disease, and systematic amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils are an ordered protein aggregate with a lamellar cross-beta structure. Enhancing amyloid clearance is one of the targets of the therapy of these amyloid-related diseases. Although there is debate on whether the toxicity is due to amyloids or their precursors, research on the degradation of amyloids may help prevent or alleviate these diseases. In this study, we explored the amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase, a fibrinolytic subtilisin-like serine protease, and determined the optimal conditions for amyloid hydrolysis. This ability is shared by proteinase K and subtilisin Carlsberg, but not by trypsin or plasmin.

  15. Self-folding and aggregation of amyloid nanofibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven W.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2011-04-01

    Amyloids are highly organized protein filaments, rich in β-sheet secondary structures that self-assemble to form dense plaques in brain tissues affected by severe neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's Disease). Identified as natural functional materials in bacteria, in addition to their remarkable mechanical properties, amyloids have also been proposed as a platform for novel biomaterials in nanotechnology applications including nanowires, liquid crystals, scaffolds and thin films. Despite recent progress in understanding amyloid structure and behavior, the latent self-assembly mechanism and the underlying adhesion forces that drive the aggregation process remain poorly understood. On the basis of previous full atomistic simulations, here we report a simple coarse-grain model to analyze the competition between adhesive forces and elastic deformation of amyloid fibrils. We use simple model system to investigate self-assembly mechanisms of fibrils, focused on the formation of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings, and thereby address a critical issue in linking the biochemical (Angstrom) to micrometre scales relevant for larger-scale states of functional amyloid materials. We investigate the effect of varying the interfibril adhesion energy on the structure and stability of self-folded nanorackets and nanorings and demonstrate that these aggregated amyloid fibrils are stable in such states even when the fibril-fibril interaction is relatively weak, given that the constituting amyloid fibril length exceeds a critical fibril length-scale of several hundred nanometres. We further present a simple approach to directly determine the interfibril adhesion strength from geometric measures. In addition to providing insight into the physics of aggregation of amyloid fibrils our model enables the analysis of large-scale amyloid plaques and presents a new method for the estimation and engineering of the adhesive forces responsible of the self-assembly process of

  16. De novo Amyloid Proteins from Designed Combinatorial Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael W.; Wang, Weixun; Patterson, Jennifer; Mancias, Joseph D.; Beasley, James R.; Hecht, Michael H.

    1999-09-01

    Amyloid deposits are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and the prion diseases. The amyloid fibrils isolated from these different diseases share similar structural features. However, the protein sequences that assemble into these fibrils differ substantially from one disease to another. To probe the relationship between amino acid sequence and the propensity to form amyloid, we studied a combinatorial library of sequences designed de novo. All sequences in the library were designed to share an identical pattern of alternating polar and nonpolar residues, but the precise identities of these side chains were not constrained and were varied combinatorially. The resulting proteins self-assemble into large oligomers visible by electron microscopy as amyloid-like fibrils. Like natural amyloid, the de novo fibrils are composed of β -sheet secondary structure and bind the diagnostic dye, Congo red. Thus, binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues arranged in alternating periodicity can direct protein sequences to form fibrils resembling amyloid. The model amyloid fibrils assemble and disassemble reversibly, providing a tractable system for both basic studies into the mechanisms of fibril assembly and the development of molecular therapies that interfere with this assembly.

  17. [Amyloid goiter].

    PubMed

    Hrívó, A; Péter, I; Bánkúti, B; Péley, G; Baska, F; Besznyák, I

    1999-03-21

    Amyloid goitre is at an extremely rare occurrence. Authors review the origin of disease and its symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The disease may be due to either primary or secondary systemic or local amyloidosis. Diagnosis may be made even before surgery on anamnestic data, on very rapid growth of thyroid glands, on diffuse appearance, on other symptoms of systemic amyloidosis, on findings of iconographic procedures and on detection of amyloid in aspirates. Final diagnosis is based on histology. Surgical therapy is aiming at avoidance of the existing and the threatening consequences of expanding mass. The outcome is independent from thyroid surgery, it is related to other manifestations of amyloidosis. Concerning with the present case the chronic superior vena cava syndrome and chylous pleural effusion as first described symptoms and asymptomatic hyperthyroxinaemia is emphasised. Neither other organ involvement, nor primary amyloidogenous molecula was found during the 18 months follow up, so patient has secondary and localised amyloidosis.

  18. Characteristics of Amyloid-Related Oligomers Revealed by Crystal Structures of Macrocyclic [beta]-Sheet Mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Nowick, James S.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-09-20

    Protein amyloid oligomers have been strongly linked to amyloid diseases and can be intermediates to amyloid fibers. {beta}-Sheets have been identified in amyloid oligomers. However, because of their transient and highly polymorphic properties, the details of their self-association remain elusive. Here we explore oligomer structure using a model system: macrocyclic peptides. Key amyloidogenic sequences from A{beta} and tau were incorporated into macrocycles, thereby restraining them to {beta}-strands, but limiting the growth of the oligomers so they may crystallize and cannot fibrillate. We determined the atomic structures for four such oligomers, and all four reveal tetrameric interfaces in which {beta}-sheet dimers pair together by highly complementary, dry interfaces, analogous to steric zippers found in fibers, suggesting a common structure for amyloid oligomers and fibers. In amyloid fibers, the axes of the paired sheets are either parallel or antiparallel, whereas the oligomeric interfaces display a variety of sheet-to-sheet pairing angles, offering a structural explanation for the heterogeneity of amyloid oligomers.

  19. Antimicrobial Properties of Amyloid Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Bruce L.; Jang, Hyunbum; Capone, Ricardo; Arce, Fernando Teran; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Lal, Ratnesh; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    More than two dozen clinical syndromes known as amyloid diseases are characterized by the buildup of extended insoluble fibrillar deposits in tissues. These amorphous Congo red staining deposits known as amyloids exhibit a characteristic green birefringence and cross-β structure. Substantial evidence implicates oligomeric intermediates of amyloids as toxic species in the pathogenesis of these chronic disease states. A growing body of data has suggested that these toxic species form ion channels in cellular membranes causing disruption of calcium homeostasis, membrane depolarization, energy drainage, and in some cases apoptosis. Amyloid peptide channels exhibit a number of common biological properties including the universal U-shape β-strand-turn-β-strand structure, irreversible and spontaneous insertion into membranes, production of large heterogeneous single-channel conductances, relatively poor ion selectivity, inhibition by Congo red, and channel blockade by zinc. Recent evidence has suggested that increased amounts of amyloids are not only toxic to its host target cells but also possess antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, at least one human antimicrobial peptide, protegrin-1, which kills microbes by a channel-forming mechanism, has been shown to possess the ability to form extended amyloid fibrils very similar to those of classic disease-forming amyloids. In this paper, we will review the reported antimicrobial properties of amyloids and the implications of these discoveries for our understanding of amyloid structure and function. PMID:22081976

  20. Deformation behavior and mechanical properties of amyloid protein nanowires.

    PubMed

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are most often associated with their pathological role in diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, but they are now increasingly being considered for uses in functional engineering materials. They are among the stiffest protein fibers known but they are also rather brittle, and it is unclear how this combination of properties affects the behavior of amyloid structures at larger length scales, such as in films, wires or plaques. Using a coarse-grained model for amyloid fibrils, we study the mechanical response of amyloid nanowires and examine fundamental mechanical properties, including mechanisms of deformation and failure under tensile loading. We also explore the effect of varying the breaking strain and adhesion strength of the constituent amyloid fibrils on the properties of the larger structure. We find that deformation in the nanowires is controlled by a combination of fibril sliding and fibril failure and that there exists a transition from brittle to ductile behavior by either increasing the fibril failure strain or decreasing the strength of adhesion between fibrils. Furthermore, our results reveal that the mechanical properties of the nanowires are quite sensitive to changes in the properties of the individual fibrils, and the larger scale structures are found to be more mechanically robust than the constituent fibrils, for all cases considered. More broadly, this work demonstrates the promise of utilizing self-assembled biological building blocks in the development of hierarchical nanomaterials. PMID:23290516

  1. Existence of Different Structural Intermediates on the Fibrillation Pathway of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Josué; Taboada, Pablo; Mosquera, Víctor

    2009-01-01

    can be formed by an antiparallel arrangement of β-strands forming the β-sheet structure of the HSA fibrils as the most probable configuration. Very long incubation times lead to a more complex morphological variability of amyloid mature fibrils (i.e., long straight fibrils, flat-ribbon structures, laterally connected fibers, etc.). We also observed that mature straight fibrils can also grow by protein oligomers tending to align within the immediate vicinity of the fibers. This filament + monomers/oligomers scenario is an alternative pathway to the otherwise dominant filament + filament manner of the protein fibril's lateral growth. Conformational preferences for a certain pathway to become active may exist, and the influence of environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, and salt must be considered. PMID:19289061

  2. Pharmacological removal of serum amyloid P component from intracerebral plaques and cerebrovascular Aβ amyloid deposits in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Millar, David J.; Richard-Londt, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Human amyloid deposits always contain the normal plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP), owing to its avid but reversible binding to all amyloid fibrils, including the amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils in the cerebral parenchyma plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). SAP promotes amyloid fibril formation in vitro, contributes to persistence of amyloid in vivo and is also itself directly toxic to cerebral neurons. We therefore developed (R)-1-[6-[(R)-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (CPHPC), a drug that removes SAP from the blood, and thereby also from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in patients with AD. Here we report that, after introduction of transgenic human SAP expression in the TASTPM double transgenic mouse model of AD, all the amyloid deposits contained human SAP. Depletion of circulating human SAP by CPHPC administration in these mice removed all detectable human SAP from both the intracerebral and cerebrovascular amyloid. The demonstration that removal of SAP from the blood and CSF also removes it from these amyloid deposits crucially validates the strategy of the forthcoming ‘Depletion of serum amyloid P component in Alzheimer's disease (DESPIAD)’ clinical trial of CPHPC. The results also strongly support clinical testing of CPHPC in patients with CAA. PMID:26842068

  3. The effect of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on amyloid aggregation and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iannuzzi, Clara; Irace, Gaetano; Sirangelo, Ivana

    2015-02-02

    Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  4. Natural polyphenols binding to amyloid: a broad class of compounds to treat different human amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Ngoungoure, Viviane L Ndam; Schluesener, Jan; Moundipa, Paul F; Schluesener, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are a large group of phytonutrients found in herbal beverages and foods. They have manifold biological activities, including antioxidative, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Interestingly, some polyphenols bind to amyloid and substantially ameliorate amyloid diseases. Misfolding, aggregation, and accumulation of amyloid fibrils in tissues or organs leads to a group of disorders, called amyloidoses. Prominent diseases are Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, but there are other, less well-known diseases wherein accumulation of misfolded protein is a prominent feature. Amyloidoses are a major burden to public health. In particular, Alzheimer's disease shows a strong increase in patient numbers. Accelerated development of effective therapies for amyloidoses is a necessity. A viable strategy can be the prevention or reduction of protein misfolding, thus reducing amyloid build-up by restoring the cellular aggretome. Amyloid-binding polyphenols affect amyloid formation on various levels, e.g. by inhibiting fibril formation or steering oligomer formation into unstructured, nontoxic pathways. Consequently, preclinical studies demonstrate reduction of amyloid-formation by polyphenols. Amyloid-binding polyphenols might be suitable lead structures for development of imaging agents for early detection of disease and monitoring amyloid deposition. Intake of dietary polyphenols might be relevant to the prevention of amyloidoses. Nutraceutical strategies might be a way to reduce amyloid diseases.

  5. Nucleation of Amyloid Oligomers by RepA-WH1-Prionoid-Functionalized Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Cristina; González-Rubio, Guillermo; Langer, Judith; Tardajos, Gloria; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Giraldo, Rafael; Guerrero-Martínez, Andrés

    2016-09-01

    Understanding protein amyloidogenesis is an important topic in protein science, fueled by the role of amyloid aggregates, especially oligomers, in the etiology of a number of devastating human degenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms that determine the formation of amyloid oligomers remain elusive due to the high complexity of the amyloidogenesis process. For instance, gold nanoparticles promote or inhibit amyloid fibrillation. We have functionalized gold nanorods with a metal-chelating group to selectively immobilize soluble RepA-WH1, a model synthetic bacterial prionoid, using a hexa-histidine tag (H6). H6-RepA-WH1 undergoes stable amyloid oligomerization in the presence of catalytic concentrations of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then, in a physically separated event, such oligomers promote the growth of amyloid fibers of untagged RepA-WH1. SERS spectral changes of H6-RepA-WH1 on spherical citrate-AuNP substrates provide evidence for structural modifications in the protein, which are compatible with a gradual increase in β-sheet structure, as expected in amyloid oligomerization. PMID:27489029

  6. Cell Damage in Light Chain Amyloidosis: FIBRIL INTERNALIZATION, TOXICITY AND CELL-MEDIATED SEEDING.

    PubMed

    Marin-Argany, Marta; Lin, Yi; Misra, Pinaki; Williams, Angela; Wall, Jonathan S; Howell, Kyle G; Elsbernd, Laura R; McClure, Megan; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2016-09-16

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis is an incurable human disease characterized by the misfolding, aggregation, and systemic deposition of amyloid composed of immunoglobulin light chains (LC). This work describes our studies on potential mechanisms of AL cytotoxicity. We have studied the internalization of AL soluble proteins and amyloid fibrils into human AC16 cardiomyocytes by using real time live cell image analysis. Our results show how external amyloid aggregates rapidly surround the cells and act as a recruitment point for soluble protein, triggering the amyloid fibril elongation. Soluble protein and external aggregates are internalized into AC16 cells via macropinocytosis. AL amyloid fibrils are shown to be highly cytotoxic at low concentrations. Additionally, caspase assays revealed soluble protein induces apoptosis, demonstrating different cytotoxic mechanisms between soluble protein and amyloid aggregates. This study emphasizes the complex immunoglobulin light chain-cell interactions that result in fibril internalization, protein recruitment, and cytotoxicity that may occur in AL amyloidosis. PMID:27462073

  7. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.

  8. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Studies of Multilayer Glucagon Fibrillation at the Solid-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Dong, Mingdong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    We have used a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) to monitor the changes in layer thickness and viscoelastic properties accompanying multilayer amyloid deposition in situ for the first time. By means of atomic force microscope imaging, an unequivocal correlation is established between the interfacial nucleation and growth of glucagon fibrils and the QCM-D response. The combination of the two techniques allows us to study the temporal evolution of the interfacial fibrillation process. We have modeled the QCM-D data using an extension to the Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic model. Three phases were observed in the fibrillation process: 1), a rigid multilayer of glucagon monomers forms and slowly rearranges; 2), this multilayer subsequently evolves into a dramatically more viscoelastic layer, containing a polymorphic network of micrometer-long fibrils growing from multiple nucleation sites; and 3), the fibrillar formation effectively stops as a result of the depletion of bulk-phase monomers, although the process can be continued without a lag phase by subsequent addition of fresh monomers. The robustness of the QCM-D technique, consolidated by complementary atomic force microscope studies, should make it possible to combine different components thought to be involved in the plaque formation process and thus build up realistic models of amyloid plaque formation in vitro. PMID:17513349

  9. Quartz crystal microbalance studies of multilayer glucagon fibrillation at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Dong, Mingdong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2007-09-15

    We have used a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) to monitor the changes in layer thickness and viscoelastic properties accompanying multilayer amyloid deposition in situ for the first time. By means of atomic force microscope imaging, an unequivocal correlation is established between the interfacial nucleation and growth of glucagon fibrils and the QCM-D response. The combination of the two techniques allows us to study the temporal evolution of the interfacial fibrillation process. We have modeled the QCM-D data using an extension to the Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic model. Three phases were observed in the fibrillation process: 1), a rigid multilayer of glucagon monomers forms and slowly rearranges; 2), this multilayer subsequently evolves into a dramatically more viscoelastic layer, containing a polymorphic network of micrometer-long fibrils growing from multiple nucleation sites; and 3), the fibrillar formation effectively stops as a result of the depletion of bulk-phase monomers, although the process can be continued without a lag phase by subsequent addition of fresh monomers. The robustness of the QCM-D technique, consolidated by complementary atomic force microscope studies, should make it possible to combine different components thought to be involved in the plaque formation process and thus build up realistic models of amyloid plaque formation in vitro.

  10. Islet amyloid polypeptide toxicity and membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ping; Abedini, Andisheh; Wang, Hui; Tu, Ling-Hsien; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2013-11-26

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is responsible for amyloid formation in type 2 diabetes and contributes to the failure of islet cell transplants, however the mechanisms of IAPP-induced cytotoxicity are not known. Interactions with model anionic membranes are known to catalyze IAPP amyloid formation in vitro. Human IAPP damages anionic membranes, promoting vesicle leakage, but the features that control IAPP-membrane interactions and the connection with cellular toxicity are not clear. Kinetic studies with wild-type IAPP and IAPP mutants demonstrate that membrane leakage is induced by prefibrillar IAPP species and continues over the course of amyloid formation, correlating additional membrane disruption with fibril growth. Analyses of a set of designed mutants reveal that membrane leakage does not require the formation of β-sheet or α-helical structures. A His-18 to Arg substitution enhances leakage, whereas replacement of all of the aromatic residues via a triple leucine mutant has no effect. Biophysical measurements in conjunction with cytotoxicity studies show that nonamyloidogenic rat IAPP is as effective as human IAPP at disrupting standard anionic model membranes under conditions where rat IAPP does not induce cellular toxicity. Similar results are obtained with more complex model membranes, including ternary systems that contain cholesterol and are capable of forming lipid rafts. A designed point mutant, I26P-IAPP; a designed double mutant, G24P, I26P-IAPP; a double N-methylated variant; and pramlintide, a US Food and Drug Administration-approved IAPP variant all induce membrane leakage, but are not cytotoxic, showing that there is no one-to-one relationship between disruption of model membranes and induction of cellular toxicity. PMID:24218607

  11. Amyloid β Oligomeric Species Present in the Lag Phase of Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Martin; Unuchek, Dmitry; Zhang, Bo; Gordeliy, Valentin; Willbold, Dieter; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-associated amyloid β peptide (Aβ) is one of the main actors in AD pathogenesis. Aβ is characterized by its high tendency to self-associate, leading to the generation of oligomers and amyloid fibrils. The elucidation of pathways and intermediates is crucial for the understanding of protein assembly mechanisms in general and in conjunction with neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., for the identification of new therapeutic targets. Our study focused on Aβ42 and its oligomeric assemblies in the lag phase of amyloid formation, as studied by sedimentation velocity (SV) centrifugation. The assembly state of Aβ during the lag phase, the time required by an Aβ solution to reach the exponential growth phase of aggregation, was characterized by a dominant monomer fraction below 1 S and a population of oligomeric species between 4 and 16 S. From the oligomer population, two major species close to a 12-mer and an 18-mer with a globular shape were identified. The recurrence of these two species at different initial concentrations and experimental conditions as the smallest assemblies present in solution supports the existence of distinct, energetically favored assemblies in solution. The sizes of the two species suggest an Aβ42 aggregation pathway that is based on a basic hexameric building block. The study demonstrates the potential of SV analysis for the evaluation of protein aggregation pathways. PMID:26024352

  12. Quaternary structure defines a large class of amyloid-β oligomers neutralized by sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Reed, Miranda N.; Kotilinek, Linda A.; Grant, Marianne K.O.; Forster, Colleen L.; Qiang, Wei; Shapiro, Samantha L.; Reichl, John H.; Chiang, Angie C.A.; Jankowsky, Joanna L.; Wilmot, Carrie M.; Cleary, James P.; Zahs, Kathleen R.; Ashe, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) as amyloid fibrils and toxic oligomers is an important step in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are numerous potentially toxic oligomers and little is known about their neurological effects when generated in the living brain. Here, we show that Aβ oligomers can be assigned to one of at least two classes (Type 1 and Type 2) based on their temporal, spatial and structural relationships to amyloid fibrils. The Type 2 oligomers are related to amyloid fibrils and represent the majority of oligomers generated in vivo, but remain confined to the vicinity of amyloid plaques and do not impair cognition at levels relevant to AD. Type 1 oligomers are unrelated to amyloid fibrils and may have greater potential to cause global neural dysfunction in AD because they are dispersed. These results refine our understanding of the pathogenicity of Aβ oligomers in vivo. PMID:26051935

  13. Monomeric ß-amyloid interacts with type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors to provide energy supply to neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Maria L.; Tomasello, Marianna F.; Pandini, Giuseppe; Caraci, Filippo; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Busceti, Carla; Di Pietro, Paola; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Attanasio, Francesco; Chiechio, Santina; Bagnoli, Silvia; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Vigneri, Riccardo; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Copani, Agata

    2015-01-01

    ß-amyloid (Aß1−42) is produced by proteolytic cleavage of the transmembrane type-1 protein, amyloid precursor protein. Under pathological conditions, Aß1−42self-aggregates into oligomers, which cause synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss, and are considered the culprit of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, Aß1−42 is mainly monomeric at physiological concentrations, and the precise role of monomeric Aß1−42 in neuronal function is largely unknown. We report that the monomer of Aß1−42 activates type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors and enhances glucose uptake in neurons and peripheral cells by promoting the translocation of the Glut3 glucose transporter from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In neurons, activity-dependent glucose uptake was blunted after blocking endogenous Aß production, and re-established in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid Aß. APP-null neurons failed to enhance depolarization-stimulated glucose uptake unless exogenous monomeric Aß1−42 was added. These data suggest that Aß1−42 monomers were critical for maintaining neuronal glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, exogenous Aß1−42 monomers were able to rescue the low levels of glucose consumption observed in brain slices from AD mutant mice. PMID:26300732

  14. Structure, orientation, and surface interaction of Alzheimer amyloid-β peptides on the graphite.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Wang, Qiuming; Lin, Yinan; Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Chao; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-24

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils in solution and on the cell membrane has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Although it is well-known that the presence of different surfaces can accelerate the aggregation of Aβ peptides into fibrils, surface-induced conformation, orientation, aggregation, and adsorption of Aβ peptides have not been well understood at the atomic level. Here, we perform all-atom explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the orientation change, conformational dynamics, surface interaction of small Aβ aggregates with different sizes (monomer to tetramer), and conformations (α-helix and β-hairpin) upon adsorption on the graphite surface, in comparison with Aβ structures in bulk solution. Simulation results show that hydrophobic graphite induces the quick adsorption of Aβ peptides regardless of their initial conformations and sizes. Upon the adsorption, Aβ prefers to adopt random structure for monomers and to remain β-rich-structure for small oligomers, but not helical structures. More importantly, due to the amphiphilic sequence of Aβ and the hydrophobic nature of graphite, hydrophobic C-terminal residues of higher-order Aβ oligomers appear to have preferential interactions with the graphite surface for facilitating Aβ fibril formation and fibril growth. In combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and MD simulation results, a postulated mechanism is proposed to describe the structure and kinetics of Aβ aggregation from aqueous solution to the graphite surface, providing parallel insights into Aβ aggregation on biological cell membranes.

  15. Amyloid peptide channels.

    PubMed

    Kagan, B L; Azimov, R; Azimova, R

    2004-11-01

    At least 16 distinct clinical syndromes including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), rheumatoid arthritis, type II diabetes mellitus (DM), and spongiform encephelopathies (prion diseases), are characterized by the deposition of amorphous, Congo red-staining deposits known as amyloid. These "misfolded" proteins adopt beta-sheet structures and aggregate spontaneously into similar extended fibrils despite their widely divergent primary sequences. Many, if not all, of these peptides are capable of forming ion-permeable channels in vitro and possibly in vivo. Common channel properties include irreversible, spontaneous insertion into membranes, relatively large, heterogeneous single-channel conductances, inhibition of channel formation by Congo red, and blockade of inserted channels by Zn2+. Physiologic effects of amyloid, including Ca2+ dysregulation, membrane depolarization, mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP), and cytotoxicity, suggest that channel formation in plasma and intracellular membranes may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the amyloidoses. PMID:15702375

  16. Immunoglobulin light chains, glycosaminoglycans and amyloid.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Kisilevsky, R.; Biosciences Division; Queen's Univ.

    2000-03-01

    Immunoglobulin light chains are the precursor proteins for fibrils that are formed during primary amyloidosis and in amyloidosis associated with multiple myeloma. As found for the approximately 20 currently described forms of focal, localized, or systemic amyloidoses, light chain-related fibrils extracted from physiological deposits are invariably associated with glycosaminoglycans, predominantly heparan sulfate. Other amyloid-related proteins are either structurally normal, such as g2-microglobulin and islet amyloid polypeptide, fragments of normal proteins such as serum amyloid A protein or the precursor protein of the g peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease, or are inherited forms of single amino acid variants of a normal protein such as found in the familial forms of amyloid associated with transthyretin. In contrast, the primary structures of light chains involved in fibril formation exhibit extensive mutational diversity rendering some proteins highly amyloidogenic and others non-pathological. The interactions between light chains and glycosaminoglycans are also affected by amino acid variation and may influence the clinical course of disease by enhancing fibril stability and contributing to resistance to protease degradation. Relatively little is currently known about the mechanisms by which glycosaminoglycans interact with light chains and light-chain fibrils. It is probable that future studies of this uniquely diverse family of proteins will continue o shed light on the processes of amyloidosis, and contribute as well to a greater understanding of the normal physiological roles of glycosaminoglycans.

  17. Extension of the generic amyloid hypothesis to nonproteinaceous metabolite assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Shaham-Niv, Shira; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Schnaider, Lee; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several major human diseases. Although the formation of these supramolecular entities has previously been associated with proteins and peptides, it was later demonstrated that even phenylalanine, a single amino acid, can form fibrils that have amyloid-like biophysical, biochemical, and cytotoxic properties. Moreover, the generation of antibodies against these assemblies in phenylketonuria patients and the correlating mice model suggested a pathological role for the assemblies. We determine that several other metabolites that accumulate in metabolic disorders form ordered amyloid-like ultrastructures, which induce apoptotic cell death, as observed for amyloid structures. The formation of amyloid-like assemblies by metabolites implies a general phenomenon of amyloid formation, not limited to proteins and peptides, and offers a new paradigm for metabolic diseases. PMID:26601224

  18. Size Effect of Graphene Oxide on Modulating Amyloid Peptide Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Cao, Yunpeng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Lei; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-06-26

    Protein misfolding and abnormal assembly could lead to aggregates such as oligomer, proto-fibril, mature fibril, and senior amyloid plaques, which are associated with the pathogenesis of many amyloid diseases. These irreversible amyloid aggregates typically form in vivo and researchers have been endeavoring to find new modulators to invert the aggregation propensity in vitro, which could increase understanding in the mechanism of the aggregation of amyloid protein and pave the way to potential clinical treatment. Graphene oxide (GO) was shown to be a good modulator, which could strongly control the amyloidosis of Aβ (33-42). In particular, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements revealed the size-dependent manner of GO on modulating the assembly of amyloid peptides, which could be a possible way to regulate the self-assembled nanostructure of amyloid peptide in a predictable manner. PMID:26031933

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  20. Molecular basis for insulin fibril assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Sievers, Stuart A.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Wall, Joseph S.; Eisenberg, David

    2009-12-01

    In the rare medical condition termed injection amyloidosis, extracellular fibrils of insulin are observed. We found that the segment of the insulin B-chain with sequence LVEALYL is the smallest segment that both nucleates and inhibits the fibrillation of full-length insulin in a molar ratio-dependent manner, suggesting that this segment is central to the cross-{beta} spine of the insulin fibril. In isolation from the rest of the protein, LVEALYL forms microcrystalline aggregates with fibrillar morphology, the structure of which we determined to 1 {angstrom} resolution. The LVEALYL segments are stacked into pairs of tightly interdigitated {beta}-sheets, each pair displaying the dry steric zipper interface typical of amyloid-like fibrils. This structure leads to a model for fibrils of human insulin consistent with electron microscopic, x-ray fiber diffraction, and biochemical studies.

  1. Aspirin, diabetes, and amyloid: re-examination of the inhibition of amyloid formation by aspirin and ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ling-Hsien; Noor, Harris; Cao, Ping; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2014-07-18

    The loss of β-cell function and β-cell death are key features of diabetes. A range of mechanisms are thought to contribute to β-cell loss, including islet amyloid formation by the neuropancreatic hormone amylin (islet amyloid polypeptide, IAPP). Islet amyloid deposition also contributes to the failure of islet transplants. There are no therapeutic strategies for the treatment or prevention of islet amyloidosis. Aspirin and the nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ketoprofen, at clinically relevant doses, have been proposed to inhibit amyloid formation by amylin and thus may hold promise for treatment of islet amyloidosis. These compounds are potentially attractive given the importance of inflammation in islet amyloidosis and given the fact that there are no anti-islet amyloid agents in the clinic. We show that aspirin, even in 20-fold excess, has no effect on the kinetics of amyloid formation by amylin as judged by thioflavin-T binding, right angle light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy, nor does it alter the morphology of resulting amyloid fibrils. Aspirin showed no ability to disaggregate preformed amylin amyloid fibrils under the conditions of these studies, 25 °C and pH 7.4. Ketoprofen is similarly ineffective at inhibiting amylin amyloid formation. The compounds do, however, interfere with circular dichroism- and Congo Red-based assays of amylin amyloid formation. This study highlights the importance of using multiple methods to follow amyloid formation when screening inhibitors.

  2. Amyloid-β peptide aggregation and the influence of carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Hui, Xi; Guang-Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Soluble peptides or proteins can self-aggregate into insoluble, ordered amyloid fibrils under appropriate conditions. These amyloid aggregates are the hallmarks of several human diseases ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to systemic amyloidoses. In this review, we first introduce the common structural features of amyloid fibrils and the amyloid fibrillation kinetics determined from experimental studies. Then, we discuss the structural models of Alzheimer’s amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils derived from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. On the computational side, molecular dynamics simulations can provide atomic details of structures and the underlying oligomerization mechanisms. We finally summarize recent progress in atomistic simulation studies on the oligomerization of Aβ (including full-length Aβ and its fragments) and the influence of carbon nanoparticles. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274075 and 91227102).

  3. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs have been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  4. Adenoviral expression of murine serum amyloid A proteins to study amyloid fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kindy, M S; King, A R; Yu, J; Gerardot, C; Whitley, J; de Beer, F C

    1998-06-15

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are one of the most inducible acute-phase reactants and are precursors of secondary amyloidosis. In the mouse, SAA1 and SAA2 are induced in approximately equal quantities in response to amyloid induction models. These two isotypes differ in only 9 of 103 amino acid residues; however, only SAA2 is selectively deposited into amyloid fibrils. SAA expression in the CE/J mouse species is an exception in that gene duplication did not occur and the CE/J variant is a hybrid molecule sharing features of SAA1 and SAA2. However, even though it is more closely related to SAA2 it is not deposited as amyloid fibrils. We have developed an adenoviral vector system to overexpress SAA proteins in cell culture to determine the ability of these proteins to form amyloid fibrils, and to study the structural features in relation to amyloid formation. Both the SAA2 and CE/J SAA proteins were synthesized in large quantities and purified to homogeneity. Electron microscopic analysis of the SAA proteins revealed that the SAA2 protein was capable of forming amyloid fibrils, whereas the CE/J SAA was incapable. Radiolabelled SAAs were associated with normal or acute-phase high-density lipoproteins (HDLs); we examined them for their clearance from the circulation. In normal mice, SAA2 had a half-life of 70 min and CE/J SAA had a half-life of 120 min; however, in amyloid mice 50% of the SAA2 cleared in 55 min, compared with 135 min for the CE/J protein. When the SAA proteins were associated with acute-phase HDLs, SAA2 clearance was decreased to 60 min in normal mice compared with 30 min in amyloidogenic mice. Both normal and acute-phase HDLs were capable of depositing SAA2 into preformed amyloid fibrils, whereas the CE/J protein did not become associated with amyloid fibrils. This established approach opens the doors for large-scale SAA production and for the examination of specific amino acids involved in the fibrillogenic capability of the SAA2 molecule in vitro

  5. The inhibitory effects of Escherichia coli maltose binding protein on β-amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sharoar, Md Golam; Shahnawaz, Md; Islam, Md Imamul; Ramasamy, Vijay Sankar; Shin, Song Yub; Park, Il-Seon

    2013-10-01

    The aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide from its monomeric to its fibrillar form importantly contributes to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we investigated the effects of Escherichia coli maltose binding protein (MBP), which has been previously used as a fusion protein, on Aβ42 fibrillization, in order to improve understanding of the self-assembly process and the cytotoxic mechanism of Aβ42. MBP, at a sub-stoichiometric ratio with respect to Aβ42, was found to have chaperone-like inhibitory effects on β-sheet fibril formation, due to the accumulation of Aβ42 aggregates by sequestration of active Aβ42 species as Aβ42-MBP complexes. Furthermore, MBP increased the lag time of Aβ42 polymerization, decreased the growth rate of fibril extension, and suppressed Aβ42 mediated toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. It appears that MBP decreases the active concentration of Aβ42 by sequestering it as Aβ42-MBP complex, and that this sequestration suppresses ongoing nucleation and retards the growth rate of Aβ42 species required for fibril formation. We speculate that inhibition of the growth rate of potent Aβ42 species by MBP suppresses Aβ42-mediated toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:23948569

  6. The Functional Curli Amyloid Is Not Based on In-register Parallel β-Sheet Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Shewmaker, Frank; McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Thurber, Kent R.; McPhie, Peter; Dyda, Fred; Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B.

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular curli proteins of Enterobacteriaceae form fibrous structures that are involved in biofilm formation and adhesion to host cells. These curli fibrils are considered a functional amyloid because they are not a consequence of misfolding, but they have many of the properties of protein amyloid. We confirm that fibrils formed by CsgA and CsgB, the primary curli proteins of Escherichia coli, possess many of the hallmarks typical of amyloid. Moreover we demonstrate that curli fibrils possess the cross-β structure that distinguishes protein amyloid. However, solid state NMR experiments indicate that curli structure is not based on an in-register parallel β-sheet architecture, which is common to many human disease-associated amyloids and the yeast prion amyloids. Solid state NMR and electron microscopy data are consistent with a β-helix-like structure but are not sufficient to establish such a structure definitively. PMID:19574225

  7. Transmissible amyloid.

    PubMed

    Tjernberg, L O; Rising, A; Johansson, J; Jaudzems, K; Westermark, P

    2016-08-01

    There are around 30 human diseases associated with protein misfolding and amyloid formation, each one caused by a certain protein or peptide. Many of these diseases are lethal and together they pose an enormous burden to society. The prion protein has attracted particular interest as being shown to be the pathogenic agent in transmissible diseases such as kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Whether similar transmission could occur also in other amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and serum amyloid A amyloidosis is a matter of intense research and debate. Furthermore, it has been suggested that novel biomaterials such as artificial spider silk are potentially amyloidogenic. Here, we provide a brief introduction to amyloid, prions and other proteins involved in amyloid disease and review recent evidence for their potential transmission. We discuss the similarities and differences between amyloid and silk, as well as the potential hazards associated with protein-based biomaterials. PMID:27002185

  8. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Anna; Sticht, Heinrich; Horn, Anselm H C

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text]) oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1) elongation of short protofilaments; (2) breakage of large protofilaments; (3) formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4) elongation of protofilament pairs.

  9. Changes in collagen fibril network organization and proteoglycan distribution in equine articular cartilage during maturation and growth.

    PubMed

    Hyttinen, Mika M; Holopainen, Jaakko; van Weeren, P René; Firth, Elwyn C; Helminen, Heikki J; Brama, Pieter A J

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to record growth-related changes in collagen network organization and proteoglycan distribution in intermittently peak-loaded and continuously lower-level-loaded articular cartilage. Cartilage from the proximal phalangeal bone of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint at birth, at 5, 11 and 18 months, and at 6-10 years of age was collected from two sites. Site 1, at the joint margin, is unloaded at slow gaits but is subjected to high-intensity loading during athletic activity; site 2 is a continuously but less intensively loaded site in the centre of the joint. The degree of collagen parallelism was determined with quantitative polarized light microscopy and the parallelism index for collagen fibrils was computed from the cartilage surface to the osteochondral junction. Concurrent changes in the proteoglycan distribution were quantified with digital densitometry. We found that the parallelism index increased significantly with age (up to 90%). At birth, site 2 exhibited a more organized collagen network than site 1. In adult horses this situation was reversed. The superficial and intermediate zones exhibited the greatest reorganization of collagen. Site 1 had a higher proteoglycan content than site 2 at birth but here too the situation was reversed in adult horses. We conclude that large changes in joint loading during growth and maturation in the period from birth to adulthood profoundly affect the architecture of the collagen network in equine cartilage. In addition, the distribution and content of proteoglycans are modified significantly by altered joint use. Intermittent peak-loading with shear seems to induce higher collagen parallelism and a lower proteoglycan content in cartilage than more constant weight-bearing. Therefore, we hypothesize that the formation of mature articular cartilage with a highly parallel collagen network and relatively low proteoglycan content in the peak-loaded area of a joint is needed to withstand

  10. Specific chaperones and regulatory domains in control of amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Rising, Anna; Presto, Jenny; Jörnvall, Hans; Johansson, Jan

    2015-10-30

    Many proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, but only about 30 amyloids are linked to disease, whereas some proteins form physiological amyloid-like assemblies. This raises questions of how the formation of toxic protein species during amyloidogenesis is prevented or contained in vivo. Intrinsic chaperoning or regulatory factors can control the aggregation in different protein systems, thereby preventing unwanted aggregation and enabling the biological use of amyloidogenic proteins. The molecular actions of these chaperones and regulators provide clues to the prevention of amyloid disease, as well as to the harnessing of amyloidogenic proteins in medicine and biotechnology. PMID:26354437

  11. Maslinic Acid Protected PC12 Cells Differentiated by Nerve Growth Factor against β-Amyloid-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-wan; Tsai, Chia-wen; Mong, Mei-chin; Yin, Mei-chin

    2015-12-01

    β-Amyloid peptide (Abeta) was used to induce apoptosis in PC12 cells differentiated by nerve growth factor, and the protective activities of maslinic acid (MA) at 2-16 μM were examined. Abeta treatment lowered Bcl-2 expression, raised Bax expression, and decreased cell viability. MA pretreatments decreased Bax expression, raised the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and increased cell viability. MA pretreatments retained glutathione content and decreased subsequent Abeta-induced release of reactive oxygen species, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. Abeta treatment up-regulated protein expression of p47(phox), gp91(phox), mitogen-activated protein kinase, advanced glycation end product receptor (RAGE), and nuclear factor-κ B (NF-κB). MA pretreatments at 2-16 μM suppressed the expression of proteins including gp91(phox), p47(phox), p-p38, and NF-κB p65, at 4-16 μM down-regulated RAGE and NF-κB p50 expression, and at 8 and 16 μM reduced p-ERK1/2 expression. These novel findings suggest that maslinic acid is a potent compound against Abeta-induced cytotoxicity.

  12. Amyloid-β25-35 induces apolipoprotein D Synthesis and growth arrest in HT22 hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Eva; Navarro, Ana; Ordóñez, Cristina; Del Valle, Eva; Tolivia, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein D (ApoD) is a secreted glycoprotein that is markedly induced in several pathological and stressful conditions in the nervous system. In the central nervous system, ApoD expression is upregulated during aging, after traumatic brain injury, and in several human neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), where it is found associated with amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques. Recent studies have indicated that ApoD has an important function as a neuroprotective and antioxidant protein. The aim of this work is to study the effect of the peptide fragment Aβ25-35, which is believed to play a major role in the neurodegenerative process of AD, in ApoD expression in a mouse hippocampal cell line. In addition, we studied whether direct addition of exogenous human recombinant ApoD protein has neuroprotective effect against Aβ25-35 treatment on neuronal cells. Our results demonstrate that Aβ25-35 induces ApoD expression in hippocampal cells in response to stress-induced growth arrest. This observed relationship between Aβ and ApoD expression could explain the elevated levels of ApoD found in AD brain, where it may be a neuroprotective molecule in the course of AD, probably related to its lipid transport function or a direct antioxidant property. However, the addition of exogenous human recombinant ApoD does not exert any protective effect, most likely due to its major structural modifications.

  13. Atrial Fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common type of arrhythmia. The ... the heart's electrical system. Often, people who have AF may not even feel symptoms. But you may ...

  14. Ventricular fibrillation

    MedlinePlus

    ... seconds, it can lead to fainting (syncope) or cardiac arrest. Fibrillation is an uncontrolled twitching or quivering of ... pubmed/23801105 . Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening arrhythmias. In: Goldman L, Schafer ...

  15. Amyloid structure and assembly: insights from scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire; Baxa, Ulrich; Simon, Martha N; Steven, Alasdair C; Engel, Andreas; Wall, Joseph S; Aebi, Ueli; Müller, Shirley A

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  16. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  17. Out-of-register β-sheets suggest a pathway to toxic amyloid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Jiang, Lin; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Park, Jiyong; Sawaya, Michael R; Pensalfini, Anna; Gou, Dawei; Berk, Arnold J; Glabe, Charles G; Nowick, James; Eisenberg, David

    2012-12-18

    Although aberrant protein aggregation has been conclusively linked to dozens of devastating amyloid diseases, scientists remain puzzled about the molecular features that render amyloid fibrils or small oligomers toxic. Here, we report a previously unobserved type of amyloid fibril that tests as cytotoxic: one in which the strands of the contributing β-sheets are out of register. In all amyloid fibrils previously characterized at the molecular level, only in-register β-sheets have been observed, in which each strand makes its full complement of hydrogen bonds with the strands above and below it in the fibril. In out-of-register sheets, strands are sheared relative to one another, leaving dangling hydrogen bonds. Based on this finding, we designed out-of-register β-sheet amyloid mimics, which form both cylindrin-like oligomers and fibrils, and these mimics are cytotoxic. Structural and energetic considerations suggest that out-of-register fibrils can readily convert to toxic cylindrins. We propose that out-of-register β-sheets and their related cylindrins are part of a toxic amyloid pathway, which is distinct from the more energetically favored in-register amyloid pathway.

  18. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  19. Amyloids in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: potential causes of the usually low resolution.

    PubMed

    Espargaró, Alba; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Estelrich, Joan; Sabate, Raimon

    2015-01-01

    Amyloids are non-crystalline and insoluble, which imply that the classical structural biology tools, ie, X-ray crystallography and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), are not suitable for their analysis. In the last years, solid-state NMR (ssNMR) has emerged as an alternative tool to decrypt the structural signatures of amyloid fibrils, providing major contributions to our understanding of molecular structures of amyloids such as β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease or fungal prions, among others. Despite this, the wide majority of amyloid fibrils display low resolution by ssNMR. Usually, this low resolution has been attributed to a high disorder or polymorphism of the fibrils, suggesting the existence of diverse elementary β-sheet structures. Here, we propose that a single β-sheet structure could be responsible for the broadening of the line widths in the ssNMR spectra. Although the fibrils and fibers consist of a single elementary structure, the angle of twist of each individual fibril in the mature fiber depends on the number of individual fibrils as well as the fibril arrangement in the final mature fiber. Thus, a wide range of angles of twist could be observed in the same amyloid sample. These twist variations involve changes in amino acid alignments that could be enough to limit the ssNMR resolution. PMID:26635473

  20. Amyloids in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: potential causes of the usually low resolution

    PubMed Central

    Espargaró, Alba; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Estelrich, Joan; Sabate, Raimon

    2015-01-01

    Amyloids are non-crystalline and insoluble, which imply that the classical structural biology tools, ie, X-ray crystallography and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), are not suitable for their analysis. In the last years, solid-state NMR (ssNMR) has emerged as an alternative tool to decrypt the structural signatures of amyloid fibrils, providing major contributions to our understanding of molecular structures of amyloids such as β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer’s disease or fungal prions, among others. Despite this, the wide majority of amyloid fibrils display low resolution by ssNMR. Usually, this low resolution has been attributed to a high disorder or polymorphism of the fibrils, suggesting the existence of diverse elementary β-sheet structures. Here, we propose that a single β-sheet structure could be responsible for the broadening of the line widths in the ssNMR spectra. Although the fibrils and fibers consist of a single elementary structure, the angle of twist of each individual fibril in the mature fiber depends on the number of individual fibrils as well as the fibril arrangement in the final mature fiber. Thus, a wide range of angles of twist could be observed in the same amyloid sample. These twist variations involve changes in amino acid alignments that could be enough to limit the ssNMR resolution. PMID:26635473

  1. Physical, morphological and functional differences between ph 5.8 and 7.4 aggregates of the Alzheimer's amyloid peptide Abeta.

    PubMed

    Wood, S J; Maleeff, B; Hart, T; Wetzel, R

    1996-03-15

    The Alzheimer's amyloid peptide Abeta(1-40) generates a turbid, Congo re-binding aggregation reaction product within minutes when incubated in the pH range 5 to 6. At pH 7.4, Abeta forms little or no aggregate in this time frame, requiring hours or days, rather than minutes, to complete fibril formation. The pH 5.8 aggregates are not amyloid fibrils, but rather appear in electron micrographs as a mixture of larger particles of different morphologies. These aggregates differ from classical fibrils by a number of other measures. Per mass of peptide aggregated, the pH 5.8 product binds less Congo red and thioflavin T than does aggregate grow in unstirred reactions at pH 7.4. Both the pH 5.8 and 7.4 aggregates exhibit light scattering at 90 degrees. However, while the pH 5.8 aggregate is visible in suspension by the light microscopy, and exhibits turbidity at 405 nm, the fibrils grown at pH 7.4 in an unstirred reaction are transparent. The two aggregate types do not interconvert in pH shift experiments. Most dramatically, and in contrast to fibrils grown at pH 7.4, the turbid aggregate generated at pH 5.8 is incapable of seeding fibril growth at pH 7.4. Although proteolytic processing of betaAPP to generate Abeta probably takes place in a low pH compartment of the cell, our results suggest that fibril formation is not likely to be initiated in such an environment.

  2. Macromolecular crowding favors the fibrillization of β2-microglobulin by accelerating the nucleation step and inhibiting fibril disassembly.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xu-Dong; Kong, Fan-Lou; Dang, Hai-Bin; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Hemodialysis-associated amyloidosis (HAA) involves the fibrillization of β2-microglobulin (β2M) and occurs in crowded physiological environments. However, how macromolecular crowding affects amyloid formation of β2M remains elusive. Here we study the e