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Sample records for amyloid peptide 1-42-stimulated

  1. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  2. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  3. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of human islet amyloid polypeptides: an insight into amyloid peptides' connection with antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Jin-Chun; Cui, Yi-Xian; Zhou, Bing; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2012-07-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) shows an antimicrobial activity towards two types of clinically relevant bacteria. The potency of hIAPP varies with its aggregation states. Circular dichroism was employed to determine the interaction between hIAPP and bacteria lipid membrane mimic. The antimicrobial activity of each aggregate species is associated with their ability to induce membrane disruption. Our findings provide new evidence revealing the antimicrobial activity of amyloid peptide, which suggest a possible connection between amyloid peptides and antimicrobial peptides.

  5. Peptide Detection of Fungal Functional Amyloids in Infected Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Sherman, Melissa C.; Lysak, Nataliya; Filonenko, Alexandra; Richards, Hazel; Sobonya, Richard E.; Klotz, Stephen A.; Lipke, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    Many fungal cell adhesion proteins form functional amyloid patches on the surface of adhering cells. The Candida albicans Agglutinin-like sequence (Als) adhesins are exemplars for this phenomenon, and have amyloid forming sequences that are conserved between family members. The Als5p amyloid sequence mediates amyloid fibril formation and is critical for cell adhesion and biofilm formation, and is also present in the related adhesins Als1p and Als3p. We have developed a fluorescent peptide probe containing the conserved Als amyloid-forming sequence. This peptide bound specifically to yeast expressing Als5p, but not to cells lacking the adhesin. The probe bound to both yeast and hyphal forms of C. albicans. Δals1/Δals3 single and double deletion strains exhibited reduced fluorescence, indicating that probe binding required expression of these proteins. Additionally, the Als peptide specifically stained fungal cells in abscesses in autopsy sections. Counterstaining with calcofluor white showed colocalization with the amyloid peptide. In addition, fungi in autopsy sections derived from the gastrointestinal tract showed colocalization of the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T and the fluorescent peptide. Collectively, our data demonstrate that we can exploit amyloid sequence specificity for detection of functional amyloids in situ. PMID:24465872

  6. Secretome analyses of Aβ(1-42) stimulated hippocampal astrocytes reveal that CXCL10 is involved in astrocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wenjia; Wu, Jing; Zou, Xiao; Xie, Jian; Zhang, Liwei; Zhao, Xuyang; Zhao, Minzhi; Wang, Qingsong; Ji, Jianguo

    2013-02-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregation plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the AD brain, amyloid plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes, and many essential functions of astrocytes have been reported to be mediated by protein secretion. However, the roles of activated astrocytes in AD progression are under intense debate. To provide an in-depth view of the secretomes of activated astrocytes, we present in this study a quantitative profile of rat hippocampal astrocyte secretomes at multiple time points after both brief and sustained Aβ(1-42) stimulation. Using SILAC labeling and LC-MS/MS analyses, we identified 19 up-regulated secreted proteins after Aβ(1-42) treatment. These differentially expressed proteins have been suggested to be involved in key aspects of biological processes, such as cell recruitment, Aβ clearance, and regulation of neurogenesis. Particularly, we validated the role played by CXCL10 in promoting astrocyte aggregation around amyloid plagues through in vitro cell migration analysis. This research provides global, quantitative profiling of astrocyte secretomes produced on Aβ stimulation and hence provides a detailed molecular basis for the relationship between amyloid plaques and astrocyte aggregation; the findings thus have important implications for further investigations into AD development and therapy.

  7. Bacterial enzymes effectively digest Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Yuliya Vasilyevna; Shagimardanova, Elena Ilyasovna; Margulis, Anna Borisovna; Toymentseva, Anna Aleksandrovna; Balaban, Nelly Pavlovna; Rudakova, Nataliya Leonidovna; Rizvanov, Albert Anatolyevich; Sharipova, Margarita Rashidovna; Palotás, András

    2014-09-01

    Aggregated β-amyloid peptides play key roles in the development of Alzheimer's disease, and recent evidence suggests that microbial particles, among others, can facilitate their polymerization. Bacterial enzymes, however, have been proved to be beneficial in degrading pathological fibrillar structures in clinical settings, such as strepto-kinases in resolving blood-clots. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of bacterial substances to effectively hydrolyze β-amyloid peptides. Degrading products of several proteinases from Bacillus pumilus were evaluated using MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry, and their toxicity was assessed in vitro using cell-culture assays and morphological studies. These enzymes have proved to be non-toxic and were demonstrated to cleave through the functional domains of β-amyloid peptide. By yielding inactive fragments, proteinases of Bacillus pumilus may be used as candidate anti-amyloid agents.

  8. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    Família, Carlos; Dennison, Sarah R.; Quintas, Alexandre; Phoenix, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea). Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html) capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation. PMID:26241652

  9. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation.

    PubMed

    Família, Carlos; Dennison, Sarah R; Quintas, Alexandre; Phoenix, David A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea). Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html) capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation.

  10. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  11. Self-Assembly and Anti-Amyloid Cytotoxicity Activity of Amyloid beta Peptide Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, V; Ryumin, P; Cramer, R; Hamley, I W; Taylor, M; Allsop, D; Reza, M; Ruokolainen, J; Arnold, T; Hermida-Merino, D; Garcia, C I; Leal, M C; Castaño, E

    2017-03-08

    The self-assembly of two derivatives of KLVFF, a fragment Aβ(16-20) of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, is investigated and recovery of viability of neuroblastoma cells exposed to Aβ (1-42) is observed at sub-stoichiometric peptide concentrations. Fluorescence assays show that NH2-KLVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse and amyloid formation at the same critical aggregation concentration (cac). In contrast, NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse at a low concentration, followed by amyloid formation at a higher cac. These findings are supported by the β-sheet features observed by FTIR. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 forms a significant population of oligomeric species above the cac. Cryo-TEM, used together with SAXS to determine fibril dimensions, shows that the length and degree of twisting of peptide fibrils seem to be influenced by the net peptide charge. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering from thin peptide films shows features of β-sheet ordering for both peptides, along with evidence for lamellar ordering of NH2-KLVFF-CONH2. This work provides a comprehensive picture of the aggregation properties of these two KLVFF derivatives and shows their utility, in unaggregated form, in restoring the viability of neuroblastoma cells against Aβ-induced toxicity.

  12. Self-Assembly and Anti-Amyloid Cytotoxicity Activity of Amyloid beta Peptide Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Castelletto, V.; Ryumin, P.; Cramer, R.; Hamley, I. W.; Taylor, M.; Allsop, D.; Reza, M.; Ruokolainen, J.; Arnold, T.; Hermida-Merino, D.; Garcia, C. I.; Leal, M. C.; Castaño, E.

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of two derivatives of KLVFF, a fragment Aβ(16–20) of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, is investigated and recovery of viability of neuroblastoma cells exposed to Aβ (1–42) is observed at sub-stoichiometric peptide concentrations. Fluorescence assays show that NH2-KLVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse and amyloid formation at the same critical aggregation concentration (cac). In contrast, NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 undergoes hydrophobic collapse at a low concentration, followed by amyloid formation at a higher cac. These findings are supported by the β-sheet features observed by FTIR. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry indicates that NH2-K(Boc)LVFF-CONH2 forms a significant population of oligomeric species above the cac. Cryo-TEM, used together with SAXS to determine fibril dimensions, shows that the length and degree of twisting of peptide fibrils seem to be influenced by the net peptide charge. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering from thin peptide films shows features of β-sheet ordering for both peptides, along with evidence for lamellar ordering of NH2-KLVFF-CONH2. This work provides a comprehensive picture of the aggregation properties of these two KLVFF derivatives and shows their utility, in unaggregated form, in restoring the viability of neuroblastoma cells against Aβ-induced toxicity. PMID:28272542

  13. TANGO-Inspired Design of Anti-Amyloid Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaomeng; Brickson, Claire R; Murphy, Regina M

    2016-09-21

    β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ) self-associates into oligomers and fibrils, in a process that is believed to directly lead to neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease. Compounds that bind to Aβ, and inhibit fibrillogenesis and neurotoxicity, are of interest as an anti-Alzheimer therapeutic strategy. Peptides are particularly attractive for this purpose, because they have advantages over small molecules in their ability to disrupt protein-protein interactions, yet they are amenable to tuning of their properties through chemical means, unlike antibodies. Self-complementation and peptide library screening are two strategies that have been employed in the search for peptides that bind to Aβ. We have taken a different approach, by designing Aβ-binding peptides using transthyretin (TTR) as a template. Previously, we demonstrated that a cyclic peptide, with sequence derived from the known Aβ-binding site on TTR, suppressed Aβ aggregation into fibrils and protected neurons against Aβ toxicity. Here, we searched for cyclic peptides with improved efficacy, by employing the algorithm TANGO, designed originally to identify amyloidogenic sequences in proteins. By using TANGO as a guide to predict the effect of sequence modifications on conformation and aggregation, we synthesized a significantly improved cyclic peptide. We demonstrate that the peptide, in binding to Aβ, redirects Aβ toward protease-sensitive, nonfibrillar aggregates. Cyclic peptides designed using this strategy have attractive solubility, specificity, and stability characteristics.

  14. In vitro oligomerization and fibrillogenesis of amyloid-beta peptides.

    PubMed

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Klementieva, Oksana; Cladera, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid beta Ab(1-40) and Ab(1-42) peptides are the main components of the fibrillar plaques characteristically found in the brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. Fibril formation has been thoroughly studied in vitro using synthetic amyloid peptides and has been described to be a nucleation dependent polymerization process. During this process, defined by a slow nucleation phase followed by a rapid exponential elongation reaction, a whole range of aggregated species (low and high molecular weight aggregates) precede fibril formation. Toxic species related to the onset and development of Alzheimer's disease are thought to be found among these prefibrillar aggregates. Two main procedures are used to experimentally monitor fibril formation kinetics: through the measurement of the light scattered by the different peptide aggregates and using the fluorescent dye thioflavin T, which fluorescence increases when specifically interacting with amyloid fibrils. Reproducibility may, however, be difficult to achieve when measuring and characterizing fibril formation kinetics. This fact is mainly due to the difficulty in experimentally handling amyloid peptides, which is directly related to the difficulty of having them in a monomeric form at the beginning of the polymerization process. This has to do mainly with the type of solvent used for the preparation of the peptide stock solutions (water, DMSO, TFE, HFIP) and the control of determinant physicochemical parameters such as pH. Moreover, kinetic progression turns out to be highly dependent on the type of peptide counter-ion used, which will basically determine the duration of the nucleation phase and the rate at which high molecular weight oligomers are formed. Centrifugation and filtration procedures used in the preparation of the peptide stock solutions will also greatly influence the duration of the fibril formation process. In this chapter, a survey of the alluded experimental procedures is provided and a general

  15. Thermodynamics and dynamics of amyloid peptide oligomerization are sequence dependent.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Guo, Zhi; Mousseau, Normand; Wei, Guanghong

    2009-06-01

    Aggregation of the full-length amyloid-beta (Abeta) and beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) proteins is associated with Alzheimer's disease and dialysis-related amyloidosis, respectively. This assembly process is not restricted to full-length proteins, however, many short peptides also assemble into amyloid fibrils in vitro. Remarkably, the kinetics of amyloid-fibril formation of all these molecules is generally described by a nucleation-polymerization process characterized by a lag phase associated with the formation of a nucleus, after which fibril elongation occurs rapidly. In this study, we report using long molecular dynamics simulations with the OPEP coarse-grained force field, the thermodynamics and dynamics of the octamerization for two amyloid 7-residue peptides: the beta2m83-89 NHVTLSQ and Abeta16-22 KLVFFAE fragments. Based on multiple trajectories run at 310 K, totaling 2.2 mus (beta2m83-89) and 4.8 mus (Abeta16-22) and starting from random configurations and orientations of the chains, we find that the two peptides not only share common but also very different aggregation properties. Notably, an increase in the hydrophobic character of the peptide, as observed in Abeta16-22 with respect to beta2m83-89 impacts the thermodynamics by reducing the population of bilayer beta-sheet assemblies. Higher hydrophobicity is also found to slow down the dynamics of beta-sheet formation by enhancing the averaged lifetime of all configuration types (CT) and by reducing the complexity of the CT transition probability matrix. Proteins 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. The role of β-amyloid peptide in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, A V; Bystryak, S; Galzitskaya, O V

    2011-09-01

    Studies of neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs) are drawing more attention of researchers worldwide due to the high incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The pathophysiology of such disorders is, in part, characterized by the transition of a wild-type peptide from its native conformation into a very stable pathological isoform. Subsequently, these abnormal proteins form aggregates of amyloid fibrils that continuously increase in size. Changes in the metabolic processes of neurons (e.g. oxidative stress, hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein, and resulting secondary changes in the cell metabolism) ultimately lead to cell death. We hypothesize that extracellular deposition of β-amyloid peptide fibrils and neurofibrillary tangles represents the body's adaptation mechanism, aimed at preservation of autonomic functioning; while the cognitive decline is severe, the rest of the organ systems remain unaffected and continue to function. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that destruction of pathological plaques, fibrils, and tangles and the use of vaccines targeting β-amyloid result in undesirable side effects. To gain a better understanding of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and to develop novel therapies, continued studies of the sporadic form of disease and the mechanisms triggering conformational changes in β-amyloid peptide fragments are essential. This review is focused on studies investigating the formation of amyloid fibrils and their role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, we discuss a related disorder--amyloidosis--where formation of fibrils, tangles, and plaques leads to neuronal death which may occur as a result of a failed adaptation process. Further in-depth investigation and comprehensive analysis of alterations in the metabolism of APP, β-amyloid, and tau protein, which have a pathological effect on cell membrane, alter phosphate exchange, and impair other key metabolic functions of the cell long before the

  17. Stability of amyloidpeptides in plasma and serum.

    PubMed

    Bibl, Mirko; Welge, Volker; Esselmann, Hermann; Wiltfang, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Plasma amyloidpeptide (Aβ) levels have been suggested as a biomarker candidate for detecting incipient AD. Aβ peptides are known to be sensitive to distinct preanalytical sample handling, which calls for standardised preanalytical procedures. We investigated serum and plasma samples of 19 patients with no clinical signs of dementia for different preanalytical sample handlings. Both serum and plasma were analysed by the one-dimensional Aβ-SDS-PAGE/immunoblot, either immediately or after storage at room temperature for 24 and 48 h, respectively. The panel of Aβ1-37/38/39/40/42 and Aβ2-40 was evaluated. In both analytical matrices, sample storage led to a significant loss of measurable peptide levels. This effect was most pronounced during the first 24 h of storage and stronger in serum than in plasma. There were no significant differences between the distinct analysed Aβ peptide species regarding these results. The ratios of peptides (e.g. Aβ1-42/Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42/Aβ1-38) displayed a higher stability under the influence of storage than each single peptide. In conclusion, plasma may be more appropriate than serum for analysing Aβ peptides for routine application. At least, the analysis should be done within 24 h and peptide ratios should be created to minimise artificial results.

  18. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid β fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, M.; Morgado, I.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ► Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ► Aβ(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ► We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of Aβ(1–40) fibril formation. ► At high Aβ(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ► Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid β (Aβ) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. Aβ(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  19. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloidpeptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides interact with DNA, as proved by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Barrantes, Alejandro; Camero, Sergio; Garcia-Lucas, Angel; Navarro, Pedro J; Benitez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2012-10-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, abnormal processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer's disease patients increases the production of β-amyloid toxic peptides, which, after forming highly aggregated fibrillar structures, lead to extracellular plaques formation, neuronal loss and dementia. However, a great deal of evidence has point to intracellular small oligomers of amyloid peptides, probably transient intermediates in the process of fibrillar structures formation, as the most toxic species. In order to study the amyloid-DNA interaction, we have selected here three different forms of the amyloid peptide: Aβ1-40, Aβ25-35 and a scrambled form of Aβ25-35. Surface Plasmon Resonance was used together with UV-visible spectroscopy, Electrophoresis and Electronic Microscopy to carry out this study. Our results prove that, similarly to the full length Aβ1-42, all conformations of toxic amyloid peptides, Aβ1-40 and Aβ25-35, may bind DNA. In contrast, the scrambled form of Aβ25-35, a non-aggregating and nontoxic form of this peptide, could not bind DNA. We conclude that although the amyloid-DNA interaction is closely related to the amyloid aggregation proneness, this cannot be the only factor which determines the interaction, since small oligomers of amyloid peptides may also bind DNA if their predominant negatively charged amino acid residues are previously neutralized.

  1. A peptide study of the relationship between the collagen triple-helix and amyloid.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Avanish S; Nunes, Ana Monica; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Type XXV collagen, or collagen-like amyloidogenic component, is a component of amyloid plaques, and recent studies suggest this collagen affects amyloid fibril elongation and has a genetic association with Alzheimer's disease. The relationship between the collagen triple helix and amyloid fibrils was investigated by studying peptide models, including a very stable triple helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)₁₀ , an amyloidogenic peptide GNNQQNY, and a hybrid peptide where the GNNQQNY sequence was incorporated between (GPO)(n) domains. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy showed the GNNQQNY peptide formed a random coil structure, whereas the hybrid peptide contained a central disordered GNNQQNY region transitioning to triple-helical ends. Light scattering confirmed the GNNQQNY peptide had a high propensity to form amyloid fibrils, whereas amyloidogenesis was delayed in the hybrid peptide. NMR data suggested the triple-helix constraints on the GNNQQNY sequence within the hybrid peptide may disfavor the conformational change necessary for aggregation. Independent addition of a triple-helical peptide to the GNNQQNY peptide under aggregating conditions delayed nucleation and amyloid fibril growth. The inhibition of amyloid nucleation depended on the Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequence and required the triple-helix conformation. The inhibitory effect of the collagen triple-helix on an amyloidogenic sequence, when in the same molecule or when added separately, suggests Type XXV collagen, and possibly other collagens, may play a role in regulating amyloid fibril formation.

  2. Short peptides self-assemble to produce catalytic amyloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufo, Caroline M.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Moroz, Olesia V.; Stöhr, Jan; Smith, Tyler A.; Hu, Xiaozhen; Degrado, William F.; Korendovych, Ivan V.

    2014-04-01

    Enzymes fold into unique three-dimensional structures, which underlie their remarkable catalytic properties. The requirement to adopt a stable, folded conformation is likely to contribute to their relatively large size (>10,000 Da). However, much shorter peptides can achieve well-defined conformations through the formation of amyloid fibrils. To test whether short amyloid-forming peptides might in fact be capable of enzyme-like catalysis, we designed a series of seven-residue peptides that act as Zn2+-dependent esterases. Zn2+ helps stabilize the fibril formation, while also acting as a cofactor to catalyse acyl ester hydrolysis. These results indicate that prion-like fibrils are able to not only catalyse their own formation, but they can also catalyse chemical reactions. Thus, they might have served as intermediates in the evolution of modern-day enzymes. These results also have implications for the design of self-assembling nanostructured catalysts including ones containing a variety of biological and non-biological metal ions.

  3. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Lerma, Armando I.; Ordaz, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM). We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function. PMID:23878547

  4. Dimensionality of carbon nanomaterial impacting on the modulation of amyloid peptide assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, Z.; Bortolini, C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Amari, A.; Zhang, H. X.; Liu, L.; Dong, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of inorganic nanomaterials have been exploited so far for their great potential for biological applications. Some of these materials could be valid candidates to modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides, which is relevant to amyloid-related diseases. In this work, we reveal that a carbon nanomaterial can indeed modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides and, additionally, we show that this modulating effect is closely related to the dimensionality of the nanomaterials.

  5. Membrane Pore Formation by Amyloid beta (25-35) Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Nabin; Tatulian, Suren

    Amyloid (A β) peptide contributes to Alzheimer's disease by a yet unidentified mechanism. One of the possible mechanisms of A β toxicity is formation of pores in cellular membranes. We have characterized the formation of pores in phospholipid membranes by the Aβ25 - 35 peptide (GSNKGAIIGLM) using fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. CD and FTIR identified formation of β-sheet structure upon incubation of the peptide in aqueous buffer for 2 hours. Unilamellar vesicles composed of a zwitterionic lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and 70 % POPC plus 30 % of an acidic lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), are made in 30 mM CaCl2. Quin-2, a fluorophore that displays increased fluorescence upon Ca2+ binding, is added to the vesicles externally. Peptide addition results in increased Quin-2 fluorescence, which is interpreted by binding of the peptide to the vesicles, pore formation, and Ca2+ leakage. The positive and negative control measurements involve addition of a detergent, Triton X-100, which causes vesicle rupture and release of total calcium, and blank buffer, respectively.

  6. Identification of Core Segment of Amyloidal Peptide Mediated by Chaperone Molecules by using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2015-10-05

    We illustrate in this work that pristine assemblies of amyloidal peptides can be obtained by perturbations of reduced scanning bias, and show a broad distribution in peptide length. In contrast, the chaperone-mediated peptide co-assembly presents ordered lamellar structures with a homogeneous distribution in length, which could be attributed to the core segment of the peptide. The efforts are beneficial for gaining insight into the aggregation propensity of peptides and inter-peptide interactions.

  7. Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta peptides in vitro electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2017-04-01

    The oxidative behaviour of the human amyloid beta (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42) peptides and a group of similar peptides: control inverse (Aβ40-1 and Aβ42-1), mutants (Aβ1-40Phe(10) and Aβ1-40Nle(35)), rat Aβ1-40Rat, and fragments (Aβ1-28, Aβ1-16, Aβ10-20, Aβ12-28, and Aβ17-42), in solution or adsorbed, at a glassy carbon electrode, by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry, were investigated and compared. Structurally the Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 sequences contain five electroactive amino acid residues, one tyrosine (Tyr(10)), three histidines (His(6), His(13) and His(14)) and one methionine (Met(35)). The Aβ peptide 3D structure influenced the exposure of the redox residues to the electrode surface and their oxidation peak currents. Depending on the amino acid sequence length and content, the Aβ peptides gave one or two oxidation peaks. The first electron transfer reaction corresponded to the tyrosine amino acid residue oxidation, and the second to both histidines and methionine amino acid residues. The highest contribution to the second oxidation peak current was from His(13), followed by His(14) and His(6) residues, and Met(35) residue had the lowest contribution. The Aβ peptides electron transfer depended on peptide hydrophobicity and 3D structure, the redox residues position in the sequence, the redox residues close to N-termini giving the highest oxidation peak currents.

  8. Copper(II) ions and the Alzheimer's amyloidpeptide: Affinity and stoichiometry of binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõugu, Vello; Friedemann, Merlin; Tiiman, Ann; Palumaa, Peep

    2014-10-01

    Deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid plaques is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis this deposition is an early event and primary cause of the disease, however, the mechanisms that cause this deposition remain elusive. An increasing amount of evidence shows that the interactions of biometals can contribute to the fibrillization and amyloid formation by amyloidogenic peptides. From different anions the copper ions deserve the most attention since it can contribute not only toamyloid formation but also to its toxicity due to the generation of ROS. In this thesis we focus on the affinity and stoichiometry of copper(II) binding to the Aβ molecule.

  9. Unwinding fibril formation of medin, the peptide of the most common form of human amyloid.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Annika; Söderberg, Linda; Westermark, Gunilla T; Sletten, Knut; Engström, Ulla; Tjernberg, Lars O; Näslund, Jan; Westermark, Per

    2007-10-05

    Medin amyloid affects the medial layer of the thoracic aorta of most people above 50 years of age. The consequences of this amyloid are not completely known but the deposits may contribute to diseases such as thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection or to the general diminished elasticity of blood vessels seen in elderly people. We show that the 50-amino acid residue peptide medin forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. With the use of Congo red staining, Thioflavin T fluorescence, electron microscopy, and a solid-phase binding assay on different synthetic peptides, we identified the last 18-19 amino acid residues to constitute the amyloid-promoting region of medin. We also demonstrate that the two C-terminal phenylalanines, previously suggested to be of importance for amyloid formation, are not required for medin amyloid formation.

  10. Unwinding fibril formation of medin, the peptide of the most common form of human amyloid

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Annika; Soederberg, Linda; Westermark, Gunilla T.; Sletten, Knut; Engstroem, Ulla; Tjernberg, Lars O.; Naeslund, Jan; Westermark, Per

    2007-10-05

    Medin amyloid affects the medial layer of the thoracic aorta of most people above 50 years of age. The consequences of this amyloid are not completely known but the deposits may contribute to diseases such as thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection or to the general diminished elasticity of blood vessels seen in elderly people. We show that the 50-amino acid residue peptide medin forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. With the use of Congo red staining, Thioflavin T fluorescence, electron microscopy, and a solid-phase binding assay on different synthetic peptides, we identified the last 18-19 amino acid residues to constitute the amyloid-promoting region of medin. We also demonstrate that the two C-terminal phenylalanines, previously suggested to be of importance for amyloid formation, are not required for medin amyloid formation.

  11. AmyloidPeptide: Dr. Jekyll or Mr. Hyde?

    PubMed Central

    Puzzo, Daniela; Arancio, Ottavio

    2013-01-01

    Amyloidpeptide (Aβ) is considered a key protein in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because of its neurotoxicity and capacity to form characteristic insoluble deposits known as senile plaques. Aβ derives from amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), whose proteolytic processing generates several fragments including Aβ peptides of various lengths. The normal function of AβPP and its fragments remains poorly understood. While some fragments has been suggested to have a function in normal physiological cellular processes, Aβ has been widely considered as a “garbage” fragment that becomes toxic when it accumulates in the brain, resulting in impaired synaptic function and memory. Aβ is produced and released physiologically in the healthy brain during neuronal activity. In the last 10 years, we have been investigating whether Aβ plays a physiological role in the brain. We first demonstrated that picomolar concentrations of a human Aβ42 preparation enhanced synaptic plasticity and memory in mice. Next, we investigated the role of endogenous Aβ in healthy murine brains and found that treatment with a specific antirodent Aβ antibody and an siRNA against murine AβPP impaired synaptic plasticity and memory. The concurrent addition of human Aβ42 rescued these deficits, suggesting that in the healthy brain, physiological Aβ concentrations are necessary for normal synaptic plasticity and memory to occur. Furthermore, the effect of both exogenous and endogenous Aβ was seen to be mediated by modulation of neurotransmitter release and α7-nicotinic receptors. These findings need to be taken into consideration when designing novel therapeutic strategies for AD. PMID:22735675

  12. Identification of a Novel Parallel β‐Strand Conformation within Molecular Monolayer of Amyloid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Xiaofeng; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Li, Jingyuan; Liu, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of protein properties and biological functions arises from the variation in the primary and secondary structure. Specifically, in abnormal assemblies of protein, such as amyloid peptide, the secondary structure is closely correlated with the stable ensemble and the cytotoxicity. In this work, the early Aβ33‐42 aggregates forming the molecular monolayer at hydrophobic interface are investigated. The molecular monolayer of amyloid peptide Aβ33‐42 consisting of novel parallel β‐strand‐like structure is further revealed by means of a quantitative nanomechanical spectroscopy technique with force controlled in pico‐Newton range, combining with molecular dynamic simulation. The identified parallel β‐strand‐like structure of molecular monolayer is distinct from the antiparallel β‐strand structure of Aβ33‐42 amyloid fibril. This finding enriches the molecular structures of amyloid peptide aggregation, which could be closely related to the pathogenesis of amyloid disease. PMID:27818898

  13. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-06-29

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca(2+)-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined "membrane therapy") targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein.

  14. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca2+-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined “membrane therapy”) targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. PMID:27352802

  15. Multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR investigation of the copper binding site of murine amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghun; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Sun Hee

    2015-01-26

    Copper-amyloid peptides are proposed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease, presumably by oxidative stress. However, mice do not produce amyloid plaques and thus do not suffer from Alzheimer's disease. Although much effort has been focused on the structural characterization of the copper- human amyloid peptides, little is known regarding the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid peptides. Thus, we investigated the structure of copper-murine amyloid peptides through multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with specific isotope labeling. Based on our pulsed EPR results, we found that Ala2, Glu3, His6, and His14 are directly coordinated with the copper ion in murine amyloid β peptides at pH 8.5. This is the first detailed structural characterization of the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid β peptides. This work may advance the knowledge required for developing inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Tunable assembly of amyloid-forming peptides into nanosheets as a retrovirus carrier

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bin; Li, Dan; Xi, Wenhui; Luo, Fang; Zhang, Xiang; Zou, Man; Cao, Mi; Hu, Jun; Wang, Wenyuan; Wei, Guanghong; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cong

    2015-01-01

    Using and engineering amyloid as nanomaterials are blossoming trends in bionanotechnology. Here, we show our discovery of an amyloid structure, termed “amyloid-like nanosheet,” formed by a key amyloid-forming segment of Alzheimer’s Aβ. Combining multiple biophysical and computational approaches, we proposed a structural model for the nanosheet that is formed by stacking the amyloid fibril spines perpendicular to the fibril axis. We further used the nanosheet for laboratorial retroviral transduction enhancement and directly visualized the presence of virus on the nanosheet surface by electron microscopy. Furthermore, based on our structural model, we designed nanosheet-forming peptides with different functionalities, elucidating the potential of rational design for amyloid-based materials with novel architecture and function. PMID:25713359

  17. Conversion of non-fibrillar beta-sheet oligomers into amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Cócera, Mercedes; Cladera, Josep

    2007-10-05

    Abeta(1-40) is one of the main components of the fibrils found in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. It is known that prior to the formation of amyloid fibrils in which the peptide adopts a well-ordered intermolecular beta-sheet structure, peptide monomers associate forming low and high molecular weight oligomers. These oligomers have been previously described in electron microscopy, AFM, and exclusion chromatography studies. Their specific secondary structures however, have not yet been well established. A major problem when comparing aggregation and secondary structure determinations in concentration-dependent processes such as amyloid aggregation is the different concentration range required in each type of experiment. In the present study we used the dye Thioflavin T (ThT), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron microscopy in order to structurally characterize the different aggregated species which form during the Abeta(1-40) fibril formation process. A unique sample containing 90microM peptide was used. The results show that oligomeric species which form during the lag phase of the aggregation kinetics are a mixture of unordered, helical, and intermolecular non-fibrillar beta-structures. The number of oligomers and the amount of non-fibrillar beta-structures grows throughout the lag phase and during the elongation phase these non-fibrillar beta-structures are transformed into fibrillar (amyloid) beta-structures, formed by association of high molecular weight intermediates.

  18. Conversion of non-fibrillar {beta}-sheet oligomers into amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptide aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Benseny-Cases, Nuria; Cocera, Mercedes; Cladera, Josep

    2007-10-05

    A{beta}(1-40) is one of the main components of the fibrils found in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. It is known that prior to the formation of amyloid fibrils in which the peptide adopts a well-ordered intermolecular {beta}-sheet structure, peptide monomers associate forming low and high molecular weight oligomers. These oligomers have been previously described in electron microscopy, AFM, and exclusion chromatography studies. Their specific secondary structures however, have not yet been well established. A major problem when comparing aggregation and secondary structure determinations in concentration-dependent processes such as amyloid aggregation is the different concentration range required in each type of experiment. In the present study we used the dye Thioflavin T (ThT), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron microscopy in order to structurally characterize the different aggregated species which form during the A{beta}(1-40) fibril formation process. A unique sample containing 90 {mu}M peptide was used. The results show that oligomeric species which form during the lag phase of the aggregation kinetics are a mixture of unordered, helical, and intermolecular non-fibrillar {beta}-structures. The number of oligomers and the amount of non-fibrillar {beta}-structures grows throughout the lag phase and during the elongation phase these non-fibrillar {beta}-structures are transformed into fibrillar (amyloid) {beta}-structures, formed by association of high molecular weight intermediates.

  19. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emily B; Williams, Angela; Heidel, Eric; Macy, Sallie; Kennel, Stephen J; Wall, Jonathan S

    2013-06-21

    In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as therapeutics for the treatment of amyloid diseases.

  20. Cupric-amyloid beta peptide complex stimulates oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Vitek, Michael P; Mason, Ronald P

    2004-02-01

    A growing body of evidence supports an important role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, a number of papers have shown a synergistic neurotoxicity of amyloid beta peptide and cupric ions. We hypothesized that complexes of cupric ions with neurotoxic amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) can stimulate copper-mediated free radical formation. We found that neurotoxic Abeta (1-42), Abeta (1-40), and Abeta (25-35) stimulated copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate, whereas nontoxic Abeta (40-1) did not. Formation of ascorbate free radical was significantly increased by Abeta (1-42) in the presence of ceruloplasmin. Once cupric ion is reduced to cuprous ion, it can be oxidized by oxygen to generate superoxide radical or it can react with hydrogen peroxide to form hydroxyl radical. Hydrogen peroxide greatly increased the oxidation of cyclic hydroxylamines and ascorbate by cupric-amyloid beta peptide complexes, implying redox cycling of copper ions. Using the spin-trapping technique, we have shown that toxic amyloid beta peptides led to a 4-fold increase in copper-mediated hydroxyl radical formation. We conclude that toxic Abeta peptides do indeed stimulate copper-mediated oxidation of ascorbate and generation of hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, cupric-amyloid beta peptide-stimulated free radical generation may be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Specific interactions between amyloidpeptide and curcumin derivatives: Ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Kadoya, Ryushi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Murakawa, Takeru; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, it is effective to inhibit the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases. However, because the secretases also play important roles to produce vital proteins for human body, inhibitors for the secretases may have side effects. To propose new agents for protecting the cleavage site of APP from the attacking of the γ-secretase, we have investigated here the specific interactions between a short APP peptide and curcumin derivatives, using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations.

  2. Benzalkonium chloride accelerates the formation of the amyloid fibrils of corneal dystrophy-associated peptides.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-08-30

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies.

  3. Benzalkonium Chloride Accelerates the Formation of the Amyloid Fibrils of Corneal Dystrophy-associated Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies. PMID:23861389

  4. An intracellular protein that binds amyloidpeptide and mediates neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Yan, Shi; Fu, Jin; Soto, Claudio; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Huaijie; Al-Mohanna, Futwan; Collison, Kate; Zhu, Aiping; Stern, Eric; Saido, Takaomi; Tohyama, Masaya; Ogawa, Satoshi; Roher, Alex; Stern, David

    1997-10-01

    Amyloid-β is a neurotoxic peptide which is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. It binds an intracellular polypeptide known as ERAB, thought to be a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme, which is expressed in normal tissues, but is overexpressed in neurons affected in Alzheimer's disease. ERAB immunoprecipitates with amyloid-β, and when cell cultures are exposed to amyloid-β, ERAB inside the cell is rapidly redistributed to the plasma membrane. The toxic effect of amyloid-β on these cells is prevented by blocking ERAB and is enhanced by overexpression of ERAB. By interacting with intracellular amyloid-β, ERAB may therefore contribute to the neuronal dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Amyloidpeptide aggregation and the influence of carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Hui, Xi; Guang-Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Soluble peptides or proteins can self-aggregate into insoluble, ordered amyloid fibrils under appropriate conditions. These amyloid aggregates are the hallmarks of several human diseases ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to systemic amyloidoses. In this review, we first introduce the common structural features of amyloid fibrils and the amyloid fibrillation kinetics determined from experimental studies. Then, we discuss the structural models of Alzheimer’s amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils derived from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. On the computational side, molecular dynamics simulations can provide atomic details of structures and the underlying oligomerization mechanisms. We finally summarize recent progress in atomistic simulation studies on the oligomerization of Aβ (including full-length Aβ and its fragments) and the influence of carbon nanoparticles. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274075 and 91227102).

  6. [The influence of dipole modifiers on the channel-forming activity of amyloid and amyloid-like peptides in lipid bilayers].

    PubMed

    Efimova, S S; Zakharov, V V; Ostroumova, O S

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the steady-state transmembrane current induced by amyloid and amyloid-like peptides in lipid bilayers in the presence of dipole modifiers. It has been shown that the addition of dipole modifier, phloretin, to the membrane bathing solutions leads to an increase in the multichannel activity of amyloid beta-peptide fragment 25-35, [Gly35]-amyloid beta-peptide fragment 25--35, prion protein fragment 106-126 and amyloid-like peptides myr-BASP1 (1--13), myr-BASP1(1--19) and GAP-43(1--40). We have found that the effect of phloretin is not the result of dipole potential changes due to adsorption of this modifier on the membrane. Using the various fragments of amyloid beta-peptide, presenilin, prion protein and neuronal proteins BASP1 and GAP-43 allowes to conclude that the steady-state peptide-induced transmembrane current in the case of addition of phloretin is due to the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged channel-forming agents and negatively charged dipole modifier. The results obtained by electron microscopy have demonstrated that this interaction increases degree of peptide oligomerization.

  7. Structural Transformation and Aggregation of cc-beta Peptides Into Amyloid Proto-fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Yuba; Steckmann, Timothy; Chapagain, Prem; Gerstman, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    The study of amyloid fibrils has important implications in understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. During the formation of amyloid fibrils, peptide polymers manifest fascinating physical behavior by undergoing complicated structural transformations. We examine the behavior of a small engineered peptide called cc-beta, that was designed to mimic the structural changes of the much larger, naturally occurring amyloid beta proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to uncover the underlying physics that is responsible for the large scale structural transformations. By using implicit solvent replica exchange MD simulations, we examined the behavior of 12 peptides, initially arranged in four different cc-beta alpha helix trimers. We observed various intermediate stages of aggregation, as well as an organized proto-fibril beta aggregate. We discuss the time evolution and the various interactions involved in the structural transformation.

  8. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We

  9. Solvent effects on self-assembly of beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C L; Murphy, R M

    1995-01-01

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) is the primary protein component of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Synthetic A beta spontaneously assembles into amyloid fibrils and is neurotoxic to cortical cultures. Neurotoxicity has been associated with the degree of peptide aggregation, yet the mechanism of assembly of A beta into amyloid fibrils is poorly understood. In this work, A beta was dissolved in several different solvents commonly used in neurotoxicity assays. In pure dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), A beta had no detectable beta-sheet content; in 0.1% trifluoroacetate, the peptide contained one-third beta-sheet; and in 35% acetonitrile/0.1% trifluoroacetate, A beta was two-thirds beta-sheet, equivalent to the fibrillar peptide in physiological buffer. Stock solutions of peptide were diluted into phosphate-buffered saline, and fibril growth was followed by static and dynamic light scattering. The growth rate was substantially faster when the peptide was predissolved in 35% acetonitrile/0.1% trifluoroacetate than in 0.1% trifluoroacetate, 10% DMSO, or 100% DMSO. Differences in growth rate were attributed to changes in the secondary structure of the peptide in the stock solvent. These results suggest that formation of an intermediate with a high beta-sheet content is a controlling step in A beta self-assembly. PMID:8527678

  10. Amyloid-beta peptide binds to microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B).

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-05-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. HIV Tat protein and amyloidpeptide form multifibrillar structures that cause neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hategan, Alina; Bianchet, Mario A; Steiner, Joseph; Karnaukhova, Elena; Masliah, Eliezer; Fields, Adam; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Dickens, Alex M; Haughey, Norman; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Nath, Avindra

    2017-02-20

    Deposition of amyloid-β plaques is increased in the brains of HIV-infected individuals, and the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein affects amyloidogenesis through several indirect mechanisms. Here, we investigated direct interactions between Tat and amyloidpeptide. Our in vitro studies showed that in the presence of Tat, uniform amyloid fibrils become double twisted fibrils and further form populations of thick unstructured filaments and aggregates. Specifically, Tat binding to the exterior surfaces of the Aβ fibrils increases β-sheet formation and lateral aggregation into thick multifibrillar structures, thus producing fibers with increased rigidity and mechanical resistance. Furthermore, Tat and Aβ aggregates in complex synergistically induced neurotoxicity both in vitro and in animal models. Increased rigidity and mechanical resistance of the amyloid-β-Tat complexes coupled with stronger adhesion due to the presence of Tat in the fibrils may account for increased damage, potentially through pore formation in membranes.

  12. Glutamate system, amyloid ß peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Revett, Timothy J; Baker, Glen B; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid ß peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid ß and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid ß production, but also amyloid ß can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness.

  13. AMYLOIDPEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  14. Competitive Mirror Image Phage Display Derived Peptide Modulates Amyloid Beta Aggregation and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Stephan; Klein, Antonia Nicole; Tusche, Markus; Schlosser, Christine; Elfgen, Anne; Brener, Oleksandr; Teunissen, Charlotte; Gremer, Lothar; Funke, Susanne Aileen; Kutzsche, Janine; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease is the most prominent type of dementia and currently no causative treatment is available. According to recent studies, oligomeric species of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide appear to be the most toxic Aβ assemblies. Aβ monomers, however, may be not toxic per se and may even have a neuroprotective role. Here we describe a competitive mirror image phage display procedure that allowed us to identify preferentially Aβ1–42 monomer binding and thereby stabilizing peptides, which destabilize and thereby eliminate toxic oligomer species. One of the peptides, called Mosd1 (monomer specific d-peptide 1), was characterized in more detail. Mosd1 abolished oligomers from a mixture of Aβ1–42 species, reduced Aβ1–42 toxicity in cell culture, and restored the physiological phenotype in neuronal cells stably transfected with the gene coding for human amyloid precursor protein. PMID:26840229

  15. Mechanism of cholesterol-assisted oligomeric channel formation by a short Alzheimer β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Lelièvre, Clément; Garmy, Nicolas; Fantini, Jacques; Chahinian, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides can self-organize into oligomeric ion channels with high neurotoxicity potential. Cholesterol is believed to play a key role in this process, but the molecular mechanisms linking cholesterol and amyloid channel formation have so far remained elusive. Here, we show that the short Aβ22-35 peptide, which encompasses the cholesterol-binding domain of Aβ, induces a specific increase of Ca(2+) levels in neural cells. This effect is neither observed in calcium-free medium nor in cholesterol-depleted cells, and is inhibited by zinc, a blocker of amyloid channel activity. Double mutations V24G/K28G and N27R/K28R in Aβ22-35 modify cholesterol binding and abrogate channel formation. Molecular dynamic simulations suggest that cholesterol induces a tilted α-helical topology of Aβ22-35. This facilitates the establishment of an inter-peptide hydrogen bond network involving Asn-27 and Lys-28, a key step in the octamerization of Aβ22-35 which proceeds gradually until the formation of a perfect annular channel in a phosphatidylcholine membrane. Overall, these data give mechanistic insights into the role of cholesterol in amyloid channel formation, opening up new therapeutic options for Alzheimer's disease. Aβ22-35 peptide, which encompasses the cholesterol binding domain of Aβ, induces a specific increase of Ca(2+) level in neural cells. Double mutations V24G/K28G and N27R/K28R modify cholesterol binding and abrogate channels formation. Molecular dynamic simulations suggest that cholesterol induces a tilted α-helical peptide topology facilitating the formation of annular octameric channels, as schematically shown in the graphic (with a hydrogen bond shown in green for two vicinal peptides). Overall, the data give insights into the role of cholesterol in amyloid channel formation and open up new therapeutic options for Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Amyloidpeptide active site: theoretical Cu K-edge XANES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaynikov, A. P.; Soldatov, M. A.; Streltsov, V.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    This article is dedicated to the local atomic structure analysis of the copper binding site in amyloidpeptide. Here we considered two possible structural models that were previously obtained by means of EXAFS analysis and density functional theory simulations. We present the calculations of Cu K-edge XANES spectra for both models and make comparison of these spectra with experiment.

  17. Interruptions between the triple helix peptides can promote the formation of amyloid-like fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Avanish; Hwang, Eileen; Brodsky, Barbara

    2010-03-01

    It has been reported that collagen can initiate or accelerate the formation of amyloid fibrils. Non-fibrillar collagen types have sites where the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequences are interrupted by non- Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequences, and we are investigating the hypothesis that some of these interruptions can promote amyloid formation. Our experimental data show that model peptides containing an 8 or 9 residue interruption sequence between (Gly-Pro-Hyp)n domains have a strong propensity for self association to form fibrous structures. A peptide containing only the 9-residue interruption sequence forms amyloid like fibrils with anti-parallel β sheet. Computational analysis predicts that 33 out of 374 naturally occurring human non-fibrillar collagen sequences within or between triple-helical sequences have significant cross-β aggregation potential, including the 8 and 9 residue sequences studied in peptides. Further studies are in progress to investigate whether a triple-helix peptide promotes amyloidogenesis and whether amyloid interferes with collagen fibrillogenesis.

  18. Ethyl ether fraction of Gastrodia elata Blume protects amyloid beta peptide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Ju; Moon, Kwang-Deog; Lee, Dong-Seok; Lee, Sang-Han

    2003-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Recently, it has been reported that Alzheimer's disease is associated with cell death in neuronal cells including the hippocampus. Amyloid beta-peptide stimulates neuronal cell death, but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In order to develop anti-dementia agents with potential therapeutic value, we examined the effect of the herbal compound Gastrodia elata Blume (GEB) on neuronal cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. The fractionation of GEB was carried out in various solvents. The hydroxyl radical scavenging effect of the ethyl ether fraction was more potent than any other fractions. In cells treated with amyloid beta-peptide, the neuroprotective effect of the ethyl ether, chloroform, and butanol fractions was 92, 44, and 39%, respectively, compared with control. Taken together, these results suggest that the ethyl ether fraction of GEB contains one or more compounds that dramatically reduce amyloid beta-peptide induced neuronal cell death in vitro.

  19. Energy landscape theory for Alzheimer's amyloid beta-peptide fibril elongation.

    PubMed

    Massi, F; Straub, J E

    2001-02-01

    Recent experiments on the kinetics of deposition and fibril elongation of the Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide on preexisting fibrils are analyzed. A mechanism is developed based on the dock-and-lock scheme recently proposed by Maggio and coworkers to organize their experimental observations of the kinetics of deposition of beta-peptide on preexisting amyloid fibrils and deposits. Our mechanism includes channels for (1) a one-step prion-like direct deposition on fibrils of activated monomeric peptide in solution, and (2) a two-step deposition of unactivated peptide on fibrils and subsequent reorganization of the peptide-fibril complex. In this way, the mechanism and implied "energy landscape" unify a number of schemes proposed to describe the process of fibril elongation. This beta-amyloid landscape mechanism (beta ALM) is found to be in good agreement with existing experimental data. A number of experimental tests of the mechanism are proposed. The mechanism leads to a clear definition of overall equilibrium or rate constants in terms of the energetics of the elementary underlying processes. Analysis of existing experimental data suggests that fibril elongation occurs through a two-step mechanism of nonspecific peptide absorption and reorganization. The mechanism predicts a turnover in the rate of fibril elongation as a function of temperature and denaturant concentration. Proteins 2001;42:217-229.

  20. Structural and Thermodynamic Properties of AmyloidPeptides: Impact of Fragment Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, T.; Wise-Scira, O.; Coskuner, O.

    2010-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease whose physiological characteristics include the accumulation of amyloid-containing deposits in the brain and consequent synapse and neuron loss. Unfortunately, most widely used drugs for the treatment can palliate the outer symptoms but cannot cure the disease itself. Hence, developing a new drug that can cure it. Most recently, the ``early aggregation and monomer'' hypothesis has become popular and a few drugs have been developed based on this hypothesis. Detailed understanding of the amyloidpeptide structure can better help us to determine more effective treatment strategies; indeed, the structure of Amyloid has been studied extensively employing experimental and theoretical tools. Nevertheless, those studies have employed different fragment sizes of Amyloid and characterized its conformational nature in different media. Thus, the structural properties might be different from each other and provide a reason for the existing debates in the literature. Here, we performed all-atom MD simulations and present the structural and thermodynamic properties of Aβ1-16, Aβ1-28, and Aβ1-42 in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. Our studies show that the overall structures, secondary structures, and the calculated thermodynamic properties change with increasing peptide size. In addition, we find that the structural properties of those peptides are different from each other in the gas phase and in aqueous solution.

  1. Dynamics of the formation of a hydrogel by a pathogenic amyloid peptide: islet amyloid polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Létitia; Lee, Chiu Fan; Hodder, Peter; Hawkins, Nick; Vaux, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic degenerative diseases result from aggregation of misfolded polypeptides to form amyloids. Many amyloidogenic polypeptides are surfactants and their assembly can be catalysed by hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (an air-water interface in-vitro or membranes in-vivo). We recently demonstrated the specificity of surface-induced amyloidogenesis but the mechanisms of amyloidogenesis and more specifically of adsorption at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces remain poorly understood. Thus, it is critical to determine how amyloidogenic polypeptides behave at interfaces. Here we used surface tensiometry, rheology and electron microscopy to demonstrate the complex dynamics of gelation by full-length human islet amyloid polypeptide (involved in type II diabetes) both in the bulk solution and at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces (air-water interface and phospholipids). We show that the hydrogel consists of a 3D supramolecular network of fibrils. We also assessed the role of solvation and dissected the evolution over time of the assembly processes. Amyloid gelation could have important pathological consequences for membrane integrity and cellular functions. PMID:27535008

  2. Reduced aggregation and cytotoxicity of amyloid peptides by graphene oxide/gold nanocomposites prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Wang, Xinhuan; Yu, Ning; Yang, Lin; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2014-11-12

    A novel and convenient method to synthesize the nanocomposites combining graphene oxides (GO) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is reported and their applications to modulate amyloid peptide aggregation are demonstrated. The nanocomposites produced by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in water show good biocompatibility and solubility. The reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides by the nanocomposites is confirmed by Thioflavin T fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. The cell viability experiments reveals that the presence of the nanocomposites can significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of the amyloid peptides. Furthermore, the depolymerization of peptide fibrils and inhibition of their cellular cytotoxicity by GO/AuNPs is also observed. These observations suggest that the nanocomposites combining GO and AuNPs have a great potential for designing new therapeutic agents and are promising for future treatment of amyloid-related diseases.

  3. Nuclear translocation uncovers the amyloid peptide Aβ42 as a regulator of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Barucker, Christian; Harmeier, Anja; Weiske, Joerg; Fauler, Beatrix; Albring, Kai Frederik; Prokop, Stefan; Hildebrand, Peter; Lurz, Rudi; Heppner, Frank L; Huber, Otmar; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2014-07-18

    Although soluble species of the amyloidpeptide Aβ42 correlate with disease symptoms in Alzheimer disease, little is known about the biological activities of amyloid-β (Aβ). Here, we show that Aβ peptides varying in lengths from 38 to 43 amino acids are internalized by cultured neuroblastoma cells and can be found in the nucleus. By three independent methods, we demonstrate direct detection of nuclear Aβ42 as follows: (i) biochemical analysis of nuclear fractions; (ii) detection of biotin-labeled Aβ in living cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy; and (iii) transmission electron microscopy of Aβ in cultured cells, as well as brain tissue of wild-type and transgenic APPPS1 mice (overexpression of amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 with Swedish and L166P mutations, respectively). Also, this study details a novel role for Aβ42 in nuclear signaling, distinct from the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Aβ42 specifically interacts as a repressor of gene transcription with LRP1 and KAI1 promoters. By quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed that mRNA levels of the examined candidate genes were exclusively decreased by the potentially neurotoxic Aβ42 wild-type peptide. Shorter peptides (Aβ38 or Aβ40) and other longer peptides (nontoxic Aβ42 G33A substitution or Aβ43) did not affect mRNA levels. Overall, our data indicate that the nuclear translocation of Aβ42 impacts gene regulation, and deleterious effects of Aβ42 in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis may be influenced by altering the expression profiles of disease-modifying genes.

  4. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs) and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells). Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study "Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides" [1].

  5. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloidpeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  6. Superhydrophobic Surfaces Boost Fibril Self-Assembly of Amyloid β Peptides.

    PubMed

    Accardo, Angelo; Shalabaeva, Victoria; Di Cola, Emanuela; Burghammer, Manfred; Krahne, Roman; Riekel, Christian; Dante, Silvia

    2015-09-23

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are the main constituents of Alzheimer's amyloid plaques in the brain. Here we report how the unique microfluidic flows exerted by droplets sitting on superhydrophobic surfaces can influence the aggregation mechanisms of several Aβ fragments by boosting their fibril self-assembly. Aβ(25-35), Aβ(1-40), and Aβ(12-28) were dried both on flat hydrophilic surfaces (contact angle (CA) = 37.3°) and on nanostructured superhydrophobic ones (CA = 175.8°). By embedding nanoroughened surfaces on top of highly X-ray transparent Si3N4 membranes, it was possible to probe the solid residues by raster-scan synchrotron radiation X-ray microdiffraction (μXRD). As compared to residues obtained on flat Si3N4 membranes, a general enhancement of fibrillar material was detected for all Aβ fragments dried on superhydrophobic surfaces, with a particular emphasis on the shorter ones. Indeed, both Aβ(25-35) and Aβ(12-28) showed a marked crystalline cross-β phase with varying fiber textures. The homogeneous evaporation rate provided by these nanostructured supports, and the possibility to use transparent membranes, can open a wide range of in situ X-ray and spectroscopic characterizations of amyloidal peptides involved in neurodegenerative diseases and for the fabrication of amyloid-based nanodevices.

  7. Direct electrochemical and AFM detection of amyloidpeptide aggregation on basal plane HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Paula; Xu, Meng; Zhang, Min; Zhou, Ting; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Ferapontova, Elena E.

    2014-06-01

    Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation.Amyloidogenesis is associated with more than 30 human diseases, including Alzheimer's which is related to aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Here, consecutive stages of Aβ42 aggregation and amyloid fibril formation were followed electrochemically via oxidation of tyrosines in Aβ42 adsorbed on the basal plane graphite electrode and directly correlated with Aβ42 morphological changes observed by atomic force microscopy of the same substrate. The results offer new tools for analysis of mechanisms of Aβ aggregation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details: procedures for Aβ42 aggregation and electrode modification, DPV/AFM measurements and analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02413c

  8. Exploring the early steps of aggregation of amyloid-forming peptide KFFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    It has been shown recently that even a tetrapeptide can form amyloid fibrils sharing all the characteristics of amyloid fibrils built from large proteins. Recent experimental studies also suggest that the toxicity observed in several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is not only related to the mature fibrils themselves, but also to the soluble oligomers formed early in the process of fibrillogenesis. This raises the interest in studying the early steps of the aggregation process. Although fibril formation follows the nucleation-condensation process, characterized by the presence of lag phase, the exact pathways remain to be determined. In this study, we used the activation-relaxation technique and a generic energy model to explore the process of self-assembly and the structures of the resulting aggregates of eight KFFE peptides. Our simulations show, starting from different states with a preformed antiparallel dimer, that eight chains can self-assemble to adopt, with various orientations, four possible distant oligomeric well-aligned structures of similar energy. Two of these structures show a double-layer β-sheet organization, in agreement with the structure of amyloid fibrils as observed by x-ray diffraction; another two are mixtures of dimers and trimers. Our results also suggest that octamers are likely to be below the critical size for nucleation of amyloid fibrils for small peptides.

  9. Amyloidpeptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  10. AmyloidPeptide Binds to Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit 1

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1–42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1–42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1–42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1–42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD. PMID:22927926

  11. Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence supports a role for brain gangliosides in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Recently we deciphered the ganglioside-recognition code controlling specific ganglioside binding to Alzheimer's β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) peptide and Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein. Cracking this code allowed us to engineer a short chimeric Aβ/α-synuclein peptide that recognizes all brain gangliosides. Here we show that ganglioside-deprived neural cells do no longer sustain the formation of zinc-sensitive amyloid pore channels induced by either Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein, as assessed by single-cell Ca(2+) fluorescence microscopy. Thus, amyloid channel formation, now considered a key step in neurodegeneration, is a ganglioside-dependent process. Nanomolar concentrations of chimeric peptide competitively inhibited amyloid pore formation induced by Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein in cultured neural cells. Moreover, this peptide abrogated the intracellular calcium increases induced by Parkinson's-associated mutant forms of α-synuclein (A30P, E46K and A53T). The chimeric peptide also prevented the deleterious effects of Aβ1-42 on synaptic vesicle trafficking and decreased the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spontaneous activity in rat hippocampal slices. Taken together, these data show that the chimeric peptide has broad anti-amyloid pore activity, suggesting that a common therapeutic strategy based on the prevention of amyloid-ganglioside interactions is a reachable goal for both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  12. New peptide inhibitors modulate the self-assembly of islet amyloid polypeptide residues 11-20 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yexuan; Yu, Lanlan; Yang, Ran; Ma, Chuanguo; Qu, Lingbo; Harrington, Peter de B

    2017-03-11

    The structural transition and misfolding of human islet amyloid polypeptide may cause a common metabolic disease Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Seventeen peptides have been synthesized, possessing different lengths, compositions, and peptide conformation. In this study, the mechanism of these peptides on inhibiting the formation of hIAPP11-20 amyloid fibrils was investigated using a conventional ThT fluorescence assay and microscale thermophoresis. The results showed that short peptides AT, SA, RF, KS, KT and KN, and cyclic peptides cyclic-KS, cyclic-KT and cyclic-KN displayed considerable inhibitory effect on hIAPP11-20 fibril formation and a strong affinity for hIAPP11-20. The detailed investigation indicated that the phenylalanine residue and some special peptide composition significantly inhibit amyloid formation. The peptide conformation of the designed peptide inhibitors may also play an important role. Microscale thermophoresis quantified the binding affinities between hIAPP11-20 and the peptides; and revealed that high affinity binding more likely leads to inhibiting fibril formation of hIAPP11-20 and vice versa, which is in accordance with the results from the ThT assays. These findings suggest a feasible model of peptide inhibitor design for inhibiting amyloid formation. In addition, microscale thermophoresis was proven as a promising rapid method for preliminarily screening inhibitors of hIAPP11-20.

  13. All-atom molecular dynamics studies of the full-length β-amyloid peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttmann, Edgar; Fels, Gregor

    2006-03-01

    β-Amyloid peptides are believed to play an essential role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), due to their sedimentation in the form of β-amyloid aggregates in the brain of AD-patients, and the in vitro neurotoxicity of oligomeric aggregates. The monomeric peptides come in different lengths of 39-43 residues, of which the 42 alloform seems to be most strongly associated with AD-symptoms. Structural information on these peptides to date comes from NMR studies in acidic solutions, organic solvents, or on shorter fragments of the peptide. In addition X-ray and solid-state NMR investigations of amyloid fibrils yield insight into the structure of the final aggregate and therefore define the endpoint of any conformational change of an Aβ-monomer along the aggregation process. The conformational changes necessary to connect the experimentally known conformations are not yet understood and this process is an active field of research. In this paper, we report results from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on experimental data from four different peptides of 40 amino acids and two peptides consisting of 42 amino acids. The simulations allow for the analysis of intramolecular interactions and the role of structural features. In particular, they show the appearance of β-turn in the region between amino acid 21 and 33, forming a hook-like shape as it is known to exist in the fibrillar Aβ-structures. This folding does not depend on the formation of a salt bridge between Asp-23 and Lys-28 but requires the Aβ(1-42) as such structure was not observed in the shorter system Aβ(1-40).

  14. Amyloidogenic amyloid-β-peptide variants induce microbial agglutination and exert antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Philipp; Condic, Mateja; Herrmann, Martin; Oberstein, Timo Jan; Scharin-Mehlmann, Marina; Gilbert, Daniel F.; Friedrich, Oliver; Grömer, Teja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Lang, Roland; Maler, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are the main components of the plaques found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. However, Aβ peptides are also detectable in secretory compartments and peripheral blood contains a complex mixture of more than 40 different modified and/or N- and C-terminally truncated Aβ peptides. Recently, anti-infective properties of Aβ peptides have been reported. Here, we investigated the interaction of Aβ peptides of different lengths with various bacterial strains and the yeast Candida albicans. The amyloidogenic peptides Aβ1-42, Aβ2-42, and Aβ3p-42 but not the non-amyloidogenic peptides Aβ1-40 and Aβ2-40 bound to microbial surfaces. As observed by immunocytochemistry, scanning electron microscopy and Gram staining, treatment of several bacterial strains and Candida albicans with Aβ peptide variants ending at position 42 (Aβx-42) caused the formation of large agglutinates. These aggregates were not detected after incubation with Aβx-40. Furthermore, Aβx-42 exerted an antimicrobial activity on all tested pathogens, killing up to 80% of microorganisms within 6 h. Aβ1-40 only had a moderate antimicrobial activity against C. albicans. Agglutination of Aβ1-42 was accelerated in the presence of microorganisms. These data demonstrate that the amyloidogenic Aβx-42 variants have antimicrobial activity and may therefore act as antimicrobial peptides in the immune system. PMID:27624303

  15. An infrared spectroscopy approach to follow β-sheet formation in peptide amyloid assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongcheol; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Warnke, Stephan; Huang, Xing; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Bowers, Michael T.; von Helden, Gert; Pagel, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Amyloidogenic peptides and proteins play a crucial role in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These proteins undergo a spontaneous transition from a soluble, often partially folded form, into insoluble amyloid fibrils that are rich in β-sheets. Increasing evidence suggests that highly dynamic, polydisperse folding intermediates, which occur during fibril formation, are the toxic species in the amyloid-related diseases. Traditional condensed-phase methods are of limited use for characterizing these states because they typically only provide ensemble averages rather than information about individual oligomers. Here we report the first direct secondary-structure analysis of individual amyloid intermediates using a combination of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and gas-phase infrared spectroscopy. Our data reveal that oligomers of the fibril-forming peptide segments VEALYL and YVEALL, which consist of 4-9 peptide strands, can contain a significant amount of β-sheet. In addition, our data show that the more-extended variants of each oligomer generally exhibit increased β-sheet content.

  16. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Streltsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloidpeptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloidpeptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloidpeptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  17. Analysis of amino-terminal variants of amyloidpeptides by capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Haußmann, Ute; Jahn, Olaf; Linning, Philipp; Janßen, Christin; Liepold, Thomas; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Bauer, Chris; Schuchhardt, Johannes; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Klafki, Hans; Wiltfang, Jens

    2013-09-03

    Here we present a novel assay for the separation and detection of amino-terminal amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide variants by capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) immunoassay. Specific amino-terminally truncated Aβ peptides appear to be generated by β-secretase (BACE1)-independent mechanisms and have previously been observed in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after BACE1 inhibitor treatment in an animal model. CIEF immunoassay sensitivity is sufficient to detect total Aβ in CSF without preconcentration. To analyze low-abundance amino-terminally truncated Aβ peptides from cell culture supernatants, we developed a CIEF-compatible immunoprecipitation protocol, allowing for selective elution of Aβ peptides with very low background. CIEF immunoassay and immunoprecipitation mass spectrometry analysis identified peptides starting at residue Arg(5) as the main amino-terminal Aβ variants produced in the presence of tripartite BACE1 inhibitor in our cell culture model. The CIEF immunoassay allows for robust relative quantification of Aβ peptide patterns in biological samples. To assess the future possibility of absolute quantification, we have prepared the Aβ peptides Aβ(x-10), Aβ(x-16), and Aβ(5-38(D23S)) by using solid phase peptide synthesis as internal standards for the CIEF immunoassay.

  18. Inhibition of the Electrostatic Interaction between β -amyloid Peptide and Membranes Prevents β -amyloid-induced Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, C.; Terzi, E.; Hauser, N.; Jakob-Rotne, R.; Seelig, J.; Kemp, J. A.

    1997-08-01

    The accumulation of β -amyloid peptides (Aβ ) into senile plaques is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease. Aggregated Aβ is toxic to cells in culture and this has been considered to be the cause of neurodegeneration that occurs in the Alzheimer disease brain. The discovery of compounds that prevent Aβ toxicity may lead to a better understanding of the processes involved and ultimately to possible therapeutic drugs. Low nanomolar concentrations of Aβ 1-42 and the toxic fragment Aβ 25-35 have been demonstrated to render cells more sensitive to subsequent insults as manifested by an increased sensitivity to formazan crystals following MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction. Formation of the toxic β -sheet conformation by Aβ peptides is increased by negatively charged membranes. Here we demonstrate that phloretin and exifone, dipolar compounds that decrease the effective negative charge of membranes, prevent association of Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 25-35 to negatively charged lipid vesicles and Aβ induced cell toxicity. These results suggest that Aβ toxicity is mediated through a nonspecific physicochemical interaction with cell membranes.

  19. Amyloid beta peptide 22-35 induces a negative inotropic effect on isolated rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Yousefirad, Neda; Kaygısız, Ziya; Aydın, Yasemin

    2016-01-01

    Evidences indicate that deposition of amyloid beta peptides (Aβs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Aβs may influence cardiovascular system and ileum contractions. But the effect of amyloid beta peptide 22-35 (Aβ22-35) on cardiovascular functions and contractions of ileum has not been studied. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the possible effects of this peptide on isolated rat heart and ileum smooth muscle. Langendorff-perfused rat heart preparations were established. The hearts were perfused under constant pressure (60 mmHg) with modified Krebs-Henseleit solution. Aβ22-35 at doses of 1, 10 and 100 nM significantly decreased left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP; an index of cardiac contractility) and maximal rate of pressure development of left ventricle (+dP/dtmax; another index of cardiac contractility). This peptide at doses studied had no significant effect on heart rate, coronary flow, monophasic action potential amplitude (MAPamp), MAP duration at 90% repolarization (MAP90) and ileum contractions. We suggest that Aβ22-35 exerts a negative inotropism on isolated rat hearts with unchanged heart rate, coronary flow, MAPamp, MAP90 and smooth muscle contractility of ileum. PMID:28078053

  20. "Clicked" sugar-curcumin conjugate: modulator of amyloid-β and tau peptide aggregation at ultralow concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dolai, Sukanta; Shi, Wei; Corbo, Christopher; Sun, Chong; Averick, Saadyah; Obeysekera, Dinali; Farid, Mina; Alonso, Alejandra; Banerjee, Probal; Raja, Krishnaswami

    2011-12-21

    The synthesis of a water/plasma soluble, noncytotoxic, "clicked" sugar-derivative of curcumin with amplified bioefficacy in modulating amyloid-β and tau peptide aggregation is presented. Curcumin inhibits amyloid-β and tau peptide aggregation at micromolar concentrations; the sugar-curcumin conjugate inhibits Aβ and tau peptide aggregation at concentrations as low as 8 nM and 0.1 nM, respectively. In comparison to curcumin, this conveniently synthesized Alzheimer's drug candidate is a more powerful antioxidant.

  1. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    SciTech Connect

    García-González, Victor; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  2. Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide modulators and other current treatment strategies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD)

    PubMed Central

    Lukiw, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common, progressive neurological disorder whose incidence is reaching epidemic proportions. The prevailing ‘amyloid cascade hypothesis’, which maintains that the aberrant proteolysis of beta-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) into neurotoxic amyloid beta (Aβ)-peptides is central to the etiopathology of AD, continues to dominate pharmacological approaches to the clinical management of this insidious disorder. This review is a compilation and update on current pharmacological strategies designed to down-regulate Aβ42-peptide generation in an effort to ameliorate the tragedy of AD. Areas Covered This review utilized on-line data searches at various open online-access websites including the Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer Research Forum; individual drug company databases; the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Medline; Pharmaprojects database; Scopus; inter-University research communications and unpublished research data. Expert Opinion Aβ immunization-, anti-acetylcholinesterase-, β-secretase-, chelation-, γ-secretase-, N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist-, statin-based and other strategies to modulate βAPP processing have dominated pharmacological approaches directed against AD-type neurodegenerative pathology. Cumulative clinical results of these efforts remain extremely disappointing, and have had little overall impact on the clinical management of AD. While a number of novel approaches are in consideration and development, to date there is still no effective treatment or cure for this expanding healthcare concern. PMID:22439907

  3. Measurement of beta-amyloid peptides in specific cells using a photo thin-film transistor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Beom; Chae, Cheol-Joo; Shin, Hye-Rim; Song, Ki-Bong

    2012-01-06

    The existence of beta-amyloid [Aβ] peptides in the brain has been regarded as the most archetypal biomarker of Alzheimer's disease [AD]. Recently, an early clinical diagnosis has been considered a great importance in identifying people who are at high risk of AD. However, no microscale electronic sensing devices for the detection of Aβ peptides have been developed yet. In this study, we propose an effective method to evaluate a small quantity of Aβ peptides labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC] using a photosensitive field-effect transistor [p-FET] with an on-chip single-layer optical filter. To accurately evaluate the quantity of Aβ peptides within the cells cultured on the p-FET device, we measured the photocurrents which resulted from the FITC-conjugated Aβ peptides expressed from the cells and measured the number of photons of the fluorochrome in the cells using a photomultiplier tube. Thus, we evaluated the correlation between the generated photocurrents and the number of emitted photons. We also evaluated the correlation between the number of emitted photons and the amount of FITC by measuring the FITC volume using AFM. Finally, we estimated the quantity of Aβ peptides of the cells placed on the p-FET sensing area on the basis of the binding ratio between FITC molecules and Aβ peptides.

  4. p75NTR antagonistic cyclic peptide decreases the size of beta amyloid-induced brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L; Stewart, Kenneth B; Qureshi, Nazer H; Kowall, Neil W; Gilchrest, Barbara A

    2008-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75(NTR) antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Abeta and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75(NTR). In vivo injections of Abeta into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Abeta and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Abeta to p75(NTR) may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  5. p75NTR Antagonistic Cyclic Peptide Decreases the Size of β Amyloid-Induced Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L.; Stewart, Kenneth B.; Qureshi, Nazer H.; Kowall, Neil W.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75NTR antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Aβ and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75NTR. In vivo injections of Aβ into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Aβ and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Aβ to p75NTR may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18807174

  6. β-Amyloid: the key peptide in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Yan-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid β peptide (Aβ) is a critical initiator that triggers the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) via accumulation and aggregation, of which the process may be caused by Aβ overproduction or perturbation clearance. Aβ is generated from amyloid precursor protein through sequential cleavage of β- and γ-secretases while Aβ removal is dependent on the proteolysis and lysosome degradation system. Here, we overviewed the biogenesis and toxicity of Aβ as well as the regulation of Aβ production and clearance. Moreover, we also summarized the animal models correlated with Aβ that are essential in AD research. In addition, we discussed current immunotherapeutic approaches targeting Aβ to give some clues for exploring the more potentially efficient drugs for treatment of AD. PMID:26483691

  7. A potential function for neuronal exosomes: sequestering intracerebral amyloidpeptide.

    PubMed

    Yuyama, Kohei; Sun, Hui; Usuki, Seigo; Sakai, Shota; Hanamatsu, Hisatoshi; Mioka, Tetsuo; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Okada, Megumi; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Fujitani, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-02

    Elevated amyloidpeptide (Aβ) in brain contributes to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. We demonstrated the presence of exosome-associated Aβ in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cynomolgus monkeys and APP transgenic mice. The levels of exosome-associated Aβ notably decreased in the CSF of aging animals. We also determined that neuronal exosomes, but not glial exosomes, had abundant glycosphingolipids and could capture Aβ. Infusion of neuronal exosomes into brains of APP transgenic mice decreased Aβ and amyloid depositions, similarly to what reported previously on neuroblastoma-derived exosomes. These findings highlight the role of neuronal exosomes in Aβ clearance, and suggest that their downregulation might relate to Aβ accumulation and, ultimately, the development of AD pathology.

  8. The Structure-Activity Relationship of Glycosaminoglycans and Their Analogues with β-Amyloid Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Jin, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a serious neurodegenerative disorder. β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) aggregation is believed to be the major cause of the disease. The process of Aβ aggregation can be enhanced by sulfated glycosaminoglycans. However, cell experiments have shown that sulfated glycosaminoglycan oligosaccharides or analogues may have significant neuroprotective properties and could inhibit the aggregation by competitive inhibition. The length and species of oligosaccharides or analogues can inhibit the toxicity of Aβ by inducing conformational changes of proteins in different manners. This review presents the conformational changes of Aβ in the presence of glycosaminoglycan, glycosaminoglycan oligosaccharides and analogues. The review might be helpful to comprehend the mechanism of β-amyloid fibrillations and the aggregation process.

  9. Separation of presenilin function in amyloid β-peptide generation and endoproteolysis of Notch

    PubMed Central

    Kulic, Luka; Walter, Jochen; Multhaup, Gerd; Teplow, David B.; Baumeister, Ralf; Romig, Helmut; Capell, Anja; Steiner, Harald; Haass, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Most of the genetically inherited Alzheimer's disease cases are caused by mutations in the presenilin genes, PS1 and PS2. PS mutations result in the enhanced production of the highly amyloidogenic 42/43 amino acid variant of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). We have introduced arbitrary mutations at position 286 of PS1, where a naturally occurring PS1 mutation has been described (L286V). Introduction of charged amino acids (L286E or L286R) resulted in an increase of Aβ42/43 production, which reached almost twice the level of the naturally occurring PS1 mutation. Although pathological Aβ production was increased, endoproteolysis of Notch and nuclear transport of its cytoplasmic domain was significantly inhibited. These results demonstrate that the biological function of PS proteins in the endoproteolysis of β-amyloid precursor protein and Notch can be separated. PMID:10811883

  10. Hydrodynamic effects on β-amyloid (16-22) peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chiricotto, Mara; Melchionna, Simone; Derreumaux, Philippe; Sterpone, Fabio

    2016-07-21

    Computer simulations based on simplified representations are routinely used to explore the early steps of amyloid aggregation. However, when protein models with implicit solvent are employed, these simulations miss the effect of solvent induced correlations on the aggregation kinetics and lifetimes of metastable states. In this work, we apply the multi-scale Lattice Boltzmann Molecular Dynamics technique (LBMD) to investigate the initial aggregation phases of the amyloid Aβ16-22 peptide. LBMD includes naturally hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) via a kinetic on-lattice representation of the fluid kinetics. The peptides are represented by the flexible OPEP coarse-grained force field. First, we have tuned the essential parameters that control the coupling between the molecular and fluid evolutions in order to reproduce the experimental diffusivity of elementary species. The method is then deployed to investigate the effect of HIs on the aggregation of 100 and 1000 Aβ16-22 peptides. We show that HIs clearly impact the aggregation process and the fluctuations of the oligomer sizes by favouring the fusion and exchange dynamics of oligomers between aggregates. HIs also guide the growth of the leading largest cluster. For the 100 Aβ16-22 peptide system, the simulation of ∼300 ns allowed us to observe the transition from ellipsoidal assemblies to an elongated and slightly twisted aggregate involving almost the totality of the peptides. For the 1000 Aβ16-22 peptides, a system of unprecedented size at quasi-atomistic resolution, we were able to explore a branched disordered fibril-like structure that has never been described by other computer simulations, but has been observed experimentally.

  11. Hydrodynamic effects on β-amyloid (16-22) peptide aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiricotto, Mara; Melchionna, Simone; Derreumaux, Philippe; Sterpone, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    Computer simulations based on simplified representations are routinely used to explore the early steps of amyloid aggregation. However, when protein models with implicit solvent are employed, these simulations miss the effect of solvent induced correlations on the aggregation kinetics and lifetimes of metastable states. In this work, we apply the multi-scale Lattice Boltzmann Molecular Dynamics technique (LBMD) to investigate the initial aggregation phases of the amyloid Aβ16-22 peptide. LBMD includes naturally hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) via a kinetic on-lattice representation of the fluid kinetics. The peptides are represented by the flexible OPEP coarse-grained force field. First, we have tuned the essential parameters that control the coupling between the molecular and fluid evolutions in order to reproduce the experimental diffusivity of elementary species. The method is then deployed to investigate the effect of HIs on the aggregation of 100 and 1000 Aβ16-22 peptides. We show that HIs clearly impact the aggregation process and the fluctuations of the oligomer sizes by favouring the fusion and exchange dynamics of oligomers between aggregates. HIs also guide the growth of the leading largest cluster. For the 100 Aβ16-22 peptide system, the simulation of ˜300 ns allowed us to observe the transition from ellipsoidal assemblies to an elongated and slightly twisted aggregate involving almost the totality of the peptides. For the 1000 Aβ16-22 peptides, a system of unprecedented size at quasi-atomistic resolution, we were able to explore a branched disordered fibril-like structure that has never been described by other computer simulations, but has been observed experimentally.

  12. Cu(2+) affects amyloid-β (1-42) aggregation by increasing peptide-peptide binding forces.

    PubMed

    Hane, Francis; Tran, Gary; Attwood, Simon J; Leonenko, Zoya

    2013-01-01

    The link between metals, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its implicated protein, amyloid-β (Aβ), is complex and highly studied. AD is believed to occur as a result of the misfolding and aggregation of Aβ. The dyshomeostasis of metal ions and their propensity to interact with Aβ has also been implicated in AD. In this work, we use single molecule atomic force spectroscopy to measure the rupture force required to dissociate two Aβ (1-42) peptides in the presence of copper ions, Cu(2+). In addition, we use atomic force microscopy to resolve the aggregation of Aβ formed. Previous research has shown that metal ions decrease the lag time associated with Aβ aggregation. We show that with the addition of copper ions the unbinding force increases notably. This suggests that the reduction of lag time associated with Aβ aggregation occurs on a single molecule level as a result of an increase in binding forces during the very initial interactions between two Aβ peptides. We attribute these results to copper ions acting as a bridge between the two peptide molecules, increasing the stability of the peptide-peptide complex.

  13. Specific interactions between amyloidpeptides in an amyloid-β hexamer with three-fold symmetry: Ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Tomioka, Shogo; Kadoya, Ryushi; Shimamura, Kanako; Okamoto, Akisumi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-03-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) aggregates in brain contributes to the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent structural analysis for the tissue obtained from AD patients revealed that Aβ aggregates have a single structure with three-fold symmetry. To explain why this structure possesses significant stability, we here investigated the specific interactions between Aβ peptides in the aggregate, using ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations. The results indicate that the interactions between the Aβ peptides of the stacked Aβ pair are stronger than those between the Aβ peptides of the trimer with three-fold symmetry and that the charged amino-acids are important.

  14. Antagonistic effects of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzymes 1 and 2 on beta-amyloid peptide production in cells.

    PubMed

    Basi, Guriqbal; Frigon, Normand; Barbour, Robin; Doan, Tam; Gordon, Grace; McConlogue, Lisa; Sinha, Sukanto; Zeller, Michelle

    2003-08-22

    The deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in the brain is a pathologic feature of Alzheimer's disease. The beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), an integral membrane aspartyl protease responsible for cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) at the beta-site, promotes A beta production. A second integral membrane aspartyl protease related to BACE1, referred to as beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 2 (BACE2) has also been demonstrated to cleave APP at the beta-cleavage site in transfected cells. The role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production remains unresolved. We investigated the role of endogenous BACE2 in A beta production in cells by selective inactivation of its transcripts using RNA interference. We are able to reduce steady state levels for mRNA for each enzyme by >85%, and protein amounts by 88-94% in cells. Selective inactivation of BACE1 by RNA interference results in decreased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells, as expected. Selective inactivation of BACE2 by RNAi results in increased beta-cleaved secreted APP and A beta peptide secretion from cells. Simultaneous targeting of both enzymes by RNA interference does not have any net effect on A beta released from cells. Our observations of changes in APP metabolism and A beta are consistent with a role of BACE2 in suppressing A beta production in cells that co-express both enzymes.

  15. Three-dimensional structures of the amyloid beta peptide (25-35) in membrane-mimicking environment.

    PubMed

    Kohno, T; Kobayashi, K; Maeda, T; Sato, K; Takashima, A

    1996-12-17

    The three-dimensional structure of amyloid beta peptide (25-35), which has neurotoxic activity, in lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles was determined by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy with simulated annealing calculations. A total of 20 converged amyloid beta peptide structures were obtained on the basis of 110 experimental constraints, including 106 distance constraints reduced from the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) connectivities and four torsion angle (phi) constraints. The atomic root mean square difference about averaged coordinates is 1.04 +/- 0.25 A for the backbone atoms (N, C alpha, C) and 1.39 +/- 0.27 A for all heavy atoms of the entire peptide. The molecular structure of amyloid beta peptide in membrane-mimicking environment is composed of a short alpha helix in the C terminal position. The three residues from the N-terminus are disordered, but the remaining eight C-terminal residues are well-ordered, which is supported by the RMSD values of the C-terminal region, Lys28-Leu34. In this region, the RMS differences from averaged coordinates are 0.26 +/- 0.11 A for the backbone atoms (N, C alpha, C) and 0.77 +/- 0.21 A for all heavy atoms, which is very low compared with those for the entire peptide. The four amino acid residues from the N-terminus are hydrophilic and the other seven amino acid residues in C-terminus are hydrophobic. So, our results show that the C-terminal region of amyloid beta peptide (25-35) is buried in the membrane and assumes alpha-helical structure, whereas the N-terminal region is exposed to the solvent with a flexible structure. This structure is very similar to membrane-mediated structure of substance P previously reported. The three-dimensional structure of a non-neurotoxic mutant of amyloid beta peptide (25-35), where Asn27 is replaced by Ala, in lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles was also determined. The structure is similar to that of the wild type amyloid beta peptide (25-35) in the C-terminal region, but the N

  16. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE)--amyloid-beta-peptide complexes in Alzheimer's disease. the Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Urra, Soledad; Colombres, Marcela

    2004-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by selective neuronal cell death, which is probably caused by amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) oligomers and fibrils. We have found that acetylcholinesterase (AChE), a senile plaque component, increases amyloid fibril assembly with the formation of highly toxic complexes (Abeta-AChE). The neurotoxic effect induced by Abeta-AChE complexes was higher than that induced by the Abeta peptide alone as shown both in vitro (hippocampal neurons) and in vivo (rats injected with Abeta peptide in the dorsal hippocampus). Interestingly, treatment with Abeta-AChE complexes decreases the cytoplasmic beta-catenin level, a key component of Wnt signaling. Conversely, the activation of this signaling pathway by Wnt-3a promotes neuronal survival and rescues changes in Wnt components (activation or subcellular localization). Moreover Frzb-1, a Wnt antagonist reverses the Wnt-3a neuroprotection effect against Abeta neurotoxicity. Compounds that mimic the Wnt signaling or modulate the cross-talking with this pathway could be used as neuroprotective agents for therapeutic strategies in AD patients.

  17. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: new algorithms for sparse patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, Aaron S.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rodriguez, Jose; Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; McFarlane, Heather T.; Cascio, Duilio; Adams, Paul D.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2015-02-01

    Special methods are required to interpret sparse diffraction patterns collected from peptide crystals at X-ray free-electron lasers. Bragg spots can be indexed from composite-image powder rings, with crystal orientations then deduced from a very limited number of spot positions. Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox (cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patterns with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.

  18. In vitro fibrillization of Alzheimer’s amyloidpeptide (1-42)

    SciTech Connect

    Tiiman, Ann; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Palumaa, Peep; Tõugu, Vello

    2015-09-15

    The amyloid deposition in the form of extracellular fibrillar aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effects of environmental factors on the kinetics of Aβ fibrillization in vitro. The effects of Aβ42 peptide concentration, temperature, pH, added solvents and the ratio of Aβ40 and Aβ42 on the peptide fibrillization under agitated conditions was studied. The analysis show that the rate of fibril growth by monomer addition is not limited by diffusion but by rearrangement in the monomer structure, which is enhanced by low concentrations of fluorinated alcohols and characterized by the activation energy of 12 kcal/mol. Fibrillization rate decreases at pH values below 7.0 where simultaneous protonation of His 13 and 14 inhibits fibril formation. The lag period for Aβ42 was only twofold shorter and the fibril growth rate twofold faster than those of Aβ40. Lag period was shortened and the fibrillization rate was increased only at 90% content of Aβ42.

  19. Amyloidpeptides are generated in mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Bernadette; Hedskog, Louise; Wiehager, Birgitta; Ankarcrona, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular aggregates of amyloidpeptides (Aβ) are a hallmark in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Recent findings suggest that Aβ is generated intracellularly and potential production sites include endosomes and trans-Golgi network. We determined the production of Aβ in subcellular fractions isolated from mouse brain. We found that a considerable amount of Aβ is produced at mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contact sites including outer mitochondrial membrane and mitochondria-associated ER membranes. Enhanced Aβ production at this site may disturb ER, mitochondrial and mitochondria-ER contact site function. This may be one key step in the cascade of events eventually leading to neurodegeneration in AD.

  20. Emerging roles for the amyloid precursor protein and derived peptides in the regulation of cellular and systemic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Czeczor, Juliane K; McGee, Sean L

    2017-03-28

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that can be cleaved by proteases through two different pathways to yield a number of small peptides, each with distinct physiological properties and functions. It has been extensively studied in the context of Alzheimer's disease, with the APP-derived amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide being a major constituent of the amyloid plaques observed in this disease. It has been known for some time that APP can regulate neuronal metabolism, however this review will examine evidence that APP and its peptides can also regulate key metabolic processes such as insulin action, lipid synthesis and storage and mitochondrial function in peripheral tissues. This review will present a hypothesis that amyloidogenic processing of APP in peripheral tissues plays a key role in the response to nutrient excess and that this could contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of amyloid formation by glucagon-like peptides: role of basic residues in heparin-mediated aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jha, Narendra Nath; Anoop, A; Ranganathan, Srivastav; Mohite, Ganesh M; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Maji, Samir K

    2013-12-10

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) have been reported to play a significant role in amyloid formation of a wide range of proteins/peptides either associated with diseases or native biological functions. The exact mechanism by which GAGs influence amyloid formation is not clearly understood. Here, we studied two closely related peptides, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) and glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP2), for their amyloid formation in the presence and absence of the representative GAG heparin using various biophysical and computational approaches. We show that the aggregation and amyloid formation by these peptides follow distinct mechanisms: GLP1 follows nucleation-dependent aggregation, whereas GLP2 forms amyloids without any significant lag time. Investigating the role of heparin, we also found that heparin interacts with GLP1, accelerates its aggregation, and gets incorporated within its amyloid fibrils. In contrast, heparin neither affects the aggregation kinetics of GLP2 nor gets embedded within its fibrils. Furthermore, we found that heparin preferentially influences the stability of the GLP1 fibrils over GLP2 fibrils. To understand the specific nature of the interaction of heparin with GLP1 and GLP2, we performed all-atom MD simulations. Our in silico results show that the basic-nonbasic-basic (B-X-B) motif of GLP1 (K28-G29-R30) facilitates the interaction between heparin and peptide monomers. However, the absence of such a motif in GLP2 could be the reason for a significantly lower strength of interaction between GLP2 and heparin. Our study not only helps to understand the role of heparin in inducing protein aggregation but also provides insight into the nature of heparin-protein interaction.

  2. Benzothiazole aniline tetra(ethylene glycol) and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole inhibit neuroprotection against amyloid peptides by catalase overexpression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chilumuri, Amrutha; Odell, Mark; Milton, Nathaniel G N

    2013-11-20

    Alzheimer's disease, Familial British dementia, Familial Danish dementia, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, plus Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are associated with amyloid fibril deposition and oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzyme catalase is a neuroprotective amyloid binding protein. Herein the effects of catalase overexpression in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells on the toxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ), amyloid-Bri (ABri), amyloid-Dan (ADan), amylin (IAPP), and prion protein (PrP) peptides were determined. Results showed catalase overexpression was neuroprotective against Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. The catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) and catalase-amyloid interaction inhibitor benzothiazole aniline tetra(ethylene glycol) (BTA-EG4) significantly enhanced neurotoxicity of amyloid peptides in catalase overexpressing neuronal cells. This suggests catalase neuroprotection involves breakdown of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plus a direct binding interaction between catalase and the Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. Kisspeptin 45-50 had additive neuroprotective actions against the Aβ peptide in catalase overexpressing cells. The effects of 3-AT had an intracellular site of action, while catalase-amyloid interactions had an extracellular component. These results suggest that the 3-AT and BTA-EG4 compounds may be able to inhibit endogenous catalase mediated neuroprotection. Use of BTA-EG4, or compounds that inhibit catalase binding to amyloid peptides, as potential therapeutics for Neurodegenerative diseases may therefore result in unwanted effects.

  3. Cytotoxic amyloid peptides inhibit cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction by enhancing MTT formazan exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Schubert, D

    1997-12-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (A beta) neurotoxicity is believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. An early indicator of A beta toxicity is the inhibition of cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction to MTT formazan, a widely used assay for measuring cell viability. In this report we show that A beta and other cytotoxic amyloid peptides such as human amylin dramatically enhance MTT formazan exocytosis, resulting in the inhibition of cellular MTT reduction. Only the amyloid peptides that are known to be cytotoxic enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis. Basal MTT formazan exocytosis and amyloid peptide-enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis are blocked by several drugs with diverse known effects. These and other data suggest that MTT formazan exocytosis is a multistep process and that cytotoxic amyloid peptides enhance MTT formazan exocytosis through an intracellular signal transduction pathway.

  4. Dynamics in Alzheimer's disease: the role of peptide flexibility on amyloid beta aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonieta Sanchez Farran, Maria; Maranas, Janna

    2010-03-01

    Aggregates of the amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) are thought to trigger brain cell death in Alzheimer's patients. Two different types of Aβ aggregates have been identified: soluble, and insoluble. Soluble aggregates are formed in early stages of peptide association, whereas insoluble aggregates are the final state of aggregation. Interestingly, it is the soluble aggregates, not the insoluble ones, which correlate with disease progression. Despite the relevance of soluble aggregates as a target for Alzheimer's disease, their mechanism of formation is unknown. The role of local flexibility in protein function has recently received attention: in this study we ask if local flexibility plays a similar role in how soluble aggregates form. To answer this question, we perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type Aβ monomer, and two mutated forms that vary in their ability to form soluble aggregates. We find that enhanced flexibility facilitates the formation and availability of nucleation sites by allowing the peptide to more easily access the conformations most favorable to association. Peptides with high flexibility show larger conformational changes than less flexible peptides, the extent of these changes could determine the ability of Aβ to self associate.

  5. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions.

  6. Amyloid-β(25-35) peptides aggregate into cross-β sheets in unsaturated anionic lipid membranes at high peptide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jennifer; Alsop, Richard J; Backholm, Matilda; Dies, Hannah; Shi, An-Chang; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2016-04-07

    One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the formation of protein plaques in the brain, which mainly consist of amyloidpeptides of different lengths. While the role of these plaques in the pathology of the disease is not clear, the mechanism behind peptide aggregation is a topic of intense research and discussion. Because of their simplicity, synthetic membranes are promising model systems to identify the elementary processes involved. We prepared unsaturated zwitterionic/anionic lipid membranes made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (DMPS) at concentrations of POPC/3 mol% DMPS containing 0 mol%, 3 mol%, 10 mol%, and 20 mol% amyloid-β25-35 peptides. Membrane-embedded peptide clusters were observed at peptide concentrations of 10 and 20 mol% with a typical cluster size of ∼11 μm. Cluster density increased with peptide concentration from 59 (±3) clusters per mm(2) to 920 (±64) clusters per mm(2), respectively. While monomeric peptides take an α-helical state when embedded in lipid bilayers at low peptide concentrations, the peptides in peptide clusters were found to form cross-β sheets and showed the characteristic pattern in X-ray experiments. The presence of the peptides was accompanied by an elastic distortion of the bilayers, which can induce a long range interaction between the peptides. The experimentally observed cluster patterns agree well with Monte Carlo simulations of long-range interacting peptides. This interaction may be the fundamental process behind cross-β sheet formation in membranes and these sheets may serve as seeds for further growth into amyloid fibrils.

  7. Inhibition of Wnt signaling induces amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein and the production and aggregation of Amyloid-β (Aβ)42 peptides.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Burgos, Patricia V; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and the most frequent cause of dementia in the aged population. According to the amyloid hypothesis, the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD. Aβ is generated from the amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein and can aggregate to form oligomers, which have been described as a major synaptotoxic agent in neurons. Dysfunction of Wnt signaling has been linked to increased Aβ formation; however, several other studies have argued against this possibility. Herein, we use multiple experimental approaches to confirm that the inhibition of Wnt signaling promoted the amyloidogenic proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein. We also demonstrate that inhibiting Wnt signaling increases the production of the Aβ42 peptide, the Aβ42 /Aβ40 ratio, and the levels of Aβ oligomers such as trimers and tetramers. Moreover, we show that activating Wnt signaling reduces the levels of Aβ42 and its aggregates, increases Aβ40 levels, and reduces the Aβ42 /Aβ40 ratio. Finally, we show that the protective effects observed in response to activation of the Wnt pathway rely on β-catenin-dependent transcription, which is demonstrated experimentally via the expression of various 'mutant forms of β-catenin'. Together, our findings indicate that loss of the Wnt signaling pathway may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  8. Feasibility of β-Sheet Breaker Peptide-H102 Treatment for Alzheimer's Disease Based on β-Amyloid Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yuan-zhen; Sun, Feng-xian; Song, Ming; Zhao, Juan; Ma, Zhi-hong; Li, Mei; Zheng, Kai-jun; Xu, Shu-mei

    2014-01-01

    β-amyloid hypothesis is the predominant hypothesis in the study of pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This hypothesis claims that aggregation and neurotoxic effects of amyloid β (Aβ) is the common pathway in a variety of etiological factors for Alzheimer's disease. Aβ peptide derives from amyloid precursor protein (APP). β-sheet breaker peptides can directly prevent and reverse protein misfolding and aggregation in conformational disorders. Based on the stereochemical structure of Aβ1-42 and aggregation character, we had designed a series of β-sheet breaker peptides in our previous work and screened out a 10-residue peptide β-sheet breaker peptide, H102. We evaluated the effects of H102 on expression of P-tau, several associated proteins, inflammatory factors and apoptosis factors, and examined the cognitive ability of APP transgenic mice by behavioral test. This study aims to validate the β-amyloid hypothesis and provide an experimental evidence for the feasibility of H102 treatment for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25372040

  9. Self-assembly of amyloid-forming peptides by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guanghong; Song, Wei; Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2008-05-01

    Protein aggregation is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. Understanding the aggregation mechanisms is a fundamental step in order to design rational drugs interfering with the toxic intermediates. This self-assembly process is however difficult to observe experimentally, which gives simulations an important role in resolving this problem. This study shows how we can proceed to gain knowledge about the first steps of aggregation. We first start by characterizing the free energy surface of the Abeta (16-22) dimer, a well-studied system numerically, using molecular dynamics simulations with OPEP coarse-grained force field. We then turn to the study of the NHVTLSQ peptide in 4-mers and 16-mers, extracting information on the onset of aggregation. In particular, the simulations indicate that the peptides are mostly random coil at room temperature, but can visit diverse amyloid-competent topologies, albeit with a low probability. The fact that the 16-mers constantly move from one structure to another is consistent with the long lag phase measured experimentally, but the rare critical steps leading to the rapid formation of amyloid fibrils still remain to be determined.

  10. Clearance mechanisms of Alzheimer's amyloid-beta peptide: implications for therapeutic design and diagnostic tests.

    PubMed

    Bates, K A; Verdile, G; Li, Q-X; Ames, D; Hudson, P; Masters, C L; Martins, R N

    2009-05-01

    Currently, the 'amyloid hypothesis' is the most widely accepted explanation for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). According to this hypothesis, altered metabolism of the amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide is central to the pathological cascade involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Although Abeta is produced by almost every cell in the body, a physiological function for the peptide has not been determined, and the pathways by which Abeta leads to cognitive dysfunction and cell death are unclear. Numerous therapeutic approaches that target the production, toxicity and removal of Abeta are being developed worldwide. Although therapeutic treatment for AD may be imminent, the value and effectiveness of such treatment are largely dependent on early diagnosis of the disease. This review summarizes current knowledge of Abeta clearance, transport and degradation, and evaluates the use of such information in the development of diagnostic tools. The conflicting results of plasma Abeta ELISAs are discussed, as are the more promising results of Abeta imaging by positron emission tomography. Current knowledge of Abeta-binding proteins and Abeta-degrading enzymes is analysed in the context of a potential therapy for AD. Transport across the blood-brain barrier by the receptor for advanced glycation end products and efflux via the multi-ligand lipoprotein receptor LRP-1 is also reviewed. Enhancing clearance and degradation of Abeta remains an attractive therapeutic strategy, and improved understanding of Abeta clearance may lead to advances in diagnostics and interventions designed to prevent or delay the onset of AD.

  11. Effect of osmolytes on the conformation and aggregation of some amyloid peptides: CD spectroscopic data.

    PubMed

    Inayathullah, Mohammed; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2016-06-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are responsible for a large number of diseases called protein conformational diseases or disorders that include Alzheimer׳s disease, Huntington׳s diseases, Prion related encephalopathies and type-II diabetes (http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/35041139) (Kopito and Ron, 2000) [1]. A variety of studies have shown that some small organic molecules, known as osmolytes have the ability to stabilize native conformation of proteins and prevent misfolding and aggregation (http://www.la-press.com/article.php?article_id=447) (Zhao et al., 2008) [2]. It has been shown that certain short segment or fragment of respective proteins can also form amyloids, and the segments also promote the aggregation in the full-length protein (http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/0929867023369187) (Gazit, 2002) [3]. This article presents circular dichroism spectroscopic data on conformational analysis and effect of osmolytes on Aβ peptide fragments, different lengths of polyglutamine peptide and the amyloidogenic segment of islet amyloid polypeptide.

  12. Antidepressants modulate intracellular amyloid peptide species in N2a neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Aboukhatwa, Marwa; Luo, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that 30%-50% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients are diagnosed with major or minor depression. Research that addresses the relationship between these two diseases will benefit patients who suffer from depression comorbid with AD and allow further understanding of the neuroanatomy of depression. A clinical study showed that the use of the antidepressant fluoxetin concomitantly with the FDA-approved AD drug rivastigmine provided an improvement in the daily activities and the overall functioning in the patients with cognitive impairment. In an attempt to understand the underlying mechanism for the antidepressant's beneficial effect in AD patients, we evaluated the effects of different classes of antidepressants on the amyloidpeptide (Aβ) species in N2a neuroblastoma cells overexpressing amyloid-β protein precursor. The effect of increasing antidepressant concentrations on the intracellular and secreted Aβ species is investigated by Western blotting. The tested antidepressants include fluoxetine, paroxetine, maprotiline, and imipramine. Fluoxetine and paroxetine at 10 μM significantly decreased the intracellular level of Aβ oligomers and increased the level of Aβ monomers. However, imipramine and maprotiline increased the intracellular amount of Aβ monomers without affecting Aβ oligomers. Based on these results, it is possible that fluoxetine and paroxetine could be beneficial to AD patients via reducing the level of the cytotoxic oligomers and keeping the Aβ peptide in the monomeric form. These data could explain some of the beneficial effects of antidepressants in AD patients observed in clinical studies.

  13. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: new algorithms for sparse patterns

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Aaron S.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rodriguez, Jose; Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; McFarlane, Heather T.; Cascio, Duilio; Adams, Paul D.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox (cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patterns with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented. PMID:25664747

  14. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: New algorithms for sparse patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, Aaron S.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rodriguez, Jose; Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; McFarlane, Heather T.; Cascio, Duilio; Adams, Paul D.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-23

    Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of theComputational Crystallography Toolbox(cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patterns with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.

  15. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: New algorithms for sparse patterns

    DOE PAGES

    Brewster, Aaron S.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rodriguez, Jose; ...

    2015-01-23

    Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of theComputational Crystallography Toolbox(cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patternsmore » with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.« less

  16. Patterning nanofibrils through the templated growth of multiple modified amyloid peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Ken; Kudoh, Fuki; Kamada, Rui; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in the patterning of functionalized nanowires because of the potential applications of these materials to the construction of nanodevices. A variety of biomolecular building blocks containing amyloid peptides have been used to functionalize nanowires. However, the patterning of self-assembled nanowires can be challenging because of the difficulties associated with controlling the self-assembly of these functionalized building blocks. Herein, we present a versatile approach for the patterning of nanowires based on the combination of templated fibril growth with a versatile functionalization method using our structure-controllable amyloid peptides (SCAPs). Using this approach, we have succeeded in the formation of multi-type nanowires with tandem domain structures in high yields. Given that the mixing-SCAP method can lead to the formation of tandem fibrils, it is noteworthy that our method allowed us to control the initiation of fibril formation from the gold nanoparticles, which were attached to a short fibril as initiation points. This approach could be used to prepare a wide variety of fibril patterns, and therefore holds great potential for the development of novel self-assembled nanodevices. PMID:27559011

  17. Vincamine Alleviates Amyloid-β 25–35 Peptides-induced Cytotoxicity in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jianfeng; Qu, Qiumin; Qiao, Jin; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Vincamine is a plant alkaloid used clinically as a peripheral vasodilator that increases cerebral blood flow and oxygen and glucose utilization by neural tissue to combat the effect of aging. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the influence of vincamine on amyloid-β 25–35 (Aβ25–35) induced cytotoxicity, to gain a better understanding of the neuroprotective effects of this clinically used anti-Alzheimer's disease drug. Materials and Methods: Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring malondialdehyde, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. Cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell apoptosis detection was performed using an Annexin-V-FITC Apoptosis Detection Kit. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using an ROS Assay Kit. Western blot detection was carried out to detect the protein expression. Results: Our studies showed that pretreatment with vincamine could reduce Aβ25–35 induced oxidative stress. Vincamine markedly inhibited cell apoptosis dose-dependently. More importantly, vincamine increased the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt and Bcl-2 family protein ratios on preincubation with cells for 2 h. Conclusion: Above observation led us to assume that one possible mechanism of vincamine protects Aβ25-35-induced cell death could be through upregulation of SOD and activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. SUMMARY Vincamine ameliorates amyloid-β 25–35 (Aβ25–35) peptides induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cellsVincamine reduces Aβ 25–35 peptides induced apoptosis of PC12 cellsVincamine activates the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathwayVincamine up-regulates the superoxide dismutase. Abbreviation used: Aβ25-35: Amyloid-β 25-35; AD: Alzheimer's disease; BCA: Bicinchoninic acid; GSH: glutathione; PBS: Phosphate buffered solution; SDS: Sodium dodecylsulphate; SOD: Superoxide dismutase PMID:28216895

  18. Neuroprotective Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract after Chronic Infusion with AmyloidPeptide in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Morzelle, Maressa Caldeira; Salgado, Jocelem Mastrodi; Telles, Milena; Mourelle, Danilo; Bachiega, Patricia; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic and degenerative condition that had no treatment until recently. The current therapeutic strategies reduce progression of the disease but are expensive and commonly cause side effects that are uncomfortable for treated patients. Functional foods to prevent and/or treat many conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, represent a promising field of study currently gaining attention. To this end, here we demonstrate the effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel extract (PPE) regarding spatial memory, biomarkers of neuroplasticity, oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. Male C57Bl/6 mice were chronically infused for 35 days with amyloidpeptide 1–42 (Aβ) or vehicle (control) using mini-osmotic pumps. Another group, also infused with Aβ, was treated with PPE (p.o.– βA+PPE, 800 mg/kg/day). Spatial memory was evaluated in the Barnes maze. Animals treated with PPE and in the control group exhibited a reduction in failure to find the escape box, a finding that was not observed in the Aβ group. The consumption of PPE reduced amyloid plaque density, increased the expression of neurotrophin BDNF and reduced the activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme. A reduction in lipid peroxidation and in the concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was also observed in the PPE group. No hepatic lesions were observed in animals treated with PPE. In conclusion, administration of pomegranate peel extract has neuroprotective effects involving multiple mechanisms to prevent establishment and progression of the neurodegenerative process induced by infusion with amyloidpeptide in mice. PMID:27829013

  19. Toxicity of substrate-bound amyloid peptides on vascular smooth muscle cells is enhanced by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Mok, Su San; Turner, Bradley J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Barrow, Colin J; Small, David H

    2002-06-01

    Tauhe main component of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in Alzheimer's disease is the amyloid-beta protein (Abeta), a 4-kDa polypeptide derived from the beta-amyloid protein precursor (APP). The accumulation of Abeta in the basement membrane has been implicated in the degeneration of adjacent vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). However, the mechanism of Abeta toxicity is still unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of substrate-bound Abeta on VSMC in culture. The use of substrate-bound proteins in cell culture mimics presentation of the proteins to cells as if bound to the basement membrane. Substrate-bound Abeta peptides were found to be toxic to the cells and to increase the rate of cell death. This toxicity was dependent on the length of time the peptide was allowed to 'age', a process by which Abeta is induced to aggregate over several hours to days. Oxidative stress via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) release was not involved in the toxic effect, as no decrease in toxicity was observed in the presence of catalase. However, substrate-bound Abeta significantly reduced cell adhesion compared to cells grown on plastic alone, indicating that cell-substrate adhesion may be important in maintaining cell viability. Abeta also caused an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. This increase in apoptosis was accompanied by activation of caspase-3. Homocysteine, a known risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, increased Abeta-induced toxicity and caspase-3 activation in a dose-dependent manner. These studies suggest that Abeta may activate apoptotic pathways to cause loss of VSMC in CAA by inhibiting cell-substrate interactions. Our studies also suggest that homocysteine, a known risk factor for other cardiovascular diseases, could also be a risk factor for hemorrhagic stroke associated with CAA.

  20. The molecular mechanism of fullerene-inhibited aggregation of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luogang; Luo, Yin; Lin, Dongdong; Xi, Wenhui; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of β-sheet formation has been considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Increasing data show that nanoparticles can retard or promote the fibrillation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides depending on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, our replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations show that fullerene nanoparticle - C60 (with a fullerene : peptide molar ratio greater than 1 : 8) can dramatically prevent β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments further confirm the inhibitory effect of C60 on Aβ(16-22) fibrillation, in support of our REMD simulations. An important finding from our REMD simulations is that fullerene C180, albeit with the same number of carbon atoms as three C60 molecules (3C60) and smaller surface area than 3C60, displays an unexpected stronger inhibitory effect on the β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. A detailed analysis of the fullerene-peptide interaction reveals that the stronger inhibition of β-sheet formation by C180 results from the strong hydrophobic and aromatic-stacking interactions of the fullerene hexagonal rings with the Phe rings relative to the pentagonal rings. The strong interactions between the fullerene nanoparticles and Aβ(16-22) peptides significantly weaken the peptide-peptide interaction that is important for β-sheet formation, thus retarding Aβ(16-22) fibrillation. Overall, our studies reveal the significant role of fullerene hexagonal rings in the inhibition of Aβ(16-22) fibrillation and provide novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of

  1. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Ion, Laura; Murariu, Manuela; Habasescu, Laura

    2014-10-06

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloidpeptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  2. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Murariu, Manuela; Ion, Laura; Habasescu, Laura

    2014-10-01

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1-3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloidpeptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  3. Dynamic behavior of small heat shock protein inhibition on amyloid fibrillization of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Dong; Dong, Xiao; Deng, Wei; Lai, Luhua

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of small heat shock protein inhibition on fibril formation was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peptide SSTSAA with modified ends was used for amyloid fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRET signal was followed during the fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 inhibits fibril formation when introduced in the lag phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 slows down fibril formation when introduced after the lag phase. -- Abstract: Small heat shock proteins, a class of molecular chaperones, are reported to inhibit amyloid fibril formation in vitro, while the mechanism of inhibition remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which Mj HSP16.5 inhibits amyloid fibril formation of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A. A model peptide (dansyl-SSTSAA-W) was designed by introducing a pair of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes into the peptide, allowing for the monitoring of fibril formation by this experimental model. Mj HSP16.5 completely inhibited fibril formation of the model peptide at a molar ratio of 1:120. The dynamic process of fibril formation, revealed by FRET, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy, showed a lag phase of about 2 h followed by a fast growth period. The effect of Mj HSP16.5 on amyloid fibril formation was investigated by adding it into the incubation solution during different growth phases. Adding Mj HSP16.5 to the incubating peptide before or during the lag phase completely inhibited fibril formation. However, introducing Mj HSP16.5 after the lag phase only slowed down the fibril formation process by adhering to the already formed fibrils. These findings provide insight into the inhibitory roles of small heat shock proteins on amyloid fibril formation at the molecular level.

  4. Amyloid β peptide conformational changes in the presence of a lipid membrane system.

    PubMed

    Accardo, Angelo; Shalabaeva, Victoria; Cotte, Marine; Burghammer, Manfred; Krahne, Roman; Riekel, Christian; Dante, Silvia

    2014-03-25

    Here we are presenting a comparative analysis of conformational changes of two amyloid β peptides, Aβ(25-35) and Aβ(1-42), in the presence and absence of a phospholipid system, namely, POPC/POPS (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphospatidylcholine/palmitoyl-2-oleoylphospatidylserine), through Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation micro Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction. Ringlike samples were obtained from the evaporation of pure and mixed solutions of the proteins together with the POPC/POPS system on highly hydrophilic substrates. The results confirm the presence of a α-helical to β-sheet transition from the internal rim of the ringlike samples to the external one in the pure Aβ(25-35) residual, probably due to the convective flow inside the droplets sitting on highly hydrophilic substrates enhancing the local concentration of the peptide at the external edge of the dried drop. In contrast, the presence of POPC/POPS lipids in the peptide does not result in α-helical structures and introduces the presence of antiparallel β-sheet material together with parallel β-sheet structures and possible β-turns. As a control, Aβ(1-42) peptide was also tested and shows β-sheet conformations independently from the presence of the lipid system. The μXRD analysis further confirmed these conclusions, showing how the absence of the phospholipid system induces in the Aβ(25-35) a probable composite α/β material while its coexistence with the peptide leads to a not oriented β-sheet conformation. These results open interesting scenarios on the study of conformational changes of Aβ peptides and could help, with further investigations, to better clarify the role of enzymes and alternative lipid systems involved in the amyloidosis process of Aβ fragments.

  5. Direct observation of internalization and ROS generation of amyloid β-peptide in neuronal cells at subcellular resolution.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yong; Zhang, Yi; Wei, Yibin; Liu, Zhiwei; An, Wenting; Guo, Maolin

    2012-11-05

    Seeing in many colors: Confocal images acquired using fluorescently labeled amyloid β-peptide revealed its efficient internalization by endocytosis into endosomes/lysosomes of human neuronal cells with a small portion reaching mitochondria, inducing marked cellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

  6. Effect of graphene oxide on the conformational transitions of amyloid beta peptide: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Lokesh; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Subramanian, Venkatesan; Dhawan, Alok

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between nanomaterials (NMs) and amyloid proteins are central to the nanotechnology-based diagnostics and therapy in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Graphene oxide (GO) and its derivatives have shown to modulate the aggregation pattern of disease causing amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. However, the mechanism is still not well understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) having carbon:oxygen ratio of 4:1 and 10:1, respectively, on the conformational transitions (alpha-helix to beta-sheet) and the dynamics of the peptide was investigated. GO and rGO decreased the beta-strand propensity of amino acid residues in Aβ. The peptide displayed different modes of adsorption on GO and rGO. The adsorption on GO was dominated by electrostatic interactions, whereas on rGO, both van der Waals and electrostatic interactions contributed in the adsorption of the peptide. Our study revealed that the slight increase in the hydrophobic patches on rGO made it more effective inhibitor of conformational transitions in the peptide. Alpha helix-beta sheet transition in Aβ peptide could be one of the plausible mechanism by which graphene oxide may inhibit amyloid fibrillation.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation of Ginkgo biloba terpene trilactones and their interaction with amyloid peptide Aβ(25-35)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiangtao; Petrovic, Ana G.; Dzyuba, Sergei V.; Berova, Nina; Nakanishi, Koji; Polavarapu, Prasad L.

    2008-04-01

    The beneficial effects of Ginkgo biloba extract in the "treatment" of dementia are attributed to its terpene trilactone (TTL) constituents. The interactions between TTLs and amyloid peptide are believed to be responsible in preventing the aggregation of peptide. These interactions have been investigated using infrared vibrational absorption (VA) and circular dichroism (VCD) spectra. Four TTLs, namely ginkgolide A (GA), ginkgolide B (GB), ginkgolide C (GC) and bilobalide (BB) and amyloid Aβ(25-35) peptide, as a model for the full length peptide, are used in this study. GA-monoether and GA-diether have also been synthesized and investigated to help understand the role of individual carbonyl groups in these interactions. The precipitation and solubility issues encountered with the mixture of ginkgolide + Aβ peptide for VA and VCD studies were overcome using binary ethanol-D 2O solvent mixture. The experimental VA and VCD spectra of GA, GB, GC and BB, GA-monoether and GA-diether have been analyzed using the corresponding spectra predicted with density functional theory. The time-dependent experimental VA and VCD spectra of Aβ(25-35) peptide and the corresponding experimental spectra in the presence of TTLs indicated that the effect of the TTLs in modulating the aggregation of Aβ(25-35) peptide is relatively small. Such small effects might indicate the absence of a specific interaction between the TTLs and Aβ(25-35) peptide as a major force leading to the reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides. It is possible that the therapeutic effect of G. biloba extract does not originate from direct interactions between TTLs and the Aβ(25-35) peptide and is more complex.

  8. The interaction with gold suppresses fiber-like conformations of the amyloid β (16-22) peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Luca; Ardèvol, Albert; Parrinello, Michele; Lutz, Helmut; Lu, Hao; Weidner, Tobias; Corni, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution.Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  9. CSF amyloidpeptides in neuropathologically diagnosed dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mollenhauer, Brit; Esselmann, Herrmann; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter; Kretzschmar, Hans; Otto, Markus; Wiltfang, Jens; Bibl, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate treatment of dementia requires biomarkers that provide an exact and differential diagnosis. We recently presented differentially expressed amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide patterns in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as biomarker candidates for neurochemical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). The objective of the present study was to investigate CSF Aβ peptide patterns in both neuropathologically and clinically defined diagnostic groups of AD and DLB. Using the quantitative Aβ-SDS-PAGE/immunoblot, we analyzed CSF samples of neuropathologically defined patients with AD (definite AD, dAD; n = 11) and DLB (definite, dDLB; n = 12). We compared absolute and relative quantities of CSF Aβ-peptides with a larger cohort of clinically diagnosed patients with probable AD (pAD; n = 71), probable DLB (pDLB; n = 32), and non-demented controls (NDC; n = 71). Each neuropathologically and clinically defined diagnostic group showed a similar relative distribution of CSF Aβ-peptides (Aβ(1-X%)). Aβ(1-42%) was lowered in dAD compared to NDC (p = 1.6 × 10⁻⁷, but did not differ between dAD and pAD. Aβ(1-40ox%) was elevated in dDLB as compared to NDC (p = 1.8 × 10⁻⁵, but did not differ between dDLB and pDLB. Thus, we were able to confirm previous results on Aβ peptide patterns in neuropathologically characterized patients with AD and DLB. Our results underline the usefulness of the CSF Aβ(1-42%) and Aβ(1-40ox%) as diagnostic biomarkers for AD and DLB, respectively.

  10. A strategy for designing a peptide probe for detection of β-amyloid oligomers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Su, Baihao; Kim, Chung-Sei; Hernandez, Michael; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge; Kim, Jin Ryoun

    2010-11-22

    Aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) is implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Development of a robust strategy to detect Aβ oligomeric intermediates, which have been identified as significant toxic agents, would be highly beneficial in the screening of drug candidates as well as enhancing our understanding of Aβ oligomerization. Rapid, specific and quantitative detection, currently unavailable, would be highly preferred for accurate and reliable probing of transient Aβ oligomers. Here, we report the development of a novel peptide probe, PG46, based on the nature of Aβ self-assembly and the conformation-sensitive fluorescence of the biarsenical dye, FlAsH. PG46 was found to bind to Aβ oligomers and displayed an increase in FlAsH fluorescence upon binding. No such event was observed when PG46 was co-incubated with Aβ low-molecular-weight species or Aβ fibrils. Aβ oligomer detection was fast, and occurred within one hour without any additional sample incubation or preparation. We anticipate that the development of a strategy for detection of amyloid oligomers described in this study will be directly relevant to a host of other amyloidogenic proteins.

  11. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Activation by Resveratrol Modulates AmyloidPeptide Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Giliberto, Luca; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Wu, Qingli; Simon, James E.; Janle, Elsa M.; Lobo, Jessica; Ferruzzi, Mario G.; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide deposition into cerebral amyloid plaques. The natural polyphenol resveratrol promotes anti-aging pathways via the activation of several metabolic sensors, including the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Resveratrol also lowers Aβ levels in cell lines; however, the underlying mechanism responsible for this effect is largely unknown. Moreover, the bioavailability of resveratrol in the brain remains uncertain. Here we show that AMPK signaling controls Aβ metabolism and mediates the anti-amyloidogenic effect of resveratrol in non-neuronal and neuronal cells, including in mouse primary neurons. Resveratrol increased cytosolic calcium levels and promoted AMPK activation by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β. Direct pharmacological and genetic activation of AMPK lowered extracellular Aβ accumulation, whereas AMPK inhibition reduced the effect of resveratrol on Aβ levels. Furthermore, resveratrol inhibited the AMPK target mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) to trigger autophagy and lysosomal degradation of Aβ. Finally, orally administered resveratrol in mice was detected in the brain where it activated AMPK and reduced cerebral Aβ levels and deposition in the cortex. These data suggest that resveratrol and pharmacological activation of AMPK have therapeutic potential against Alzheimer disease. PMID:20080969

  12. Presenilin and nicastrin regulate each other and determine amyloid β-peptide production via complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Edbauer, Dieter; Winkler, Edith; Haass, Christian; Steiner, Harald

    2002-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is generated by the consecutive cuts of two membrane-bound proteases. β-Secretase cuts at the N terminus of the Aβ domain, whereas γ-secretase mediates the C-terminal cut. Recent evidence suggests that the presenilin (PS) proteins, PS1 and PS2, may be γ-secretases. Because PSs principally exist as high molecular weight protein complexes, biologically active γ-secretases likely require other cofactors such as nicastrin (Nct) for their activities. Here we show that preferentially mature Nct forms a stable complex with PSs. Furthermore, we have down-regulated Nct levels by using a highly specific and efficient RNA interference approach. Very similar to a loss of PS function, down-regulation of Nct levels leads to a massive accumulation of the C-terminal fragments of the β-amyloid precursor protein. In addition, Aβ production was markedly reduced. Strikingly, down-regulation of Nct destabilized PS and strongly lowered levels of the high molecular weight PS1 complex. Interestingly, absence of the PS1 complex in PS1−/− cells was associated with a strong down-regulation of the levels of mature Nct, suggesting that binding to PS is required for trafficking of Nct through the secretory pathway. Based on these findings we conclude that Nct and PS regulate each other and determine γ-secretase function via complex formation. PMID:12048259

  13. An integrated microfluidic chip for immunocapture, preconcentration and separation of β-amyloid peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadi, Reza M.; Svobodova, Zuzana; Bilkova, Zuzana; Otto, Markus; Taverna, Myriam; Descroix, Stephanie; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic chip for detection of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Aβ peptides are major biomarkers for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in its early stages. This microfluidic device consists of three main parts: (1) An immunocapture microcolumn based on self-assembled magnetic beads coated with antibodies specific to Aβ peptides, (2) a nano-porous membrane made of photopolymerized hydrogel for preconcentration, and (3) a microchip electrophoresis (MCE) channel with fluorescent detection. Sub-milliliter sample volume is either mixed off-chip with antibody coated magnetic beads and injected into the device or is injected into an already self-assembled column of magnetic beads in the microchannel. The captured peptides on the beads are then electrokinetically eluted and re-concentrated onto the nano-membrane in a few nano-liters. By integrating the nano-membrane, total assay time was reduced and also off-chip re-concentration or buffer exchange steps were not needed. Finally, the concentrated peptides in the chip are separated by electrophoresis in a polymer-based matrix. The device was applied to the capture and MCE analysis of differently truncated peptides Aβ (1–37, 1–39, 1–40, and 1–42) and was able to detect as low as 25 ng of synthetic Aβ peptides spiked in undiluted cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The device was also tested with CSF samples from healthy donors. CSF samples were fluorescently labelled and pre-mixed with the magnetic beads and injected into the device. The results indicated that Aβ1-40, an important biomarker for distinguishing patients with frontotemporal lobe dementia from controls and AD patients, was detectable. Although the sensitivity of this device is not yet enough to detect all Aβ subtypes in CSF, this is the first report on an integrated or semi-integrated device for capturing and analyzing of differently truncated Aβ peptides. The method is less demanding and faster than the conventional

  14. Amyloid β Peptide-Induced Changes in Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Its Response to Hippocampal Input.

    PubMed

    Flores-Martínez, Ernesto; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function and abnormalities in its interactions with other brain areas (i.e., the hippocampus) have been related to Alzheimer Disease (AD). Considering that these malfunctions correlate with the increase in the brain's amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide production, here we looked for a causal relationship between these pathognomonic signs of AD. Thus, we tested whether or not Aβ affects the activity of the PFC network and the activation of this cortex by hippocampal input stimulation in vitro. We found that Aβ application to brain slices inhibits PFC spontaneous network activity as well as PFC activation, both at the population and at the single-cell level, when the hippocampal input is stimulated. Our data suggest that Aβ can contribute to AD by disrupting PFC activity and its long-range interactions throughout the brain.

  15. Amyloid β Peptide-Induced Changes in Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Its Response to Hippocampal Input

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Martínez, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in prefrontal cortex (PFC) function and abnormalities in its interactions with other brain areas (i.e., the hippocampus) have been related to Alzheimer Disease (AD). Considering that these malfunctions correlate with the increase in the brain's amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide production, here we looked for a causal relationship between these pathognomonic signs of AD. Thus, we tested whether or not Aβ affects the activity of the PFC network and the activation of this cortex by hippocampal input stimulation in vitro. We found that Aβ application to brain slices inhibits PFC spontaneous network activity as well as PFC activation, both at the population and at the single-cell level, when the hippocampal input is stimulated. Our data suggest that Aβ can contribute to AD by disrupting PFC activity and its long-range interactions throughout the brain. PMID:28127312

  16. Common benzothiazole and benzoxazole fluorescent DNA intercalators for studying Alzheimer Aβ1-42 and prion amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Steingrimur; Adams, Daniel L; Tang, Cha-Mei

    2012-05-01

    Amyloids are fibrillar protein aggregates associated with a number of neurodegenerative pathologies including Alzheimer and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The study of amyloids is usually based on fluorescence with the dye thioflavin-T. Although a number of amyloid binding compounds have been synthesized, many are nonfluorescent or not readily available for research use. Here we report on a class of commercial benzothiazole/benzoxazole containing fluorescent DNA intercalators from Invitrogen that possess the ability to bind amyloid Aβ1-42 peptide and hamster prion. These dyes fluoresce from 500-750 nm and are available as dimers or monomers. We demonstrate that these dyes can be used as acceptors for thioflavin-T fluorescence resonance energy transfer as well as reporter groups for binding studies with Congo red and chrysamine G. As more potential therapeutic compounds for these diseases are generated, there is a need for simple and inexpensive methods to monitor their interactions with amyloids. The fluorescent dyes reported here are readily available and can be used as tools for biochemical studies of amyloid structures and in vitro screening of potential therapeutics.

  17. Amyloid properties of the leader peptide of variant B cystatin C: implications for Alzheimer and macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Ricardo; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Paraoan, Luminita; Foguel, Debora

    2016-03-01

    Variant B (VB) of cystatin C has a mutation in its signal peptide (A25T), which interferes with its processing leading to reduced secretion and partial retention in the vicinity of the mitochondria. There are genetic evidences of the association of VB with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we investigated aggregation and amyloid propensities of unprocessed VB combining computational and in vitro studies. Aggregation predictors revealed the presence of four aggregation-prone regions, with a strong one at the level of the signal peptide, which indeed formed toxic aggregates and mature amyloid fibrils in solution. In light of these results, we propose for the first time the role of the signal peptide in pathogenesis of AD and AMD.

  18. X-Ray Structural Study of Amyloid-Like Fibrils of Tau Peptides Bound to Small-Molecule Ligands.

    PubMed

    Tayeb-Fligelman, Einav; Landau, Meytal

    2017-01-01

    Atomic structures of Tau involved in Alzheimer's disease complexed with small molecule binders are the first step to define the Tau pharmacophore, leading the way to a structure-based design of improved diagnostics and therapeutics. Yet the partially disordered and polymorphic nature of Tau hinders structural analyses. Fortunately, short segments from amyloid proteins, which exhibit similar biophysical properties to the full-length proteins, also form fibrils and oligomers, and their atomic structures can be determined using X-ray microcrystallography. Such structures were successfully used to design amyloid inhibitors. This chapter describes experimental procedures used to determine crystal structures of Tau peptide segments in complex with small-molecule binders.

  19. A bifunctional non-natural tetrapeptide modulates amyloid-beta peptide aggregation in the presence of Cu(ii).

    PubMed

    Márquez, Maripaz; Blancas-Mejía, Luis M; Campos, Adriana; Rojas, Luis; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Quintanar, Liliana

    2014-12-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) aggregation is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and metal ions such as Cu(ii) have been proposed to play a role in amyloid formation and the onset of this progressive neurodegenerative disorder. This study reports the design and characterization of a novel bifunctional non-natural tetrapeptide, Met-Asp-d-Trp-Aib, that is capable of binding copper, competing with Aβ for Cu(ii), and modulating Aβ aggregation. The study of this tetrapeptide provides further insights into the role of Cu(ii) in the Aβ aggregation pathway, and into the design of compounds with therapeutic potential for Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Lattice model for amyloid peptides: OPEP force field parametrization and applications to the nucleus size of Alzheimer's peptides.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Phuong H; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2016-05-28

    Coarse-grained protein lattice models approximate atomistic details and keep the essential interactions. They are, therefore, suitable for capturing generic features of protein folding and amyloid formation at low computational cost. As our aim is to study the critical nucleus sizes of two experimentally well-characterized peptide fragments Aβ16-22 and Aβ37-42 of the full length Aβ1-42 Alzheimer's peptide, it is important that simulations with the lattice model reproduce all-atom simulations. In this study, we present a comprehensive force field parameterization based on the OPEP (Optimized Potential for Efficient protein structure Prediction) force field for an on-lattice protein model, which incorporates explicitly the formation of hydrogen bonds and directions of side-chains. Our bottom-up approach starts with the determination of the best lattice force parameters for the Aβ16-22 dimer by fitting its equilibrium parallel and anti-parallel β-sheet populations to all-atom simulation results. Surprisingly, the calibrated force field is transferable to the trimer of Aβ16-22 and the dimer and trimer of Aβ37-42. Encouraged by this finding, we characterized the free energy landscapes of the two decamers. The dominant structure of the Aβ16-22 decamer matches the microcrystal structure. Pushing the simulations for aggregates between 4-mer and 12-mer suggests a nucleus size for fibril formation of 10 chains. In contrast, the Aβ37-42 decamer is largely disordered with mixed by parallel and antiparallel chains, suggesting that the nucleus size is >10 peptides. Our refined force field coupled to this on-lattice model should provide useful insights into the critical nucleation number associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Lattice model for amyloid peptides: OPEP force field parametrization and applications to the nucleus size of Alzheimer's peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Coarse-grained protein lattice models approximate atomistic details and keep the essential interactions. They are, therefore, suitable for capturing generic features of protein folding and amyloid formation at low computational cost. As our aim is to study the critical nucleus sizes of two experimentally well-characterized peptide fragments Aβ16-22 and Aβ37-42 of the full length Aβ1-42 Alzheimer's peptide, it is important that simulations with the lattice model reproduce all-atom simulations. In this study, we present a comprehensive force field parameterization based on the OPEP (Optimized Potential for Efficient protein structure Prediction) force field for an on-lattice protein model, which incorporates explicitly the formation of hydrogen bonds and directions of side-chains. Our bottom-up approach starts with the determination of the best lattice force parameters for the Aβ16-22 dimer by fitting its equilibrium parallel and anti-parallel β-sheet populations to all-atom simulation results. Surprisingly, the calibrated force field is transferable to the trimer of Aβ16-22 and the dimer and trimer of Aβ37-42. Encouraged by this finding, we characterized the free energy landscapes of the two decamers. The dominant structure of the Aβ16-22 decamer matches the microcrystal structure. Pushing the simulations for aggregates between 4-mer and 12-mer suggests a nucleus size for fibril formation of 10 chains. In contrast, the Aβ37-42 decamer is largely disordered with mixed by parallel and antiparallel chains, suggesting that the nucleus size is >10 peptides. Our refined force field coupled to this on-lattice model should provide useful insights into the critical nucleation number associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Acceleration and inhibition of amyloid-β fibril formation by peptide-conjugated fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaat, Hadas; Shafir, Gilead; Margel, Shlomo

    2011-08-01

    The formation of amyloid aggregates by association of peptides into ordered structures is hallmark of certain neurodegenerative disorders. Exploring the effect of specific nanoparticles on the formation of amyloid fibrils may contribute toward a mechanistic understanding of the aggregation processes, leading to design nanoparticles that modulate the formation of toxic amyloid plaques. Uniform maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles, containing fluorescein covalently encapsulated within (F-γ-Fe2O3), were prepared. These F-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles of 14.0 ± 4.0 nm were then coated with human serum albumin (HSA) via a precipitation process. Covalent conjugation of the spacer arm succinimidyl polyethylene glycol succinimidyl ester (NHS-PEG-NHS) to the F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles was then accomplished by interacting the primary amine groups of the HSA coating with excess NHS-PEG-NHS molecules. Covalent conjugation of the peptides amyloid-β 40 (Aβ40) or Leu-Pro-Phe-Phe-Asp (LPFFD) onto the surface of the former fluorescent nanoparticles was then performed, by interacting the terminal activated NHS groups of the PEG derivatized F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles with primary amino groups of the peptides. Kinetics of the Aβ40 fibrillation process in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of the Aβ40 or LPFFD conjugated nanoparticles were also elucidated. The non-peptide conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles do not affect the Aβ40 fibrillation process significantly. However, the Aβ40-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-Aβ40) accelerate the fibrillation process while the LPFFD-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-LPFFD) inhibit it. By applying MRI and fluorescence imaging techniques simultaneously these bioactive fluorescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be used as an efficient tool to study and control the Aβ40 amyloid fibril formation process.

  3. β-Amyloid peptides display protective activity against the human Alzheimer's disease-associated herpes simplex virus-1.

    PubMed

    Bourgade, Karine; Garneau, Hugo; Giroux, Geneviève; Le Page, Aurélie Y; Bocti, Christian; Dupuis, Gilles; Frost, Eric H; Fülöp, Tamàs

    2015-02-01

    Amyloid plaques, the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), contain fibrillar β-amyloid (Aβ) 1-40 and 1-42 peptides. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has been implicated as a risk factor for AD and found to co-localize within amyloid plaques. Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 display anti-bacterial, anti-yeast and anti-viral activities. Here, fibroblast, epithelial and neuronal cell lines were exposed to Aβ 1-40 or Aβ 1-42 and challenged with HSV-1. Quantitative analysis revealed that Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 inhibited HSV-1 replication when added 2 h prior to or concomitantly with virus challenge, but not when added 2 or 6 h after virus addition. In contrast, Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 did not prevent replication of the non-enveloped human adenovirus. In comparison, antimicrobial peptide LL-37 prevented HSV-1 infection independently of its sequence of addition. Our findings showed also that Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 acted directly on HSV-1 in a cell-free system and prevented viral entry into cells. The sequence homology between Aβ and a proximal transmembrane region of HSV-1 glycoprotein B suggested that Aβ interference with HSV-1 replication could involve its insertion into the HSV-1 envelope. Our data suggest that Aβ peptides represent a novel class of antimicrobial peptides that protect against neurotropic enveloped virus infections such as HSV-1. Overproduction of Aβ peptide to protect against latent herpes viruses and eventually against other infections, may contribute to amyloid plaque formation, and partially explain why brain infections play a pathogenic role in the progression of the sporadic form of AD.

  4. P3 beta-amyloid peptide has a unique and potentially pathogenic immunohistochemical profile in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, L. S.; Murphy, G. M.; Forno, L. S.; Catalano, R.; Cordell, B.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of beta-amyloid in brain tissue is characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A naturally occurring derivative of the beta-amyloid peptide, p3, possesses all of the structural determinants required for fibril assembly and neurotoxicity. p3-specific antibodies were used to examine the distribution of this peptide in brain. p3 reactivity was absent or sparse in aged non-AD brains but was prevalent in selected areas of AD brain in diffuse deposits and in a subset of dystrophic neurites. p3-reactive dystrophic neurites were found both independent in the neuropil and associated with plaques. Little or no reactivity was observed to amyloid cores in classical plaques or to amyloid in the cerebral vasculature. The exclusive appearance of p3 reactivity in AD brain plus the selective localization of p3 reactivity to abnormal structures in the temporal lobe limbic system suggests that p3 may be a contributing factor to AD pathology. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8701997

  5. The Conformational Stability of Nonfibrillar AmyloidPeptide Oligomers Critically Depends on the C-Terminal Peptide Length

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is one key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. We investigated the conformational stability of a nonfibrillar tetrameric Aβ structure by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealing that the stability of the Aβ tetramer depends critically on the C-terminal length. In contrast to the Aβ17–40 tetramer, which proved to be instable, the simulations demonstrate structural integrity of the Aβ17–42 and Aβ17–43 tetramers. These differences in stability can be attributed to an extension of the middle strand of a three-stranded antiparallel β sheet through residues 41–43, only present in the longer Aβ species that aggregate faster and are more neurotoxic. Additional MD simulations demonstrate that this higher stability is also present in the monomers forming the tetramer. In conclusion, our findings suggest the existence of a nonfibrillar oligomer topology that is significantly more stable for the longer Aβ species, thus offering a structural explanation for their higher neurotoxicity. PMID:24494584

  6. COMPUTER SIMULATION STUDY OF AMYLOID FIBRIL FORMATION BY PALINDROMIC SEQUENCES IN PRION PEPTIDES

    PubMed Central

    Wagoner, Victoria; Cheon, Mookyung; Chang, Iksoo; Hall, Carol

    2011-01-01

    We simulate the aggregation of large systems containing palindromic peptides from the Syrian hamster prion protein SHaPrP 113–120 (AGAAAAGA) and the mouse prion protein MoPrP 111–120 (VAGAAAAGAV) and eight sequence variations: GAAAAAAG, (AG)4, A8, GAAAGAAA, A10, V10, GAVAAAAVAG, and VAVAAAAVAV The first two peptides are thought to act as the Velcro that holds the parent prion proteins together in amyloid structures and can form fibrils themselves. Kinetic events along the fibrillization pathway influence the types of structures that occur and variations in the sequence affect aggregation kinetics and fibrillar structure. Discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations using the PRIME20 force field are performed on systems containing 48 peptides starting from a random coil configuration. Depending on the sequence, fibrillar structures form spontaneously over a range of temperatures, below which amorphous aggregates form and above which no aggregation occurs. AGAAAAGA forms well organized fibrillar structures whereas VAGAAAAGAV forms less well organized structures that are partially fibrillar and partially amorphous. The degree of order in the fibrillar structure stems in part from the types of kinetic events leading up to its formation, with AGAAAAGA forming less amorphous structures early in the simulation than VAGAAAAGAV. The ability to form fibrils increases as the chain length and the length of the stretch of hydrophobic residues increase. However as the hydrophobicity of the sequence increases, the ability to form well-ordered structures decreases. Thus, longer hydrophobic sequences form slightly disordered aggregates that are partially fibrillar and partially amorphous. Subtle changes in sequence result in slightly different fibril structures. PMID:21557317

  7. ABCA5 regulates amyloidpeptide production and is associated with Alzheimer's disease neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Fu, YuHong; Hsiao, Jen-Hsiang T; Paxinos, George; Halliday, Glenda M; Kim, Woojin Scott

    2015-01-01

    Brain cholesterol homeostasis is regulated by a group of proteins called ATP-binding cassette subfamily A (ABCA) transporters. Certain ABCA transporters regulate amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) processing to generate amyloidpeptides (Aβ) and are associated with an increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). ABCA5 is a little-known member of the ABCA subfamily with no known function. In this study we undertook a comprehensive analysis of ABCA5 expression in the human and mouse brains. We explored the potential role of ABCA5 in AβPP processing associated with AD pathology. ABCA5 was differentially expressed in multiple regions of both human and mouse brains. It was strongly expressed in neurons with only weak expression in microglia, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. ABCA5 was able to stimulate cholesterol efflux in neurons. ABCA5 expression was specifically elevated in the hippocampus of AD brains. Using two in vitro cell systems we demonstrated that ABCA5 reduces Aβ production, both Aβ40 and Aβ42, without altering AβPP mRNA and protein levels, indicating that the decrease in the Aβ levels was due to changes in AβPP processing and not AβPP expression. This report represents the first extensive expression and functional study of ABCA5 in the human brain and our data suggest a plausible function of ABCA5 in the brain as a cholesterol transporter associated with Aβ generation, information that may offer a potential new target for controlling Aβ levels in the brain.

  8. Aloe arborescens Extract Protects IMR-32 Cells against Alzheimer Amyloid Beta Peptide via Inhibition of Radical Peroxide Production.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Maria Elisabetta; Tringali, Giuseppe; Triggiani, Doriana; Giardina, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Aloe arborescens is commonly used as a pharmaceutical ingredient for its effect in burn treatment and ability to increase skin wound healing properties. Besides, it is well known to have beneficial phytotherapeutic, anticancer, and radio-protective properties. In this study, we first provided evidence that A. arborescens extract protects IMR32, a neuroblastoma human cellular line, from toxicity induced by beta amyloid, the peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease. In particular, pretreatment with A. arborescens maintains an elevated cell viability and exerts a protective effect on mitochondrial functionality, as evidenced by oxygen consumption experiments. The protective mechanism exerted by A. arborescens seems be related to lowering of oxidative potential of the cells, as demonstrated by the ROS measurement compared with the results obtained in the presence of amyloid beta (1-42) peptide alone. Based on these preliminary observations we suggest that use ofA. arborescens extract could be developed as agents for the management of AD.

  9. Site-specific characterization of threonine, serine, and tyrosine glycosylations of amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β-peptides in human cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Adnan; Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Rüetschi, Ulla; Westman-Brinkmalm, Ann; Portelius, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Larson, Göran; Nilsson, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of human amyloid precursor protein (APP) into shorter aggregating amyloid β (Aβ)-peptides, e.g., Aβ1-42, is considered a critical step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although APP is a well-known membrane glycoprotein carrying both N- and O-glycans, nothing is known about the occurrence of released APP/Aβ glycopeptides in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used the 6E10 antibody and immunopurified Aβ peptides and glycopeptides from CSF samples and then liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry for structural analysis using collision-induced dissociation and electron capture dissociation. In addition to 33 unglycosylated APP/Aβ peptides, we identified 37 APP/Aβ glycopeptides with sialylated core 1 like O-glycans attached to Thr(−39, −21, −20, and −13), in a series of APP/AβX-15 glycopeptides, where X was −63, −57, −52, and −45, in relation to Asp1 of the Aβ sequence. Unexpectedly, we also identified a series of 27 glycopeptides, the Aβ1-X series, where X was 20 (DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQKLVFF), 19, 18, 17, 16, and 15, which were all uniquely glycosylated on Tyr10. The Tyr10 linked O-glycans were (Neu5Ac)1-2Hex(Neu5Ac)HexNAc-O- structures with the disialylated terminals occasionally O-acetylated or lactonized, indicating a terminal Neu5Acα2,8Neu5Ac linkage. We could not detect any glycosylation of the Aβ1-38/40/42 isoforms. We observed an increase of up to 2.5 times of Tyr10 glycosylated Aβ peptides in CSF in six AD patients compared to seven non-AD patients. APP/Aβ sialylated O-glycans, including that of a Tyr residue, the first in a mammalian protein, may modulate APP processing, inhibiting the amyloidogenic pathway associated with AD. PMID:21712440

  10. Interaction of the Heparin-Binding Consensus Sequence of β-Amyloid Peptides with Heparin and Heparin-Derived Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh; Rabenstein, Dallas L

    2016-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the AD brain. Comprised primarily of the 40- and 42-residue β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, there is evidence that the heparan sulfate (HS) of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) plays a role in amyloid plaque formation and stability; however, details of the interaction of Aβ peptides with HS are not known. We have characterized the interaction of heparin and heparin-derived oligosaccharides with a model peptide for the heparin- and HS-binding domain of Aβ peptides (Ac-VHHQKLV-NH2; Aβ(12-18)), with mutants of Aβ(12-18), and with additional histidine-containing peptides. The nature of the binding interaction was characterized by NMR, binding constants and other thermodynamic parameters were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and relative binding affinities were determined by heparin affinity chromatography. The binding of Aβ(12-18) by heparin and heparin-derived oligosaccharides is pH-dependent, with the imidazolium groups of the histidine side chains interacting site-specifically within a cleft created by a trisaccharide sequence of heparin, the binding is mediated by electrostatic interactions, and there is a significant entropic contribution to the binding free energy as a result of displacement of Na(+) ions from heparin upon binding of cationic Aβ(12-18). The binding constant decreases as the size of the heparin-derived oligosaccharide decreases and as the concentration of Na(+) ion in the bulk solution increases. Structure-binding relationships characterized in this study are analyzed and discussed in terms of the counterion condensation theory of the binding of cationic peptides by anionic polyelectrolytes.

  11. Structural and Functional Properties of Peptides Based on the N-terminus of HIV-1 gp41 and the C-terminus of the Amyloid-Beta Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Larry M.; Nisthal, Alex; Lee, Andy B.; Eskandari, Sepehr; Ruchala, Piotr; Jung, Chun-Ling; Waring, Alan J.; Mobley, Patrick W.

    2008-01-01

    Given their high alanine and glycine levels, plaque formation, α-helix to β-sheet interconversion and fusogenicity, FP (i.e., the N-terminal fusion peptide of HIV-1 gp41; 23 residues) and amyloids were proposed as belonging to the same protein superfamily. Here, we further test whether FP may exhibit ‘amyloid-like’ characteristics, by contrasting its structural and functional properties with those of Aβ(26–42), a 17-residue peptide from the C-terminus of the amyloid-beta protein responsible for Alzheimer’s. FTIR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, light scattering and predicted amyloid structure aggregation (PASTA) indicated that aqueous FP and Aβ(26–42) formed similar networked β-sheet fibrils, although the FP fibril interactions were weaker. FP and Aβ(26–42) both lysed and aggregated human erythrocytes, with the hemolysis-onsets correlated with the conversion of α-helix to β-sheet for each peptide in liposomes. Congo red (CR), a marker of amyloid plaques in situ, similarly inhibited either FP- or Aβ(26–42)-induced hemolysis, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that this may be due to direct CR-peptide binding. These findings suggest that membrane-bound β-sheets of FP may contribute to the cytopathicity of HIV in vivo through an amyloid-type mechanism, and support the classification of HIV-1 FP as an ‘amyloid homolog’ (or ‘amylog’). PMID:18515070

  12. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation: toward engineering of functional nanomedicines for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin; Nicolas, Julien; Taverna, Myriam; Kóňa, Juraj; Lettiero, Barbara; Hashemi, S Hossein; De Kimpe, Line; Canovi, Mara; Gobbi, Marco; Nicolas, Valérie; Scheper, Wiep; Moghimi, S Moein; Tvaroška, Igor; Couvreur, Patrick; Andrieux, Karine

    2012-07-24

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aβ(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs on the interaction with monomeric and soluble oligomeric forms of Aβ(1-42) peptide was demonstrated by capillary electrophoresis, surface plasmon resonance, thioflavin T assay, and confocal microscopy, where the binding affected peptide aggregation kinetics. The capture of peptide by NPs in serum was also evidenced by fluorescence spectroscopy and ELISA. Moreover, in silico and modeling experiments highlighted the mode of PEG interaction with the Aβ(1-42) peptide and its conformational changes at the nanoparticle surface. Finally, Aβ(1-42) peptide binding to NPs affected neither complement activation in serum nor apolipoprotein-E (Apo-E) adsorption from the serum. These observations have crucial implications in NP safety and clearance kinetics from the blood. Apo-E deposition is of prime importance since it can also interact with the Aβ(1-42) peptide and increase the affinity of NPs for the peptide in the blood. Collectively, our results suggest that these engineered long-circulating NPs may have the ability to capture the toxic forms of the Aβ(1-42) peptide from the systemic circulation and potentially improve Alzheimer's disease condition through the proposed "sink effect".

  13. Structural basis of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase amyloid fibril formation involves interaction of multiple peptide core regions.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masataka; Ando, Mizuho; Adachi, Masayuki; Tanaka, Asumi; Machida, Kodai; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Yamakawa, Miho Yoshida; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-02-01

    Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), an enzyme implicated in the progression of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS), forms amyloid fibrils under certain experimental conditions. As part of our efforts to understand ALS pathogenesis, in this study we found that reduction of the intramolecular disulfide bond destabilized the tertiary structure of metal free wild-type SOD1 and greatly enhanced fibril formation in vitro. We also identified fibril core peptides that are resistant to protease digestion by using mass spectroscopy and Edman degradation analyses. Three regions dispersed throughout the sequence were detected as fibril core sequences of SOD1. Interestingly, by using three synthetic peptides that correspond to these identified regions, we determined that each region was capable of fibril formation, either alone or in a mixture containing multiple peptides. It was also revealed that by reducing the disulfide bond and causing a decrease in the structural stability, the amyloid fibril formation of a familial mutant SOD1 G93A was accelerated even under physiological conditions. These results demonstrate that by destabilizing the structure of SOD1 by removing metal ions and breaking the intramolecular disulfide bridge, multiple fibril-forming core regions are exposed, which then interact with each another and form amyloid fibrils under physiological conditions.

  14. Structural basis of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase amyloid fibril formation involves interaction of multiple peptide core regions

    PubMed Central

    Ida, Masataka; Ando, Mizuho; Adachi, Masayuki; Tanaka, Asumi; Machida, Kodai; Hongo, Kunihiro; Mizobata, Tomohiro; Yamakawa, Miho Yoshida; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Nakashima, Kenji; Kawata, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), an enzyme implicated in the progression of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS), forms amyloid fibrils under certain experimental conditions. As part of our efforts to understand ALS pathogenesis, in this study we found that reduction of the intramolecular disulfide bond destabilized the tertiary structure of metal free wild-type SOD1 and greatly enhanced fibril formation in vitro. We also identified fibril core peptides that are resistant to protease digestion by using mass spectroscopy and Edman degradation analyses. Three regions dispersed throughout the sequence were detected as fibril core sequences of SOD1. Interestingly, by using three synthetic peptides that correspond to these identified regions, we determined that each region was capable of fibril formation, either alone or in a mixture containing multiple peptides. It was also revealed that by reducing the disulfide bond and causing a decrease in the structural stability, the amyloid fibril formation of a familial mutant SOD1 G93A was accelerated even under physiological conditions. These results demonstrate that by destabilizing the structure of SOD1 by removing metal ions and breaking the intramolecular disulfide bridge, multiple fibril-forming core regions are exposed, which then interact with each another and form amyloid fibrils under physiological conditions. PMID:26319711

  15. Protective effects of Lingguizhugan decoction on amyloid-beta peptide (25-35)-induced cell injury: Anti-inflammatory effects☆

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Feifei; Sang, Feng; Zhou, Chunxiang; Ling, Yun

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) and BV-2 microglia were treated with amyloidpeptide (25–35), as a model of Alzheimer’s disease, to evaluate the protective effects of 10-3–10-8 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction and to examine the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanism. Lingguizhugan decoction significantly enhanced the viability of SH-SY5Y cells with amyloidpeptide-induced injury, and lowered levels of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide in the culture supernatant of activated BV-2 microglia. The effects of 10-3 g/mL Lingguizhugan decoction were more significant. These results suggest that Lingguizhugan decoction can protect SH-SY5Y cells against amyloidpeptide (25–35)-induced injury in a dose-dependent manner by inhibiting overexpression of inflammatory factors by activated microglia. PMID:25317138

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the cerebrovascular and the neuritic plaque amyloid peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Robakis, N.K.; Ramakrishna, N.; Wolfe, G.; Wisniewski, H.M.

    1987-06-01

    Deposits of amyloid fibers are found in large numbers in the walls of blood vessels and in neuritic plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease and adults with Down syndrome. The authors used the amino acid sequence of the amyloid peptide to synthesize oligonucleotide probes specific for the gene encoding this peptide. When a human brain cDNA library was screened with this probe, a clone was found with a 1.7-kilobase insert that contains a long open reading frame coding for 412 amino acid residues including the 28 amino acids of the amyloid peptide. RNA gel blots revealed that a 3.3-kilobase mRNA species was present in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease, with Down syndrome, or with not apparent neurological disorders. Southern blots showed that homologous genes are present in the genomic DNA of humans, rabbits, sheep, hamsters, and mice, suggesting that this gene has been conserved through mammalian evolution. Localization of the corresponding genomic sequences on human chromosome 21 suggest a genetic relationship between Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome, and it may explain the early appearance of large numbers of neuritic plaques in adult Down syndrome patients.

  17. The killing of neurons by beta-amyloid peptides, prions, and pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Dal Pra, Ilaria; Whitfield, James F; Armato, Ubaldo

    2006-01-01

    Reportedly, beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta40 and Abeta42) induce the neurodegenerative changes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) both directly by interacting with components of the cell surface to trigger apoptogenic signaling and indirectly by activating astrocytes and microglia to produce excess amounts of inflammatory cytokines. A possible cell surface target for Abetas is the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)). By using SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cells without neurotrophin receptors or engineered to express the full-length p75(NTR) or various parts of it, we have proven that p75(NTR) does mediate the Abeta-induced cell killing via its intracellular death domain (DD). This signaling via the DD activates caspase-8, which then activates caspase-3 and apoptogenesis. We also found a strong cytocidal interaction of direct p75(NTR)-mediated and indirect pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated neuronal damage induced by Abeta. In fact, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IL-1beta from Abeta-activated microglia potentiated the neurotoxic action of Aalpha mediated by p75(NTR) signaling. The pro-inflammatory cytokines probably amplify neuronal damage and killing by causing astrocytes to flood their associated neurons with NO and its lethal oxidizing ONOO- derivative. Indeed, we have found that a combination of three major pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta+IFN-gamma+TNF-alpha, causes normal adult human astrocytes (NAHA) to express nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2) and make dangerously large amounts of NO via mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Soluble Abeta40, the major amyloid precursor protein cleavage product, by itself stimulates astrocytes to express NOS-2 and make NO, possibly by activating p75(NTR) receptors, which they share with neurons, and can considerably amplify NOS-2 expression by the pro-inflammatory cytokine trio. These observations have uncovered a deadly synergistic interaction of Abeta peptides with pro-inflammatory cytokines in the neuron

  18. Antimicrobial peptide (Cn-AMP2) from liquid endosperm of Cocos nucifera forms amyloid-like fibrillar structure.

    PubMed

    Gour, Shalini; Kaushik, Vibha; Kumar, Vijay; Bhat, Priyanka; Yadav, Subhash C; Yadav, Jay K

    2016-04-01

    Cn-AMP2 is an antimicrobial peptide derived from liquid endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera). It consists of 11 amino acid residues and predicted to have high propensity for β-sheet formation that disposes this peptide to be amyloidogenic. In the present study, we have examined the amyloidogenic propensities of Cn-AMP2 in silico and then tested the predictions under in vitro conditions. The in silico study revealed that the peptide possesses high amyloidogenic propensity comparable with Aβ. Upon solubilisation and agitation in aqueous buffer, Cn-AMP2 forms visible aggregates that display bathochromic shift in the Congo red absorbance spectra, strong increase in thioflavin T fluorescence and fibrillar morphology under transmission electron microscopy. All these properties are typical of an amyloid fibril derived from various proteins/peptides including Aβ.

  19. Deciphering the glycolipid code of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's amyloid proteins allowed the creation of a universal ganglioside-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Yahi, Nouara; Fantini, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    A broad range of microbial and amyloid proteins interact with cell surface glycolipids which behave as infectivity and/or toxicity cofactors in human pathologies. Here we have deciphered the biochemical code that determines the glycolipid-binding specificity of two major amyloid proteins, Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and Parkinson's disease associated protein α-synuclein. We showed that both proteins interact with selected glycolipids through a common loop-shaped motif exhibiting little sequence homology. This 12-residue domain corresponded to fragments 34-45 of α-synuclein and 5-16 of Aβ. By modulating the amino acid sequence of α-synuclein at only two positions in which we introduced a pair of histidine residues found in Aβ, we created a chimeric α-synuclein/Aβ peptide with extended ganglioside-binding properties. This chimeric peptide retained the property of α-synuclein to recognize GM3, and acquired the capacity to recognize GM1 (an Aβ-inherited characteristic). Free histidine (but not tryptophan or asparagine) and Zn2+ (but not Na+) prevented this interaction, confirming the key role of His-13 and His-14 in ganglioside binding. Molecular dynamics studies suggested that the chimeric peptide recognized cholesterol-constrained conformers of GM1, including typical chalice-shaped dimers, that are representative of the condensed cholesterol-ganglioside complexes found in lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane of neural cells. Correspondingly, the peptide had a particular affinity for raft-like membranes containing both GM1 and cholesterol. The chimeric peptide also interacted with several other gangliosides, including major brain gangliosides (GM4, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) but not with neutral glycolipids such as GlcCer, LacCer or asialo-GM1. It could inhibit the binding of Aβ1-42 onto neural SH-SY5Y cells and did not induce toxicity in these cells. In conclusion, deciphering the glycolipid code of amyloid proteins allowed us to create a universal

  20. Arginine metabolising enzymes as therapeutic tools for Alzheimer's disease: peptidyl arginine deiminase catalyses fibrillogenesis of beta-amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Mohlake, Peter; Whiteley, Chris G

    2010-06-01

    The accumulation of arginine in the cerebrospinal fluid and brains of patients suffering from acute neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, point to defects in the metabolic pathways involving this amino acids. The deposits of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques perhaps as a consequence of fibrillogenesis of beta-amyloid peptides has also been shown to be a hallmark in the aetiology of certain neurodegenerative diseases. Peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD II) is an enzyme that uses arginine as a substrate and we now show that PAD II not only binds with the peptides Abeta(1-40), Abeta(22-35), Abeta(17-28), Abeta(25-35) and Abeta(32-35) but assists in the proteolytic degradation of these peptides with the concomitant formation of insoluble fibrils. PAD was purified in 12.5% yield and 137 fold with a specific activity of 59 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) from bovine brain by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sephacel. Characterisation of the enzyme gave a pH and temperature optima of 7.5 degrees C and 68 degrees C, respectively, and the enzyme lost 50% activity within 38 min at this temperature. Michaelis-Menten kinetics established a V(max) and K(m) of 1.57 micromol min(-1) ml(-1) and 1.35 mM, respectively, with N-benzoyl arginine ethyl ester as substrate. Kinetic analysis was used to measure the affinity (K(i)) of the amyloid peptides to PAD with values between 1.4 and 4.6 microM. The formation of Abeta fibrils was rate limiting involving an initial lag time of about 24 h that was dependent on the concentration of the amyloid peptides. Turbidity measurements at 400 nm, Congo Red assay and Thioflavin-T staining fluorescence were used to establish the aggregation kinetics of PAD-induced fibril formation.

  1. Glutamatergic synaptic depression by synthetic amyloid beta-peptide in the medial septum.

    PubMed

    Santos-Torres, Julio; Fuente, Antonio; Criado, Jose Maria; Riolobos, Adelaida Sanchez; Heredia, Margarita; Yajeya, Javier

    2007-02-15

    The medial septum/diagonal band region, which participates in learning and memory processes via its cholinergic and GABAergic projection to the hippocampus, is one of the structures affected by beta amyloid (betaA) deposition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The acute effects of betaA (25-35 and 1-40) on action potential generation and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in slices of the medial septal area of the rat brain were studied using current and patch-clamp techniques. The betaA mechanism of action through M1 muscarinic receptors and voltage-dependent calcium channels was also addressed. Excitatory evoked responses decreased (30-60%) in amplitude after betaA (2 microM) perfusion in 70% of recorded cells. However, the firing properties were unaltered at the same concentration. This depression was irreversible in most cases, and was not prevented or reversed by nicotine (5 microM). In addition, the results obtained using a paired-pulse protocol support pre- and postsynaptic actions of the peptide. The betaA effect was blocked by calcicludine (50 nM), a selective antagonist of L-type calcium channels, and also by blocking muscarinic receptors with atropine (5 muM) or pirenzepine (1 microM), a more specific M1-receptor blocker. We show that in the medial septal area this oligomeric peptide acts through calcium channels and muscarinic receptors. As blocking any of these pathways blocks the betaA effects, we propose a joint action through both mechanisms. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology at the onset of AD. This understanding will be required for the development of new therapeutic agents.

  2. Amyloid beta-peptide disrupts carbachol-induced muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction in cortical neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J F; Furukawa, K; Barger, S W; Rengen, M R; Mark, R J; Blanc, E M; Roth, G S; Mattson, M P

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic pathways serve important functions in learning and memory processes, and deficits in cholinergic transmission occur in Alzheimer disease (AD). A subset of muscarinic cholinergic receptors are linked to G-proteins that activate phospholipase C, resulting in the liberation of inositol trisphosphate and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. We now report that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which forms plaques in the brain in AD, impairs muscarinic receptor activation of G proteins in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of rodent fetal cortical neurons to Abeta25-35 and Abeta1-40 resulted in a concentration and time-dependent attenuation of carbachol-induced GTPase activity without affecting muscarinic receptor ligand binding parameters. Downstream events in the signal transduction cascade were similarly attenuated by Abeta. Carbachol-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP, IP2, IP3, and IP4) was decreased and calcium imaging studies revealed that carbachol-induced release of calcium was severely impaired in neurons pretreated with Abeta. Muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction was disrupted with subtoxic levels of exposure to AP. The effects of Abeta on carbachol-induced GTPase activity and calcium release were attenuated by antioxidants, implicating free radicals in the mechanism whereby Abeta induced uncoupling of muscarinic receptors. These data demonstrate that Abeta disrupts muscarinic receptor coupling to G proteins that mediate induction of phosphoinositide accumulation and calcium release, findings that implicate Abeta in the impairment of cholinergic transmission that occurs in AD. PMID:8692890

  3. Viscoelastic response of neural cells governed by the deposition of amyloidpeptides (Aβ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ze; You, Ran; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; Lin, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Because of its intimate relation with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the question of how amyloidpeptide (Aβ) deposition alters the membrane and cytoskeltal structure of neural cells and eventually their mechanical response has received great attention. In this study, the viscoelastic properties of primary neurons subjected to various Aβ treatments were systematically characterized using atomic force microrheology. It was found that both the storage ( G ') and loss ( G ″) moduli of neural cells are rate-dependent and grow by orders of magnitude as the driving frequency ω varies from 1 to 100 Hz. However, a much stronger frequency dependence was observed in the loss moduli (with a scaling exponent of ˜0.96) than that in G ' ( ˜ ω 0.2 ). Furthermore, both cell moduli increase gradually within the first 6 h of Aβ treatment before steady-state values are reached, with a higher dosage of Aβ leading to larger changes in cell properties. Interestingly, we showed that the measured neuron response can be well-explained by a power law structural damping model. Findings here establish a quantitative link between Aβ accumulation and the physical characteristics of neural cells and hence could provide new insights into how disorders like AD affect the progression of different neurological processes from a mechanics point of view.

  4. Quantitative analysis of co-oligomer formation by amyloid-beta peptide isoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iljina, Marija; Garcia, Gonzalo A.; Dear, Alexander J.; Flint, Jennie; Narayan, Priyanka; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Frenkel, Daan; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Klenerman, David

    2016-06-01

    Multiple isoforms of aggregation-prone proteins are present under physiological conditions and have the propensity to assemble into co-oligomers with different properties from self-oligomers, but this process has not been quantitatively studied to date. We have investigated the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and the aggregation of its two major isoforms, Aβ40 and Aβ42, using a statistical mechanical modelling approach in combination with in vitro single-molecule fluorescence measurements. We find that at low concentrations of Aβ, corresponding to its physiological abundance, there is little free energy penalty in forming co-oligomers, suggesting that the formation of both self-oligomers and co-oligomers is possible under these conditions. Our model is used to predict the oligomer concentration and size at physiological concentrations of Aβ and suggests the mechanisms by which the ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40 can affect cell toxicity. An increased ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40 raises the fraction of oligomers containing Aβ42, which can increase the hydrophobicity of the oligomers and thus promote deleterious binding to the cell membrane and increase neuronal damage. Our results suggest that co-oligomers are a common form of aggregate when Aβ isoforms are present in solution and may potentially play a significant role in Alzheimer’s disease.

  5. Metabolism of amyloid β peptide and pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    SAIDO, Takaomi C.

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of what has been interpreted as “normal brain aging” to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) via transition states, i.e., preclinical AD and mild cognitive impairment, appears to be a continuous process caused primarily by aging-dependent accumulation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the brain. This notion however gives us a hope that, by manipulating the Aβ levels in the brain, we may be able not only to prevent and cure the disease but also to partially control some very significant aspects of brain aging. Aβ is constantly produced from its precursor and immediately catabolized under normal conditions, whereas dysmetabolism of Aβ seems to lead to pathological deposition upon aging. We have focused our attention on elucidation of the unresolved mechanism of Aβ catabolism in the brain. In this review, I describe a new approach to prevent AD development by reducing Aβ burdens in aging brains through up-regulation of the catabolic mechanism involving neprilysin that can degrade both monomeric and oligomeric forms of Aβ. The strategy of combining presymptomatic diagnosis with preventive medicine seems to be the most pragmatic in both medical and socioeconomical terms. PMID:23883611

  6. Amyloidpeptide (1-42) aggregation induced by copper ions under acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bin, Yannan; Li, Xia; He, Yonghui; Chen, Shu; Xiang, Juan

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that the aggregation of amyloidpeptide (Aβ) induced by Cu²⁺ is related to incubation time, solution pH, and temperature. In this work, the aggregation of Aβ₁₋₄₂ in the presence of Cu²⁺ under acidic conditions was studied at different incubation time and temperature (e.g. 25 and 37°C). Incubation temperature, pH, and the presence of Cu²⁺ in Aβ solution were confirmed to alter the morphology of aggregation (fibrils or amorphous aggregates), and the morphology is pivotal for Aβ neurotoxicity and Alzheimer disease (AD) development. The results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the formation of Aβ fibrous morphology is preferred at lower pH, but Cu²⁺ induced the formation of amorphous aggregates. The aggregation rate of Aβ was increased with the elevation of temperature. These results were further confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy and it was found that the formation of β-sheet structure was inhibited by Cu²⁺ binding to Aβ. The result was consistent with AFM observation and the fibrillation process was restrained. We believe that the local charge state in hydrophilic domain of Aβ may play a dominant role in the aggregate morphology due to the strong steric hindrance. This research will be valuable for understanding of Aβ toxicity in AD.

  7. Minocycline recovers MTT-formazan exocytosis impaired by amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Kreutzmann, Peter; Wolf, Gerald; Kupsch, Kathleen

    2010-10-01

    Minocycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, has been reported to exert beneficial effects in models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To characterize the mechanisms underlying the putative minocycline-related neuroprotection, we studied its effect in an in vitro model of AD. Primary hippocampal cultures were treated with β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and cell viability was assessed by standard MTT-assay. Incubation with 10 μM Aβ for 24 h significantly inhibits cellular MTT-reduction without inducing morphological signs of enhanced cell death or increase in release of lactate dehydrogenase. This indicates that cell viability was not affected. The inhibition of MTT-reduction by Aβ was due to an acceleration of MTT-formazan exocytosis. Intriguingly, the Aβ-triggered increase in MTT-formazan exocytosis was abolished by co-treatment with minocycline. In vehicle-treated cells minocycline had no effect on formazan exocytosis. This hitherto unrecognized property of minocycline has to be noticed in the elucidation of the underlying mechanism of this promising neuroprotectant.

  8. Loss of proteostasis induced by amyloid beta peptide in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Oliveira, Catarina R; Pereira, Cláudia F; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition to neurotoxic effects, Aβ also damages brain endothelial cells (ECs) and may thus contribute to the degeneration of cerebral vasculature, which has been proposed as an early pathogenic event in the course of AD and is able to trigger and/or potentiate the neurodegenerative process and cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms underlying Aβ-induced endothelial dysfunction are not completely understood. Here we hypothesized that Aβ impairs protein quality control mechanisms both in the secretory pathway and in the cytosol in brain ECs, leading cells to death. In rat brain RBE4 cells, we demonstrated that Aβ1-40 induces the failure of the ER stress-adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), deregulates the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) decreasing overall proteasome activity with accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and impairs the autophagic protein degradation pathway due to failure in the autophagic flux, which culminates in cell demise. In conclusion, Aβ deregulates proteostasis in brain ECs and, as a consequence, these cells die by apoptosis.

  9. Oxidation of cholesterol catalyzed by amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta)-Cu complex on lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Noriko; Tasaki, Makoto; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Umakoshi, Hiroshi; Kuboi, Ryoichi

    2005-10-01

    A catalytic reaction of H2O2 production by an amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta)-Cu complex with cholesterol incorporated in a liposome was kinetically analyzed. The Michaelis-Menten model was applied to the H2O2 production reaction using cholesterol as the substrate catalyzed by the Abeta-Cu complex. The Km value for the Abeta-Cu complex catalytic reaction with cholesterol-containing 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) liposomes (Km=0.436 microM for Abeta(1-40); Km=0.641 microM for Abeta(1-42)) was found to be smaller than that with cholesterol-containing 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) liposomes (Km=0.585 microM for Abeta(1-40), Km=0.890 microM for Abeta(1-42)). The results imply that membrane properties could play an important role in the interactions of the Abeta-Cu complex with cholesterol in these liposomes. Considering the physical states of the cholesterol/POPC (liquid disordered phase) and cholesterol/DPPC (liquid ordered phase) liposomes in the present reaction conditions, the data obtained suggests that the H2O2-generating activity of the Abeta-Cu complex, accompanied by oxidation of membrane-incorporated cholesterol, could be effected by the phase of the liposome membranes.

  10. Cytosolic amyloid-{beta} peptide 42 escaping from degradation induces cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Park, Yong Wook; Shin, Dong Yeon; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Yoo, Yung Joon . E-mail: yjyoo@gist.ac.kr

    2006-06-02

    Accumulating evidence suggests that intracellular amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide triggers the early pathological events in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about the consequence of cytosolic A{beta}. In this study, we ectopically expressed A{beta}42 in the cytoplasm of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by expressing a fusion protein of GFP-tagged ubiquitin and A{beta}42 (GFPUb-A{beta}42). Although GFPUb and A{beta}42 are stochastically produced with the same molar ratio in the cytoplasm, A{beta}42 was completely degraded in more than 50% of the GFPUb-expressing cells. However, if A{beta}42 was not degraded in their cytoplasm, then A{beta}42-expressing cells underwent apoptosis. The number of A{beta}42-expressing cells is significantly increased by the inhibition of proteasome with MG132. Cytosolic A{beta}42 which has escaped degradation inhibits proteasome and thereby may accelerate the accumulation of A{beta}42 and its detrimental effects. Our findings suggest that cells have the potential to degrade A{beta}42 in their cytoplasm but if A{beta}42 appears in the cytoplasm due to its incomplete degradation, it accumulates and may trigger the fatal cascade of pathology of AD.

  11. Isoflurane and desflurane at clinically relevant concentrations induce amyloid {beta}-peptide oligomerization: An NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Pravat K Fodale, Vincenzo

    2009-02-13

    Current understanding on Alzheimer's disease (AD) reveals that soluble amyloid {beta}-peptide (A{beta}) oligomeric formation plays an important role in AD pathophysiology. A potential role for several inhaled anesthetics in promoting A{beta} oligomer formation has been suggested. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, we previously demonstrated that at a high concentration (higher than clinically relevant concentrations), the inhaled anesthetics halothane and isoflurane, interact with specific amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31) and induce A{beta} oligomerization. The present study confirms this is true at a clinically relevant concentration. Isoflurane and desflurane induce A{beta} oligomerization by inducing chemical shift changes of the critical amino acid residues (G29, A30, and I31), reinforcing the evidence that perturbation of these three crucial residues indeed plays an important role in oligomerization. These findings support the emerging hypothesis that several commonly used inhaled anesthetics could be involved in neurodegeneration, as well as risk factor for accelerating the onset of AD.

  12. Alzheimer's disease beta-amyloid peptide is increased in mice deficient in endothelin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Elizabeth A; Watson, Mona; Marlow, Laura; Sambamurti, Kumar; Eckman, Christopher B

    2003-01-24

    The abnormal accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in the brain is an early and invariant feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is believed to play a pivotal role in the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease. As such, a major focus of AD research has been the elucidation of the mechanisms responsible for the generation of Abeta. As with any peptide, however, the degree of Abeta accumulation is dependent not only on its production but also on its removal. In cell-based and in vitro models we have previously characterized endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) as an Abeta-degrading enzyme that appears to act intracellularly, thus limiting the amount of Abeta available for secretion. To determine the physiological significance of this activity, we analyzed Abeta levels in the brains of mice deficient for ECE-1 and a closely related enzyme, ECE-2. Significant increases in the levels of both Abeta40 and Abeta42 were found in the brains of these animals when compared with age-matched littermate controls. The increase in Abeta levels in the ECE-deficient mice provides the first direct evidence for a physiological role for both ECE-1 and ECE-2 in limiting Abeta accumulation in the brain and also provides further insight into the factors involved in Abeta clearance in vivo.

  13. Study of amyloidpeptide functional brain networks in AD, MCI and HC.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiehui; Duan, Huoqiang; Huang, Zheming; Yu, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    One medical challenge in studying the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide mechanism for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is exploring the law of beta toxic oligomers' diffusion in human brains in vivo. One beneficial means of solving this problem is brain network analysis based on graph theory. In this study, the characteristics of Aβ functional brain networks of Healthy Control (HC), Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and AD groups were compared by applying graph theoretical analyses to Carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography (11C PiB-PET) data. 120 groups of PiB-PET images from the ADNI database were analyzed. The results showed that the small-world property of MCI and AD were lost as compared to HC. Furthermore, the local clustering of networks was higher in both MCI and AD as compared to HC, whereas the path length was similar among the three groups. The results also showed that there could be four potential Aβ toxic oligomer seeds: Frontal_Sup_Medial_L, Parietal_Inf_L, Frontal_Med_Orb_R, and Parietal_Inf_R. These four seeds are corresponding to Regions of Interests referred by physicians to clinically diagnose AD.

  14. Mitochondrial Cholesterol Loading Exacerbates Amyloid Beta Peptide-Induced Inflammation and Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Anna; Llacuna, Laura; Fernández-Checa, José C.; Colell., Anna

    2009-01-01

    The role of cholesterol in Alzheimer's disease has been linked to the generation of toxic amyloid β peptides (Aβ). Using genetic mouse models of cholesterol loading, we examined whether mitochondrial cholesterol regulates Aβ neurotoxicity and AD pathology. Isolated mitochondria from brain or cortical neurons of transgenic mice overexpressing SREBP-2 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 2) or NPC1 (Niemann-Pick type C1) knockout mice exhibited mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation, mitochondrial GSH (mGSH) depletion and increased susceptibility to Aβ1-42-induced oxidative stress and release of apoptogenic proteins. Similar findings were observed in pharmacologically GSH-restricted rat brain mitochondria, while selective mGSH depletion sensitized human neuronal and glial cell lines to Aβ1-42-mediated cell death. Intracerebroventricular human Aβ delivery co-localized with mitochondria resulting in oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neuronal damage that were enhanced in Tg-SREBP-2 mice and prevented upon mGSH recovery by GSH ethyl ester co-infusion, with a similar protection observed by i.p. administration of GSH ethyl ester. Finally, APP/PS1 mice, a transgenic AD mouse model, exhibited mitochondrial cholesterol loading and mGSH depletion. Thus, mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation emerges as a novel pathogenic factor in AD by modulating Aβ toxicity via mGSH regulation; strategies boosting the particular pool of mGSH may be of relevance to slow down disease progression. PMID:19458211

  15. MALDI, AP/MALDI and ESI techniques for the MS detection of amyloid [beta]-peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Mineo, Placido; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Amyloid [beta]-peptides (A[beta]s) are involved in several neuropathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and considerable experimental evidences have emerged indicating that different proteases play a major role in regulating the accumulation of A[beta]s in the brain. Particularly, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been shown to degrade A[beta]s at different cleavage sites, but the experimental results reported in the literature and obtained by mass spectrometry methods are somehow fragmentary. The detection of A[beta]s is often complicated by solubility issues, oxidation artifacts and spontaneous aggregation/cleavage and, in order to rationalize the different reported results, we analyzed A[beta]s solutions by three different MS approaches: matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF), atmospheric pressure (AP) MALDI ion trap and electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap. Differences in the obtained results are discussed and ESI is chosen as the most suitable MS method for A[beta]s detection. Finally, cleavage sites produced by interaction of A[beta]s with IDE are identified, two of which had never been reported in the literature.

  16. Interaction between amyloidpeptide and heme probed by electrochemistry and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Wang, Jing; Liu, Lantao; Wang, Rongrong; Lai, Xinhe; Xu, Maotian

    2013-04-17

    Heme binds to amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, thus forming Aβ-heme complexes and leading the characteristic pathological features of AD. The interaction between heme and Aβ might have important biological relevance to AD etiology. In this work, the electrochemical performances of heme after incubation with Aβ1-42, Aβ fragments, and mutated Aβ were systematically investigated using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Our results indicated that His13 and His14 were possible binding sites, and Aβ bound two molecules of heme with a binding constant of K(a1) = 7.27 × 10(6) M(-1) (n(1) = 1.5) and K(a2) = 2.89 × 10(6) M(-1) (n(1) = 1.8). Detailed analysis with atomic force microscopy (AFM) of Aβ1-42 in the absence or presence of heme under the same incubation conditions showed that heme inhibited the formation of Aβ fibrils. According to results of the spectroscopic characterization, Arg5 was the key residue in making the heme-Aβ1-42 complex as a peroxidase.

  17. Estimation of electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties of relevant amyloid-beta peptides through the modeling of their effective electrophoretic mobilities and analysis of their propensities to aggregation.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Piaggio, Maria V; Peirotti, Marta B

    2014-09-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused by amyloid-beta peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here amyloid-beta peptides (1-42, 1-40, 1-39, 1-38, and 1-37) are characterized through the modeling of their experimental effective electrophoretic mobilities determined by a capillary zone electrophoresis method as reported in the literature. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are used to evaluate amyloid-beta peptide propensities to aggregation through pair particles interaction potentials and Brownian aggregation kinetic theories. Two background electrolytes are considered at 25°C, one for pH 9 and ionic strength I = 40 mM (aggregation is inhibited through NH4OH) the other for pH 10 and I = 100 mM (without NH4OH). Physical explanations of peptide oligomerization mechanisms are provided. The effect of hydration, electrostatic, and dispersion forces in the amyloidogenic process of amyloid-beta peptides (1-40 and 1-42) are quantitatively presented. The interplay among effective charge number, hydration, and conformation of chains is described. It is shown that amyloid-beta peptides (1-40 and 1-42) at pH 10, I = 100 mM and 25°C, may form soluble oligomers, mainly of order 2 and 4, after an incubation of 48 h, which at higher times evolve and end up in complex structures (protofibrils and fibrils) found in plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Self-Assembly of a 9-Residue Amyloid-Forming Peptide Fragment of SARS Corona Virus E-protein: Mechanism of Self Aggregation and Amyloid-Inhibition of hIAPP

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Jyotsna; Bera, Supriyo; Midya, Anupam; Fierke, Carol A.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly, a phenomenon widely observed in nature, has been exploited through organic molecules, proteins, DNA and peptides to study complex biological systems. These self-assembly systems may also be used in understanding the molecular and structural biology which can inspire the design and synthesis of increasingly complex biomaterials. Specifically, use of these building blocks to investigate protein folding and misfolding has been of particular value since it can provide tremendous insights into peptide aggregation related to a variety of protein misfolding diseases, or amyloid diseases (e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, type-II diabetes). Herein, the self-assembly of TK9, a 9 residue peptide of the extra membrane C-terminal tail of the SARS Corona virus envelope, and its variants were characterized through biophysical, spectroscopic and simulated studies, and it was confirmed that the structure of these peptides influence their aggregation propensity, hence, mimicking amyloid proteins. TK9, which forms a beta-sheet rich fibril, contains a key sequence motif that may be critical for beta-sheet formation, thus making it an interesting system to study amyloid fibrillation. TK9 aggregates were further examined through simulations to evaluate the possible intra- and inter peptide interactions at the molecular level. These self-assembly peptides can also serve as amyloid inhibitors through hydrophobic and electrophilic recognition interactions. Our results show that TK9 inhibits the fibrillation of hIAPP, a 37 amino acid peptide implicated in the pathology of type-II diabetes. Thus, biophysical and NMR experimental results have revealed a molecular level understanding of peptide folding events, as well as the inhibition of amyloid-protein aggregation are reported. PMID:25785896

  19. A Robust and Efficient Production and Purification Procedure of Recombinant Alzheimers Disease Methionine-Modified AmyloidPeptides

    PubMed Central

    Hoarau, Marie; Hureau, Christelle; Faller, Peter; Gras, Emmanuel; André, Isabelle; Remaud-Siméon, Magali

    2016-01-01

    An improved production and purification method for Alzheimer’s disease related methionine-modified amyloid-β 1–40 and 1–42 peptides is proposed, taking advantage of the formation of inclusion body in Escherichia coli. A Thioflavin-S assay was set-up to evaluate inclusion body formation during growth and optimize culture conditions for amyloidpeptides production. A simple and fast purification protocol including first the isolation of the inclusion bodies and second, two cycles of high pH denaturation/ neutralization combined with an ultrafiltration step on 30-kDa cut-off membrane was established. Special attention was paid to purity monitoring based on a rational combination of UV spectrophotometry and SDS-PAGE analyses at the various stages of the process. It revealed that this chromatography-free protocol affords good yield of high quality peptides in term of purity. The resulting peptides were fully characterized and are appropriate models for highly reproducible in vitro aggregation studies. PMID:27532547

  20. Bilirubin and amyloid-beta peptide induce cytochrome c release through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, C. M.; Solá, S.; Silva, R.; Brites, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of bilirubin encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease appears to result from accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, respectively, which may cause apoptosis. Permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane, with release of intermembrane proteins, has been strongly implicated in cell death. Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability is one pathway by which ursodeoxycholate (UDC) and tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC) protect against apoptosis in hepatic and nonhepatic cells. In this study, we further characterize UCB- and Abeta-induced cytotoxicty in isolated neural cells, and investigate membrane perturbation during incubation of isolated mitochondria with both agents. In addition, we evaluate whether the anti-apoptotic drugs UDC and TUDC prevent any changes from occurring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Primary rat neuron and astrocyte cultures were incubated with UCB or Abeta peptide, either alone or in the presence of UDC. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation and nuclear morphological changes. Isolated mitochondria were treated with each toxic, either alone or in combination with UDC, TUDC, or cyclosporine A. Mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically and cytochrome c protein levels determined by Western blot. RESULTS: Incubation of neural cells with both UCB and Abeta induced apoptosis (p < 0.01). Coincubation with UDC reduced apoptosis by > 50% (p < 0.05). Both toxins caused membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria (p < 0.001); whereas, pretreatment with UDC was protective (p < 0.05). TUDC was even more effective at preventing matrix swelling mediated by Abeta (p < 0.01). UDC and TUDC markedly reduced cytochrome c release associated with mitochondrial permeabilization induced by UCB and Abeta, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, cyclosporine A significantly inhibited mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c efflux mediated by UCB (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: UCB and Abeta peptide

  1. Acute and Chronic Sustained Hypoxia Do Not Substantially Regulate AmyloidPeptide Generation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Heras-Garvín, Antonio; March-Díaz, Rosana; Navarro, Victoria; Vizuete, Marisa; López-Barneo, José; Vitorica, Javier; Pascual, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiological evidence has linked hypoxia with the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). A number of in vitro and in vivo studies have reported that hypoxia can induce amyloidpeptide accumulation through various molecular mechanisms including the up-regulation of the amyloid-β precursor protein, the β-secretase Bace1, or the γγ-secretase complex components, as well as the down-regulation of Aβ-degrading enzymes. Objectives To investigate the effects of acute and chronic sustained hypoxia in Aβ generation in vivo. Methods 2–3 month-old C57/Bl6J wild-type mice were exposed to either normoxia (21% O2) or hypoxia (9% O2) for either 4 to 72 h (acute) or 21–30 days (chronic sustained) in a hermetic chamber. Brain mRNA levels of Aβ-related genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, whereas levels of Bace1 protein, full length AβPP, and its C-terminal fragments (C99/C88 ratio) were measured by Western blot. In addition, 8 and 14-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic mice were subjected to 9% O2 for 21 days and levels of Aβ40, Aβ42, full length AβPP, and soluble AβPPα (sAβPPα) were measured by ELISA or WB. Results Hypoxia (either acute or chronic sustained) did not impact the transcription of any of the Aβ-related genes in young wild-type mice. A significant reduction of Bace1 protein level was noted with acute hypoxia for 16 h but did not correlate with an increased level of full length AβPP or a decreased C99/C83 ratio. Chronic sustained hypoxia did not significantly alter the levels of Bace1, full length AβPP or the C99/C83 ratio. Last, chronic sustained hypoxia did not significantly change the levels of Aβ40, Aβ42, full length AβPP, or sAβPPα in either young or aged APP/PS1 mice. Discussion Our results argue against a hypoxia-induced shift of AβPP proteolysis from the non-amyloidogenic to the amyloidogenic pathways. We discuss the possible methodological caveats of previous in vivo studies. PMID:28099462

  2. Effect of Copper and Zinc on the Single Molecule Self-Affinity of Alzheimer's AmyloidPeptides.

    PubMed

    Hane, Francis T; Hayes, Reid; Lee, Brenda Y; Leonenko, Zoya

    2016-01-01

    The presence of trace concentrations of metallic ions, such as copper and zinc, has previously been shown to drastically increase the aggregation rate and neurotoxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ), the peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanism of why copper and zinc accelerate Aβ aggregation is poorly understood. In this work, we use single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to probe the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters (dissociation constant, Kd, kinetic dissociation rate, koff, and free energy, ΔG) of the dissociation of an Aβ dimer, the amyloid species which initiates the amyloid cascade. Our results show that nanomolar concentrations of copper do not change the single molecule affinity of Aβ to another Aβ peptide in a statistically significant way, while nanomolar concentrations of zinc decrease the affinity of Aβ-Aβ by an order of magnitude. This suggests that the binding of zinc ion to Aβ may interfere with the binding of Aβ-Aβ, leading to a lower self-affinity.

  3. Increased AmyloidPeptide-Induced Memory Deficits in Phospholipid Transfer Protein (PLTP) Gene Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Desrumaux, Catherine; Pisoni, Amandine; Meunier, Johann; Deckert, Valérie; Athias, Anne; Perrier, Véronique; Villard, Vanessa; Lagrost, Laurent; Verdier, Jean-Michel; Maurice, Tangui

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is recognized as one of the earliest and most intense pathological processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the antioxidant vitamin E has been shown to efficiently prevent amyloid plaque formation and neurodegeneration. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has a major role in vitamin E transfers in vivo, and PLTP deficiency in mice is associated with reduced brain vitamin E levels. To determine the impact of PLTP on amyloid pathology in vivo, we analyzed the vulnerability of PLTP-deficient (PLTP-KO) mice to the toxic effects induced by intracerebroventricular injection of oligomeric amyloid-β25–35 (Aβ25–35) peptide, a non-transgenic model of AD. Under basal conditions, PLTP-KO mice showed increased cerebral oxidative stress, increased brain Aβ1–42 levels, and a lower expression of the synaptic function marker synaptophysin, as compared with wild-type mice. This PLTP-KO phenotype was associated with increased memory impairment 1 week after Aβ25–35 peptide injection. Restoration of brain vitamin E levels in PLTP-KO mice through a chronic dietary supplementation prevented Aβ25–35-induced memory deficits and reduced cerebral oxidative stress and toxicity. We conclude that PLTP, through its ability to deliver vitamin E to the brain, constitutes an endogenous neuroprotective agent. Increasing PLTP activity may offer a new way to develop neuroprotective therapies. PMID:23303044

  4. Effect of Copper and Zinc on the Single Molecule Self-Affinity of Alzheimer’s AmyloidPeptides

    PubMed Central

    Hane, Francis T.; Hayes, Reid; Lee, Brenda Y.; Leonenko, Zoya

    2016-01-01

    The presence of trace concentrations of metallic ions, such as copper and zinc, has previously been shown to drastically increase the aggregation rate and neurotoxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ), the peptide implicated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The mechanism of why copper and zinc accelerate Aβ aggregation is poorly understood. In this work, we use single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) to probe the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters (dissociation constant, Kd, kinetic dissociation rate, koff, and free energy, ΔG) of the dissociation of an Aβ dimer, the amyloid species which initiates the amyloid cascade. Our results show that nanomolar concentrations of copper do not change the single molecule affinity of Aβ to another Aβ peptide in a statistically significant way, while nanomolar concentrations of zinc decrease the affinity of Aβ-Aβ by an order of magnitude. This suggests that the binding of zinc ion to Aβ may interfere with the binding of Aβ-Aβ, leading to a lower self-affinity. PMID:26808970

  5. Biochemical stages of amyloidpeptide aggregation and accumulation in the human brain and their association with symptomatic and pathologically preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rijal Upadhaya, Ajeet; Kosterin, Irina; Kumar, Sathish; von Arnim, Christine A F; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Fändrich, Marcus; Walter, Jochen; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the deposition of amyloidpeptide in the brain. N-terminal truncation resulting in the formation of AβN3pE and phosphorylation at serine 8 have been reported to modify aggregation properties of amyloid-β. Biochemically, soluble, dispersible, membrane-associated, and insoluble, plaque-associated amyloid-β aggregates have been distinguished. Soluble and dispersible amyloid-β aggregates are both in mixture with the extracellular or intracellular fluid but dispersible aggregates can be cleared from proteins in solution by ultracentrifugation. To clarify the role of phosphorylated amyloid-β and AβN3pE in soluble, dispersible, membrane-associated, and plaque-associated amyloid-β aggregates in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease we studied brains from 21 cases with symptomatic Alzheimer's disease, 33 pathologically preclinical Alzheimer's disease cases, and 20 control cases. Western blot analysis showed that soluble, dispersible, membrane-associated and plaque-associated amyloid-β aggregates in the earliest preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease did not exhibit detectable amounts of AβN3pE and phosphorylated amyloid-β. This stage was referred to as biochemical stage 1 of amyloid-β aggregation and accumulation. In biochemical amyloid-β stage 2, AβN3pE was additionally found whereas phosphorylated amyloid-β was restricted to biochemical amyloid-β stage 3, the last stage of amyloid-β aggregation. Phosphorylated amyloid-β was seen in the dispersible, membrane-associated, and plaque-associated fraction. All cases with symptomatic Alzheimer's disease in our sample fulfilled biochemical amyloid-β stage 3 criteria, i.e. detection of phosphorylated amyloid-β. Most, but not all, cases with pathologically preclinical Alzheimer's disease had biochemical amyloid-β stages 1 or 2. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the hierarchical occurrence of amyloid-β, AβN3pE, and phosphorylated amyloid-β in amyloid plaques

  6. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Langkilde, Annette E.; Morris, Kyle L.; Serpell, Louise C.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-04-01

    The aggregation process and the fibril state of an amyloidogenic peptide suggest monomer addition to be the prevailing mechanism of elongation and a model of the peptide packing in the fibrils has been obtained. Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods.

  7. Interaction of PiB-derivative metal complexes with beta-amyloid peptides: selective recognition of the aggregated forms.

    PubMed

    Martins, André F; Dias, David M; Morfin, Jean-François; Lacerda, Sara; Laurents, Douglas V; Tóth, Éva; Geraldes, Carlos F G C

    2015-03-27

    Metal complexes are increasingly explored as imaging probes in amyloid peptide related pathologies. We report the first detailed study on the mechanism of interaction between a metal complex and both the monomer and the aggregated form of Aβ1-40 peptide. We have studied lanthanide(III) chelates of two PiB-derivative ligands (PiB=Pittsburgh compound B), L(1) and L(2), differing in the length of the spacer between the metal-complexing DO3A macrocycle (DO3A=1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid) and the peptide-recognition PiB moiety. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy revealed that they both bind to aggregated Aβ1-40 (KD =67-160 μM), primarily through the benzothiazole unit. HSQC NMR spectroscopy on the (15) N-labeled, monomer Aβ1-40 peptide indicates nonsignificant interaction with monomeric Aβ. Time-dependent circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and TEM investigations of the secondary structure and of the aggregation of Aβ1-40 in the presence of increasing amounts of the metal complexes provide coherent data showing that, despite their structural similarity, the two complexes affect Aβ fibril formation distinctly. Whereas GdL(1), at higher concentrations, stabilizes β-sheets, GdL(2) prevents aggregation by promoting α-helical structures. These results give insight into the behavior of amyloid-targeted metal complexes in general and contribute to a more rational design of metal-based diagnostic and therapeutic agents for amyloid- associated pathologies.

  8. Effect of Taiwan mutation (D7H) on structures of amyloidpeptides: replica exchange molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Truong, Phan Minh; Viet, Man Hoang; Nguyen, Phuong H; Hu, Chin-Kun; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-07-31

    Recent experiments have shown that the Taiwan mutation (D7H) slows the fibril formation of amyloid peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42. Motivated by this finding, we have studied the influence of D7H mutation on structures of Aβ peptide monomers using the replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations with OPLS force field and implicit water model. Our study reveals that the mechanism behind modulation of aggregation rates is associated with decrease of β-content and dynamics of the salt bridge D23-K28. Estimating the bending free energy of this salt bridge, we have found that, in agreement with the experiments, the fibril formation rate of both peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42 is reduced about two times by mutation.

  9. Detection of β-amyloid peptide (1-16) and amyloid precursor protein (APP770) using spectroscopic ellipsometry and QCM techniques: a step forward towards Alzheimers disease diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, M K; Nabok, A; Parkinson, D; Tothill, I E; Salam, F; Tsargorodskaya, A

    2010-12-15

    A highly sensitive method of spectroscopic ellipsometry in total internal reflection mode (TIRE) was exploited for detecting β-amyloid peptide (Aβ(1-16)) in the direct immune reaction with monoclonal DE2 antibodies (raised against Aβ(1-16)) electrostatically immobilised on the surface of gold. A rapid detection of Aβ(1-16) in a wide range of concentrations from 5 μg/ml down to 0.05 ng/ml was achieved using a cost-effective and label-free direct immunoassay format. TIRE dynamic spectral measurements proved that the immune reaction between DE2 monoclonal antibodies and Aβ(1-16) is highly specific with the affinity constant K(D)=1.46×10(-8) mol/l. The same DE2 antibodies were utilised for detection of amyloid precursor protein APP(770), a larger protein containing Aβ(1-16) domain, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements in liquid. A combination of QCM and TIRE kinetics results allowed the evaluation of the originally unknown concentration of APP(770) in complete medium solution containing other proteins, salts, and amino acids.

  10. X-ray absorption and diffraction studies of the metal binding sites in amyloid beta-peptide.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor

    2008-03-01

    A major source of neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer's disease is believed to be caused by the toxicity from reactive oxygen species produced in the brain mediated by the A beta protein and mainly copper species. An atomic model of an amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) Cu2+ complex or at least the structure of the metal binding site is of great interest. Accurate information about the Cu-binding site of A beta protein can facilitate simulation of redox chemistry using high level quantum mechanics. Complementary X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption techniques can be employed to obtain such accurate information. This review provides a blend of X-ray diffraction results on amyloid structures and selected works on A beta Cu2+ binding based on spectroscopic measurements with emphasis on the X-ray absorption technique.

  11. Gallotannins and Tannic Acid: First Chemical Syntheses and In Vitro Inhibitory Activity on Alzheimer's Amyloid β-Peptide Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Tahiri; Pouységu, Laurent; Da Costa, Grégory; Deffieux, Denis; Monti, Jean-Pierre; Quideau, Stéphane

    2015-07-06

    The screening of natural products in the search for new lead compounds against Alzheimer's disease has unveiled several plant polyphenols that are capable of inhibiting the formation of toxic β-amyloid fibrils. Gallic acid based gallotannins are among these polyphenols, but their antifibrillogenic activity has thus far been examined using "tannic acid", a commercial mixture of gallotannins and other galloylated glucopyranoses. The first total syntheses of two true gallotannins, a hexagalloylglucopyranose and a decagalloylated compound whose structure is commonly used to depict "tannic acid", are now described. These depsidic gallotannins and simpler galloylated glucose derivatives all inhibit amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) aggregation in vitro, and monogalloylated α-glucogallin and a natural β-hexagalloylglucose are shown to be the strongest inhibitors.

  12. Green tea aroma fraction reduces β-amyloid peptide-induced toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans transfected with human β-amyloid minigene.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Watanabe, Tatsuro; Fujita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Toshio; Saito, Michio; Suganuma, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is a popular world-wide beverage with health benefits that include preventive effects on cancer as well as cardiovascular, liver and Alzheimer's diseases (AD). This study will examine the preventive effects on AD of a unique aroma of Japanese green tea. First, a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) CL4176 expressing human β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) was used as a model of AD. A hexane extract of processed green tea was further fractionated into volatile and non-volatile fractions, named roasty aroma and green tea aroma fractions depending on their aroma, by microscale distillation. Both hexane extract and green tea aroma fraction were found to inhibit Aβ-induced paralysis, while only green tea aroma fraction extended lifespan in CL4176. We also found that green tea aroma fraction has antioxidant activity. This paper indicates that the green tea aroma fraction is an additional component for prevention of AD.

  13. Evidence that a synthetic amyloid-ß oligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice.

  14. Longipin: An Amyloid Antimicrobial Peptide from the Harvestman Acutisoma longipes (Arachnida: Opiliones) with Preferential Affinity for Anionic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Isabel de Fátima Correia; de Melo, Robson Lopes; Riske, Karin A.; Daffre, Sirlei; Montich, Guillermo; da Silva Junior, Pedro Ismael

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to vertebrate immune systems, invertebrates lack an adaptive response and rely solely on innate immunity in which antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play an essential role. Most of them are membrane active molecules that are typically unstructured in solution and adopt secondary/tertiary structures upon binding to phospholipid bilayers. This work presents the first characterization of a constitutive AMP from the hemolymph of an Opiliones order animal: the harvestman Acutisoma longipes. This peptide was named longipin. It presents 18 aminoacid residues (SGYLPGKEYVYKYKGKVF) and a positive net charge at neutral pH. No similarity with other AMPs was observed. However, high sequence similarity with heme-lipoproteins from ticks suggested that longipin might be a protein fragment. The synthetic peptide showed enhanced antifungal activity against Candida guilliermondii and C. tropicalis yeasts (MIC: 3.8–7.5 μM) and did not interfered with VERO cells line viability at all concentrations tested (200–0.1 μM). This selectivity against microbial cells is related to the highest affinity of longipin for anionic charged vesicles (POPG:POPC) compared to zwitterionic ones (POPC), once microbial plasma membrane are generally more negatively charged compared to mammalian cells membrane. Dye leakage from carboxyfluorescein-loaded POPG:POPC vesicles suggested that longipin is a membrane active antimicrobial peptide and FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the peptide chain is mainly unstructured in solution or in the presence of POPC vesicles. However, upon binding to POPG:POPC vesicles, the FT-IR spectrum showed bands related to β-sheet and amyloid-like fibril conformations in agreement with thioflavin-T binding assays, indicating that longipin is an amyloid antimicrobial peptide. PMID:27997568

  15. Longipin: An Amyloid Antimicrobial Peptide from the Harvestman Acutisoma longipes (Arachnida: Opiliones) with Preferential Affinity for Anionic Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sayegh, Raphael Santa Rosa; Batista, Isabel de Fátima Correia; Melo, Robson Lopes de; Riske, Karin A; Daffre, Sirlei; Montich, Guillermo; da Silva Junior, Pedro Ismael

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to vertebrate immune systems, invertebrates lack an adaptive response and rely solely on innate immunity in which antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play an essential role. Most of them are membrane active molecules that are typically unstructured in solution and adopt secondary/tertiary structures upon binding to phospholipid bilayers. This work presents the first characterization of a constitutive AMP from the hemolymph of an Opiliones order animal: the harvestman Acutisoma longipes. This peptide was named longipin. It presents 18 aminoacid residues (SGYLPGKEYVYKYKGKVF) and a positive net charge at neutral pH. No similarity with other AMPs was observed. However, high sequence similarity with heme-lipoproteins from ticks suggested that longipin might be a protein fragment. The synthetic peptide showed enhanced antifungal activity against Candida guilliermondii and C. tropicalis yeasts (MIC: 3.8-7.5 μM) and did not interfered with VERO cells line viability at all concentrations tested (200-0.1 μM). This selectivity against microbial cells is related to the highest affinity of longipin for anionic charged vesicles (POPG:POPC) compared to zwitterionic ones (POPC), once microbial plasma membrane are generally more negatively charged compared to mammalian cells membrane. Dye leakage from carboxyfluorescein-loaded POPG:POPC vesicles suggested that longipin is a membrane active antimicrobial peptide and FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the peptide chain is mainly unstructured in solution or in the presence of POPC vesicles. However, upon binding to POPG:POPC vesicles, the FT-IR spectrum showed bands related to β-sheet and amyloid-like fibril conformations in agreement with thioflavin-T binding assays, indicating that longipin is an amyloid antimicrobial peptide.

  16. Biochemical studies in Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) patients: change in CSF levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and phospho-tau.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Reyes, Patricio F; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2011-04-01

    Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) is one of the causes of dementia of the elderly characterized by impaired mental function, gait difficulties and urinary incontinence. Previously, it was proposed that some of the NPH patients may develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) like pathology. Aim of this study was to compare levels of different CSF biomarkers, including total secreted β-amyloid precursor protein (sAPP), sAPP-alpha form (sAPPα), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, total-tau protein and hyperphosphorylated-tau protein in subjects from NPH and Non-NPH Control (NNC). CSF was collected from 23 NPH patients and 13 Non-NPH controls by lumber puncture. Western blot analysis was performed to measure levels of sAPP-total. ELISA was used separately to determine levels of sAPPα, Aβ peptide, total-tau and phospho-tau proteins. We found a significant decrease in levels of total secreted APP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) in the CSF sample of NPH patients vs. NNC. We did not observe any change in levels of total-tau or phospho-tau in NPH vs. NNC subjects. Notably, phospho-tau level was significantly increased in the NPH patients, who were suffering from the disease for more than one year, vs. NNC. Among five biomarkers studied, decreased sAPP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) levels in CSF can be molecular markers to distinguish NPH cases from NNC. Disease severity can also be assessed by increased levels of CSF phospho-tau protein and the ratio of phospho-tau to Aβ (1-42), which might be a useful tool for predicting conversion of NPH individuals to other neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  17. Cytokine-mediated inhibition of fibrillar amyloidpeptide degradation by human mononuclear phagocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Kiyota, Tomomi; Walsh, Shannon M.; Liu, Jianuo; Kipnis, Jonathan; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2008-01-01

    Vaccination therapy of AD animal models and patients strongly suggests an active role of brain mononuclear phagocytes in immune-mediated clearance of amyloidpeptides (Aβ) in brain. Although Aβ uptake by macrophages can be regulated by pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, their effects on macrophage-mediated Aβ degradation are poorly understood. To better understand this mechanism of degradation, we examined whether pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines affect the degradation of Aβ using primary cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and microglia using pulse-chase analysis of fibrillar and oligomer 125I-Aβ40 and Aβ42. Initial uptake of fibrillar Aβ40 and Aβ42 was 40% and its degradation was saturated by 120 hrs in both MDM and microglia, compared to an initial uptake of oligomeric Aβ less than 0.5% and saturation of degradation within 24 hrs. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) increased the intracellular retention of fibrillar Aβ40 and Aβ42 by inhibiting degradation, whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), but not IL-13 and IL-27, enhanced degradation. Fibrillar Aβ degradation in MDM is sensitive to lysosomal and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors but insensitive to proteasomal and neprilysin inhibitors. IFN-γ and TNF-α directly reduced the expression of IDE and chaperone molecules (Hsp70 and Hsc70), which are involved in refolding of aggregated proteins. Co-culture of MDM with activated, but not naïve T cells, suppressed Aβ degradation in MDM, which was partially blocked by a combination of neutralizing antibodies against pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines suppress Aβ degradation in MDM, whereas select anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines antagonize these effects. PMID:18768842

  18. AIP-1 ameliorates beta-amyloid peptide toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Wail M; Merin, David A; Fonte, Virginia; Link, Christopher D

    2009-08-01

    Multiple neurodegenerative diseases are causally linked to aggregation-prone proteins. Cellular mechanisms involving protein turnover may be key defense mechanisms against aggregating protein disorders. We have used a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer's disease model to identify cellular responses to proteotoxicity resulting from expression of the human beta amyloid peptide (Abeta). We show up-regulation of aip-1 in Abeta-expressing animals. Mammalian homologues of AIP-1 have been shown to associate with, and regulate the function of, the 26S proteasome, leading us to hypothesize that induction of AIP-1 may be a protective cellular response directed toward modulating proteasomal function in response to toxic protein aggregation. Using our transgenic model, we show that overexpression of AIP-1 protected against, while RNAi knockdown of AIP-1 exacerbated, Abeta toxicity. AIP-1 overexpression also reduced accumulation of Abeta in this model, which is consistent with AIP-1 enhancing protein degradation. Transgenic expression of one of the two human aip-1 homologues (AIRAPL), but not the other (AIRAP), suppressed Abeta toxicity in C. elegans, which advocates the biological relevance of the data to human biology. Interestingly, AIRAPL and AIP-1 contain a predicted farnesylation site, which is absent from AIRAP. This farnesylation site was shown by others to be essential for an AIP-1 prolongevity function. Consistent with this, we show that an AIP-1 mutant lacking the predicted farnesylation site failed to protect against Abeta toxicity. Our results implicate AIP-1 in the regulation of protein turnover and protection against Abeta toxicity and point at AIRAPL as the functional mammalian homologue of AIP-1.

  19. Structural evolution and membrane interactions of Alzheimer's amyloid-beta peptide oligomers: New knowledge from single-molecule fluorescence studies

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robin D; Steel, Duncan G; Gafni, Ari

    2014-01-01

    Amyloidpeptide (Aβ) oligomers may represent the proximal neurotoxin in Alzheimer's disease. Single-molecule microscopy (SMM) techniques have recently emerged as a method for overcoming the innate difficulties of working with amyloid-β, including the peptide's low endogenous concentrations, the dynamic nature of its oligomeric states, and its heterogeneous and complex membrane interactions. SMM techniques have revealed that small oligomers of the peptide bind to model membranes and cells at low nanomolar-to-picomolar concentrations and diffuse at rates dependent on the membrane characteristics. These methods have also shown that oligomers grow or dissociate based on the presence of specific inhibitors or promoters and on the ratio of Aβ40 to Aβ42. Here, we discuss several types of single-molecule imaging that have been applied to the study of Aβ oligomers and their membrane interactions. We also summarize some of the recent insights SMM has provided into oligomer behavior in solution, on planar lipid membranes, and on living cell membranes. A brief overview of the current limitations of the technique, including the lack of sensitive assays for Aβ-induced toxicity, is included in hopes of inspiring future development in this area of research. PMID:24753305

  20. Effect of curcumin and Cu 2+/Zn 2+ ions on the fibrillar aggregates formed by the amyloid peptide and other peptides at the organic-aqueous interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghamitra, Nusrat J. M.; Varghese, Neenu; Rao, C. N. R.

    2010-08-01

    Characteristic features of a perilous neuro-degenerative disease such as the Alzhiemer's disease is fibrillar plaque formation by the amyloid (Aβ) peptide. We have modelled the formation and disintegration of fibrils by studying the aggregate structures formed by Aβ structural motif diphenylalanine as well as insulin and bovine serum albumin at the organic-aqueous interface. Even small concentrations of curcumin in the organic medium or Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ ions in the aqueous medium are found to break down the fibrillar structures.

  1. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis of Cu(2+)-induced oligomers of the Alzheimer's amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Timothy M; Kirby, Nigel; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Roberts, Blaine; Barnham, Kevin J; Cappai, Roberto; Pham, Chi Le Lan; Masters, Colin L; Curtain, Cyril C

    2015-03-01

    Research into causes of Alzheimer's disease and its treatment has produced a tantalising array of hypotheses about the role of transition metal dyshomeostasis, many of them on the interaction of these metals with the neurotoxic amyloidpeptide (Aβ). Here, we have used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to study the effect of the molar ratio, Cu(2+)/Aβ, on the early three-dimensional structures of the Aβ1-40 and Cu(2+)/Aβ1-42 peptides in solution. We found that at molar ratios of 0.5 copper to peptide Aβ1-40 aggregated, while Aβ1-42 adopted a relatively monodisperse cylindrical shape, and at a ratio of 1.5 copper to peptide Aβ1-40 adopted a monodisperse cylindrical shape, while Aβ1-42 adopted the shape of an ellipsoid of rotation. We also found, via in-line rapid mixing SAXS analysis, that both peptides in the absence of copper were monodisperse at very short timeframes (<2 s). Kratky plots of these scattering profiles indicated that immediately after mixing both were intrinsically disordered. Ensemble optimisation modelling reflected this, indicating a wide range of structural conformers. These data reflect the ensembles from which the Cu(2+)-promoted oligomers were derived. Our results are discussed in the light of other studies that have shown that the Cu(2+)/Aβ has a marked effect on fibril and oligomer formation by this peptide, with a higher ratio favouring the formation of cytotoxic non-amyloid oligomers. Our results are relatively consistent with previous two-dimensional studies of the conformations of these Cu(2+)-induced entities, made on a much longer time-scale than SAXS, by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, which showed that a range of oligomeric species are formed. We propose that SAXS carried out on a modern synchrotron beamline enables studies on initial events in disordered protein folding on physiologically-relevant time-scales, and will likely provide great insight into the initiating processes of the A

  2. Synthetic Curcumin Analogs as Inhibitors of β -Amyloid Peptide Aggregation: Potential Therapeutic and Diagnostic Agents for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    There is a crucial need to develop new effective drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as the currently available AD treatments provide only momentary and incomplete symptomatic relief. Amongst natural products, curcumin, a major constituent of turmeric, has been intensively investigated for its neuroprotective effect against β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced toxicity in cultured neuronal cells. The ability of curcumin to attach to Aβ peptide and prevent its accumulation is attributed to its three structural characteristics such as the presence of two aromatic end groups and their co-planarity, the length and rigidity of the linker region and the substitution conformation of these aromatics. However, curcumin failed to reach adequate brain levels after oral absorption in AD clinical trials due to its low water solubility and poor oral bioavailability. A number of new curcumin analogs that mimic the active site of the compound along with analogs that mimic the curcumin anti-amyloid effect combined with anticholinesterase effect have been developed to enhance the bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, water solubility, stability at physiological conditions and delivery of curcumin. In this article, we have summarized all reported synthetic analogs of curcumin showing effects on β-amyloid and discussed their potential as therapeutic and diagnostic agents for AD.

  3. Studies on the interactions of copper and zinc ions with β-amyloid peptides by a surface plasmon resonance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fujun; Zhang, Ruiping; Tian, He; Li, Xiangjun

    2012-01-01

    The aggregation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) into fibrils plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Metal ions including copper and zinc are closely connected to the precipitation and toxicity of Aβ. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was constructed to investigate the interactions between Aβ and metal ions. Aβ peptide was immobilized on the SPR chip surface through a preformed alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Our observations indicate that the immobilized Aβ undergoes a conformational change upon exposure to the metal ions. A difference in metal binding affinity between Aβ(1-28) and Aβ(1-42) was also detected. The results suggest that SPR is an effective method to characterize the interactions between Aβ and metal ions.

  4. Statins reduce amyloid β-peptide production by modulating amyloid precursor protein maturation and phosphorylation through a cholesterol-independent mechanism in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Ai; Araki, Wataru; Oda, Akiko; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Tamaoka, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been reported to attenuate amyloidpeptide (Aβ) production in various cellular models. However, the mechanisms by which statins affect neuronal Aβ production have not yet been clarified. Here, we investigated this issue in rat primary cortical neurons using two statins, pitavastatin (PV) and atorvastatin (AV). Treatment of neurons with 0.2-2.5 μM PV or AV for 4 days induced a concentration- and time-dependent reduction in the secretion of both Aβ40 and Aβ42. Moreover, Western blot analyses of cell lysates showed that treatment with PV or AV significantly reduced expression levels of the mature form of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Thr668-phosphorylated APP (P-APP), but not immature form of APP; the decreases in P-APP levels were more notable than those of mature APP levels. The statin treatment did not alter expression of BACE1 (β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1) or γ-secretase complex proteins (presenilin 1, nicastrin, APH-1, and PEN-2). In neurons overexpressing APP via recombinant adenoviruses, PV or AV similarly reduced Aβ secretion and the levels of mature APP and P-APP. Statins also markedly reduced cellular cholesterol content in neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. Co-treatment with mevalonate reversed the statin-induced decreases in Aβ secretion and mature APP and P-APP levels, whereas co-treatment with cholesterol did not, despite recovery of cellular cholesterol levels. Finally, cell-surface biotinylation experiments revealed that both statins significantly reduced the levels of cell-surface P-APP without changing those of cell surface mature APP. These results suggest that statins reduce Aβ production by selectively modulating APP maturation and phosphorylation through a mechanism independent of cholesterol reduction in cultured neurons.

  5. Alzheimer's amyloid-β A2T variant and its N-terminal peptides inhibit amyloid-β fibrillization and rescue the induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Wei; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chang, Yu-Jen; Liao, Yi-Hung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chen, Yun-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementia affecting tens of million people worldwide. The primary neuropathological hallmark in AD is amyloid plaques composed of amyloidpeptide (Aβ). Several familial mutations found in Aβ sequence result in early onset of AD. Previous studies showed that the mutations located at N-terminus of Aβ, such as the English (H6R) and Tottori (D7N) mutations, promote fibril formation and increase cytotoxicity. However, A2T mutant located at the very N-terminus of Aβ shows low-prevalence incidence of AD, whereas, another mutant A2V causes early onset of AD. To understand the molecular mechanism of the distinct effect and develop new potential therapeutic strategy, here, we examined the effect of full-length and N-terminal A2V/T variants to wild type (WT) Aβ40 by fibrillization assays and NMR studies. We found that full-length and N-terminal A2V accelerated WT fibrillization and induced large chemical shifts on the N-terminus of WT Aβ, whereas, full-length and N-terminal A2T retarded the fibrillization. We further examined the inhibition effect of various N-terminal fragments (NTFs) of A2T to WT Aβ. The A2T NTFs ranging from residue 1 to residue 7 to 10, but not 1 to 6 or shorter, are capable to retard WT Aβ fibrillization and rescue cytotoxicity. The results suggest that in the presence of full-length or specific N-terminal A2T can retard Aβ aggregation and the A2T NTFs can mitigate its toxicity. Our results provide a novel targeting site for future therapeutic development of AD.

  6. Alzheimer’s amyloid-β A2T variant and its N-terminal peptides inhibit amyloid-β fibrillization and rescue the induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Wei; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chang, Yu-Jen; Liao, Yi-Hung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chen, Yun-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common dementia affecting tens of million people worldwide. The primary neuropathological hallmark in AD is amyloid plaques composed of amyloidpeptide (Aβ). Several familial mutations found in Aβ sequence result in early onset of AD. Previous studies showed that the mutations located at N-terminus of Aβ, such as the English (H6R) and Tottori (D7N) mutations, promote fibril formation and increase cytotoxicity. However, A2T mutant located at the very N-terminus of Aβ shows low-prevalence incidence of AD, whereas, another mutant A2V causes early onset of AD. To understand the molecular mechanism of the distinct effect and develop new potential therapeutic strategy, here, we examined the effect of full-length and N-terminal A2V/T variants to wild type (WT) Aβ40 by fibrillization assays and NMR studies. We found that full-length and N-terminal A2V accelerated WT fibrillization and induced large chemical shifts on the N-terminus of WT Aβ, whereas, full-length and N-terminal A2T retarded the fibrillization. We further examined the inhibition effect of various N-terminal fragments (NTFs) of A2T to WT Aβ. The A2T NTFs ranging from residue 1 to residue 7 to 10, but not 1 to 6 or shorter, are capable to retard WT Aβ fibrillization and rescue cytotoxicity. The results suggest that in the presence of full-length or specific N-terminal A2T can retard Aβ aggregation and the A2T NTFs can mitigate its toxicity. Our results provide a novel targeting site for future therapeutic development of AD. PMID:28362827

  7. Wild-type amyloid beta 1-40 peptide induces vascular smooth muscle cell death independently from matrix metalloprotease activity.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Régis; Mateo, Véronique; Rouxel, Clotilde; Zaccarini, François; Glorian, Martine; Béréziat, Gilbert; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Limon, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of intracerebral hemorrhages in the elderly, characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulating in central nervous system blood vessels. Within the vessel walls, Aβ-peptide deposits [composed mainly of wild-type (WT) Aβ(1-40) peptide in sporadic forms] induce impaired adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to the extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with their degeneration. This process often results in a loss of blood vessel wall integrity and ultimately translates into cerebral ischemia and microhemorrhages, both clinical features of CAA. In this study, we decipher the molecular mechanism of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-2 activation in WT-Aβ(1-40) -treated VSMC and provide evidence that MMP activity, although playing a critical role in cell detachment disrupting ECM components, is not involved in the WT-Aβ(1-40) -induced degeneration of VSMCs. Indeed, whereas this peptide clearly induced VSMC apoptosis, neither preventing MMP-2 activity nor hampering the expression of membrane type1-MMP, or preventing tissue inhibitors of MMPs-2 (TIMP-2) recruitment (two proteins evidenced here as involved in MMP-2 activation), reduced the number of dead cells. Even the use of broad-range MMP inhibitors (GM6001 and Batimastat) did not affect WT-Aβ(1-40) -induced cell apoptosis. Our results, in contrast to those obtained using the Aβ(1-40) Dutch variant suggesting a link between MMP-2 activity, VSMC mortality and degradation of specific matrix components, indicate that the ontogenesis of the Dutch familial and sporadic forms of CAAs is different. ECM degradation and VSMC degeneration would be tightly connected in the Dutch familial form while being two independent processes in sporadic forms of CAA.

  8. Ultrasonic force microscopy for nanomechanical characterization of early and late-stage amyloidpeptide aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinker-Mill, Claire; Mayes, Jennifer; Allsop, David; Kolosov, Oleg V.

    2014-02-01

    The aggregation of amyloidpeptides into protein fibres is one of the main neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While imaging of amyloid-β aggregate morphology in vitro is extremely important for understanding AD pathology and in the development of aggregation inhibitors, unfortunately, potentially highly toxic, early aggregates are difficult to observe by current electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods, due to low contrast and variability of peptide attachment to the substrate. Here, we use a poly-L-Lysine (PLL) surface that captures all protein components from monomers to fully formed fibres, followed by nanomechanical mapping via ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM), which marries high spatial resolution and nanomechanical contrast with the non-destructive nature of tapping mode AFM. For the main putative AD pathogenic component, Aβ1-42, the PLL-UFM approach reveals the morphology of oligomers, protofibrils and mature fibres, and finds that a fraction of small oligomers is still present at later stages of fibril assembly.

  9. Epitope and isotype specificities of antibodies to -amyloid peptide for protection against Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Frédérique; Barbour, Robin; Cannon, Catherine; Carretto, Robert; Fox, Michael; Games, Dora; Guido, Teresa; Hoenow, Kathleen; Hu, Kang; Johnson-Wood, Kelly; Khan, Karen; Kholodenko, Dora; Lee, Celeste; Lee, Mike; Motter, Ruth; Nguyen, Minh; Reed, Amanda; Schenk, Dale; Tang, Pearl; Vasquez, Nicki; Seubert, Peter; Yednock, Ted

    2003-02-01

    Transgenic PDAPP mice, which express a disease-linked isoform of the human amyloid precursor protein, exhibit CNS pathology that is similar to Alzheimer's disease. In an age-dependent fashion, the mice develop plaques containing -amyloid peptide (A) and exhibit neuronal dystrophy and synaptic loss. It has been shown in previous studies that pathology can be prevented and even reversed by immunization of the mice with the A peptide. Similar protection could be achieved by passive administration of some but not all monoclonal antibodies against A. In the current studies we sought to define the optimal antibody response for reducing neuropathology. Immune sera with reactivity against different A epitopes and monoclonal antibodies with different isotypes were examined for efficacy both ex vivo and in vivo. The studies showed that: (i) of the purified or elicited antibodies tested, only antibodies against the N-terminal regions of A were able to invoke plaque clearance; (ii) plaque binding correlated with a clearance response and neuronal protection, whereas the ability of antibodies to capture soluble A was not necessarily correlated with efficacy; (iii) the isotype of the antibody dramatically influenced the degree of plaque clearance and neuronal protection; (iv) high affinity of the antibody for Fc receptors on microglial cells seemed more important than high affinity for Aβ itself; and (v) complement activation was not required for plaque clearance. These results indicate that antibody Fc-mediated plaque clearance is a highly efficient and effective process for protection against neuropathology in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Charge regulation phenomenon predicted from the modeling of polypeptide electrophoretic mobilities as a relevant mechanism of amyloid-beta peptide oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2016-03-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities of amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides and their aggregates are modeled to study the amyloidogenic pathway associated with Alzheimer´s Disease. The near molecule pH generated by the intraparticle charge regulation phenomenon during the oligomerization of amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides is evaluated and discussed as a relevant mechanism supporting the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" proposed in the literature. A theoretical framework associated with the oligomerization of amyloid-beta peptides including simple scaling laws and the consideration of electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties of oligomers is presented. The central finding is the explanation of the near molecule pH change toward the pI when the oligomerization number increases. These results allow one to rationalize consecutive physical stages that validate the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Concluding remarks involving mainly the effects of pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena on the amyloidogenic pathway with some suggestions for future research are provided.

  11. Immunization with the SDPM1 peptide lowers amyloid plaque burden and improves cognitive function in the APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chiou-Miin; Devries, Sarah; Camboni, Marybeth; Glass, Matthew; Martin, Paul T

    2010-09-01

    Vaccination has become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, immunization with Abeta amyloid can have unwanted, potentially lethal, side effects. Here we demonstrate an alternative peptide-mimotope vaccine strategy using the SDPM1 peptide. SDPM1 is a 20 amino acid peptide bounded by cysteines that binds tetramer forms of Abeta(1-40)- and Abeta(1-42)-amyloids and blocks subsequent Abeta amyloid aggregation. Immunization of mice with SDPM1 induced peptide-mimotope antibodies with the same biological activity as the SDPM1 peptide. When done prior to the onset of amyloid plaque formation, SDPM1 vaccination of APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mice reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) levels in the brain, improved cognitive performance in Morris water maze tests, and resulted in no increased T cell responses to immunogenic or Abeta peptides or brain inflammation. When done after plaque burden was already significant, SDPM1 immunization still significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40/1-42) peptide levels in APPswePSEN1(A246E) brain without inducing encephalitogenic T cell responses or brain inflammation, but treatment at this stage did not improve cognitive function. These experiments demonstrate the efficacy of a novel vaccine approach for Alzheimer's disease where immunization with an Abeta(1-40/1-42) amyloid-specific binding and blocking peptide is used to inhibit the development of neuropathology and cognitive dysfunction.

  12. 1–42 β-Amyloid peptide requires PDK1/nPKC/Rac 1 pathway to induce neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, L; Hernando-Rodríguez, M; Ruiz, A; Apraiz, A; Arrizabalaga, O; Vellón, L; Alberdi, E; Cavaliere, F; Lacerda, H M; Jimenez, S; Parada, L A; Matute, C; Zugaza, J L

    2013-01-01

    1–42 β-Amyloid (Aβ1–42) peptide is a key molecule involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Some of its effects are manifested at the neuronal morphological level. These morphological changes involve loss of neurites due to cytoskeleton alterations. However, the mechanism of Aβ1–42 peptide activation of the neurodegenerative program is still poorly understood. Here, Aβ1–42 peptide-induced transduction of cellular death signals through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphoinositol-dependent kinase (PDK)/novel protein kinase C (nPKC)/Rac 1 axis is described. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 and nPKC activities blocks Rac 1 activation and neuronal cell death. Our results provide insights into an unsuspected connection between PDK1, nPKCs and Rac 1 in the same signal-transduction pathway and points out nPKCs and Rac 1 as potential therapeutic targets to block the toxic effects of Aβ1–42 peptide in neurons. PMID:23340502

  13. General dynamic properties of Abeta12-36 amyloid peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease from unfolding simulation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Galzitskaya, Oxana V; Mitomo, Daisuke; Higo, Junichi

    2004-11-01

    To study the folding/unfolding properties of a beta-amyloid peptide Abeta(12-36) of Alzheimer's disease, five molecular dynamics simulations of Abeta(12-36) in explicit water were done at 450 K starting from a structure that is stable in trifluoroethanol/water at room temperature with two alpha-helices. Due to high temperature, the initial helical structure unfolded during the simulation. The observed aspects of the unfolding were as follows. 1) One helix (helix 1) had a longer life than the other (helix 2), which correlates well with the theoretically computed Phi values. 2) Temporal prolongation of helix 1 was found before unfolding. 3) Hydrophobic cores formed frequently with rearrangement of amino-acid residues in the hydrophobic cores. The formation and rearrangement of the hydrophobic cores may be a general aspect of this peptide in the unfolded state, and the structural changes accompanied by the hydrophobic-core rearrangement may lead the peptide to the most stable structure. 4) Concerted motions (collective modes) appeared to unfold helix 1. The collective modes were similar with those observed in another simulation at 300 K. The analysis implies that the conformation moves according to the collective modes when the peptide is in the initial stage of protein unfolding and in the final stage of protein folding.

  14. Structural Studies of Copper(I) Complexes of Amyloid-Beta Peptide Fragments: Formation of Two-Coordinate Bis(Histidine) Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Himes, R.A.; Park, G.Young.; Siluvai, G.Sutha.; Blackburn, N.J.; Karlin, K.D.

    2009-05-18

    The beta bind: Copper(I) binds to amyloid {beta}-peptide fragments (see structure) as a stable bis(histidine), two-coordinate, near-linear complex, even in the presence of potential additional ligands. As has been proposed or assumed in other studies, the copper(I)-peptide complexes react with dioxygen to form the reactive oxygen species H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, without the need for a third histidine ligand to promote the chemistry.

  15. The Structure of Intrinsically Disordered Peptides Implicated in Amyloid Diseases: Insights from Fully Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chun; Shea, Joan-Emma

    Protein aggregation involves the self-assembly of proteins into large β-sheet-rich complexes. This process can be the result of aberrant protein folding and lead to "amyloidosis," a condition characterized by deposits of protein aggregates known as amyloids on various organs of the body [1]. Amyloid-related diseases include, among others, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and type II diabetes [2, 3, 4]. In other instances, however, protein aggregation is not a pathological process, but rather a functional one, with aggregates serving as structural scaffolds in a number of organisms [5].

  16. High-affinity Anticalins with aggregation-blocking activity directed against the Alzheimer β-amyloid peptide

    PubMed Central

    Rauth, Sabine; Hinz, Dominik; Börger, Michael; Uhrig, Markus; Mayhaus, Manuel; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Skerra, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, in particular Aβ42 and Aβ40, exert neurotoxic effects and their overproduction leads to amyloid deposits in the brain, thus constituting an important biomolecular target for treatments of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We describe the engineering of cognate Anticalins as a novel type of neutralizing protein reagent based on the human lipocalin scaffold. Phage display selection from a genetic random library comprising variants of the human lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) with mutations targeted at 20 exposed amino acid positions in the four loops that form the natural binding site was performed using both recombinant and synthetic target peptides and resulted in three different Anticalins. Biochemical characterization of the purified proteins produced by periplasmic secretion in Escherichia coli revealed high folding stability in a monomeric state, with Tm values ranging from 53.4°C to 74.5°C, as well as high affinities for Aβ40, between 95 pM and 563 pM, as measured by real-time surface plasmon resonance analysis. The central linear VFFAED epitope within the Aβ sequence was mapped using a synthetic peptide array on membranes and was shared by all three Anticalins, despite up to 13 mutual amino acid differences in their binding sites. All Anticalins had the ability–with varying extent–to inhibit Aβ aggregation in vitro according to the thioflavin-T fluorescence assay and, furthermore, they abolished Aβ42-mediated toxicity in neuronal cell culture. Thus, these Anticalins provide not only useful protein reagents to study the molecular pathology of AD but they also show potential as alternative drug candidates compared with antibodies. PMID:27029347

  17. Simple Colorimetric Detection of Amyloid β-peptide (1-40) based on Aggregation of Gold Nanoparticles in the Presence of Copper Ions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanli; Dong, Hui; Liu, Lantao; Xu, Maotian

    2015-05-13

    A simple method for specific colorimetric sensing of Alzheimer's disease related amyloidpeptide (Aβ) is developed based on the aggregation of gold nanoparticles in the presence of copper ion. The detection of limit for Aβ(1-40) is 0.6 nM and the promising results from practical samples (human serum) indicate the great potential for the routine detection.

  18. Characterization of the effects of anti-aging medicine Fructus lycii on beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man-Shan; Lai, Cora Sau-Wan; Ho, Yuen-Shan; Zee, Sze-Yong; So, Kwok-Fai; Yuen, Wai-Hung; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2007-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease. There are increasing lines of evidence showing that the molecular signaling pathways in aged cells are altered so that cells are susceptible to injury. We and other laboratories have demonstrated the significant involvement of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) in beta-amyloid (A beta) peptide neurotoxicity and in AD. Fructus lycii (the fruit of Lycium barbarum) has long been used in oriental medicine as an anti-aging agent. Our previous studies demonstrated that the aqueous extract isolated from L. barbarum exhibited significant protection on cultured neurons against harmful chemical toxins such as A beta and dithiothreitol. We also showed that the polysaccharide-containing extract (LBP) from L. barbarum exhibited neuroprotective effects in the retina against ocular hypertension in a laser-induced glaucoma animal model. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether LBP can elicit neuroprotection to neurons stressed by A beta peptides. Furthermore, we planned to isolate and identify the neuroprotective agent from LBP using chromatographic methods. Our results showed that pretreatment of LBP effectively protected neurons against A beta-induced apoptosis by reducing the activity of both caspase-3 and -2, but not caspase-8 and -9. A new arabinogalactan-protein (LBP-III) was isolated from LBP and attenuated A beta peptide-activated caspase-3-like activity. LBP-III markedly reduced the phosphorylation of PKR triggered by A beta peptide. Since the phosphorylation state of PKR increased with age, reduction of its phosphorylation triggered by A beta peptide may implicate that LBP-III from Fructus lycii is a potential neuroprotective agent in AD. As herbal medicine has received increasing attention for the treatment of AD, our study will open a window for the development of a neuroprotective agent for anti-aging from Chinese medicine.

  19. Microfluidic Isoelectric Focusing of Amyloid Beta Peptides Followed by Micropillar-Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mikkonen, Saara; Jacksén, Johan; Roeraade, Johan; Thormann, Wolfgang; Emmer, Åsa

    2016-10-18

    A novel method for preconcentration and purification of the Alzheimer's disease related amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides by isoelectric focusing (IEF) in 75 nL microchannels combined with their analysis by micropillar-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is presented. A semiopen chip-based setup, consisting of open microchannels covered by a lid of a liquid fluorocarbon, was used. IEF was performed in a mixture of four small and chemically well-defined amphoteric carriers, glutamic acid, aspartyl-histidine (Asp-His), cycloserine (cSer), and arginine, which provided a stepwise pH gradient tailored for focusing of the C-terminal Aβ peptides with a pI of 5.3 in the boundary between cSer and Asp-His. Information about the focusing dynamics and location of the foci of Aβ peptides and other compounds was obtained using computer simulation and by performing MALDI-MS analysis directly from the open microchannel. With the established configuration, detection was performed by direct sampling of a nanoliter volume containing the focused Aβ peptides from the microchannel, followed by deposition of this volume onto a chip with micropillar MALDI targets. In addition to purification, IEF preconcentration provides at least a 10-fold increase of the MALDI-MS-signal. After immunoprecipitation and concentration of the eluate in the microchannel, IEF-micropillar-MALDI-MS is demonstrated to be a suitable platform for detection of Aβ peptides in human cerebrospinal fluid as well as in blood plasma.

  20. Cysteine Cathepsins in the Secretory Vesicle Produce Active Peptides: Cathepsin L Generates Peptide Neurotransmitters and Cathepsin B Produces Beta-Amyloid of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Vivian; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Wegrzyn, Jill; Bark, Steven; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Recent new findings indicate significant biological roles of cysteine cathepsin proteases in secretory vesicles for production of biologically active peptides. Notably, cathepsin L in secretory vesicles has been demonstrated as a key protease for proteolytic processing of proneuropeptides (and prohormones) into active neuropeptides that are released to mediate cell-cell communication in the nervous system for neurotransmission. Moreover, cathepsin B in secretory vesicles has been recently identified as a β-secretase for production of neurotoxic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides that accumulate in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), participating as a notable factor in the severe memory loss in AD. These secretory vesicle functions of cathepsins L and B for production of biologically active peptides contrasts with the well-known role of cathepsin proteases in lysosomes for the degradation of proteins to result in their inactivation. The unique secretory vesicle proteome indicates proteins of distinct functional categories that provide the intravesicular environment for support of cysteine cathepsin function. Features of the secretory vesicle protein systems insure optimized intravesicular conditions that support the proteolytic activity of cathepsins. These new findings of recently discovered biological roles of cathepsins L and B indicate their significance in human health and disease. PMID:21925292

  1. Zinc(II) Binding Site to the AmyloidPeptide: Insights from Spectroscopic Studies with a Wide Series of Modified Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Zn(II) ion has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) due to its ability to modulate the aggregating properties of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, where Aβ aggregation is a central event in the etiology of the disease. Delineating Zn(II) binding properties to Aβ is thus a prerequisite to better grasp its potential role in AD. Because of (i) the flexibility of the Aβ peptide, (ii) the multiplicity of anchoring sites, and (iii) the silent nature of the Zn(II) ion in most classical spectroscopies, this is a difficult task. To overcome these difficulties, we have investigated the impact of peptide alterations (mutations, N-terminal acetylation) on the Zn(Aβ) X-ray absorption spectroscopy fingerprint and on the Zn(II)-induced modifications of the Aβ peptides’ NMR signatures. We propose a tetrahedrally bound Zn(II) ion, in which the coordination sphere is made by two His residues and two carboxylate side chains. Equilibria between equivalent ligands for one Zn(II) binding position have also been observed, the predominant site being made by the side chains of His6, His13 or His14, Glu11, and Asp1 or Glu3 or Asp7, with a slight preference for Asp1. PMID:27665863

  2. Protective spin-labeled fluorenes maintain amyloid beta peptide in small oligomers and limit transitions in secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, Robin; Ly, Sonny; Hilt, Silvia; Petrlova, Jitka; Maezawa, Izumi; Kálai, Tamás; Hideg, Kálmán; Jin, Lee-Way; Laurence, Ted A.; Voss, John C.

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques comprised of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. Soluble oligomers of the Aβ peptide underlie a cascade of neuronal loss and dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease. Single particle analyses of Aβ oligomers in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were used to provide real-time descriptions of how spin-labeled fluorenes (SLFs; bi-functional small molecules that block the toxicity of Aβ) prevent and disrupt oligomeric assemblies of Aβ in solution. The FCS results, combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy, demonstrate SLFs can inhibit the growth of Aβ oligomers and disrupt existing oligomers while retaining Aβ in a largely disordered state. Furthermore, while the ability of SLF to block Aβ toxicity correlates with a reduction in oligomer size, our results suggest the conformation of Aβ within the oligomer determines the toxicity of the species. Attenuation of Aβ toxicity, which has been associated primarily with the soluble oligomeric form, can be achieved through redistribution of the peptides into smaller oligomers and arrest of the fractional increase in beta secondary structure.

  3. Association of β-amyloid peptide fragments with neuronal nitric oxide synthase: Implications in the etiology of Alzheimers disease.

    PubMed

    Padayachee, Eden; Ngqwala, Nosiphiwe; Whiteley, Chris G

    2012-06-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) was purified on DEAE-Sepharose anion-exchange in a 38% yield, with 3-fold recovery and specific activity of 5 µmol.min(-1).mg(-1). The enzyme was a heterogeneous dimer of molecular mass 225 kDa having a temperature and pH optima of 40°C and 6.5, K(m) and V(max) of 2.6 μM and 996 nmol.min(-1).ml(-1), respectively and was relatively stable at the optimum conditions (t(½) = 3 h). β-Amyloid peptide fragments Aβ(17-28) was the better inhibitor for nNOS (K(i) = 0.81 µM). After extended incubation of nNOS (96 h) with each of the peptide fragments, Congo Red, turbidity and thioflavin-T assays detected the presence of soluble and insoluble fibrils that had formed at a rate of 5 nM.min(-1). A hydrophobic fragment Aβ(17-21) [Leu(17) - Val(18) - Phe(19) - Phe(20) - Ala(21)] and glycine zipper motifs within the peptide fragment Aβ(17-35) were critical in binding and in fibrillogenesis confirming that nNOS was amyloidogenic catalyst.

  4. Current and future implications of basic and translational research on amyloidpeptide production and removal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, C.; Chen, F.; Sevalle, J.; Qamar, S.; Dodd, R.; Li, Y.; Schmitt-Ulms, G.; Fraser, P.E.; St George-Hyslop, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited variants in multiple different genes are associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In many of these genes, the inherited variants alter some aspect of the production or clearance of the neurotoxic amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Thus missense, splice site or duplication mutants in the presenilin 1 (PS1), presenilin 2 (PS2) or the amyloid precursor protein (APP) genes, which alter the levels or shift the balance of Aβ produced, are associated with rare, highly penetrant autosomal dominant forms of Familial Alzheimer's Disease (FAD). Similarly, the more prevalent late-onset forms of AD are associated with both coding and non-coding variants in genes such as SORL1, PICALM and ABCA7 that affect the production and clearance of Aβ. This review summarises some of the recent molecular and structural work on the role of these genes and the proteins coded by them in the biology of Aβ. We also briefly outline how the emerging knowledge about the pathways involved in Aβ generation and clearance can be potentially targeted therapeutically. This article is part of Special Issue entitled "Neuronal Protein". PMID:25748120

  5. AmyloidPeptide Aβ3pE-42 Induces Lipid Peroxidation, Membrane Permeabilization, and Calcium Influx in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Adam P; Wong, Bruce X; Johanssen, Timothy; Griffith, James C; Masters, Colin L; Bush, Ashley I; Barnham, Kevin J; Duce, James A; Cherny, Robert A

    2016-03-18

    Pyroglutamate-modified amyloid-β (pE-Aβ) is a highly neurotoxic amyloid-β (Aβ) isoform and is enriched in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease compared with healthy aged controls. Pyroglutamate formation increases the rate of Aβ oligomerization and alters the interactions of Aβ with Cu(2+) and lipids; however, a link between these properties and the toxicity of pE-Aβ peptides has not been established. We report here that Aβ3pE-42 has an enhanced capacity to cause lipid peroxidation in primary cortical mouse neurons compared with the full-length isoform (Aβ(1-42)). In contrast, Aβ(1-42) caused a significant elevation in cytosolic reactive oxygen species, whereas Aβ3pE-42 did not. We also report that Aβ3pE-42 preferentially associates with neuronal membranes and triggers Ca(2+) influx that can be partially blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801. Aβ3pE-42 further caused a loss of plasma membrane integrity and remained bound to neurons at significantly higher levels than Aβ(1-42) over extended incubations. Pyroglutamate formation was additionally found to increase the relative efficiency of Aβ-dityrosine oligomer formation mediated by copper-redox cycling.

  6. Laminar distribution of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide deposits in the frontal lobe in familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R A

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether genetic factors influence frontal lobe degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the laminar distributions of diffuse, primitive, and classic β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide deposits were compared in early-onset familial AD (EO-FAD) linked to mutations of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) or presenilin 1 (PSEN1) gene, late-onset familial AD (LO-FAD), and sporadic AD (SAD). The influence of apolipoprotein E (Apo E) genotype on laminar distribution was also studied. In the majority of FAD and SAD cases, maximum density of the diffuse and primitive Aβdeposits occurred in the upper cortical layers, whereas the distribution of the classic Aβ deposits was more variable, either occurring in the lower layers, or a double-peaked (bimodal) distribution was present, density peaks occurring in upper and lower layers. The cortical layer at which maximum density of Aβ deposits occurred and maximum density were similar in EO-FAD, LO-FAD and SAD. In addition, there were no significant differences in distributions in cases expressing Apo E ε4 alleles compared with cases expressing the ε2 or ε3 alleles. These results suggest that gene expression had relatively little effect on the laminar distribution of Aβ deposits in the frontal lobe of the AD cases studied. Hence, the pattern of frontal lobe degeneration in AD is similar regardless of whether it is associated with APP and PSEN1, mutation, allelic variation in Apo E, or with SAD.

  7. Copper Coordination Features of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: The Type 2 Diabetes Peptide.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, Carolina; Cortés-Mejía, Rodrigo; Miotto, Marco C; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O; Del Campo, Jorge M; Quintanar, Liliana

    2016-10-05

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major component of amyloid deposits found in pancreatic β-cells of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Copper ions have an inhibitory effect on the amyloid aggregation of hIAPP, and they may play a role in the etiology of T2D. However, deeper knowledge of the structural details of the copper-hIAPP interaction is required to understand the molecular mechanisms involved. Here, we performed a spectroscopic study of Cu(II) binding to hIAPP and several variants, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electronic absorption, and circular dichroism (CD) in the UV-vis region in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) and density functional theory geometry optimizations. We find that Cu(II) binds to the imidazole N1 of His18, the deprotonated amides of Ser19 and Ser20, and an oxygen-based ligand provided by Ser20, either via its hydroxyl group or its backbone carbonyl, while Asn22 might also play a role as an axial ligand. Ser20 plays a crucial role in stabilizing Cu(II) coordination toward the C-terminal, providing a potential link between the S20G mutation associated with early onset of T2D, its impact in Cu binding properties, and hIAPP amyloid aggregation. Our study defines the nature of the coordination environment in the Cu(II)-hIAPP complex, revealing that the amino acid residues involved in metal ion binding are also key residues for the formation of β-sheet structures and amyloid fibrils. Cu(II) binding to hIAPP may lead to the coexistence of more than one coordination mode, which in turn could favor different sets of Cu-induced conformational ensembles. Cu-induced hIAPP conformers would display a higher energetic barrier to form amyloid fibrils, hence explaining the inhibitory effect of Cu ions in hIAPP aggregation. Overall, this study provides further structural insights into the bioinorganic chemistry of T2D.

  8. Cisplatin inhibits the formation of a reactive intermediate during copper-catalyzed oxidation of amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Walke, Gulshan R; Rapole, Srikanth; Kulkarni, Prasad P

    2014-10-06

    Cisplatin was studied for its effect on the copper-catalyzed oxidation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. The interaction of cisplatin with Aβ1-16 in the presence of Cu(II) was investigated using cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry. The positive shift in the E1/2 value of Aβ1-16-Cu(II) suggests that the interaction of cisplatin alters the copper-binding properties of Aβ1-16. The mass spectrometry data show complete inhibition of copper-catalyzed decarboxylation/deamination of the Asp1 residue of Aβ1-16, while there is a significant decrease in copper-catalyzed oxidation of Aβ1-16 in the presence of cisplatin. Overall, our results provide a novel mode by which cisplatin inhibits copper-catalyzed oxidation of Aβ. These findings may lead to the design of better platinum complexes to treat oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease and other related neurological disorders.

  9. Mechanical Dilution of Beta-amyloid Peptide and Phosphorylated Tau Protein in Alzheimer's Disease: Too Simple to be True?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the widespread accumulation of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of deposits of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (phospho-tau) respectively. Considerable effort has been expended to identify methods to retard the deposition of these proteins or to enhance their clearance. It is strikingly surprising that until now, very few researchers have attempted to remove these proteins using mechanical procedures. In this article, we start by showing the rationale of mechanical dilution of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a therapeutic approach in AD. Then, we present models of implantable systems allowing mechanical dilution of CSF by means of CSF replacement and CSF filtration (liquorpheresis). We conclude that even though this approach seems simplistic, it is feasible and deserves exploration.

  10. Folic Acid Inhibits Amyloid β-Peptide Production through Modulating DNA Methyltransferase Activity in N2a-APP Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Jiang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shijing; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xumei; Wilson, John X; Huang, Guowei

    2015-10-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease resulting in progressive dementia, and is a principal cause of dementia among older adults. Folate acts through one-carbon metabolism to support the methylation of multiple substrates. We hypothesized that folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and may alter amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production in AD. Mouse Neuro-2a cells expressing human APP695 were incubated with folic acid (2.8-40 μmol/L), and with or without zebularine (the DNMT inhibitor). DNMT activity, cell viability, Aβ and DNMTs expression were then examined. The results showed that folic acid stimulated DNMT gene and protein expression, and DNMT activity. Furthermore, folic acid decreased Aβ protein production, whereas inhibition of DNMT activity by zebularine increased Aβ production. The results indicate that folic acid induces methylation potential-dependent DNMT enzymes, thereby attenuating Aβ production.

  11. Free fatty acids stimulate the polymerization of tau and amyloid beta peptides. In vitro evidence for a common effector of pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D. M.; Binder, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, characterized by the concomitant deposition of extracellular filaments composed of beta-amyloid peptides and intracellular filaments composed of the microtubule-associated protein tau. We have discovered that free fatty acids (FFAs) stimulate the assembly of both amyloid and tau filaments in vitro. The minimal concentration of arachidonic acid observed to stimulate tau assembly ranged from 10 to 20 mumol/L, depending on the source of the purified tau. Tau preparations that do not exhibit spontaneous assembly were among those induced to polymerize by arachidonic acid. All long-chain FFAs tested enhanced assembly to some extent, although greater stimulation was usually associated with unsaturated forms. Utilizing fluorescence spectroscopy, unsaturated FFAs were also demonstrated to induce beta-amyloid assembly. The minimal concentration of oleic or linoleic acid observed to stimulate the assembly of amyloid was 40 mumol/L. The filamentous nature of these thioflavin-binding amyloid polymers was verified by electron microscopy. These data define a new set of tools for examining the polymerization of amyloid and tau proteins and suggest that cortical elevations of FFAs may constitute a unifying stimulatory event driving the formation of two of the obvious pathogenetic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9176408

  12. Molecular mechanisms linking diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer disease: beta-amyloid peptide, insulin signaling, and neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuko; Sato, Naoyuki; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-06-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing at an alarming rate and has become a major public health concern worldwide. Recent epidemiological studies have provided direct evidence that DM is a strong risk factor for AD; this finding is now attracting attention. However, the underlying mechanisms for this association remain largely unknown. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies reported that diabetic conditions could cause an increase in the beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) levels, which exhibits neurotoxic properties and plays a causative role in AD. However, unexpectedly, recent clinicopathological studies have shown no evidence that the pathological hallmarks of AD, including amyloid plaque, were increased in the brains of diabetic patients, suggesting that DM could affect the pathogenesis of AD through mechanisms other than modulation of Aβ metabolism. One possible mechanism is the alteration in brain insulin signaling. It has been shown that insulin signaling is involved in a variety of neuronal functions, and that it also plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of AD. Thus, the modification of neuronal insulin signaling by diabetic conditions may contribute to AD progression. Another possible mechanism is cerebrovascular alteration, a common pathological change observed in both diseases. Accumulating evidence has suggested the importance of Aβ-induced cerebrovascular dysfunction in AD, and indicated that pathological interactions between the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and Aβ peptides may play a role in this dysfunction. Our study has provided a further understanding of the potential underlying mechanisms linking DM and AD by establishing novel mouse models showing pathological manifestations of both diseases. The current review summarizes the results from recent studies on the pathological relationship between DM and AD while focusing on brain insulin signaling and cerebrovascular alteration

  13. Nanoliposomes protect against human arteriole endothelial dysfunction induced by β-amyloid peptide

    PubMed Central

    Truran, Seth; Weissig, Volkmar; Madine, Jillian; Davies, Hannah A; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Franco, Daniel A; Karamanova, Nina; Burciu, Camelia; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether nanoliposomes containing phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and phosphatidic acid (NLPA) prevent β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) fibrillation and Aβ42-induced human arteriole endothelial dysfunction. NLPA abolished Aβ42 fibril formation (thioflavin-T fluorescence/electron microscopy). In ex-vivo human adipose and leptomeningeal arterioles, Aβ42 impaired dilator response to acetylcholine that was reversed by NLPA; this protection was abolished by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester. Aβ42 reduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell NO production that was restored by NLPA. Nanoliposomes prevented Aβ42 amyloid formation, reversed Aβ42-induced human microvascular endothelial dysfunction and may be useful in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26661197

  14. Involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme in insulin- and atrial natriuretic peptide-sensitive internalization of amyloidpeptide in mouse brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Murata, Sho; Katsukura, Yuki; Suzuki, Hiroya; Funaki, Miho; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral clearance of amyloidpeptide (Aβ), which is implicated in Alzheimer's disease, involves elimination across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and we previously showed that an insulin-sensitive process is involved in the case of Aβ1-40. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanism of the insulin-sensitive Aβ1-40 elimination across mouse BBB. An in vivo cerebral microinjection study demonstrated that [125I]hAβ1-40 elimination from mouse brain was inhibited by human natriuretic peptide (hANP), and [125I]hANP elimination was inhibited by hAβ1-40, suggesting that hAβ1-40 and hANP share a common elimination process. Internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 into cultured mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (TM-BBB4) was significantly inhibited by either insulin, hANP, other natriuretic peptides or insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors, but was not inhibited by phosphoramidon or thiorphan. Although we have reported the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptor C (Npr-C) in hANP internalization, cells stably expressing Npr-C internalized [125I]hANP but not [125I]hAβ1-40, suggesting that there is no direct interaction between Npr-C and hAβ1-40. IDE was detected in plasma membrane of TM-BBB4 cells, and internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 by TM-BBB4 cells was reduced by IDE-targeted siRNAs. We conclude that elimination of hAβ1-40 from mouse brain across the BBB involves an insulin- and ANP-sensitive process, mediated by IDE expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells.

  15. Amyloid β-peptides interfere with mitochondrial preprotein import competence by a coaggregation process

    PubMed Central

    Cenini, Giovanna; Rüb, Cornelia; Bruderek, Michael; Voos, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    peptides play a central role in the etiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) by exerting cellular toxicity correlated with aggregate formation. Experimental evidence has shown intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ peptides and interference with mitochondrial functions. Nevertheless, the relevance of intracellular Aβ peptides in the pathophysiology of AD is controversial. Here we found that the two major species of Aβ peptides, in particular Aβ42, exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on the preprotein import reactions essential for mitochondrial biogenesis. However, Aβ peptides interacted only weakly with mitochondria and did not affect the inner membrane potential or the structure of the preprotein translocase complexes. Aβ peptides significantly decreased the import competence of mitochondrial precursor proteins via an extramitochondrial coaggregation mechanism. Coaggregation and import inhibition were significantly stronger for the longer peptide Aβ42, correlating with its importance in AD pathology. Our results demonstrate that direct interference of aggregation-prone Aβ peptides with mitochondrial protein biogenesis represents a crucial aspect of the pathobiochemical mechanisms contributing to cellular damage in AD. PMID:27630262

  16. The Structure of the Amyloid-[beta] Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N.

    2008-11-03

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of A{beta}-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in A{beta} may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of A{beta} peptides complexed with Cu{sup 2+} in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to A{beta} can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  17. Protective spin-labeled fluorenes maintain amyloid beta peptide in small oligomers and limit transitions in secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Robin; Ly, Sonny; Hilt, Silvia; Petrlova, Jitka; Maezawa, Izumi; Kálai, Tamás; Hideg, Kálmán; Jin, Lee-Way; Laurence, Ted A.; Voss, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques comprised of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. Soluble oligomers of the Aβ peptide underlie a cascade of neuronal loss and dysfunction associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Single particle analyses of Aβ oligomers in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were used to provide real-time descriptions of how spin-labeled fluorenes (SLFs; bi-functional small molecules that block the toxicity of Aβ) prevent and disrupt oligomeric assemblies of Aβ in solution. Furthermore, the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of untreated Aβ shows a continuous, progressive change over a 24-hour period, while the spectrum of Aβ treated with SLF remains relatively constant following initial incubation. These findings suggest the conformation of Aβ within the oligomer provides a complementary determinant of Aβ toxicity in addition to oligomer growth and size. Although SLF does not produce a dominant state of secondary structure in Aβ, it does induce a net reduction in beta secondary content compared to untreated samples of Aβ. The FCS results, combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and CD spectroscopy, demonstrate SLFs can inhibit the growth of Aβ oligomers and disrupt existing oligomers, while retaining Aβ as a population of smaller, yet largely disordered oligomers. PMID:26374940

  18. Aβ42-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) neutralizes toxic amyloid-β42 species and protects synaptic structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucker, Christian; Bittner, Heiko J.; Chang, Philip K.-Y.; Cameron, Scott; Hancock, Mark A.; Liebsch, Filip; Hossain, Shireen; Harmeier, Anja; Shaw, Hunter; Charron, François M.; Gensler, Manuel; Dembny, Paul; Zhuang, Wei; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Rao, Yong; Lurz, Rudi; Hildebrand, Peter W.; McKinney, R. Anne; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    The amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide is believed to be the main culprit in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), impairing synaptic function and initiating neuronal degeneration. Soluble Aβ42 oligomers are highly toxic and contribute to progressive neuronal dysfunction, loss of synaptic spine density, and affect long-term potentiation (LTP). We have characterized a short, L-amino acid Aβ-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) that targets a relatively well-defined population of low-n Aβ42 oligomers, rather than simply inhibiting the aggregation of Aβ monomers into oligomers. Our data show that AIP diminishes the loss of Aβ42-induced synaptic spine density and rescues LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Notably, the AIP enantiomer (comprised of D-amino acids) attenuated the rough-eye phenotype in a transgenic Aβ42 fly model and significantly improved the function of photoreceptors of these flies in electroretinography tests. Overall, our results indicate that specifically “trapping” low-n oligomers provides a novel strategy for toxic Aβ42-oligomer recognition and removal.

  19. Binding of iron(III) to the single tyrosine residue of amyloid β-peptide probed by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Takashi; Suzuki, Kiyoko; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2001-10-01

    The Fe(III) ion binds to amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) and induces significant aggregation of the peptide. In addition to the Aβ aggregation, the redox activity of the Fe(III) ion bound to Aβ is considered to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In order to understand the role of Fe(III) in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity, we have examined the Fe(III)-binding mode of human Aβ by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of Fe(III)-Aβ complexes excited at 514.5 nm are dominated by resonance Raman bands of metal-bound tyrosinate, evidencing that the Fe(III) ion primarily binds to Aβ via the phenolic oxygen of Tyr10. In addition, carboxylate groups of glutamate/aspartate side chains are also bound to Fe(III). On the other hand, histidine residues in the N-terminal hydrophilic region of Aβ do not bind to Fe(III). These results are in sharp contrast to the Zn(II)- or Cu(II)-induced aggregation of Aβ, in which histidine residues act as the primary metal binding sites. The Fe(III)-Tyr10 binding may play an important role in Aβ aggregation and in decreasing the reduction potential of the bound Fe(III) ion.

  20. Large-scale production of soluble recombinant amyloidpeptide 1-42 using cold-inducible expression system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Jeong Chan; Lee, Jeong Mi; Jeong, Min Seop; Oh, Choongseob; Ahn, Sung-Min; Yoo, Yung Joon; Jang, Ho Hee

    2012-11-01

    Amyloidpeptide 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)), the predominant form in senile plaques, plays important roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Because Aβ(1-42) has aggregation-prone nature, it has been difficult to produce in a soluble state in bacterial expression systems. In this study, we modified our expression system to increase the soluble fraction of Aβ(1-42) in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells. The expression level and solubility of recombinant Aβ(1-42) induced at the low temperature (16°C) is highly increased compared to that induced at 37°C. To optimize expression temperature, the coding region of Aβ(1-42) was constructed in a pCold vector, pCold-TF, which has a hexahistidine-tagged trigger factor (TF). Recombinant Aβ(1-42) was expressed primarily as a soluble protein using pCold vector system and purified with a nickel-chelating resin. When the toxic effect of recombinant Aβ(1-42) examined on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, the purified Aβ(1-42) induced cell toxicity on SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, the system developed in this study will provide a useful method for the production of aggregation prone-peptide such as Aβ(1-42).

  1. Aβ42-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) neutralizes toxic amyloid-β42 species and protects synaptic structure and function.

    PubMed

    Barucker, Christian; Bittner, Heiko J; Chang, Philip K-Y; Cameron, Scott; Hancock, Mark A; Liebsch, Filip; Hossain, Shireen; Harmeier, Anja; Shaw, Hunter; Charron, François M; Gensler, Manuel; Dembny, Paul; Zhuang, Wei; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rabe, Jürgen P; Rao, Yong; Lurz, Rudi; Hildebrand, Peter W; McKinney, R Anne; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2015-10-29

    The amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide is believed to be the main culprit in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), impairing synaptic function and initiating neuronal degeneration. Soluble Aβ42 oligomers are highly toxic and contribute to progressive neuronal dysfunction, loss of synaptic spine density, and affect long-term potentiation (LTP). We have characterized a short, L-amino acid Aβ-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) that targets a relatively well-defined population of low-n Aβ42 oligomers, rather than simply inhibiting the aggregation of Aβ monomers into oligomers. Our data show that AIP diminishes the loss of Aβ42-induced synaptic spine density and rescues LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Notably, the AIP enantiomer (comprised of D-amino acids) attenuated the rough-eye phenotype in a transgenic Aβ42 fly model and significantly improved the function of photoreceptors of these flies in electroretinography tests. Overall, our results indicate that specifically "trapping" low-n oligomers provides a novel strategy for toxic Aβ42-oligomer recognition and removal.

  2. The structure of the amyloid-beta peptide high-affinity copper II binding site in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Streltsov, Victor A; Titmuss, Stephen J; Epa, V Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J; Masters, Colin L; Varghese, Joseph N

    2008-10-01

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of Abeta-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in Abeta may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of Abeta peptides complexed with Cu(2+) in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length Abeta-Cu(2+) peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the Abeta-Cu(2+) complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu(2+) binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to Abeta can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  3. The Structure of the AmyloidPeptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N.

    2008-01-01

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-β (Aβ) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of Aβ-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in Aβ may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of Aβ peptides complexed with Cu2+ in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length Aβ-Cu2+ peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the Aβ-Cu2+ complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu2+ binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to Aβ can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD. PMID:18599641

  4. Activation of phospholipase A2 by temporin B: formation of antimicrobial peptide-enzyme amyloid-type cofibrils.

    PubMed

    Code, Christian; Domanov, Yegor A; Killian, J Antoinette; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2009-05-01

    Phospholipases A2 have been shown to be activated in a concentration dependent manner by a number of antimicrobial peptides, including melittin, magainin 2, indolicidin, and temporins B and L. Here we used fluorescently labelled bee venom PLA2 (PLA2D) and the saturated phospholipid substrate 1,2-dipalmitoyl-glycero-sn-3-phosphocholine (L-DPPC), exhibiting a lag-burst behaviour upon the initiation of the hydrolytic reaction by PLA2. Increasing concentrations of Cys-temporin B and its fluorescent Texas red derivative (TRC-temB) caused progressive shortening of the lag period. TRC-temB/PLA2D interaction was observed by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), with maximum efficiency coinciding with the burst in hydrolysis. Subsequently, supramolecular structures became visible by microscopy, revealing amyloid-like fibrils composed of both the activating peptide and PLA2. Reaction products, palmitic acid and 1-palmitoyl-2-lyso-glycero-sn-3-phosphocholine (lysoPC, both at >8 mol%) were required for FRET when using the non-hydrolysable substrate enantiomer 2,3-dipalmitoyl-glycero-sn-1-phosphocholine (D-DPPC). A novel mechanism of PLA2 activation by co-fibril formation and associated conformational changes is suggested.

  5. ESEEM Analysis of Multi-Histidine Cu(II)-Coordination in Model Complexes, Peptides, and Amyloid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We validate the use of ESEEM to predict the number of 14N nuclei coupled to a Cu(II) ion by the use of model complexes and two small peptides with well-known Cu(II) coordination. We apply this method to gain new insight into less explored aspects of Cu(II) coordination in amyloid-β (Aβ). Aβ has two coordination modes of Cu(II) at physiological pH. A controversy has existed regarding the number of histidine residues coordinated to the Cu(II) ion in component II, which is dominant at high pH (∼8.7) values. Importantly, with an excess amount of Zn(II) ions, as is the case in brain tissues affected by Alzheimer’s disease, component II becomes the dominant coordination mode, as Zn(II) selectively substitutes component I bound to Cu(II). We confirm that component II only contains single histidine coordination, using ESEEM and set of model complexes. The ESEEM experiments carried out on systematically 15N-labeled peptides reveal that, in component II, His 13 and His 14 are more favored as equatorial ligands compared to His 6. Revealing molecular level details of subcomponents in metal ion coordination is critical in understanding the role of metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease etiology. PMID:25014537

  6. Aβ42-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) neutralizes toxic amyloid-β42 species and protects synaptic structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Barucker, Christian; Bittner, Heiko J.; Chang, Philip K.-Y.; Cameron, Scott; Hancock, Mark A.; Liebsch, Filip; Hossain, Shireen; Harmeier, Anja; Shaw, Hunter; Charron, François M.; Gensler, Manuel; Dembny, Paul; Zhuang, Wei; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Rao, Yong; Lurz, Rudi; Hildebrand, Peter W.; McKinney, R. Anne; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide is believed to be the main culprit in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), impairing synaptic function and initiating neuronal degeneration. Soluble Aβ42 oligomers are highly toxic and contribute to progressive neuronal dysfunction, loss of synaptic spine density, and affect long-term potentiation (LTP). We have characterized a short, L-amino acid Aβ-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) that targets a relatively well-defined population of low-n Aβ42 oligomers, rather than simply inhibiting the aggregation of Aβ monomers into oligomers. Our data show that AIP diminishes the loss of Aβ42-induced synaptic spine density and rescues LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Notably, the AIP enantiomer (comprised of D-amino acids) attenuated the rough-eye phenotype in a transgenic Aβ42 fly model and significantly improved the function of photoreceptors of these flies in electroretinography tests. Overall, our results indicate that specifically “trapping” low-n oligomers provides a novel strategy for toxic Aβ42-oligomer recognition and removal. PMID:26510576

  7. Isotope-edited FTIR reveals distinct aggregation and structural behaviors of unmodified and pyroglutamylated amyloid β peptides

    PubMed Central

    Goldblatt, Greg; Matos, Jason O.; Gornto, Jeremy; Tatulian, Suren A.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide (Aβ) is causatively associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and N-terminally truncated and pyroglutamylated Aβ peptides (AβpE) exert hypertoxic effect by an unknown mechanism. Recent evidence has identified the prefibrillar oligomers of Aβ, not the fibrils, as the prevalent cytotoxic species. Structural characterization of Aβ and AβpE oligomers is therefore important for better understanding of their toxic effect. Here we have used isotope-edited Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to identify the conformational changes in Aβ1-42 and AβpE3-42 upon aggregation, individually and in 1:1 molar combination. During the first two hours of exposure to aqueous buffer, the peptides undergo transition from mostly α-helical to mostly β-sheet structure. Data on peptides 13C,15N-labeled at K16L17V18 or V36G37G38V39 allowed construction of structural models for the monomer and early oligomers. The peptide monomer comprises a β-hairpin that involves residues upstream of the K16L17V18 sequence and an N-terminal α-helix. The oligomers form by non-H-bonding interactions between the β-strands of neighboring β-hairpins, in lateral or staggered manner, with the strands running parallel or antiparallel. Relative α-helical and β-sheet propensities of Aβ1-42 and AβpE3-42 depend on the ionic strength of the buffer, emphasizing the importance of ionic interactions in Aβ peptide structure and aggregation. It is inferred that N-terminal modification of AβpE3-42 affects the helix stability and thereby modulates β-sheet oligomer formation. The data thus provide new insight into the molecular mechanism of Aβ oligomerization by emphasizing the role of the N-terminal transient α-helical structure and by identifying structural constraints for molecular organization of the oligomers. PMID:26214017

  8. An improved method for high-level soluble expression and purification of recombinant amyloid-beta peptide for in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Gaurav; Pandey, Tripti; Chinta, Ramesh; Kumar, Awanish; Tripathi, Timir

    2015-10-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide mediates several neurodegenerative diseases. The 42 amino acid (Aβ1-42) is the predominant form of peptide found in the neuritic plaques and has been demonstrated to be neurotoxic in vivo and in vitro. The availability of large quantities of Aβ peptide will help in several biochemical and biophysical studies that may help in exploring the aggregation mechanism and toxicity of Aβ peptide. We report a convenient and economical method to obtain such a peptide biologically. Synthetic oligonucleotides encoding Aβ1-42 were constructed and amplified through the polymerase cycling assembly (also known as assembly PCR), followed by the amplification PCR. Aβ1-42 gene was cloned into pET41a(+) vector for expression. Interestingly, the addition of 3% (v/v) ethanol to the culture medium resulted in the production of large amounts of soluble Aβ fusion protein. The Aβ fusion protein was subjected to a Ni-NTA affinity chromatography followed by enterokinase digestion, and the Aβ peptide was purified using glutathione Sepharose affinity chromatography. The peptide yield was ∼15mg/L culture, indicating the utility of this method for high-yield production of soluble Aβ peptide. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting with anti-His antibody confirmed the identity of purified Aβ fusion protein and Aβ peptide. In addition, this method provides an advantage over the chemical synthesis and other conventional methods used for large-scale production of recombinant Aβ peptide.

  9. Global properties and propensity to dimerization of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment through the modeling of its monomer and dimer diffusion coefficients and electrophoretic mobilities.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2015-03-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused mainly by amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment (monomer) and its dimer are characterized at low pH through the modeling of their diffusion coefficients and effective electrophoretic mobilities. Translational diffusion coefficient experimental values of monomer and dimer analogs of this peptide fragment and monomer and dimer mixtures at thermodynamic equilibrium are used as reported in the literature for different monomer initial concentrations. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are employed to evaluate the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment propensity to dimerization through a thermodynamic theoretical framework. Therefore equilibrium constants are considered at pH 2.9 to elucidate one of the amyloidogenic mechanisms involving the central hydrophobic region LVFFA of the peptide spanning residues 17-21 associated with phenylalanine at positions 19 and 20 in the amino acid sequence of amyloid-beta peptides. An analysis demonstrating that peptide aggregation is a concentration-dependent process is provided, where both pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena become relevant. It is shown that the modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment is crucial to understand the effect of hydrophobic region LVFFA in the amyloidogenic process.

  10. Amyloidpeptide absence in short term effects on kinase activity of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ianiski, Francine R; Rech, Virginia C; Nishihira, Vivian S K; Alves, Catiane B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Luchese, Cristiane

    2016-01-01

    Considering that Alzheimer's disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease worldwide, we investigated the activities of three key kinases: creatine kinase, pyruvate kinase and adenylate kinase in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease model. Male adult Swiss mice received amyloid-β or saline. One day after, mice were treated with blank nanocapsules (17 ml/kg) or meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules (5 mg/kg) or free meloxicam (5 mg/kg). Treatments were performed on alternating days, until the end of the experimental protocol. In the fourteenth day, kinases activities were performed. Amyloid-β did not change the kinases activity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice. However, free meloxicam decrease the creatine kinase activity in mitochondrial-rich fraction in the group induced by amyloid-β, but for the cytosolic fraction, it has raised in the activity of pyruvate kinase activity in cerebral cortex. Further, meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules administration reduced adenylate kinase activity in the hippocampus of mice injected by amyloid-β. In conclusion we observed absence in short-term effects in kinases activities of energy metabolism in mice hippocampus and cerebral cortex using amyloidpeptide model. These findings established the foundation to further study the kinases in phosphoryltransfer network changes observed in the brains of patients post-mortem with Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Nanoprobing of the effect of Cu2+ cations on misfolding, interaction and aggregation of amyloid β peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhengjian; Condron, Margaret M.; Teplow, David B.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2012-01-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease. Both processes are dependent on the environmental conditions, including the presence of divalent cations, such as Cu2+. Cu2+ cations regulate early stages of Aβ aggregation, but the molecular mechanism of Cu2+ regulation is unknown. In this study we applied single molecule AFM force spectroscopy to elucidate the role of Cu2+ cations on interpeptide interactions. By immobilizing one of two interacting Aβ42 molecules on a mica surface and tethering the counterpart molecule onto the tip, we were able to probe the interpeptide interactions in the presence and absence of Cu2+ cations at pH 7.4, 6.8, 6.0, 5.0, and 4.0. The results show that the presence of Cu2+ cations change the pattern of Aβ interactions for pH values between pH 7.4 and pH 5.0. Under these conditions, Cu2+ cations induce Aβ42 peptide structural changes resulting in N–termini interactions within the dimers. Cu2+ cations also stabilize the dimers. No effects of Cu2+ cations on Aβ–Aβ interactions were observed at pH 4.0, suggesting that peptide protonation changes the peptide-cation interaction. The effect of Cu2+ cations on later stages of Aβ aggregation was studied by AFM topographic images. The results demonstrate that substoichiometric Cu2+ cations accelerate the formation of fibrils at pH 7.4 and 5.0, whereas no effect of Cu2+ cations was observed at pH 4.0. Taken together, the combined AFM force spectroscopy and imaging analyses demonstrate that Cu2+ cations promote both the initial and the elongation stages of Aβ aggregation, but protein protonation diminishes the effect of Cu2+. PMID:23143330

  12. Binding of amyloid beta peptide to beta2 adrenergic receptor induces PKA-dependent AMPA receptor hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Govindaiah, G; Liu, Ruijie; De Arcangelis, Vania; Cox, Charles L; Xiang, Yang K

    2010-09-01

    Progressive decrease in neuronal function is an established feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide induces acute increase in spontaneous synaptic activity accompanied by neurotoxicity, and Abeta induces excitotoxic neuronal death by increasing calcium influx mediated by hyperactive alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptors. An in vivo study has revealed subpopulations of hyperactive neurons near Abeta plaques in mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that can be normalized by an AMPA receptor antagonist. In the present study, we aim to determine whether soluble Abeta acutely induces hyperactivity of AMPA receptors by a mechanism involving beta(2) adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR). We found that the soluble Abeta binds to beta(2)AR, and the extracellular N terminus of beta(2)AR is critical for the binding. The binding is required to induce G-protein/cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, which controls PKA-dependent phosphorylation of GluR1 and beta(2)AR, and AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). beta(2)AR and GluR1 also form a complex comprising postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), PKA and its anchor AKAP150, and protein phosphotase 2A (PP2A). Both the third intracellular (i3) loop and C terminus of beta(2)AR are required for the beta(2)AR/AMPA receptor complex. Abeta acutely induces PKA phosphorylation of GluR1 in the complex without affecting the association between two receptors. The present study reveals that non-neurotransmitter Abeta has a binding capacity to beta(2)AR and induces PKA-dependent hyperactivity in AMPA receptors.

  13. Increased vulnerability of hippocampal neurons from presenilin-1 mutant knock-in mice to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity: central roles of superoxide production and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Sebastian, L; Sopher, B L; Miller, M W; Ware, C B; Martin, G M; Mattson, M P

    1999-03-01

    Many cases of early-onset inherited Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by mutations in the presenilin-1 (PS1) gene. Overexpression of PS1 mutations in cultured PC12 cells increases their vulnerability to apoptosis-induced trophic factor withdrawal and oxidative insults. We now report that primary hippocampal neurons from PS1 mutant knock-in mice, which express the human PS1M146V mutation at normal levels, exhibit increased vulnerability to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity. The endangering action of mutant PS1 was associated with increased superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and caspase activation. The peroxynitrite-scavenging antioxidant uric acid and the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone protected hippocampal neurons expressing mutant PS1 against cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide. Increased oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenic action of PS1 mutations, and antioxidants may counteract the adverse property of such AD-linked mutations.

  14. Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles Induce Amyloid Formation of the PrP(110-136) Peptide via an α-Helical Metastable Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Sauvé, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A peptide encompassing the conserved hydrophobic region and the first β-strand of the prion protein (PrP(110–136)) shown to interact with the surface of dodecylphosphocholine micelles adopts an α-helical conformation that is localized below the head-group layer. This surface-bound peptide has a half-life of one day, and readily initiates the formation of amyloid fibrils. The presence of the latter was confirmed using birefringence microscopy upon Congo red binding and thioflavin T-binding induced fluorescence. The observation of this metastable α-helical conformer provides a unique snapshot of the early steps of the inter-conversion pathway. These findings together with the body of evidence from the prion literature allowed us to propose a mechanism for the conversion of PrPC to amyloid material. PMID:27930722

  15. Exploring the Alzheimer amyloidpeptide conformational ensemble: A review of molecular dynamics approaches.

    PubMed

    Tran, Linh; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common dementia among elderly worldwide. There is no therapeutic drugs until now to treat effectively this disease. One main reason is due to the poorly understood mechanism of Aβ peptide aggregation, which plays a crucial role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. It remains challenging to experimentally or theoretically characterize the secondary and tertiary structures of the Aβ monomer because of its high flexibility and aggregation propensity, and its conformations that lead to the aggregation are not fully identified. In this review, we highlight various structural ensembles of Aβ peptide revealed and characterized by computational approaches in order to find converging structures of Aβ monomer. Understanding how Aβ peptide forms transiently stable structures prior to aggregation will contribute to the design of new therapeutic molecules against the Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Homocysteine and folate deficiency sensitize oligodendrocytes to the cell death-promoting effects of a presenilin-1 mutation and amyloid beta-peptide.

    PubMed

    Pak, Kirk J; Chan, Sic L; Mattson, Mark P

    2003-01-01

    Although damage to white matter occurs in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Recent findings suggest that individuals with elevated levels of homocysteine are at increased risk of AD. Here we show that oligodendrocytes from mice expressing a mutant form of presenilin-1 (PS1) that causes familial AD exhibit increased sensitivity to death induced by homocysteine compared to oligodendrocytes from wild-type control mice. Homocysteine also sensitized oligodendrocytes to the cytotoxicity of amyloid beta-peptide. Folate deficiency, which is known to result in elevated levels of homocysteine in vivo, also sensitized oligodendrocytes to the cell-death-promoting actions of mutant PS1 and amyloid beta-peptide. Inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and p53 protected oligodendrocytes against cell death induced by homocysteine and amyloid beta-peptide, consistent with a role for a DNA-damage response in the cell death process. These findings demonstrate an adverse effect of homocysteine on oligodendrocytes, and suggest roles for homocysteine and folate deficiency in the white matter damage in AD and related neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Hypocretin and brain β-amyloid peptide interactions in cognitive disorders and narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dauvilliers, Yves A.; Lehmann, Sylvain; Jaussent, Isabelle; Gabelle, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer' disease (AD) biomarkers and hypocretin-1 levels in patients with cognitive abnormalities and hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy-cataplexy (NC), estimate diagnostic accuracy, and determine correlations with sleep disturbances. Background: Sleep disturbances are frequent in AD. Interactions between brain β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation and a wake-related neurotransmitter hypocretin have been reported in a mouse model of AD. Methods: Ninety-one cognitive patients (37 AD, 16 mild cognitive impairment—MCI that converts to AD, 38 other dementias) and 15 elderly patients with NC were recruited. Patients were diagnosed blind to CSF results. CSF Aβ42, total tau, ptau181, and hypocretin-1 were measured. Sleep disturbances were assessed with questionnaires in 32 cognitive patients. Results: Lower CSF Aβ42 but higher tau and P-tau levels were found in AD and MCI compared to other dementias. CSF hypocretin-1 levels were higher in patients with MCI due to AD compared to other dementias, with a similar tendency for patients with advanced AD. CSF hypocretin-1 was significantly and independently associated with AD/MCI due to AD, with an OR of 2.70 after full adjustment, exceeding that for Aβ42. Aβ42 correlated positively with hypocretin-1 levels in advanced stage AD. No association was found between sleep disturbances and CSF biomarkers. No patients with NC achieved pathological cutoffs for Aβ42, with respectively one and four patients with NC above tau and P-tau cutoffs and no correlations between hypocretin-1 and other biomarkers. Conclusions: Our results suggest a pathophysiological relationship between Aβ42 and hypocretin-1 in the AD process, with higher CSF hypocretin-1 levels in early disease stages. Further longitudinal studies are needed to validate these biomarker interactions and to determine the cause-effect relationship and the role of wake/sleep behavior in amyloid plaque regulation

  18. Copper enhances amyloid-beta peptide neurotoxicity and non beta-aggregation: a series of experiments conducted upon copper-bound and copper-free amyloid-beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xueling; Sun, Yaxuan; Gao, Zhaolan; Jiang, Zhaofeng

    2010-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the abnormal aggregation of amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) in extracellular deposits known as senile plaques. However, the nature of the toxic Abeta species and its precise mechanism of action remain unclear. Previous reports suggest that the histidine residues are involved in copper-Abeta interaction, by which resulting in the neurotoxicity of Abeta and free radical damage. Here, we employed a mutant Abeta (Abeta H13R) in which a histidine residue was replaced by arginine. Copper facilitated the precipitation of both wild-type and mutant Abeta in the spectrophotometric absorbance assay but suppressed beta-structure aggregates according to Thioflavine-T assay. Wild-type Abeta alone is more cytotoxic but produced less amount of H(2)O(2) than AbetaH13R-copper complexes, suggesting that Abeta-membrane interaction may also implicated in the pathologic progress. Abeta toxicity is in positive correlation to its competence to aggregate despite the aggregation is mainly composed of non-beta fibril substances. In short, these findings may provide further evidence on the role of copper in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Identification and quantification of amyloid beta-related peptides in human plasma using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Naoki; YAMAMOTO, Rie; SATO, Taka-Aki

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase and γ-secretase leads to the generation and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). N-terminally or C-terminally truncated Aβ variants have been found in human cerebrospinal fluid and cultured cell media using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, the profile of plasma Aβ variants has not been revealed due to the difficulty of isolating Aβ from plasma. We present here for the first time studies of Aβ and related peptides in human plasma. Twenty-two Aβ-related peptides including novel peptides truncated before the β-secretase site were detected in human plasma and 20 of the peptides were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Using an internal standard, we developed a quantitative assay for the Aβ-related peptides and demonstrated plasma dilution linearity and the precision required for their quantitation. The present method should enhance the understanding of APP processing and clearance in AD progression. PMID:24621957

  20. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  1. AmyloidPeptides and Tau Protein as Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal and Interstitial Fluid Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review of Experimental and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsopoulos, Parmenion P.; Marklund, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors frequently suffer from life-long deficits in cognitive functions and a reduced quality of life. Axonal injury, observed in many severe TBI patients, results in accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Post-injury enzymatic cleavage of APP can generate amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark finding in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). At autopsy, brains of AD and a subset of TBI victims display some similarities including accumulation of Aβ peptides and neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Most epidemiological evidence suggests a link between TBI and AD, implying that TBI has neurodegenerative sequelae. Aβ peptides and tau may be used as biomarkers in interstitial fluid (ISF) using cerebral microdialysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following clinical TBI. In the present review, the available clinical and experimental literature on Aβ peptides and tau as potential biomarkers following TBI is comprehensively analyzed. Elevated CSF and ISF tau protein levels have been observed following severe TBI and suggested to correlate with clinical outcome. Although Aβ peptides are produced by normal neuronal metabolism, high levels of long and/or fibrillary Aβ peptides may be neurotoxic. Increased CSF and/or ISF Aβ levels post-injury may be related to neuronal activity and/or the presence of axonal injury. The heterogeneity of animal models, clinical cohorts, analytical techniques, and the complexity of TBI in the available studies make the clinical value of tau and Aβ as biomarkers uncertain at present. Additionally, the link between early post-injury changes in tau and Aβ peptides and the future risk of developing AD remains unclear. Future studies using methods such as rapid biomarker sampling combined with enhanced analytical techniques and/or novel pharmacological tools could provide additional information on the importance of Aβ peptides and tau protein in both the acute pathophysiology and long

  2. Memantine Lowers Amyloid-beta Peptide Levels in Neuronal Cultures and in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alley, George M.; Bailey, Jason A; Chen, DeMao; Ray, Balmiki; Puli, Lakshman K.; Tanila, Heikki; Banerjee, Pradeep K; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2009-01-01

    Memantine is a moderate-affinity, uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that stabilizes cognitive, functional, and behavioral decline in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In AD, the extracellular deposition of fibrillogenic amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) occurs due to aberrant processing of the full-length Aβ precursor protein (APP). Memantine protects neurons from the neurotoxic effects of Aβ and improves cognition in transgenic mice with high brain levels of Aβ. However, it is unknown how memantine protects cells against neurodegeneration and affects APP processing and Aβ production. We report the effects of memantine in three different systems. In human neuroblastoma cells, memantine, at therapeutically relevant concentrations (1-4 μM), decreased levels of secreted APP and Aβ1-40. Levels of the potentially amylodogenic Aβ1-42 were undetectable in these cells. In primary rat cortical neuronal cultures, memantine treatment lowered Aβ1-42 secretion. At the concentrations used, memantine treatment was not toxic to neuroblastoma or primary cultures and increased cell viability and/or metabolic activity under certain conditions. In APP/presenilin-1 (PS1) transgenic mice exhibiting high brain levels of Aβ1-42, oral dosing of memantine (20 mg/kg/day for 8 days) produced plasma drug concentration of 0.96 μM and significantly reduced the cortical levels of soluble Aβ1-42. The ratio of Aβ1-40/Aβ1-42 increased in treated mice, suggesting effects on the γ-secretase complex. Thus, memantine reduces the levels of Aβ peptides at therapeutic concentrations and may inhibit the accumulation of fibrillogenic Aβ in mammalian brains. Memantine’s ability to preserve neuronal cells against neurodegeneration, increase metabolic activity, and lower Aβ level has therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19642202

  3. Translational, rotational and internal dynamics of amyloid β-peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42) from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Ram Prasad; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2009-10-01

    In this study, diffusion constants [translational (DT) and rotational (DR)], correlation times [rotational (τrot) and internal (τint)], and the intramolecular order parameters (S2) of the Alzheimer amyloidpeptides Aβ40 and Aβ42 have been calculated from 150 ns molecular dynamics simulations in aqueous solution. The computed parameters have been compared with the experimentally measured values. The calculated DT of 1.61×10-6 cm2/s and 1.43×10-6 cm2/s for Aβ40 and Aβ42, respectively, at 300 K was found to follow the correct trend defined by the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation that its value should decrease with the increase in the molecular weight. The estimated DR for Aβ40 and Aβ42 at 300 K are 0.085 and 0.071 ns-1, respectively. The rotational (Crot(t)) and internal (Cint(t)) correlation functions of Aβ40 and Aβ42 were observed to decay at nano- and picosecond time scales, respectively. The significantly different time decays of these functions validate the factorization of the total correlation function (Ctot(t)) of Aβ peptides into Crot(t) and Cint(t). At both short and long time scales, the Clore-Szabo model that was used as Cint(t) provided the best behavior of Ctot(t) for both Aβ40 and Aβ42. In addition, an effective rotational correlation time of Aβ40 is also computed at 18 °C and the computed value (2.30 ns) is in close agreement with the experimental value of 2.45 ns. The computed S2 parameters for the central hydrophobic core, the loop region, and C-terminal domains of Aβ40 and Aβ42 are in accord with the previous studies.

  4. A Synthetic Peptide with the Putative Iron Binding Motif of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Does Not Catalytically Oxidize Iron

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2012-01-01

    The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II) binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the ferroxidase site of ferritin. The activity was indirectly measured using transferrin, which scavenges the Fe(III) product of the reaction. A 22-residue synthetic peptide, named FD1, with the putative ferroxidase site of APP, and the E2 domain of APP were each reported to exhibit 40% of the ferroxidase activity of APP and of ceruloplasmin. It was also claimed that the ferroxidase activity of APP is inhibited by Zn(II) just as in ferritin. We measured the ferroxidase activity indirectly (i) by the incorporation of the Fe(III) product of the ferroxidase reaction into transferrin and directly (ii) by monitoring consumption of the substrate molecular oxygen. The results with the FD1 peptide were compared to the established ferroxidase activities of human H-chain ferritin and of ceruloplasmin. For FD1 we observed no activity above the background of non-enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation by molecular oxygen. Zn(II) binds to transferrin and diminishes its Fe(III) incorporation capacity and rate but it does not specifically bind to a putative ferroxidase site of FD1. Based on these results, and on comparison of the putative ligands of the ferroxidase site of APP with those of ferritin, we conclude that the previously reported results for ferroxidase activity of FD1 and – by implication – of APP should be re-evaluated. PMID:22916096

  5. Intrinsic excitability changes induced by acute treatment of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons with exogenous amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Tamagnini, Francesco; Scullion, Sarah; Brown, Jon T; Randall, Andrew D

    2015-07-01

    Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the human brain is a canonical pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent work in Aβ-overexpressing transgenic mice indicates that increased brain Aβ levels can be associated with aberrant epileptiform activity. In line with this, such mice can also exhibit altered intrinsic excitability (IE) of cortical and hippocampal neurons: these observations may relate to the increased prevalence of seizures in AD patients. In this study, we examined what changes in IE are produced in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells after 2-5 h treatment with an oligomeric preparation of synthetic human Aβ 1-42 peptide. Whole cell current clamp recordings were compared between Aβ-(500 nM) and vehicle-(DMSO 0.05%) treated hippocampal slices obtained from mice. The soluble Aβ treatment did not produce alterations in sub-threshold intrinsic properties, including membrane potential, input resistance, and hyperpolarization activated "sag". Similarly, no changes were noted in the firing profile evoked by 500 ms square current supra-threshold stimuli. However, Aβ 500 nM treatment resulted in the hyperpolarization of the action potential (AP) threshold. In addition, treatment with Aβ at 500 nM depressed the after-hyperpolarization that followed both a single AP or 50 Hz trains of a number of APs between 5 and 25. These data suggest that acute exposure to soluble Aβ oligomers affects IE properties of CA1 pyramidal neurons differently from outcomes seen in transgenic models of amyloidopathy. However, in both chronic and acute models, the IE changes are toward hyperexcitability, reinforcing the idea that amyloidopathy and increased incidence in seizures might be causally related in AD patients.

  6. Metabolic changes may precede proteostatic dysfunction in a Drosophila model of amyloid beta peptide toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Stanislav; Vishnivetskaya, Anastasia; Malmendal, Anders; Crowther, Damian C.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is linked to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease; accordingly, aggregation-prone isoforms of Aβ, expressed in the brain, shorten the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lethal effects of Aβ are not apparent until after day 15. We used shibireTS flies that exhibit a temperature-sensitive paralysis phenotype as a reporter of proteostatic robustness. In this model, we found that increasing age but not Aβ expression lowered the flies' permissive temperature, suggesting that Aβ did not exert its lethal effects by proteostatic disruption. Instead, we observed that chemical challenges, in particular oxidative stressors, discriminated clearly between young (robust) and old (sensitive) flies. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis, we compared water-soluble metabolite profiles at various ages in flies expressing Aβ in their brains. We observed 2 genotype-linked metabolomic signals, the first reported the presence of any Aβ isoform and the second the effects of the lethal Arctic Aβ. Lethality was specifically associated with signs of oxidative respiration dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:27103517

  7. Selenium-enhanced electron microscopic imaging of different aggregate forms of a segment of the amyloid β peptide in cells.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Eva K; Motskin, Michael; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Bergin, Shane D; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Skepper, Jeremy; Luheshi, Leila M; McComb, David W; Dobson, Christopher M; Porter, Alexandra E

    2012-06-26

    The aggregation of misfolded proteins is a common feature underlying a wide range of age-related degenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. A key aspect of understanding the molecular origins of these conditions is to define the manner in which specific types of protein aggregates influence disease pathogenesis through their interactions with cells. We demonstrate how selenium-enhanced electron microscopy (SE-EM), combined with tomographic reconstruction methods, can be used to image, here at a resolution of 5-10 nm, the interaction with human macrophage cells of amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ(25-36), a fragment of the Aβ peptide whose self-assembly is associated with Alzheimer's disease. We find that prefibrillar aggregates and mature fibrils are distributed into distinct subcellular compartments and undergo varying degrees of morphological change over time, observations that shed new light on the origins of their differential toxicity and the mechanisms of their clearance. In addition, the results show that SE-EM provides a powerful and potentially widely applicable means to define the nature and location of protein assemblies in situ and to provide detailed and specific information about their partitioning and processing.

  8. Ameliorative effect of 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester against amyloid beta peptide-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jung Choi, Soo; Kim, Mi Jeong; Jin Heo, Ho; Kim, Jae Kyeum; Jin Jun, Woo; Kim, Hye Kyung; Kim, Eun-Ki; Ok Kim, Myeong; Yon Cho, Hong; Hwang, Han-Joon; Jun Kim, Young; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2009-03-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta)-induced oxidative stress may be linked to neurodegenerative disease. Ethanol extracts of Rosa laevigata protected PC12 cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) reduction assays revealed a significant increase in cell viability when oxidatively stressed PC12 cells were treated with R. laevigata extract. The effect of R. laevigata on oxidative stress-induced cell death was further investigated by lactate dehydrogenase release assays and trypan blue exclusion assays. Administration of 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester from R. laevigata extract to mice infused with Abeta significantly reversed learning and memory impairment in behavioural tests. After behavioural testing, the mice were sacrificed and brains were collected for the examination of lipid peroxidation, catalase activity and acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity. These results suggest that 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid dinonyl ester from R. laevigata extract may be able to reduce Abeta-induced neurotoxicity, possibly by reducing oxidative stress. Therefore, R. laevigata extract may be useful for the prevention of oxidative stress-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  9. Amyloid β peptide directly impairs pineal gland melatonin synthesis and melatonin receptor signaling through the ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Cecon, Erika; Chen, Min; Marçola, Marina; Fernandes, Pedro A C; Jockers, Ralf; Markus, Regina P

    2015-06-01

    Melatonin is the hormone produced by the pineal gland known to regulate physiologic rhythms and to display immunomodulatory and neuroprotective properties. It has been reported that Alzheimer disease patients show impaired melatonin production and altered expression of the 2 G protein-coupled melatonin receptors (MTRs), MT₁ and MT₂, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Here we evaluated whether this dysfunction of the melatonergic system is directly caused by amyloid β peptides (Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42)). Aβ treatment of rat pineal glands elicited an inflammatory response within the gland, evidenced by the up-regulation of 52 inflammatory genes, and decreased the production of melatonin up to 75% compared to vehicle-treated glands. Blocking NF-κB activity prevented this effect. Exposure of HEK293 cells stably expressing recombinant MT₁ or MT₂ receptors to Aβ lead to a 40% reduction in [(125)I]iodomelatonin binding to MT₁. ERK1/2 activation triggered by MTRs, but not by the β₂-adrenergic receptor, was markedly impaired by Aβ in HEK293 transfected cells, as well as in primary rat endothelial cells expressing endogenous MTRs. Our data reveal the melatonergic system as a new target of Aβ, opening new perspectives to Alzheimer disease diagnosis and therapeutic intervention.

  10. Role of p75 Neurotrophin Receptor in the Neurotoxicity by β-amyloid Peptides and Synergistic Effect of Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Giovanni; Della-Bianca, Vittorina; Politi, Valeria; Della Valle, Giuliano; Dal-Pra, Ilaria; Rossi, Filippo; Armato, Ubaldo

    2002-01-01

    The neurodegenerative changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are elicited by the accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ), which damage neurons either directly by interacting with components of the cell surface to trigger cell death signaling or indirectly by activating astrocytes and microglia to produce inflammatory mediators. It has been recently proposed that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is responsible for neuronal damage by interacting with Aβ. By using neuroblastoma cell clones lacking the expression of all neurotrophin receptors or engineered to express full-length or various truncated forms of p75NTR, we could show that p75NTR is involved in the direct signaling of cell death by Aβ via the function of its death domain. This signaling leads to the activation of caspases-8 and -3, the production of reactive oxygen intermediates and the induction of an oxidative stress. We also found that the direct and indirect (inflammatory) mechanisms of neuronal damage by Aβ could act synergistically. In fact, TNF-α and IL-1β, cytokines produced by Aβ-activated microglia, could potentiate the neurotoxic action of Aβ mediated by p75NTR signaling. Together, our results indicate that neurons expressing p75NTR, mostly if expressing also proinflammatory cytokine receptors, might be preferential targets of the cytotoxic action of Aβ in AD. PMID:11927634

  11. Posttranslational nitro-glycative modifications of albumin in Alzheimer's disease: implications in cytotoxicity and amyloidpeptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Tajes, Marta; Palomer, Ernest; Ill-Raga, Gerard; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Guivernau, Biuse; Román-Dégano, Irene; Eraso-Pichot, Abel; Alcolea, Daniel; Fortea, Juan; Nuñez, Laura; Paez, Antonio; Alameda, Francesc; Fernández-Busquets, Xavier; Lleó, Alberto; Elosúa, Roberto; Boada, Mercé; Valverde, Miguel A; Muñoz, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Glycation and nitrotyrosination are pathological posttranslational modifications that make proteins prone to losing their physiological properties. Since both modifications are increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to amyloidpeptide (Aβ) accumulation, we have studied their effect on albumin, the most abundant protein in cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Brain and plasmatic levels of glycated and nitrated albumin were significantly higher in AD patients than in controls. In vitro turbidometry and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that glycation and nitrotyrosination promote changes in albumin structure and biochemical properties. Glycated albumin was more resistant to proteolysis and less uptake by hepatoma cells occurred. Glycated albumin also reduced the osmolarity expected for a solution containing native albumin. Both glycation and nitrotyrosination turned albumin cytotoxic in a cell type-dependent manner for cerebral and vascular cells. Finally, of particular relevance to AD, these modified albumins were significantly less effective in avoiding Aβ aggregation than native albumin. In summary, nitrotyrosination and especially glycation alter albumin structural and biochemical properties, and these modifications might contribute for the progression of AD.

  12. Novel Nuclear Factor-KappaB Targeting Peptide Suppresses β-Amyloid Induced Inflammatory and Apoptotic Responses in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Mythily; Bayon, Baindu; Chopra, Nipun; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2016-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κβ) is associated with both neuronal survival and increased vulnerability to apoptosis. The mechanisms underlying these dichotomous effects are attributed to the composition of NF-κΒ dimers. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), β-amyloid (Aβ) and other aggregates upregulate activation of p65:p50 dimers in CNS cells and enhance transactivation of pathological mediators that cause neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Hence selective targeting of activated p65 is an attractive therapeutic strategy for AD. Here we report the design, structural and functional characterization of peptide analogs of a p65 interacting protein, the glucocorticoid induced leucine zipper (GILZ). By virtue of binding the transactivation domain of p65 exposed after release from the inhibitory IκΒ proteins in activated cells, the GILZ analogs can act as highly selective inhibitors of activated p65 with minimal potential for off-target effects. PMID:27764084

  13. Amyloid β Peptide Enhances RANKL-Induced Osteoclast Activation through NF-κB, ERK, and Calcium Oscillation Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shangfu; Yang, Bu; Teguh, Dian; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Jiake; Rong, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are common chronic degenerative disorders which are strongly associated with advanced age. We have previously demonstrated that amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, accumulated abnormally in osteoporotic bone specimens in addition to having an activation effect on osteoclast (Bone 2014,61:164-75). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Activation of NF-κB, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylates, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways by receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) plays a pivotal role in osteoclast activation. Targeting this signaling to modulate osteoclast function has been a promising strategy for osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Aβ on RANKL-induced osteoclast signaling pathways in vitro. In mouse bone marrow monocytes (BMMs), Aβ exerted no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis but promoted osteoclastic bone resorption. In molecular levels, Aβ enhanced NF-κB activity and IκB-α degradation, activated ERK phosphorylation and stimulated calcium oscillation, thus leading to upregulation of NFAT-c1 expression during osteoclast activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Aβ enhances RANKL-induced osteoclast activation through IκB-α degradation, ERK phosphorylation, and calcium oscillation signaling pathways and that Aβ may be a promising agent in the treatment of osteoclast-related disease such as osteoporosis. PMID:27735865

  14. Amyloidpeptide-specific DARPins as a novel class of potential therapeutics for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hanenberg, Michael; McAfoose, Jordan; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Wirth, Fabian; Parizek, Petra; Strobel, Lisa; Cattepoel, Susann; Späni, Claudia; Derungs, Rebecca; Maier, Marcel; Plückthun, Andreas; Nitsch, Roger M

    2014-09-26

    Passive immunization with anti-amyloidpeptide (Aβ) antibodies is effective in animal models of Alzheimer disease. With the advent of efficient in vitro selection technologies, the novel class of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) presents an attractive alternative to the immunoglobulin scaffold. DARPins are small and highly stable proteins with a compact modular architecture ideal for high affinity protein-protein interactions. In this report, we describe the selection, binding profile, and epitope analysis of Aβ-specific DARPins. We further showed their ability to delay Aβ aggregation and prevent Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity in vitro. To demonstrate their therapeutic potential in vivo, mono- and trivalent Aβ-specific DARPins (D23 and 3×D23) were infused intracerebroventricularly into the brains of 11-month-old Tg2576 mice over 4 weeks. Both D23 and 3×D23 treatments were shown to result in improved cognitive performance and reduced soluble Aβ levels. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Aβ-specific DARPins for the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  15. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin; Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki; Akaike, Akinori; Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  16. The FDA-approved natural product dihydroergocristine reduces the production of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloidpeptides

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiling; Yu, Jing; Niu, Qi; Liu, Jianhua; Fraering, Patrick C.; Wu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Known γ-secretase inhibitors or modulators display an undesirable pharmacokinetic profile and toxicity and have therefore not been successful in clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). So far, no compounds from natural products have been identified as direct inhibitors of γ-secretase. To search for bioactive molecules that can reduce the amount of amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) and that have better pharmacokinetics and an improved safety profile, we completed a screen of ~400 natural products by using cell-based and cell-free γ-secretase activity assays. We identified dihydroergocristine (DHEC), a component of an FDA- (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drug, to be a direct inhibitor of γ-secretase. Micromolar concentrations of DHEC substantially reduced Aβ levels in different cell types, including a cell line derived from an AD patient. Structure-activity relationship studies implied that the key moiety for inhibiting γ-secretase is the cyclized tripeptide moiety of DHEC. A Surface Plasmon Resonance assay showed that DHEC binds directly to γ-secretase and Nicastrin, with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 25.7 nM and 9.8 μM, respectively. This study offers DHEC not only as a new chemical moiety for selectively modulating the activity of γ-secretase but also a candidate for drug repositioning in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26567970

  17. Induction of sestrin2 as an endogenous protective mechanism against amyloid beta-peptide neurotoxicity in primary cortical culture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Chen, Shang-Der; Wu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Yang, Ding-I

    2014-03-01

    Accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in senile plaques, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been implicated in neurodegeneration. Recent studies suggested sestrin2 as a crucial mediator for reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and autophagy regulation that both play a pivotal role in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases. However, the potential link between sestrin2 and Aβ neurotoxicity has never been explored. The present study was therefore undertaken to test whether sestrin2 may be induced by Aβ and its possible role in modulating Aβ neurotoxicity. We showed that sestrin2 expression was elevated in primary rat cortical neurons upon Aβ exposure; a heightened extent of sestrin2 expression was also detected in the cortices of 12-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9 transgenic mice. Exposure of cortical neurons to Aβ led to formation of LC3B-II, an autophagic marker; an increased LC3B-II level was also observed in the cortices of 12-month-old AD transgenic mice. More importantly, downregulation of sestrin2 by siRNA abolished LC3B-II formation caused by Aβ that was accompanied by more severe neuronal death. Inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 also enhanced Aβ neurotoxicity. Together, these results indicate that sestrin2 induced by Aβ plays a protective role against Aβ neurotoxicity through, at least in part, regulation of autophagy.

  18. Intracerebroventricular Injection of AmyloidPeptides in Normal Mice to Acutely Induce Alzheimer-like Cognitive Deficits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Yun; Lee, Dongkeun K; Chung, Bo-Ryehn; Kim, Hyunjin V; Kim, YoungSoo

    2016-03-16

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a major pathological mediator of both familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the brains of AD patients, progressive accumulation of Aβ oligomers and plaques is observed. Such Aβ abnormalities are believed to block long-term potentiation, impair synaptic function, and induce cognitive deficits. Clinical and experimental evidences have revealed that the acute increase of Aβ levels in the brain allows development of Alzheimer-like phenotypes. Hence, a detailed protocol describing how to acutely generate an AD mouse model via the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ is necessary in many cases. In this protocol, the steps of the experiment with an Aβ-injected mouse are included, from the preparation of peptides to the testing of behavioral abnormalities. The process of preparing the tools and animal subjects before the injection, of injecting the Aβ into the mouse brain via ICV injection, and of assessing the degree of cognitive impairment are easily explained throughout the protocol, with an emphasis on tips for effective ICV injection of Aβ. By mimicking certain aspects of AD with a designated injection of Aβ, researchers can bypass the aging process and focus on the downstream pathology of Aβ abnormalities.

  19. Intravenous immunoglobulin protects neurons against amyloid beta-peptide toxicity and ischemic stroke by attenuating multiple cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Widiapradja, Alexander; Vegh, Viktor; Lok, Ker Zhing; Manzanero, Silvia; Thundyil, John; Gelderblom, Mathias; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Pavlovski, Dale; Tang, Sung-Chun; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Magnus, Tim; Chan, Sic L; Sobey, Christopher G; Reutens, David; Basta, Milan; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2012-07-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) preparations obtained by fractionating blood plasma, are increasingly being used increasingly as an effective therapeutic agent in treatment of several inflammatory diseases. Its use as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of stroke and Alzheimer's disease has been proposed, but little is known about the neuroprotective mechanisms of IVIg. In this study, we investigated the effect of IVIg on downstream signaling pathways that are involved in neuronal cell death in experimental models of stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Treatment of cultured neurons with IVIg reduced simulated ischemia- and amyloid βpeptide (Aβ)-induced caspase 3 cleavage, and phosphorylation of the cell death-associated kinases p38MAPK, c-Jun NH2 -terminal kinase and p65, in vitro. Additionally, Aβ-induced accumulation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal was attenuated in neurons treated with IVIg. IVIg treatment also up-regulated the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl2 in cortical neurons under ischemia-like conditions and exposure to Aβ. Treatment of mice with IVIg reduced neuronal cell loss, apoptosis and infarct size, and improved functional outcome in a model of focal ischemic stroke. Together, these results indicate that IVIg acts directly on neurons to protect them against ischemic stroke and Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis by inhibiting cell death pathways and by elevating levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2.

  20. The Characterization of the Caenorhabditis elegans Mitochondrial Thioredoxin System Uncovers an Unexpected Protective Role of Thioredoxin Reductase 2 in β-Amyloid Peptide Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cacho-Valadez, Briseida; Muñoz-Lobato, Fernando; Pedrajas, José Rafael; Cabello, Juan; Fierro-González, Juan Carlos; Navas, Plácido; Swoboda, Peter; Link, Chris D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Functional in vivo studies on the mitochondrial thioredoxin system are hampered by the embryonic or larval lethal phenotypes displayed by murine or Drosophila knock-out models. Thus, the access to alternative metazoan knock-out models for the mitochondrial thioredoxin system is of critical importance. Results: We report here the characterization of the mitochondrial thioredoxin system of Caenorhabditis elegans that is composed of the genes trx-2 and trxr-2. We demonstrate that the proteins thioredoxin 2 (TRX-2) and thioredoxin reductase 2 (TRXR-2) localize to the mitochondria of several cells and tissues of the nematode and that trx-2 and trxr-2 are upregulated upon induction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Surprisingly, C. elegans trx-2 (lof ) and trxr-2 (null) single and double mutants are viable and display similar growth rates as wild-type controls. Moreover, the lack of the mitochondrial thioredoxin system does not affect longevity, reactive oxygen species production or the apoptotic program. Interestingly, we found a protective role of TRXR-2 in a transgenic nematode model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that expresses human β-amyloid peptide and causes an age-dependent progressive paralysis. Hence, trxr-2 downregulation enhanced the paralysis phenotype, while a strong decrease of β-amyloid peptide and amyloid deposits occurred when TRXR-2 was overexpressed. Innovation: C. elegans provides the first viable metazoan knock-out model for the mitochondrial thioredoxin system and identifies a novel role of this system in β-amyloid peptide toxicity and AD. Conclusion: The nematode strains characterized in this work make C. elegans an ideal model organism to study the pathophysiology of the mitochondrial thioredoxin system at the level of a complete organism. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1384–1400. PMID:22220943

  1. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide Protects Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans from β-Amyloid Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Xi; Zhou, Ting-Ting; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Our previous studies found SVHRP could enhance neurogenesis and inhibit microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in vivo. Here, we use the transgenic CL4176, CL2006, and CL2355 strains of Caenorhabditis elegans which express the human Aβ1-42 to investigate the effects and the possible mechanisms of SVHRP mediated protection against Aβ toxicity in vivo. The results showed that SVHRP-fed worms displayed remarkably decreased paralysis, less abundant toxic Aβ oligomers, reduced Aβ plaque deposition with respect to untreated animals. SVHRP also suppressed neuronal Aβ expression-induced defects in chemotaxis behavior and attenuated levels of ROS in the transgenic C. elegans. Taken together, these results suggest SVHRP could protect against Aβ-induced toxicity in C. elegans. Further studies need to be conducted in murine models and humans to analyze the effectiveness of the peptide. PMID:27507947

  2. The AmyloidPeptide of Alzheimer’s Disease Binds CuI in a Linear Bis-His Coordination Environment: Insight into a Possible Neuroprotective Mechanism for the AmyloidPeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, J.; Szalai, V

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to neuronal apoptosis associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Copper may participate in oxidative stress through redox-cycling between its +2 and +1 oxidation states to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). In vitro, copper binds to the amyloid-? peptide of AD, and in vivo, copper is associated with amyloid plaques characteristic of AD. As a result, the A?CuI complex may be a critical reactant involved in ROS associated with AD etiology. To characterize the A?CuI complex, we have pursued X-ray absorption (XAS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of A?CuII and A?CuI (produced by ascorbate reduction of A?CuII). The A?CuII complex Cu K-edge XAS spectrum is indicative of a square-planar CuII center with mixed N/O ligation. Multiple scattering analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data for A?CuII indicates that two of the ligands are imidazole groups of histidine ligands, indicating a (NIm)2(N/O)2 CuII ligation sphere for A?CuII. After reduction of the A?CuII complex with ascorbate, the edge region decreases in energy by 4 eV. The X-ray absorption near-edge spectrum region of A?CuI displays an intense pre-edge feature at 8984.1(2) eV. EXAFS data fitting yielded a two-coordinate geometry, with two imidazole ligands coordinated to CuI at 1.877(2) A in a linear geometry. Ascorbate reduction of A?CuII under inert atmosphere and subsequent air oxidation of A?CuI to regenerate A?CuII was monitored by low-temperature EPR spectroscopy. Slow reappearance of the A?CuII EPR signal indicates that O2 oxidation of the A?CuI complex is kinetically sluggish and A? damage is occurring following reoxidation of A?CuI by O2. Together, these results lead us to hypothesize that CuI is ligated by His13 and His14 in a linear coordination environment in ??, that A? may be playing a neuroprotective role, and that metal-mediated oxidative damage of A? occurs over multiple redox cycles.

  3. The aggregation kinetics of Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide is controlled by stochastic nucleation

    PubMed Central

    Hortschansky, Peter; Schroeckh, Volker; Christopeit, Tony; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Fändrich, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    We report here a recombinant expression system that allows production of large quantities of Alzheimer’s Aβ(1–40) peptide. The material is competent to dissolve in water solutions with “random-coil properties,” although its conformation and factual oligomerization state are determined by the physico-chemical solution conditions. When dissolved in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 37°C, the peptide is able to undergo a nucleated polymerization reaction. The aggregation profile is characteristically bipartite, consisting of lag and growth phase. From these curves we determined the lag time as well as the rate of aggregation. Both values were found to depend on peptide concentration and addition or formation of seeds. Moreover, they can vary considerably between apparently identical samples. These data imply that the nucleation event is under influence of a stochastic factor that can manifest itself in profound macroscopic differences in the aggregation kinetics of otherwise indistinguishable samples. PMID:15937275

  4. The β-amyloid peptide compromises Reelin signaling in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Cuchillo-Ibañez, Inmaculada; Mata-Balaguer, Trinidad; Balmaceda, Valeria; Arranz, Juan José; Nimpf, Johannes; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is a signaling protein that plays a crucial role in synaptic function, which expression is influenced by β-amyloid (Aβ). We show that Reelin and Aβ oligomers co-immunoprecipitated in human brain extracts and were present in the same size-exclusion chromatography fractions. Aβ treatment of cells led to increase expression of Reelin, but secreted Reelin results trapped together with Aβ aggregates. In frontal cortex extracts an increase in Reelin mRNA, and in soluble and insoluble (guanidine-extractable) Reelin protein, was associated with late Braak stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while expression of its receptor, ApoER2, did not change. However, Reelin-dependent induction of Dab1 phosphorylation appeared reduced in AD. In cells, Aβ reduced the capacity of Reelin to induce internalization of biotinylated ApoER2 and ApoER2 processing. Soluble proteolytic fragments of ApoER2 generated after Reelin binding can be detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Quantification of these soluble fragments in CSF could be a tool to evaluate the efficiency of Reelin signaling in the brain. These CSF-ApoER2 fragments correlated with Reelin levels only in control subjects, not in AD, where these fragments diminished. We conclude that while Reelin expression is enhanced in the Alzheimer’s brain, the interaction of Reelin with Aβ hinders its biological activity. PMID:27531658

  5. Antagonizing beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity of the anti-aging fungus Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cora Sau-Wan; Yu, Man-Shan; Yuen, Wai-Hung; So, Kwok-Fai; Zee, Sze-Yong; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2008-01-23

    Ganoderma lucidum (Leyss. ex Fr.) Karst. (Lingzhi) is a medicinal fungus used clinically in many Asian countries to promote health and longevity. Synaptic degeneration is another key mode of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have shown the loss of synaptic density proteins in each individual neuron during the progression of AD. It was recently reported that beta-amyloid (Abeta) could cause synaptic dysfunction and contribute to AD pathology. In this study, we reported that aqueous extract of G. lucidum significantly attenuated Abeta-induced synaptotoxicity by preserving the synaptic density protein, synaptophysin. In addition, G. lucidum aqueous extract antagonized Abeta-triggered DEVD cleavage activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further studies elucidated that phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and p38 MAP kinase was attenuated by G. lucidum in Abeta-stressed neurons. Taken together, the results prove a hypothesis that anti-aging G. lucidum can prevent harmful effects of the exterminating toxin Abeta in AD.

  6. Amyloid Beta Peptides Affect Pregnenolone and Pregnenolone Sulfate Levels in PC-12 and SH-SY5Y Cells Depending on Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Calan, Ozlem Gursoy; Akan, Pinar; Cataler, Aysenur; Dogan, Cumhur; Kocturk, Semra

    2016-07-01

    Increased amyloid beta (AB) peptide concentration is one of the initiating factors in the neurodegeneration process. It has been suggested that cholesterol induces the synthesis of AB peptide from amyloid precursor protein or facilitates the formation of amyloid plaque by lowering the aggregation threshold of the peptide. It is also shown that AB peptides may affect cholesterol metabolism and the synthesis of steroid hormones such as progesterone and estradiol. Pregnenolone (P) and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are the major steroids produced from cholesterol in neural tissue. In toxicity conditions, the effect of AB peptides on P and PS levels has not yet been determined. Furthermore, it has not been clearly defined how changes in cellular P and PS levels affect neuronal cell survival. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of AB peptides on cellular changes in P and PS levels depending on the level of their main precursor, cholesterol. Cholesterol and toxic concentrations of AB fragments (AB 25-35, AB 1-40 and AB 1-42) were applied to PC-12 and SH-SY5Y cells. Changes in cellular cholesterol, P and PS levels were determined simultaneously in a dose-and time-dependent manner. The cell viability and cell death types were also evaluated. AB peptides affected both cell viability and P/PS levels. Steroid levels were altered depending on AB fragment type and the cholesterol content of the cells. Treatment with each of the AB fragments alone increased P levels by twofold. However, combined treatment with AB peptides and cholesterol increased P levels by approximately sixfold, while PS levels were increased only about 2.5 fold in both cell lines. P levels in the groups treated with AB 25-35 were higher than those in AB 1-40 and AB 1-42 groups. The cell viabilities were significantly low in the group treated by AB and cholesterol (9 mM). The effect of AB peptides on P levels might be a result of cellular self-defense. On the other hand, the rate of P increase

  7. Dutch and arctic mutant peptides of {beta} amyloid{sub 1-40} differentially affect the FGF-2 pathway in brain endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Solito, Raffaella; Corti, Federico; Fossati, Silvia; Mezhericher, Emiliya; Donnini, Sandra; Ghiso, Jorge; Giachetti, Antonio; Rostagno, Agueda; Ziche, Marina

    2009-02-01

    Single point mutations of the amyloid precursor protein generate A{beta} variants bearing amino acid substitutions at positions 21-23. These mutants are associated with distinct hereditary phenotypes of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, manifesting varying degrees of tropism for brain vessels, and impaired microvessel remodeling and angiogenesis. We examined the differential effects of E22Q (Dutch), and E22G (Arctic) variants in comparison to WT A{beta} on brain endothelial cell proliferation, angiogenic phenotype expression triggered by fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), pseudo-capillary sprouting, and induction of apoptosis. E22Q exhibited a potent anti-angiogenic profile in contrast to E22G, which had a much weaker effect. Investigations on the FGF-2 signaling pathway revealed the greatest differences among the peptides: E22Q and WT peptides suppressed FGF-2 expression while E22G had barely any effect. Phosphorylation of the FGF-2 receptor, FGFR-1, and the survival signal Akt were abolished by E22Q and WT peptides, but not by E22G. The biological dissimilar effect of the mutant and WT peptides on cerebral EC cannot be assigned to a particular A{beta} structure, suggesting that the toxic effect of the A{beta} assemblies goes beyond mere multimerization.

  8. Impact on the replacement of Phe by Trp in a short fragment of Aβ amyloid peptide on the formation of fibrils.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Nitin; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2011-02-01

    Aβ(16-22) (Ac-KLVFFAE-NH(2) ) is one of the shortest amyloid fibril-forming sequences identified in β-amyloid peptide. At neutral pH, the peptide forms fibrils in the concentration range of 0.2-2.0 mM after ≥ 10 days of incubation. Structures of the fibrils proposed based on solid-state NMR and MD simulations studies suggest antiparallel arrangement of β-strands and aromatic interactions between the Phe residues. In an effort to examine the role of aromatic interactions between two Phe residues in Aβ(16-22) , we have studied the self-assembly of Aβ(16-22) (AβFF) and two of its variants, Ac-KLVFWAE-NH(2) (AβFW) and Ac-KLVWFAE-NH(2) (AβWF). The peptides were dissolved in methanol (MeOH) at a concentration of 1 mM and in water (AβFW and AβWF, 1 mM; AβFF, 330 µM). Peptide solutions (100 µM) were prepared in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer at pH 7 by diluting from MeOH and water stock solutions. AβFW forms amyloid-like fibrils immediately from MeOH, as indicated by atomic force microscopy. Dilution of AβFW into phosphate buffer from stock solution prepared in MeOH results in fibrils, but with different morphology and dimensions. The secondary structure potentiated by MeOH seems to be important for the self-assembly of AβFW, as fibrils are not formed from water where the peptide is unordered. On the other hand, AβFF and AβWF do not form amyloid fibrils rapidly from any of the solvents used for dissolution. However, drying of AβWF from MeOH on mica surface gives rod-like and fibrous structures. Our study indicates that positioning of the aromatic residues F and W has an important role to play in promoting self-assembly of the Aβ(16-22) peptides.

  9. Neuroprotective effects of anti-aging oriental medicine Lycium barbarum against beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man-Shan; Leung, Sarana Ka-Yan; Lai, Sau-Wan; Che, Chi-Ming; Zee, Sze-Yong; So, Kwok-Fai; Yuen, Wai-Hung; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2005-01-01

    As aged population dramatically increases in these decades, efforts should be made on the intervention for curing age-associated neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Natural plant extracts of Lycium barbarum are well-known to exhibit anti-aging effects. We therefore hypothesized that they exhibit neuroprotective effects against toxins in aging-related neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether extracts from L. barbarum have neuroprotective effects against toxicity of fibrillar Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(25-35) fragments. Primary rat cortical neurons exposed to Abeta peptides resulted in apoptosis and necrosis. Pre-treatment with extract isolated from L. barbarum significantly reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In addition, it attenuated Abeta peptide-activated caspases-3-like activity. The extract elicited a typical dose-dependent neuroprotective effect. Effective dosage of this extract was wider than that of a well-known western neuroprotective medicine lithium chloride (LiCl). We have further examined the underlying mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects. In agreement with other laboratories, Abeta peptides induce a rapid activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by phosphorylation. Pre-treatment of aqueous extract markedly reduced the phosphorylation of JNK-1 (Thr183/Tyr185) and its substrates c-Jun-I (Ser 73) and c-Jun-II (Ser 63). Taken together, we have proved our hypothesis by showing neuroprotective effects of the extract from L. barbarum. Study on anti-aging herbal medicine like L. barbarum may open a new therapeutic window for the prevention of AD.

  10. Increased production of 4 kDa amyloid beta peptide in serum deprived human primary neuron cultures: possible involvement of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, A

    1995-12-01

    The etiology of the amyloid beta peptide in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is not known. Amyloid beta peptide (A beta), a proteolytic product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is deposited in the senile plaques and cerebrovascular tissues of individuals with either sporadic or familial AD (FAD). Increased A beta production from mutant APPs in FAD fosters the hypothesis that overexpression of A beta plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of AD. The absence of APP mutations in sporadic AD which displays identical pathological features than FAD such as synapse and neuronal loss, senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, suggests other causes for overexpression and/or deposition of A beta. To investigate the effect of neuronal death on APP metabolism and A beta secretion, human primary neuron cultures were induced to undergo apoptosis by serum deprivation. Serum deprived neurons display shrunken and rounded morphology, contain condensed chromatine and fragmented DNA, which are characteristic of apoptosis. In serum deprived neurons, metabolism of APP through the nonamyloidogenic secretory pathway is decreased to 20% from 40% in control cultures whereas 4kDa A beta is increased three- to fourfold. The results suggest that human neurons undergoing apoptosis generate excess A beta and indicates a possible mechanism for increased A beta in the absence of APP mutations.

  11. Context-dependent toxicity of amyloidpeptides on mouse cerebellar cells.

    PubMed

    Alasia, Silvia; Aimar, Patrizia; Merighi, Adalberto; Lossi, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia in old people. AD pathology is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in several regions of the brain, and links have been hypothesized between Aβ toxicity and apoptosis. Cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) have been widely used as in vitro tools for molecular studies correlating apoptosis with AD, although the cerebellum is a relatively spared area of the brain in vivo. We have used mixed neuronal-glial cerebellar cultures (NGCCs) and organotypic cerebellar cultures (OCCs) obtained from postnatal mice to assess the toxic effect of the Aβ oligomer 1-40 (Aβ1-40) after propidium iodide uptake in vitro. Our results demonstrate that NGCCs, which are primarily composed of CGCs, are resistant to Aβ1-40 challenge (5-10 μM) when cultured in physiological (5 mM) extracellular KCl ([K+]e) concentrations, i.e., in a condition in which CGCs undergo full maturation. Conversely, when 10 μM Aβ1-40 is given to NGCCs cultured in elevated (25 mM) [K+]e (and thus maintained in an immature state), there is a statistically significant increase in cell death. Cell death is by apoptosis, as demonstrated by ultrastructural examination. OCCs are resistant to Aβ challenge in any of the conditions tested (variation of [K+]e, presence or absence of serum, or addition of the neprilysin blocker phosphoramidon). Altogether these observations lead us to conclude that cerebellar cells in an organotypic context may be less susceptible to damage by Aβ, raising the question whether isolated CGCs are a reliable assay in drug discovery studies of AD.

  12. AN APOLIPOPROTEIN E4 FRAGMENT CAN PROMOTE INTRACELLULAR ACCUMULATION OF AMYLOID PEPTIDE BETA 42

    PubMed Central

    Dafnis, Ioannis; Stratikos, Efstratios; Tzinia, Athina; Tsilibary, Effie C.; Zannis, Vassilis I.; Chroni, Angeliki

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays a crucial role in lipid transport in circulation and the brain. The apoE4 isoform is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE4 is more susceptible to proteolysis than other apoE isoforms and apoE4 fragments have been found in brains of AD patients. These apoE4 fragments have been hypothesized to be involved in the pathogenesis of AD, although the mechanism is not clear. In this study we examined the effect of lipid-free apoE4 on amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. We discovered that a specific apoE4 fragment, apoE4[Δ(166-299)], can promote the cellular uptake of extracellular Aβ40 and Aβ42 either generated after APP transfection or added exogenously. A longer length fragment, apoE4[Δ(186-299)], or full-length apoE4 failed to elicit this effect. ApoE4[Δ(166-299)] effected a 20% reduction of cellular sphingomyelin levels, as well as changes in cellular membrane micro-fluidity. Following uptake, approximately 50% of Aβ42 remained within the cell for at least 24h, and led to increased formation of reactive oxygen species. Overall, our findings suggest a direct link between two early events in the pathogenesis of AD, apoE4 proteolysis and intraneuronal presence of Aβ. PMID:20412390

  13. The H63D HFE gene variant promotes activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via mitochondria dysfunction following β-amyloid peptide exposure.

    PubMed

    Mairuae, Nootchanat; Hall Ii, Eric C; Cheepsunthorn, Poonlarp; Lee, Sang Y; Connor, James R

    2010-11-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies suggest that the expression of the HFE allelic variant H63D may be a risk factor or genetic modifier for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The H63D variant alters cellular iron homeostasis and increases baseline oxidative stress. The elevated cellular stress milieu, we have proposed, may alter cellular responses to genetic and environmental determinants of AD. Accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) is one of the most prominent pathogenic characteristics of AD. Several studies have demonstrated that Aβ can induce neuronal cell death through apoptosis. In this study, we provide evidence that an Aβ(25-35) fragment, which contains the cytotoxic sequence of the amyloid peptide, activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells expressing the HFE allelic variant H63D to a greater extent than in cells with wild-type (WT) HFE. Specifically, Aβ(25-35) peptide exposure significantly induced Bax translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondria in H63D-expressing cells compared with WT cells. This translocation was associated with increased cytochrome c release from mitochondria and an increase in active caspase-9 and caspase-3 activity in H63D cells. Consequently, there is increased apoptosis in cells expressing the H63D variant as opposed to cells expressing WT HFE. We also found increased amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ(1-42) peptide in the mitochondrial compartment as well as increased mitochondrial stress in H63D-expressing cells compared with WT. These findings support our hypothesis that the presence of the HFE H63D allele enables factors that trigger neurodegenerative processes associated with AD and predisposes cells to cytotoxcity.

  14. Statins promote the degradation of extracellular amyloid {beta}-peptide by microglia via stimulation of exosome-associated insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) secretion.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Irfan Y; Barth, Esther; Christian, Leonie; Siepmann, Martin; Kumar, Sathish; Singh, Sandesh; Tolksdorf, Karen; Heneka, Michael T; Lütjohann, Dieter; Wunderlich, Patrick; Walter, Jochen

    2010-11-26

    Epidemiological studies indicate that intake of statins decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer disease. Cellular and in vivo studies suggested that statins might decrease the generation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) from the β-amyloid precursor protein. Here, we show that statins potently stimulate the degradation of extracellular Aβ by microglia. The statin-dependent clearance of extracellular Aβ is mainly exerted by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) that is secreted in a nonconventional pathway in association with exosomes. Stimulated IDE secretion and Aβ degradation were also observed in blood of mice upon peripheral treatment with lovastatin. Importantly, increased IDE secretion upon lovastatin treatment was dependent on protein isoprenylation and up-regulation of exosome secretion by fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. These data demonstrate a novel pathway for the nonconventional secretion of IDE via exosomes. The modulation of this pathway could provide a new strategy to enhance the extracellular clearance of Aβ.

  15. Validation and Characterization of a Novel Peptide That Binds Monomeric and Aggregated β-Amyloid and Inhibits the Formation of Neurotoxic Oligomers*

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Renae K.; Verdile, Giuseppe; Wijaya, Linda K.; Morici, Michael; Taddei, Kevin; Gupta, Veer B.; Pedrini, Steve; Jin, Liang; Nicolazzo, Joseph A.; Knock, Erin; Fraser, Paul E.; Martins, Ralph N.

    2016-01-01

    Although the formation of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), the soluble oligomers rather than the mature amyloid fibrils most likely contribute to Aβ toxicity and neurodegeneration. Thus, the discovery of agents targeting soluble Aβ oligomers is highly desirable for early diagnosis prior to the manifestation of a clinical AD phenotype and also more effective therapies. We have previously reported that a novel 15-amino acid peptide (15-mer), isolated via phage display screening, targeted Aβ and attenuated its neurotoxicity (Taddei, K., Laws, S. M., Verdile, G., Munns, S., D'Costa, K., Harvey, A. R., Martins, I. J., Hill, F., Levy, E., Shaw, J. E., and Martins, R. N. (2010) Neurobiol. Aging 31, 203–214). The aim of the current study was to generate and biochemically characterize analogues of this peptide with improved stability and therapeutic potential. We demonstrated that a stable analogue of the 15-amino acid peptide (15M S.A.) retained the activity and potency of the parent peptide and demonstrated improved proteolytic resistance in vitro (stable to t = 300 min, c.f. t = 30 min for the parent peptide). This candidate reduced the formation of soluble Aβ42 oligomers, with the concurrent generation of non-toxic, insoluble aggregates measuring up to 25–30 nm diameter as determined by atomic force microscopy. The 15M S.A. candidate directly interacted with oligomeric Aβ42, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance/Biacore analysis, with an affinity in the low micromolar range. Furthermore, this peptide bound fibrillar Aβ42 and also stained plaques ex vivo in brain tissue from AD model mice. Given its multifaceted ability to target monomeric and aggregated Aβ42 species, this candidate holds promise for novel preclinical AD imaging and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26538562

  16. Gas-Phase Structure of Amyloid-β (12 - 28) Peptide Investigated by Infrared Spectroscopy, Electron Capture Dissociation and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thi Nga; Poully, Jean Christophe; Lecomte, Frédéric; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Manil, Bruno; Desfrançois, Charles; Chirot, Fabien; Lemoine, Jerome; Dugourd, Philippe; van der Rest, Guillaume; Grégoire, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    The gas-phase structures of doubly and triply protonated Amyloid-β12-28 peptides have been investigated through the combination of ion mobility (IM), electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry, and infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy together with theoretical modeling. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to explore the conformational space of these protonated peptides, from which several classes of structures were found. Among the low-lying conformers, those with predicted diffusion cross-sections consistent with the ion mobility experiment were further selected and their IR spectra simulated using a hybrid quantum mechanical/semiempirical method at the ONIOM DFT/B3LYP/6-31 g(d)/AM1 level. In ECD mass spectrometry, the c/z product ion abundance (PIA) has been analyzed for the two charge states and revealed drastic differences. For the doubly protonated species, N - Cα bond cleavage occurs only on the N and C terminal parts, while a periodic distribution of PIA is clearly observed for the triply charged peptides. These PIA distributions have been rationalized by comparison with the inverse of the distances from the protonated sites to the carbonyl oxygens for the conformations suggested from IR and IM experiments. Structural assignment for the amyloid peptide is then made possible by the combination of these three experimental techniques that provide complementary information on the possible secondary structure adopted by peptides. Although globular conformations are favored for the doubly protonated peptide, incrementing the charge state leads to a conformational transition towards extended structures with 310- and α-helix motifs.

  17. Inhibition of amyloid fiber assembly by both BiP and its target peptide.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D. P.; Raffen, R.; Vogen, S.; Williamson, E.; Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2000-10-01

    Immunoglobulin light chain (LC) normally is a soluble, secreted protein, but some LC assemble into ordered fibrils whose deposition in tissues results in amyloidosis and organ failure. Here we reconstitute fibril formation in vitro and show that preformed fibrils can nucleate polymerization of soluble LC. This prion-like behavior has important physiological implications, since somatic mutations generate multiple related LC sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrate that fibril formation in vitro and aggregation of whole LC within cells are inhibited by BiP and by a synthetic peptide that is identical to a major LC binding site for BiP. We propose that LC form fibrils via an interprotein loop swap and that the underlying conformational change should be amenable to drug therapy.

  18. A Comparative Interaction between Copper Ions with Alzheimer's β Amyloid Peptide and Human Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Behbehani, G Rezaei; Barzegar, L; Mohebbian, M; Saboury, A A

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of Cu(2+) with the first 16 residues of the Alzheimer's amyliod β peptide, Aβ(1-16), and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied in vitro by isothermal titration calorimetry at pH 7.2 and 310 K in aqueous solution. The solvation parameters recovered from the extended solvation model indicate that HSA is involved in the transport of copper ion. Complexes between Aβ(1-16) and copper ions have been proposed to be an aberrant interaction in the development of Alzheimer's disease, where Cu(2+) is involved in Aβ(1-16) aggregation. The indexes of stability indicate that HSA removed Cu(2+) from Aβ(1-16), rapidly, decreased Cu-induced aggregation of Aβ(1-16), and reduced the toxicity of Aβ(1-16) + Cu(2+) significantly.

  19. A Comparative Interaction between Copper Ions with Alzheimer's β Amyloid Peptide and Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Behbehani, G. Rezaei; Barzegar, L.; Mohebbian, M.; Saboury, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of Cu2+ with the first 16 residues of the Alzheimer's amyliod β peptide, Aβ(1–16), and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied in vitro by isothermal titration calorimetry at pH 7.2 and 310 K in aqueous solution. The solvation parameters recovered from the extended solvation model indicate that HSA is involved in the transport of copper ion. Complexes between Aβ(1–16) and copper ions have been proposed to be an aberrant interaction in the development of Alzheimer's disease, where Cu2+ is involved in Aβ(1–16) aggregation. The indexes of stability indicate that HSA removed Cu2+ from Aβ(1–16), rapidly, decreased Cu-induced aggregation of Aβ(1–16), and reduced the toxicity of Aβ(1–16) + Cu2+ significantly. PMID:22844264

  20. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, protects against amyloidpeptide-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Tao; Ye-Tian; Yuan-Li; Zhang, Ge-Juan; Liu, Zhi-Qin; Di, Zheng-Li; Ying, Xiao-Ping; Fang, Yan; Song, Er-Fei; Qi, Jin-Shun; Pan, Yan-Fang

    2016-05-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share specific molecular mechanisms, and agents with proven efficacy in one may be useful against the other. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 has similar properties to GLP-1 and is currently in clinical use for T2DM treatment. Thus, this study was designed to characterize the effects of exendin-4 on the impairment of learning and memory induced by amyloid protein (Aβ) and its probable molecular underlying mechanisms. The results showed that (1) intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ1-42 resulted in a significant decline of spatial learning and memory of rats in water maze tests; (2) pretreatment with exendin-4 effectively and dose-dependently protected against the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory; (3) exendin-4 treatment significantly decreased the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 and increased the expression of Bcl2 in Aβ1-42-induced Alzheimer's rats. The vision and swimming speed of the rats among all groups in the visible platform tests did not show any difference. These findings indicate that systemic pretreatment with exendin-4 can effectively prevent the behavioral impairment induced by neurotoxic Aβ1-42, and the underlying protective mechanism of exendin-4 may be involved in the Bcl2, Bax and caspase-3 pathways. Thus, the application of exendin-4 or the activation of its signaling pathways may be a promising strategy to ameliorate the degenerative processes observed in AD.

  1. Specific soluble oligomers of amyloidpeptide undergo replication and form non-fibrillar aggregates in interfacial environments.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Paslay, Lea C; Lyons, Daniel; Morgan, Sarah E; Correia, John J; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan

    2012-06-15

    Aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides have been implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer disease. Among the different forms of Aβ aggregates, low molecular weight species ranging between ~2- and 50-mers, also called "soluble oligomers," have emerged as the species responsible for early synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss. Emerging evidence suggests that the neurotoxic oligomers need not be formed along the obligatory nucleation-dependant fibril formation pathway. In our earlier work, we reported the isolation of one such "off-pathway" 12-18-mer species of Aβ42 generated from fatty acids called large fatty acid-derived oligomers (LFAOs) (Kumar, A., Bullard, R. L., Patel, P., Paslay, L. C., Singh, D., Bienkiewicz, E. A., Morgan, S. E., and Rangachari, V. (2011) PLoS One 6, e18759). Here, we report the physiochemical aspects of LFAO-monomer interactions as well as LFAO-LFAO associations in the presence of interfaces. We discovered that LFAOs are a replicating strain of oligomers that recruit Aβ42 monomers and quantitatively convert them into LFAO assemblies at the expense of fibrils, a mechanism similar to prion propagation. We also found that in the presence of hexane-buffer or chloroform-buffer interfaces LFAOs are able to associate with themselves to form larger but non-fibrillar aggregates. These results further support the hypothesis that low molecular weight oligomers can be generated via non-fibril formation pathways. Furthermore, the unique replicating property of off-pathway oligomers may hold profound significance for Alzheimer disease pathology.

  2. The relationship between plasma amyloidpeptides and the medial temporal lobe in the homebound elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Bhadelia, Rafeeque; Liebson, Elizabeth; Bergethon, Peter; Folstein, Marshal; Zhu, Jay-Jiguang; Mwamburi, D. Mkaya; Patz, Samuel; Qiu, Wei Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Background The ratio of high amyloidpeptide40 (Aβ40) and low Aβ42 in plasma predicts the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and is associated with episodic recall in depression. We thus examined the relationship between plasma Aβ levels and brain volumes. Methods Homebound elders (N = 352) who had undergone brain MRI were used. Plasma Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 were measured by ELISA. Volumes of medial temporal regions, including the amygdala and hippocampus, were manually measured. Results Amygdala volume was associated with log10 of plasma Aβ1-42 (β = + 0.19, SE = 0.07, p = 0.005) after adjusting for AD, infarcts, white matter hyperintensities and demographics. In the absence of dementia, decreasing quartiles of plasma Aβ1-42 (Mean + SD ml: Q4 = 4.1±0.8; Q3 = 3.9±0.7; Q2 = 3.6 ± 0.8 and Q1 = 3.7 ± 0.8, p = 0.01) and increasing quartiles of plasma Aβ1-40/l-42 ratio were associated with smaller amygdala volume. Those depressed subjects with a high plasma Aβ1-40/1–42 ratio had smaller amygdala (Mean + SD ml: 3.3 ±0.8 vs. 3.6 ±0.8, p = 0.04) and total brain volume (Mean + SD liter: 0.95 ±0.07 vs. 1.04 ± 0.12, p = 0.005), and had a higher rate of MCI (67 vs. 36%, p = 0.02) than those with a low plasma Aβ1-40/l-42 ratio. Conclusions The combination of low plasma Aβ1-42 concentration and atrophy of the medial temporal lobe structures, which regulates mood and cognition, may represent a biomarker for a prodromal stage of AD. PMID:21480376

  3. Effect of metal chelators on the aggregation of beta-amyloid peptides in the presence of copper and iron.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebinia, Foozhan; Emadi, Saeed

    2017-04-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils and amorphous aggregates are found in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and are implicated in the etiology of AD. The metal imbalance is also among leading causes of AD, owing to the fact that Aβ aggregation takes place in the synaptic cleft where Aβ, Cu(II) and Fe(III) are found in abnormally high concentrations. Aβ40 and Aβ42 are the main components of plaques found in afflicted brains. Coordination of Cu(II) and Fe(III) ions to Aβ peptides have been linked to Aβ aggregation and production of reactive oxygen species, two key events in the development of AD pathology. Metal chelation was proposed as a therapy for AD on the basis that it might prevent Aβ aggregation. In this work, we first examined the formation of Aβ40 and Aβ42 aggregates in the presence of metal ions, i.e. Fe(III) and Cu(II), which were detected by fluorescence spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Second, we studied the ability of the two chelators, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline (clioquinol), to investigate their effect on the availability of these metal ions to interact with Aβ and thereby their effect on Aβ accumulation. Our findings show that Fe(III), but not Cu(II), promote aggregation of both Aβ40 and Aβ42. We also found that only clioquinol decreased significantly iron ion-induced aggregation of Aβ42. The presence of ions and/or chelators also affected the morphology of Aβ aggregates.

  4. Activation of PKR Causes Amyloid ß-Peptide Accumulation via De-Repression of BACE1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    ILL-Raga, Gerard; Palomer, Ernest; Wozniak, Matthew A.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Tajes, Marta; Guix, Francesc X.; Galán, José J.; Clarimón, Jordi; Antúnez, Carmen; Real, Luis M.; Boada, Mercé; Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Fandos, César; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    BACE1 is a key enzyme involved in the production of amyloid ß-peptide (Aß) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Normally, its expression is constitutively inhibited due to the presence of the 5′untranslated region (5′UTR) in the BACE1 promoter. BACE1 expression is activated by phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)2-alpha, which reverses the inhibitory effect exerted by BACE1 5′UTR. There are four kinases associated with different types of stress that could phosphorylate eIF2-alpha. Here we focus on the double-stranded (ds) RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR). PKR is activated during viral infection, including that of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), a virus suggested to be implicated in the development of AD, acting when present in brains of carriers of the type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene. HSV1 is a dsDNA virus but it has genes on both strands of the genome, and from these genes complementary RNA molecules are transcribed. These could activate BACE1 expression by the PKR pathway. Here we demonstrate in HSV1-infected neuroblastoma cells, and in peripheral nervous tissue from HSV1-infected mice, that HSV1 activates PKR. Cloning BACE1 5′UTR upstream of a luciferase (luc) gene confirmed its inhibitory effect, which can be prevented by salubrinal, an inhibitor of the eIF2-alpha phosphatase PP1c. Treatment with the dsRNA analog poly (I∶C) mimicked the stimulatory effect exerted by salubrinal over BACE1 translation in the 5′UTR-luc construct and increased Aß production in HEK-APPsw cells. Summarizing, our data suggest that PKR activated in brain by HSV1 could play an important role in the development of AD. PMID:21738672

  5. Amyloidpeptide on sialyl-Lewis(X)-selectin-mediated membrane tether mechanics at the cerebral endothelial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Askarova, Sholpan; Sun, Zhe; Sun, Grace Y; Meininger, Gerald A; Lee, James C-M

    2013-01-01

    Increased deposition of amyloidpeptide (Aβ) at the cerebral endothelial cell (CEC) surface has been implicated in enhancement of transmigration of monocytes across the brain blood barrier (BBB) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy (QIM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) with cantilevers biofunctionalized by sialyl-Lewis(x) (sLe(x)) were employed to investigate Aβ-altered mechanics of membrane tethers formed by bonding between sLe(x) and p-selectin at the CEC surface, the initial mechanical step governing the transmigration of monocytes. QIM results indicated the ability for Aβ to increase p-selectin expression at the cell surface and promote actin polymerization in both bEND3 cells (immortalized mouse CECs) and human primary CECs. AFM data also showed the ability for Aβ to increase cell stiffness and adhesion probability in bEND3 cells. On the contrary, Aβ lowered the overall force of membrane tether formation (Fmtf ), and produced a bimodal population of Fmtf , suggesting subcellular mechanical alterations in membrane tethering. The lower Fmtf population was similar to the results obtained from cells treated with an F-actin-disrupting drug, latrunculin A. Indeed, AFM results also showed that both Aβ and latrunculin A decreased membrane stiffness, suggesting a lower membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, a factor resulting in lower Fmtf . In addition, these cerebral endothelial alterations induced by Aβ were abrogated by lovastatin, consistent with its anti-inflammatory effects. In sum, these results demonstrated the ability for Aβ to enhance p-selectin expression at the CEC surface and induce cytoskeleton reorganization, which in turn, resulted in changes in membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion and membrane tethering, mechanical factors important in transmigration of monocytes through the BBB.

  6. Generation and Partial Characterization of Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody to AmyloidPeptide 1-37 (Aβ37).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Pankaj D; Blain, Jean-Francois; Freeman, Emily A; Patrick, Bruce A; Barshatzky, Marc; Hrdlicka, Lori A; Mehta, Sangita P; Frackowiak, Janusz; Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Wegiel, Jerzy; Patzke, Holger; Miller, David L

    2017-02-10

    Secreted soluble amyloid-β 1-37 (Aβ37) peptide is one of the prominent Aβ forms next to Aβ40, and is found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood. Recent studies have shown the importance of quantitation of CSF Aβ37 levels in combination with Aβ38, Aβ40, and Aβ42 to support the diagnosis of patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the value of antibody to Aβ37 to facilitate drug discovery studies. However, the availability of reliable and specific monoclonal antibody to Aβ37 is very limited. Our aims were: 1) to generate and partially characterize rabbit monoclonal antibody (RabmAb) to Aβ37, and 2) to determine whether the antibody detects changes in Aβ37 levels produced by a γ-secretase modulator (GSM). Our generated RabmAb to Aβ37 was found to be specific to Aβ37, since it did not react with Aβ36, Aβ38, Aβ39, Aβ40, and Aβ42 in an ELISA or immunoblotting. The epitope of the antibody was contained in the seven C-terminal residues of Aβ37. The antibody was sensitive enough to measure CSF and plasma Aβ37 levels in ELISA. Immunohistological studies showed the presence of Aβ37-positive deposits in the brain of AD, and Down syndrome persons diagnosed with AD. Our studies also showed that the antibody detected Aβ37 increases in CSF and brains of rodents following treatment with a GSM. Thus, our antibody can be widely applied to AD research, and in a panel based approach it may have potential to support the diagnosis of probable AD, and in testing the effect of GSMs to target AD.

  7. Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response by the amyloid-beta 1-40 peptide in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Catarina R G; Ferreiro, Elisabete; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cardoso, Sandra M; Pereira, Cláudia F

    2013-12-01

    Neurovascular dysfunction arising from endothelial cell damage is an early pathogenic event that contributes to the neurodegenerative process occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since the mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are not fully elucidated, this study was aimed to explore the hypothesis that brain endothelial cell death is induced upon the sustained activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response by amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, which deposits in the cerebral vessels in many AD patients and transgenic mice. Incubation of rat brain endothelial cells (RBE4 cell line) with Aβ1-40 increased the levels of several markers of ER stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR), in a time-dependent manner, and affected the Ca(2+) homeostasis due to the release of Ca(2+) from this intracellular store. Finally, Aβ1-40 was shown to activate both mitochondria-dependent and -independent apoptotic cell death pathways. Enhanced release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and activation of the downstream caspase-9 were observed in cells treated with Aβ1-40 concomitantly with caspase-12 activation. Furthermore, Aβ1-40 activated the apoptosis effectors' caspase-3 and promoted the translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus demonstrating the involvement of caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms during Aβ-induced endothelial cell death. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that ER stress plays a significant role in Aβ1-40-induced apoptotic cell death in brain endothelial cells suggesting that ER stress-targeted therapeutic strategies might be useful in AD to counteract vascular defects and ultimately neurodegeneration.

  8. Low-dose intraperitoneal Freund's adjuvant: toxicity and immunogenicity in mice using an immunogen targeting amyloid-beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Oscherwitz, Jon; Hankenson, F C; Yu, Fen; Cease, Kemp B

    2006-04-05

    Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) is effective for potentiating immune responses in mice when administered subcutaneously, and is often more potent when given intraperitoneally (i.p.). However, the the potential toxicity of i.p. administration in mice has led investigators and Institutional Animal Care and Use committees to increasingly view the use of CFA i.p. with reservation. We evaluated whether an 80% reduction in the dose of CFA administered i.p. to mice, compared to the i.p. doses used in a previous analysis, could abrogate the untoward effects associated with its use, while still maintaining adjuvanticity. Using a novel immunogen targeting the N-terminus of the 42-amino acid amyloid-beta peptide, we compared low dose CFA administered i.p., with three other commonly used adjuvants given i.p.: alum, incomplete Freunds adjuvant (IFA) and monophoshoryl lipid A + trehalose dicorynomycolate (MPL + TDM). The results of the study showed that, though the reduction in intraperitoneal dose of CFA mitigated transient weight loss and leukocytosis observed previously with higher doses of i.p. CFA, all mice administered CFA or IFA i.p. developed abdominal adhesions and granulomatous peritonitis. Mice from all adjuvant groups, however, appeared to tolerate the respective adjuvants well and excellent comparative immunogenicity was observed in mice immunized with the Freunds and MPL + TDM adjuvants. Consequently, we conclude that though a high-titered, humoral response may be generated using low dose CFA administered i.p., the accompanying toxicity remains significant, and thus alternative adjuvants and/or routes should be considered.

  9. Lipid peroxidation and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal formation by copper ion bound to amyloid-beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takaaki; Shishido, Naomi; Nakayama, Kenji; Nunomura, Akihiko; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George; Nakamura, Masao

    2007-12-01

    The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is proposed to be a toxic factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The primary products of lipid peroxidation are phospholipid hydroperoxides, and degraded reactive aldehydes, such as HNE, are considered secondary peroxidation products. In this study, we investigated the role of amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) in the formation of phospholipid hydroperoxides and HNE by copper ion bound to A beta. The A beta1-42-Cu2+ (1:1 molar ratio) complex showed an activity to form phospholipid hydroperoxides from a phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl phosphatidylcholine, through Cu2+ reduction in the presence of ascorbic acid. The phospholipid hydroperoxides were considered to be a racemic mixture of 9-hydroperoxide and 13-hydroperoxide of the linoleoyl residue. When Cu2+ was bound to 2 molar equivalents of A beta(1-42) (2 A beta1-42-Cu2+), lipid peroxidation was inhibited. HNE was generated from one of the phospholipid hydroperoxides, 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroperoxy-cis-9, trans-11-octadecadienoyl) phosphatidylcholine (PLPC-OOH), by free Cu2+ in the presence of ascorbic acid through Cu2+ reduction and degradation of PLPC-OOH. HNE generation was markedly inhibited by equimolar concentrations of A beta(1-40) (92%) and A beta(1-42) (92%). However, A beta(1-42) binding 2 or 3 molar equivalents of Cu2+ (A beta1-42-2Cu2+, A beta1-42-3Cu2+) acted as a pro-oxidant to form HNE from PLPC-OOH. These findings suggest that, at moderate concentrations of copper, A beta acts primarily as an antioxidant to prevent Cu2+-catalyzed oxidation of biomolecules, but that, in the presence of excess copper, pro-oxidant complexes of A beta with Cu2+ are formed.

  10. Effects of amyloidpeptides on the serotoninergic 5-HT1A receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Verdurand, Mathieu; Bérod, Anne; Le Bars, Didier; Zimmer, Luc

    2011-01-01

    A recent [(18)F]MPPF-positron emission tomography study has highlighted an overexpression of 5-HT(1A) receptors in the hippocampus of patients with mild cognitive impairment compared to a decrease in those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) [Truchot, L., Costes, S.N., Zimmer, L., Laurent, B., Le Bars, D., Thomas-Antérion, C., Croisile, B., Mercier, B., Hermier, M., Vighetto, A., Krolak-Salmon, P., 2007. Up-regulation of hippocampal serotonin metabolism in mild cognitive impairment. Neurology 69 (10), 1012-1017]. We used in vivo and in vitro neuroimaging to evaluate the longitudinal effects of injecting amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides (1-40) into the dorsal hippocampus of rats. In vivo microPET imaging showed no significant change in [(18)F]MPPF binding in the dorsal hippocampus over time, perhaps due to spatial resolution. However, in vitro autoradiography with [(18)F]MPPF (which is antagonist) displayed a transient increase in 5-HT(1A) receptor density 7 days after Aβ injection, whereas [(18)F]F15599 (a radiolabelled 5-HT(1A) agonist) binding was unchanged suggesting that the overexpressed 5-HT(1A) receptors were in a non-functional state. Complementary histology revealed a loss of glutamatergic neurons and an intense astroglial reaction at the injection site. Although a neurogenesis process cannot be excluded, we propose that Aβ injection leads to a transient astroglial overexpression of 5-HT(1A) receptors in compensation for the local neuronal loss. Exploration of the functional consequences of these serotoninergic modifications during the neurodegenerative process may have an impact on therapeutics targeting 5-HT(1A) receptors in AD.

  11. Isobaric Quantification of Cerebrospinal Fluid AmyloidPeptides in Alzheimer's Disease: C-Terminal Truncation Relates to Early Measures of Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Rogeberg, Magnus; Almdahl, Ina Selseth; Wettergreen, Marianne; Nilsson, Lars N G; Fladby, Tormod

    2015-11-06

    The amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide is the main constituent of the plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Measurement of Aβ1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a valuable marker in AD research, where low levels indicate AD. Although the use of immunoassays measuring Aβ1-38 and Aβ1-40 in addition to Aβ1-42 has increased, quantitative assays of other Aβ peptides remain rarely explored. We recently discovered novel Aβ peptides in CSF using antibodies recognizing the Aβ mid-domain region. Here we have developed a method using both Aβ N-terminal and mid-domain antibodies for immunoprecipitation in combination with isobaric labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for relative quantification of endogenous Aβ peptides in CSF. The developed method was used in a pilot study to produce Aβ peptide profiles from 38 CSF samples. Statistical comparison between CSF samples from 19 AD patients and 19 cognitively healthy controls revealed no significant differences at group level. A significant correlation was found between several larger C-terminally truncated Aβ peptides and protein biomarkers for neuronal damage, particularly prominent in the control group. Comparison of the isobaric quantification with immunoassays measuring Aβ1-38 or Aβ1-40 showed good correlation (r(2) = 0.84 and 0.85, respectively) between the two analysis methods. The developed method could be used to assess disease-modifying therapies directed at Aβ production or degradation.

  12. Low molecular weight oligomers of amyloid peptides display β-barrel conformations: A replica exchange molecular dynamics study in explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Alfonso; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils is connected to over 40 pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and systemic amyloidosis. Diffusible, low molecular weight protein and peptide oligomers that form in the early steps of aggregation appear to be the harmful cytotoxic species in the molecular etiology of these diseases. So far, the structural characterization of these oligomers has remained elusive owing to their transient and dynamic features. We here address, by means of full atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, the energy landscape of heptamers of the amyloidogenic peptide NHVTLSQ from the beta-2 microglobulin protein. The simulations totaling 5 μs show that low molecular weight oligomers in explicit solvent consist of β-barrels in equilibrium with amorphous states and fibril-like assemblies. The results, also accounting for the influence of the pH on the conformational properties, provide a strong evidence of the formation of transient β-barrel assemblies in the early aggregation steps of amyloid-forming systems. Our findings are discussed in terms of oligomers cytotoxicity.

  13. Low molecular weight oligomers of amyloid peptides display beta-barrel conformations: a replica exchange molecular dynamics study in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Alfonso; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2010-04-28

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils is connected to over 40 pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and systemic amyloidosis. Diffusible, low molecular weight protein and peptide oligomers that form in the early steps of aggregation appear to be the harmful cytotoxic species in the molecular etiology of these diseases. So far, the structural characterization of these oligomers has remained elusive owing to their transient and dynamic features. We here address, by means of full atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, the energy landscape of heptamers of the amyloidogenic peptide NHVTLSQ from the beta-2 microglobulin protein. The simulations totaling 5 micros show that low molecular weight oligomers in explicit solvent consist of beta-barrels in equilibrium with amorphous states and fibril-like assemblies. The results, also accounting for the influence of the pH on the conformational properties, provide a strong evidence of the formation of transient beta-barrel assemblies in the early aggregation steps of amyloid-forming systems. Our findings are discussed in terms of oligomers cytotoxicity.

  14. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins, such as APP

  15. A facile method for expression and purification of 15N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Tara; Ball, K. Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Wemmer, David E.; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with 15N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the 15N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼6 mg/L culture for 15N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and 1H–15N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with 15N and 13C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants. PMID:26231074

  16. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  17. Investigation of the inhibitory effects of TiO(2) on the β-amyloid peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mukhtar H; Byrne, John A; Keyes, Tia E

    2014-06-01

    TiO2 thin films are of great interest as biocompatible coatings and also as photocatalytic self-cleaning and antimicrobial coatings. In this work we used β-amyloid as a model for infectious protein to investigate the attachment and photocatalytic degradation. TiO2 films were prepared on stainless steel substrates using magnetron sputtering. The films were characterised before and after exposure to β-amyloid (1-42), using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and AFM. The TiO2 film was mostly composed of the anatase phase with a relatively high surface roughness. The presence of Raman peaks at 1668cm(-1) and 1263cm(-1), with the XPS spectral feature for nitrogen at 400eV, confirmed the adsorption of amyloid on surface. Following exposure of the β-amyloid contaminated TiO2 to UV-B irradiation a slight shift of amide modes was observed. Furthermore, the amide I spectra show an overall decrease in α-helix content with presence of a minor peak around 1591cm(-1), which is related to tryptophanyl and tyrosinyl radicals, which can lead to conformational change of β-amyloid. The C1s band at 292.2eV suggests the formation of free carboxylic acid. The loss in the crucial structure of β-amyloid leads to reduce the fibril formation, thought to be induced through a photocatalytic process.

  18. Cilostazol Modulates Autophagic Degradation of β-Amyloid Peptide via SIRT1-Coupled LKB1/AMPKα Signaling in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Suk; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Kim, Hye Young; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    A neuroprotective role of autophagy mediates the degradation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The previous study showed cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing beclin1, Atg5 and LC3-II expressions, and depletes intracellular Aβ accumulation. This study elucidated the mechanisms through which cilostazol modulates the autophagic degradation of Aβ in neurons. In N2a cells, cilostazol (10–30 μM), significantly increased the expression of P-AMPKα (Thr 172) and downstream P-ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) (Ser 79) as did resveratrol (SIRT1 activator), or AICAR (AMPK activator), which were blocked by KT5720, compound C (AMPK inhibitor), or sirtinol. Furthermore, phosphorylated-mTOR (Ser 2448) and phosphorylated-P70S6K (Thr 389) expressions were suppressed, and LC3-II levels were elevated in association with decreased P62/Sqstm1 by cilostazol. Cilostazol increased cathepsin B activity and decreased p62/SQSTM 1, consequently decreased accumulation of Aβ1–42 in the activated N2aSwe cells, and these results were blocked by sirtinol, compound C and bafilomycin A1 (autophagosome blocker), suggesting enhanced autophagosome formation by cilostazol. In SIRT1 gene-silenced N2a cells, cilostazol failed to increase the expressions of P-LKB1 (Ser 428) and P-AMPKα, which contrasted with its effect in negative control cells transfected with scrambled siRNA duplex. Further, N2a cells transfected with expression vectors encoding pcDNA SIRT1 showed increased P-AMPKα expression, which mimicked the effect of cilostazol in N2a cells; suggesting cilostazol-stimulated expressions of P-LKB1 and P-AMPKα were SIRT1-dependent. Unlike their effects in N2a cells, in HeLa cells, which lack LKB1, cilostazol and resveratrol did not elevate SIRT1 or P-AMPKα expression, indicating cilostazol and resveratrol-stimulated expressions of SIRT1 and P-AMPKα are LKB1-dependent. In conclusion, cilostazol upregulates autophagy by activating SIRT1-coupled P-LKB1/P-AMPKα and

  19. Cilostazol Upregulates Autophagy via SIRT1 Activation: Reducing AmyloidPeptide and APP-CTFβ Levels in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Rin; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Hye Young; Bae, Sun Sik; Lee, Won Suk; Rhim, Byung Yong; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a vital pathway for the removal of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and the aggregated proteins that cause Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We previously found that cilostazol induced SIRT1 expression and its activity in neuronal cells, and thus, we hypothesized that cilostazol might stimulate clearances of Aβ and C-terminal APP fragment β subunit (APP-CTFβ) by up-regulating autophagy.When N2a cells were exposed to soluble Aβ1–42, protein levels of beclin-1, autophagy-related protein5 (Atg5), and SIRT1 decreased significantly. Pretreatment with cilostazol (10–30 μM) or resveratrol (20 μM) prevented these Aβ1–42 evoked suppressions. LC3-II (a marker of mammalian autophagy) levels were significantly increased by cilostazol, and this increase was reduced by 3-methyladenine. To evoke endogenous Aβ overproduction, N2aSwe cells (N2a cells stably expressing human APP containing the Swedish mutation) were cultured in medium with or without tetracycline (Tet+ for 48 h and then placed in Tet- condition). Aβ and APP-CTFβ expressions were increased after 12~24 h in Tet- condition, and these increased expressions were significantly reduced by pretreating cilostazol. Cilostazol-induced reductions in the expressions of Aβ and APP-CTFβ were blocked by bafilomycin A1 (a blocker of autophagosome to lysosome fusion). After knockdown of the SIRT1 gene (to ~40% in SIRT1 protein), cilostazol failed to elevate the expressions of beclin-1, Atg5, and LC3-II, indicating that cilostazol increases these expressions by up-regulating SIRT1. Further, decreased cell viability induced by Aβ was prevented by cilostazol, and this inhibition was reversed by 3-methyladenine, indicating that the protective effect of cilostazol against Aβ induced neurotoxicity is, in part, ascribable to the induction of autophagy. In conclusion, cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing the activation of SIRT1, and thereby enhances Aβ clearance and increases cell viability. PMID:26244661

  20. Development of gold nanoparticle based colorimetric method for quantitatively studying the inhibitors of Cu(2+)/Zn(2+) induced β-amyloid peptide assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengke; Wang, Kun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2015-02-09

    In this paper, a kind of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-based colorimetric assay has been developed for studying the reversible interaction of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) with Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), and quantitatively analyzing four inhibitors (i.e., EDTA, EGTA, histidine and clioquinol) of Cu(2+)/Zn(2+) induced Aβ assembly. The inhibition efficiencies (e.g., half maximal inhibitory concentration, IC50 value) of these inhibitors could be measured in this work. As far as we know, these IC50 values were reported at the first time. In this assay, the streptavidin conjugated GNPs (SA-GNPs) were employed as indicators to monitor the Cu(2+)/Zn(2+) induced aggregating/disaggregating behaviors of biotin modified β-amyloid 1-16 peptides (Aβ1-16(biotin)). Because of high affinity of streptavidin (SA) with biotin, the aggregating/disaggregating of Aβ1-16(biotin) results in the significant color change of SA-GNPs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the assay can be used as an effective tool for designing anti-dementia drugs through quantitative analysis of the interactions of four representative inhibitors with Cu(2+)/Zn(2+) induced Aβ assembly.

  1. Copper(II)-bis-histidine coordination structure in a fibrillar amyloid β-peptide fragment and model complexes revealed by electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Guzmán, Jessica; Sun, Li; Mehta, Anil K; Dong, Jijun; Lynn, David G; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-09-23

    Truncated and mutated amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are models for systematic study-in homogeneous preparations-of the molecular origins of metal ion effects on Aβ aggregation rates, types of aggregate structures formed, and cytotoxicity. The 3D geometry of bis-histidine imidazole coordination of Cu(II) in fibrils of the nonapetide acetyl-Aβ(13-21)H14A has been determined by powder (14) N electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. The method of simulation of the anisotropic combination modulation is described and benchmarked for a Cu(II) -bis-cis-imidazole complex of known structure. The revealed bis-cis coordination mode, and the mutual orientation of the imidazole rings, for Cu(II) in Ac-Aβ(13-21)H14A fibrils are consistent with the proposed β-sheet structural model and pairwise peptide interaction with Cu(II) , with an alternating [-metal-vacancy-]n pattern, along the N-terminal edge. Metal coordination does not significantly distort the intra-β-strand peptide interactions, which provides a possible explanation for the acceleration of Ac-Aβ(13-21)H14A fibrillization by Cu(II) , through stabilization of the associated state and low-reorganization integration of β-strand peptide pair precursors.

  2. Phosphorylation of Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor peptide by protein kinase C and Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, S.; Czernik, A.J.; Greengard, P. )

    1988-08-01

    The amino acid sequence of the Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor (ADAP) has been deduced from the corresponding cDNA, and hydropathy analysis of the sequence suggest a receptor-like structure with a single transmembrane domain. The putative cytoplasmic domain of ADAP contains potential sites for serine and threonine phosphorylation. In the present study, synthetic peptides derived from this domain were used as model substrates for various purified protein kinases. Protein kinase C rapidly catalyzed the phosphorylation of a peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 645-661 of ADAP. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylated ADAP peptide (645-661) on Thr-654 and Ser-655. Using rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes prelabeled with {sup 32}P{sub i}, a {sup 32}P-labeled phosphoprotein of {approx}135 kDa was immunoprecipitated by using antisera prepared against ADAP peptide(597-624), consistent with the possibility that the holoform of ADAP in rat brain is a phosphoprotein. Based on analogy with the effect of phosphorylation by protein kinase C of juxtamembrane residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin 2 receptor, phosphorylation of ADAP may target it for internalization.

  3. Kinesin-1 inhibits the aggregation of amyloidpeptide as detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanpeng; Tian, Shijun; Peng, Xianglei; Yang, Jingfa; Fu, Yuanhui; Jiao, Yueying; Zhao, Jiang; He, Jinsheng; Hong, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Although the exact etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still unclear, amyloid-β (Aβ) generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) aggregate to form toxic amyloid species. Kinesin-1 is the first identified ATP-dependent axonal transport motor protein that has been proven to affect Aβ generation and deposition. In this paper, we applied dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (DC-FCCS) to investigate the direct interaction of Aβ with kinesin-1 at the single-molecule fluorescence level in vitro. The results showed that two kinds of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged kinesin light-chain subunits of kinesin-1(KLCs), KLC-E and E-KLC inhibited the aggregation of Aβ over a period of time, providing additional insight into the mechanism of axonal transport deficits in AD.

  4. Beta-secretase cleavage at amino acid residue 34 in the amyloid beta peptide is dependent upon gamma-secretase activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Ping; Tugusheva, Katherine; Bruce, James E; Lucka, Adam; Wu, Guo-Xin; Chen-Dodson, Elizabeth; Price, Eric; Li, Yueming; Xu, Min; Huang, Qian; Sardana, Mohinder K; Hazuda, Daria J

    2003-06-06

    The amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) are the major components of the senile plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Abeta peptides are generated from the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases. Beta-secretase (BACE), a type-I transmembrane aspartyl protease, cleaves APP first to generate a 99-amino acid membrane-associated fragment (CT99) containing the N terminus of Abeta peptides. Gamma-secretase, a multi-protein complex, then cleaves within the transmembrane region of CT99 to generate the C termini of Abeta peptides. The production of Abeta peptides is, therefore, dependent on the activities of both BACE and gamma-secretase. The cleavage of APP by BACE is believed to be a prerequisite for gamma-secretase-mediated processing. In the present study, we provide evidence both in vitro and in cells that BACE-mediated cleavage between amino acid residues 34 and 35 (Abeta-34 site) in the Abeta region is dependent on gamma-secretase activity. In vitro, the Abeta-34 site is processed specifically by BACE1 and BACE2, but not by cathepsin D, a closely related aspartyl protease. Moreover, the cleavage of the Abeta-34 site by BACE1 or BACE2 occurred only when Abeta 1- 40 peptide, a gamma-secretase cleavage product, was used as substrate, not the non-cleaved CT99. In cells, overexpression of BACE1 or BACE2 dramatically increased the production of the Abeta 1-34 species. More importantly, the cellular production of Abeta 1-34 species induced by overexpression of BACE1 or BACE2 was blocked by a number of known gamma-secretase inhibitors in a concentration-dependent manner. These gamma-secretase inhibitors had no effect on enzymatic activity of BACE1 or BACE2 in vitro. Our data thus suggest that gamma-secretase cleavage of CT99 is a prerequisite for BACE-mediated processing at Abeta-34 site. Therefore, BACE and gamma-secretase activity can be mutually dependent.

  5. Structural Similarities and Differences between Amyloidogenic and Non-Amyloidogenic Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) Sequences and Implications for the Dual Physiological and Pathological Activities of These Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2013-01-01

    IAPP, a 37 amino-acid peptide hormone belonging to the calcitonin family, is an intrinsically disordered protein that is coexpressed and cosecreted along with insulin by pancreatic islet β-cells in response to meals. IAPP plays a physiological role in glucose regulation; however, in certain species, IAPP can aggregate and this process is linked to β-cell death and Type II Diabetes. Using replica exchange molecular dynamics with extensive sampling (16 replicas per sequence and 600 ns per replica), we investigate the structure of the monomeric state of two species of aggregating peptides (human and cat IAPP) and two species of non-aggregating peptides (pig and rat IAPP). Our simulations reveal that the pig and rat conformations are very similar, and consist of helix-coil and helix-hairpin conformations. The aggregating sequences, on the other hand, populate the same helix-coil and helix-hairpin conformations as the non-aggregating sequence, but, in addition, populate a hairpin structure. Our exhaustive simulations, coupled with available peptide-activity data, leads us to a structure-activity relationship (SAR) in which we propose that the functional role of IAPP is carried out by the helix-coil conformation, a structure common to both aggregating and non-aggregating species. The pathological role of this peptide may have multiple origins, including the interaction of the helical elements with membranes. Nonetheless, our simulations suggest that the hairpin structure, only observed in the aggregating species, might be linked to the pathological role of this peptide, either as a direct precursor to amyloid fibrils, or as part of a cylindrin type of toxic oligomer. We further propose that the helix-hairpin fold is also a possible aggregation prone conformation that would lead normally non-aggregating variants of IAPP to form fibrils under conditions where an external perturbation is applied. The SAR relationship is used to suggest the rational design of therapeutics

  6. Modeling copper binding to the amyloidpeptide at different pH: toward a molecular mechanism for Cu reduction.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Sara; Hureau, Christelle; Faller, Peter; La Penna, Giovanni

    2012-10-04

    Oxidative stress, including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), has been reported to be a key event in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cu has been found in high concentrations in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of AD, where it is bound to the main constituent amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Whereas it has been proposed that Cu-Aβ complexes catalyze the production of ROS via redox-cycling between the Cu(I) and Cu(II) state, the redox chemistry of Cu-Aβ and the precise mechanism of redox reactions are still unclear. Because experiments indicate different coordination environments for Cu(II) and Cu(I), it is expected that the electron is not transferred between Cu-Aβ and reactants in a straightforward manner but involves structural rearrangement. In this work the structures indicated by experimental data are modeled at the level of modern density-functional theory approximations. Possible pathways for Cu(II) reduction in different coordination sites are investigated by means of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations in the water solvent and at room temperature. The models of the ligand reorganization around Cu allow the proposal of a preferential mechanism for Cu-Aβ complex reduction at physiological pH. Models reveal that for efficient reduction the deprotonated amide N in the Ala 2-Glu 3 peptide bond has to be protonated and that interactions in the second coordination sphere make important contributions to the reductive pathway, in particular the interaction between COO(-) and NH(2) groups of Asp 1. The proposed mechanism is an important step forward to a clear understanding of the redox chemistry of Cu-Aβ, a difficult task for spectroscopic approaches as the Cu-peptide interactions are weak and dynamical in nature.

  7. Origins of amyloid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amyloid-β plaques are a defining characteristic of Alzheimer Disease. However, Amyloid-β deposition is also found in other forms of dementia and in non-pathological contexts. Amyloid-β deposition is variable among vertebrate species and the evolutionary emergence of the amyloidogenic property is currently unknown. Evolutionary persistence of a pathological peptide sequence may depend on the functions of the precursor gene, conservation or mutation of nucleotides or peptide domains within the precursor gene, or a species-specific physiological environment. Results In this study, we asked when amyloidogenic Amyloid-β first arose using phylogenetic trees constructed for the Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene family and by modeling the potential for Amyloid-β aggregation across species in silico. We collected the most comprehensive set of sequences for the Amyloid-β Precursor Protein family using an automated, iterative meta-database search and constructed a highly resolved phylogeny. The analysis revealed that the ancestral gene for invertebrate and vertebrate Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene families arose around metazoic speciation during the Ediacaran period. Synapomorphic frequencies found domain-specific conservation of sequence. Analyses of aggregation potential showed that potentially amyloidogenic sequences are a ubiquitous feature of vertebrate Amyloid-β Precursor Protein but are also found in echinoderm, nematode, and cephalochordate, and hymenoptera species homologues. Conclusions The Amyloid-β Precursor Protein gene is ancient and highly conserved. The amyloid forming Amyloid-β domains may have been present in early deuterostomes, but more recent mutations appear to have resulted in potentially unrelated amyoid forming sequences. Our results further highlight that the species-specific physiological environment is as critical to Amyloid-β formation as the peptide sequence. PMID:23627794

  8. Copper ligation to soluble oligomers of the English mutant of the amyloidpeptide yields a linear Cu(I) site that is resistant to O2 oxidation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Kristy L; Clewett, Heather S; Schmitt, Jennifer C; Shearer, Jason

    2013-05-25

    Copper coordination to soluble oligomers of the English (AβH(6)R) mutant of the amyloidpeptide is probed. Cu(II) coordination yields a square planar (N/O)4 coordination environment, while reduction yields an O2 inert linear bis-His Cu(I) centre.

  9. Immunohistochemical analysis of transporters related to clearance of amyloidpeptides through blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in human brain.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Koichi; Chiba, Yoichi; Fujihara, Ryuji; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Haruhiko; Ueno, Masaki

    2015-12-01

    A large number of previous reports have focused on the transport of amyloidpeptides through cerebral endothelial cells via the blood-brain barrier, while fewer reports have mentioned the transport through the choroid plexus epithelium via the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Concrete roles of these two pathways remain to be clarified. In this study, we immunohistochemically examined the expression of transporters/receptors that are supposed to be related to the clearance of amyloidpeptides in the choroid plexus epithelium, the ventricular ependymal cells and the brain microvessels, using seven autopsied human brains. In the choroid plexus epithelium, immunoreactivity for low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1), LRP2, formylpeptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-A1 (ABCA1), ABCC1 and ABCG4 was seen in 7 of 7 brains, while that for ABCB1, ABCG2, RAGE and CD36 was seen in 0-2 brains. In the ventricular ependymal cells, immunoreactivity for CD36, LDLR, LRP1, LRP2, FPRL1, ABCA1, ABCC1 and ABCG4 was seen in 6-7 brains, while that for ABCB1, ABCG2 and RAGE was seen in 0-1 brain. Immunoreactivity for insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was seen in three and four brains in the choroid plexus epithelium and the ventricular ependymal cells, respectively. In addition, immunoreactivity for LDLR, ABCB1 and ABCG2 was seen in over 40 % of the microvessels (all seven brains), and that for FPRL1, ABCA1, ABCC1 and RAGE was seen in over 5 % of the microvessels (4-6 brains), while that for CD36, IDE, LRP1, LRP2 and ABCG4 was seen in less than 5 % of the microvessels (0-2 brains). These findings may suggest that these multiple transporters/receptors and IDE expressed on the choroid plexus epithelium, ventricular ependymal cells and brain microvessels complementarily or cooperatively contribute to the clearance of amyloidpeptides from the brain.

  10. pH-dependence of the specific binding of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions to the amyloid-{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghalebani, Leila; Wahlstroem, Anna; Danielsson, Jens; Waermlaender, Sebastian K.T.S.; Graeslund, Astrid

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu(II) and Zn(II) display pH-dependent binding to the A{beta}(1-40) peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 7.4 both metal ions display residue-specific binding to the A{beta} peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At pH 5.5 the binding specificity is lost for Zn(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential Cu(II) and Zn(II) binding may help explain metal-induced AD toxicity. -- Abstract: Metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) are accumulated in Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques. The amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide involved in the disease interacts with these metal ions at neutral pH via ligands provided by the N-terminal histidines and the N-terminus. The present study uses high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to monitor the residue-specific interactions of Cu(II) and Zn(II) with {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled A{beta}(1-40) peptides at varying pH levels. At pH 7.4 both ions bind to the specific ligands, competing with one another. At pH 5.5 Cu(II) retains its specific histidine ligands, while Zn(II) seems to lack residue-specific interactions. The low pH mimics acidosis which is linked to inflammatory processes in vivo. The results suggest that the cell toxic effects of redox active Cu(II) binding to A{beta} may be reversed by the protective activity of non-redox active Zn(II) binding to the same major binding site under non-acidic conditions. Under acidic conditions, the protective effect of Zn(II) may be decreased or changed, since Zn(II) is less able to compete with Cu(II) for the specific binding site on the A{beta} peptide under these conditions.

  11. Hippocampal Injections of Oligomeric Amyloid β-peptide (1–42) Induce Selective Working Memory Deficits and Long-lasting Alterations of ERK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Pierre; Mons, Nicole; Micheau, Jacques; Louis, Caroline; Beracochea, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that abnormal brain accumulation of soluble rather than aggregated amyloid-β1–42 oligomers (Aβo(1–42)) plays a causal role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, as yet, animal’s models of AD based on oligomeric amyloid-β1–42 injections in the brain have not investigated their long-lasting impacts on molecular and cognitive functions. In addition, the injections have been most often performed in ventricles, but not in the hippocampus, in spite of the fact that the hippocampus is importantly involved in memory processes and is strongly and precociously affected during the early stages of AD. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the long-lasting impacts of intra-hippocampal injections of oligomeric forms of Aβo(1–42) on working and spatial memory and on the related activation of ERK1/2. Indeed, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) which is involved in memory function had been found to be activated by amyloid peptides. We found that repeated bilateral injections (1injection/day over 4 successive days) of oligomeric forms of Aβo(1–42) into the dorsal hippocampus lead to long-lasting impairments in two working memory tasks, these deficits being observed 7 days after the last injection, while spatial memory remained unaffected. Moreover, the working memory deficits were correlated with sustained impairments of ERK1/2 activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the septum, two brain areas tightly connected with the hippocampus and involved in working memory. Thus, our study is first to evidence that sub-chronic injections of oligomeric forms of Aβo(1–42) into the dorsal hippocampus produces the main sign of cognitive impairments corresponding to the early stages of AD, via long-lasting alterations of an ERK/MAPK pathway in an interconnected brain networks. PMID:26793098

  12. Syntaxin 5 interacts with presenilin holoproteins, but not with their N- or C-terminal fragments, and affects β-amyloid peptide production

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in presenilins 1 and 2 (PS1 and PS2) account for the majority of cases of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. However, the trafficking and interaction of PSs with other proteins in the early secretory pathways are poorly understood. Using co-immunoprecipitation, we found that PS bound to Syx5 (syntaxin 5), which is a target-soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–Golgi vesicular transport in vivo. Syx5 interacted only with the full-length PS holoproteins and not with the naturally occurring N- or C-terminal fragments. The PS holoproteins co-immunoprecipitated with the mutant Syx5, which localized to the ER and Golgi compartments, despite the substitution of the transmembrane region with that of syntaxin 1A. In contrast, the transmembrane deletion mutant that localized to the cytosol, but not to the ER or Golgi compartments, did not co-immunoprecipitate the PS holoproteins. The PS1 variant linked to familial Alzheimer's disease (PS1ΔE9), lacking the region that contains the endoproteolytic cleavage site in the cytoplasmic loop, showed markedly decreased binding to Syx5. Immunofluorescence and sucrose-density-gradient fractionation analyses showed that the full-length PS holoproteins co-localized with Syx5 to the ER and cis-Golgi compartments. Furthermore, Syx5 overexpression resulted in the accumulation of PS holoproteins and the β-amyloid precursor protein, and reduced the secretion of the Aβ (amyloid β) peptide in COS-7 cells. In summary, these results indicate that Syx5 binds to full-length PSs and affects the processing and trafficking of β-amyloid precursor protein in the early secretory compartments. PMID:15109302

  13. Effects of super-hard rice bread blended with black rice bran on amyloid β peptide production and abrupt increase in postprandial blood glucose levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sumiko; Hara, Takashi; Joh, Toshio; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Akira; Kasuga, Kensaku; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes are very serious diseases with the latter having been suggested to cause the former. We prepared super-hard rice bread blended with black rice bran (SRBBB), which contained a high amount of resistant starch that showed strong inhibitory activities against β-secretase and acetylcholinesterase even after heating. Black rice bran showed greater β-secretase inhibitory activity (3.6-fold) than Koshihikari rice. The bran contained more oleic acid and anthocyanin, meaning that it is potentially a biofunctional food with a high antioxidant capacity. Furthermore, aged mice, which were fed a SRBBB diet for four weeks, showed lower amyloid β 40 peptide in the blood than mice fed a commercial diet (p < 0.01). Additionally, their initial blood glucose levels (BGLs) after 12 weeks of being fed SRBBB were significantly lower than those in the control group. Taken together, our results indicate SRBBB shows promise for inhibiting not only amyloid β production, but also abrupt increases in postprandial BGLs.

  14. The aspartate-257 of presenilin 1 is indispensable for mouse development and production of β-amyloid peptides through β-catenin-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xuefeng; Wang, Pei; Sun, Xiaoyan; Soriano, Salvador; Shum, Wan-Kyng; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Trumbauer, Myrna E.; Takashima, Akihiko; Koo, Edward H.; Zheng, Hui

    2002-01-01

    To differentiate multiple activities of presenilin 1 (PS1), we generated transgenic mice expressing two human PS1 alleles: one with the aspartate to alanine mutation at residue 257 (hPS1D257A) that impairs the proteolytic activity of PS1, and the other deleting amino acids 340–371 of the hydrophilic loop sequence (hPS1Δcat) essential for β-catenin interaction. We show here that although hPS1Δcat is fully competent in rescuing the PS1-null lethal phenotype, hPS1D257A does not exhibit developmental activity. hPS1D257A also leads to the concurrent loss of the proteolytic processing of Notch and β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the generation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ). Further, by measuring the levels of endogenous AβX-40 and AβX-42 in primary neuronal cultures, we confirmed the concept that PS1 is indispensable for the production of secreted Aβ. PMID:12070348

  15. Bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) crosslinking analysis of the behavior of amyloidpeptide in solution and in phospholipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jie; Liu, En-Qi; Zhang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The structure and state of amyloidpeptide (Aβ) oligomers often need to be checked by reliable experimental methods. Electrophoresis is a commonly applied measurement method. However, due to the presence of detergents, oligomers are easily broken during electrophoresis, which makes it very hard to accurately assess Aβ aggregate states. In the current study, bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) was used to cross-link Aβ1–42 oligomers prior to electrophoresis. When compared to a previously reported Aβ cross-linking agent, glutaraldehyde, it was quite apparent that BS3 is more suitable for detecting intra-membrane Aβ oligomers and extra-membrane Aβ oligomers states. As such, our findings provide an efficient method for analyzing Aβ proteins or other proteins that are easily aggregated in solution and in phospholipid membranes. PMID:28323849

  16. Link between Affinity and Cu(II) Binding Sites to AmyloidPeptides Evaluated by a New Water-Soluble UV-Visible Ratiometric Dye with a Moderate Cu(II) Affinity.

    PubMed

    Conte-Daban, Amandine; Borghesani, Valentina; Sayen, Stéphanie; Guillon, Emmanuel; Journaux, Yves; Gontard, Geoffrey; Lisnard, Laurent; Hureau, Christelle

    2017-02-07

    Being able to easily determine the Cu(II) affinity for biomolecules of moderate affinity is important. Such biomolecules include amyloidogenic peptides, such as the well-known amyloidpeptide involved in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report the synthesis of a new water-soluble ratiometric Cu(II) dye with a moderate affinity (10(9) M(-1) at pH 7.1) and the characterizations of the Cu(II) corresponding complex by X-ray crystallography, EPR, and XAS spectroscopic methods. UV-vis competition was performed on the Aβ peptide as well as on a wide series of modified peptides, leading to an affinity value of 1.6 × 10(9) M(-1) at pH 7.1 for the Aβ peptide and to a coordination model for the Cu(II) site within the Aβ peptide that agrees with the one mostly accepted currently.

  17. Transfer of Copper from an Amyloid to a Natural Copper-Carrier Peptide with a Specific Mediating Ligand.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michel; Bijani, Christian; Martins, Nathalie; Meunier, Bernard; Robert, Anne

    2015-11-16

    The oxidative stress that arises from the catalytic reduction of dioxygen by Cu(II/I)-loaded amyloids is the major pathway for neuron death that occurs in Alzheimer's disease. In this work, we show that bis-8(aminoquinoline) ligands, copper(II) specific chelators, are able to catalytically extract Cu(II) from Cu-Aβ1-16 and then completely release Cu(I) in the presence of glutathione to provide a Cu(I)-glutathione complex, a biological intermediate that is able to deliver copper to apo forms of copper-protein complexes. These data demonstrate that bis-8(aminoquinolines) can perform the transfer of copper ions from the pathological Cu-amyloid complexes to regular copper-protein complexes. These copper-specific ligands assist GSH to recycle Cu(I) in an AD brain and consequently slow down oxidative damage that is due to copper dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease. Under the same conditions, we have shown that the copper complex of PBT2, a mono(8-hydroxyquinoline) previously used as a drug candidate, does not efficiently release copper in the presence of GSH. In addition, we report that GSH itself was unable to fully abstract copper ions from Cu-β-amyloid complexes.

  18. Amyloid-β-Acetylcholinesterase complexes potentiate neurodegenerative changes induced by the Aβ peptide. Implications for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in selected brain regions is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The amyloid deposits have "chaperone molecules" which play critical roles in amyloid formation and toxicity. We report here that treatment of rat hippocampal neurons with Aβ-acetylcholinesterase (Aβ-AChE) complexes induced neurite network dystrophia and apoptosis. Moreover, the Aβ-AChE complexes induced a sustained increase in intracellular Ca2+ as well as a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The Aβ-AChE oligomers complex also induced higher alteration of Ca2+ homeostasis compared with Aβ-AChE fibrillar complexes. These alterations in calcium homeostasis were reversed when the neurons were treated previously with lithium, a GSK-3β inhibitor; Wnt-7a ligand, an activator for Wnt Pathway; and an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist (MK-801), demonstrating protective roles for activation of the Wnt signaling pathway as well as for NMDA-receptor inhibition. Our results indicate that the Aβ-AChE complexes enhance Aβ-dependent deregulation of intracellular Ca2+ as well as mitochondrial dysfunction in hippocampal neurons, triggering an enhanced damage than Aβ alone. From a therapeutic point of view, activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, as well as NMDAR inhibition may be important factors to protect neurons under Aβ-AChE attack. PMID:20205793

  19. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  20. Facet-Dependent Interactions of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide with Gold Nanoparticles: Implications for Fibril Formation and Peptide-Induced Lipid Membrane Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between proteins or peptides and nanomaterials is crucial for the development of nanomaterial-based diagnostics and therapeutics. In this work, we systematically explored the interactions between citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), a 37-amino acid peptide hormone co-secreted with insulin from the pancreatic islet. We utilized diffusion-ordered spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to systematically elucidate the underlying mechanism of the IAPP–AuNP interactions. Because of the presence of a metal-binding sequence motif in the hydrophilic peptide domain, IAPP strongly interacts with the Au surface in both the monomeric and fibrillar states. Circular dichroism showed that AuNPs triggered the IAPP conformational transition from random coil to ordered structures (α-helix and β-sheet), and TEM imaging suggested the acceleration of IAPP fibrillation in the presence of AuNPs. MD simulations revealed that the IAPP–AuNP interactions were initiated by the N-terminal domain (IAPP residues 1–19), which subsequently induced a facet-dependent conformational change in IAPP. On a Au(111) surface, IAPP was unfolded and adsorbed directly onto the Au surface, while for the Au(100) surface, it interacted predominantly with the citrate adlayer and retained some helical conformation. The observed affinity of AuNPs for IAPP was further applied to reduce the level of peptide-induced lipid membrane disruption. PMID:28260837

  1. Simulations of monomeric amyloid β-peptide (1-40) with varying solution conditions and oxidation state of Met35: implications for aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anne M; Lemkul, Justin A; Schaum, Nicholas; Bevan, David R

    2014-03-01

    The amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is a 40-42 residue peptide that is the principal toxic species in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The oxidation of methionine-35 (Met35) to the sulfoxide form (Met35(ox)) has been identified as potential modulator of Aβ aggregation. The role Met35(ox) plays in Aβ neurotoxicity differs among experimental studies, which may be due to inconsistent solution conditions (pH, buffer, temperature). We applied atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a means to probe the dynamics of the monomeric 40-residue alloform of Aβ (Aβ40) containing Met35 or Met35(ox) in an effort to resolve the conflicting experimental results. We found that Met35 oxidation decreases the β-strand content of the C-terminal hydrophobic region (residues 29-40), with a specific effect on the secondary structure of residues 33-35, thus potentially impeding aggregation. Further, there is an important interplay between oxidation state and solution conditions, with pH and salt concentration augmenting the effects of oxidation. The results presented here serve to rationalize the conflicting results seen in experimental studies and provide a fundamental biophysical characterization of monomeric Aβ40 dynamics in both reduced and oxidized forms, providing insight into the biochemical mechanism of Aβ40 and oxidative stress related to AD.

  2. Redox cycling of copper-amyloid β 1-16 peptide complexes is highly dependent on the coordination mode.

    PubMed

    Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; González, Felipe J; Quintanar, Liliana

    2015-01-05

    Copper (Cu)-amyloid β (Aβ) interactions play a role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. This work presents a spectroscopic and electrochemical study of two physiologically relevant Aβ-Cu(II) complexes, as a function of pH and relative Cu-Aβ(1-16) concentrations. Our results reveal that these coordination modes display distinct redox behaviors and provide experimental evidence for the existence of an intermediate Cu(I) species. A mechanism for the redox cycling of these complexes is proposed, providing further insight into the redox relevance of Aβ-Cu interactions.

  3. Curcumin Improves Amyloid β-Peptide (1-42) Induced Spatial Memory Deficits through BDNF-ERK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Fang, Yu; Xu, Yuming; Lian, Yajun; Xie, Nanchang; Wu, Tianwen; Zhang, Haifeng; Sun, Limin; Zhang, Ruifang; Wang, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, the most active component of turmeric, has various beneficial properties, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor effects. Previous studies have suggested that curcumin reduces the levels of amyloid and oxidized proteins and prevents memory deficits and thus is beneficial to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying curcumin's effect on cognitive functions are not well-understood. In the present study, we examined the working memory and spatial reference memory in rats that received a ventricular injection of amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42), representing a rodent model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rats treated with Aβ1-42 exhibited obvious cognitive deficits in behavioral tasks. Chronic (seven consecutive days, once per day) but not acute (once a day) curcumin treatments (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) improved the cognitive functions in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the beneficial effect of curcumin is accompanied by increased BDNF levels and elevated levels of phosphorylated ERK in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the cognition enhancement effect of curcumin could be mimicked by the overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus and blocked by either bilateral hippocampal injections with lentiviruses that express BDNF shRNA or a microinjection of ERK inhibitor. These findings suggest that chronic curcumin ameliorates AD-related cognitive deficits and that upregulated BDNF-ERK signaling in the hippocampus may underlie the cognitive improvement produced by curcumin.

  4. Aberrant Co-localization of Synaptic Proteins Promoted by Alzheimer’s Disease AmyloidPeptides: Protective Effect of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Prieto, Marta; Velasco, Ana; Vega, Lourdes; Tabernero, Arantxa; Medina, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ), Aβ40, Aβ42, and, recently, Aβ25-35 have been directly implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. We have studied the effects of Aβ on neuronal death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and synaptic assembling in neurons in primary culture. Aβ25-35, Aβ40, and Aβ42 significantly decreased neuronal viability, although Aβ25-35 showed a higher effect. Aβ25-35 showed a more penetrating ability to reach mitochondria while Aβ40 did not enter the neuronal cytosol and Aβ42 was scarcely internalized. We did not observe a direct correlation between ROS production and cell death because both Aβ40 and Aβ42 decreased neuronal viability but Aβ40 did not change ROS production. Rather, ROS production seems to correlate with the penetrating ability of each Aβ. No significant differences were found between Aβ40 and Aβ42 regarding the extent of the deleterious effects of both peptides on neuronal viability or synaptophysin expression. However, Aβ40 elicited a clear delocalization of PSD-95 and synaptotagmin from prospective synapsis to the neuronal soma, suggesting the occurrence of a crucial effect of Aβ40 on synaptic disassembling. The formation of Aβ40- or Aβ42-serum albumin complexes avoided the effects of these peptides on neuronal viability, synaptophysin expression, and PSD-95/synaptotagmin disarrangement suggesting that sequestration of Aβ by albumin prevents deleterious effects of these peptides. We can conclude that Aβ borne by albumin can be safely transported through body fluids, a fact that may be compulsory for Aβ disposal by peripheral tissues. PMID:27662292

  5. Amyloid β-peptide 1-42 modulates the proliferation of mouse neural stem cells: upregulation of fucosyltransferase IX and notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Itokazu, Yutaka; Yu, Robert K

    2014-08-01

    Amyloid β-peptides (Aβs) aggregate to form amyloid plaques, also known as senile plaques, which are a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβs are reported to possess proliferation effects on neural stem cells (NSCs); however, this effect remains controversial. Thus, clarification of their physiological function is an important topic. We have systematically evaluated the effects of several putative bioactive Aβs (Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and Aβ25-35) on NSC proliferation. Treatment of NSCs with Aβ1-42 significantly increased the number of those cells (149 ± 10 %). This was not observed with Aβ1-40 which did not have any effects on the proliferative property of NSC. Aβ25-35, on the other hand, exhibited inhibitory effects on cellular proliferation. Since cell surface glycoconjugates, such as glycolipids, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans, are known to be important for maintaining cell fate determination, including cellular proliferation, in NSCs and they undergo dramatic changes during differentiation, we examined the effect of Aβs on a number of key glycoconjugate metabolizing enzymes. Significantly, we found for the first time that Aβ1-42 altered the expression of several key glycosyltransferases and glycosidases, including fucosyltransferase IX (FUT9), sialyltransferase III (ST-III), glucosylceramide ceramidase (GLCC), and mitochondrial sialidase (Neu4). FUT9 is a key enzyme for the synthesis of the Lewis X carbohydrate epitope, which is known to be expressed in stem cells. Aβ1-42 also stimulated the Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) by upregulation of the expression of Musashi-1 and the paired box protein, Pax6. Thus, Aβ1-42 upregulates NSC proliferation by modulating the expression of several glycogenes involved in Notch signaling.

  6. IgG-assisted age-dependent clearance of Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide by the blood-brain barrier neonatal Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Deane, Rashid; Sagare, Abhay; Hamm, Katie; Parisi, Margaret; LaRue, Barbra; Guo, Huang; Wu, Zhenhua; Holtzman, David M; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2005-12-14

    The role of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport in clearance of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) by Abeta immunotherapy is not fully understood. To address this issue, we studied the effects of peripherally and centrally administered Abeta-specific IgG on BBB influx of circulating Abeta and efflux of brain-derived Abeta in APPsw(+/-) mice, a model that develops Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology, and wild-type mice. Our data show that anti-Abeta IgG blocks the BBB influx of circulating Abeta in APPsw(+/-) mice and penetrates into the brain to sequester brain Abeta. In young mice, Abeta-anti-Abeta complexes were cleared from brain to blood by transcytosis across the BBB via the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), whereas in older mice, there was an age-dependent increase in FcRn-mediated IgG-assisted Abeta BBB efflux and a decrease in LRP-mediated clearance of Abeta-anti-Abeta complexes. Inhibition of the FcRn pathway in older APPsw(+/-) mice blocked clearance of endogenous Abeta40/42 by centrally administered Abeta immunotherapy. Moreover, deletion of the FcRn gene in wild-type mice inhibited clearance of endogenous mouse Abeta40/42 by systemically administered anti-Abeta. Our data suggest that the FcRn pathway at the BBB plays a crucial role in IgG-assisted Abeta removal from the aging brain.

  7. Chronic treatment with the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411,575 inhibits beta-amyloid peptide production and alters lymphopoiesis and intestinal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gwendolyn T; Manfra, Denise; Poulet, Frederique M; Zhang, Qi; Josien, Hubert; Bara, Thomas; Engstrom, Laura; Pinzon-Ortiz, Maria; Fine, Jay S; Lee, Hu-Jung J; Zhang, Lili; Higgins, Guy A; Parker, Eric M

    2004-03-26

    Inhibition of gamma-secretase, one of the enzymes responsible for the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) to produce the pathogenic beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides, is an attractive approach to the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In addition to APP, however, several other gamma-secretase substrates have been identified (e.g. Notch), and altered processing of these substrates by gamma-secretase inhibitors could lead to unintended biological consequences. To study the in vivo consequences of gamma-secretase inhibition, the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411,575 was administered to C57BL/6 and TgCRND8 APP transgenic mice for 15 days. Although most tissues were unaffected, doses of LY-411,575 that inhibited Abeta production had marked effects on lymphocyte development and on the intestine. LY-411,575 decreased overall thymic cellularity and impaired intrathymic differentiation at the CD4(-)CD8(-)CD44(+)CD25(+) precursor stage. No effects on peripheral T cell populations were noted following LY-411,575 treatment, but evidence for the altered maturation of peripheral B cells was observed. In the intestine, LY-411,575 treatment increased goblet cell number and drastically altered tissue morphology. These effects of LY-411,575 were not seen in mice that were administered LY-D, a diastereoisomer of LY-411,575, which is a very weak gamma-secretase inhibitor. These studies show that inhibition of gamma-secretase has the expected benefit of reducing Abeta in a murine model of Alzheimer disease but has potentially undesirable biological effects as well, most likely because of the inhibition of Notch processing.

  8. On the origin of the stronger binding of PIB over thioflavin T to protofibrils of the Alzheimer amyloidpeptide: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun; Bowers, Michael T; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2011-03-02

    Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) is a neutral derivative of the fluorescent dye Thioflavin T (ThT), which displays enhanced hydrophobicity and binding affinity to amyloid fibrils. We present molecular dynamics simulations of binding of PIB and ThT to a common cross-β-subunit of the Alzheimer Amyloidpeptide (Aβ). Our simulations of binding to Aβ(9-40) protofibrils show that PIB, like ThT, selectively binds to the hydrophobic or aromatic surface grooves on the β-sheet surface along the fibril axis. The lack of two methyl groups and charge in PIB not only improves its hydrophobicity but also leads to a deeper insertion of PIB compared to ThT into the surface grooves. This significantly increases the steric, aromatic, and hydrophobic interactions, and hence leads to stronger binding. Simulations on protofibrils consisting of the more-toxic Aβ(17-42) revealed an additional binding mode in which PIB and ThT insert into the channel that forms in the loop region of the protofibril, sandwiched between two sheet layers. Our simulations indicate that the rotation between the two ring parts of the dyes is significantly more restricted when the dyes are bound to the surface of the cross-β-subunits or to the channel inside the Aβ(17-42) cross-β-subunit, compared with free solution. The specific conformations of the dyes are influenced by small chemical modifications (ThT versus PIB) and by the environment in which the dye is placed.

  9. Protective effect of meloxicam-loaded nanocapsules against amyloidpeptide-induced damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Ianiski, Francine R; Alves, Catiane B; Souza, Ana Cristina G; Pinton, Simone; Roman, Silvane S; Rhoden, Cristiano R B; Alves, Marta P; Luchese, Cristiane

    2012-04-21

    The objective of present study was to investigate the protective effect of M-NC against aβ (25-35) peptide-induced damage in mice, as the first step to evaluate their potential value for the treatment of AD. Moreover, we compared the effects of M-NC with free meloxicam (M-F). Mice were divided into six groups: (I) sham, (II) aβ, (III) M-NC, (IV) M-F, (V) M-NC+aβ and (VI) M-F+aβ. Mice were pre-treated with M-NC (5mg/kg, by gavage), M-F (5mg/kg, by gavage) or blank nanocapsules (B-NC). Thirty minutes after treatments, aβ peptide (3nmol) or filtered water were i.c.v. injected. Learning and memory were assessed with the Morris water maze (MWM) (days 4-7) and step-down-type passive-avoidance (SDPA) (days 7-8) tasks. At the end of the experimental protocol (day 8), animals were euthanized and brains were removed for biochemical determinations (reactive species (RS), non-protein thiols (NPSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST)) and histological examination. Our results confirmed that aβ peptide caused learning and memory deficits in mice. Histological analysis demonstrated neuronal loss, intense cellular accumulation and chromatolysis caused by aβ peptide. Furthermore, this study showed that oxidative stress was increased in mice that received aβ peptide. An important finding of the present study was the protective effect of M-NC in damage induced by aβ peptide. However, M-F did not have protective effect. In summary, the data reported herein clearly demonstrate that meloxicam carried by polymeric nanocapsules protected against learning and memory impairments, loss neuronal and oxidative stress in a mouse model of AD induced by aβ peptide.

  10. Amyloid-like self-assembly of peptide sequences from the adenovirus fiber shaft: insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Kasotakis, Emmanouil; Mitraki, Anna; Archontis, Georgios

    2009-11-26

    The self-assembly of peptides and proteins into nanostructures is related to the fundamental problems of protein folding and misfolding and has potential applications in medicine, materials science and nanotechnology. Natural peptides, corresponding to sequence repeats from self-assembling proteins, may constitute elementary building blocks of such nanostructures. In this work, we study by implicit-solvent replica-exchange simulations the self-assembly of two amyloidogenic sequences derived from the naturally occurring fiber shaft of the adenovirus, the octapeptide NSGAITIG (asparagine-serine-glycine-alanine-isoleucine-threonine-isoleucine-glycine) and its hexapeptide counterpart, GAITIG. In accordance with their amyloidogenic capacity, both peptides form readily intermolecular beta-sheets, stabilized by extensive main- and side-chain contacts involving the C-terminal moieties (segments 3-8 and 2-6, respectively). The structural and energetic properties of these sheets are analyzed extensively. The N-terminal residues Asn1 and Ser2 of the octapeptide remain disordered in the sheets, suggesting that these residues are exposed at the exterior of the fibrils and accessible. On the basis of insight provided by the simulations, cysteine residues were recently substituted at positions 1 and 2 of NSGAITIG; the newly designed peptides maintain their amyloidogenic properties and can bind to silver, gold and platinum nanoparticles [Kasotakis et al. Biopolymers 2009, 92, 164-172]. Computational investigation can identify suitable positions for rational modification of peptide building blocks, aiming at the fabrication of novel biomaterials.

  11. Reaction between the Pt(II)-complexes and the amino acids of the β-amyloid peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novato, Willian T. G.; Stroppa, Pedro Henrique F.; Da Silva, Adilson D.; Botezine, Naiara P.; Machado, Flávia C.; Costa, Luiz Antônio S.; Dos Santos, Hélio F.

    2017-01-01

    Reaction between [Pt(ophen)Cl2] and HIS was monitored and the solvolysis (k1) and Cl/HIS ligand exchange (k2) rate constants obtained. The k1 and k2 were (6.2 ± 0.4) × 10-5 s-1 and 52.8 × 10-2 M-1 s-1, respectively. The corresponding calculated values were 47.5 × 10-5 s-1 and 52.2 × 10-2 M-1 s-1, in agreement with the experiment. Calculations were used to establish the reactivity order for a set of amino acids: MET ∼ LYS ∼ HIS(ε) > GLU ∼ ASP >> ASN ∼ GLN. In spite of the similar reactivity among MET, LYS and HIS, the thermodynamics suggests the reactions with LYS and HIS more favorable than with MET. Therefore, N-containing amino acids should be potential targets of Pt(II)-complexes in β-amyloid.

  12. Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides can activate the early components of complement classical pathway in a C1q-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschini, L; Canziani, S; Bottasso, B; Cugno, M; Braidotti, P; Agostoni, A

    1999-01-01

    β-Amyloid (β-A) accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is presumably involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, on account of its neurotoxicity and complement-activating ability. Although assembly of β-A in particular aggregates seems to be crucial, soluble non-fibrillar β-A may also be involved. Non-fibrillar β-A does not bind C1q, so we investigated alternative mechanisms of β-A-dependent complement activation in vitro. On incubation with normal human plasma, non-fibrillar β-A 1-42, and truncated peptide 1–28, induced dose-dependent activation of C1s and C4, sparing C3, as assessed by densitometric analysis of immunostained membrane after SDS–PAGE and Western blotting. The mechanism of C4 activation was not dependent on C1q, because non-fibrillar β-A can still activate C1s and C4 in plasma genetically deficient in C1q (C1qd). In Factor XII-deficient plasma (F.XIId) the amount of cleaved C4 was about 5–10% less that in C1qd and in normal EDTA plasma; the reconstitution of F.XIId plasma with physiologic concentrations of F.XII resulted in an increased (8–15%) β-A-dependent cleavage of C4. Thus our results indicate that the C1q-independent activation of C1 and C4 can be partially mediated by the activation products of contact system. Since the activation of contact system and of C4 leads to generation of several humoral inflammatory peptides, non-fibrillar β-A might play a role in initiating the early inflammatory reactions leading to a multistep cascade contributing to neuronal and clinical dysfunction of AD brain. PMID:10193429

  13. Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptides can activate the early components of complement classical pathway in a C1q-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschini, L; Canziani, S; Bottasso, B; Cugno, M; Braidotti, P; Agostoni, A

    1999-03-01

    beta-Amyloid (beta-A) accumulates in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is presumably involved in the pathogenesis of this disease, on account of its neurotoxicity and complement-activating ability. Although assembly of beta-A in particular aggregates seems to be crucial, soluble non-fibrillar beta-A may also be involved. Non-fibrillar beta-A does not bind C1q, so we investigated alternative mechanisms of beta-A-dependent complement activation in vitro. On incubation with normal human plasma, non-fibrillar beta-A 1-42, and truncated peptide 1-28, induced dose-dependent activation of C1s and C4, sparing C3, as assessed by densitometric analysis of immunostained membrane after SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The mechanism of C4 activation was not dependent on C1q, because non-fibrillar beta-A can still activate C1s and C4 in plasma genetically deficient in C1q (C1qd). In Factor XII-deficient plasma (F.XIId) the amount of cleaved C4 was about 5-10% less that in C1qd and in normal EDTA plasma; the reconstitution of F.XIId plasma with physiologic concentrations of F.XII resulted in an increased (8-15%) beta-A-dependent cleavage of C4. Thus our results indicate that the C1q-independent activation of C1 and C4 can be partially mediated by the activation products of contact system. Since the activation of contact system and of C4 leads to generation of several humoral inflammatory peptides, non-fibrillar beta-A might play a role in initiating the early inflammatory reactions leading to a multistep cascade contributing to neuronal and clinical dysfunction of AD brain.

  14. Cholesterol accelerates the binding of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide to ganglioside GM1 through a universal hydrogen-bond-dependent sterol tuning of glycolipid conformation.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Yahi, Nouara; Garmy, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Age-related alterations of membrane lipids in brain cell membranes together with high blood cholesterol are considered as major risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Yet the molecular mechanisms by which these factors increase Alzheimer's risk are mostly unknown. In lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane, neurotoxic Alzheimer's beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides interact with both cholesterol and ganglioside GM1. Recent data also suggested that cholesterol could stimulate the binding of Abeta to GM1 through conformational modulation of the ganglioside headgroup. Here we used a combination of physicochemical and molecular modeling approaches to decipher the mechanisms of cholesterol-assisted binding of Abeta to GM1. With the aim of decoupling the effect of cholesterol on GM1 from direct Abeta-cholesterol interactions, we designed a minimal peptide (Abeta5-16) containing the GM1-binding domain but lacking the amino acid residues involved in cholesterol recognition. Using the Langmuir technique, we showed that cholesterol (but not phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin) significantly accelerates the interaction of Abeta5-16 with GM1. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that Abeta5-16 interacts with a cholesterol-stabilized dimer of GM1. The main structural effect of cholesterol is to establish a hydrogen-bond between its own OH group and the glycosidic-bond linking ceramide to the glycone part of GM1, thereby inducing a tilt in the glycolipid headgroup. This fine conformational tuning stabilizes the active conformation of the GM1 dimer whose headgroups, oriented in two opposite directions, form a chalice-shaped receptacle for Abeta. These data give new mechanistic insights into the stimulatory effect of cholesterol on Abeta/GM1 interactions. They also support the emerging concept that cholesterol is a universal modulator of protein-glycolipid interactions in the broader context of membrane recognition processes.

  15. Restricted V gene usage and VH/VL pairing of mouse humoral response against the N-terminal immunodominant epitope of the amyloid β peptide

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Remy; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Agadjanyan, Michael G.; Cribbs, David H.; Van Nostrand, William E.; Wark, Kim L.; Dolezal, Olan

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, the potential of antibodies as therapeutic strategies to treat Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been growing, based on successful experimental and clinical trials in transgenic mice. Despite, undesirable side effects in humans using an active immunization approach, immunotherapy still remains one of the most promising treatments for AD. In this study, we analyzed the V genes of twelve independently isolated monoclonal antibodies raised against the N-terminal immunodominant epitope of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ or A beta). Surprisingly, we found a high and unusual level of restriction in the VH/VL pairing of these antibodies. Moreover, these antibodies mostly differ in their heavy chain complementary determining region 3 (HCDR3) and the residues in the antibodies which contact Aβ are already present in the germline V-genes. Based on these observations and or co-crystal structures of antibodies with Aβ, the aim of the current study was to better understand the role of antibody V-domains, HCDR3 regions, key contact residue (H58) and germline encoded residues in Aβ recognition. For that purpose, we designed and produced a range of recombinant Fab constructs. All the Fabs were tested and compared by surface plasmon resonance on Aβ1–16, Aβ1–42 high molecular weight and Aβ1–42 low molecular weight soluble oligomers. Although all the Fabs recognized the Aβ1–16 peptide and the Aβ1–42 high molecular weight soluble oligomers, they did not bind the Aβ1–42 low molecular weight soluble oligomers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that: (1) an aromatic residue at position H58 in the antibody is essential in the recognition of Aβ and (2) Fabs based on germline V-genes bind to Aβ monomers with a low affinity. These findings may have important implications in designing more effective therapeutic antibodies against Aβ. PMID:20970857

  16. A Multiscale Approach to Characterize the Early Aggregation Steps of the Amyloid-Forming Peptide GNNQQNY from the Yeast Prion Sup-35

    PubMed Central

    Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Meli, Massimiliano; Derreumaux, Philippe; Colombo, Giorgio; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-01-01

    The self-organization of peptides into amyloidogenic oligomers is one of the key events for a wide range of molecular and degenerative diseases. Atomic-resolution characterization of the mechanisms responsible for the aggregation process and the resulting structures is thus a necessary step to improve our understanding of the determinants of these pathologies. To address this issue, we combine the accelerated sampling properties of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations based on the OPEP coarse-grained potential with the atomic resolution description of interactions provided by all-atom MD simulations, and investigate the oligomerization process of the GNNQQNY for three system sizes: 3-mers, 12-mers and 20-mers. Results for our integrated simulations show a rich variety of structural arrangements for aggregates of all sizes. Elongated fibril-like structures can form transiently in the 20-mer case, but they are not stable and easily interconvert in more globular and disordered forms. Our extensive characterization of the intermediate structures and their physico-chemical determinants points to a high degree of polymorphism for the GNNQQNY sequence that can be reflected at the macroscopic scale. Detailed mechanisms and structures that underlie amyloid aggregation are also provided. PMID:21625573

  17. A Study of the α-Helical Intermediate Preceding the Aggregation of the Amino-Terminal Fragment of the β Amyloid Peptide (Aβ1–28)

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Ana V.; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2011-01-01

    The β amyloid (Aβ) peptide aggregates to form β-rich structures that are known to trigger Alzheimer’s disease. Experiments suggest that an α-helical intermediate precedes the formation of these aggregates. However, a description at the molecular level of the α-to-β transition has not been obtained. Because it has been proposed that the transition might be initiated in the amino-terminal region of Aβ, we studied the aggregation of the 28-residue amino-terminal fragment of Aβ (Aβ1–28) using molecular dynamics and a coarse-grained force field. Simulations starting from extended and helical conformations showed that oligomerization is initiated by formation of intermolecular β -sheets between the residues in the N-terminal regions. In simulations starting from the α-helical conformation, forcing residues 17–21 to remain in the initial (helical) conformation prevents aggregation but allows for the formation of dimers, indicating that oligomerization, initiated along the non-helical N-terminal regions, cannot progress without the α-to-β transition propagating along the chains. PMID:21939202

  18. A multiscale approach to characterize the early aggregation steps of the amyloid-forming peptide GNNQQNY from the yeast prion sup-35.

    PubMed

    Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Meli, Massimiliano; Derreumaux, Philippe; Colombo, Giorgio; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-05-01

    The self-organization of peptides into amyloidogenic oligomers is one of the key events for a wide range of molecular and degenerative diseases. Atomic-resolution characterization of the mechanisms responsible for the aggregation process and the resulting structures is thus a necessary step to improve our understanding of the determinants of these pathologies. To address this issue, we combine the accelerated sampling properties of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations based on the OPEP coarse-grained potential with the atomic resolution description of interactions provided by all-atom MD simulations, and investigate the oligomerization process of the GNNQQNY for three system sizes: 3-mers, 12-mers and 20-mers. Results for our integrated simulations show a rich variety of structural arrangements for aggregates of all sizes. Elongated fibril-like structures can form transiently in the 20-mer case, but they are not stable and easily interconvert in more globular and disordered forms. Our extensive characterization of the intermediate structures and their physico-chemical determinants points to a high degree of polymorphism for the GNNQQNY sequence that can be reflected at the macroscopic scale. Detailed mechanisms and structures that underlie amyloid aggregation are also provided.

  19. The Role of Molecular Simulations in the Development of Inhibitors of Amyloid β-Peptide Aggregation for the Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenic aggregation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is considered a hallmark of the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, the leading cause of senile dementia in the elderly and one of the principal causes of death in the United States. In the absence of effective therapeutics, the incidence and economic burden associated with the disease are expected to rise dramatically in the coming decades. Targeting Aβ aggregation is an attractive therapeutic approach, though structural insights into the nature of Aβ aggregates from traditional experiments are elusive, making drug design difficult. Theoretical methods have been used for several years to augment experimental work and drive progress forward in Alzheimer’s drug design. In this Review, we will describe how two common techniques, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, are being applied in developing small molecules as effective therapeutics against monomeric, oligomeric, and fibrillated forms of Aβ. Recent successes and important limitations will be discussed, and we conclude by providing a perspective on the future of this field by citing recent examples of sophisticated approaches used to better characterize interactions of small molecules with Aβ and other amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:23173066

  20. Ferulic acid reverses the cognitive dysfunction caused by amyloid β peptide 1-40 through anti-oxidant activity and cholinergic activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Fan-Shiu; Wu, Lung-Yuan; Yang, Shu-Er; Cheng, Hao-Yuan; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Wu, Chi-Rei; Lin, Li-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction and oxidation stress are the dominant mechanisms of memory deficit in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study describes how ferulic acid (FA) ameliorates cognitive deficits induced by mecamylamine (MECA), scopolamine (SCOP), central acetylcholinergic neurotoxin ethylcholine mustard aziridinium ion (AF64A) and amyloid β peptide (Aβ1-40). This study also elucidates the role of anti-oxidant enzymes and cholinergic marker acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the reversal of FA from Aβ1-40-induced cognitive deficits in rats. At 100 mg/kg, FA attenuated impairment induced by MECA and SCOP plus MECA; however, this improvement was not blocked by the peripheral muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine methylbromide (M-SCOP). At 100 and 300 mg/kg, FA also attenuated the impairment of inhibitory passive avoidance induced by AF64A. Further, FA attenuated the performance impairment and memory deficit induced by Aβ1-40 in rats, as did vitamin E/C. FA reversed the deterioration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and AChE activities, and the glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and glutathione (GSH) levels in the cortex and hippocampus. Vitamin E/C only selectively reversed deterioration in the hippocampus. We suggest that FA reduced the progression of cognitive deficits by activating central muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and anti-oxidant enzymes.

  1. Solvent exposure of Tyr10 as a probe of structural differences between monomeric and aggregated forms of the amyloidpeptide

    PubMed Central

    Aran Terol, Pablo; Kumita, Janet R.; Hook, Sharon C.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Esbjörner, Elin K.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides is a characteristic pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. We have exploited the relationship between solvent exposure and intrinsic fluorescence of a single tyrosine residue, Tyr10, in the Aβ sequence to probe structural features of the monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of the 42-residue Aβ1-42. By monitoring the quenching of Tyr10 fluorescence upon addition of water-soluble acrylamide, we show that in Aβ1-42 oligomers this residue is solvent-exposed to a similar extent to that found in the unfolded monomer. By contrast, Tyr10 is significantly shielded from acrylamide quenching in Aβ1-42 fibrils, consistent with its proximity to the fibrillar cross-β core. Furthermore, circular dichroism measurements reveal that Aβ1-42 oligomers have a considerably lower β-sheet content than the Aβ1-42 fibrils, indicative of a less ordered molecular arrangement in the former. Taken together these findings suggest significant differences in the structural assembly of oligomers and fibrils that are consistent with differences in their biological effects. PMID:26551456

  2. Increased amyloid β-peptide uptake in skeletal muscle is induced by hyposialylation and may account for apoptosis in GNE myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Iriondo, Cinta; Guivernau, Biuse; Valls-Comamala, Victòria; Vidal, Noemí; Olivé, Montse; Querfurth, Henry; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    GNE myopathy is an autosomal recessive muscular disorder of young adults characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. It is caused by a mutation in the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) gene, which encodes a key enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. The mutated hypofunctional GNE is associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in patient muscles through as yet unknown mechanisms. We found here for the first time that an experimental reduction in sialic acid favors Aβ1-42 endocytosis in C2C12 myotubes, which is dependent on clathrin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. Accordingly, Aβ1-42 internalization in myoblasts from a GNE myopathy patient was enhanced. Next, we investigated signal changes triggered by Aβ1-42 that may underlie toxicity. We observed that p-Akt levels are reduced in step with an increase in apoptotic markers in GNE myopathy myoblasts compared to control myoblasts. The same results were experimentally obtained when Aβ1-42 was overexpressed in myotubes. Hence, we propose a novel disease mechanism whereby hyposialylation favors Aβ1-42 internalization and the subsequent apoptosis in myotubes and in skeletal muscle from GNE myopathy patients. PMID:26968811

  3. Neutron Scattering Studies of the Interplay of Amyloid β Peptide(1–40) and An Anionic Lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Sharma, Veerendra K.; Anunciado, Divina; O’Neill, Hugh; Mamontov, Eugene; Urban, Volker; Heller, William T.; Qian, Shuo

    2016-08-09

    The interaction between lipid bilayers and Amyloid β peptide (Aβ) plays a critical role in proliferation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is expected to affect one in every 85 humans by 2050, and therefore, deciphering the interplay of Aβ and lipid bilayers at the molecular level is of profound importance. In this work, we applied an array of neutron scattering methods to study the structure and dynamics of Aβ(1–40) interacting 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) bilayers. In the structural investigations of lipid bilayer’s response to Aβ binding, Small Angle Neutron Scattering and Neutron Membrane Diffraction revealed that the Aβ anchors firmly to the highly charged DMPG bilayers in the interfacial region between water and hydrocarbon chain, and it doesn’t penetrate deeply into the bilayer. This association mode is substantiated by the dynamics studies with high resolution Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering experiments, showing that the addition of Aβ mainly affects the slower lateral motion of lipid molecules, especially in the fluid phase, but not the faster internal motion. The results revealed that Aβ associates with the highly charged membrane in surface with limited impact on the structure, but the altered membrane dynamics could have more influence on other membrane processes.

  4. Neutron Scattering Studies of the Interplay of Amyloid β Peptide(1–40) and An Anionic Lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol

    DOE PAGES

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Sharma, Veerendra K.; Anunciado, Divina; ...

    2016-08-09

    The interaction between lipid bilayers and Amyloid β peptide (Aβ) plays a critical role in proliferation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is expected to affect one in every 85 humans by 2050, and therefore, deciphering the interplay of Aβ and lipid bilayers at the molecular level is of profound importance. In this work, we applied an array of neutron scattering methods to study the structure and dynamics of Aβ(1–40) interacting 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) bilayers. In the structural investigations of lipid bilayer’s response to Aβ binding, Small Angle Neutron Scattering and Neutron Membrane Diffraction revealed that the Aβ anchors firmly to themore » highly charged DMPG bilayers in the interfacial region between water and hydrocarbon chain, and it doesn’t penetrate deeply into the bilayer. This association mode is substantiated by the dynamics studies with high resolution Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering experiments, showing that the addition of Aβ mainly affects the slower lateral motion of lipid molecules, especially in the fluid phase, but not the faster internal motion. The results revealed that Aβ associates with the highly charged membrane in surface with limited impact on the structure, but the altered membrane dynamics could have more influence on other membrane processes.« less

  5. Neutron Scattering Studies of the Interplay of Amyloid β Peptide(1–40) and An Anionic Lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Sharma, Veerendra K.; Anunciado, Divina; O’Neill, Hugh; Mamontov, Eugene; Urban, Volker; Heller, William T.; Qian, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between lipid bilayers and Amyloid β peptide (Aβ) plays a critical role in proliferation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD is expected to affect one in every 85 humans by 2050, and therefore, deciphering the interplay of Aβ and lipid bilayers at the molecular level is of profound importance. In this work, we applied an array of neutron scattering methods to study the structure and dynamics of Aβ(1–40) interacting 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) bilayers. In the structural investigations of lipid bilayer’s response to Aβ binding, Small Angle Neutron Scattering and Neutron Membrane Diffraction revealed that the Aβ anchors firmly to the highly charged DMPG bilayers in the interfacial region between water and hydrocarbon chain, and it doesn’t penetrate deeply into the bilayer. This association mode is substantiated by the dynamics studies with high resolution Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering experiments, showing that the addition of Aβ mainly affects the slower lateral motion of lipid molecules, especially in the fluid phase, but not the faster internal motion. The results revealed that Aβ associates with the highly charged membrane in surface with limited impact on the structure, but the altered membrane dynamics could have more influence on other membrane processes. PMID:27503057

  6. Protection of SK-N-MC cells against β-amyloid peptide-induced degeneration using neuron growth factor-loaded liposomes with surface lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Wang, Cheng-Ting

    2014-07-01

    A liposomal system with surface lactoferrin (Lf) was developed for delivering neuron growth factor (NGF) across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and improving the viability of neuron-like SK-N-MC cells with deposited β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). The Lf-grafted liposomes carrying NGF (Lf/NGF-liposomes) were applied to a monolayer of human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) regulated by human astrocytes (HAs) and to fibrillar Aβ1-42-insulted SK-N-MC cells. An increase in cholesterol mole percentage enhanced the particle size, absolute value of zeta potential, and physical stability, however, reduced the entrapment efficiency and release rate of NGF. In addition, an increase in Lf concentration increased the particle size, surface nitrogen percentage, NGF permeability across the BBB, and viability of HBMECs, HAs, and SK-N-MC cells, however, decreased the absolute value of zeta potential, surface phosphorus percentage, and loading efficiency of Lf. After treating with Lf/NGF-liposomes, a higher Aβ concentration yielded a lower survival of SK-N-MC cells. The current Lf/NGF-liposomes are efficacious drug carriers to target the BBB and inhibit the Aβ-induced neurotoxicity as potential pharmacotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

  7. The pro-neurotrophin receptor sortilin is a major neuronal APOE receptor for catabolism of amyloidpeptide in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Carlo, Anne-Sophie; Gustafsen, Camilla; Mastrobuoni, Guido; Nielsen, Morten S.; Burgert, Tilman; Hartl, Daniela; Rohe, Michael; Nykjaer, Anders; Herz, Joachim; Heeren, Joerg; Kempa, Stefan; Petersen, Claus Munck; Willnow, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (APO) E is the major risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer disease. Among other functions, APOE is proposed to sequester neurotoxic amyloidpeptides (Aβ) in the brain, delivering them to cellular catabolism via neuronal APOE receptors. Still, the receptors involved in this process remain controversial. Here, we identified the pro-neurotrophin receptor sortilin as major endocytic pathway for clearance of APOE/Aβ complexes in neurons. Sortilin binds APOE with high affinity. Lack of receptor expression in mice results in accumulation of APOE and of Aβ in the brain, and in aggravated plaque burden. Also, primary neurons lacking sortilin exhibit significantly impaired uptake of APOE/Aβ complexes despite proper expression of other APOE receptors. In spite of higher than normal brain APOE levels, sortilin-deficient animals display anomalies in brain lipid metabolism (e.g., accumulation of sulfatides) seen in APOE-deficient mice, indicating functional deficiency in cellular APOE uptake pathways. Taken together, our findings identified sortilin as an essential neuronal pathway for APOE-containing lipoproteins in vivo and suggest an intriguing link between Aβ catabolism and pro-neurotrophin signaling converging on this receptor. PMID:23283348

  8. The pathological cross talk between apolipoprotein E and amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer's disease: emerging gene-based therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Iurescia, Sandra; Fioretti, Daniela; Mangialasche, Francesca; Rinaldi, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays a key role in lipid transport in the plasma and in the central nervous system through its interaction with members of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family. The three common isoforms of ApoE (ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4) differ in their ability to perform neuronal maintenance and repair functions and differentially affect the risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders. The ApoE4 isoform is a strong genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Up-to-date knowledge about the structural and biophysical features of ApoE4 shed light on the molecular basis underlying the isoform-specific pathogenic role of ApoE4 and its contribution to AD pathology through several different mechanisms. ApoE4 impacts on amyloid-beta (Abeta) production, Abeta clearance, Abeta fibrillation, and tangle formation as well as on mitochondrial functions leading to neuronal toxicity and synaptic damage. This review summarizes the pathological cross talk between ApoE and Abeta peptide in Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we examine emerging gene-based therapeutic approaches encompassing the use of ApoE and their potential opportunities to preventing or treating Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Accumulation of Exogenous Amyloid-Beta Peptide in Hippocampal Mitochondria Causes Their Dysfunction: A Protective Role for Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Acuna-Castroviejo, Dario; Tan, Dun Xian; López-Armas, Gabriela; Cruz-Ramos, José; Munoz, Rubén; Melnikov, Valery G.; Manchester, Lucien C.; Reiter, Russel J.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) pathology is related to mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by energy reduction and an elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Monomers and oligomers of Aβ have been found inside mitochondria where they accumulate in a time-dependent manner as demonstrated in transgenic mice and in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. We hypothesize that the internalization of extracellular Aβ aggregates is the major cause of mitochondrial damage and here we report that following the injection of fibrillar Aβ into the hippocampus, there is severe axonal damage which is accompanied by the entrance of Aβ into the cell. Thereafter, Aβ appears in mitochondria where it is linked to alterations in the ionic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. This effect is accompanied by disruption of subcellular structure, oxidative stress, and a significant reduction in both the respiratory control ratio and in the hydrolytic activity of ATPase. Orally administrated melatonin reduced oxidative stress, improved the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio, and ameliorated the energy imbalance. PMID:22666521

  10. Insight into Amyloid Structure Using Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Ashley A.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloids in the brain. One prominent form of amyloid is composed of repeating units of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Over the past decade, it has become clear that these Aβ amyloids are not homogeneous; rather, they are composed of a series of structures varying in their overall size and shape and the number of Aβ peptides they contain. Recent theories suggest that these different amyloid conformations may play distinct roles in disease, although their relative contributions are still being discovered. Here, we review how chemical probes, such as congo red, thioflavin T and their derivatives, have been powerful tools for better understanding amyloid structure and function. Moreover, we discuss how design and deployment of conformationally selective probes might be used to test emerging models of AD. PMID:21457473

  11. [Gly14]-Humanin Protects Against Amyloid β Peptide-Induced Impairment of Spatial Learning and Memory in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Liu, Xiao-Jie; Han, Wei-Na; Li, Qing-Shan; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Wu, Mei-Na; Yang, Wei; Qi, Jin-Shun

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by cognitive decline and the accumulation of senile plaques in the brain. Amyloid β protein (Aβ) in the plaques is thought to be responsible for the memory loss in AD patients. [Gly14]-humanin (HNG), a derivative of humanin (HN), has much stronger neuroprotective effects than natural HN in vitro. However, clarification of the Aβ active center and the neuroprotective mechanism of HN still need in vivo evidence. The present study first compared the in vivo biological effects of three Aβ fragments (1-42, 31-35, and 35-31) on spatial memory in rats, and investigated the neuroprotective effects and molecular mechanisms of HNG. The results showed that intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 and Aβ31-35 almost equally impaired spatial learning and memory, but the reversed sequence Aβ35-31 did not have any effect; a high dose of Aβ31-35 (20 nmol) produced a more detrimental response than a low dose (2 nmol); Aβ31-35 injection also disrupted gene and protein expression in the hippocampus, with up-regulation of caspase3 and down-regulation of STAT3; pretreatment with HNG not only protected spatial memory but also rescued STAT3 from Aβ-induced disruption; and the neuroprotective effects of HNG were effectively counteracted by genistein, a specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor. These results clearly show that sequence 31-35 in Aβ is the shortest active center responsible for the neurotoxicity of Aβ from molecule to behavior; and HNG protects spatial learning and memory in rats against Aβ-induced insults; and probably involves the activation of tyrosine kinases and subsequent beneficial modulation of STAT3 and caspase3.

  12. Structural Modifications of cis-Glycofused Benzopyran Compounds and Their Influence on the Binding to AmyloidPeptide.

    PubMed

    Airoldi, Cristina; D'Orazio, Giuseppe; Richichi, Barbara; Guzzi, Cinzia; Baldoneschi, Veronica; Colombo, Laura; Salmona, Mario; Nativi, Cristina; Nicotra, Francesco; La Ferla, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A small library of glycofused tricyclic compounds with a central pyran ring chemically modified in the position para to the ring oxygen has been synthesised. The influence of the chemical modification on the structural conformation of the compounds and on their ability to bind Aβ peptide has been evaluated respectively using molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and STD NMR spectroscopy. The introduction of particularly polar/charged groups leads to the loss of binding ability, without a significant change in the conformation, whilst other substitutions does not significantly affect either the structural conformation or the binding.

  13. Investigating the Neuroprotective Effects of Turmeric Extract: Structural Interactions of β-Amyloid Peptide with Single Curcuminoids

    PubMed Central

    Randino, Rosario; Grimaldi, Manuela; Persico, Marco; De Santis, Augusta; Cini, Elena; Cabri, Walter; Riva, Antonella; D’Errico, Gerardino; Fattorusso, Caterina; D’Ursi, Anna Maria; Rodriquez, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    A broad biophysical analysis was performed to investigate the molecular basis of the neuroprotective action of Curcuma longa extracts in Alzheimer’s disease. By combining circular dichroism and electron paramagnetic resonance experiments with molecular modeling calculations, the minor components of Curcuma longa extracts, such as demethoxycurcumin (2, DMC), bisdemethoxycurcumin (3, BDMC) and cyclocurcumin (4, CYC), were analyzed in a membrane environment mimicking the phospholipid bilayer. Our study provides the first evidence on the relative role of single curcuminoids interacting with Aβ-peptide. When the CYC and curcumin metabolite tetrahydrocurcumin (5, THC) were inserted into an anionic lipid solution, a significant modification of the Aβ CD curves was detected. These data were implemented by EPR experiments, demonstrating that CYC reaches the inner part of the bilayer, while the other curcuminoids are localized close to the membrane interface. Computational studies provided a model for the curcuminoid-Aβ interaction, highlighting the importance of a constrained “semi-folded” conformation to interact with Aβ analogously to the pattern observed in α-helical coiled-coil peptide structures. This combined approach led to a better understanding of the intriguing in vitro and in vivo activity of curcuminoids as anti-Alzheimer agents, paving a new path for the rational design of optimized druggable analogues. PMID:28004737

  14. Characterization of new polyclonal antibodies specific for 40 and 42 amino acid-long amyloid beta peptides: their use to examine the cell biology of presenilins and the immunohistochemistry of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy cases.

    PubMed Central

    Barelli, H.; Lebeau, A.; Vizzavona, J.; Delaere, P.; Chevallier, N.; Drouot, C.; Marambaud, P.; Ancolio, K.; Buxbaum, J. D.; Khorkova, O.; Heroux, J.; Sahasrabudhe, S.; Martinez, J.; Warter, J. M.; Mohr, M.; Checler, F.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the main histological lesion is a proteinaceous deposit, the senile plaque, which is mainly composed of a peptide called A beta. The aggregation process is thought to occur through enhanced concentration of A beta 40 or increased production of the more readily aggregating 42 amino acid-long A beta 42 species. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Specificity of the antibodies was assessed by dot blot, Western blot, ELISA, and immunoprecipitation procedures on synthetic and endogenous A beta produced by secreted HK293 cells. A beta and p3 production by wild-type and mutated presenilin 1-expressing cells transiently transfected with beta APP751 was monitored after metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation procedures. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on brains of sporadic and typical cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy (CAA) cases. RESULTS: Dot and Western blot analyses indicate that IgG-purified fractions of antisera recognize native and denaturated A beta s. FCA3340 and FCA 3542 display full specificity for A beta 40 and A beta 42, respectively. Antibodies immunoprecipitate their respective synthetic A beta species but also A beta s and their related p3 counterparts endogenously secreted by transfected human kidney 293 cells. This allowed us to show that mutations on presenilin 1 triggered similar increased ratios of A beta 42 and its p 342 counterpart over total A beta and p3. ELISA assays allow detection of about 25-50 pg/ml of A beta s and remain linear up to 750 to 1500 pg/ml without any cross-reactivity. FCA18 and FCA3542 label diffuse and mature plaques of a sporadic AD case whereas FCA3340 only reveals the mature lesions and particularly labels their central dense core. In a CAA case, FCA18 and FCA3340 reveal leptomeningeal and cortical arterioles whereas FCA3542 only faintly labels such structures. CONCLUSIONS: Polyclonal antibodies exclusively recognizing A beta 40 (FCA 3340) or A beta 42 (FCA3542) were obtained. These

  15. Inhibitor of Differentiation-1 and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 Mediate Sonic Hedgehog Induction by Amyloid Beta-Peptide in Rat Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Hsing; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Tzu; Yin, Jiu-Haw; Hwang, Chi-Shin; Yang, Liang-Yo; Yang, Ding-I

    2016-03-01

    One major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of senile plaques mainly composed of neurotoxic amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) in the patients' brains. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is a morphogen critically involved in the embryonic development of the central nervous system (CNS). In the present study, we tested whether Aβ may induce SHH expression and explored its underlying mechanisms. We found that both Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-42 enhanced SHH expression in the primary cortical neurons derived from fetal rat brains. Immunohistochemistry revealed heightened expression of SHH in the cortex and hippocampus of aged (9 and 12 months old) AD transgenic mouse brains as compared to age-matched littermate controls. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated that Aβ25-35 enhanced binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) to the promoter of the Shh gene in primary cortical cultures; consistently, Aβ25-35 induction of SHH was abolished by HIF-1α small interfering RNA (siRNA). Aβ25-35 also time-dependently induced inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) that has been shown to stabilize HIF-1α; further, Aβ25-35-mediated induction of HIF-1α and SHH was both suppressed by Id1 siRNA. Pharmacological induction of HIF-1α by cobalt chloride and application of the cell-permeable recombinant Id1 proteins were both sufficient to induce SHH expression. Finally, both the SHH pathway inhibitor cyclopamine and its neutralizing antibody attenuated Aβ cytotoxicity, albeit to a minor extent. These results thus established a signaling cascade of "Aβ → Id1 → HIF-1 → SHH" in primary rat cortical cultures; furthermore, SHH may in part contribute to Aβ neurotoxicity.

  16. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase mediates neurobehavioral alterations induced by an intracerebroventricular injection of amyloid-β1-42 peptide in mice.

    PubMed

    Souza, Leandro Cattelan; Jesse, Cristiano R; Antunes, Michelle S; Ruff, Jossana Rodrigues; de Oliveira Espinosa, Dieniffer; Gomes, Nathalie Savedra; Donato, Franciele; Giacomeli, Renata; Boeira, Silvana Peterini

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline along with various neuropsychiatric symptoms, including depression and anxiety. Increasing evidence has been proposed the activation of the tryptophan-degrading indoleamine-2,3-dyoxigenase (IDO), the rate-limiting enzyme of kynurerine pathway (KP), as a pathogenic factor of amyloid-beta (Aβ)-related inflammation in AD. In the current study, the effects of an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ1-42 peptide (400pmol/mice; 3μl/site) on the regulation of KP biomarkers (IDO activity, tryptophan and kynurerine levels) and the impact of Aβ1-42 on neurotrophic factors levels were investigated as potential mechanisms linking neuroinflammation to cognitive/emotional disturbances in mice. Our results demonstrated that Aβ1-42 induced memory impairment in the object recognition test. Aβ1-42 also induced emotional alterations, such as depressive and anxiety-like behaviors, as evaluated in the tail suspension and elevated-plus maze tests, respectively. We observed an increase in levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the Aβ1-42-treated mice, which led to an increase in IDO activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the hippocampus (HC). The IDO activation subsequently increased kynurerine production and the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio and decreased the levels of neurotrophic factors in the PFC and HC, which contributed to Aβ-associated behavioral disturbances. The inhibition of IDO activation by IDO inhibitor 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT), prevented the development of behavioral and neurochemical alterations. These data demonstrate that brain IDO activation plays a key role in mediating the memory and emotional disturbances in an experimental model based on Aβ-induced neuroinflammation.

  17. Amyloid beta-peptide impairs ion-motive ATPase activities: evidence for a role in loss of neuronal Ca2+ homeostasis and cell death.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Hensley, K; Butterfield, D A; Mattson, M P

    1995-09-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) that accumulates as insoluble plaques in the brain in Alzheimer's disease can be directly neurotoxic and can increase neuronal vulnerability to excitotoxic insults. The mechanism of A beta toxicity is unclear but is believed to involve generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of calcium homeostasis. We now report that exposure of cultured rat hippocampal neurons to A beta 1-40 or A beta 25-35 causes a selective reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity which precedes loss of calcium homeostasis and cell degeneration. Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity was reduced within 30 min of exposure to A beta 25-35 and declined to less than 40% of basal level by 3 hr. A beta did not impair other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Experiments with ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na+/K(+)-ATPase, demonstrated that impairment of this enzyme was sufficient to induce an elevation of [Ca2+]i and neuronal injury. Impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity appeared to be causally involved in the elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity since suppression of Na+ influx significantly reduced A beta- and ouabain-induced [Ca2+]i elevation and neuronal death. Neuronal degeneration induced by ouabain appeared to be of an apoptotic form as indicated by nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. The antioxidant free radical scavengers vitamin E and propylgallate significantly attenuated A beta-induced impairment of Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity, elevation of [Ca2+]i and neurotoxicity, suggesting a role for ROS. Finally, exposure of synaptosomes from postmortem human hippocampus to A beta resulted in a significant and specific reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities, without affecting other Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activities or Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These data suggest that impairment of ion-motive ATPases may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease.

  18. The ability of apolipoprotein E fragments to promote intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid beta peptide 42 is both isoform and size-specific

    PubMed Central

    Dafnis, Ioannis; Argyri, Letta; Sagnou, Marina; Tzinia, Athina; Tsilibary, Effie C.; Stratikos, Efstratios; Chroni, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein (apo) E4 isoform is the strongest risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). ApoE4 is more susceptible to proteolysis than apoE2 and apoE3 isoforms and carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms have been found in AD patients’ brain. We have previously shown that a specific apoE4 fragment, apoE4-165, promotes amyloid-peptide beta 42 (Aβ42) accumulation in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species formation, two events considered to occur early in AD pathogenesis. Here, we show that these effects are allele-dependent and absolutely require the apoE4 background. Furthermore, the exact length of the fragment is critical since longer or shorter length carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms do not elicit the same effects. Structural and thermodynamic analyses showed that apoE4-165 has a compact structure, in contrast to other carboxyl-terminal truncated apoE4 forms that are instead destabilized. Compared however to other allelic backgrounds, apoE4-165 is structurally distinct and less thermodynamically stable suggesting that the combination of a well-folded structure with structural plasticity is a unique characteristic of this fragment. Overall, our findings suggest that the ability of apoE fragments to promote Aβ42 intraneuronal accumulation is specific for both the apoE4 isoform and the particular structural and thermodynamic properties of the fragment. PMID:27476701

  19. HLA-DR alleles in amyloid beta-peptide autoimmunity: a highly immunogenic role for the DRB1*1501 allele.

    PubMed

    Zota, Victor; Nemirovsky, Anna; Baron, Rona; Fisher, Yair; Selkoe, Dennis J; Altmann, Daniel M; Weiner, Howard L; Monsonego, Alon

    2009-09-01

    Active amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) immunization of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) caused meningoencephalitis in approximately 6% of immunized patients in a clinical trial. In addition, long-term studies of AD patients show varying degrees of Abeta Ab responses, which correlate with the extent of Abeta clearance from the brain. In this study, we examined the contribution of various HLA-DR alleles to these immune-response variations by assessing Abeta T cell reactivity, epitope specificity, and immunogenicity. Analysis of blood samples from 133 individuals disclosed that the abundant DR haplotypes DR15 (found in 36% of subjects), DR3 (in 18%), DR4 (12.5%), DR1 (11%), and DR13 (8%) were associated with Abeta-specific T cell responses elicited via distinct T cell epitopes within residues 15-42 of Abeta. Because the HLA-DRB1*1501 occurred most frequently, we examined the effect of Abeta challenge in humanized mice bearing this allele. The observed T cell response was remarkably strong, dominated by secretion of IFN-gamma and IL-17, and specific to the same T cell epitope as that observed in the HLA-DR15-bearing humans. Furthermore, following long-term therapeutic immunization of an AD mouse model bearing the DRB1*1501 allele, Abeta was effectively cleared from the brain parenchyma and brain microglial activation was reduced. The present study thus characterizes HLA-DR alleles directly associated with specific Abeta T cell epitopes and demonstrates the highly immunogenic properties of the abundant allele DRB1*1501 in a mouse model of AD. This new knowledge enables us to explore the basis for understanding the variations in naturally occurring Abeta-reactive T cells and Abeta immunogenicity among humans.

  20. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K.; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  1. How changes in the sequence of the peptide CLPFFD-NH2 can modify the conjugation and stability of gold nanoparticles and their affinity for beta-amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Ivonne; Araya, Eyleen; Sanz, Fausto; Medina, Elias; Arbiol, Jordi; Toledo, Pedro; Alvarez-Lueje, Alejandro; Giralt, Ernest; Kogan, Marcelo J

    2008-06-01

    In a previous work, we studied the interaction of beta-amyloid fibrils (Abeta) with gold nanoparticles (AuNP) conjugated with the peptide CLPFFD-NH2. Here, we studied the effect of changing the residue sequence of the peptide CLPFFD-NH2 on the efficiency of conjugation to AuNP, the stability of the conjugates, and the affinity of the conjugates to the Abeta fibrils. We conjugated the AuNP with CLPFFD-NH 2 isomeric peptides (CDLPFF-NH2 and CLPDFF-NH2) and characterized the resulting conjugates with different techniques including UV-Vis, TEM, EELS, XPS, analysis of amino acids, agarose gel electrophoresis, and CD. In addition, we determined the proportion of AuNP bonded to the Abeta fibrils by ICP-MS. AuNP-CLPFFD-NH2 was the most stable of the conjugates and presented more affinity for Abeta fibrils with respect to the other conjugates and bare AuNP. These findings help to better understand the way peptide sequences affect conjugation and stability of AuNP and their interaction with Abeta fibrils. The peptide sequence, the steric effects, and the charge and disposition of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues are crucial parameters when considering the design of AuNP peptide conjugates for biomedical applications.

  2. Mutations in amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 genes increase the basal oxidative stress in murine neuronal cells and lead to increased sensitivity to oxidative stress mediated by amyloid beta-peptide (1-42), HO and kainic acid: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mohmmad Abdul, Hafiz; Sultana, Rukhsana; Keller, Jeffrey N; St Clair, Daret K; Markesbery, William R; Butterfield, D Allan

    2006-03-01

    Oxidative stress is observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, including protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. One of the major pathological hallmarks of AD is the brain deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). This 42-mer peptide is derived from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and is associated with oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. Mutations in the PS-1 and APP genes, which increase production of the highly amyloidogenic amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta42), are the major causes of early onset familial AD. Several lines of evidence suggest that enhanced oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. In the present study, primary neuronal cultures from knock-in mice expressing mutant human PS-1 and APP were compared with those from wild-type mice, in the presence or absence of various oxidizing agents, viz, Abeta(1-42), H2O2 and kainic acid (KA). APP/PS-1 double mutant neurons displayed a significant basal increase in oxidative stress as measured by protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and 3-nitrotyrosine when compared with the wild-type neurons (p < 0.0005). Elevated levels of human APP, PS-1 and Abeta(1-42) were found in APP/PS-1 cultures compared with wild-type neurons. APP/PS-1 double mutant neuron cultures exhibited increased vulnerability to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis induced by Abeta(1-42), H2O2 and KA compared with wild-type neuronal cultures. The results are consonant with the hypothesis that Abeta(1-42)-associated oxidative stress and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress may contribute significantly to neuronal apoptosis and death in familial early onset AD.

  3. Pramipexole prevents neurotoxicity induced by oligomers of beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Uberti, Daniela; Bianchi, Irene; Olivari, Luca; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Canonico, PierLuigi; Memo, Maurizio

    2007-08-27

    Here we demonstrate that pramipexole, an antiparkinsonian dopamine receptor agonist drug, exerts neuroprotective effects against beta-amyloid neurotoxicity. Using a specific protocol to test individually oligomers, fibrils, or unaggregated amyloid beta-peptide, we found pramipexole able to protect cells against oligomers and fibrils. Unaggregated amyloid beta-peptide was found unable to cause cell death. Fibrils and oligomers were also found to produce elevated amount of free radicals, and this effect was prevented by pramipexole. We propose pramipexole may become in the future a coadjuvant in the treatment of neuropathologies, besides Parkinson's disease, where amyloid beta-peptide-mediated oxidative injury exerts a relevant role.

  4. The Human Disease-Associated Aβ Amyloid Core Sequence Forms Functional Amyloids in a Fungal Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Rameau, Rachele D.; Jackson, Desmond N.; Beaussart, Audrey; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is increasing evidence that many amyloids in living cells have physiological functions. On the surfaces of fungal cells, amyloid core sequences in adhesins can aggregate into 100- to 1,000-nm-wide patches to form high-avidity adhesion nanodomains on the cell surface. The nanodomains form through interactions that have amyloid-like properties: binding of amyloid dyes, perturbation by antiamyloid agents, and interaction with homologous sequences. To test whether these functional interactions are mediated by typical amyloid interactions, we substituted an amyloid core sequence, LVFFA, from human Aβ protein for the native sequence IVIVA in the 1,419-residue Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. The chimeric protein formed cell surface nanodomains and mediated cellular aggregation. The native sequence and chimeric adhesins responded similarly to the amyloid dye thioflavin T and to amyloid perturbants. However, unlike the native protein, the nanodomains formed by the chimeric protein were not force activated and formed less-robust aggregates under flow. These results showed the similarity of amyloid interactions in the amyloid core sequences of native Als5p and Aβ, but they also highlighted emergent properties of the native sequence. Also, a peptide composed of the Aβ amyloid sequence flanked by amino acids from the adhesin formed two-dimensional sheets with sizes similar to the cell surface patches of the adhesins. These results inform an initial model for the structure of fungal cell surface amyloid nanodomains. PMID:26758179

  5. Chiral recognition in amyloid fiber growth.

    PubMed

    Torbeev, Vladimir; Grogg, Marcel; Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Schirer, Alicia; Hellwig, Petra; Jeschke, Gunnar; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Insoluble amyloid fibers represent a pathological signature of many human diseases. To treat such diseases, inhibition of amyloid formation has been proposed as a possible therapeutic strategy. d-Peptides, which possess high proteolytic stability and lessened immunogenicity, are attractive candidates in this context. However, a molecular understanding of chiral recognition phenomena for d-peptides and l-amyloids is currently incomplete. Here we report experiments on amyloid growth of individual enantiomers and their mixtures for two distinct polypeptide systems of different length and structural organization: a 44-residue covalently-linked dimer derived from a peptide corresponding to the [20-41]-fragment of human β2-microglobulin (β2m) and the 99-residue full-length protein. For the dimeric [20-41]β2m construct, a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide-labeled constructs and (13) C-isotope edited FT-IR spectroscopy of (13) C-labeled preparations was used to show that racemic mixtures precipitate as intact homochiral fibers, i.e. undergo spontaneous Pasteur-like resolution into a mixture of left- and right-handed amyloids. In the case of full-length β2m, the presence of the mirror-image d-protein affords morphologically distinct amyloids that are composed largely of enantiopure domains. Removal of the l-component from hybrid amyloids by proteolytic digestion results in their rapid transformation into characteristic long straight d-β2m amyloids. Furthermore, the full-length d-enantiomer of β2m was found to be an efficient inhibitor of l-β2m amyloid growth. This observation highlights the potential of longer d-polypeptides for future development into inhibitors of amyloid propagation. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effect of trehalose on amyloid β (29-40)-membrane interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Allam S.; Izmitli, Aslin; de Pablo, J. J.

    2009-08-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the interaction between amyloid β peptide and lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer disease. Recent experimental evidence also suggests that trehalose, a simple disaccharide, reduces the toxicity of amyloid β peptide. Molecular simulations are used to examine the effect of trehalose on the conformational stability of amyloid β peptide in aqueous solution and its effect on the interaction between amyloid β peptide and a model phospholipid bilayer membrane. It is found that, in aqueous solution, the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation but, in the presence of trehalose, it adopts an alpha helical conformation. It is then shown that the insertion of amyloid β peptide into a membrane is more favorable when the peptide is folded into an α-helix than in a random coil conformation, thereby suggesting that trehalose promotes the insertion of α-helical amyloid β into biological membranes.

  7. Effect of trehalose on amyloid beta (29-40)-membrane interaction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Allam S; Izmitli, Aslin; de Pablo, J J

    2009-08-28

    A growing body of experimental evidence indicates that the interaction between amyloid beta peptide and lipid bilayer membranes plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer disease. Recent experimental evidence also suggests that trehalose, a simple disaccharide, reduces the toxicity of amyloid beta peptide. Molecular simulations are used to examine the effect of trehalose on the conformational stability of amyloid beta peptide in aqueous solution and its effect on the interaction between amyloid beta peptide and a model phospholipid bilayer membrane. It is found that, in aqueous solution, the peptide exhibits a random coil conformation but, in the presence of trehalose, it adopts an alpha helical conformation. It is then shown that the insertion of amyloid beta peptide into a membrane is more favorable when the peptide is folded into an alpha-helix than in a random coil conformation, thereby suggesting that trehalose promotes the insertion of alpha-helical amyloid beta into biological membranes.

  8. Secondary structure propensity and chirality of the amyloidophilic peptide p5 and its analogues impacts ligand binding - In vitro characterization

    DOE PAGES

    Wall, Jonathan S.; Williams, Angela; Wooliver, Craig; ...

    2016-08-11

    Here, polybasic helical peptides, such as peptide p5, bind human amyloid extracts and synthetic amyloid fibrils. When radio labeled, peptide p5 has been shown to specifically bind amyloid in vivo thereby allowing imaging of the disease. Structural requirements for heparin and amyloid binding have been studied using analogues of p5 that modify helicity and chirality.

  9. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Asencio-Hernández, Julia; Kieffer, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA), a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), estrogen-related receptor (ERR) and androgen receptor (AR). BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD), which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules. PMID:27583469

  10. Effects of amyloid β-peptide fragment 31-35 on the BK channel-mediated K⁺ current and intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration of hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Shi, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Li, Jian-Guo; Chen, Jin-Yuan; Zhang, Ce

    2014-05-07

    The present study characterizes the effects of Aβ31-35, a short active fragment of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), upon the BK channel-mediated K⁺ current and intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]i) of freshly dissociated pyramidal cells from rat CA1 hippocampus by using whole-cell patch-clamp recording and single cell Ca²⁺ imaging techniques. The results show that: (1) in the presence of voltage- and ATP-gated K⁺ channel blockers application of 5.0 μM Aβ31-35 significantly diminished transient outward K⁺ current amplitudes at clamped voltages between 0 and 45mV; (2) under the same conditions [Ca²⁺]i was minimally affected by 5.0 μM but significantly increased by 12.5 μM and 25 μM Aβ31-35; and (3) when 25 μM of a larger fragment of the amyloid β-peptide, Aβ25-35, was applied, the results were similar to those obtained with the same concentration of Aβ31-35. These results indicate that Aβ31-35 is likely to be the shortest active fragment of the full Aβ sequence, and can be as effectively as the full-length Aβ peptide in suppressing BK-channel mediated K⁺ currents and significantly elevating [Ca²⁺]i in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

  11. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation.

    PubMed

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases.

  12. Secondary structure propensity and chirality of the amyloidophilic peptide p5 and its analogues impacts ligand binding - In vitro characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Jonathan S.; Williams, Angela; Wooliver, Craig; Martin, Emily B.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heidel, R. Eric; Kennel, Stephen J.

    2016-08-11

    Here, polybasic helical peptides, such as peptide p5, bind human amyloid extracts and synthetic amyloid fibrils. When radio labeled, peptide p5 has been shown to specifically bind amyloid in vivo thereby allowing imaging of the disease. Structural requirements for heparin and amyloid binding have been studied using analogues of p5 that modify helicity and chirality.

  13. Oral Administration of a Fusion Protein between the Cholera Toxin B Subunit and the 42-Amino Acid Isoform of AmyloidPeptide Produced in Silkworm Pupae Protects against Alzheimer's Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si; Wei, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yanhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Meng, Qiaohong; Jin, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloidpeptide (Aβ42), which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD. PMID:25469702

  14. Oral administration of a fusion protein between the cholera toxin B subunit and the 42-amino acid isoform of amyloidpeptide produced in silkworm pupae protects against Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Wei, Zhen; Chen, Jian; Chen, Yanhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Yu, Wei; Meng, Qiaohong; Jin, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloidpeptide (Aβ42), which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD.

  15. Extension of the generic amyloid hypothesis to nonproteinaceous metabolite assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Shaham-Niv, Shira; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Schnaider, Lee; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of several major human diseases. Although the formation of these supramolecular entities has previously been associated with proteins and peptides, it was later demonstrated that even phenylalanine, a single amino acid, can form fibrils that have amyloid-like biophysical, biochemical, and cytotoxic properties. Moreover, the generation of antibodies against these assemblies in phenylketonuria patients and the correlating mice model suggested a pathological role for the assemblies. We determine that several other metabolites that accumulate in metabolic disorders form ordered amyloid-like ultrastructures, which induce apoptotic cell death, as observed for amyloid structures. The formation of amyloid-like assemblies by metabolites implies a general phenomenon of amyloid formation, not limited to proteins and peptides, and offers a new paradigm for metabolic diseases. PMID:26601224

  16. A novel retro-inverso peptide inhibitor reduces amyloid deposition, oxidation and inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Parthsarathy, Vadivel; McClean, Paula L; Hölscher, Christian; Taylor, Mark; Tinker, Claire; Jones, Glynn; Kolosov, Oleg; Salvati, Elisa; Gregori, Maria; Masserini, Massimo; Allsop, David

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have developed a retro-inverso peptide inhibitor (RI-OR2, rGffvlkGr) that blocks the in vitro formation and toxicity of the Aβ oligomers which are thought to be a cause of neurodegeneration and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease. We have now attached a retro-inverted version of the HIV protein transduction domain 'TAT' to RI-OR2 to target this new inhibitor (RI-OR2-TAT, Ac-rGffvlkGrrrrqrrkkrGy-NH(2)) into the brain. Following its peripheral injection, a fluorescein-labelled version of RI-OR2-TAT was found to cross the blood brain barrier and bind to the amyloid plaques and activated microglial cells present in the cerebral cortex of 17-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice. Daily intraperitoneal injection of RI-OR2-TAT (at 100 nmol/kg) for 21 days into 10-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice resulted in a 25% reduction (p<0.01) in the cerebral cortex of Aβ oligomer levels, a 32% reduction (p<0.0001) of β-amyloid plaque count, a 44% reduction (p<0.0001) in the numbers of activated microglial cells, and a 25% reduction (p<0.0001) in oxidative damage, while the number of young neurons in the dentate gyrus was increased by 210% (p<0.0001), all compared to control APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice injected with vehicle (saline) alone. Our data suggest that oxidative damage, inflammation, and inhibition of neurogenesis are all a downstream consequence of Aβ aggregation, and identify a novel brain-penetrant retro-inverso peptide inhibitor of Aβ oligomer formation for further testing in humans as a potential disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Dimerization Mechanism of Alzheimer Aβ40 Peptides: The High Content of Intrapeptide-Stabilized Conformations in A2V and A2T Heterozygous Dimers Retards Amyloid Fibril Formation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong H; Sterpone, Fabio; Pouplana, Ramon; Derreumaux, Philippe; Campanera, Josep M

    2016-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomerization is associated with the origin and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While the A2V mutation enhances aggregation kinetics and toxicity, mixtures of wild-type (WT) and A2V, and also WT and A2T, peptides retard fibril formation and protect against AD. In this study, we simulate the equilibrium ensemble of WT:A2T Aβ40 dimer by means of extensive atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics and compare our results with previous equivalent simulations of A2V:A2V, WT:WT, and WT:A2V Aβ40 dimers for a total time scale of nearly 0.1 ms. Qualitative comparison of the resulting thermodynamic properties, such as the relative binding free energies, with the reported experimental kinetic and thermodynamic data affords us important insight into the conversion from slow-pathway to fast-pathway dimer conformations. The crucial reaction coordinate or driving force of such transformation turns out to be related to hydrophobic interpeptide interactions. Analysis of the equilibrium ensembles shows that the fast-pathway conformations contain interpeptide out-of-register antiparallel β-sheet structures at short interpeptide distances. In contrast, the slow-pathway conformations are formed by the association of peptides at large interpeptide distances and high intrapeptide compactness, such as conformations containing intramolecular three-stranded β-sheets which sharply distinguish fast (A2V:A2V and WT:WT) and slow (WT:A2T and WT:A2V) amyloid-forming sequences. Also, this analysis leads us to predict that a molecule stabilizing the intramolecular three-stranded β-sheet or inhibiting the formation of an interpeptide β-sheet spanning residues 17-20 and 31-37 would further reduce fibril formation and probably the cytotoxicity of Aβ species.

  18. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloidpeptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  19. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid β aggregation by polyvalent trehalose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yoshiko; You, Chouga; Ohnishi, Reiko

    2008-04-01

    A glycopolymer carrying trehalose was found to suppress the formation of amyloid fibrils from the amyloid β peptide (1-42) (Aβ), as evaluated by thioflavin T assay and atomic force microscopy. Glycopolymers carrying sugar alcohols also changed the aggregation properties of Aβ, and the inhibitory effect depended on the type of sugar and alkyl side chain. Neutralization activity was confirmed by in vitro assay using HeLa cells. The glycopolymer carrying trehalose strongly inhibited amyloid formation and neutralized cytotoxicity.

  20. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid β aggregation by polyvalent trehalose.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshiko; You, Chouga; Ohnishi, Reiko

    2008-04-01

    A glycopolymer carrying trehalose was found to suppress the formation of amyloid fibrils from the amyloid β peptide (1-42) (Aβ), as evaluated by thioflavin T assay and atomic force microscopy. Glycopolymers carrying sugar alcohols also changed the aggregation properties of Aβ, and the inhibitory effect depended on the type of sugar and alkyl side chain. Neutralization activity was confirmed by in vitro assay using HeLa cells. The glycopolymer carrying trehalose strongly inhibited amyloid formation and neutralized cytotoxicity.

  1. Peripherally expressed neprilysin reduces brain amyloid burden: A novel approach for treating Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hanjun; Liu, Yinxing; Daily, Abigail; Police, Sara; Kim, Myung-Hee; Oddo, Salvatore; LaFerla, Frank M.; Pauly, James R.; Murphy, M. Paul; Hersh, Louis B.

    2009-01-01

    A number of therapeutic strategies for treating Alzheimer’s disease have focused on reducing amyloid burden in the brain. Amongst these approaches, the expression of amyloid β peptide (Aβ)-degrading enzymes in the brain has been shown to be effective, but to date not practical for treating patients. We report here a novel strategy for lowering amyloid burden in the brain by peripherally expressing the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin on leukocytes in the 3×Tg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Through transplantation of lentivirus transduced bone marrow cells, the Aβ-degrading protease neprilysin was expressed on the surface of leukocytes. This peripheral neprilysin reduced soluble brain amyloid β peptide levels by ~30% and lowered the accumulation of amyloid β peptides by 50–60% when transplantation was performed at both young and early adult age. In addition, peripheral neprilysin expression reduced amyloid dependent performance deficits as measured by the Morris Water Maze. Unlike other methods designed to lower amyloid β peptide levels in blood, which cause a net increase in peptide, neprilysin expression results in the catabolism of the amyloid β peptide to small innocuous peptide fragments. These findings demonstrate that peripherally expressed neprilysin, and likely other amyloid β peptide degrading enzymes, has the potential for being utilized as a therapeutic approach to prevent and treat Alzheimer’s disease and suggest this approach should be further explored. PMID:19021293

  2. Neuritic Plaques and Cerebrovascular Amyloid in Alzheimer Disease are Antigenically Related

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Caine W.; Quaranta, Vito; Glenner, George G.

    1985-12-01

    A synthetic peptide (Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser-Gly-Tyr), homologous to the amino terminus of a protein purified from cerebrovascular amyloid (β protein), induced antibodies in BALB/c mice that were used immunohistochemically to stain not only amyloid-laden cerebral vessels but neuritic plaques as well. These findings suggest that the amyloid in neuritic plaques shares antigenic determinants with β protein of cerebral vessels. Since the amino acid compositions of plaque amyloid and cerebrovascular amyloid are similar, it is likely that plaque amyloid also consists of β protein. This possibility suggests a model for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease involving β protein.

  3. The peptide sequence Arg-Glu-Arg, present in the amyloid precursor protein, protects against memory loss caused by A beta and acts as a cognitive enhancer.

    PubMed

    Mileusnic, R; Lancashire, C L; Rose, S P R

    2004-04-01

    Amino acid sequences containing the palindromic tripeptide RER, matching amino acids 328-330 of the amyloid precursor protein APP, when injected intracerebrally prior to or just after training, protect against memory loss induced by amyloid-beta (A beta) in a one-trial passive avoidance task in the young chick. RER also acts as a cognitive enhancer, strengthening memory for a weak version of the task. N-terminal acylation of RER protects it against rapid degradation, and AcRER is effective in restoring memory if administered peripherally. Biotinylated RER binds to chick neuronal perikarya in an APP-displaceable manner via 66 and approximately 110 kDa neuronal cell membrane proteins. We suggest that RER binding is likely to exert effects on memory retention via receptor-mediated events that include activation of second messenger pathways. These findings suggest that RER and its derivatives may offer a novel approach to enhancing the neuroprotective effects of APP and alleviating the effects of memory loss in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Curcumin Ameliorates the Reduction Effect of PGE2 on Fibrillar β-Amyloid Peptide (1-42)-Induced Microglial Phagocytosis through the Inhibition of EP2-PKA Signaling in N9 Microglial Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Gen-Lin; Luo, Zhen; Yang, Ju; Shen, Ting-Ting; Chen, Yi; Yang, Xue-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory activation of microglia and β amyloid (Aβ) deposition are considered to work both independently and synergistically to contribute to the increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies indicate that long-term use of phenolic compounds provides protection against AD, primarily due to their anti-inflammatory actions. We previously suggested that phenolic compound curcumin ameliorated phagocytosis possibly through its anti-inflammatory effects rather than direct regulation of phagocytic function in electromagnetic field-exposed N9 microglial cells (N9 cells). Here, we explored the prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2)-related signaling pathway that involved in curcumin-mediated phagocytosis in fibrillar β-amyloid peptide (1-42) (fAβ42)-stimulated N9 cells. Treatment with fAβ42 increased phagocytosis of fluorescent-labeled latex beads in N9 cells. This increase was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner by endogenous and exogenous PGE2, as well as a selective EP2 or protein kinase A (PKA) agonist, but not by an EP4 agonist. We also found that an antagonist of EP2, but not EP4, abolished the reduction effect of PGE2 on fAβ42-induced microglial phagocytosis. Additionally, the increased expression of endogenous PGE2, EP2, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), and activation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein, and PKA were depressed by curcumin administration. This reduction led to the amelioration of the phagocytic abilities of PGE2-stimulated N9 cells. Taken together, these data suggested that curcumin restored the attenuating effect of PGE2 on fAβ42-induced microglial phagocytosis via a signaling mechanism involving EP2 and PKA. Moreover, due to its immune modulatory effects, curcumin may be a promising pharmacological candidate for neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Alcadein cleavages by amyloid beta-precursor protein (APP) alpha- and gamma-secretases generate small peptides, p3-Alcs, indicating Alzheimer disease-related gamma-secretase dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hata, Saori; Fujishige, Sayaka; Araki, Yoichi; Kato, Naoko; Araseki, Masahiko; Nishimura, Masaki; Hartmann, Dieter; Saftig, Paul; Fahrenholz, Falk; Taniguchi, Miyako; Urakami, Katsuya; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Martins, Ralph N; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Maeda, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Tohru; Nakaya, Tadashi; Gandy, Sam; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2009-12-25

    Alcadeins (Alcs) constitute a family of neuronal type I membrane proteins, designated Alc(alpha), Alc(beta), and Alc(gamma). The Alcs express in neurons dominantly and largely colocalize with the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain. Alcs and APP show an identical function as a cargo receptor of kinesin-1. Moreover, proteolytic processing of Alc proteins appears highly similar to that of APP. We found that APP alpha-secretases ADAM 10 and ADAM 17 primarily cleave Alc proteins and trigger the subsequent secondary intramembranous cleavage of Alc C-terminal fragments by a presenilin-dependent gamma-secretase complex, thereby generating "APP p3-like" and non-aggregative Alc peptides (p3-Alcs). We determined the complete amino acid sequence of p3-Alc(alpha), p3-Alc(beta), and p3-Alc(gamma), whose major species comprise 35, 37, and 31 amino acids, respectively, in human cerebrospinal fluid. We demonstrate here that variant p3-Alc C termini are modulated by FAD-linked presenilin 1 mutations increasing minor beta-amyloid species Abeta42, and these mutations alter the level of minor p3-Alc species. However, the magnitudes of C-terminal alteration of p3-Alc(alpha), p3-Alc(beta), and p3-Alc(gamma) were not equivalent, suggesting that one type of gamma-secretase dysfunction does not appear in the phenotype equivalently in the cleavage of type I membrane proteins. Because these C-terminal alterations are detectable in human cerebrospinal fluid, the use of a substrate panel, including Alcs and APP, may be effective to detect gamma-secretase dysfunction in the prepathogenic state of Alzheimer disease subjects.

  6. Curcumin Ameliorates the Reduction Effect of PGE2 on Fibrillar β-Amyloid Peptide (1-42)-Induced Microglial Phagocytosis through the Inhibition of EP2-PKA Signaling in N9 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ju; Shen, Ting-ting; Chen, Yi; Yang, Xue-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory activation of microglia and β amyloid (Aβ) deposition are considered to work both independently and synergistically to contribute to the increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recent studies indicate that long-term use of phenolic compounds provides protection against AD, primarily due to their anti-inflammatory actions. We previously suggested that phenolic compound curcumin ameliorated phagocytosis possibly through its anti-inflammatory effects rather than direct regulation of phagocytic function in electromagnetic field-exposed N9 microglial cells (N9 cells). Here, we explored the prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2)-related signaling pathway that involved in curcumin-mediated phagocytosis in fibrillar β-amyloid peptide (1–42) (fAβ42)-stimulated N9 cells. Treatment with fAβ42 increased phagocytosis of fluorescent-labeled latex beads in N9 cells. This increase was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner by endogenous and exogenous PGE2, as well as a selective EP2 or protein kinase A (PKA) agonist, but not by an EP4 agonist. We also found that an antagonist of EP2, but not EP4, abolished the reduction effect of PGE2 on fAβ42-induced microglial phagocytosis. Additionally, the increased expression of endogenous PGE2, EP2, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), and activation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein, and PKA were depressed by curcumin administration. This reduction led to the amelioration of the phagocytic abilities of PGE2-stimulated N9 cells. Taken together, these data suggested that curcumin restored the attenuating effect of PGE2 on fAβ42-induced microglial phagocytosis via a signaling mechanism involving EP2 and PKA. Moreover, due to its immune modulatory effects, curcumin may be a promising pharmacological candidate for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26824354

  7. The metal loading ability of beta-amyloid N-terminus: a combined potentiometric and spectroscopic study of copper(II) complexes with beta-amyloid(1-16), its short or mutated peptide fragments, and its polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ylated analogue.

    PubMed

    Damante, Chiara A; Osz, Katalin; Nagy, Zoltán; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Grasso, Giulia; Impellizzeri, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Sóvágó, Imre

    2008-10-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming a rapidly growing health problem, as it is one of the main causes of dementia in the elderly. Interestingly, copper(II) (together with zinc and iron) ions are accumulated in amyloid deposits, suggesting that metal binding to Abeta could be involved in AD pathogenesis. In Abeta, the metal binding is believed to occur within the N-terminal region encompassing the amino acid residues 1-16. In this work, potentiometric, spectroscopic (UV-vis, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) approaches were used to investigate the copper(II) coordination features of a new polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated Abeta peptide fragment encompassing the 1-16 amino acid residues of the N-terminal region (Abeta(1-16)PEG). The high water solubility of the resulting metal complexes allowed us to obtain a complete complex speciation at different metal-to-ligand ratios ranging from 1:1 to 4:1. Potentiometric and ESI-MS data indicate that Abeta(1-16)PEG is able to bind up to four copper(II) ions. Furthermore, in order to establish the coordination environment at each metal binding site, a series of shorter peptide fragments of Abeta, namely, Abeta(1-4), Abeta(1-6), AcAbeta(1-6), and AcAbeta(8-16)Y10A, were synthesized, each encompassing a potential copper(II) binding site. The complexation properties of these shorter peptides were also comparatively investigated by using the same experimental approach.

  8. Islet amyloid polypeptide forms rigid lipid-protein amyloid fibrils on supported phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-02-08

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms fibrillar amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and its misfolding and aggregation are thought to contribute to beta-cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that IAPP fibrillization is strongly influenced by lipid membranes and, vice versa, that the membrane architecture and integrity are severely affected by amyloid growth. Here, we report direct fluorescence microscopic observations of the morphological transformations accompanying IAPP fibrillization on the surface of supported lipid membranes. Within minutes of application in submicromolar concentrations, IAPP caused extensive remodeling of the membrane including formation of defects, vesiculation, and tubulation. The effects of IAPP concentration, ionic strength, and the presence of amyloid seeds on the bilayer perturbation and peptide aggregation were examined. Growth of amyloid fibrils was visualized using fluorescently labeled IAPP or thioflavin T staining. Two-color imaging of the peptide and membranes revealed that the fibrils were initially composed of the peptide only, and vesiculation occurred in the points where growing fibers touched the lipid membrane. Interestingly, after 2-5 h of incubation, IAPP fibers became "wrapped" by lipid membranes derived from the supported membrane. Progressive increase in molecular-level association between amyloid and membranes in the maturing fibers was confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy.

  9. AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Susan C.; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, or clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This chapter reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. PMID:23239211

  10. Exploring amyloid formation by a de novo design.

    PubMed

    Kammerer, Richard A; Kostrewa, Dirk; Zurdo, Jesús; Detken, Andreas; García-Echeverría, Carlos; Green, Janelle D; Müller, Shirley A; Meier, Beat H; Winkler, Fritz K; Dobson, Christopher M; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2004-03-30

    Protein deposition as amyloid fibrils underlies many debilitating human disorders. The complexity and size of disease-related polypeptides, however, often hinders a detailed rational approach to study effects that contribute to the process of amyloid formation. We report here a simplified peptide sequence successfully designed de novo to fold into a coiled-coil conformation under ambient conditions but to transform into amyloid fibrils at elevated temperatures. We have determined the crystal structure of the coiled-coil form and propose a detailed molecular model for the peptide in its fibrillar state. The relative stabilities of the two structural forms and the kinetics of their interconversion were found to be highly sensitive to small sequence changes. The results reveal the importance of specific packing interactions on the kinetics of amyloid formation and show the potential of this exceptionally favorable system for probing details of the molecular origins of amyloid disease.

  11. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  12. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the ‘London’ (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and ‘Swedish’ mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  13. Probing the role of metal cations on the aggregation behavior of amyloid β-peptide at a single molecule level by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yang; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Chundong

    2016-09-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, understanding of intermolecular interactions on a single molecule level by atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) has played an important role in molecular biology and biomedical science. In recent years, some research suggested that the presence of metal cations is an important regulator in the processes of misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which may be an important etiological factor of Alzheimer's disease. However, the knowledge on the principle of interactions between Aβ and metal cations at the single molecule level is still poor understood. In this paper, the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) was fabricated on substrate of mixed thiol-modified gold nanoparticles using self-assembled monolayer method and the adhesion force in the longitudinal direction between metal cations and Aβ42 were investigated by AFM. The role of metal ions on Aβ aggregation is discussed from the perspective of single molecular force. The force results showed that the specific adhesion force F i and the nonspecific force F 0 between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in control experiment were calculated as 42 ± 3 and 80 pN, respectively. However, F i between a single Aβ-Aβ pair in the presence of Cu2+, Zn2+, Ca2+ and Al3+ increased dramatically to 84 ± 6, 89 ± 3, 73 ± 5, 95 ± 5 pN successively, which indicated that unbinding between Aβ proteins is accelerated in the presence of metal cations. What is more, the imaging results showed that substoichiometric copper cations accelerate the formation of fibrils within 3 days. The combined atomic force spectroscopy and imaging analysis indicate that metal cations play a role in promoting the aggregating behavior of Aβ42.

  14. Evaluation of peptide adsorption-controlled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (PAC-LC-MS/MS) method for simple and simultaneous quantitation of amyloid β 1-38, 1-40, 1-42 and 1-43 peptides in dog cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Goda, Ryoya; Kobayashi, Nobuhiro

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the peptide adsorption-controlled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (PAC-LC-MS/MS) for reproducible measurement of peptides in biological fluids, simultaneous quantitation of amyloid β 1-38, 1-40, 1-42 and 1-43 peptides (Aβ38, Aβ40, Aβ42 and Aβ43) in dog cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was tried. Each stable isotope labeled Aβ was used as the internal standard to minimize the influence of CSF matrix on the reproducible Aβ quantitation. To reduce a loss of Aβ during the pretreatment procedures, the dog CSF diluted by water-acetic acid-methanol (2:6:1, v/v/v) was loaded on PAC-LC-MS/MS directly. Quantification of the Aβ in the diluted dog CSF was carried out using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The [M+5H(5+)] and b(5+) ion fragment of each peptide were chosen as the precursor and product ions for MRM transitions of each peptide. The calibration curves were drawn from Aβ standard calibration solutions using PAC-LC-MS/MS. Analysis of dog CSF samples suggests that the basal concentration of Aβ38, Aβ40, Aβ42 and Aβ43 in dog CSF is approximately 300, 900, 200 and 30 pM, respectively. This is the first time Aβ concentrations in dog CSF have been reported. Additionally, the evaluation of intra- and inter-day reproducibility of analysis of Aβ standard solution, the freeze-thaw stability and the room temperature stability of Aβ standard solution suggest that the PAC-LC-MS/MS method enables reproducible Aβ quantitation.

  15. Direct observation of amyloid nucleation under nanomechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varongchayakul, Nitinun

    Self-assembly of amyloid nanofiber is associated with functional and pathological processes such as in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite intensive studies, stochastic nature of the process has made it difficult to elucidate molecular mechanisms for the key amyloid nucleation. Here, we investigated the amyloid nucleation of silk-elastin-like peptide (SELP) using time-lapse lateral force microscopy (LFM). By repeated scanning a single line on a SELP-coated mica surface, we observed sudden stepwise height increases, corresponds to nucleation of an amyloid fiber. The lateral force profiles followed either a worm-like chain model or an exponential function, suggesting that the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip stretches a single or multiple SELP molecules along the scanning direction, serves as the template for further self-assembly perpendicular to the scan direction. Such mechanically induced nucleation of amyloid fibrils allows positional and directional control of amyloid assembly in vitro , which we demonstrate by generating single nanofibers at predetermined nucleation sites.

  16. Degradation of soluble amyloid beta-peptides 1-40, 1-42, and the Dutch variant 1-40Q by insulin degrading enzyme from Alzheimer disease and control brains.

    PubMed

    Pérez, A; Morelli, L; Cresto, J C; Castaño, E M

    2000-02-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is a metalloprotease that has been involved in amyloid beta peptide (A(beta)) degradation in the brain. We analyzed the ability of human brain soluble fraction to degrade A(beta) analogs 1-40, 1-42 and the Dutch variant 1-40Q at physiological concentrations (1 nM). The rate of synthetic 125I-A(beta) degradation was similar among the A(beta) analogs, as demonstrated by trichloroacetic acid precipitation and SDS-PAGE. A 110 kDa protein, corresponding to the molecular mass of IDE, was affinity labeled with either 125I-insulin, 125I-Abeta 1-40 or 125I-A(beta) 1-42 and both A(beta) degradation and cross-linking were specifically inhibited by an excess of each peptide. Sensitivity to inhibitors was consistent with the reported inhibitor profile of IDE. Taken together, these results suggested that the degradation of A(beta) analogs was due to IDE or a closely related protease. The apparent Km, as determined using partially purified IDE from rat liver, were 2.2 +/- 0.4, 2.0 +/- 0.1 and 2.3 +/- 0.3 microM for A(beta) 1-40, A(beta) 1-42 and A(beta) 1-40Q, respectively. Comparison of IDE activity from seven AD brain cytosolic fractions and six age-matched controls revealed a significant decrease in A(beta) degrading activity in the first group, supporting the hypothesis that a reduced IDE activity may contribute to A(beta) accumulation in the brain.

  17. N-terminal 5-mer peptide analog P165 of amyloid precursor protein inhibits UVA-induced MMP-1 expression by suppressing the MAPK pathway in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Hui; Wang, Wen; Wang, Rong; Liu, Zi-Lian; Zhu, Wei; Lian, Shi

    2014-07-05

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation leads to a progressive increase in dermal damage through the degradation of collagen, which is mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). UV radiation alters the intracellular signaling events that regulate the elaboration of MMPs. Our previous study showed that P165, the N-terminal 5-mer peptide analog of amyloid precursor protein, exerts a protective effect on ultraviolet A (UVA)-induced loss of collagen type I in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) by inhibiting the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and MMP-1. In this study, we focused on specific signal transduction pathways to elucidate the possible photoprotective mechanisms of P165 in controlling MMP-1 inhibition. Results from western blot analyses indicated that pretreatment with P165 dose-dependently inhibited UVA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kniase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and the phosphorylation of their downstream targets c-Jun and c-Fos. The photoprotective effects of P165 were further demonstrated in collagen type I secretion and cellular senescence induced by UVA irradiation. These findings suggest that P165 exerts photoprotective activity in UVA-treated HDFs by regulating MMP-1 generation. This activity may be mediated by inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathways. Thus, P165 is a potential agent for the prevention of skin photoaging.

  18. Contributions of degradation and brain-to-blood elimination across the blood–brain barrier to cerebral clearance of human amyloidpeptide(1-40) in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shingo; Matsumiya, Kohta; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Kamiie, Junichi; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to estimate the relative contributions of degradation and brain-to-blood elimination processes to the clearance of microinjected human amyloidpeptide(1-40) (hAβ(1-40)) from mouse cerebral cortex, using a solid-phase extraction method together with a newly developed ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) quantitation method for intact hAβ(1-40). The clearance rate constant of hAβ(1-40) in mouse cerebral cortex was determined to be 3.21 × 10−2/min under conditions where the saturable brain-to-blood elimination process across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was expected to be saturated. Thus, this clearance rate constant should mainly reflect degradation. The [125I]hAβ(1-40) elimination rate across the BBB under nonsaturating conditions was determined to be 1.48 × 10−2/min. Inhibition studies suggested that processes sensitive to insulin and phosphoramidon, which inhibit neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, and endothelin-converting enzyme, are involved not only in degradation, but also in elimination of hAβ(1-40). In conclusion, our results suggest a dominant contribution of degradation to cerebral hAβ(1-40) clearance, and also indicate that a sequential process of degradation and elimination of degradation products is involved in cerebral hAβ(1-40) clearance. PMID:23963369

  19. Protective effects of Borago officinalis extract on amyloid β-peptide(25-35)-induced memory impairment in male rats: a behavioral study.

    PubMed

    Ghahremanitamadon, Fatemeh; Shahidi, Siamak; Zargooshnia, Somayeh; Nikkhah, Ali; Ranjbar, Akram; Soleimani Asl, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and most common form of dementia that leads to memory impairment. In the present study we have examined the protective effects of Borago officinalis (borage) extract on Amyloid β (A β)-Induced memory impairment. Wistar male rats received intrahippocampal (IHP) injection of the A β (25-35) and borage extract throughout gestation (100 mg/kg). Learning and memory functions in the rats were examined by the passive avoidance and the Morris water maze (MWM) tasks. Finally, the antioxidant capacity of hippocampus was measured using ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The results showed that A β (25-35) impaired step-through latency and time in dark compartment in passive avoidance task. In the MWM, A β (25-35) significantly increased escape latency and traveled distance. Borage administration attenuated the A β-induced memory impairment in both the passive avoidance and the MWM tasks. A β induced a remarkable decrease in antioxidant power (FRAP value) of hippocampus and borage prevented the decrease of the hippocampal antioxidant status. This data suggests that borage could improve the learning impairment and oxidative damage in the hippocampal tissue following A β treatment and that borage consumption may lead to an improvement of AD-induced cognitive dysfunction.

  20. Amyloid Beta as a Modulator of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Brewer, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is associated with synapse loss, memory dysfunction and pathological accumulation of amyloid beta in plaques. However, an exclusively pathological role for amyloid beta is being challenged by new evidence for an essential function of amyloid beta at the synapse. Amyloid beta protein exists in different assembly states in the central nervous system and plays distinct roles ranging from synapse and memory formation to memory loss and neuronal cell death. Amyloid beta is present in the brain of symptom-free people where it likely performs important physiological roles. New evidence indicates that synaptic activity directly evokes the release of amyloid beta at the synapse. At physiological levels, amyloid beta is a normal, soluble product of neuronal metabolism that regulates synaptic function beginning early in life. Monomeric amyloid beta 40 and 42 are the predominant forms required for synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. With age, some assemblies of amyloid beta are associated with synaptic failure and Alzheimer’s disease pathology, possibly targeting the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor through the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), mitochondrial amyloid-β alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) and cyclophilin D. But emerging data suggests a distinction between age effects on the target response in contrast to the assembly state or the accumulation of the peptide. Both aging and beta amyloid independently decrease neuronal plasticity. Our laboratory has reported that amyloid beta, glutamate and lactic acid are each increasingly toxic with neuron age. The basis of the age-related toxicity partly resides in age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and an oxidative shift in mitochondrial and cytoplasmic redox potential. In turn, signaling through phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (pERK) is affected along with an age-independent increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (p

  1. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The amyloidpeptide (Aβ42) is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results Here we describe a rapid and high-throughput screening method to identify molecules able to modulate amyloid aggregation. The approach exploits the inclusion bodies (IBs) formed by Aβ42 when expressed in bacteria. We have shown previously that these aggregates retain amyloid structural and functional properties. In the present work, we demonstrate that their in vitro refolding is selectively sensitive to the presence of aggregation-promoting metal ions, allowing the detection of inhibitors of metal-promoted amyloid aggregation with potential therapeutic interest. Conclusions Because IBs can be produced at high levels and easily purified, the method overcomes one of the main limitations in screens to detect amyloid modulators: the use of expensive and usually highly insoluble synthetic peptides. PMID:22553999

  2. AGGREGATION PATHWAYS OF THE AMYLOID β(1–42) PEPTIDE DEPEND ON ITS COLLOIDAL STABILITY AND ORDERED β-SHEET STACKING

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dianlu; Rauda, Iris; Han, Shubo; Chen, Shu; Zhou, Feimeng

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils are present as a major component in senile plaques, the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Diffuse plaques (non-fibrous, loosely packed Aβ aggregates) containing amorphous Aβ aggregates are also formed in brain. This work examines the influence of Cu2+ complexation by Aβ on the aggregation process in the context of charge and structural variations. Changes in the surface charges of Aβ molecules due to Cu2+ binding, measured with a zeta potential measurement device, were correlated with the aggregate morphologies examined by atomic force microscopy. As a result of the charge variation, the “colloid-like” stability of the aggregation intermediates, which is essential to the fibrillation process, is affected. Consequently Cu2+ enhances the amorphous aggregate formation. By monitoring variations in the secondary structures with circular dichroism spectroscopy, a direct transformation from the unstructured conformation to the β-sheet structure was observed for all types of aggregates observed (oligomers, fibrils, and/or amorphous aggregates). Compared to the Aβ aggregation pathway in the absence of Cu2+ and taking other factors affecting Aβ aggregation (i.e., pH and temperature) into account, our investigation indicates that formations of amorphous and fibrous aggregates diverge from the same β-sheet-containing partially folded intermediate. This study suggests that the hydrophilic domain of Aβ also plays a role in the Aβ aggregation process. A kinetic model was proposed to account for the effects of the Cu2+ binding on these two aggregation pathways in terms of charge and structural variations. PMID:22870885

  3. Antiaggregation Potential of Padina gymnospora against the Toxic Alzheimer’s Beta-Amyloid Peptide 25–35 and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Property of Its Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Balakrishnan; Sheeja Malar, Dicson; Sathya, Sethuraman; Pandima Devi, Kasi

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation in the cerebral cortex of the brain is a promising therapeutic and defensive strategy in identification of disease modifying agents for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since natural products are considered as the current alternative trend for the discovery of AD drugs, the present study aims at the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic potential of the marine seaweed Padina gymnospora. Prevention of aggregation and disaggregation of the mature fibril formation of Aβ 25–35 by acetone extracts of P. gymnospora (ACTPG) was evaluated in two phases by Thioflavin T assay. The results were further confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. The results of antiaggregation and disaggregation assay showed that the increase in fluorescence intensity of aggregated Aβ and the co-treatment of ACTPG (250 μg/ml) with Aβ 25–35, an extensive decrease in the fluorescence intensity was observed in both phases, which suggests that ACTPG prevents the oligomers formation and disaggregation of mature fibrils. In addition, ACTPG was subjected to column chromatography and the bioactivity was screened based on the cholinesterase inhibitory activity. Finally, the active fraction was subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for the identification of bioactive compounds. Overall, the results suggest that the bioactive compound alpha bisabolol present in the alga might be responsible for the observed cholinesterase inhibition with the IC50 value < 10 μg/ml for both AChE and BuChE when compared to standard drug donepezil (IC50 value < 6 μg/ml) and support its use for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:26536106

  4. Investigation of thymol effect on learning and memory impairment induced by intrahippocampal injection of amyloid beta peptide in high fat diet- fed rats.

    PubMed

    Asadbegi, Masoumeh; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Salehi, Iraj; Komaki, Alireza; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2017-03-02

    Obesity and consumption of a high fat diet (HFD) are known to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we have examined the protective and therapeutic effects of thymol (main monoterpene phenol found in thyme essential oil) on a HFD-fed rat model of AD. Fourty adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups:(n = 8 rats/group): group 1, control, consumed an ordinary diet, group 2 consumed a HFD for 8 weeks, then received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) via intrahippocampal (IHP) injection, group 3 consumed HFD for 8 weeks, then received beta-amyloid (Aβ)1-42 via IHP injections to induce AD, group 4 consumed HFD for 8 weeks, then received Aβ1-42, and was treated by thymol (30 mg/kg in sunflower oil) daily for 4 weeks, and group 5 consumed HFD for 8 week, then received Aβ1-42 after what sunflower oil was administered by oral gavage daily for 4 weeks. Biochemical tests showed an impaired lipid profile and higher glucose levels upon consumption of HFD, which was ameliorated by thymol treatment. In behavioral results, spatial memory in group 3 was significantly impaired, but groups treated with thymol showed better spatial memory compared to group 3 (p ≤ 0.01). In histological results, formation of Aβ plaque in hippocampus of group 3 increased significantly compared to group 1 and group 2 (p ≤ 0.05), but group 4 showed decreased Aβ plaques compared to group 3 (p ≤ 0.01). In conclusion, thymol decreased the effects of Aβ on memory and could be considered as neuroprotective.

  5. Candidate genes for Alzheimer’s disease are associated with individual differences in plasma levels of beta amyloid peptides in adults with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schupf, Nicole; Lee, Annie; Park, Naeun; Dang, Lam-Ha; Pang, Deborah; Yale, Alexander; Oh, David Kyung-Taek; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Luchsinger, José A.; Zigman, Warren B.; Silverman, Wayne; Tycko, Benjamin; Kisselev, Sergey; Clark, Lorraine; Lee, Joseph H.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the contribution of candidate genes for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) on Chromosome 21 and other chromosomes to differences in Aβ peptide levels in a cohort of adults with DS, a population at high risk for AD. Participants were 254 non-demented adults with Down syndrome, 30–78 years of age. Genomic DNA was genotyped using an Illumina GoldenGate custom array. We used linear regression to examine differences in levels of Aβ peptides associated with the number of risk alleles, adjusting for age, sex, level of intellectual disability, race/ethnicity and the presence of the APOE ε4 allele. For Aβ42 levels, the strongest gene-wise association was found for a SNP on CAHLM1; for Aβ40 levels the strongest gene-wise associations were found for SNPs in IDE and SOD1, while the strongest gene-wise associations with levels of the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio were found for SNPs in SORCS1. Broadly classified, variants in these genes may influence APP processing (CALHM1, IDE), vesicular trafficking (SORCS1), and response to oxidative stress (SOD1). PMID:26166206

  6. New insights into the coordination of Cu(II) by the amyloid-B 16 peptide from Fourier transform IR spectroscopy and isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Youssef; Dorlet, Pierre; Faller, Peter; Hellwig, Petra

    2011-12-15

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in which the formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates plays a causative role. There is ample evidence that Cu(II) can bind to Aβ and modulate its aggregation. Moreover, Cu(II) bound to Aβ might be involved in the production of reactive oxygen species, a process supposed to be involved in the Alzheimer's disease. The native Aβ40 contains a high affinity binding site for Cu(II), which is comprised in the N-terminal portion. Thus, Aβ16 (amino acid 1-16 of Aβ) has often been used as a model for Cu(II)-binding to monomeric Aβ. The Cu(II)-binding to Aβ is pH dependent and at pH 7.4, two different type of Cu(II) coordinations exist in equilibrium. These two forms are predominant at pH 6.5 and pH 9.0. In either form, a variety of studies show that the N-terminal Asp and the three His play a key role in the coordination, although the exact binding of these amino acids has not been addressed. Therefore, we studied the coordination modes of Cu(II) at pH 6.5 and 9.0 with the help of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Combined with isotopic labeling of the amino acids involved in the coordination sphere, the data points toward the coordination of Cu(II) via the carboxylate of Asp1 at both pH values in a pseudobridging monovalent fashion. At low pH, His6 binds copper via Nτ, while His13 and His14 are bound via Nπ. At high pH, direct evidence is given on the coordination of Cu(II) via the Nτ atom of His6. Additionally, this study clearly shows the effect of Cu(II) binding on the protonation state of the His residues where a proton displacement takes places on the nitrogen atoms of the imidazole ring.

  7. Different configurational states of beta-amyloid and their distributions relative to plaques and tangles in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Spillantini, M G; Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Klug, A

    1990-01-01

    Antibodies have been raised against synthetic peptides corresponding to different parts of the beta-amyloid sequence. These antibodies stain different kinds of amyloid distributions in the hippocampal formation in Alzheimer disease, suggesting the existence of different states of aggregation and/or folding of beta-amyloid molecules. An antibody directed against the middle region of beta-amyloid stained mostly amyloid plaques without cores, whereas an antibody directed against the carboxyl-terminal region of beta-amyloid stained only amyloid plaques with cores. An antiserum directed against the amino terminus of beta-amyloid stained numerous tangle-bearing cells and bodies, as well as the neuritic component of plaques and neuropil threads. These antibodies, in conjunction with anti-tau antibodies, were used to demonstrate a close spatial relationship between amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles. Images PMID:2111023

  8. Laser-induced propagation and destruction of amyloid beta fibrils.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisashi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Toru; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-06-18

    The amyloid deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD). Preventing the formation of amyloid deposits and removing preformed fibrils in tissues are important therapeutic strategies against AD. Previously, we reported the destruction of amyloid fibrils of beta(2)-microglobulin K3 fragments by laser irradiation coupled with the binding of amyloid-specific thioflavin T. Here, we studied the effects of a laser beam on Abeta fibrils. As was the case for K3 fibrils, extensive irradiation destroyed the preformed Abeta fibrils. However, irradiation during spontaneous fibril formation resulted in only the partial destruction of growing fibrils and a subsequent explosive propagation of fibrils. The explosive propagation was caused by an increase in the number of active ends due to breakage. The results not only reveal a case of fragmentation-induced propagation of fibrils but also provide insights into therapeutic strategies for AD.

  9. Cell Surface Expression of the Major AmyloidPeptide (Aβ)-degrading Enzyme, Neprilysin, Depends on Phosphorylation by Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Kinase (MEK) and Dephosphorylation by Protein Phosphatase 1a*

    PubMed Central

    Kakiya, Naomasa; Saito, Takashi; Nilsson, Per; Matsuba, Yukio; Tsubuki, Satoshi; Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki; Saido, Takaomi C.

    2012-01-01

    Neprilysin is one of the major amyloidpeptide (Aβ)-degrading enzymes, the expression of which declines in the brain during aging. The decrease in neprilysin leads to a metabolic Aβ imbalance, which can induce the amyloidosis underlying Alzheimer disease. Pharmacological activation of neprilysin during aging therefore represents a potential strategy to prevent the development of Alzheimer disease. However, the regulatory mechanisms mediating neprilysin activity in the brain remain unclear. To address this issue, we screened for pharmacological regulators of neprilysin activity and found that the neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and neurotrophins 3 and 4 reduce cell surface neprilysin activity. This decrease was mediated by MEK/ERK signaling, which enhanced phosphorylation at serine 6 in the neprilysin intracellular domain (S6-NEP-ICD). Increased phosphorylation of S6-NEP-ICD in primary neurons reduced the levels of cell surface neprilysin and led to a subsequent increase in extracellular Aβ levels. Furthermore, a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1a, tautomycetin, induced extensive phosphorylation of the S6-NEP-ICD, resulting in reduced cell surface neprilysin activity. In contrast, activation of protein phosphatase-1a increased cell surface neprilysin activity and lowered Aβ levels. Taken together, these results indicate that the phosphorylation status of S6-NEP-ICD influences the localization of neprilysin and affects extracellular Aβ levels. Therefore, maintaining S6-NEP-ICD in a dephosphorylated state, either by inhibition of protein kinases involved in its phosphorylation or by activation of phosphatases catalyzing its dephosphorylation, may represent a new approach to prevent reduction of cell surface neprilysin activity during aging and to maintain physiological levels of Aβ in the brain. PMID:22767595

  10. Quantitative analysis of the flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones in the extract of Ginkgo biloba and evaluation of their inhibitory activity towards fibril formation of β-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyan; Wang, Jing-Rong; Yau, Lee-Fong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Liang; Han, Quan-Bin; Zhao, Zhongzhen; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-04-10

    The standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761) is used clinically in Europe for the symptomatic treatment of impaired cerebral function in primary degenerative dementia syndromes, and the results of numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have supported such clinical use. The abnormal production and aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and the deposition of fibrils in the brain are regarded as key steps in the onset of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and the inhibition of Aβ aggregation and destabilization of the preformed fibrils represent viable approaches for the prevention and treatment of AD. Flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones (TTLs) are the two main components of EGb761 which represent 24 and 6% of the overall content, respectively. In our research, seven abundant flavonoid glycosides 1-7 were isolated from the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves and characterized by spectroscopic analysis. Furthermore, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography method was established for the simultaneous quantification of these seven flavonoids. The inhibitory activities of these flavonoids, as well as four TTLs, i.e., ginkgolides A, B, and C and bilobalide (compounds 8-11), were evaluated towards Aβ42 fibril formation using a thioflavin T fluorescence assay. It was found that three flavonoids 1, 3 and 4 exhibited moderate inhibitory activities, whereas the other four flavonoids 2, 5, 6 and 7, as well as the four terpene trilactones, showed poor activity. This is the first report of the inhibition of Aβ fibril formation of two characteristic acylated flavonoid glycosides 6, 7 in Ginkgo leaves, on the basis of which the structure-activity relationship of these flavonoids 1-7 was discussed.

  11. JAK2/STAT5/Bcl-xL signalling is essential for erythropoietin-mediated protection against apoptosis induced in PC12 cells by the amyloid β−peptide Aβ25–35

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rong; Hu, Jing; Huang, Chengfang; Wang, Min; Xiang, Jizhou; Li, Gang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Erythropoietin (EPO) exerts neuroprotective actions in the CNS, including protection against apoptosis induced by the amyloid β−peptide Aβ25–35. However, it remains unclear which signalling pathway activated by EPO is involved in this neuroprotection. Here, we have investigated whether JAK2/STAT5/Bcl-xL and ERK1/2 signalling pathways are essential for EPO-mediated protection against apoptosis induced by Aβ25–35. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH EPO was added to cultures of PC12 cells, 1 h before Aβ25–35. For kinase inhibitor studies, AG490 and PD98059 were added to PC12 cells, 0.5 h before the addition of EPO. Transfection with siRNA was used to knockdown STAT5. Activation of JAK2/STAT5/Bcl-xL and ERK1/2 signalling pathways were investigated by Western blotting. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and apoptosis was detected by TUNEL and acridine orange–ethidium bromide double staining. KEY RESULTS EPO increased phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT5 in PC12 cells treated with Aβ25–35. Furthermore, EPO modulated the nuclear translocation of phospho-STAT5, which increased expression of Bcl-xL and decreased levels of caspase-3. These beneficial effects were blocked by the JAK2 inhibitor, AG490 or STAT5 knockdown. However, the ERK1/2 pathway did not play a crucial role in our model. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS EPO protected PC12 cells against Aβ25–35-induced neurotoxicity. Activation of JAK2/STAT5/Bcl-xL pathway was important in EPO-mediated neuroprotection. EPO may serve as a novel protective agent against Aβ25–35-induced cytotoxicity in, for instance, Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24597613

  12. MR microscopy of human amyloid-β deposits: characterization of parenchymal amyloid, diffuse plaques, and vascular amyloid.

    PubMed

    Nabuurs, Rob J A; Natté, Remco; de Ronde, Fenna M; Hegeman-Kleinn, Ingrid; Dijkstra, Jouke; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Webb, Andrew G; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; van Buchem, Mark A; van der Weerd, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral deposits of amyloidpeptides (Aβ) form the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). In the brain, Aβ can aggregate as insoluble fibrils present in amyloid plaques and vascular amyloid, or as diffuse plaques consisting of mainly non-fibrillar Aβ. Previously, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be capable of detecting individual amyloid plaques, not only via the associated iron, but also Aβ itself has been suggested to be responsible for a decrease in the image intensity. In this current study we aim to investigate the MRI properties of the different cerebral Aβ deposits including diffuse plaques and vascular amyloid. Postmortem 60-μm-thick brain sections of AD, CAA, and Down's syndrome patients, known to contain Aβ, were studied. High resolution T2*- and T2-weighted MRI scans and quantitative relaxation maps were acquired using a microcoil on a Bruker 9.4T MRI system. Specific MRI characteristics of each type of Aβ deposit were examined by co-registration of the MRI with Congo Red and Aβ-immunostainings of the same sections. Our results show that only fibrillar Aβ, present in both vascular and parenchymal amyloid, induced a significant change in T2* and T2 values. However, signal changes were not as consistent for all of the vessels affected by CAA, irrespective of possible dyshoric changes. In contrast, the non-fibrillar diffuse plaques did not create any detectable MRI signal changes. These findings are relevant for the interpretation and further development of (quantitative) MRI methods for the detection and follow-up of AD and CAA.

  13. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end.

  14. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs have been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  15. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs thave been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  16. Surface Effects on Amyloid Fibril Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Brad; Simons, Janet; Leonenko, Zoya

    2009-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are insoluble aggregates composed of proteins in beta-sheet conformation, which are implicated in at least 20 diseases for which no cure is currently available. Although fibril plaque formation is associated with biological membranes in vivo, most of earlier research on fibrillogenesis has been performed in a solution phase, in which only a protein-protein interactions are considered. On the other hand, the surface of plasma membrane could provide the environment in which amyloid forming proteins could cluster. In order to get an insight into the understanding of the effect of the surface of plasma membrane, and the surfaces in general, on amyloid fibril formation, we used Atomic force microscopy to study binding of amyloid beta 1-42 peptide and amyloid fibril formation on model surfaces, such as chemically modified positively charged, negatively charged and hydrophobic substrates. The results show that structure, size and amount of larger fibrils and smaller aggregates depend on the type of surface, and differ from aggregation observed in solution.

  17. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties.

  18. β-sheet interfering molecules acting against β-amyloid aggregation and fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Francioso, Antonio; Punzi, Pasqualina; Boffi, Alberto; Lori, Clorinda; Martire, Sara; Giordano, Cesare; D'Erme, Maria; Mosca, Luciana

    2015-04-15

    β-Sheet aggregates and amyloid fibrils rising from conformational changes of proteins are observed in several pathological human conditions. These structures are organized in β-strands that can reciprocally interact by hydrophobic and π-π interactions. The amyloid aggregates can give rise to pathological conditions through complex biochemical mechanisms whose physico-chemical nature has been understood in recent times. This review focuses on the various classes of natural and synthetic small molecules able to act against β-amyloid fibrillogenesis and toxicity that may represent new pharmacological tools in Alzheimer's diseases. Some peptides, named 'β-sheet breaker peptides', are able to hamper amyloid aggregation and fibrillogenesis by interfering with and destabilizing the non native β-sheet structures. Other natural compounds, like polyphenols or indolic molecules such as melatonin, can interfere with β-amyloid peptide pathogenicity by inhibiting aggregation and counteracting oxidative stress that is a key hallmark in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Collapsed state of polyglutamic acid results in amyloid spherulite formation

    PubMed Central

    Stehli, Daniel; Mulaj, Mentor; Miti, Tatiana; Traina, Joshua; Foley, Joseph; Muschol, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils involves multiple distinct intermediates and late-stage fibrillar polymorphs. Understanding the conditions and mechanisms that promote the formation of one type of intermediate and polymorph over the other represents a fundamental challenge. Answers to this question are also of immediate biomedical relevance since different amyloid aggregate species have been shown to have distinct pathogenic potencies. One amyloid polymorph that has received comparatively little attention are amyloid spherulites. Here we report that self-assembly of the intrinsically disordered polymer poly(L-glutamic) acid (PLE) can generate amyloid spherulites. We characterize spherulite growth kinetics, as well as the morphological, optical and tinctorial features of this amyloid polymorph previously unreported for PLE. We find that PLE spherulites share both tinctorial and structural characteristics with their amyloid fibril counterparts. Differences in PLE's molecular weight, polydispersity or chemistry could not explain the selective propensity toward either fibril or spherulite formation. Instead, we provide evidence that PLE polymers can exist in either a collapsed globule or an extended random coil conformation. The collapsed globule consistently produces spherulites while the extended coil assembles into disordered fibril bundles. This results suggests that these 2 PLE conformers directly affect the morphology of the resulting macroscopic amyloid assembly.

  20. Accelerated amyloid deposition, neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in double mutant APP/tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ribé, Elena M; Pérez, Mar; Puig, Berta; Gich, Ignasi; Lim, Filip; Cuadrado, Mar; Sesma, Teresa; Catena, Silvia; Sánchez, Belén; Nieto, María; Gómez-Ramos, Pilar; Morán, M Asunción; Cabodevilla, Felipe; Samaranch, Lluis; Ortiz, Lourdes; Pérez, Alberto; Ferrer, Isidro; Avila, Jesús; Gómez-Isla, Teresa

    2005-12-01

    Even though the idea that amyloid beta peptide accumulation is the primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease has become the leading hypothesis, the causal link between aberrant amyloid precursor protein processing and tau alterations in this type of dementia remains controversial. We further investigated the role of beta-amyloid production/deposition in tau pathology and neuronal cell death in the mouse brain by crossing Tg2576 and VLW lines expressing human mutant amyloid precursor protein and human mutant tau, respectively. The resulting double transgenic mice showed enhanced amyloid deposition accompanied by neurofibrillary degeneration and overt neuronal loss in selectively vulnerable brain limbic areas. These findings challenge the idea that tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease is merely a downstream effect of amyloid production/deposition and suggest that reciprocal interactions between beta-amyloid and tau alterations may take place in vivo.

  1. Adeno-associated Virus Gene Therapy With Cholesterol 24-Hydroxylase Reduces the Amyloid Pathology Before or After the Onset of Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hudry, Eloise; Van Dam, Debby; Kulik, Wim; De Deyn, Peter P; Stet, Femke S; Ahouansou, Ornella; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Delacourte, André; Bougnères, Pierre; Aubourg, Patrick; Cartier, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is closely connected with cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol increases the production and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that result in the formation of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of the pathology. In the brain, cholesterol is synthesized in situ but cannot be degraded nor cross the blood–brain barrier. The major exportable form of brain cholesterol is 24S-hydroxycholesterol, an oxysterol generated by the neuronal cholesterol 24-hydroxylase encoded by the CYP46A1 gene. We report that the injection of adeno-associated vector (AAV) encoding CYP46A1 in the cortex and hippocampus of APP23 mice before the onset of amyloid deposits markedly reduces Aβ peptides, amyloid deposits and trimeric oligomers at 12 months of age. The Morris water maze (MWM) procedure also demonstrated improvement of spatial memory at 6 months, before the onset of amyloid deposits. AAV5-wtCYP46A1 vector injection in the cortex and hippocampus of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS) mice after the onset of amyloid deposits also reduced markedly the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus, and to a less extent in the cortex, 3 months after the injection. Our data demonstrate that neuronal overexpression of CYP46A1 before or after the onset of amyloid plaques significantly reduces Aβ pathology in mouse models of AD. PMID:19654569

  2. An amyloid lung

    PubMed Central

    Zundel, W. E.; Prior, A. P.

    1971-01-01

    A 55-year-old housewife died from an illness characterized by progressive respiratory incapacity. Changes were confined to the lungs and consisted of a diffuse infiltration by amyloid. No adequate cause was found for this amyloid, and we suggest that this is a case of primary alveolar septal amyloidosis. Images PMID:5559913

  3. Sulforaphane exerts its anti-inflammatory effect against amyloidpeptide via STAT-1 dephosphorylation and activation of Nrf2/HO-1 cascade in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    An, Ye Won; Jhang, Kyoung A; Woo, So-Youn; Kang, Jihee Lee; Chong, Young Hae

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide, accounting for most cases of dementia in elderly individuals, and effective therapies are still lacking. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane against Aβ1-42 monomers in human THP-1 microglia-like cells. The results showed that sulforaphane preferentially inhibited cathepsin B- and caspase-1-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by mostly Aβ1-42 monomers, an effect that potently reduced excessive secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that sulforaphane mitigated the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 induced by Aβ1-42 monomers. Sulforaphane also increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation, which was followed by upregulation of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The anti-inflammatory effect of sulforaphane on Aβ1-42-induced IL-1β production was diminished by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1. Moreover, sulforaphane significantly attenuated the levels of microRNA-146a, which is selectively upregulated in the temporal cortex and hippocampus of AD brains. The aforementioned effects of sulforaphane were replicated by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, and Nrf2 activator. These results indicate that signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 dephosphorylation, HO-1 and its upstream effector, Nrf2, play a pivotal role in triggering an anti-inflammatory signaling cascade of sulforaphane that results in decreases of IL-1β release and microRNA-146a production in Aβ1-42-stimulated human microglia-like cells. These findings suggest that the phytochemical sulforaphane has a potential application in AD therapeutics.

  4. Design and Optimization of Anti-amyloid Domain Antibodies Specific for β-Amyloid and Islet Amyloid Polypeptide*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christine C.; Julian, Mark C.; Tiller, Kathryn E.; Meng, Fanling; DuConge, Sarah E.; Akter, Rehana; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Tessier, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies with conformational specificity are important for detecting and interfering with polypeptide aggregation linked to several human disorders. We are developing a motif-grafting approach for designing lead antibody candidates specific for amyloid-forming polypeptides such as the Alzheimer peptide (Aβ). This approach involves grafting amyloidogenic peptide segments into the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of single-domain (VH) antibodies. Here we have investigated the impact of polar mutations inserted at the edges of a large hydrophobic Aβ42 peptide segment (Aβ residues 17–42) in CDR3 on the solubility and conformational specificity of the corresponding VH domains. We find that VH expression and solubility are strongly enhanced by introducing multiple negatively charged or asparagine residues at the edges of CDR3, whereas other polar mutations are less effective (glutamine and serine) or ineffective (threonine, lysine, and arginine). Moreover, Aβ VH domains with negatively charged CDR3 mutations show significant preference for recognizing Aβ fibrils relative to Aβ monomers, whereas the same VH domains with other polar CDR3 mutations recognize both Aβ conformers. We observe similar behavior for a VH domain grafted with a large hydrophobic peptide from islet amyloid polypeptide (residues 8–37) that contains negatively charged mutations at the edges of CDR3. These findings highlight the sensitivity of antibody binding and solubility to residues at the edges of CDRs, and provide guidelines for designing other grafted antibody fragments with hydrophobic binding loops. PMID:26601942

  5. Design and Optimization of Anti-amyloid Domain Antibodies Specific for β-Amyloid and Islet Amyloid Polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christine C; Julian, Mark C; Tiller, Kathryn E; Meng, Fanling; DuConge, Sarah E; Akter, Rehana; Raleigh, Daniel P; Tessier, Peter M

    2016-02-05

    Antibodies with conformational specificity are important for detecting and interfering with polypeptide aggregation linked to several human disorders. We are developing a motif-grafting approach for designing lead antibody candidates specific for amyloid-forming polypeptides such as the Alzheimer peptide (Aβ). This approach involves grafting amyloidogenic peptide segments into the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of single-domain (VH) antibodies. Here we have investigated the impact of polar mutations inserted at the edges of a large hydrophobic Aβ42 peptide segment (Aβ residues 17-42) in CDR3 on the solubility and conformational specificity of the corresponding VH domains. We find that VH expression and solubility are strongly enhanced by introducing multiple negatively charged or asparagine residues at the edges of CDR3, whereas other polar mutations are less effective (glutamine and serine) or ineffective (threonine, lysine, and arginine). Moreover, Aβ VH domains with negatively charged CDR3 mutations show significant preference for recognizing Aβ fibrils relative to Aβ monomers, whereas the same VH domains with other polar CDR3 mutations recognize both Aβ conformers. We observe similar behavior for a VH domain grafted with a large hydrophobic peptide from islet amyloid polypeptide (residues 8-37) that contains negatively charged mutations at the edges of CDR3. These findings highlight the sensitivity of antibody binding and solubility to residues at the edges of CDRs, and provide guidelines for designing other grafted antibody fragments with hydrophobic binding loops.

  6. Amyloid plaque structure and cell surface interactions of β-amyloid fibrils revealed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Han, Shen; Kollmer, Marius; Markx, Daniel; Claus, Stephanie; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2017-02-27

    The deposition of amyloid fibrils as plaques is a key feature of several neurodegenerative diseases including in particular Alzheimer's. This disease is characterized, if not provoked, by amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ peptide that deposit inside the brain or are toxic to neuronal cells. We here used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to determine the fibril network structure and interactions of Aβ fibrils within a cell culture model of Alzheimer's disease. STEM images taken from the formed Aβ amyloid deposits revealed three main types of fibril network structures, termed amorphous meshwork, fibril bundle and amyloid star. All three were infiltrated by different types of lipid inclusions from small-sized exosome-like structures (50-100 nm diameter) to large-sized extracellular vesicles (up to 300 nm). The fibrils also presented strong interactions with the surrounding cells such that fibril bundles extended into tubular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Amyloid formation in the cell model was previously found to have an intracellular origin and we show here that it functionally destroys the integrity of the intracellular membranes as it leads to lysosomal leakage. These data provide a mechanistic link to explain why intracellular fibril formation is toxic to the cell.

  7. Amyloid plaque structure and cell surface interactions of β-amyloid fibrils revealed by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shen; Kollmer, Marius; Markx, Daniel; Claus, Stephanie; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid fibrils as plaques is a key feature of several neurodegenerative diseases including in particular Alzheimer’s. This disease is characterized, if not provoked, by amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ peptide that deposit inside the brain or are toxic to neuronal cells. We here used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to determine the fibril network structure and interactions of Aβ fibrils within a cell culture model of Alzheimer’s disease. STEM images taken from the formed Aβ amyloid deposits revealed three main types of fibril network structures, termed amorphous meshwork, fibril bundle and amyloid star. All three were infiltrated by different types of lipid inclusions from small-sized exosome-like structures (50–100 nm diameter) to large-sized extracellular vesicles (up to 300 nm). The fibrils also presented strong interactions with the surrounding cells such that fibril bundles extended into tubular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Amyloid formation in the cell model was previously found to have an intracellular origin and we show here that it functionally destroys the integrity of the intracellular membranes as it leads to lysosomal leakage. These data provide a mechanistic link to explain why intracellular fibril formation is toxic to the cell. PMID:28240273

  8. Structure-Based Design of Functional Amyloid Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Jones, Eric M.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Luo, Fang; Ivanova, Magdalena; Sievers, Stuart A.; Wang, Wenyuan; Yaghi, Omar M.; Liu, Cong; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-12-04

    We report that amyloid fibers, once exclusively associated with disease, are acquiring utility as a class of biological nanomaterials. We introduce a method that utilizes the atomic structures of amyloid peptides, to design materials with versatile applications. As a model application, we designed a