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Sample records for anaerobic conditions

  1. PCB biohalogenation under anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gauger, W.K.; McCue, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is conducting research on the biodehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) under anoxic conditions. Reductive dechlorination of PCB's has been observed in treatments inoculated with Hudson River sediments. Differences in gas chromatograms between time 0 and 4-month incubations indicate pattern shifts of the PCB homologs that constitute Aroclor 1242 from highly chlorinated to lesser chlorinated congeners. Changes in distribution patterns of PCB homologs were also evident. PCB homologs containing 4, 5, 6, and 7 chlorine atoms were shown to decrease over the incubation period, whereas PCB homologs containing 2 and 3 chlorines increased in concentration. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Anaerobic biodegradation of cyanide under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, R D; Cooper, D A; Speece, R; Henson, M

    1991-01-01

    Upflow, anaerobic, fixed-bed, activated charcoal biotreatment columns capable of operating at free cyanide concentrations of greater than 100 mg liter-1 with a hydraulic retention time of less than 48 h were developed. Methanogenesis was maintained under a variety of feed medium conditions which included ethanol, phenol, or methanol as the primary reduced carbon source. Under optimal conditions, greater than 70% of the inflow free cyanide was removed in the first 30% of the column height. Strongly complexed cyanides were resistant to removal. Ammonia was the nitrogen end product of cyanide transformation. In cell material removed from the charcoal columns, [14C]bicarbonate was the major carbon end product of [14C]cyanide transformation. PMID:1872600

  3. Anaerobic Growth of Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria Under Dark Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Uffen, Robert L.; Wolfe, R. S.

    1970-01-01

    Purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacteria were cultured anaerobically in the absence of light by a modification of the Hungate technique. Growth was slow and resembled that of fastidious anaerobes; on yeast extract-peptone-agar medium, each cell produced about 16 descendants in 15 to 20 days. Growth was stimulated by addition of ethyl alcohol, acetate and H2, or pyruvate and H2. Cells grown in the presence of pyruvate and H2 produced acetate and CO2; each cell produced approximately 10 descendants in 24 hr under anaerobic, dark conditions. Spectrophotometric evidence obtained from cells which were the product of five generations suggests no difference between the bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoids synthesized by cells grown anaerobically under dark or light conditions. Likewise, the ultrastructure of the photosynthetic apparatus in cells grown anaerobically in the dark and in the light appears similar. Images PMID:5473903

  4. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  5. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    DeMars, Zachary; Biswas, Silpak; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Renter, David G; Volkova, Victoriya V

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host's enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  6. Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions

    DOEpatents

    Buelter, Thomas; Meinhold, Peter; Feldman, Reid M. Renny; Hawkins, Andrew C.; Urano, Jun; Bastian, Sabine; Arnold, Frances

    2012-01-17

    The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

  7. Decolorization of azo dyes under batch anaerobic and sequential anaerobic/aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Işik, Mustafa; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Batch anaerobic and sequential anaerobic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)/aerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were used to determine the color and COD removals under anaerobic/aerobic conditions. Two azo dyes namely "Reactive Black 5 (RB 5)," "Congo Red (CR)," and glucose as a carbon source were used for synthetic wastewater. The course of the decolorization process approximates to first order and zero order kinetics with respect to dye concentration for RB 5 and Congo Red azo dyes, respectively, in batch conditions. The decolorization kinetic constant (K0) values increased from 3.6 to 11.8 mg(L h)(-1) as increases in dye concentrations from 200 to 3200 mg L(-1) for CR. Increases in dye concentrations from 0 to 3200 mg L(-1) reduce the decolorization rate constant (k1) values from 0.0141 to 0.0019 h(-1) in batch studies performed with RB 5. Decolorization was achieved effectively under test conditions but ultimate decolorization of azo dyes was not observed at all dye concentrations in batch assay conditions. Dye concentrations of 100 mg L(-1) and 3000 mg L(-1) of glucose-COD containing basal medium were used for continuous studies. The effect of organic loadings and HRT, on the color removal efficiencies and methane gas productions were monitored. 94.1-45.4% COD and 79-73% color removal efficiencies were obtained at an organic system during decolorization of Reactive Black 5. 92.3-77.0% COD and 95.3-92.2% decolorization efficiencies were achieved at a organic loading rate of 1.03-6.65 kg (m3 day)(-1) and a HRT of 3.54-0.49 for Congo Red treatment. The results of this study showed that, although decolorization continued, COD removal efficiencies and methane gas production were depressed at high organic loadings under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, VFA accumulation, alkalinity consumption, and methane gas percentage were monitored at organic loading as high as 2.49-4.74 kg (m3 day)(-1) and 24.60-30.62 kg (m3 day)(-1), respectively, through the

  8. Degradation of triclosan under aerobic, anoxic, and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil, Prajeesh; Vijaya Nadaraja, Anupama; Bhasi, Arya; Khan, Sudheer; Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar

    2012-07-01

    Triclosan (2, 4, 4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxyl diphenyl ether) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent present in a number of house hold consumables. Aerobic and anaerobic enrichment cultures tolerating triclosan were developed and 77 bacterial strains tolerating triclosan at different levels were isolated from different inoculum sources. Biodegradation of triclosan under aerobic, anoxic (denitrifying and sulphate reducing conditions), and anaerobic conditions was studied in batch cultures with isolated pure strains and enrichment consortium developed. Under aerobic conditions, the isolated strains tolerated triclosan up to 1 g/L and degraded the compound in inorganic-mineral-broth and agar media. At 10 mg/L level triclosan, 95 ± 1.2% was degraded in 5 days, producing phenol, catechol and 2, 4-dichlorophenol as the degradation products. The strains were able to metabolize triclosan and its degradation products in the presence of monooxygenase inhibitor 1-pentyne. Under anoxic/anaerobic conditions highest degradation (87%) was observed in methanogenic system with acetate as co-substrate and phenol, catechol, and 2, 4-dichlorophenol were among the products. Three of the isolated strains tolerating 1 g/L triclosan were identified as Pseudomonas sp. (BDC 1, 2, and 3).

  9. Anaerobic conditions improve germination of a gibberellic acid deficient rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frantz, Jonathan M.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Dwarf plants are useful in research because multiple plants can be grown in a small area. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is especially important since its relatively simple genome has recently been sequenced. We are characterizing a gibberellic acid (GA) mutant of rice (japonica cv 'Shiokari,' line N-71) that is extremely dwarf (20 cm tall). Unfortunately, this GA mutation is associated with poor germination (70%) under aerobic conditions. Neither exogenous GA nor a dormancy-breaking heat treatment improved germination. However, 95% germination was achieved by germinating the seeds anaerobically, either in a pure N2 environment or submerged in unstirred tap water. The anaerobic conditions appear to break a mild post-harvest dormancy in this rice cultivar. Copyright 2002 Crop Science Society of America.

  10. Stabilisation of microalgae: Iodine mobilisation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Clarke, William; Pratt, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Mobilisation of iodine during microalgae stabilisation was investigated, with the view of assessing the potential of stabilised microalgae as an iodine-rich fertiliser. An iodine-rich waste microalgae (0.35 ± 0.05 mg I g(-1) VS(added)) was stabilised under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Iodine mobilisation was linearly correlated with carbon emission, indicating iodine was in the form of organoiodine. Comparison between iodine and nitrogen mobilisation relative to carbon emission indicated that these elements were, at least in part, housed separately within the cells. After stabilisation, there were 0.22 ± 0.05 and 0.19 ± 0.01 mg g(-1) VS(added) iodine remaining in the solid in the aerobic and anaerobic processed material respectively, meaning 38 ± 5.0% (aerobic) and 50 ± 8.6% (anaerobic) of the iodine were mobilised, and consequently lost from the material. The iodine content of the stabilised material is comparable to the iodine content of some seaweed fertilisers, and potentially satisfies an efficient I-fertilisation dose.

  11. Bacterial drug tolerance under clinical conditions is governed by anaerobic adaptation but not anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Claudia M; Luo, Jamie X; Andreae, Clio A; Butler, Clive S; Soyer, Orkun S; Titball, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Noninherited antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of genetically identical bacteria displays phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics. We show here that compared to Escherichia coli, the clinically relevant genus Burkholderia displays much higher levels of cells that tolerate ceftazidime. By measuring the dynamics of the formation of drug-tolerant cells under conditions that mimic in vivo infections, we show that in Burkholderia bacteria, oxygen levels affect the formation of these cells. The drug-tolerant cells are characterized by an anaerobic metabolic signature and can be eliminated by oxygenating the system or adding nitrate. The transcriptome profile suggests that these cells are not dormant persister cells and are likely to be drug tolerant as a consequence of the upregulation of anaerobic nitrate respiration, efflux pumps, β-lactamases, and stress response proteins. These findings have important implications for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections and the methodologies and conditions that are used to study drug-tolerant and persister cells in vitro.

  12. Carbon Isotope Fractionation In Biotic Vs. Abiotic Anaerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebrehiwet, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) are thought to play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of Fe, and nutrient elements such as C and P, in the anaerobic subsurface. The consumption of organic carbon sources (including contaminants) by these bacteria can significantly fractionate substrate C isotopes, however the effects of solution composition, electron acceptor, or electron donor on C isotopic fractionation by DMRB is at present poorly quantified. We have conducted experiments to compare the effects of bicarbonate (δ13C = -3‰) and phosphate buffers on carbon isotope fractionation by Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200R. The effects of dissolved carbonate and phosphate on δ13C values of dissolved inorganic C evolved during microbial reduction of ferric citrate (δ 13Cinitial = -25‰) were examined using sodium lactate (δ13Cinitial = -25‰) as electron donor under strict anaerobic conditions at neutral pH and 30°C, under dark and (fluorescent) light conditions. Our results suggest that bicarbonate may enhance the rate of Fe(III) reduction by S. putrefaciens, in comparison with media containing phosphate buffer but no added bicarbonate. Compared with phosphate buffered experiments, the presence of dissolved bicarbonate also resulted in a greater degree of C isotopic fractionation (ɛ=2-3‰ and ɛ=5-7‰, respectively). The effect of light on microbial Fe(III) reduction was negligible, however sterile controls showed a minor but significant quantity of carbon dioxide production in liquid media, most likely from photochemical decomposition of citrate. The abiotic experiments also showed measurable carbon isotope fractionation between the carbon dioxide produced and the organic carbon substrate which will be discussed.

  13. Environmental factors affecting indole metabolism under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, E L; Francis, A J; Bollag, J M

    1988-01-01

    The influence of physiological and environmental factors on the accumulation of oxindole during anaerobic indole metabolism was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under methanogenic conditions, indole was temporarily converted to oxindole in stoichiometric amounts in media inoculated with three freshwater sediments and an organic soil. In media inoculated with methanogenic sewage sludge, the modest amounts of oxindole detected at 35 degrees C reached higher concentrations and persisted longer when the incubation temperature was decreased from 35 to 15 degrees C. Also, decreasing the concentration of sewage sludge used as an inoculum from 50 to 1% caused an increase in the accumulation of oxindole from 10 to 75% of the indole added. Under denitrifying conditions, regardless of the concentration or source of the inoculum, oxindole appeared in trace amounts but did not accumulate during indole metabolism. In addition, denitrifying consortia which previously metabolized indole degraded oxindole with no lag period. Our data suggest that oxindole accumulation under methanogenic, but not under denitrifying conditions is caused by differences between relative rates of oxindole production and destruction. PMID:3345080

  14. Potential of hydrolysis of particulate COD in extended anaerobic conditions to enhance biological phosphorous removal.

    PubMed

    Jabari, P; Yuan, Q; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2016-11-01

    The effect of anaerobic hydrolysis of particulate COD (pCOD) on biological phosphorous removal in extended anaerobic condition was investigated through (i) sequencing batch reactors (SBR)s with anaerobic hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 0.8, 2, and 4 h; (ii) batch tests using biomass from a full scale biological nutrient removal (BNR) plant; and (iii) activated sludge modeling (BioWin 4.1 simulation). The results from long-term SBRs operation showed that phosphorus removal was correlated to the ratio of filtered COD (FCOD) to total phosphorus (TP) in the influent. Under conditions with low FCOD/TP ratio (average of 20) in the influent, extending anaerobic HRT to 4 h in the presence of pCOD did not significantly improve overall phosphorous removal. During the period with high FCOD/TP ratio (average of 37) in the influent, all SBRs removed phosphorous completely, and the long anaerobic HRT did not have negative effect on overall phosphorous removal. The batch tests also showed that pCOD at different concentration during 4 h test did not affect the rate of anaerobic phosphorus release. The rate of anaerobic hydrolysis of pCOD was significantly low and extending the anaerobic HRT was ineffective. The simulation (BioWin 4.1) of SBRs with low influent FCOD/TP ratio showed that the default kinetics of anaerobic hydrolysis in ASM2d overestimated phosphorous removal in the SBRs (high anaerobic hydrolysis of pCOD). The default anaerobic hydrolysis rate in BioWin 4.1 (ten times lower) could produce similar phosphorous removal to that in the experiment. Results showed that the current kinetics of anaerobic hydrolysis in ASM2d could lead to considerable error in predicting phosphorus removal in processes with extended anaerobic HRT. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2377-2385. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Metabolically engineered glucose-utilizing Shewanella strains under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Donggeon; Lee, Sae Bom; Kim, Sohyun; Min, Byoungnam; Choi, In-Geol; Chang, In Seop

    2014-02-01

    Comparative genome analysis of Shewanella strains predicted that the strains metabolize preferably two- and three-carbon carbohydrates as carbon/electron source because many Shewanella genomes are deficient of the key enzymes in glycolysis (e.g., glucokinase). In addition, all Shewanella genomes are known to have only one set of genes associated with the phosphotransferase system required to uptake sugars. To engineer Shewanella strains that can utilize five- and six-carbon carbohydrates, we constructed glucose-utilizing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by introducing the glucose facilitator (glf; ZMO0366) and glucokinase (glk; ZMO0369) genes of Zymomonas mobilis. The engineered MR-1 strain was able to grow on glucose as a sole carbon/electron source under anaerobic conditions. The glucose affinity (Ks) and glucokinase activity in the engineered MR-1 strain were 299.46 mM and 0.259 ± 0.034 U/g proteins. The engineered strain was successfully applied to a microbial fuel cell system and exhibited current generation using glucose as the electron source.

  16. Biogeochemical Conditions Favoring Magnetite Formation during Anaerobic Iron Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bell, P. E.; Mills, A. L.; Herman, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Several anaerobic bacteria isolated from the sediments of Contrary Creek, an iron-rich environment, produced magnetite when cultured in combinations but not when cultured alone in synthetic iron oxyhydroxide medium. When glucose was added as a carbon source, the pH of the medium decreased (to 5.5) and no magnetite was formed. When the same growth medium without glucose was used, the pH increased (to 8.5) and magnetite was formed. In both cases, Fe2+ was released into the growth medium. Geochemical equilibrium equations with Eh and pH as master variables were solved for the concentrations of iron and inorganic carbon that were observed in the system. Magnetite was predicted to be the dominant iron oxide formed at high pHs, while free Fe2+ or siderite were the dominant forms of iron expected at low pHs. Thus, magnetite formation occurs because of microbial alteration of the local Eh and pH conditions, along with concurrent reduction of ferric iron (direct biological reduction or abiological oxidation-reduction reactions). PMID:16347480

  17. NATURAL BIOLOGICAL ATTENUATION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is little consistent difference in the calculated half-lives of aromatic hydrocarbons in different anaerobic environments, but methanogenic environments might be generally the least supportive of rapid biotransformation. Toluene was usually the most rapidly biotransformed...

  18. Systems-level characterization and engineering of oxidative stress tolerance in Escherichia coli under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Aram; Tan, Mui Hua; Ling, Hua; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2013-02-01

    Despite many prior studies on microbial response to oxidative stress, our understanding of microbial tolerance against oxidative stress is currently limited to aerobic conditions, and few engineering strategies have been devised to resolve toxicity issues of oxidative stress under anaerobic conditions. Since biological processes, such as anaerobic fermentation, are frequently hampered by toxicity arising from oxidative stress, increased microbial tolerance against oxidative stress improves the overall productivity and yield of biological processes. Here, we show a systems-level analysis of oxidative stress response of Escherichia coli under anaerobic conditions, and present an engineering strategy to improve oxidative stress tolerance. First, we identified essential cellular mechanisms and regulatory factors underlying oxidative stress response under anaerobic conditions using a transcriptome analysis. In particular, we showed that nitrogen metabolisms and respiratory pathways were differentially regulated in response to oxidative stress under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Further, we demonstrated that among transcription factors with oxidative stress-derived perturbed activity, the deletion of arcA and arcB significantly improved oxidative stress tolerance under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, whereas fnr was identified as an essential transcription factor for oxidative stress tolerance under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, we showed that oxidative stress increased the intracellular NADH : NAD(+) ratio under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, which indicates a regulatory role of NADH in oxidative stress tolerance. Based on this finding, we demonstrated that increased NADH availability through fdh1 overexpression significantly improved oxidative stress tolerance under aerobic conditions. Our results here provide novel insight into better understanding of cellular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress tolerance under anaerobic conditions, and

  19. Euglena gracilis rhodoquinone:ubiquinone ratio and mitochondrial proteome differ under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Meike; van der Klei, Anita; Rotte, Carmen; van Grinsven, Koen W A; van Hellemond, Jaap J; Henze, Katrin; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William

    2004-05-21

    Euglena gracilis cells grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were compared for their whole cell rhodoquinone and ubiquinone content and for major protein spots contained in isolated mitochondria as assayed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry sequencing. Anaerobically grown cells had higher rhodoquinone levels than aerobically grown cells in agreement with earlier findings indicating the need for fumarate reductase activity in anaerobic wax ester fermentation in Euglena. Microsequencing revealed components of complex III and complex IV of the respiratory chain and the E1beta subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase to be present in mitochondria of aerobically grown cells but lacking in mitochondria from anaerobically grown cells. No proteins were identified as specific to mitochondria from anaerobically grown cells. cDNAs for the E1alpha, E2, and E3 subunits of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase were cloned and shown to be differentially expressed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Their expression patterns differed from that of mitochondrial pyruvate:NADP(+) oxidoreductase, the N-terminal domain of which is pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, an enzyme otherwise typical of hydrogenosomes, hydrogen-producing forms of mitochondria found among anaerobic protists. The Euglena mitochondrion is thus a long sought intermediate that unites biochemical properties of aerobic and anaerobic mitochondria and hydrogenosomes because it contains both pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and rhodoquinone typical of hydrogenosomes and anaerobic mitochondria as well as pyruvate dehydrogenase and ubiquinone typical of aerobic mitochondria. Our data show that under aerobic conditions Euglena mitochondria are prepared for anaerobic function and furthermore suggest that the ancestor of mitochondria was a facultative anaerobe, segments of whose physiology have been preserved in the Euglena lineage.

  20. Nutrient Transformations in Soils Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, P.; Lee, L.

    2003-12-01

    Poultry litter is most commonly land applied as a fertilizer for pastures. Soils vary according to landscape position and the biogeochemistry changes within the soils depending on the landscape position. This research focuses on nutrient speciation in aerobic and anaerobic environments. A 3.4 kg Ha-1 chicken litter application rate was used to determine the speciation of nutrients in these two environments. A 50 g sample of Ruston soil was placed in 250 mL centrifuge tubes and continuously stirred in anaerobic and aerobic environments. The Eh and pH were measured daily and a sample was collected at 0, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. The Eh decreased from around 600 mV at day 0 to near 100 at day 2; whereas the aerobic sample had a decrease to around 450 mV. The pH increased from 6.5 to 7.0 in the anaerobic soil and from 6.5 to around 8.0 in the aerobic soil. The anaerobic soils had a rapid decrease in NO3- and a sharp increase in NH4+ to around 100 mg NH4+ kg-1 soil at day 7. The aerobic soil had an increase in NH4+ to 70 mg Nh4+ kg-1 soil at day 7 then decrease in NH4+ with a corresponding increase in NO3-. Both the anaerobic and aerobic soil had a rapid decrease in PO42- concentrations and remained low for 21 d.

  1. The effect of cyclic anaerobic-aerobic conditions on biodegradation of azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Yaşar, Semra; Cirik, Kevser; Cinar, Ozer

    2012-03-01

    The effect of cyclic anaerobic-aerobic conditions on the biodegradative capability of the mixed microbial culture for the azo dye Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R (RBV-5R) was investigated in the sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with a synthetic textile wastewater. The SBR had a 12-h cycle time with anaerobic-aerobic periods of 3/9, 6/6 and 9/3 h. General SBR performance was assessed by measurement of catabolic enzymes (catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, azo reductase), chemical oxygen demand (COD), color and amount of aromatic amines. In this study, under steady-state conditions, the anaerobic period of the cyclic SBR was found to allow the reductive decolorization of azo dye. Longer anaerobic periods resulted in higher color removal efficiencies, approximately 71% for the 3-h, 87% for 6-h and 92% for the 9-h duration. Total COD removal efficiencies were over 84% under each of the cyclic conditions and increased as the length of the anaerobic period was increased; however, the highest color removal rate was attained for the cycle with the shortest anaerobic period of 3 h. During the decolorization of RBV-5R, two sulfonated aromatic amines (benzene based and naphthalene based) were formed. Additionally, anaerobic azo reductase enzyme was found to be positively affected with the increasing duration of the anaerobic period; however; it was vice versa for the aerobic catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23DO) enzyme.

  2. Microbial degradation of lignin-derived compounds under anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Colberg, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant form of organic carbon in the biosphere. Recent laboratory studies indicate that a large fraction of polymeric lignin is incompletely degraded by aerobic lignolytic microorganisms and is subsequently released as lignin fragments of reduced molecular size. If such lignin-derived compounds become available in the anaerobic environment, they may serve as potential sources of organic carbon for organisms which release methane precursors. The methanogenic bacteria, in turn, serve as terminal members of the anaerobic food chain, and thus, limit the accumulation of organic carbon in anaerobic sinks. This thesis presents evidence to suggest that lignin-derived compounds which have molecular sizes greater than those of single-ring aromatic compounds (MW > 200) are anaerobically biodegradable to methane. This research involved development of selective enrichment cultures capable of utilizing oligolignols as sole carbon sources. Radiolabeled water-soluble catabolites, released during aerobic lignin degradation by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were subjected to anaerobic degradation. The second phase of work involved capillary gas chromatographic analyses of enrichment cultures fed a /sup 14/C-labeled, lignin-derived substrate of average molecular weight 600. 2-Bromoethanesulfonic acid was used to inhibit methane formation and enhance buildup of metabolic intermediates, resulting in the accumulation of volatile fatty acids, phenylacetate, benzoate, catechol, 3-phenyl-propionate, vanillin, syringic acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid. A conceptual model for the anaerobic degradation of two- and three-ring lignin fragments is proposed which overlaps both the ferulate and benzoate degradation pathways at the level of single-ring aromatic compounds.

  3. Metabolism of aniline under different anaerobic electron-accepting and nutritional conditions

    SciTech Connect

    De, M.A.; O'Connor, O.A.; Kosson, D.S. . Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    The biodegradability of aniline was evaluated under two different anaerobic conditions, denitrifying and methanogenic. In addition, under denitrifying conditions, the influence of bicarbonate was studied. Anaerobic sewage digester sludge and estuarine sediment were used as heterogeneous sources of bacteria. Under anaerobic denitrifying conditions amended with bicarbonate, aniline was completely mineralized to CO[sub 2] and N[sub 2]. After an initial lag period, N[sub 2] recoveries of 74 and 100% were obtained for sludge and sediment cultures, respectively. Under anaerobic denitrifying conditions with no bicarbonate, aniline depletion was observed; however, stoichiometric quantities of N[sub 2] were not produced from mineralization and were in fact inhibited below background controls. Under methanogenic conditions, aniline concentration remained unchanged for > 31 weeks. A metabolite of aniline, 4-hydroxybenzoate, was detected in bicarbonate-amended denitrifying cultures.

  4. Biodegradation of three selected benzotriazoles in aquifer materials under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, You-Sheng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Shareef, Ali; Kookana, Rai S.

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the biodegradation of three selected benzotriazoles (BTs), namely benzotriazole (BT), 5-methyl-benzotriazole (5-TTri) and 5-chloro-benzotriazole (CBT), in aquifer materials. Biodegradation experiments were conducted in microcosms with fresh groundwater and aquifer sediment materials under aerobic and anaerobic (nitrate, sulfate, and Fe (III) reducing) conditions. All three BTs were degraded by microorganisms in aquifer materials under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic conditions, BT and 5-TTri were found to be degraded fastest with their half-lives of 43 days and 31 days, respectively, among the redox conditions used. Under anaerobic conditions, CBT was found to be degraded better with its half-life of 21 days under nitrate reducing conditions than under aerobic conditions with its half-life of 47 days. The two BT derivatives 5-TTri and CBT could be biotransformed into BT via demethylation and dechlorination reactions, respectively.

  5. Directed evolution of a cellodextrin transporter for improved biofuel production under anaerobic conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiazhang; Li, Yanglin; HamediRad, Mohammad; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-08-01

    Introduction of a cellobiose utilization pathway consisting of a cellodextrin transporter and a β-glucosidase into Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables co-fermentation of cellobiose and xylose. Cellodextrin transporter 1 (CDT1) from Neurospora crassa has been established as an effective transporter for the engineered cellobiose utilization pathways. However, cellodextrin transporter 2 (CDT2) from the same species is a facilitator and has the potential to be more efficient than CDT1 under anaerobic conditions due to its energetic benefits. Currently, CDT2 has a very low activity and is considered rate-limiting in cellobiose fermentation. Here, we report the directed evolution of CDT2 with an increased cellobiose uptake activity, which results in improved cellobiose fermentation under anaerobic conditions. After three rounds of directed evolution, the cellobiose uptake activity of CDT2 was increased by 2.2-fold, which resulted from both increased specific activity and transporter expression level. Using high cell density fermentation under anaerobic conditions, the evolved mutant conferred 4.0- and 4.4-fold increase in the cellobiose consumption rate and ethanol productivity, respectively. In addition, although the cellobiose uptake activity was still lower than that of CDT1, the engineered CDT2 showed significantly improved cellobiose consumption and ethanol production under anaerobic conditions, representing the energetic benefits of a sugar facilitator for anaerobic cellobiose fermentation. This study demonstrated that anaerobic biofuel production could be significantly improved via directed evolution of a sugar transporter protein in yeast. PMID:24519319

  6. Decomposition Dynamics and Changes in Chemical Composition of Wheat Straw Residue under Anaerobic and Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongjian; Chen, Xi; Wei, Junling; Zhang, Yajie; Zhang, Ligan; Chang, Jiang; Thompson, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Soil aeration is a crucial factor that regulates crop residue decomposition, and the chemical composition of decomposing crop residues may change the forms and availability of soil nutrients, such as N and P. However, to date, differences in the chemical composition of crop straw residues after incorporation into soil and during its decomposition under anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions have not been well documented. The objective of the present study was to assess changes in the C-containing functional groups of wheat straw residue during its decomposition in anaerobic and aerobic environments. A 12-month incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the temporal variations of mass, carbon, and nitrogen loss, as well as changes in the chemical composition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) straw residues under anaerobic and aerobic conditions by measuring C-containing functional groups using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The residual mass, carbon content, and nitrogen content of the straw residue sharply declined during the initial 3 months, and then slowly decreased during the last incubation period from 3 to 12 months. The decomposition rate constant (k) for mass loss under aerobic conditions (0.022 d-1) was higher than that under anaerobic conditions (0.014 d-1). The residual mass percentage of cellulose and hemicellulose in the wheat straw gradually declined, whereas that of lignin gradually increased during the entire 12-month incubation period. The NMR spectra of C-containing functional groups in the decomposing straw under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were similar at the beginning of the incubation as well as at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months. The main alterations in C-containing functional groups during the decomposition of wheat straw were a decrease in the relative abundances of O-alkyl C and an increase in the relative abundances of alkyl C, aromatic C and COO/N-C = O functional groups. The NMR signals of alkyl C

  7. Decomposition Dynamics and Changes in Chemical Composition of Wheat Straw Residue under Anaerobic and Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongjian; Chen, Xi; Wei, Junling; Zhang, Yajie; Zhang, Ligan; Chang, Jiang; Thompson, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Soil aeration is a crucial factor that regulates crop residue decomposition, and the chemical composition of decomposing crop residues may change the forms and availability of soil nutrients, such as N and P. However, to date, differences in the chemical composition of crop straw residues after incorporation into soil and during its decomposition under anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions have not been well documented. The objective of the present study was to assess changes in the C-containing functional groups of wheat straw residue during its decomposition in anaerobic and aerobic environments. A 12-month incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the temporal variations of mass, carbon, and nitrogen loss, as well as changes in the chemical composition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) straw residues under anaerobic and aerobic conditions by measuring C-containing functional groups using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The residual mass, carbon content, and nitrogen content of the straw residue sharply declined during the initial 3 months, and then slowly decreased during the last incubation period from 3 to 12 months. The decomposition rate constant (k) for mass loss under aerobic conditions (0.022 d-1) was higher than that under anaerobic conditions (0.014 d-1). The residual mass percentage of cellulose and hemicellulose in the wheat straw gradually declined, whereas that of lignin gradually increased during the entire 12-month incubation period. The NMR spectra of C-containing functional groups in the decomposing straw under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were similar at the beginning of the incubation as well as at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months. The main alterations in C-containing functional groups during the decomposition of wheat straw were a decrease in the relative abundances of O-alkyl C and an increase in the relative abundances of alkyl C, aromatic C and COO/N-C = O functional groups. The NMR signals of alkyl C

  8. Decomposition Dynamics and Changes in Chemical Composition of Wheat Straw Residue under Anaerobic and Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongjian; Chen, Xi; Wei, Junling; Zhang, Yajie; Zhang, Ligan; Chang, Jiang; Thompson, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Soil aeration is a crucial factor that regulates crop residue decomposition, and the chemical composition of decomposing crop residues may change the forms and availability of soil nutrients, such as N and P. However, to date, differences in the chemical composition of crop straw residues after incorporation into soil and during its decomposition under anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions have not been well documented. The objective of the present study was to assess changes in the C-containing functional groups of wheat straw residue during its decomposition in anaerobic and aerobic environments. A 12-month incubation experiment was carried out to investigate the temporal variations of mass, carbon, and nitrogen loss, as well as changes in the chemical composition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L) straw residues under anaerobic and aerobic conditions by measuring C-containing functional groups using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The residual mass, carbon content, and nitrogen content of the straw residue sharply declined during the initial 3 months, and then slowly decreased during the last incubation period from 3 to 12 months. The decomposition rate constant (k) for mass loss under aerobic conditions (0.022 d-1) was higher than that under anaerobic conditions (0.014 d-1). The residual mass percentage of cellulose and hemicellulose in the wheat straw gradually declined, whereas that of lignin gradually increased during the entire 12-month incubation period. The NMR spectra of C-containing functional groups in the decomposing straw under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were similar at the beginning of the incubation as well as at 1 month, 6 months, and 12 months. The main alterations in C-containing functional groups during the decomposition of wheat straw were a decrease in the relative abundances of O-alkyl C and an increase in the relative abundances of alkyl C, aromatic C and COO/N-C = O functional groups. The NMR signals of alkyl C

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]dichloroethene under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Dinicola, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]dichloroethene to14CO2 under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that oxidative degradation of partially chlorinated solvents like dichloroethene can be significant even under anoxic conditions and demonstrate the potential importance of Mn(IV) reduction for remediation of chlorinated groundwater contaminants.

  10. Anaerobic Oxidation of [1,2-C]Dichloroethene under Mn(IV)-Reducing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bradley, P M; Landmeyer, J E; Dinicola, R S

    1998-04-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-C]dichloroethene to CO(2) under Mn(IV)-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that oxidative degradation of partially chlorinated solvents like dichloroethene can be significant even under anoxic conditions and demonstrate the potential importance of Mn(IV) reduction for remediation of chlorinated groundwater contaminants.

  11. Microbial bioavailability of pyrene in three laboratory-contaminated soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Pravecek, Tasha L; Christman, Russell F; Pfaender, Frederic K

    2006-06-30

    Changes in bioavailability of pyrene in three uncontaminated soils were examined under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Three soils were aerobically aged with pyrene and [(14)C]pyrene for 63 days, then incubated with water, nitrate, or sulfate under aerobic or anaerobic conditions for one year. Under aerobic conditions, microorganisms in two soils mineralized 58-82% of the added [(14)C]pyrene. The two soils amended with nitrate were seen to have enhanced aerobic mineralization rates. In one of these soils, non-extractable pyrene was seen to decrease over the course of the study due to desorption and mineralization, nitrate amendment enhanced this effect. Under anaerobic conditions, generated with a N(2):CO(2)(g) headspace, two soils with nitrate or sulfate amendment showed an increase in extractable [(14)C]pyrene at 365 days relative to inhibited controls, presumably due to microbially mediated oxidation-reduction potential and pH alteration of the soil environment. These observations in different soils incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions have important implications relative to the impact of microbial electron acceptors on bioavailability and transport of non-polar organic compounds in the environment suggesting that, given enough time, under the appropriate environmental conditions, non-extractable material becomes bioavailable. This information should be considered when assessing site specific exposure risks at PAH contaminated locations. PMID:16574273

  12. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria.

  13. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria. PMID:26566932

  14. Inhibition of acetate ester biosynthesis in banana (Musa sapientum L.) fruit pulp under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wendakoon, Sumithra K; Ueda, Yoshinori; Imahori, Yoshihiro; Ishimaru, Megumi

    2004-03-24

    The effect of anaerobic conditions on acetate ester biosynthesis in ripened banana pulp was investigated. Incubation of the pulp in less than 1% O(2) resulted in a significant reduction in the formation of ethyl acetate. Regardless of the presence of a large amount of endogenous ethanol and the remaining exogenous isobutyl alcohol after complete anaerobic incubation with the pulp, the production of acetate ester decreased. The effect of addition of pyruvate, isobutyl alcohol, acetate, and methyl hexanoate on acetate ester formation in 100% N(2) was also investigated. The addition of pyruvate and isobutyl alcohol to the pulp gave lower acetate esters in N(2) than in air, whereas the pulp incubated with acetate and isobutyl alcohol produced more acetate ester in both conditions. Therefore, the lack of acetyl CoA, or more precisely acetate, in the tissue is the main reason for the inhibition of acetate ester formation under anaerobic conditions. The activity of beta-oxidation measured by incubation with methyl hexanoate was detected only in the samples incubated in air. The formation of acetyl CoA, derived from pyruvate through mitochondria and through beta-oxidation, was inhibited by anaerobic conditions, which suggests that mitochondrial activity and/or beta-oxidation are essential for ester biosynthesis.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of an Enterobacter cloacae Strain That Reduces Hexavalent Chromium under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pi-Chao; Mori, Tsukasa; Komori, Kohya; Sasatsu, Masanori; Toda, Kiyoshi; Ohtake, Hisao

    1989-01-01

    An Enterobacter cloacae strain (HO1) capable of reducing hexavalent chromium (chromate) was isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium was resistant to chromate under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Only the anaerobic culture of the E. cloacae isolate showed chromate reduction. In the anaerobic culture, yellow turned white with chromate and the turbidity increased as the reduction proceeded, suggesting that insoluble chromium hydroxide was formed. E. cloacae is likely to utilize toxic chromate as an electron acceptor anaerobically because (i) the anaerobic growth of E. cloacae HO1 accompanied the decrease of toxic chromate in culture medium, (ii) the chromate-reducing activity was rapidly inhibited by oxygen, and (iii) the reduction occurred more rapidly in glycerol- or acetate-grown cells than in glucose-grown cells. The chromate reduction in E. cloacae HO1 was observed at pH 6.0 to 8.5 (optimum pH, 7.0) and at 10 to 40°C (optimum, 30°C). PMID:16347962

  16. Phosphorus Release to Floodwater from Calcareous Surface Soils and Their Corresponding Subsurface Soils under Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jayarathne, P D K D; Kumaragamage, D; Indraratne, S; Flaten, D; Goltz, D

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced phosphorus (P) release from soils to overlying water under flooded, anaerobic conditions has been well documented for noncalcareous and surface soils, but little information is available for calcareous and subsurface soils. We compared the magnitude of P released from 12 calcareous surface soils and corresponding subsurface soils to overlying water under flooded, anaerobic conditions and examined the reasons for the differences. Surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface (15-30 cm) soils were packed into vessels and flooded for 8 wk. Soil redox potential and concentrations of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and total dissolved Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn in floodwater and pore water were measured weekly. Soil test P was significantly smaller in subsurface soils than in corresponding surface soils; thus, the P release to floodwater from subsurface soils was significantly less than from corresponding surface soils. Under anaerobic conditions, floodwater DRP concentration significantly increased in >80% of calcareous surface soils and in about 40% of subsurface soils. The increase in floodwater DRP concentration was 2- to 17-fold in surface soils but only 4- to 7-fold in subsurface soils. With time of flooding, molar ratios of Ca/P and Mg/P in floodwater increased, whereas Fe/P and Mn/P decreased, suggesting that resorption and/or reprecipitation of P took place involving Fe and Mn. Results indicate that P release to floodwater under anaerobic conditions was enhanced in most calcareous soils. Surface and subsurface calcareous soils in general behaved similarly in releasing P under flooded, anaerobic conditions, with concentrations released mainly governed by initial soil P concentrations. PMID:27380087

  17. Effects of limestone on the dissolution of phosphate from sediments under anaerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Park, J

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a study on the role of limestone on the dissolution of phosphates when phosphate-containing sediments are put under anaerobic conditions. Anaerobic decomposition of organic substances produces both organic acids and carbonic acids which in turn could accelerate the dissolution of the phosphates. If limestone coexisted, both phosphate and limestone would compete as receptors of hydrogen ions so as to affect the dissolution of phosphate. A small quantity of calcium hydroxyapatite, alone or mixed with limestone powder, was put in contact with an aqueous solution of acetic acid or carbonic acid and the variations in phosphate concentration were determined over time. The results showed that the phosphate concentration was remarkably low in the case of limestone presence, in comparison with the case of limestone absence. This signifies that the coexistence of limestone suppresses the dissolution of phosphate by organic acid and/or carbonic acid. Separate experiments conducted by developing an anaerobic condition, after mixing lake sediments with dried leaves and limestone, allowed us to observe that the existence of limestone suppressed the dissolution of phosphate. It seems that the limestone acts as a material sacrificing to the leaching of hydrogen ions from the acids produced under anaerobic conditions. These results show that the application of limestone might be a useful measure to prevent deterioration of water quality through eutrophication, by breaking the internal loading of phosphates in eutrophic water bodies. PMID:18619142

  18. Biodegradability of biodegradable/degradable plastic materials under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mohee, R; Unmar, G D; Mudhoo, A; Khadoo, P

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted on two types of plastic materials, Mater-Bi Novamont (MB) and Environmental Product Inc. (EPI), to assess their biodegradability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. For aerobic conditions, organic fractions of municipal solid wastes were composted. For the anaerobic process, anaerobic inoculum from a wastewater treatment plant was used. Cellulose filter papers (CFP) were used as a positive control for both mediums. The composting process was monitored in terms of temperature, moisture and volatile solids and the biodegradation of the samples were monitored in terms of mass loss. Monitoring results showed a biodegradation of 27.1% on a dry basis for MB plastic within a period of 72 days of composting. Biodegradability under an anaerobic environment was monitored in terms of biogas production. A cumulative methane gas production of 245 ml was obtained for MB, which showed good degradation as compared to CFP (246.8 ml). However, EPI plastic showed a cumulative methane value of 7.6 ml for a period of 32 days, which was close to the blank (4.0 ml). The EPI plastic did not biodegrade under either condition. The cumulative carbon dioxide evolution after 32 days was as follows: CFP 4.406 cm3, MB 2.198 cm3 and EPI 1.328 cm3. The cumulative level of CO2 varying with time fitted sigmoid type curves with R2 values of 0.996, 0.996 and 0.995 for CFP, MB and EPI, respectively.

  19. Products of Leishmania braziliensis glucose catabolism: release of D-lactate and, under anaerobic conditions, glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, T.N.; Davis, D.G.; London, R.E.; Blum, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    Leishmania braziliensis panamensis promastigotes were incubated with glucose as the sole carbon source. About one-fifth of the glucose consumed under aerobic conditions was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies with (1-/sup 13/C)glucose showed that the other products released were succinate, acetate, alanine, pyruvate, and lactate. Under anaerobic conditions, lactate output increased, glycerol became a major product, and, surprisingly, glucose consumption decreased. Enzymatic assays showed that the lactate formed was D(-)-lactate. The release of alanine during incubation with glucose as the sole carbon source suggested that appreciable proteolysis occurred, consistent with our observation that a large amount of ammonia was released under these conditions. The discoveries that D-lactate is a product of L. braziliensis glucose catabolism, that glycerol is produced under anaerobic conditions, and that the cells exhibit a reverse Pasteur effect open the way for detailed studies of the pathways of glucose metabolism and their regulation in this organism.

  20. Aerobic versus Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Clothianidin under Simulated California Rice Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Rebecca A; Tomco, Patrick L; Howard, Megan W; Schempp, Tabitha T; Stewart, Davis J; Stacey, Phillip M; Ball, David B; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2016-09-28

    Microbial degradation of clothianidin was characterized under aerobic and anaerobic California rice field conditions. Rate constants (k) and half-lives (DT50) were determined for aerobic and anaerobic microcosms, and an enrichment experiment was performed at various nutrient conditions and pesticide concentrations. Temperature effects on anaerobic degradation rates were determined at 22 ± 2 and 35 ± 2 °C. Microbial growth was assessed in the presence of various pesticide concentrations, and distinct colonies were isolated and identified. Slow aerobic degradation was observed, but anaerobic degradation occurred rapidly at both 25 and 35 °C. Transformation rates and DT50 values in flooded soil at 35 ± 2 °C (k = -7.16 × 10(-2) ± 3.08 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 9.7 days) were significantly faster than in 25 ± 2 °C microcosms (k= -2.45 × 10(-2) ± 1.59 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 28.3 days). At the field scale, biodegradation of clothianidin will vary with extent of oxygenation.

  1. Aerobic versus Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Clothianidin under Simulated California Rice Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Rebecca A; Tomco, Patrick L; Howard, Megan W; Schempp, Tabitha T; Stewart, Davis J; Stacey, Phillip M; Ball, David B; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2016-09-28

    Microbial degradation of clothianidin was characterized under aerobic and anaerobic California rice field conditions. Rate constants (k) and half-lives (DT50) were determined for aerobic and anaerobic microcosms, and an enrichment experiment was performed at various nutrient conditions and pesticide concentrations. Temperature effects on anaerobic degradation rates were determined at 22 ± 2 and 35 ± 2 °C. Microbial growth was assessed in the presence of various pesticide concentrations, and distinct colonies were isolated and identified. Slow aerobic degradation was observed, but anaerobic degradation occurred rapidly at both 25 and 35 °C. Transformation rates and DT50 values in flooded soil at 35 ± 2 °C (k = -7.16 × 10(-2) ± 3.08 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 9.7 days) were significantly faster than in 25 ± 2 °C microcosms (k= -2.45 × 10(-2) ± 1.59 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 28.3 days). At the field scale, biodegradation of clothianidin will vary with extent of oxygenation. PMID:27499061

  2. Soil metabolism of [14C]methiozolin under aerobic and anaerobic flooded conditions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ki-Hwan; Lim, Jong-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hun; Chang, Hee-Ra; Kim, Kyun; Koo, Suk-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Han

    2013-07-17

    Methiozolin is a new turf herbicide controlling annual bluegrass in various cool- and warm-season turfgrasses. This study was conducted to investigate the fate of methiozolin in soil under aerobic and anaerobic flooded conditions using two radiolabeled tracers, [benzyl-(14)C]- and [isoxazole-(14)C]methiozolin. The mass balance of applied radioactivity ranged from 91.7 to 104.5% in both soil conditions. In the soil under the aerobic condition, [(14)C]methiozolin degraded with time to remain by 17.9 and 15.9% of the applied in soil at 120 days after treatment (DAT). [(14)C]Carbon dioxide and the nonextractable radioactivity increased as the soil aged to reach up to 41.5 and 35.7% for [benzyl-(14)C]methiozolin at 120 DAT, respectively, but 36.1 and 39.8% for [isoxazole-(14)C]methiozolin, respectively, during the same period. The nonextractable residue was associated more with humin and fulvic acid fractions under the aerobic condition. No significant volatile products or metabolites were detected during this study. The half-life of [(14)C]methiozolin was approximately 49 days in the soil under the aerobic condition; however, it could not be estimated in the soil under the anaerobic flooded condition because [(14)C]methiozolin degradation was limited. On the basis of these results, methiozolin is considered to undergo fast degradation by aerobic microbes, but not by anaerobic microbes in soil. PMID:23772889

  3. Soil metabolism of [14C]methiozolin under aerobic and anaerobic flooded conditions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ki-Hwan; Lim, Jong-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hun; Chang, Hee-Ra; Kim, Kyun; Koo, Suk-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Han

    2013-07-17

    Methiozolin is a new turf herbicide controlling annual bluegrass in various cool- and warm-season turfgrasses. This study was conducted to investigate the fate of methiozolin in soil under aerobic and anaerobic flooded conditions using two radiolabeled tracers, [benzyl-(14)C]- and [isoxazole-(14)C]methiozolin. The mass balance of applied radioactivity ranged from 91.7 to 104.5% in both soil conditions. In the soil under the aerobic condition, [(14)C]methiozolin degraded with time to remain by 17.9 and 15.9% of the applied in soil at 120 days after treatment (DAT). [(14)C]Carbon dioxide and the nonextractable radioactivity increased as the soil aged to reach up to 41.5 and 35.7% for [benzyl-(14)C]methiozolin at 120 DAT, respectively, but 36.1 and 39.8% for [isoxazole-(14)C]methiozolin, respectively, during the same period. The nonextractable residue was associated more with humin and fulvic acid fractions under the aerobic condition. No significant volatile products or metabolites were detected during this study. The half-life of [(14)C]methiozolin was approximately 49 days in the soil under the aerobic condition; however, it could not be estimated in the soil under the anaerobic flooded condition because [(14)C]methiozolin degradation was limited. On the basis of these results, methiozolin is considered to undergo fast degradation by aerobic microbes, but not by anaerobic microbes in soil.

  4. Cyanide toxicity in hepatocytes under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Aw, T Y; Jones, D P

    1989-09-01

    The effect of cyanide on cell viability and mitochondrial function was studied in hepatocytes exposed to air or argon. Cells were more susceptible to cyanide toxicity under air than under argon. Analysis of the disposition of cyanide showed that the difference in susceptibility to KCN was not due to O2-dependent differences in cyanide metabolism or elimination. Studies of mitochondrial function revealed that cyanide under aerobic conditions resulted in substantial swelling of the mitochondria, which corresponded to a matrix loading of phosphate. In addition, cyanide caused a loss of the mitochondrial protonmotive force. This was in contrast to the results for cells exposed to 30 min of anoxia alone in which there was no loss of mitochondrial delta pH, no detectable change in mitochondrial volume, and little matrix loading of phosphate. These results show that at least some of the protective mechanisms elicited by anoxia (B. S. Andersson, T. Y. Aw, and D. P. Jones. Am. J. Physiol. 252 (Cell Physiol. 21): C349-C355, 1987) are not elicited by cyanide alone. Thus cyanide under aerobic conditions does not provide a completely valid model for simple anoxia. Moreover, the results suggest that the molecular sensor necessary to signal suppression of metabolic and transport functions during neahypoxia is dependent on O2 and is neither stimulated nor antagonized by KCN. PMID:2782387

  5. Detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Hori, Yoshimi; Kudou, Motonori; Ishii, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    The toxic fermentation inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates raise serious problems for the microbial production of fuels and chemicals. Furfural is considered to be one of the most toxic compounds among these inhibitors. Here, we describe the detoxification of furfural in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic culture conditions, furfuryl alcohol and 2-furoic acid were produced as detoxification products of furfural. The ratio of the products varied depending on the initial furfural concentration. Neither furfuryl alcohol nor 2-furoic acid showed any toxic effect on cell growth, and both compounds were determined to be the end products of furfural degradation. Interestingly, unlike under aerobic conditions, most of the furfural was converted to furfuryl alcohol under anaerobic conditions, without affecting the glucose consumption rate. Both the NADH/NAD(+) and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio decreased in the accordance with furfural concentration under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. These results indicate the presence of a single or multiple endogenous enzymes with broad and high affinity for furfural and co-factors in C. glutamicum ATCC13032.

  6. TBA biodegradation in surface-water sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Landmeyer, J.E.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2002-01-01

    The potential for [U-14C] TBA biodegradation was examined in laboratory microcosms under a range of terminal electron accepting conditions. TBA mineralization to CO2 was substantial in surface-water sediments under oxic, denitrifying, or Mn(IV)-reducing conditions and statistically significant but low under SO4-reducing conditions. Thus, anaerobic TBA biodegradation may be a significant natural attenuation mechanism for TBA in the environment, and stimulation of in situ TBA bioremediation by addition of suitable terminal electron acceptors may be feasible. No degradation of [U-14C] TBA was observed under methanogenic or Fe(III)-reducing conditions.

  7. Reductive dechlorination of Tri- and tetrachloroethylenes depends on transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Kästner, M

    1991-01-01

    Aerobic enrichment cultures from contaminated groundwaters dechlorinated trichloroethylene (TCE) (14.6 mg/liter; 111 mumol/liter) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) (16.2 mg/liter; 98 mumol/liter) reductively within 4 days after the transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. The transformation products were equimolar amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene. No other chlorinated product and no methane were detected. The change was accompanied by the release of sulfide, which caused a decrease in the redox potential from 0 to -150 mV. In sterile control experiments, sulfide led to the abiotic formation of traces of 1,1-dichloroethylene without cis-1,2-dichloroethylene production. The reductive dechlorination of PCE via TCE depended on these specific transition conditions after consumption of the electron acceptor oxygen or nitrate. Repeated feeding of TCE or PCE to cultures after the change to anaerobic conditions yielded no further dechlorination. Only aerobic subcultures with an air/liquid ratio of 1:4 maintained dechlorination activities; anaerobic subcultures showed no transformation. Bacteria from noncontaminated sites showed no reduction under the same conditions. PMID:1892393

  8. Biodegradation of soluble aromatic compounds of jet fuel under anaerobic conditions: laboratory batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Z; Breedveld, G; Aagaard, P

    2001-11-01

    Laboratory batch experiments were performed with contaminated aquifer sediments and four soluble aromatic components of jet fuel to assess their biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. The biodegradation of four aromatic compounds, toluene, o-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (TMB), and naphthalene, separately or together, was investigated under strictly anaerobic conditions in the dark for a period of 160 days. Of the aromatic compounds, toluene and o-xylene were degraded both as a single substrate and in a mixture with the other aromatic compounds, while TMB was not biodegraded as a single substrate, but was biodegraded in the presence of the other aromatic hydrocarbons. Substrate interaction is thus significant in the biodegradation of TMB. Biodegradation of naphthalene was not observed, either as a single substrate or in a mixture of other aromatic hydrocarbons. Although redox conditions were dominated by iron reduction, a clear relation between degradation and sulfate reduction was observed. Methanogenesis took place during the later stages of incubation. However, the large background of Fe(II) masked the increase of Fe(II) concentration due to iron reduction. Thus, although microbial reduction of Fe(III) is an important process, the evidence is not conclusive. Our results have shown that a better understanding of the degradation of complex mixtures of hydrocarbons under anaerobic conditions is important in the application of natural attenuation as a remedial method for soil and groundwater contamination.

  9. Anionic metabolite biosynthesis enhanced by potassium under dark, anaerobic conditions in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Sakiko; Kawamura, Yuhki; Iijima, Hiroko; Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Shirai, Tomokazu; Okamoto, Mami; Kondo, Akihiko; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K(+)) is an essential macronutrient for all living organisms including cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are a group of bacteria performing oxygenic photosynthesis, widely studied in basic and applied sciences. The primary metabolism of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is altered by environmental conditions, and it excretes organic acids and hydrogen under dark, anaerobic conditions. Here we demonstrated that K(+) widely changes the primary carbon metabolism of this cyanobacterium. Succinate and lactate excretion from the cells incubated under dark, anaerobic conditions was enhanced in the presence of K(+), while hydrogen production was repressed. The addition of K(+) and the genetic manipulation of acetate kinase AckA and an RNA polymerase sigma factor SigE additively increased succinate and lactate production to 141.0 and 217.6 mg/L, which are 11 and 46 times, compared to the wild-type strain without K(+), respectively. Intracellular levels of 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, and malate increased by K(+) under dark, anaerobic conditions. This study provides the evidence of the considerable effect of K(+) on the biosynthesis of anionic metabolites in a unicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:27576448

  10. Anionic metabolite biosynthesis enhanced by potassium under dark, anaerobic conditions in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Sakiko; Kawamura, Yuhki; Iijima, Hiroko; Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Shirai, Tomokazu; Okamoto, Mami; Kondo, Akihiko; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K+) is an essential macronutrient for all living organisms including cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are a group of bacteria performing oxygenic photosynthesis, widely studied in basic and applied sciences. The primary metabolism of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is altered by environmental conditions, and it excretes organic acids and hydrogen under dark, anaerobic conditions. Here we demonstrated that K+ widely changes the primary carbon metabolism of this cyanobacterium. Succinate and lactate excretion from the cells incubated under dark, anaerobic conditions was enhanced in the presence of K+, while hydrogen production was repressed. The addition of K+ and the genetic manipulation of acetate kinase AckA and an RNA polymerase sigma factor SigE additively increased succinate and lactate production to 141.0 and 217.6 mg/L, which are 11 and 46 times, compared to the wild-type strain without K+, respectively. Intracellular levels of 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, and malate increased by K+ under dark, anaerobic conditions. This study provides the evidence of the considerable effect of K+ on the biosynthesis of anionic metabolites in a unicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:27576448

  11. Dry anaerobic digestion of food waste under mesophilic conditions: performance and methanogenic community analysis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Si-Kyung; Im, Wan-Taek; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Shin, Hang-Sik; Oh, Sae-Eun

    2013-03-01

    The performance of dry anaerobic digestion (AD) of food waste was investigated under mesophilic conditions and the methanogenic community was investigated using 454 pyrosequencing. Stable dry AD was achieved by hydraulic retention time (HRT) control without the addition of alkali agents. The average CH4 production rate, CH4 content, and volatile solid reduction rate were 2.51±0.17m(3)/m(3)/d, 66±2.1%, and 65.8±1.22%, respectively, at an HRT of 40d. The methanogenic community of the seed sludge experienced a significant reduction in genus diversity from 18 to 4 and a dominant methanogenic shift from hydrogenotrophic to acetoclastic groups after the acclimation under dry condition. Almost all sequences of the dry anaerobic digester were closely related with those of Methanosarcina thermophila with similarity of 96.4-99.1%. The experimental results would serve as useful information to understand the dry AD system.

  12. Degradation of 1-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) urea by nanoscale zerovalent iron under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haiying; Hou, Shaogang; Xie, Guohong; Yao, Ziwei; Zhou, Qingxiang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of present study was to investigate the applicability of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) on the degradation of 1-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) urea (CCU) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The experimental results showed that NZVI could effectively degrade CCU, but the removal efficiencies were different under these two different conditions. The best removal efficiencies for CCU were 90.2 and 75.8% under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The highly oxidative hydroxyl radicals and reductively hydrogen would account for the rapid degradation of CCU under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The experimental results also showed that surfactant Tween 20 significantly inhibited the degradation of CCU under aerobic conditions. However it markedly enhanced the degradation of CCU under anaerobic condition.

  13. Biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanaotes by a novel facultatively anaerobic Vibrio sp. under marine conditions.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Doi, Yoshiharu

    2012-06-01

    Marine bacteria have recently attracted attention as potentially useful candidates for the production of practical materials from marine ecosystems, including the oceanic carbon dioxide cycle. The advantages of using marine bacteria for the biosynthesis of poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA), one of the eco-friendly bioplastics, include avoiding contamination with bacteria that lack salt-water resistance, ability to use filtered seawater as a culture medium, and the potential for extracellular production of PHA, all of which would contribute to large-scale industrial production of PHA. A novel marine bacterium, Vibrio sp. strain KN01, was isolated and characterized in PHA productivity using various carbon sources under aerobic and aerobic-anaerobic marine conditions. The PHA contents of all the samples under the aerobic-anaerobic condition, especially when using soybean oil as the sole carbon source, were enhanced by limiting the amount of dissolved oxygen. The PHA accumulated using soybean oil as a sole carbon source under the aerobic-anaerobic condition contained 14% 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP) and 3% 5-hydroxyvalerate (5HV) units in addition to (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) units and had a molecular weight of 42 × 10³ g/mol. The present result indicates that the activity of the beta-oxidation pathway under the aerobic-anaerobic condition is reduced due to a reduction in the amount of dissolved oxygen. These findings have potential for use in controlling the biosynthesis of long main-chain PHA by regulating the activity of the beta-oxidation pathway, which also could be regulated by varying the dissolved oxygen concentration. PMID:22068389

  14. Anaerobic digestion in mesophilic and room temperature conditions: Digestion performance and soil-borne pathogen survival.

    PubMed

    Chen, Le; Jian, Shanshan; Bi, Jinhua; Li, Yunlong; Chang, Zhizhou; He, Jian; Ye, Xiaomei

    2016-05-01

    Tomato plant waste (TPW) was used as the feedstock of a batch anaerobic reactor to evaluate the effect of anaerobic digestion on Ralstonia solanacearum and Phytophthora capsici survival. Batch experiments were carried out for TS (total solid) concentrations of 2%, 4% and 6% respectively, at mesophilic (37±1°C) and room (20-25°C) temperatures. Results showed that higher digestion performance was achieved under mesophilic digestion temperature and lower TS concentration conditions. The biogas production ranged from 71 to 416L/kg VS (volatile solids). The inactivation of anaerobic digestion tended to increase as digestion performance improved. The maximum log copies reduction of R. solanacearum and P. capsici detected by quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) were 3.80 and 4.08 respectively in reactors with 4% TS concentration at mesophilic temperatures. However, both in mesophilic and room temperature conditions, the lowest reduction of R. solanacearum was found in the reactors with 6% TS concentration, which possessed the highest VFA (volatile fatty acid) concentration. These findings indicated that simple accumulation of VFAs failed to restrain R. solanacearum effectively, although the VFAs were considered poisonous. P. capsici was nearly completely dead under all conditions. Based on the digestion performance and the pathogen survival rate, a model was established to evaluate the digestate biosafety. PMID:27155428

  15. Identification of crude-oil components and microorganisms that cause souring under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, R; Toyama, K; Miyanaga, K; Tanji, Y

    2014-02-01

    Oil souring has important implications with respect to energy resources. Understanding the physiology of the microorganisms that play a role and the biological mechanisms are both important for the maintenance of infrastructure and mitigation of corrosion processes. The objective of this study was to identify crude-oil components and microorganisms in oil-field water that contribute to crude-oil souring. To identify the crude-oil components and microorganisms that are responsible for anaerobic souring in oil reservoirs, biological conversion of crude-oil components under anaerobic conditions was investigated. Microorganisms in oil field water in Akita, Japan degraded alkanes and aromatics to volatile fatty acids (VFAs) under anaerobic conditions, and fermenting bacteria such as Fusibacter sp. were involved in VFA production. Aromatics such as toluene and ethylbenzene were degraded by sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfotignum sp.) via the fumarate-addition pathway and not only degradation of VFA but also degradation of aromatics by sulfate-reducing bacteria was the cause of souring. Naphthenic acid and 2,4-xylenol were not converted.

  16. A Hidden Transhydrogen Activity of a FMN-Bound Diaphorase under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John; Zhang, Ting; Huston, Scott; Sun, Fangfang; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Fu, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Background Redox cofactors of NADH/NADPH participate in many cellular metabolic pathways for facilitating the electron transfer from one molecule to another in redox reactions. Transhydrogenase plays an important role in linking catabolism and anabolism, regulating the ratio of NADH/NADPH in cells. The cytoplasmic transhydrogenases could be useful to engineer synthetic biochemical pathways for the production of high-value chemicals and biofuels. Methodology/Principal Findings A transhydrogenase activity was discovered for a FMN-bound diaphorase (DI) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus under anaerobic conditions. The DI-catalyzed hydride exchange were monitored and characterized between a NAD(P)H and a thio-modified NAD+ analogue. This new function of DI was demonstrated to transfer a hydride from NADPH to NAD+ that was consumed by NAD-specific lactate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase. Conclusions/Significance We discover a novel transhydrogenase activity of a FMN-DI by stabilizing the reduced state of FMNH2 under anaerobic conditions. FMN-DI was demonstrated to catalyze the hydride transfer between NADPH and NAD+. In the future, it may be possible to incorporate this FMN-DI into synthetic enzymatic pathways for balancing NADH generation and NADPH consumption for anaerobic production of biofuels and biochemicals. PMID:27145082

  17. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2015-05-15

    The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd(2+)) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5×10(6)cellsmL(-1)) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O₂, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25-33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd(2+) which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd(2+) induced a higher MDA production. Cd(2+) stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd(2+) from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd(2+) under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O₂ concentration is particularly low. PMID:25698571

  18. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2015-05-15

    The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd(2+)) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5×10(6)cellsmL(-1)) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O₂, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25-33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd(2+) which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd(2+) induced a higher MDA production. Cd(2+) stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd(2+) from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd(2+) under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O₂ concentration is particularly low.

  19. Interrogation of Chesapeake Bay sediment microbial communities for intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jamie M; Wawrik, Boris; Isom, Catherine; Boling, Wilford B; Callaghan, Amy V

    2015-02-01

    Based on the transient exposure of Chesapeake Bay sediments to hydrocarbons and the metabolic versatility of known anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms, it was hypothesized that distinct Bay sediment communities, governed by geochemical gradients, would have intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under sulfate-reducing and/or methanogenic conditions. Sediment cores were collected along a transect of the Bay. Community DNA was interrogated via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, PCR of anaerobic hydrocarbon activation genes, and qPCR of 16S rRNA genes and genes involved in sulfate reduction/methanogenesis. Site sediments were used to establish microcosms amended with n-hexadecane under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that sediments associated with hypoxic water columns contained significantly greater proportions of Bacteria and Archaea consistent with syntrophic degradation of organic matter and methanogenesis compared to less reduced sediments. Microbial taxa frequently associated with hydrocarbon-degrading communities were found throughout the Bay, and the genetic potential for hydrocarbon metabolism was demonstrated via the detection of benzyl-(bssA) and alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) genes. Although microcosm studies did not indicate sulfidogenic alkane degradation, the data suggested that methanogenic conversion of alkanes was occurring. These findings highlight the potential role that anaerobic microorganisms could play in the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in the Bay. PMID:25764556

  20. Interrogation of Chesapeake Bay sediment microbial communities for intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jamie M; Wawrik, Boris; Isom, Catherine; Boling, Wilford B; Callaghan, Amy V

    2015-02-01

    Based on the transient exposure of Chesapeake Bay sediments to hydrocarbons and the metabolic versatility of known anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms, it was hypothesized that distinct Bay sediment communities, governed by geochemical gradients, would have intrinsic alkane-utilizing potential under sulfate-reducing and/or methanogenic conditions. Sediment cores were collected along a transect of the Bay. Community DNA was interrogated via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, PCR of anaerobic hydrocarbon activation genes, and qPCR of 16S rRNA genes and genes involved in sulfate reduction/methanogenesis. Site sediments were used to establish microcosms amended with n-hexadecane under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that sediments associated with hypoxic water columns contained significantly greater proportions of Bacteria and Archaea consistent with syntrophic degradation of organic matter and methanogenesis compared to less reduced sediments. Microbial taxa frequently associated with hydrocarbon-degrading communities were found throughout the Bay, and the genetic potential for hydrocarbon metabolism was demonstrated via the detection of benzyl-(bssA) and alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) genes. Although microcosm studies did not indicate sulfidogenic alkane degradation, the data suggested that methanogenic conversion of alkanes was occurring. These findings highlight the potential role that anaerobic microorganisms could play in the bioremediation of hydrocarbons in the Bay.

  1. Anaerobic digestion of the microalga Spirulina at extreme alkaline conditions: biogas production, metagenome, and metatranscriptome.

    PubMed

    Nolla-Ardèvol, Vímac; Strous, Marc; Tegetmeyer, Halina E

    2015-01-01

    A haloalkaline anaerobic microbial community obtained from soda lake sediments was used to inoculate anaerobic reactors for the production of methane rich biogas. The microalga Spirulina was successfully digested by the haloalkaline microbial consortium at alkaline conditions (pH 10, 2.0 M Na(+)). Continuous biogas production was observed and the obtained biogas was rich in methane, up to 96%. Alkaline medium acted as a CO2 scrubber which resulted in low amounts of CO2 and no traces of H2S in the produced biogas. A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days and 0.25 g Spirulina L(-1) day(-1) organic loading rate (OLR) were identified as the optimal operational parameters. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis showed that the hydrolysis of the supplied substrate was mainly carried out by Bacteroidetes of the "ML635J-40 aquatic group" while the hydrogenotrophic pathway was the main producer of methane in a methanogenic community dominated by Methanocalculus. PMID:26157422

  2. Carboxylation of o-cresol by an anaerobic consortium under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Bisaillon, J G; Lépine, F; Beaudet, R; Sylvestre, M

    1991-01-01

    The metabolism of o-cresol under methanogenic conditions by an anaerobic consortium known to carboxylate phenol to benzoate was investigated. After incubation with the consortium at 29 degrees C for 59 days, o-cresol was transformed to 3-methylbenzoic acid, which was not further metabolized by the consortium. Proteose peptone in the culture medium was essential for the transformation of o-cresol. In addition, a transient compound detected in the culture was identified as 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoic acid. o-Cresol-6d was transformed by the consortium to deuterated hydroxy-methylbenzoic acid and deuterated methylbenzoic acid. These results demonstrate that o-cresol is carboxylated in the para position relative to the phenolic hydroxyl group and dehydroxylated by the anaerobic consortium. PMID:1768084

  3. Bacterial metabolism of aromatic compounds and a complex hazardous waste under anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, O.A.

    1992-01-01

    The biological fate of organic chemicals in the environment depends upon a variety of physical/chemical factors. In the absence of molecular oxygen, the importance of terminal electron acceptors has been often overlooked. Since anaerobic microbial consortia are dependent upon the availability of particular electron acceptors, these conditions can play an important role in influencing the fate of environmental pollutants. In this research, different electron acceptors were evaluated for their effects on the biodegradation of environmental toxicants. Two anaerobic bioassays, the Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) and the Anaerobic Toxicity Assay (ATA), were used to evaluate a series of phthalic acid esters (PAEs), substituted phenols and a landfill leachate, for their methanogenic biodegradability and toxicity. Many of the PAEs and phenols could be stoichiometrically mineralized. In addition, the landfill leachate was found to be inhibitory at concentrations greater than 10%, and partially mineralized in approximately 50 weeks. Based upon these assays, 6 different functional groups and their isomers were evaluated for their effect on the biodegradability and toxicity of phenol under methanogenic and denitrifying conditions. These results indicated that nitro- and chloro-substituted phenols were persistent under denitrifying conditions. Under methanogenic conditions, these compounds were metabolized to a more reduced intermediate with less toxicity. Conversely, amino-substituted phenols were not readily mineralized under methanogenic conditions, but were metabolized after minimal lag under denitrifying conditions. From active denitrifying phenol degrading cultures, a pure culture was obtained which could grow on phenol and on a variety of other alkyl-substituted aromatic compounds. Additional studies have tentatively identified several alicyclic metabolites including cyclohexanol, 2-cyclohexene-1-ol, cyclohexanone and 2-cyclohexene-1-one from phenol catabolism.

  4. Start-up phase of an anaerobic full-scale farm reactor - Appearance of mesophilic anaerobic conditions and establishment of the methanogenic microbial community.

    PubMed

    Goux, Xavier; Calusinska, Magdalena; Fossépré, Marie; Benizri, Emile; Delfosse, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate how the microbial community structure establishes during the start-up phase of a full-scale farm anaerobic reactor inoculated with stale and cold cattle slurry. The 16S/18S high-throughput amplicon sequencing results showed an increase of the bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic diversity, evenness and richness during the settlement of the mesophilic anaerobic conditions. When a steady performing digestion process was reached, the microbial diversity, evenness and richness decreased, indicating the establishment of a few dominant microbial populations, best adapted to biogas production. Interestingly, among the environmental parameters, the temperature, alkalinity, free-NH3, total solids and O2 content were found to be the main drivers of microbial dynamics. Interactions between eukaryotes, characterized by a high number of unknown organisms, and the bacterial and archaeal communities were also evidenced, suggesting that eukaryotes might play important roles in the anaerobic digestion process. PMID:27099947

  5. Modeling of yeast Brettanomyces bruxellensis growth at different acetic acid concentrations under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Garcia Alvarado; Javier, Mendez Ancona; Tulio, Mata Jimenez Marco; Javier, Gómez Rodriguez; Guadalupe, Aguilar Uscanga Maria

    2007-11-01

    Glucose utilization by Brettanomyces bruxellensis at different acetic acid concentrations under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was investigated. The presence of the organic acid disturbs the growth and fermentative activity of the yeast when its concentration exceeds 2 g l(-1). A mathematical model is proposed for the kinetic behavior analysis of yeast growing in batch culture. A Matlab algorithm was used for estimation of model parameters, whose confidence intervals were also calculated at a 0.95 probability level using a t-Student distribution for f degrees of freedom. The model successfully simulated the batch kinetics observed at different concentrations of acetic acid under both oxygen conditions.

  6. Sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate thionation of diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ling; Shiiya, Ayaka; Hisatomi, Shihoko; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2015-02-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is often found as a toxic intermediate metabolite of diphenylchloroarsine or diphenylcyanoarsine that were produced as chemical warfare agents and were buried in soil after the World Wars. In our previous study Guan et al. (J Hazard Mater 241-242:355-362, 2012), after application of sulfate and carbon sources, anaerobic transformation of DPAA in soil was enhanced with the production of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTAA) as a main metabolite. This study aimed to isolate and characterize anaerobic soil microorganisms responsible for the metabolism of DPAA. First, we obtained four microbial consortia capable of transforming DPAA to DPTAA at a high transformation rate of more than 80% after 4 weeks of incubation. Sequencing for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from the consortia revealed that all the positive consortia contained Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans species. In contrast, the absence of dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrAB) which is unique to sulfate-reducing bacteria was confirmed in the negative consortia showing no DPAA reduction. Finally, strain DEA14 showing transformation of DPAA to DPTAA was isolated from one of the positive consortia. The isolate was assigned to D. acetoxidans based on the partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Thionation of DPAA was also carried out in a pure culture of a known sulfate-reducing bacterial strain, Desulfovibrio aerotolerans JCM 12613(T). These facts indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria are microorganisms responsible for the transformation of DPAA to DPTAA under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25228086

  7. Sulfate-reducing bacteria mediate thionation of diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ling; Shiiya, Ayaka; Hisatomi, Shihoko; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2015-02-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is often found as a toxic intermediate metabolite of diphenylchloroarsine or diphenylcyanoarsine that were produced as chemical warfare agents and were buried in soil after the World Wars. In our previous study Guan et al. (J Hazard Mater 241-242:355-362, 2012), after application of sulfate and carbon sources, anaerobic transformation of DPAA in soil was enhanced with the production of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTAA) as a main metabolite. This study aimed to isolate and characterize anaerobic soil microorganisms responsible for the metabolism of DPAA. First, we obtained four microbial consortia capable of transforming DPAA to DPTAA at a high transformation rate of more than 80% after 4 weeks of incubation. Sequencing for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from the consortia revealed that all the positive consortia contained Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans species. In contrast, the absence of dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrAB) which is unique to sulfate-reducing bacteria was confirmed in the negative consortia showing no DPAA reduction. Finally, strain DEA14 showing transformation of DPAA to DPTAA was isolated from one of the positive consortia. The isolate was assigned to D. acetoxidans based on the partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Thionation of DPAA was also carried out in a pure culture of a known sulfate-reducing bacterial strain, Desulfovibrio aerotolerans JCM 12613(T). These facts indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria are microorganisms responsible for the transformation of DPAA to DPTAA under anaerobic conditions.

  8. Dry co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw under mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiangqian; Wu, Guangxue; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Zhen-Hu

    2015-12-01

    Dry anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge can recover biogas as energy; however, its low C/N ratio limits it as a single substrate in the anaerobic digestion. Rice straw is an abundant agricultural residue in China, which is rich in carbon and can be used as carbon source. In the present study, the performance of dry co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw was investigated under mesophilic (35 °C) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. The operational factors impacting dry co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw such as C/N ratio, moisture content, and initial pH were explored under mesophilic conditions. The results show that low C/N ratios resulted in a higher biogas production rate, but a lower specific biogas yield; low moisture content of 65 % resulted in the instability of the digestion system and a low specific biogas yield. Initial pH ranging 7.0-9.0 did not affect the performance of the anaerobic digestion. The C/N ratio of 26-29:1, moisture content of 70-80 %, and pH 7.0-9.0 resulted in good performance in the dry mesophilic co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw. As compared with mesophilic digestion, thermophilic co-digestion of sewage sludge and rice straw significantly enhanced the degradation efficiency of the substrates and the specific biogas yield (p < 0.05) at the conditions of C/N ratio 26:1, moisture content 80 %, and natural initial pH. Although high concentrations of ammonia-nitrogen (NH4-N, 1500 mg/kg wet weight) were formed during thermophilic digestion, there was no obvious inhibition occurred. The results indicated that rice straw can be used as carbon source for the dry co-digestion of sewage sludge under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

  9. Anaerobic digestion of raw and thermally hydrolyzed wastewater solids under various operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher A; Tanneru, Charan T; Banjade, Sarita; Murthy, Sudhir N; Novak, John T

    2011-09-01

    In this study, high-solids anaerobic digestion of thermally pretreated wastewater solids (THD) was compared with conventional mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD). Operational conditions, such as pretreatment temperature (150 to 170 degrees C), solids retention time (15 to 20 days), and digestion temperature (37 to 42 degrees C), were varied for the seven THD systems operated. Volatile solids reduction (VSR) by THD ranged from 56 to 62%, compared with approximately 50% for MAD. Higher VSR contributed to 24 to 59% increased biogas production (m3/kg VSR-d) from THD relative to MAD. The high-solids conditions of the THD feed resulted in high total ammonia-nitrogen (proportional to solids loading) and total alkalinity concentrations in excess of 14 g/L as calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Increased pH in THD reactors caused 5 to 8 times more un-ionized ammonia to be present than in MAD, and this likely led to inhibition of aceticlastic methanogens, resulting in accumulation of residual volatile fatty acids between 2 and 6 g/L as acetic acid. The THD produced biosolids cake that possessed low organic sulfur-based biosolids odor and dewatered to between 33 and 39% total solids. Dual conditioning with cationic polymer and ferric chloride was shown to be an effective strategy for mitigating dissolved organic nitrogen and UV-quenching compounds in the return stream following centrifugal dewatering of THD biosolids. PMID:22073729

  10. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV) by U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI) as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI), via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV) uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI) phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions. PMID:26132209

  11. Anaerobic digestion of raw and thermally hydrolyzed wastewater solids under various operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher A; Tanneru, Charan T; Banjade, Sarita; Murthy, Sudhir N; Novak, John T

    2011-09-01

    In this study, high-solids anaerobic digestion of thermally pretreated wastewater solids (THD) was compared with conventional mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD). Operational conditions, such as pretreatment temperature (150 to 170 degrees C), solids retention time (15 to 20 days), and digestion temperature (37 to 42 degrees C), were varied for the seven THD systems operated. Volatile solids reduction (VSR) by THD ranged from 56 to 62%, compared with approximately 50% for MAD. Higher VSR contributed to 24 to 59% increased biogas production (m3/kg VSR-d) from THD relative to MAD. The high-solids conditions of the THD feed resulted in high total ammonia-nitrogen (proportional to solids loading) and total alkalinity concentrations in excess of 14 g/L as calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Increased pH in THD reactors caused 5 to 8 times more un-ionized ammonia to be present than in MAD, and this likely led to inhibition of aceticlastic methanogens, resulting in accumulation of residual volatile fatty acids between 2 and 6 g/L as acetic acid. The THD produced biosolids cake that possessed low organic sulfur-based biosolids odor and dewatered to between 33 and 39% total solids. Dual conditioning with cationic polymer and ferric chloride was shown to be an effective strategy for mitigating dissolved organic nitrogen and UV-quenching compounds in the return stream following centrifugal dewatering of THD biosolids.

  12. Increased bactericidal activity of colistin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kolpen, Mette; Appeldorff, Cecilie F; Brandt, Sarah; Mousavi, Nabi; Kragh, Kasper N; Aydogan, Sevtap; Uppal, Haleema A; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Ciofu, Oana; Høiby, Niels; Jensen, Peter Ø

    2016-02-01

    Tolerance towards antibiotics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is recognized as a major cause of therapeutic failure of chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This lung infection is characterized by antibiotic-tolerant biofilms in mucus with zones of O2 depletion mainly due to polymorphonuclear leukocytic activity. In contrast to the main types of bactericidal antibiotics, it has not been possible to establish an association between the bactericidal effects of colistin and the production of detectable levels of OH ˙ on several strains of planktonic P. aeruginosa. Therefore, we propose that production of OH ˙ may not contribute significantly to the bactericidal activity of colistin on P. aeruginosa biofilm. Thus, we investigated the effect of colistin treatment on biofilm of wild-type PAO1, a catalase-deficient mutant (ΔkatA) and a colistin-resistant CF isolate cultured in microtiter plates in normoxic- or anoxic atmosphere with 1 mM nitrate. The killing of bacteria during colistin treatment was measured by CFU counts, and the OH⋅ formation was measured by 3(')-(p-hydroxylphenyl fluorescein) fluorescein (HPF) fluorescence. Validation of the assay was done by hydrogen peroxide treatment. OH⋅ formation was undetectable in aerobic PAO1 biofilms during 3 h of colistin treatment. Interestingly, we demonstrate increased susceptibility of P. aeruginosa biofilms towards colistin during anaerobic conditions. In fact, the maximum enhancement of killing by anaerobic conditions exceeded 2 logs using 4 mg L(-1) of colistin compared to killing at aerobic conditions.

  13. Iron-binding compounds impair Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, especially under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    O'May, Che Y; Sanderson, Kevin; Roddam, Louise F; Kirov, Sylvia M; Reid, David W

    2009-06-01

    The success of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) and other chronic infections is largely attributed to its ability to grow in antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities. This study investigated the effects of limiting iron levels as a strategy for preventing/disrupting P. aeruginosa biofilms. A range of synthetic and naturally occurring iron-chelating agents were examined. Biofilm development by P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and CF sputum isolates from chronically infected individuals was significantly decreased by iron removal under aerobic atmospheres. CF strains formed poor biofilms under anaerobic conditions. Strain PAO1 was also tested under anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation by this model strain was almost totally prevented by several of the chelators tested. The ability of synthetic chelators to impair biofilm formation could be reversed by iron addition to cultures, providing evidence that these effective chelating compounds functioned by directly reducing availability of iron to P. aeruginosa. In contrast, the biological chelator lactoferrin demonstrated enhanced anti-biofilm effects as iron supplementation increased. Hence biofilm inhibition by lactoferrin appeared to occur through more complex mechanisms to those of the synthetic chelators. Overall, our results demonstrate the importance of iron availability to biofilms and that iron chelators have potential as adjunct therapies for preventing biofilm development, especially under low oxygen conditions such as encountered in the chronically infected CF lung. PMID:19429753

  14. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan. R.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV) by U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI) as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI), via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV) uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI) phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions. PMID:26132209

  15. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV) by U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI) as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI), via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV) uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI) phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions.

  16. [Microbial degradation of 2, 2', 4, 4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether under anaerobic condition].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Xia; Chen, Chao-Qi; Zhang, Shu; Ou, Yang; Yin, Li; Wu, Wei

    2012-03-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers are emerging contaminants in the environment, among which 2, 2' 4, 4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47) is one of the most frequently detected and the most toxic to organisms. Using BDE-47 as the object, this study investigated the degradation of BDE-47 by six enriched cultures containing Dehalococcoides species. The purpose is to understand the microbial degradation of BDE-47 under anaerobic condition and its kinetics. Serum bottles of 100 mL were used to construct the microcosms and enrich the anaerobic microorganisms. For each culture, two treatments were performed. One used BDE-47 as the only energy source with the designed concentration of 200 microg x L(-1), and the other used both BDE-47 and trichloroethene (TCE) as the energy source with the designed concentrations being 200 microg x L(-1) and 13 mg x L(-1), respectively. After three months of experiment, two enriched cultures (6M6B and T2) could obviously degrade BDE-47, producing BDE-17 and BDE-4 (and small amount of DE). The presence of TCE inhibited the degradation of BDE-47 by 6M6B and T2 cultures to a certain degree. The PCR-DGGE assay was performed to compare the microbial community structure of various enrichments and it was found that Acetobacterium sp. had good correlation with the degradation of BDE-47. Under three different initial BDE-47 concentrations (50 microg x L(-1), 250 microg x L(-1) and 500 microg x L(-1)), the degradation rates of BDE-47 were 0.003 3, 0.001 4 and 0.001 0 d(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that BDE-47 could be reductively degraded by bacteria under anaerobic condition, producing BDE-17 and BDE-4. Acetobacterium sp. might play an important role in the degradation of BDE-47. High concentration of BDE-47 might inhibit the activity of the BDE-47 degrading bacteria to a certain degree.

  17. Strong Pasteur effect in rabbit corneal endothelium preserves fluid transport under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Riley, M V; Winkler, B S

    1990-07-01

    1. The hydration and transparency of the mammalian cornea are maintained by a metabolically dependent fluid transport system located in the endothelial cell layer. The purpose of the study was to determine whether this pump activity is dependent upon aerobic or anaerobic metabolism. 2. The ability of the cornea, superfused in vitro with a bicarbonate-Ringer solution containing glucose and adenosine, to maintain normal hydration (thickness) when respiration is inhibited has been examined in intact and de-epithelialized preparations and correlated with glycolytic activity and cellular concentrations of ATP. 3. In respiring intact and de-epithelialized corneas thickness was maintained for periods up to 5 h during superfusion with the control Ringer solution. 4. KCN (10(-3) M) or antimycin A (10(-6) M) caused the intact cornea to swell at 15 +/- 3 microns h-1, whereas the de-epithelialized tissue maintained normal thickness under these conditions. This swelling of the intact tissue appears to be due to the osmotic effect of increased epithelial lactate production under anaerobic conditions. 5. Pre-swollen de-epithelialized corneas deturgesced fully to original thickness at a rate of 43 +/- 7 microns h-1 under aerobic conditions, but with KCN or antimycin they deturgesced at only 65% of that rate and generally failed to return to their original thickness. 6. Ouabain (10(-4) M) caused de-epithelialized corneas to swell in the presence of KCN or antimycin, as it did under aerobic conditions, showing that maintenance of hydration or deturgescence are pump-dependent processes under both conditions. 7. Lactate production was markedly stimulated by KCN or antimycin in intact and de-epithelialized preparations, but not in the stroma alone. The magnitude of the Pasteur effect was calculated to be 5-fold in the endothelium and 2.5-fold in the epithelium. Ouabain inhibited anaerobic lactate production in the endothelium by 50%. 8. ATP content of the epithelium following 5 h

  18. Influence of extreme ambient temperatures and anaerobic conditions on Peltigera aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakov, M. Yu.; Insarova, I. D.; Kharabadze, D. E.; Ptushenko, V. V.; Shtaer, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    Lichen are symbiotic systems constituted by heterotrophic fungi (mycobionts) and photosynthetic microorganism (photobionts). These organisms can survive under extreme stress conditions. The aim of this work was to study the influence of low (- 70 °C) or high (+ 70 °C) temperatures, temperature fluctuations from + 70 °C to - 70 °C, and anaerobic conditions on P. aphthosa (L.) Willd. viability. None of the studied stress factors affected significantly photosynthetic and respiratory activity of the thalli. No changes in morphology or ultrastructure of the cells were revealed for both photobiont and mycobiont components after extreme temperature treatment of P. aphthosa thalli. The data show the extreme tolerance of P. aphthosa to some stress factors inherent to the space flight conditions.

  19. Quantitative proteome and transcriptome analysis of the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Pan, Cuiping; Nickell, Stephan; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nagy, István

    2010-09-01

    A comparative proteome and transcriptome analysis of Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions has been performed. One-thousand twenty-five proteins were identified covering 88% of the cytosolic proteome. Using a label-free quantitation method, we found that approximately one-quarter of the identified proteome (263 proteins) were significantly induced (>2 fold) under anaerobic conditions. Thirty-nine macromolecular complexes were identified, of which 28 were quantified and 15 were regulated under anaerobiosis. In parallel, a whole genome cDNA microarray analysis was performed showing that the expression levels of 445 genes were influenced by the absence of oxygen. Interestingly, more than 40% of the membrane protein-encoding genes (145 out of 335 ORFs) were up- or down-regulated at the mRNA level. Many of these proteins are functionally associated with extracellular protein or peptide degradation or ion and amino acid transport. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome showed only a weak positive correlation between mRNA and protein expression changes, which is indicative of extensive post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in T. acidophilum. Integration of transcriptomics and proteomics data generated hypotheses for physiological adaptations of the cells to anaerobiosis, and the quantitative proteomics data together with quantitative analysis of protein complexes provide a platform for correlation of MS-based proteomics studies with cryo-electron tomography-based visual proteomics approaches.

  20. Determination of operating conditions in an anaerobic acid-phase reactor treating dairy wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Kasapgil, B.; Ince, O.; Anderson, G.K.

    1996-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion of organic material is a multistep process. Two groups of bacteria, namely acidogenic and methanogenic bacteria, are responsible for the acidification and for the methane formation, respectively. The growth requirements of the two groups of bacteria are rather different. In order to create optimum conditions for the process, it was first proposed to separate the process into two phases. Operating variables applicable for the selection and enrichment of microbial populations in phased digesters include digester loading, hydraulic retention time (HRT), pH, temperature, reactor design, and operating mode. By proper manipulation of these operating parameters it is possible to prevent any significant growth of methane bacteria and at the same time achieve the required level of acidification in the first reactor. Further enrichment of two cultures is possible by biomass recycle around each phase. Since the 1970s, phase separation has been introduced into anaerobic digestion technology. However, data concerning the optimization of operating conditions in both acidogenic and methanogenic phase reactors are scarce. This study was therefore carried out for the purposes given below. These were: (1) to determine the best combination of pH and temperature within the ranges studied for the pre-acidification of dairy wastewater; (2) to determine the maximum acidogenic conversion from COD to VFAs, and (3) to determine the changes in the distribution of major VFAs being produced during the pre-acidification of dairy wastewater.

  1. Formation of diphenylthioarsinic acid from diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Shihoko; Guan, Ling; Nakajima, Mami; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a toxic phenylarsenical compound often found around sites contaminated with phenylarsenic chemical warfare agents, diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, which were buried in soil after the World Wars. This research concerns the elucidation of the chemical structure of an arsenic metabolite transformed from DPAA under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions. In LC/ICP-MS analysis, the retention time of the metabolite was identical to that of a major phenylarsenical compound synthesized by chemical reaction of DPAA and hydrogen sulfide. Moreover the mass spectra for the two compounds measured using LC/TOF-MS were similar. Subsequent high resolution mass spectral analysis indicated that two major ions at m/z 261 and 279, observed on both mass spectra, were attributable to C12H10AsS and C12H12AsSO, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that the latter ion is the molecular-related ion ([M+H](+)) of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTA; (C6H5)2AsS(OH)) and the former ion is its dehydrated fragment. Thus, our results reveal that DPAA can be transformed to DPTA, as a major metabolite, under sulfate-reducing soil conditions. Moreover, formation of diphenyldithioarsinic acid and subsequent dimerization were predicted by the chemical reaction analysis of DPAA with hydrogen sulfide. This is the first report to elucidate the occurrence of DPAA-thionation in an anaerobic soil. PMID:24007995

  2. Breaking The Enzymatic Latch: Do Anaerobic Conditions Constrain Decomposition In Humid Tropical Forest Soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic conditions have been proposed to impose a "latch" on soil organic matter decomposition by inhibiting the activity of extracellular enzymes that catalyze the transformation of organic polymers into monomers for microbial assimilation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that anaerobiosis inhibits soil hydrolytic enzyme activity in a humid tropical forest ecosystem in Puerto Rico. We sampled surface and sub-surface soil from each of 59 plots (n = 118) stratified across distinct topographical zones (ridges, slopes, and valleys) known to vary in soil oxygen (O2) concentrations, and measured the potential activity of five hydrolytic enzymes that decompose carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) substrates. We measured reduced iron (Fe (II)) concentrations in soil extractions to provide a spatially and temporally integrated index of anaerobic microbial activity, since iron oxides constitute the dominant anaerobic terminal electron acceptor in this ecosystem. Surprisingly, we observed positive relationships between Fe (II) concentrations and the activity of all enzymes that we assayed. Linear mixed effects models that included Fe (II) concentration, topographic position, and their interaction explained between 30 to 70 % of the variance of enzyme activity of β-1,4-glucosidase, β-cellobiohydrolase, β-xylosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase. Soils from ridges and slopes contained between 10 and 800 μg Fe (II) g-1 soil, and exhibited consistently positive relationships (p < 0.0001) between Fe (II) and enzyme activity. Valley soils did not display significant relationships between enzyme activity and Fe (II), although they displayed variation in soil Fe (II) concentrations similar to ridges and slopes. Overall, valleys exhibited lower enzyme activity and lower Fe (II) concentrations than ridges or slopes, possibly related to decreased root biomass and soil C. Our data provide no indication that anaerobiosis suppresses soil enzyme activity, but

  3. Plutonium Oxidation State Distribution under Aerobic and Anaerobic Subsurface Conditions for Metal-Reducing Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. T.; Swanson, J.; Khaing, H.; Deo, R.; Rittmann, B.

    2009-12-01

    The fate and potential mobility of plutonium in the subsurface is receiving increased attention as the DOE looks to cleanup the many legacy nuclear waste sites and associated subsurface contamination. Plutonium is the near-surface contaminant of concern at several DOE sites and continues to be the contaminant of concern for the permanent disposal of nuclear waste. The mobility of plutonium is highly dependent on its redox distribution at its contamination source and along its potential migration pathways. This redox distribution is often controlled, especially in the near-surface where organic/inorganic contaminants often coexist, by the direct and indirect effects of microbial activity. The redox distribution of plutonium in the presence of facultative metal reducing bacteria (specifically Shewanella and Geobacter species) was established in a concurrent experimental and modeling study under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Pu(VI), although relatively soluble under oxidizing conditions at near-neutral pH, does not persist under a wide range of the oxic and anoxic conditions investigated in microbiologically active systems. Pu(V) complexes, which exhibit high chemical toxicity towards microorganisms, are relatively stable under oxic conditions but are reduced by metal reducing bacteria under anaerobic conditions. These facultative metal-reducing bacteria led to the rapid reduction of higher valent plutonium to form Pu(III/IV) species depending on nature of the starting plutonium species and chelating agents present in solution. Redox cycling of these lower oxidation states is likely a critical step in the formation of pseudo colloids that may lead to long-range subsurface transport. The CCBATCH biogeochemical model is used to explain the redox mechanisms and final speciation of the plutonium oxidation state distributions observed. These results for microbiologically active systems are interpreted in the context of their importance in defining the overall migration

  4. O-demethylation, dehydroxylation, ring-reduction and cleavage of aromatic substrates by Enterobacteriaceae under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Grbić-Galić, D

    1986-12-01

    Four fermentative facultative anaerobes, members of the genera Enterobacter and Escherichia, were tested for their ability to transform an aromatic lignin derivative, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid (ferulic acid), under anaerobic (fermentative) conditions. The pure cultures studied were shown to O-demethylate, dehydroxylate, reduce the double bond in the side-chain, decarboxylate the aromatic ring to the stage of benzoate and to reduce the ring to an alicyclic acid. Aromatic hydrocarbons (toluene, ethylbenzene and propylbenzene), as well as phenols (phenol, o-cresol, p-cresol, 2-ethylphenol and 3-hydroxy-4-ethylphenol) were also produced. In addition, during 3 months incubation, the cleavage of the aromatic ring occurred, whereby a small fraction of the substrate was converted to straight-chain and branched (methylated, ethylated) five- to eight-carbon aliphatic acids. The results indicate that pure cultures of fermentative facultative anaerobes might be capable of degrading substituted aromatic acids to aliphatic products under strictly anaerobic (fermentative) conditions. These abilities, which have so far been found only in denitrifying pseudomonads among facultative anaerobes, might be common in Enterobacteriaceae. It is conceivable that these bacteria are important as degraders of aromatic compounds in anaerobic ecosystems.

  5. Microbial ecology in anaerobic digestion at agitated and non-agitated conditions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhuoli; Cabrol, Léa; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo; Pullammanappallil, Pratap

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the distribution and dynamics of microbial community in anaerobic digestion at agitated and non-agitated condition, 454 pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA was conducted. It revealed the distinct community compositions between the two digesters and their progressive shifting over time. Methanogens and syntrophic bacteria were found much less abundant in the agitated digester, which was mainly attributed to the presence of bacterial genera Acetanaerobacterium and Ruminococcus with relatively high abundance. The characterization of the microbial community corroborated the digestion performance affected at the agitated condition, where lower methane yield and delayed methane production rate were observed. This was further verified by the accumulation of propionic acid in the agitated digester.

  6. Microbial Ecology in Anaerobic Digestion at Agitated and Non-Agitated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhuoli; Cabrol, Léa; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo; Pullammanappallil, Pratap

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the distribution and dynamics of microbial community in anaerobic digestion at agitated and non-agitated condition, 454 pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA was conducted. It revealed the distinct community compositions between the two digesters and their progressive shifting over time. Methanogens and syntrophic bacteria were found much less abundant in the agitated digester, which was mainly attributed to the presence of bacterial genera Acetanaerobacterium and Ruminococcus with relatively high abundance. The characterization of the microbial community corroborated the digestion performance affected at the agitated condition, where lower methane yield and delayed methane production rate were observed. This was further verified by the accumulation of propionic acid in the agitated digester. PMID:25313520

  7. Reductive dechlorination of methoxychlor and DDT by human intestinal bacterium Eubacterium limosum under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yim, You-Jin; Seo, Jiyoung; Kang, Su-Il; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2008-04-01

    Methoxychlor [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)ethane], a substitute for 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), is a compound of environmental concern because of potential long-term health risks related to its endocrine-disrupting and carcinogenic potency. In order to determine the metabolic fate of methoxychlor and DDT in the human intestinal gut, Eubacterium limosum (ATCC 8486), a strict anaerobe isolated from the human intestine that is capable of O-demethylation toward O-methylated isoflavones, was used as a model intestinal microbial organism. Under anaerobic incubation conditions, E. limosum completely transformed methoxychlor and DDT in 16 days. Based on gas chromatography-mass chromatography analyses, the metabolites produced from methoxychlor and DDT by E. limosum were confirmed to be 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-methoxyphenyl)ethane (methoxydichlor) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD), respectively. This study suggests that E. limosum in the human intestinal gut might be a participant in the reductive dechlorination of methoxychlor to the more antiandrogenic active methoxydichlor.

  8. Anaerobic digestion of the microalga Spirulina at extreme alkaline conditions: biogas production, metagenome, and metatranscriptome

    PubMed Central

    Nolla-Ardèvol, Vímac; Strous, Marc; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.

    2015-01-01

    A haloalkaline anaerobic microbial community obtained from soda lake sediments was used to inoculate anaerobic reactors for the production of methane rich biogas. The microalga Spirulina was successfully digested by the haloalkaline microbial consortium at alkaline conditions (pH 10, 2.0 M Na+). Continuous biogas production was observed and the obtained biogas was rich in methane, up to 96%. Alkaline medium acted as a CO2 scrubber which resulted in low amounts of CO2 and no traces of H2S in the produced biogas. A hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days and 0.25 g Spirulina L−1 day−1 organic loading rate (OLR) were identified as the optimal operational parameters. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis showed that the hydrolysis of the supplied substrate was mainly carried out by Bacteroidetes of the “ML635J-40 aquatic group” while the hydrogenotrophic pathway was the main producer of methane in a methanogenic community dominated by Methanocalculus. PMID:26157422

  9. Study of the operational conditions for anaerobic digestion of urban solid wastes.

    PubMed

    M, Edgar Fernando Castillo; Cristancho, Diego Edison; Arellano, A Victor

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental evaluation of anaerobic digestion technology as an option for the management of organic solid waste in developing countries. As raw material, a real and heterogeneous organic waste from urban solid wastes was used. In the first experimental phase, seed selection was achieved through an evaluation of three different anaerobic sludges coming from wastewater treatment plants. The methanization potential of these sludges was assessed in three different batch digesters of 500 mL, at two temperature levels. The results showed that by increasing the temperature to 15 degrees C above room temperature, the methane production increases to three times. So, the best results were obtained in the digester fed with a mixed sludge, working at mesophilic conditions (38-40 degrees C). Then, this selected seed was used at the next experimental phase, testing at different digestion times (DT) of 25, 20 and 18 days in a bigger batch digester of 20 L with a reaction volume of 13 L. The conversion rates were registered at the lowest DT (18 days), reaching 44.9 L/kg(-1) of wet wasteday(-1). Moreover, DT also has a strong influence over COD removal, because there is a direct relationship between solids removal inside the reactor and DT. PMID:16321515

  10. Increased bactericidal activity of colistin on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kolpen, Mette; Appeldorff, Cecilie F.; Brandt, Sarah; Mousavi, Nabi; Kragh, Kasper N.; Aydogan, Sevtap; Uppal, Haleema A.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Ciofu, Oana; Høiby, Niels; Jensen, Peter Ø.

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance towards antibiotics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is recognized as a major cause of therapeutic failure of chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This lung infection is characterized by antibiotic-tolerant biofilms in mucus with zones of O2 depletion mainly due to polymorphonuclear leukocytic activity. In contrast to the main types of bactericidal antibiotics, it has not been possible to establish an association between the bactericidal effects of colistin and the production of detectable levels of OH ˙ on several strains of planktonic P. aeruginosa. Therefore, we propose that production of OH ˙ may not contribute significantly to the bactericidal activity of colistin on P. aeruginosa biofilm. Thus, we investigated the effect of colistin treatment on biofilm of wild-type PAO1, a catalase-deficient mutant (ΔkatA) and a colistin-resistant CF isolate cultured in microtiter plates in normoxic- or anoxic atmosphere with 1 mM nitrate. The killing of bacteria during colistin treatment was measured by CFU counts, and the OH⋅ formation was measured by 3′-(p-hydroxylphenyl fluorescein) fluorescein (HPF) fluorescence. Validation of the assay was done by hydrogen peroxide treatment. OH⋅ formation was undetectable in aerobic PAO1 biofilms during 3 h of colistin treatment. Interestingly, we demonstrate increased susceptibility of P. aeruginosa biofilms towards colistin during anaerobic conditions. In fact, the maximum enhancement of killing by anaerobic conditions exceeded 2 logs using 4 mg L−1 of colistin compared to killing at aerobic conditions. PMID:26458402

  11. Continuous high-solids anaerobic co-digestion of organic solid wastes under mesophilic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Oh, Sae-Eun

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > High-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion is attracting a lot of attention these days. > One reactor was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste. > Maximum biogas production rate of 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d was achieved at HRT 40 d and 40% TS. > The other reactor was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW). > Until a 40% LW content increase, the reactor exhibited a stable performance. - Abstract: With increasing concerns over the limited capacity of landfills, conservation of resources, and reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions, high-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste (OSW) is attracting a great deal of attention these days. In the present work, two dry anaerobic co-digestion systems fed with different mixtures of OSW were continuously operated under mesophilic conditions. Dewatered sludge cake was used as a main seeding source. In reactor (I), which was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste (PW), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solid content were controlled to find the maximum treatability. At a fixed solid content of 30% total solids (TS), stable performance was maintained up to an HRT decrease to 40 d. However, the stable performance was not sustained at 30 d HRT, and hence, HRT was increased to 40 d again. In further operation, instead of decreasing HRT, solid content was increased to 40% TS, which was found to be a better option to increase the treatability. The biogas production rate (BPR), CH{sub 4} production yield (MPY) and VS reduction achieved in this condition were 5.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, 0.25 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and 80%, respectively. Reactor (II) was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW), and LW content was increased during the operation. Until a 40% LW content increase, reactor (II) exhibited a stable performance. A BPR of 1.7 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d, MPY of 0.26 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub added}, and VS reduction of 72% was achieved at 40% LW content. However, when the LW content was increased to 60

  12. Inhibition of sulfide generation by dosing formaldehyde and its derivatives in sewage under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Mendoza, L; Marzorati, M; Verstraete, W

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide emission in sewers is associated with toxicity, corrosion, odor nuisance and a lot of costs. The possibility to inhibit sulfide generation by formaldehyde and its derivatives (paraformaldehyde and urea formaldehyde) has been evaluated under anaerobic conditions. The impact of formaldehyde on an activated sludge system and an appraisal of the economic aspects are also presented. The optimum dosage to inhibit sulfide generation in sewage was 12-19 mg L(-1) formaldehyde. The dosages of 32 mg L(-1) paraformaldehyde or 100 mg L(-1) urea formaldehyde were not capable of inhibiting sulfide generation in sewage. The impact of 19 mg L(-1) formaldehyde on activated sludge system was negligible in terms of COD removal, nitrification rate and oxygen uptake rate.

  13. Evaluating inhibition conditions in high-solids anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Schievano, Andrea; D'Imporzano, Giuliana; Malagutti, Luca; Fragali, Emilio; Ruboni, Gabriella; Adani, Fabrizio

    2010-07-01

    High-solids anaerobic digestion (HSAD) processes, when applied to different types of organic fractions of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), may easily be subjected to inhibition due to organic overloading. In this study, a new approach for predicting these phenomena was proposed based on the estimation of the putrescibility (oxygen consumption in 20 h biodegradation, OD(20)) of the organic mixtures undergoing the HSAD process. Different wastes exhibiting different putrescibility were subjected to lab-scale batch-HSAD. Measuring the organic loading (OL) as volatile solids (VS) was found unsuitable for predicting overload inhibition, because similar VS contents corresponded to both inhibited and successful trials. Instead, the OL calculated as OD(20) was a very good indicator of the inhibiting conditions (inhibition started for OD(20)>17-18 g O(2)kg(-1)). This new method of predicting inhibition in the HSAD process of diverse OFMSW may be useful for developing a correct approach to the technology in very different contexts.

  14. Continuous high-solids anaerobic co-digestion of organic solid wastes under mesophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Oh, Sae-Eun

    2011-01-01

    With increasing concerns over the limited capacity of landfills, conservation of resources, and reduction of CO(2) emissions, high-solids (dry) anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste (OSW) is attracting a great deal of attention these days. In the present work, two dry anaerobic co-digestion systems fed with different mixtures of OSW were continuously operated under mesophilic conditions. Dewatered sludge cake was used as a main seeding source. In reactor (I), which was fed with food waste (FW) and paper waste (PW), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solid content were controlled to find the maximum treatability. At a fixed solid content of 30% total solids (TS), stable performance was maintained up to an HRT decrease to 40 d. However, the stable performance was not sustained at 30 d HRT, and hence, HRT was increased to 40 d again. In further operation, instead of decreasing HRT, solid content was increased to 40% TS, which was found to be a better option to increase the treatability. The biogas production rate (BPR), CH(4) production yield (MPY) and VS reduction achieved in this condition were 5.0m(3)/m(3)/d, 0.25 m(3) CH(4)/g COD(added), and 80%, respectively. Reactor (II) was fed with FW and livestock waste (LW), and LW content was increased during the operation. Until a 40% LW content increase, reactor (II) exhibited a stable performance. A BPR of 1.7 m(3)/m(3)/d, MPY of 0.26 m(3) CH(4)/g COD(added), and VS reduction of 72% was achieved at 40% LW content. However, when the LW content was increased to 60%, there was a significant performance drop, which was attributed to free ammonia inhibition. The performances in these two reactors were comparable to the ones achieved in the conventional wet digestion and thermophilic dry digestion processes.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of Interfacial Water at Selected Sulfide Mineral Surfaces under Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we report on a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) study of the behavior of interfacial water at selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions. The study revealed the interfacial water structure and wetting characteristics of the pyrite (100) surface, galena (100) surface, chalcopyrite (012) surface, sphalerite (110) surface, and molybdenite surfaces (i.e., the face, armchair-edge, and zigzag-edge surfaces), including simulated contact angles, relative number density profiles, water dipole orientations, hydrogen-bonding, and residence times. For force fields of the metal and sulfur atoms in selected sulfide minerals used in the MDS, we used the universal force field (UFF) and another set of force fields optimized by quantum chemical calculations for interactions with interfacial water molecules at selected sulfide mineral surfaces. Simulation results for the structural and dynamic properties of interfacial water molecules indicate the natural hydrophobic character for the selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions as well as the relatively weak hydrophobicity for the sphalerite (110) surface and two molybdenite edge surfaces. Part of the financial support for this study was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Basic Science Grant No. DE-FG-03-93ER14315. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE, funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES. The authors are grateful to Professor Tsun-Mei Chang for valuable discussions.

  16. pH-Dependent Uptake of Fumaric Acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jamalzadeh, Elaheh; Verheijen, Peter J. T.; Heijnen, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial production of C4 dicarboxylic acids from renewable resources has gained renewed interest. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known as a robust microorganism and is able to grow at low pH, which makes it a suitable candidate for biological production of organic acids. However, a successful metabolic engineering approach for overproduction of organic acids requires an incorporation of a proper exporter to increase the productivity. Moreover, low-pH fermentations, which are desirable for facilitating the downstream processing, may cause back diffusion of the undissociated acid into the cells with simultaneous active export, thereby creating an ATP-dissipating futile cycle. In this work, we have studied the uptake of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in carbon-limited chemostat cultures under anaerobic conditions. The effect of the presence of fumaric acid at different pH values (3 to 5) has been investigated in order to obtain more knowledge about possible uptake mechanisms. The experimental results showed that at a cultivation pH of 5.0 and an external fumaric acid concentration of approximately 0.8 mmol · liter−1, the fumaric acid uptake rate was unexpectedly high and could not be explained by diffusion of the undissociated form across the plasma membrane alone. This could indicate the presence of protein-mediated import. At decreasing pH levels, the fumaric acid uptake rate was found to increase asymptotically to a maximum level. Although this observation is in accordance with protein-mediated import, the presence of a metabolic bottleneck for fumaric acid conversion under anaerobic conditions could not be excluded. PMID:22113915

  17. Antibacterial Action of Nitric Oxide-Releasing Chitosan Oligosaccharides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reighard, Katelyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides were modified with N-diazeniumdiolates to yield biocompatible nitric oxide (NO) donor scaffolds. The minimum bactericidal concentrations and MICs of the NO donors against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were compared under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Differential antibacterial activities were primarily the result of NO scavenging by oxygen under aerobic environments and not changes in bacterial physiology. Bacterial killing was also tested against nonmucoid and mucoid biofilms and compared to that of tobramycin. Smaller NO payloads were required to eradicate P. aeruginosa biofilms under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Under oxygen-free environments, the NO treatment was 10-fold more effective at killing biofilms than tobramycin. These results demonstrate the potential utility of NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. PMID:26239983

  18. Dynamics of brominated flame retardants removal in contaminated wastewater sewage sludge under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Stiborova, Hana; Vrkoslavova, Jana; Pulkrabova, Jana; Poustka, Jan; Hajslova, Jana; Demnerova, Katerina

    2015-11-15

    Disposal of solid waste to landfills from waste water sewage treatment plants (WWTPs) serves as a potential source of contamination by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). Native microbial communities have been found to degrade a variety of xenobiotics, such as PBDEs and HBCDs. This study investigates the potential of autochthonous microflora to remove 11 PBDE congeners and HBCDs in waste water sludge under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory microcosms were constructed with sewage sludge from the WWTPs of Hradec Kralove and Brno. BDE 209 was detected as the prevailing congener in concentrations 685 and 1403 ng/g dw and the total amounts of 10 lower PBDEs (BDE 28, 47, 49, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183) were 605 and 205 ng/g dw in sludge from Hradec Kralove and Brno, respectively. The levels of HBCD were detected in both sludge lower than 24 ng/g dw. The experiment was carried out for 15 months. After three months of incubation, HBCD was completely degraded to below detection limits. In sewage from both WWTPs, the higher brominated DEs were removed faster than the lower brominated congeners. One exception was tri-BDE, which was degraded completely within 15 months of cultivation. A significant increase in congener tetra-BDE 49 concentrations was observed over the course of the experiment in all tested sewage. The relative distribution of individual congeners among all PBDEs changed after 15 months of the incubation in favour of lower brominated congeners. This indicates that debromination is the major mechanism of anaerobic biodegradation. Despite of the increase of BDE 49, the overall removal of all 11 PBDEs achieved the levels of 47.4 and 68.7% in samples from WWTPs Hradec Kralove and Brno, respectively.

  19. Reductive dissolution of Pu(IV) by Clostridium sp. under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Francis, Arokiasamy J; Dodge, Cleveland J; Gillow, Jeffrey B

    2008-04-01

    An anaerobic, gram positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium sp., common in soils and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), and U(VI) to U(IV), reduced Pu(IV) to Pu(III). Addition of 242Pu (IV)-nitrate to the bacterial growth medium at pH 6.4 resulted in the precipitation of Pu as amorphous Pu(OH)4 due to hydrolysis and polymerization reactions. The Pu (1 x 10(-5) M) had no effect upon growth of the bacterium as evidenced by glucose consumption; carbon dioxide and hydrogen production; a decrease in pH of the medium from 6.4 to 3.0 due to production of acetic and butyric acids from glucose fermentation; and a change in the Eh of the culture medium from +50 to -180 mV. Commensurate with bacterial growth, Pu was rapidly solubilized as evidenced by an increase in Pu concentration in solution which passed through a 0.03 microm filtration. Selective solvent extraction of the culture by thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) indicated the presence of a reduced Pu species in the soluble fraction. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopic (XANES) analysis of Pu in the culture sample at the Pu LIII absorption edge (18.054 keV) showed a shift of -3 eV compared to a Pu(IV) standard indicating reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III). These results suggestthat, although Pu generally exists as insoluble Pu(IV) in the environment, under appropriate conditions, anaerobic microbial activity could affect the long-term stability and mobility of Pu by its reductive dissolution.

  20. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis clades enriched under cyclic anaerobic and microaerobic conditions simultaneously use different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Pamela Y; Owen, Brian R; Martirano, Joseph; Ma, Juan; Kapoor, Vikram; Santo Domingo, Jorge; McMahon, Katherine D; Noguera, Daniel R

    2016-10-01

    Lab- and pilot-scale simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal-sequencing batch reactors were operated under cyclic anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions. The use of oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate as electron acceptors by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis during the micro-aerobic stage was investigated. A complete clade-level characterization of Accumulibacter in both reactors was performed using newly designed qPCR primers targeting the polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk1). In the lab-scale reactor, limited-oxygen conditions led to an alternated dominance of Clade IID and IC over the other clades. Results from batch tests when Clade IC was dominant (i.e., >92% of Accumulibacter) showed that this clade was capable of using oxygen, nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for P uptake. A more heterogeneous distribution of clades was found in the pilot-scale system (Clades IIA, IIB, IIC, IID, IA, and IC), and in this reactor, oxygen, nitrite and nitrate were also used as electron acceptors coupled to phosphorus uptake. However, nitrite was not an efficient electron acceptor in either reactor, and nitrate allowed only partial P removal. The results from the Clade IC dominated reactor indicated that either organisms in this clade can simultaneously use multiple electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions, or that the use of multiple electron acceptors by Clade IC is due to significant microdiversity within the Accumulibacter clades defined using the ppk1 gene. PMID:27340814

  1. Experimental evidence for growth advantage and metabolic shift stimulated by photophosphorylation of proteorhodopsin expressed in Escherichia coli at anaerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Yan; Xu, Tuan; Shi, Zhenyu; Wu, Qiong

    2015-05-01

    Since solar light energy is the source of all renewable biological energy, the direct usage of light energy by bacterial cell factory has been a very attractive concept, especially using light energy to promote anaerobic fermentation growth and even recycle low-energy carbon source when energy is the limiting factor. Proteorhodopsin(PR), a light-driven proton pump proven to couple with ATP synthesis when expressed heterogeneously, is an interesting and simple option to enable light usage in engineered strains. However, although it was reported to influence fermentation in some cases, heterogeneous proteorhodopsin expression was never shown to support growth advantage or cause metabolic shift by photophosphorylation so far. Hereby, we presented the first experimental evidence that heterogeneously expressed proteorhodopsin can provide growth advantage and cause ATP-dependent metabolism shift of acetate and lactate changes in Escherichia coli at anaerobic condition. Those discoveries suggest further application potential of PR in anaerobic fermentation where energy is a limiting factor.

  2. Monitoring of growth and physiological activities of biofilm during succession on polystyrene from activated sludge under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Iffat; Batool, Syeda Ain-ul; Ali, Naeem; Khatoon, Nazia; Atiq, Niama; Hameed, Abdul; Ahmed, Safia

    2013-08-01

    The present research work monitored the successive biofilm development and its catabolic role in the degradation of polystyrene (PS). PS material was artificially colonized with biofilm by incubating it with activated sludge under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation was monitored by gravimetric weight analysis, spectrophotometric absorbance technique, heterotrophic plate count, and scanning electron microscopy under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The wet weight (1.59 and 1.17 g) and dry weight (0.41 and 0.08 g) of a biofilm showed a significant constant increase under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, from first till 9 weeks of incubation. Plate count of the selected bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella dysenteriae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) considerably declined (90-99 %) in the biofilm after seventh and fifth weeks of incubation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, indicating a positive shift from pathogenic to beneficial microbial community. While most probable number index of fecal coliforms and E. coli in the sludge showed more reduction (98 and 99 %) under aerobic as compare to anaerobic conditions (86 and 91 %) after 9 weeks of biofilm formation on PS cubes. Correspondingly, the decreasing levels of chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand (up to 73 %) showed signs of sludge digestion. Scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope revealed nature of PS media containing high carbon content. However, biofilm development proved to be involved in the biochemical transformation of the PS medium as indicated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  3. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2015-12-15

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and the inhibitory effect of petrodiesel were studied under methanogenic conditions. Biodiesel removal efficiency of more than 95% was achieved in a chemostat with influent biodiesel concentrations up to 2.45 g/L. The kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel B100 (biodiesel only) with different petrodiesel loads was studied using biomass pre-acclimated to B100 and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). The results indicated that the biodiesel fraction of the blend could be effectively biodegraded, whereas petrodiesel was not biodegraded at all under methanogenic conditions. The presence of petrodiesel in blends with biodiesel had a greater inhibitory effect on the rate of biodegradation than the biodegradation efficiency (defined as the efficiency of methane production). Both the biodegradation rate coefficient and the methane production efficiency increased almost linearly with the increasing fraction of biodiesel. With the increasing fraction of petrodiesel, the biodegradation rate and efficiency were correlated with the concentration of soluble FAMEs in the water.

  4. Coenzyme B12 can be produced by engineered Escherichia coli under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yeounjoo; Ashok, Somasundar; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Chun, Ah Yeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (Vitamin B12 ) is one of the most complex biomolecules and an essential cofactor required for the catalytic activity of many enzymes. Pseudomonas denitrificans synthesizes coenzyme B12 in an oxygen-dependent manner using a pathway encoded by more than 25 genes that are located in six different operons. Escherichia coli, a robust and suitable host for metabolic engineering was used to produce coenzyme B12 . These genes were cloned into three compatible plasmids and expressed heterologously in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE analysis and bioassay showed that the recombinant E. coli expressed the coenzyme B12 synthetic genes and successfully produced coenzyme B12 . However, according to the quantitative determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, the amount of coenzyme B12 produced by the recombinant E. coli (0.21 ± 0.02 μg/g cdw) was approximately 13-fold lower than that by P. denitrificans (2.75 ± 0.22 μg/g cdw). Optimization of the culture conditions to improve the production of coenzyme B12 by the recombinant E. coli was successful, and the highest titer (0.65 ± 0.03 μg/g cdw) of coenzyme B12 was obtained. Interestingly, although the synthesis of coenzyme B12 in P. denitrificans is strictly oxygen-dependent, the recombinant E. coli could produce coenzyme B12 under anaerobic conditions.

  5. The anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) treating communal wastewater under mesophilic conditions: a review.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, N; Buckley, C A

    2016-01-01

    A review concerning the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) treating communal wastewater under mesophilic conditions is presented. Existing studies indicate strong resilience of the reactor towards loading variations and shock-loads. The compartmentalisation of the ABR is a strongly stabilising factor with feed fluctuations being evened out across reactor chambers. Significant chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction occurs almost exclusively in the first three chambers. The hydraulic rather than the organic loading rate is treatment limiting. Laboratory-scale studies show high treatment efficiencies of above 80% COD removal. It was found that most laboratory-scale studies do not factor in important aspects of field operation, such as diurnal fluctuations of feed characteristics, adequate start-up periods and periods of constant loading and optimised chamber outlet design, and never studied the effect of loading on sludge digestion. Performance data on full-scale ABR implementations, however, are extremely scarce, and existing studies are without exception affected by site-specific treatment-limiting factors hindering the extrapolation of generally valid conclusions. In view of a large-scale roll-out, communal ABRs are not sufficiently understood. Current challenges concerning the optimisation of reactor design require numerous well-monitored long-term full-scale reactor investigations. Existing ABR investigations yield encouraging results, supporting that the ABR may be one of the solutions answering the global call for low-maintenance, robust treatment systems.

  6. Horizontal gene transfer promoted evolution of the ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Gojković, Z; Knecht, W; Zameitat, E; Warneboldt, J; Coutelis, J-B; Pynyaha, Y; Neuveglise, C; Møller, K; Löffler, M; Piskur, J

    2004-05-01

    The ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions is an essential and unique trait of brewer's or baker's yeast ( Saccharomyces cervisiae). To understand the evolution of facultative anaerobiosis we studied the dependence of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, more precisely the fourth enzymic activity catalysed by dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase), on the enzymes of the respiratory chain in several yeast species. While the majority of yeasts possess a mitochondrial DHODase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a cytoplasmatic enzyme, whose activity is independent of the presence of oxygen. From the phylogenetic point of view, this enzyme is closely related to a bacterial DHODase from Lactococcus lactis. Here we show that S. kluyveri, which separated from the S. cerevisiae lineage more than 100 million years ago, represents an evolutionary intermediate, having both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial DHODases. We show that these two S. kluyveri enzymes, and their coding genes, differ in their dependence on the presence of oxygen. Only the cytoplasmic DHODase promotes growth in the absence of oxygen. Apparently a Saccharomyces yeast progenitor which had a eukaryotic-like mitochondrial DHODase acquired a bacterial gene for DHODase, which subsequently allowed cell growth gradually to become independent of oxygen. PMID:15014982

  7. [Simultaneous Biotransformation of Ammonium and Nitrate via Zero-Valent Iron on Anaerobic Conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Yong; Yuan, Yi; Liu, Xin; Li, Xiang; Shen, Jie; Yang, Peng-bing

    2015-12-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to improve the biological autotrophic denitrification process between nitrate and ammonia by anaerobic ammonia oxidation ( ANAMMOX) bacteria. With the addition of ZVI, the biological autotrophic denitrification process could be reacted in the influent condition of pH was 7-8, at 35°C ±0.5°C, the concentration of ammonia was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹ and the concentration of nitrate was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹. The highest conversion rate could be reached to 17.2 mg · (L·h) ⁻¹. With the change of reaction time and the molar ratio of nitrate and ammonia in influent, the final molar conversion ratio of nitrate and ammonia in effluent fluctuated between 1.2-3. 5. The result showed that this autotrophic denitrification process was not belonged to elementary reaction. The mechanism of this autotrophic denitrification process could be summarized that with the reduction of ZVI, the nitrate could be reduced to nitrite. Hereafter, the ANAMMOX process reacted between the nitrite and ammonia. PMID:27011992

  8. Anaerobic benzene biodegradation by a pure bacterial culture of Bacillus cereus under nitrate reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Dou, Junfeng; Ding, Aizhong; Liu, Xiang; Du, Yongchao; Deng, Dong; Wang, Jinsheng

    2010-01-01

    A pure culture using benzene as sole carbon and energy sources was isolated by screening procedure from gasoline contaminated soil. The analysis of the 16S rDNA gene sequence, morpholpgical and physiological characteristics showed that the isolated strain was a member of genus Bacillus cereus. The biodegradation performance of benzene by B. cereus was evaluated, and the results showed that benzene could be efficiently biodegraded when the initial benzene concentration was below 150 mg/L. The metabolites of anaerobic nitrate-dependent benzene oxidation by strain B. cereus were identified as phenol and benzoate. The results of substrate interaction between binary combinations for benzene, phenol and benzoate showed that the simultaneous presence of benzene stimulated the degradation of benzoate, whereas the addition of benzene inhibited the degradation of phenol. Benzene degradation by B. cereus was enhanced by the addition of phenol and benzoate, the enhanced effects were more pronounced at higher concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the isolated bacterial culture of B. cereus can efficiently degraded benzene under nitrate reducing conditions.

  9. Juvenile roach (Rutilus rutilus) increase their anaerobic metabolism in response to copper exposure in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Maes, Virginie; Betoulle, Stéphane; Jaffal, Ali; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Delahaut, Laurence; Geffard, Alain; Palluel, Olivier; Sanchez, Wilfried; Paris-Palacios, Séverine; Vettier, Aurélie; David, Elise

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to determine the potential impairment of cell energy synthesis processes (glycolysis and respiratory chain pathways) by copper in juvenile roach at different regulation levels by using a multi-marker approach. Juvenile roach were exposed to 0, 10, 50, and 100 µg/L of copper for 7 days in laboratory conditions. The glycolysis pathway was assessed by measuring the relative expression levels of 4 genes encoding glycolysis enzymes. The respiratory chain was studied by assessing the electron transport system and cytochrome c oxidase gene expression. Muscle mitochondria ultrastructure was studied, and antioxidant responses were measured. Furthermore, the main energy reserves-carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins-were measured, and cellular energy was evaluated by measuring ATP, ADP, AMP and IMP concentrations. This study revealed a disturbance of the cell energy metabolism due to copper exposure, with a significant decrease in adenylate energy charge in roach exposed to 10 μg/L of copper after 1 day. Moreover, ATP concentrations significantly decreased in roach exposed to 10 μg/L of copper after 1 day. This significant decrease persisted in roach exposed to 50 µg/L of copper after 7 days. AMP concentrations increased in all contaminated fish after 1 day of exposure. In parallel, the relative expression of 3 genes encoding for glycolysis enzymes increased in all contaminated fish after 1 day of copper exposure. Focusing on the respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase gene expression also increased in all contaminated fish at the two time-points. The activity of the electron transport system was not disturbed by copper, except in roach exposed to 100 µg/L of copper after 1 day. Copper induced a metabolic stress. Juvenile roach seemed to respond to the ensuing high energy demand by increasing their anaerobic metabolism, but the energy produced by the anaerobic metabolism is unable to compensate for the stress induced by copper after 7

  10. Juvenile roach (Rutilus rutilus) increase their anaerobic metabolism in response to copper exposure in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Maes, Virginie; Betoulle, Stéphane; Jaffal, Ali; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Delahaut, Laurence; Geffard, Alain; Palluel, Olivier; Sanchez, Wilfried; Paris-Palacios, Séverine; Vettier, Aurélie; David, Elise

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to determine the potential impairment of cell energy synthesis processes (glycolysis and respiratory chain pathways) by copper in juvenile roach at different regulation levels by using a multi-marker approach. Juvenile roach were exposed to 0, 10, 50, and 100 µg/L of copper for 7 days in laboratory conditions. The glycolysis pathway was assessed by measuring the relative expression levels of 4 genes encoding glycolysis enzymes. The respiratory chain was studied by assessing the electron transport system and cytochrome c oxidase gene expression. Muscle mitochondria ultrastructure was studied, and antioxidant responses were measured. Furthermore, the main energy reserves-carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins-were measured, and cellular energy was evaluated by measuring ATP, ADP, AMP and IMP concentrations. This study revealed a disturbance of the cell energy metabolism due to copper exposure, with a significant decrease in adenylate energy charge in roach exposed to 10 μg/L of copper after 1 day. Moreover, ATP concentrations significantly decreased in roach exposed to 10 μg/L of copper after 1 day. This significant decrease persisted in roach exposed to 50 µg/L of copper after 7 days. AMP concentrations increased in all contaminated fish after 1 day of exposure. In parallel, the relative expression of 3 genes encoding for glycolysis enzymes increased in all contaminated fish after 1 day of copper exposure. Focusing on the respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase gene expression also increased in all contaminated fish at the two time-points. The activity of the electron transport system was not disturbed by copper, except in roach exposed to 100 µg/L of copper after 1 day. Copper induced a metabolic stress. Juvenile roach seemed to respond to the ensuing high energy demand by increasing their anaerobic metabolism, but the energy produced by the anaerobic metabolism is unable to compensate for the stress induced by copper after 7

  11. Microbial sulfate reduction under sequentially acidic conditions in an upflow anaerobic packed bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to operate an upflow anaerobic packed bed reactor (UAPB) containing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) under acidic conditions similar to those found in acid mine drainage (AMD). The UAPB was filled with sand and operated under continuous flow at progressively lower pH and was shown to be capable of supporting sulfate reduction at pH values of 6.0, 5.0, 4.5, 4.0 and 3.5 in a synthetic medium containing 53.5 mmol l(-1) lactate. Sulfate reduction rates of 553-1,052 mmol m(-3) d(-1) were obtained when the influent solution pH was progressively lowered from pH 6.0 to 4.0, under an optimal flow rate of 2.61 ml min(-1). When the influent pH was further lowered to pH 3.5, sulfate reduction was substantially reduced with only about 1% sulfate removed at a rate of 3.35 mmol m(-3) d(-1) after 20 days of operation. However, viable SRB were recovered from the column, indicating that the SRB population was capable of surviving and metabolizing at low levels even at pH 3.5 conditions for at least 20 days. The changes in conductivity in the SRB column did not always occur with changes in pH and redox potential, suggesting that conductivity measurements may be more sensitive to SRB activity and could be used as an additional tool for monitoring SRB activity. The bioreactor containing SRB was able to reduce sulfate and generate alkalinity even when challenged with influent as low as pH 3.5, indicating that such treatment systems have potential for bioremediating highly acidic, sulfate contaminated waste waters.

  12. Anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments under sulfate-reducing and artificially imposed iron-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The potential use of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in-situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments was investigated. Previous studies have indicated that Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) can oxidize some electron donors more effectively than sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB). In contrast to previous results in freshwater sediments, the addition of Fe(III) to marine sediments from San Diego Bay, CA did not switch the terminal electron-accepting process (TEAP) from sulfate reduction to Fe-(III) reduction. Addition of Fe(III) also did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III)] followed by anaerobic incubation of the sediments, resulted in Fe-(III) reduction as the TEAP, but contaminant degradation was not stimulated and in some instances was inhibited. The difference in the ability of FeRB to compete with the SRB in the different sediment treatments was related to relative population sizes. Although the addition of Fe(III) did not stimulate hydrocarbon degradation, the results presented here as well as other recent studies demonstrate that there may be significant anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments.

  13. Metabolism of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids from tansy ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) in ovine ruminal fluid under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, A M; Latham, C J; Blythe, L L; Schmotzer, W B; O'Connor, O A

    1992-01-01

    The ability of ovine ruminal fluid to metabolize pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) from Senecio jacobaea under anaerobic conditions was evaluated. Four fistulated sheep fed PA served as individual sources of ruminal fluid, which was incubated in a defined minimal salts medium under two different anaerobic conditions, denitrifying and methanogenic. Anaerobic cultures amended with ovine ruminal fluids (20%), PA (100 micrograms/ml), and a defined minimal salts medium were monitored for a period of several days. These cultures revealed that while PA was not depleted in sterile, autoclaved controls or under denitrifying conditions, it was metabolized during periods of active methanogenesis under methanogenic conditions. In addition, samples of ruminal fluid were separated by differential centrifugation under anaerobic conditions, and the resultant supernatants were tested for their ability to metabolize PA as compared with those of the respective uncentrifuged control fluids. Uncentrifuged controls exhibited a PA depletion rate of -4.04 +/- 0.17 micrograms of PA per ml per h. Supernatants 1 (centrifuged at 41 x g for 2 min), 2 (centrifuged at 166 x g for 5 min), and 3 (centrifuged at 1,500 x g for 10 min) exhibited significantly slower depletion rates, with slopes of data representing -1.64 +/- 0.16, -1.44 +/- 0.16, and -1.48 +/- 0.16 micrograms of PA metabolized per ml per h, respectively, demonstrating no statistically significant difference among the supernatant cultures. Microscopic evaluations revealed that protozoa were present in the control whole ruminal fluid and to a lesser extent in supernatant 1, while supernatants 2 and 3 contained only bacteria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1444382

  14. Physiological activities associated with biofilm growth in attached and suspended growth bioreactors under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Iffat; Seher, Shama; Perveen, Irum; Saroj, Devendra P; Ahmed, Safia

    2015-01-01

    This research work evaluated the biofilm succession on stone media and compared the biochemical changes of sludge in attached and suspended biological reactors operated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Stones incubated (30±2°C) with activated sludge showed a constant increase in biofilm weight up to the fifth and seventh week time under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively, where after reduction (>80%) the most probable number index of pathogen indicators on ninth week was recorded. Reduction in parameters such as biological oxygen demand (BOD) (47.7%), chemical oxygen demand (COD, 41%), nitrites (60.2%), nitrates (105.5%) and phosphates (58.9%) and increase in dissolved oxygen (176.5%) of sludge were higher in aerobic attached growth reactors as compared with other settings. While, considerable reductions in these values were also observed (BOD, 53.8%; COD, 2.8%; nitrites, 28.6%; nitrates, 31.7%; phosphates, 41.4%) in the suspended growth system under anaerobic conditions. However, higher sulphate removal was observed in suspended (40.9% and 54.9%) as compared with biofilm reactors (28.2% and 29.3%). Six weeks biofilm on the stone media showed maximum physiological activities; thus, the operational conditions should be controlled to keep the biofilm structure similar to six-week-old biofilm, and can be used in fixed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment.

  15. Anaerobic biodegradation tests of poly(lactic acid) under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions using a new evaluation system for methane fermentation in anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisaaki; Ninomiya, Fumi; Funabashi, Masahiro; Kunioka, Masao

    2009-09-02

    Anaerobic biodegradation tests of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) powder were done at the thermophilic (55 degrees C) and mesophilic temperature (35 degrees C) under aquatic conditions [total solid concentrations of the used sludge were 2.07% (at 55 degrees C) and 2.24% (at 35 degrees C)] using a newly developed evaluation system. With this system, the evolved biogas is collected in a gas sampling bag at atmospheric pressure. This method is more convenient than using a pressure transducer or inverted graduated cylinder submerged in water. PLA was degraded about 60% in 30 days, about 80% in 40 days and about 90% in 60 days at 55 degrees C. On the other hand, the PLA degradation started in 55 days at 35 degrees C and degradation rate was much slower than at 55 degrees C.

  16. Anaerobic biodegradation tests of poly(lactic acid) under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions using a new evaluation system for methane fermentation in anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisaaki; Ninomiya, Fumi; Funabashi, Masahiro; Kunioka, Masao

    2009-09-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation tests of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) powder were done at the thermophilic (55 degrees C) and mesophilic temperature (35 degrees C) under aquatic conditions [total solid concentrations of the used sludge were 2.07% (at 55 degrees C) and 2.24% (at 35 degrees C)] using a newly developed evaluation system. With this system, the evolved biogas is collected in a gas sampling bag at atmospheric pressure. This method is more convenient than using a pressure transducer or inverted graduated cylinder submerged in water. PLA was degraded about 60% in 30 days, about 80% in 40 days and about 90% in 60 days at 55 degrees C. On the other hand, the PLA degradation started in 55 days at 35 degrees C and degradation rate was much slower than at 55 degrees C. PMID:19865521

  17. Using a tank flow model with PEARL to measure the variation in pesticide persistence between anaerobic and aerobic soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Joaquin; Seiterle-Winn, Natalie; Frances, Felix

    2013-04-01

    Pesticide leaching is very sensitive to the transformation rate (Boesten and Linden, 1991). The values of the transformation rates of the pesticides differ between aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions. The main objective is to determine if there is a significant variation in pesticide persistence between aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions. An auxiliary hydrological model is used with the PEARL model (Leistra et al, 2001). The auxiliary model determines the degree of saturation of the soil at each time step. The value of the degradation rate for a given pesticide in the PEARL model varies depending on the time periods with saturated or unsaturated soil conditions. The proposed auxiliary model has been conceptualized as a static tank flow model based on the actual evapotranspiration of the crop plants. It is based on the RIBAV model (Garcia-Arias et al. 2012) used for the modeling of riparian vegetation zonation. The tank represents a soil column which also includes the superficial root layer. The lower capacity limit of this tank is the permanent wilting moisture of the soil. The upper capacity limit represents the saturated condition of the soil. The tanks input flows are precipitation and irrigation. In contrast, output flows are the actual evapotranspiration and the discharge of the tank. The most relevant model parameters are the soil retention curves, the crop parameters (specially related to root depths and crop coefficients) and the daily meteorological data (such as precipitation and potential evapotranspiration). The main output of the auxiliary model is the relative soil moisture, which determines if the PEARL model should use the transformation rate value for aerobic or for anaerobic conditions. In order to prove the applicability of the model, it was tested with various pesticides, which cover a wide range of transformation rates. The results show that the auxiliary tank model is able to determine the partition of the pesticides degrading in both

  18. Use of Response Surface Methodology to Optimize Culture Conditions for Hydrogen Production by an Anaerobic Bacterial Strain from Soluble Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieu, Hoa Thi Quynh; Nguyen, Yen Thi; Dang, Yen Thi; Nguyen, Binh Thanh

    2016-05-01

    Biohydrogen is a clean source of energy that produces no harmful byproducts during combustion, being a potential sustainable energy carrier for the future. Therefore, biohydrogen produced by anaerobic bacteria via dark fermentation has attracted attention worldwide as a renewable energy source. However, the hydrogen production capability of these bacteria depends on major factors such as substrate, iron-containing hydrogenase, reduction agent, pH, and temperature. In this study, the response surface methodology (RSM) with central composite design (CCD) was employed to improve the hydrogen production by an anaerobic bacterial strain isolated from animal waste in Phu Linh, Soc Son, Vietnam (PL strain). The hydrogen production process was investigated as a function of three critical factors: soluble starch concentration (8 g L-1 to 12 g L-1), ferrous iron concentration (100 mg L-1 to 200 mg L-1), and l-cysteine concentration (300 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1). RSM analysis showed that all three factors significantly influenced hydrogen production. Among them, the ferrous iron concentration presented the greatest influence. The optimum hydrogen concentration of 1030 mL L-1 medium was obtained with 10 g L-1 soluble starch, 150 mg L-1 ferrous iron, and 400 mg L-1 l-cysteine after 48 h of anaerobic fermentation. The hydrogen concentration produced by the PL strain was doubled after using RSM. The obtained results indicate that RSM with CCD can be used as a technique to optimize culture conditions for enhancement of hydrogen production by the selected anaerobic bacterial strain. Hydrogen production from low-cost organic substrates such as soluble starch using anaerobic fermentation methods may be one of the most promising approaches.

  19. Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

    2012-06-01

    Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

  20. Direct production of organic acids from starch by cell surface-engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum in anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We produced organic acids, including lactate and succinate, directly from soluble starch under anaerobic conditions using high cell-density cultures of Corynebacterium glutamicum displaying α-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 on the cell surface. Notably, reactions performed under anaerobic conditions at 35 and 40°C, which are higher than the optimal growth temperature of 30°C, showed 32% and 19%, respectively, higher productivity of the organic acids lactate, succinate, and acetate compared to that at 30°C. However, α-amylase was not stably anchored and released into the medium from the cell surface during reactions at these higher temperatures, as demonstrated by the 61% and 85% decreases in activity, respectively, from baseline, compared to the only 8% decrease at 30°C. The AmyA-displaying C. glutamicum cells retained their starch-degrading capacity during five 10 h reaction cycles at 30°C, producing 107.8 g/l of total organic acids, including 88.9 g/l lactate and 14.0 g/l succinate. The applicability of cell surface-engineering technology for the production of organic acids from biomass by high cell-density cultures of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions was demonstrated. PMID:24342107

  1. Microbial Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions, Alternative Electron Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Urigüen, M.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Autotrophic Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium named A6 (A6), part of the Actinobacteria phylum have been linked to anaerobic ammonium (NH4+) oxidation under iron reducing conditions. These organisms obtain their energy by oxidizing NH4+ and transferring the electrons to a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Under environmental conditions, the TEAs are iron oxides [Fe(III)], which are reduced to Fe(II), this process is known as Feammox. Our studies indicate that alternative forms of TEAs can be used by A6, e.g. iron rich clays (i.e. nontronite) and electrodes in bioelectrochemical systems such as Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs), which can sustain NH4+removal and A6 biomass production. Our results show that nontronite can support Feammox and promote bacterial cell production. A6 biomass increased from 4.7 x 104 to 3.9 x 105 cells/ml in 10 days. Incubations of A6 in nontronite resulted in up to 10 times more NH4+ removal and 3 times more biomass production than when ferrihydrite is used as the Fe(III) source. Additionally, Fe in nontronite can be reoxidized by aeration and A6 can reutilize it; however, Fe is still finite in the clay. In contrast, in MECs, A6 harvest electrons from NH4+ and use an anode as an unlimited TEA, as a result current is produced. We operated multiple MECs in parallel using a single external power source, as described by Call & Logan (2011). MECs were run with an applied voltage of 0.7V and different growing mediums always containing initial 5mM NH4+. Results show that current production is favored when anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttled, is present in the medium as it facilitates the transfer of electrons from the bacterial cell to the anode. Additionally, A6 biomass increased from 1 x 104 to 9.77 x 105cells/ml in 14 days of operation. Due to Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium A6's ability to use various TEAs, MECs represent an alternative, iron-free form, for optimized biomass production of A6 and its application in NH4

  2. Diversity of methanotrophs in Zoige wetland soils under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yun, Juanli; Ma, Anzhou; Li, Yaoming; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Wang, Yanfen; Zhang, Hongxun

    2010-01-01

    Zoige wetland is one of the most important methane emission centers in China. The oxidation of methane in the wetland affects global warming, soil ecology and atmospheric chemistry. Despite their global significance, microorganisms that consume methane in Zoige wetland remain poorly characterized. In this study, we investigated methanotrophs diversity in soil samples from both anaerobic site and aerobic site in Zoige wetland using pmoA gene as a molecular marker. The cloning library was constructed according to the pmoA sequences detected. Four clusters of methanotrophs were detected. The phylogenetic tree showed that all four clusters detected were affiliated to type I methanotrophs. Two novel clusters (cluster 1, cluster 2) were found to relate to none of the recognized genera of methanotrophs. These clusters have no cultured representatives and reveal an ecological adaptation of particular uncultured methanotrophs in Zoige wetland. Two clusters were belonging to Methylobacter and Methylococcus separately. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis gel bands pattern retrieved from these two samples revealed that the community compositions of anaerobic soil and aerobic soil were different from each other while anaerobic soil showed a higher metanotrophs diversity. Real-time PCR assays of the two samples demonstrated that aerobic soil sample in Zoige wetland was 1.5 times as much copy numbers as anaerobic soil. These data illustrated that methanotrophs are a group of microorganisms influence the methane consumption in Zoige wetland.

  3. Effect Of Imposed Anaerobic Conditions On Metals Release From Acid-Mine Drainage Contaminated Streambed Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remediation of streams influenced by mine-drainage may require removal and burial of metal-containing bed sediments. Burial of aerobic sediments into an anaerobic environment may release metals, such as through reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides. Mining-impacted aerob...

  4. New generic mathematical model for WWTP sludge digesters operating under aerobic and anaerobic conditions: Model building and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    de Gracia, M; Grau, P; Huete, E; Gómez, J; García-Heras, J L; Ayesa, E

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a new mathematical model developed to reproduce the performance of a generic sludge digester working either under aerobic or anaerobic operational conditions. The digester has been modelled as two completely mixed tanks associated with gaseous and liquid volumes. The conversion model has been developed based on a plant wide modelling methodology (PWM) and comprises biochemical transformations, physicochemical reactions and thermodynamic considerations. The model predicts the reactor temperature and the temporary evolution of an extensive vector of model components which are completely defined in terms of elemental mass fractions (C, H, O, N and P) and charge density. Thus, the comprehensive definition of the model components guarantees the continuity of elemental mass and charge in all the model transformations and between any two systems defined by the model. The aim of the generic digester model is to overcome the problems that arise when trying to connect aerobic and anaerobic digestion processes working in series or to connect water and sludge lines in a WWTP. The modelling methodology used has allowed the systematic construction of the biochemical model which acts as an initial illustrative example of an application that has been experimentally verified. The variation of the temperature is also predicted based on a thermal dynamic model. Real data from four different facilities and a straightforward calibration have been used to successfully verify the model predictions in the cases of mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion as well as autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD). The large amount of data from the full scale ATAD and the anaerobic digestion pilot plants, all of them working under different conditions, has allowed the validation of the model for that case study. PMID:19720390

  5. Degradation of n-Hexadecane and Its Metabolites by Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Microaerobic and Anaerobic Denitrifying Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chayabutra, Chawala; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for sequential hydrocarbon bioremediation is proposed. The initial O2-requiring transformation is effected by aerobic resting cells, thus avoiding a high oxygen demand. The oxygenated metabolites can then be degraded even under anaerobic conditions when supplemented with a highly water-soluble alternative electron acceptor, such as nitrate. To develop the new strategy, some phenomena were studied by examining Pseudomonas aeruginosa fermentation. The effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on n-hexadecane biodegradation were investigated first. Under microaerobic conditions, the denitrification rate decreased as the DO concentration decreased, implying that the O2-requiring reactions were rate limiting. The effects of different nitrate and nitrite concentrations were examined next. When cultivated aerobically in tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0 to 0.35 g of NO2−-N per liter, cells grew in all systems, but the lag phase was longer in the presence of higher nitrite concentrations. However, under anaerobic denitrifying conditions, even 0.1 g of NO2−-N per liter totally inhibited cell growth. Growth was also inhibited by high nitrate concentrations (>1 g of NO3−-N per liter). Cells were found to be more sensitive to nitrate or nitrite inhibition under denitrifying conditions than under aerobic conditions. Sequential hexadecane biodegradation by P. aeruginosa was then investigated. The initial fermentation was aerobic for cell growth and hydrocarbon oxidation to oxygenated metabolites, as confirmed by increasing dissolved total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations. The culture was then supplemented with nitrate and purged with nitrogen (N2). Nitrate was consumed rapidly initially. The live cell concentration, however, also decreased. The aqueous-phase TOC level decreased by about 40% during the initial active period but remained high after this period. Additional experiments confirmed that only about one-half of the derived TOC was readily

  6. A strategy for aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation under anaerobic conditions and the impacts of ethanol: A microcosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu Dao; Barker, James F.; Gui, Lai

    2008-02-01

    Increased use of ethanol-blended gasoline (gasohol) and its potential release into the subsurface have spurred interest in studying the biodegradation of and interactions between ethanol and gasoline components such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene isomers (BTEX) in groundwater plumes. The preferred substrate status and the high biological oxygen demand (BOD) posed by ethanol and its biodegradation products suggests that anaerobic electron acceptors (EAs) will be required to support in situ bioremediation of BTEX. To develop a strategy for aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation and to understand the impacts of ethanol on BTEX biodegradation under strictly anaerobic conditions, a microcosm experiment was conducted using pristine aquifer sand and groundwater obtained from Canadian Forces Base Borden, Canada. The initial electron accepter pool included nitrate, sulfate and/or ferric iron. The microcosms typically contained 400 g of sediment, 600˜800 ml of groundwater, and with differing EAs added, and were run under anaerobic conditions. Ethanol was added to some at concentrations of 500 and 5000 mg/L. Trends for biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons for the Borden aquifer material were first developed in the absence of ethanol, The results showed that indigenous microorganisms could degrade all aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX and trimethylbenzene isomers-TMB) under nitrate- and ferric iron-combined conditions, but not under sulfate-reducing conditions. Toluene, ethylbenzene and m/p-xylene were biodegraded under denitrifying conditions. However, the persistence of benzene indicated that enhancing denitrification alone was insufficient. Both benzene and o-xylene biodegraded significantly under iron-reducing conditions, but only after denitrification had removed other aromatics. For the trimethylbenzene isomers, 1,3,5-TMB biodegradation was found under denitrifying and then iron-reducing conditions. Biodegradation of 1,2,3-TMB or 1,2,4-TMB was slower under iron

  7. Differential sensitivities of the growth of Escherichia coli to acrylate under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and its effect on product formation.

    PubMed

    Arya, Ajay S; Lee, Sarah A; Eiteman, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    The effect of acrylate on the growth of Escherichia coli was determined under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in glucose-defined medium. Growth occurred with up to 35 mM acrylate under aerobic conditions but ceased at 5 mM acrylate under anaerobic conditions. This differential sensitivity can be attributed to inhibition of pyruvate formate lyase and/or pflB gene repression, as this enzyme is necessary for anaerobic growth of E. coli. The effect of acrylate on end-product distribution was also determined by growing E. coli first aerobically, then switching to anaerobic conditions. In the absence of acrylate, E. coli generated the typical distribution of mixed-acid products, with about 12 % of pyruvate being metabolically converted to lactate. In contrast, in the presence of 5 mM acrylate, E. coli converted 83 % of pyruvate to lactate, consistent with a reduction in pyruvate formate lyase activity.

  8. Molecular analysis of the biomass of a fluidized bed reactor treating synthetic vinasse at anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Elisa; Lopes, Alexandre; Fdz-Polanco, María; Stams, Alfons J M; García-Encina, Pedro A

    2012-03-01

    The microbial communities (Bacteria and Archaea) established in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor used to treat synthetic vinasse (betaine, glucose, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) were characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and phylogenetic analysis. This study was focused on the competitive and syntrophic interactions between the different microbial groups at varying influent substrate to sulfate ratios of 8, 4, and 2 and anaerobic or micro-aerobic conditions. Acetogens detected along the anaerobic phases at substrate to sulfate ratios of 8 and 4 seemed to be mainly involved in the fermentation of glucose and betaine, but they were substituted by other sugar or betaine degraders after oxygen application. Typical fatty acid degraders that grow in syntrophy with methanogens were not detected during the entire reactor run. Likely, sugar and betaine degraders outnumbered them in the DGGE analysis. The detected sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) belonged to the hydrogen-utilizing Desulfovibrio. The introduction of oxygen led to the formation of elemental sulfur (S(0)) and probably other sulfur compounds by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (γ-Proteobacteria). It is likely that the sulfur intermediates produced from sulfide oxidation were used by SRB and other microorganisms as electron acceptors, as was supported by the detection of the sulfur respiring Wolinella succinogenes. Within the Archaea population, members of Methanomethylovorans and Methanosaeta were detected throughout the entire reactor operation. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens mainly belonging to the genus Methanobacterium were detected at the highest substrate to sulfate ratio but rapidly disappeared by increasing the sulfate concentration. PMID:21861082

  9. Performance optimization and validation of ADM1 simulations under anaerobic thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Nabil M; El-Fadel, Mutasem; Ghanimeh, Sophia; Saikaly, Pascal; Abou-Najm, Majdi

    2014-12-01

    In this study, two experimental sets of data each involving two thermophilic anaerobic digesters treating food waste, were simulated using the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). A sensitivity analysis was conducted, using both data sets of one digester, for parameter optimization based on five measured performance indicators: methane generation, pH, acetate, total COD, ammonia, and an equally weighted combination of the five indicators. The simulation results revealed that while optimization with respect to methane alone, a commonly adopted approach, succeeded in simulating methane experimental results, it predicted other intermediary outputs less accurately. On the other hand, the multi-objective optimization has the advantage of providing better results than methane optimization despite not capturing the intermediary output. The results from the parameter optimization were validated upon their independent application on the data sets of the second digester.

  10. Impact of ultrasonic pretreatment under different operational conditions on the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sunflower oil cake in batch mode.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cegrí, V; de la Rubia, M A; Raposo, F; Borja, R

    2012-09-01

    In this study ultrasonic (US) pretreatment was investigated with the aim of improving the anaerobic digestion of sunflower oil cake (SuOC), the solid waste derived from the extraction process of sunflower oil. Five ultrasonic pretreatment assays were conducted at specific energy (SE) and sonication times in a range from 24,000 kJ/kg TS and 16.6 min (assay 1: US1) to 597,600 kJ/kg TS and 331.2 min (assay 5: US5), respectively, all operating at a constant sonication frequency (20 kHz) and ultrasonic power (120 W). As regards ultrasonic pretreatment, the working conditions of the first assay (US1) using samples of SuOC at 2% (w/v) showed to be the most appropriate in terms of both lignin and hemicellulose degradation (57.7% and 66.7%, respectively) and cellulose increase (54% increase with respect to its initial concentration). The percentage of COD solubilization increased from only 14% to 21% when SE was 25 times higher. Results obtained in batch anaerobic digestion experiments (biochemical methane potential - BMP - tests) conducted at 35°C of the solid and liquid fractions released from the different ultrasonic conditions tested, indicated that for the first experiment (US1) the average ultimate methane yield obtained was 53.8% higher than that achieved for untreated SuOC. Finally, the kinetic constants of the anaerobic digestion of the solid and liquid fractions released after the ultrasonic pretreatment were virtually independent of the operation conditions assayed. PMID:22366228

  11. Phthalic acid esters found in municipal organic waste: enhanced anaerobic degradation under hyper-thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, H; Ahring, B K

    2003-01-01

    Contamination of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with xenobiotic compounds and their fate during anaerobic digestion was investigated. The phthalic acid ester di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) was identified as the main contaminant in OFMSW in concentrations more than half of the threshold value for the use as fertilizer on agricultural soil in Denmark. Analysis of DEHP in samples before and after large-scale anaerobic digesters revealed higher concentrations of DEHP per kg dry matter in the effluent than in the influent. The concentration of DEHP and DBP (dibutylphthalate) in OFMSW was monitored in the influent and effluent of anaerobic thermophilic (55 degrees C) and hyper-thermophilic (68 degrees C) laboratory-scale reactor systems. In the thermophilic reactors with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days 38-70% of DBP was removed, but no consistent removal of DEHP was observed. However, after treatment of the effluent from the thermophilic reactor in a hyper-thermophilic digester (HRT: 5 days) 34-53% of the DEHP content was removed and the DBP removal was increased to further 62-74%. Removal rates (k(h)) of DEHP and DBP were found to be 0.11-0.32 d(-1) and 0.41-0.79 d(-1), which is much higher than in previous investigations. It can be concluded that the higher removal rates are due to the higher temperature and higher initial concentrations per kg dry matter. These results suggest that the limiting factor for DEHP degradation is the bioavailability, which is enhanced at higher temperature and higher degradation of solid organic matter, to which the highly hydrophobic DEHP is adsorbed. The investigated reactor configuration with a thermophilic and a hyper-thermophilic treatment is, therefore, a good option for combining high rate degradation of organic matter with high biogas yields and efficient reduction of the phthalic acid ester contamination.

  12. Organic intermediates in the anaerobic biodegradation of coal to methane under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Voytek, M.A.; Jones, E.J.; Lerch, H.E.; Bates, A.L.; Corum, M.D.; Warwick, P.D.; Clark, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Organic intermediates in coal fluids produced by anaerobic biodegradation of geopolymers in coal play a key role in the production of methane in natural gas reservoirs. Laboratory biodegradation experiments on sub-bituminous coal from Texas, USA, were conducted using bioreactors to examine the organic intermediates relevant to methane production. Production of methane in the bioreactors was linked to acetate accumulation in bioreactor fluid. Long chain fatty acids, alkanes (C19-C36) and various low molecular weight aromatics, including phenols, also accumulated in the bioreactor fluid and appear to be the primary intermediates in the biodegradation pathway from coal-derived geopolymers to acetate and methane. ?? 2010.

  13. Macroscopic mass and energy balance of a pilot plant anaerobic bioreactor operated under thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Bombardiere, John; Chatfield, Mark; Domaschko, Max; Easter, Michael; Stafford, David A; Castillo-Angeles, Saul; Castellanos-Hernandez, Nehemias

    2006-01-01

    Intensive poultry production generates over 100,000 t of litter annually in West Virginia and 9 x 10(6) t nationwide. Current available technological alternatives based on thermophilic anaerobic digestion for residuals treatment are diverse. A modification of the typical continuous stirred tank reactor is a promising process being relatively stable and owing to its capability to manage considerable amounts of residuals at low operational cost. A 40-m3 pilot plant digester was used for performance evaluation considering energy input and methane production. Results suggest some changes to the pilot plant configuration are necessary to reduce power consumption although maximizing biodigester performance.

  14. Optimization of microwave pretreatment conditions to maximize methane production and methane yield in mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion.

    PubMed

    Park, W J; Ahn, J H

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to find optimum microwave pretreatment conditions for methane production and methane yield in anaerobic sludge digestion. The sludge was pretreated using a laboratory-scale industrial microwave unit (2450 MHz frequency). Microwave temperature increase rate (TIR) (2.9-17.1 degrees C/min) and final temperature (FT) (52-108 degrees C) significantly affected solubilization, methane production, and methane yield. Solubilization degree (soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD)/total COD) in the pretreated sludge (3.3-14.7%) was clearly higher than that in the raw sludge (2.6%). Within the design boundaries, the optimum conditions for maximum methane production (2.02 L/L) were TIR = 9.1 degrees C/min and FT = 90 degrees C, and the optimum conditions for maximum methane yield (809 mL/g VS(removed)) were TIR 7.1 degrees C/min and FT = 92 degrees C.

  15. Germination of Echinochloa crus-galli (Barnyard Grass) Seeds under Anaerobic Conditions 1

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Robert A.; Rumpho, Mary E.; Vanderzee, Delma

    1983-01-01

    Echinochloa crus-galli L. Beauv., a rice-field weed, can germinate and grow for extended periods of time in an anaerobic environment. Compared to pea, which does not germinate under anaerobiosis, the evolution of CO2 in Echinochloa and rice is lower and the peak rate of CO2 evolution is delayed when germinated without oxygen. The plants studied also differ with respect to their respiration ratio ([CO2] N2/[CO2] air) and metabolism used during the early stages of germination. Echinochloa does not increase its glycolytic rate under anaerobiosis, whereas pentose phosphate pathway activity appears to increase during the first 40 to 50 hours of germination. Based on its response to metabolic inhibitors (NaF, dinitrophenol, and malonate), anaerobic metabolism in Echinochloa proceeds primarily through glycolysis, with partial operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and little or no oxidative phosphorylation. Also, Echinochloa is sensitive to CN during aerobic germination, whereas rice appears to be able to shift to CN-insensitive electron transport. Finally, the effectiveness of cyanide and azide on inhibiting germination of Echinochloa in N2, but not CO, suggests that cytochrome oxidase is not used to reoxidize pyridine nucleotides in the absence of oxygen. The possible existence of an alternate electron acceptor is discussed. PMID:16663086

  16. Anaerobic killing of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa by acidified nitrite derivatives under cystic fibrosis airway conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Coakley, Ray; Lau, Gee W.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Gaston, Benjamin; Karabulut, Ahmet C.; Hennigan, Robert F.; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Buettner, Garry; Schurr, Michael J.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Burns, Jane L.; Speert, David; Boucher, Richard C.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Mucoid, mucA mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are refractory to phagocytosis and antibiotics. Here we show that mucoid bacteria perish during anaerobic exposure to 15 mM nitrite (NO2–) at pH 6.5, which mimics CF airway mucus. Killing required a pH lower than 7, implicating formation of nitrous acid (HNO2) and NO, that adds NO equivalents to cellular molecules. Eighty-seven percent of CF isolates possessed mucA mutations and were killed by HNO2 (3-log reduction in 4 days). Furthermore, antibiotic-resistant strains determined were also equally sensitive to HNO2. More importantly, HNO2 killed mucoid bacteria (a) in anaerobic biofilms; (b) in vitro in ultrasupernatants of airway secretions derived from explanted CF patient lungs; and (c) in mouse lungs in vivo in a pH-dependent fashion, with no organisms remaining after daily exposure to HNO2 for 16 days. HNO2 at these levels of acidity and NO2– also had no adverse effects on cultured human airway epithelia in vitro. In summary, selective killing by HNO2 may provide novel insights into the important clinical goal of eradicating mucoid P. aeruginosa from the CF airways. PMID:16440061

  17. Strategies for changing temperature from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions in anaerobic CSTR reactors treating sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Bousková, A; Dohányos, M; Schmidt, J E; Angelidaki, I

    2005-04-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic digestion presents an advantageous way for stabilization of sludge from wastewater treatment plants. Two different strategies for changing operational process temperature from mesophilic (37 degrees C) to thermophilic (55 degrees C) were tested using two continuous flow stirred tank reactors operated at constant organic loading rate of 1.38 g VS/l reactor/day and hydraulic retention time of 20 days. In reactor A, the temperature was increased step-wise: 37 degrees C-->42 degrees C-->47 degrees C-->51 degrees C-->55 degrees C. While in reactor B, the temperature was changed in one-step, from 37 degrees C to the desired temperature of 55 degrees C, The results showed that the overall adaptation of the process for the step-wise temperature increment took 70 days in total and a new change was applied when the process was stabilized as indicated by stable methane production and low volatile fatty acids concentrations. Although the one-step temperature increase caused a severe disturbance in all the process parameters, the system reached a new stable operation after only 30 days indicating that this strategy is the best in changing from mesophilic to thermophilic operation in anaerobic digestion plants.

  18. Biotransformation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene by obligate marine Shewanella marisflavi EP1 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiexun; Ning, Guojing; Li, Feili; Sheng, G Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic transformation of 2,4-DNT by obligate marine Shewanella marisflavi EP1 was investigated. The cell growth of EP1 was proportional to the total amount of 2,4-DNT reduced. The eventual transformation product was 2,4-diaminotoluene, via 2-amino-4-nitrotoluene and 4-amino-2-nitrotoluene as intermediates. The presence of Cu(2+), dicumarol, metyrapone and flavins intensively influenced the reduction activity of 2,4-DNT, suggesting that dehydrogenease, menaquinone, cytochromes and flavins are essentially involved in electron transport process for 2,4-DNT reduction. These results indicate that biotransformation of 2,4-DNT by EP1 is a form of microbial anaerobic respiration. Furthermore, EP1 was capable of transforming 2,4-DNT at relatively alkaline range of pH (7-9), and at a wide range of temperature (4-40°C) and salinity (2-8% NaCl concentration). Our findings not only deepen our understanding of the environmental fate of 2,4-DNT, but also provide an extension to the application of shewanellae in the site bioremediation and/or wastewater treatment.

  19. Anaerobic biodegradation of long-chain n-alkanes under sulfate-reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, M.E.; Suflita, J.M.; Garrett, R.M.; Prince, R.C.

    1998-07-15

    The ability of anaerobic microorganisms to degrade a wide variety of crude oil components was investigated using chronically hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments as the source of inoculum. When sulfate reduction was the predominant electron-accepting process, gas chromatographic analysis revealed almost complete n-alkane removal (C{sub 15}-C{sub 34}) from a weathered oil within 201 d of incubation. No alteration of the oil was detected in sterile control incubations or when nitrate served as an alternate electron acceptor. The amount of sulfate reduced in the oil-amended nonsterile incubations was more than enough to account for the complete mineralization of the n-alkane fraction of the oil; no loss of this anion was observed in sterile control incubations. The mineralization of the alkanes was confirmed using {sup 14}C-14,15-octacosane (C{sub 28}H{sub 58}), with 97% of the radioactivity recovered as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. These findings extend the range of hydrocarbons known to be amenable to anaerobic biodegradation. Moreover, the rapid and extensive alteration in the n-alkanes can no longer be considered a defining characteristic of aerobic oil biodegradation processes alone.

  20. Microbial characteristics associated with six different organic wastes undergoing anaerobic decomposition in batch vial conditions.

    PubMed

    Kong, In Chul

    2008-06-01

    In this study, the biodegradation characteristics of six plant-based wastes were compared in anaerobic batch vial systems. The highest gas accumulation and methane (CH4) concentrations (approximately 70%) were observed in samples containing copy paper, newspaper and box paper materials, whereas the lowest were observed in samples containing wood and leaves. In samples containing steamed rice and fruit, the methanogenic activity was inhibited, which resulted in acid accumulation. The high biodegradation activity of newspaper samples was also associated with high adenosine triphosphate levels and dehydrogenase activity. No significant differences were, however, observed in the dehydrogenase activity of the samples. High bioluminescence was observed in samples with high biodegradation activities, indicative of low toxicity. PMID:18649574

  1. Metabolic model for acetate uptake by a mixed culture of phosphate- and glycogen-accumulating organisms under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yagci, Nevin; Artan, Nazik; Cokgör, Emine Ubay; Randall, Clifford W; Orhon, Derin

    2003-11-01

    This paper proposes a new metabolic model for acetate uptake by a mixed culture of phosphate- and glycogen-accumulating organisms (PAOs and GAOs) under anaerobic conditions. The model uses variable overall stoichiometry based on the assumption that PAOs may have the ability of using the glyoxylate pathway to produce the required reducing power for polyhydroxyalkonate (PHA) synthesis. The proposed model was tested and verified by experimental results. A sequencing batch reactor system was operated for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) with acetate as the sole carbon source at different influent acetate/phosphate ratios. The resulting experimental data supported the validity of the proposed model, indicating the presence of GAOs for all tested HAc/P ratios, especially under P-limiting conditions. Strong agreement is observed between experimental values and model predictions for all model components, namely, PHB production, PHA composition, glycogen utilization, and P release.

  2. Enrichment of acetogenic bacteria in high rate anaerobic reactors under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ryan, P; Forbes, C; McHugh, S; O'Reilly, C; Fleming, G T A; Colleran, E

    2010-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to expand the knowledge of the role of acetogenic Bacteria in high rate anaerobic digesters. To this end, acetogens were enriched by supplying a variety of acetogenic growth supportive substrates to two laboratory scale high rate upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors operated at 37 degrees C (R1) and 55 degrees C (R2). The reactors were initially fed a glucose/acetate influent. Having achieved high operational performance and granular sludge development and activity, both reactors were changed to homoacetogenic bacterial substrates on day 373 of the trial. The reactors were initially fed with sodium vanillate as a sole substrate. Although % COD removal indicated that the 55 degrees C reactor out performed the 37 degrees C reactor, effluent acetate levels from R2 were generally higher than from R1, reaching values as high as 5023 mg l(-1). Homoacetogenic activity in both reactors was confirmed on day 419 by specific acetogenic activity (SAA) measurement, with higher values obtained for R2 than R1. Sodium formate was introduced as sole substrate to both reactors on day 464. It was found that formate supported acetogenic activity at both temperatures. By the end of the trial, no specific methanogenic activity (SMA) was observed against acetate and propionate indicating that the methane produced was solely by hydrogenotrophic Archaea. Higher SMA and SAA values against H(2)/CO(2) suggested development of a formate utilising acetogenic population growing in syntrophy with hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Throughout the formate trial, the mesophilic reactor performed better overall than the thermophilic reactor.

  3. Survival of weed seeds and animal parasites as affected by anaerobic digestion at meso- and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anders; Nielsen, Henrik B; Hansen, Christian M; Andreasen, Christian; Carlsgart, Josefine; Hauggard-Nielsen, Henrik; Roepstorff, Allan

    2013-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion of residual materials from animals and crops offers an opportunity to simultaneously produce bioenergy and plant fertilizers at single farms and in farm communities where input substrate materials and resulting digested residues are shared among member farms. A surplus benefit from this practice may be the suppressing of propagules from harmful biological pests like weeds and animal pathogens (e.g. parasites). In the present work, batch experiments were performed, where survival of seeds of seven species of weeds and non-embryonated eggs of the large roundworm of pigs, Ascaris suum, was assessed under conditions similar to biogas plants managed at meso- (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. Cattle manure was used as digestion substrate and experimental units were sampled destructively over time. Regarding weed seeds, the effect of thermophilic conditions (55°C) was very clear as complete mortality, irrespective of weed species, was reached after less than 2 days. At mesophilic conditions, seeds of Avena fatua, Sinapsis arvensis, Solidago canadensis had completely lost germination ability, while Brassica napus, Fallopia convolvulus and Amzinckia micrantha still maintained low levels (~1%) of germination ability after 1 week. Chenopodium album was the only weed species which survived 1 week at substantial levels (7%) although after 11 d germination ability was totally lost. Similarly, at 55°C, no Ascaris eggs survived more than 3h of incubation. Incubation at 37°C did not affect egg survival during the first 48 h and it took up to 10 days before total elimination was reached. In general, anaerobic digestion in biogas plants seems an efficient way (thermophilic more efficient than mesophilic) to treat organic farm wastes in a way that suppresses animal parasites and weeds so that the digestates can be applied without risking spread of these pests. PMID:23266071

  4. Elevated Expression of GlpT and UhpT via FNR Activation Contributes to Increased Fosfomycin Susceptibility in Escherichia coli under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kurabayashi, Kumiko; Tanimoto, Koichi; Fueki, Shinobu; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Because a shortage of new antimicrobial agents is a critical issue at present, and with the spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, the use of fosfomycin to treat infections is being revisited as a “last-resort option.” This drug offers a particular benefit in that it is more effective against bacteria growing under oxygen-limited conditions, unlike other commonly used antimicrobials, such as fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. In this study, we showed that Escherichia coli strains, including enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), were more susceptible to fosfomycin when grown anaerobically than when grown aerobically, and we investigated how the activity of this drug was enhanced during anaerobic growth of E. coli. Our quantitative PCR analysis and a transport assay showed that E. coli cells grown under anaerobic conditions had higher levels of expression of glpT and uhpT, encoding proteins that transport fosfomycin into cells with their native substrates, i.e., glycerol-3-phosphate and glucose-6-phosphate, and led to increased intracellular accumulation of the drug. Elevation of expression of these genes during anaerobic growth requires FNR, a global transcriptional regulator that is activated under anaerobic conditions. Purified FNR bound to DNA fragments from regions upstream of glpT and uhpT, suggesting that it is an activator of expression of glpT and uhpT during anaerobic growth. We concluded that the increased antibacterial activity of fosfomycin toward E. coli under anaerobic conditions can be attributed to elevated expression of GlpT and UhpT following activation of FNR, leading to increased uptake of the drug. PMID:26248376

  5. Reactor performance of a 750 m(3) anaerobic digestion plant: varied substrate input conditions impacting methanogenic community.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andreas Otto; Malin, Cornelia; Lins, Philipp; Gstraunthaler, Gudrun; Illmer, Paul

    2014-10-01

    A 750 m(3) anaerobic digester was studied over a half year period including a shift from good reactor performance to a reduced one. Various abiotic parameters like volatile fatty acids (VFA) (formic-, acetic-, propionic-, (iso-)butyric-, (iso-)valeric-, lactic acid), total C, total N, NH4 -N, and total proteins, as well as the organic matter content and dry mass were determined. In addition several process parameters such as temperature, pH, retention time and input of substrate and the concentrations of CH4, H2, CO2 and H2S within the reactor were monitored continuously. The present study aimed at the investigation of the abundance of acetogens and total cell numbers and the microbial methanogenic community as derived from PCR-dHPLC analysis in order to put it into context with the determined abiotic parameters. An influence of substrate quantity on the efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process was found as well as a shift from a hydrogenotrophic in times of good reactor performance towards an acetoclastic dominated methanogenic community in times of reduced reactor performance. After the change in substrate conditions it took the methano-archaeal community about 5-6 weeks to be affected but then changes occurred quickly.

  6. Enhancement of sludge anaerobic biodegradability by combined microwave-H2O2 pretreatment in acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Eswari, Parvathy; Kavitha, S; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick-Tae; Banu, J Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the sludge disintegration and reduce the cost of microwave (MW) pretreatment. Thermodynamic analysis of MW hydrolysis revealed the best fit with a first-order kinetic model at a specific energy of 18,600 kJ/kg total solids (TS). Combining H2O2 with MW resulted in a significant increment in solubilization from 30 to 50 % at 18,600 kJ/kg TS. The pH of H2O2-assisted MW-pretreated sludge (MW + H2O2) was in the alkaline range (pH 9-10), and it made the sludge unfavorable for subsequent anaerobic digestion and inhibits methane production. In order to nullify the alkaline effect caused by the MW + H2O2 combination, the addition of acid was considered for pH adjustment. H2O2-assisted MW-pretreated sludge in acidic conditions (MW + H2O2 + acid) showed a maximum methane production of 323 mL/g volatile solids (VS) than others during anaerobic biodegradability. A cost analysis of this study reveals that MW + H2O2 + acid was the most economical method with a net profit of 59.90 €/t of sludge.

  7. Bioaugmented composting of Jatropha de-oiled cake and vegetable waste under aerobic and partial anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Shivani; Kumar, Ashwani; Singh, Balraj; Nain, Lata; Joshi, Monica; Satya, Santosh

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of microbial inoculation in Jatropha cake composting with different vegetable waste. The microbial inoculums composed of fungal strains (Aspergillus awamori, Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma viride, Phanerochaete chrysosporium) and bacterial inoculums (Pseudomonas striata as phosphorus solublizer and Azotobacter chroococcum as nitrogen fixer) were added to the compost mixture after the thermophilic phase was over for bioaugmenting of Jatropha cake under aerobic and partial anaerobic conditions. Addition of both fungal and bacterial inoculum with mixed substrate (Jatropha cake + vegetable waste) during composting (aerobic and partial anaerobic) showed, better results as compared to compost with only fungal inoculants. Increased enzymatic activity initially, during composting (like dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase activity and FDA) proved role of inoculated microbes in rapid decomposition. Analysis of compost (with both bacterial and fungal inoculum) showed presence of high humus (12.7%), humic acid (0.5%), fulvic acid (5.68%), soluble protein content and low C/N ratio. Decreased in concentration of extractable metals (Cu, Fe and Mn) were recorded at maturity in all the substrate composts. The C/N ratio was significantly correlated to parameters like humic acid, humus, fulvic acid, protein and also microbial activity parameters. We conclude that the composting of de-oiled Jatropha cake with different vegetables waste could be feasible and sustainable approach in recycling of agricultural and industrial residues in huge quantities.

  8. Model based evaluation of a contaminant plume development under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in 2D bench-scale tank experiments.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Beyer, C; Bauer, R D; Griebler, C; Bauer, S

    2014-06-01

    The influence of transverse mixing on competitive aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume was investigated using a two-dimensional, bench-scale flow-through laboratory tank experiment. In the first part of the experiment aerobic degradation of increasing toluene concentrations was carried out by the aerobic strain Pseudomonas putida F1. Successively, ethylbenzene (injected as a mixture of unlabeled and fully deuterium-labeled isotopologues) substituted toluene; nitrate was added as additional electron acceptor and the anaerobic denitrifying strain Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1 was inoculated to study competitive degradation under aerobic /anaerobic conditions. The spatial distribution of anaerobic degradation was resolved by measurements of compound-specific stable isotope fractionation induced by the anaerobic strain as well as compound concentrations. A fully transient numerical reactive transport model was employed and calibrated using measurements of electron donors, acceptors and isotope fractionation. The aerobic phases of the experiment were successfully reproduced using a double Monod kinetic growth model and assuming an initial homogeneous distribution of P. putida F1. Investigation of the competitive degradation phase shows that the observed isotopic pattern cannot be explained by transverse mixing driven biodegradation only, but also depends on the inoculation process of the anaerobic strain. Transient concentrations of electron acceptors and donors are well reproduced by the model, showing its ability to simulate transient competitive biodegradation. PMID:24122285

  9. Anaerobic digestion of pig and dairy manure under photo-dark fermentation condition.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dongxue; Liu, Wei; Zhai, Ningning; Yang, Gaihe; Wang, Xiaojiao; Feng, Yongzhong; Ren, Guangxin

    2014-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) with livestock manure is a promising way for biogas production. This work presents the influence of photo-dark fermentation on biogas production of pig manure (PM) and dairy manure (DM). All sets were conducted with temperature 35 ± 2 °C and total solid concentrations 8%: PM₁ and DM₁ in transparent reactor under sunlight for photo-dark fermentation, and PM₂ and DM₂ in non-transparent reactor for dark fermentation. DM₂ had the best cumulative biogas production (CBP) of 15,447.5 mL, followed by PM₁ (15,020 mL) with stable pH and low total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentration (1384.99 mg/L), and DM₁ and PM₂. The CBP of DM₂ was 5.77 times as much as PM₂. The relationship between CBP and four factors including volatile fatty acid (VFA), TAN, total alkalinity and pH was analyzed. pH gained the maximum determination coefficient with the CBP among all sets and total alkalinity showed negative correlation with CBP of PM₁ and DM₁. PMID:24929281

  10. Comparison of microbial communities during the anaerobic digestion of Gracilaria under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Aqil; Kim, Wonduck; Lee, Jung Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digesters (MD and TD, respectively) utilizing Gracilaria and marine sediment as the substrate and inoculum, respectively, were compared by analyzing their performances and microbial community changes. During three successive transfers, the average cumulative methane yields in the MD and TD were 222.6 ± 17.3 mL CH4/g volatile solids (VS) and 246.1 ± 11 mL CH4/g VS, respectively. The higher hydrolysis rate and acidogenesis in the TD resulted in a several fold greater accumulation of volatile fatty acids (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) followed by a larger pH drop with a prolonged recovery than in the MD. However, the operational stability between both digesters remained comparable. Pyrosequencing analyses revealed that the MD had more complex microbial diversity indices and microbial community changes than the TD. Interestingly, Methanomassiliicoccales, the seventh methanogen order was the predominant archaeal order in the MD along with bacterial orders of Clostridiales, Bacteriodales, and Synergistales. Meanwhile, Coprothermobacter and Methanobacteriales dominated the bacterial and archaeal community in the TD, respectively. Although the methane yield is comparable, both MD and TD show a different profile of pH, VFA and the microbial communities. PMID:27562592

  11. Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and strawberry extrudate under mesophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Antonio; Siles, José A; Chica, Arturo F; Martín, M Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    The biomethanization of sewage sludge has several disadvantages such as low methane yield, poor biodegradability and nutrient imbalance. In this paper, a sewage sludge and strawberry extrudate mixture in a proportion of 40:60 (wet weight) is proposed to improve the viability of the process. The addition of an easily biodegradable co-substrate enhanced the nutrient balance and diluted the heavy metals and inhibitors from sewage sludge. Two different experimental set-ups at lab and semi-pilot scale were employed in order to ensure the reproducibility and significance of the obtained values. Co-digestion improved the stability of the process by decreasing the alkalinity to a mean value of 3215 ± 190 mg CaCO₃/L, while maintaining the pH within the optimal range for anaerobic digestion. The methane yield coefficient and biodegradability were 176 L/kg VS (total volatile solids) (0°C, 1 atm) and 81% (VS), respectively. Kinetic parameters decreased at the highest loads, suggesting the occurrence of a slowing down phenomenon. A quality organic amendment with a heavy metal content lower than the limits established under European legislation for agricultural applications was obtained from the digestate of the proposed treatment. PMID:25189839

  12. Comparison of microbial communities during the anaerobic digestion of Gracilaria under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Aqil; Kim, Wonduck; Lee, Jung Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digesters (MD and TD, respectively) utilizing Gracilaria and marine sediment as the substrate and inoculum, respectively, were compared by analyzing their performances and microbial community changes. During three successive transfers, the average cumulative methane yields in the MD and TD were 222.6 ± 17.3 mL CH4/g volatile solids (VS) and 246.1 ± 11 mL CH4/g VS, respectively. The higher hydrolysis rate and acidogenesis in the TD resulted in a several fold greater accumulation of volatile fatty acids (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) followed by a larger pH drop with a prolonged recovery than in the MD. However, the operational stability between both digesters remained comparable. Pyrosequencing analyses revealed that the MD had more complex microbial diversity indices and microbial community changes than the TD. Interestingly, Methanomassiliicoccales, the seventh methanogen order was the predominant archaeal order in the MD along with bacterial orders of Clostridiales, Bacteriodales, and Synergistales. Meanwhile, Coprothermobacter and Methanobacteriales dominated the bacterial and archaeal community in the TD, respectively. Although the methane yield is comparable, both MD and TD show a different profile of pH, VFA and the microbial communities.

  13. Demonstration of anaerobic stabilization of black water in accumulation systems under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Chaggu, Esnati J; Sanders, Wendy; Lettinga, Gatze

    2007-11-01

    The anaerobic digestion of "human waste" was studied at Mlalakuwa residential settlement in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania at ambient tropical temperatures (24-31 degrees C). This settlement experiences a high water table with flooding during the rainy season, resulting in a very costly emptying of the latrines once per month. To improve the situation, two plastic tanks (while one is in use, the other one is on stand-by) of 3000 l capacity each, named as Improved Pit-Latrines Without Urine Separation (IMPLWUS), were used as latrine pits. They received faeces+urine+wash water; basically, an accumulation system. Septic tank seed sludge was used. The dissolved chemical oxygen demand (COD(dis)) remaining when the reactor was closed after 380 days was about 8 g COD/l, volatile fatty acids were 100 mg COD/l and total ammonium nitrogen was about 2.8 g N/l, implying the possibility of methanogenesis inhibition. Stability results indicated a need for more degradation time after reactor closure. Estimated biogas production from wastewater generated by 10 people was 544 g COD-CH(4)/day, not enough for cooking purposes.

  14. Microcosm experiments to control anaerobic redox conditions when studying the fate of organic micropollutants in aquifer material.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Manuela; Carrera, Jesús; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Ayora, Carlos; Cama, Jordi; Köck-Schulmeyer, Marianne; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià; Tobella Brunet, Joana; Hernández García, Marta

    2011-11-01

    The natural processes occurring in subsurface environments have proven to effectively remove a number of organic pollutants from water. The predominant redox conditions revealed to be one of the controlling factors. However, in the case of organic micropollutants the knowledge on this potential redox-dependent behavior is still limited. Motivated by managed aquifer recharge practices microcosm experiments involving aquifer material, settings potentially feasible in field applications, and organic micropollutants at environmental concentrations were carried out. Different anaerobic redox conditions were promoted and sustained in each set of microcosms by adding adequate quantities of electron donors and acceptors. Whereas denitrification and sulfate-reducing conditions are easily achieved and maintained, Fe- and Mn-reduction are strongly constrained by the slower dissolution of the solid phases commonly present in aquifers. The thorough description and numerical modeling of the evolution of the experiments, including major and trace solutes and dissolution/precipitation of solid phases, have been proven necessary to the understanding of the processes and closing the mass balance. As an example of micropollutant results, the ubiquitous beta-blocker atenolol is completely removed in the experiments, the removal occurring faster under more advanced redox conditions. This suggests that aquifers constitute a potentially efficient alternative water treatment for atenolol, especially if adequate redox conditions are promoted during recharge and long enough residence times are ensured. PMID:22115096

  15. Microcosm experiments to control anaerobic redox conditions when studying the fate of organic micropollutants in aquifer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Manuela; Carrera, Jesús; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Ayora, Carlos; Cama, Jordi; Köck-Schulmeyer, Marianne; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià; Tobella Brunet, Joana; Hernández García, Marta

    2011-11-01

    The natural processes occurring in subsurface environments have proven to effectively remove a number of organic pollutants from water. The predominant redox conditions revealed to be one of the controlling factors. However, in the case of organic micropollutants the knowledge on this potential redox-dependent behavior is still limited. Motivated by managed aquifer recharge practices microcosm experiments involving aquifer material, settings potentially feasible in field applications, and organic micropollutants at environmental concentrations were carried out. Different anaerobic redox conditions were promoted and sustained in each set of microcosms by adding adequate quantities of electron donors and acceptors. Whereas denitrification and sulfate-reducing conditions are easily achieved and maintained, Fe- and Mn-reduction are strongly constrained by the slower dissolution of the solid phases commonly present in aquifers. The thorough description and numerical modeling of the evolution of the experiments, including major and trace solutes and dissolution/precipitation of solid phases, have been proven necessary to the understanding of the processes and closing the mass balance. As an example of micropollutant results, the ubiquitous beta-blocker atenolol is completely removed in the experiments, the removal occurring faster under more advanced redox conditions. This suggests that aquifers constitute a potentially efficient alternative water treatment for atenolol, especially if adequate redox conditions are promoted during recharge and long enough residence times are ensured.

  16. Requirement of ArcA for redox regulation in Escherichia coli under microaerobic but not anaerobic or aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, Svetlana; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Teixeira de Mattos, M Joost

    2003-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the two-component regulatory ArcAB system functions as a major control system for the regulation of expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in both aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways. Previously, we have described the physiological response of wild-type E. coli to changes in oxygen availability through the complete range from anaerobiosis to full aerobiosis (S. Alexeeva, B. de Kort, G. Sawers, K. J. Hellingwerf, and M. J. Teixeira de Mattos, J. Bacteriol. 182:4934-4940, 2000, and S. Alexeeva, K. J. Hellingwerf, and M. J. Teixeira de Mattos, J. Bacteriol. 184:1402-1406, 2002). Here, we address the question of the contribution of the ArcAB-dependent transcriptional regulation to this response. Wild-type E. coli and a mutant lacking the ArcA regulator were grown in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at controlled levels of oxygen availability ranging from full aerobiosis to complete anaerobiosis. A flux analysis of the distribution of catabolic fluxes over parallel pathways was carried out, and the intracellular redox state (as reflected by the NADH/NAD ratio) was monitored for all steady states. Deletion of ArcA neither significantly altered the in vivo activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and pyruvate formate lyase nor significantly affected catabolism under fully aerobic and fully anaerobic conditions. In contrast, profound effects of the absence of ArcA were seen under conditions of oxygen-restricted growth: increased respiration, an altered electron flux distribution over the cytochrome o- and d-terminal oxidases, and a significant change in the intracellular redox state were observed. Thus, the ArcA regulator was found to exert major control on flux distribution, and it is concluded that the ArcAB system should be considered a microaerobic redox regulator.

  17. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. 13C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using 3H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  18. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-07-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. (13)C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using (3)H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  19. Determination of the in vivo NAD:NADH ratio in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under anaerobic conditions, using alcohol dehydrogenase as sensor reaction.

    PubMed

    Bekers, K M; Heijnen, J J; van Gulik, W M

    2015-08-01

    With the current quantitative metabolomics techniques, only whole-cell concentrations of NAD and NADH can be quantified. These measurements cannot provide information on the in vivo redox state of the cells, which is determined by the ratio of the free forms only. In this work we quantified free NAD:NADH ratios in yeast under anaerobic conditions, using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the lumped reaction of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase as sensor reactions. We showed that, with an alternative accurate acetaldehyde determination method, based on rapid sampling, instantaneous derivatization with 2,4 diaminophenol hydrazine (DNPH) and quantification with HPLC, the ADH-catalysed oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde can be applied as a relatively fast and simple sensor reaction to quantify the free NAD:NADH ratio under anaerobic conditions. We evaluated the applicability of ADH as a sensor reaction in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, grown in anaerobic glucose-limited chemostats under steady-state and dynamic conditions. The results found in this study showed that the cytosolic redox status (NAD:NADH ratio) of yeast is at least one order of magnitude lower, and is thus much more reduced, under anaerobic conditions compared to aerobic glucose-limited steady-state conditions. The more reduced state of the cytosol under anaerobic conditions has major implications for (central) metabolism. Accurate determination of the free NAD:NADH ratio is therefore of importance for the unravelling of in vivo enzyme kinetics and to judge accurately the thermodynamic reversibility of each redox reaction.

  20. Electron Acceptors Induce Secretion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin under Anaerobic Conditions through Promotion of GspD Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Jin, Faguang

    2016-10-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), the major virulence factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), can lead to severe diarrhea and promotes ETEC adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. Most previous in vitro studies focused on ETEC pathogenesis were conducted under aerobic conditions, which do not reflect the real situation of ETEC infection because the intestine is anoxic. In this study, the expression and secretion of LT under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions were determined; LT was not efficiently secreted into the supernatant under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions unless terminal electron acceptors (trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate [TMAO] or nitrate) were available. Furthermore, we found that the restoration effects of TMAO and nitrate on LT secretion could be inhibited by amytal or ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG E. coli strains, indicating that LT secretion under anaerobic conditions was dependent on the integrity of the respiratory chain. At the same time, electron acceptors increase the ATP level of ETEC, but this increase was not the main reason for LT secretion. Subsequently, the relationship between the integrity of the respiratory chain and the function of the type II secretion system was determined. The GspD protein, the secretin of ETEC, was assembled under anaerobic conditions and was accompanied by LT secretion when TMAO or nitrate was added. Our data also demonstrated that TMAO and nitrate could not induce the GspD assembly and LT secretion in ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG strains, respectively. Moreover, GspD assembly under anaerobic conditions was assisted by the pilot protein YghG.

  1. Electron Acceptors Induce Secretion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin under Anaerobic Conditions through Promotion of GspD Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi; Fu, Enqing; Xie, Yonghong; Jin, Faguang

    2016-10-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), the major virulence factor of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), can lead to severe diarrhea and promotes ETEC adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. Most previous in vitro studies focused on ETEC pathogenesis were conducted under aerobic conditions, which do not reflect the real situation of ETEC infection because the intestine is anoxic. In this study, the expression and secretion of LT under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions were determined; LT was not efficiently secreted into the supernatant under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions unless terminal electron acceptors (trimethylamine N-oxide dihydrate [TMAO] or nitrate) were available. Furthermore, we found that the restoration effects of TMAO and nitrate on LT secretion could be inhibited by amytal or ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG E. coli strains, indicating that LT secretion under anaerobic conditions was dependent on the integrity of the respiratory chain. At the same time, electron acceptors increase the ATP level of ETEC, but this increase was not the main reason for LT secretion. Subsequently, the relationship between the integrity of the respiratory chain and the function of the type II secretion system was determined. The GspD protein, the secretin of ETEC, was assembled under anaerobic conditions and was accompanied by LT secretion when TMAO or nitrate was added. Our data also demonstrated that TMAO and nitrate could not induce the GspD assembly and LT secretion in ΔtorCAD and ΔnarG strains, respectively. Moreover, GspD assembly under anaerobic conditions was assisted by the pilot protein YghG. PMID:27430271

  2. Anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (AnSMBR) for municipal wastewater treatment under mesophilic and psychrophilic temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Sosa, David; Helmreich, Brigitte; Netter, Thomas; Paris, Stefania; Bischof, Franz; Horn, Harald

    2011-11-01

    A pilot scale anaerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (AnSMBR) with an external filtration unit for municipal wastewater treatment was operated for 100 days. Besides gas sparging, additional shear was created by circulating sludge to control membrane fouling. During the first 69 days, the reactor was operated under mesophilic temperature conditions. Afterwards, the temperature was gradually reduced to 20 °C. A slow and linear increase in the filtration resistance was observed under critical flux conditions (7 L/(m2 h)) at 35 °C. However, an increase in the fouling rate probably linked to an accumulation of solids, a higher viscosity and soluble COD concentrations in the reactor was observed at 20 °C. The COD removal efficiency was close to 90% under both temperature ranges. Effluent COD and BOD5 concentrations were lower than 80 and 25 mg/L, respectively. Pathogen indicator microorganisms (fecal coliforms bacteria) were reduced by log(10)5. Hence, the effluent could be used for irrigation purposes in agriculture.

  3. Interaction between phosphorus removal and hybrid granular sludge formation under low hydraulic selection pressure at alternating anaerobic/aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lang, Longqi; Wan, Junfeng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The hybrid granular sludge (HGS) formation and its performances on phosphorus removal were investigated in a sequencing batch airlift reactor. Under conditions of low superficial air velocity (SAV = 0.68 cm s(-1)) and relatively long settling time (15-30 min), aerobic granules appeared and coexisted with bio-flocs after 120 days operation. At the stable phase, 54% of total suspended solid (m/m) was granular sludge with the two typical sizes (D(mean) = 1.77 ± 0.33 and 0.89 ± 0.11 mm) in the reactor, where the settling velocity was 98.7 ± 12.4 and 37.8 ± 0.9 m h(-1) for the big and small granules. With progressive extension of anaerobic time from 15 to 60 min before aerobic condition per cycle during the whole experiment, the HGS system can be maintained at a high total phosphorus removal efficiency (ca. 99%) since Day-270. The phosphorus content (wt %) in biomass was respectively 9.54 ± 0.29, 7.60 ± 0.48 and 6.15 ± 0.59 for the big granules, small granules and flocs.

  4. Adherence to abiotic surface induces SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12 strains under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, Suelen B; Campos, Ana Carolina C; Pereira, Ana Claudia M; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luiza; Júnior, Raphael Hirata; Rosa, Ana Cláudia P; Asad, Lídia M B O

    2014-09-01

    During the colonization of surfaces, Escherichia coli bacteria often encounter DNA-damaging agents and these agents can induce several defence mechanisms. Base excision repair (BER) is dedicated to the repair of oxidative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chemical and physical agents or by metabolism. In this work, we have evaluated whether the interaction with an abiotic surface by mutants derived from E. coli K-12 deficient in some enzymes that are part of BER causes DNA damage and associated filamentation. Moreover, we studied the role of endonuclease V (nfi gene; 1506 mutant strain) in biofilm formation. Endonuclease V is an enzyme that is involved in DNA repair of nitrosative lesions. We verified that endonuclease V is involved in biofilm formation. Our results showed more filamentation in the xthA mutant (BW9091) and triple xthA nfo nth mutant (BW535) than in the wild-type strain (AB1157). By contrast, the mutant nfi did not present filamentation in biofilm, although its wild-type strain (1466) showed rare filaments in biofilm. The filamentation of bacterial cells attaching to a surface was a consequence of SOS induction measured by the SOS chromotest. However, biofilm formation depended on the ability of the bacteria to induce the SOS response since the mutant lexA Ind(-) did not induce the SOS response and did not form any biofilm. Oxygen tension was an important factor for the interaction of the BER mutants, since these mutants exhibited decreased quantitative adherence under anaerobic conditions. However, our results showed that the presence or absence of oxygen did not affect the viability of BW9091 and BW535 strains. The nfi mutant and its wild-type did not exhibit decreased biofilm formation under anaerobic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy was also performed on the E. coli K-12 strains that had adhered to the glass, and we observed the presence of a structure similar to an extracellular matrix that depended on the

  5. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  6. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2016-10-01

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). Results indicate that the biodiesel could be effectively biodegraded in the presence or absence of petrodiesel, whereas petrodiesel could not be biodegraded at all under sulfate-reducing conditions. The kinetics of biodegradation of individual Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) compounds and their accompanying sulfate-reduction rates were studied using a serum bottle test. As for the biodegradation of individual FAME compounds, the biodegradation rates for the saturated FAMEs decreased with increasing carbon chain length. For unsaturated FAMEs, biodegradation rates increased with increasing number of double bonds. The presence of petrodiesel had a greater effect on the rate of biodegradation of biodiesel than on the extent of removal. PMID:27448319

  7. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2016-10-01

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and its biodiesel/petrodiesel blends were investigated under sulfate-reducing conditions. Three blends of biodiesel, B100, B50, and B0, were treated using microbial cultures pre-acclimated to B100 (biodiesel only) and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). Results indicate that the biodiesel could be effectively biodegraded in the presence or absence of petrodiesel, whereas petrodiesel could not be biodegraded at all under sulfate-reducing conditions. The kinetics of biodegradation of individual Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) compounds and their accompanying sulfate-reduction rates were studied using a serum bottle test. As for the biodegradation of individual FAME compounds, the biodegradation rates for the saturated FAMEs decreased with increasing carbon chain length. For unsaturated FAMEs, biodegradation rates increased with increasing number of double bonds. The presence of petrodiesel had a greater effect on the rate of biodegradation of biodiesel than on the extent of removal.

  8. Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and chemically enhanced primary-treated sludge under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Obulisamy, Parthiba Karthikeyan; Chakraborty, Debkumar; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste with primary sewage sludge is beneficial for urban centers, while the optimized conditions reported in the literature are not locally suitable for Hong Kong. Therefore, the present study was aimed to develop an optimized mixing ratio of food waste to chemically enhanced primary-treated sewer sludge (CEPT) for co-digestion using batch tests under mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The mixing ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 2:1 and 3:1 (v v(-1)) of food waste to CEPT sludge was tested under the following conditions: temperature - 35°C and 55°C; pH - not regulated; agitation - 150 rpm and time - 20 days. The thermophilic incubations led a good hydrolysis rate and 2-12-fold higher enzyme activities than in mesophilic incubations for different mixing ratios. While the acidogenesis were found retarded that leading to 'sour and stuck' digestion for all mixing ratio of food waste to CEPT sludge from thermophilic incubations. The measured zeta potential was most favourable (-5 to -16.8 mV) for methane production under thermophilic incubations; however the CH4 recovery was less than that in mesophilic incubations. The results suggested that the quick hydrolysis and subsequent acid accumulation under thermophilic incubation lead to inhibited methanogenesis at the early stage than in mesophilic systems. It is concluded that buffer addition is therefore required for any mixing ratio of food waste to CEPT sludge for improved CH4 recovery for both mesophilic and thermophilic operations.

  9. Bacterial survival and association with sludge flocs during aerobic and anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, S R; Bitton, G

    1983-01-01

    The fate of indicator bacteria, a bacterial pathogen, and total aerobic bacteria during aerobic and anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludge under laboratory conditions was determined. Correlation coefficients were calculated between physical and chemical parameters (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, total solids, and volatile solids) and either the daily change in bacterial numbers or the percentage of bacteria in the supernatant. The major factor influencing survival of Salmonella typhimurium and indicator bacteria during aerobic digestion was the temperature of sludge digestion. At 28 degrees C with greater than 4 mg of dissolved oxygen per liter, the daily change in numbers of these bacteria was approximately -1.0 log10/ml. At 6 degrees C, the daily change was less than -0.3 log10/ml. Most of the bacteria were associated with the sludge flocs during aerobic digestion of sludge at 28 degrees C with greater than 2.4 mg of dissolved oxygen per liter. Lowering the temperature or the amount of dissolved oxygen decreased the fraction of bacteria associated with the flocs and increased the fraction found in the supernatant. PMID:6401978

  10. Thermal modelling of the completely stirred anaerobic reactor treating pig manure at low range of mesophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbin; Dong, Renjie; Clemens, Joachim; Wang, Wei

    2013-09-30

    Most of Chinese middle size agricultural biogas plants run at the lower range of mesophilic conditions and low organic loading rates (OLRs) which result in the low biogas production. How to obtain an economically viable operation mode is a challenge for Chinese farm biogas plants. In this study, the performance of completely stirred anaerobic reactors treating pig manure was studied at 20, 28 and 38 °C. A thermal mathematic model was accordingly developed to decide the optimum digesting temperature and OLRs considering ambient temperature of 20, 10 and 0 °C. The regression surface model can fit well on the experimental data when the ambient temperature was around 10-20 °C, at which maximum net energy production (Np,max) can be achieved when the digesters run at OLR of 4.6-5.4 kgODM/m(3) d with temperature of above 26 °C. Co-digestion on the pig farm was suggested in winter in order to increase the Np.

  11. Performance evaluation of a completely stirred anaerobic reactor treating pig manure at a low range of mesophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbin; Dong, Renjie; Clemens, Joachim; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Many Chinese biogas plants run in the lower range of mesophilic conditions. This study evaluated the performance of a completely stirred anaerobic reactor treating pig manure at different temperatures (20, 28 and 38°C). The start-up phase of the reactor at 20°C was very long and extremely poor performance was observed with increasing organic loading rate (OLR). At an OLR of 4.3g ODML(-1)d(-1), methane production at 28°C was comparable (3% less) with that at 38°C, but the risk of acidification was high at 28°C. At low OLR (1.3g ODML(-1)d(-1)), the biogas process appeared stable at 28°C and gave same methane yields as compared to the reactor operating at 38°C. The estimated sludge yield at 28°C was 0.065g VSSg(-1) CODremoved, which was higher than that at 38°C (0.016g VSSg(-1) CODremoved).

  12. Decolorization and detoxification of a sulfonated triphenylmethane dye aniline blue by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongmin; Xiao, Xiang; Xu, Cancan; Cao, Danming; Du, Daolin

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the extracellular decolorization of aniline blue, a sulfonated triphenylmethane dye, by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was confirmed. S. oneidensis MR-1 showed a high capacity for decolorizing aniline blue even at a concentration of up to 1,000 mg/l under anaerobic conditions. Maximum decolorization efficiency appeared at pH 7.0 and 30 °C. Lactate was a better candidate of electron donor for the decolorization of aniline blue. The addition of nitrate, hydrous ferric oxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide all could cause a significant decline of decolorization efficiency. The Mtr respiratory pathway was found to be involved into the decolorization of aniline blue by S. oneidensis MR-1. The toxicity evaluation through phytotoxicity and genotoxicity showed that S. oneidensis MR-1 could decrease the toxicity of aniline blue during the decolorization process. Thus, this work may facilitate a better understanding on the degradation mechanisms of the triphenylmethane dyes by Shewanella and is beneficial to their application in bioremediation.

  13. Performance evaluation of a completely stirred anaerobic reactor treating pig manure at a low range of mesophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbin; Dong, Renjie; Clemens, Joachim; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Many Chinese biogas plants run in the lower range of mesophilic conditions. This study evaluated the performance of a completely stirred anaerobic reactor treating pig manure at different temperatures (20, 28 and 38°C). The start-up phase of the reactor at 20°C was very long and extremely poor performance was observed with increasing organic loading rate (OLR). At an OLR of 4.3g ODML(-1)d(-1), methane production at 28°C was comparable (3% less) with that at 38°C, but the risk of acidification was high at 28°C. At low OLR (1.3g ODML(-1)d(-1)), the biogas process appeared stable at 28°C and gave same methane yields as compared to the reactor operating at 38°C. The estimated sludge yield at 28°C was 0.065g VSSg(-1) CODremoved, which was higher than that at 38°C (0.016g VSSg(-1) CODremoved). PMID:23842452

  14. Hydrogen photoproduction by nutrient-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells immobilized within thin alginate films under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kosourov, Sergey N; Seibert, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A new technique for immobilizing H2-photoproducing green algae within a thin (<400 microm) alginate film has been developed. Alginate films with entrapped sulfur/phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, strain cc124, cells demonstrate (a) higher cell density (up to 2,000 microg Chl mL(-1) of matrix), (b) kinetics of H2 photoproduction similar to sulfur-deprived suspension cultures, (c) higher specific rates (up to 12.5 micromol mg(-1) Chl h(-1)) of H2 evolution, (d) light conversion efficiencies to H2 of over 1% and (e) unexpectedly high resistance of the H2-photoproducing system to inactivation by atmospheric O2. The algal cells, entrapped in alginate and then placed in vials containing 21% O2 in the headspace, evolved up to 67% of the H2 gas produced under anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that the lower susceptibility of the immobilized algal H2-producing system to inactivation by O2 depends on two factors: (a) the presence of acetate in the medium, which supports higher rates of respiration and (b) the capability of the alginate polymer itself to effectively separate the entrapped cells from O2 in the liquid and headspace and restrict O2 diffusion into the matrix. The strategy presented for immobilizing algal cells within thin polymeric matrices shows the potential for scale-up and possible future applications. PMID:18823051

  15. Effect of fermentation conditions on biohydrogen production from cassava starch by anaerobic mixed cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Hai M.; Le, Kien A.; Tran, An T.; Le, Phung K.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a series of batch tests were conducted to investigate the effect of pH, temperature, fermentation time, and inoculums ratio to hydrogen production using cassava starch as a substrate. The statistical analysis of the experiment indicated that the significant effects for the fermentation yield were the main effect of temperature, pH and inoculums ratio. It was fouund that the suitable fermentation conditions of biohydrogen production should be at temperature 40 ° C; pH 6.5, inoculums to medium ratio 10 % and COD operation at 4800 g/mL. The maximum value of hydrogen volume produced was 76.22 mL. These affected has been evaluated and the result can be used as an reference for the pilot or industrial biohydrogen production.

  16. Effect of increasing total solids contents on anaerobic digestion of food waste under mesophilic conditions: performance and microbial characteristics analysis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jing; Dong, Bin; Jin, Jingwei; Dai, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    The total solids content of feedstocks affects the performances of anaerobic digestion and the change of total solids content will lead the change of microbial morphology in systems. In order to increase the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, it is necessary to understand the role of the total solids content on the behavior of the microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion of organic matter from wet to dry technology. The performances of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste with different total solids contents from 5% to 20% were compared and the microbial communities in reactors were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing technology. Three stable anaerobic digestion processes were achieved for food waste biodegradation and methane generation. Better performances mainly including volatile solids reduction and methane yield were obtained in the reactors with higher total solids content. Pyrosequencing results revealed significant shifts in bacterial community with increasing total solids contents. The proportion of phylum Chloroflexi decreased obviously with increasing total solids contents while other functional bacteria showed increasing trend. Methanosarcina absolutely dominated in archaeal communities in three reactors and the relative abundance of this group showed increasing trend with increasing total solids contents. These results revealed the effects of the total solids content on the performance parameters and the behavior of the microbial communities involved in the anaerobic digestion of food waste from wet to dry technologies.

  17. Effect of Increasing Total Solids Contents on Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste under Mesophilic Conditions: Performance and Microbial Characteristics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jingwei; Dai, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    The total solids content of feedstocks affects the performances of anaerobic digestion and the change of total solids content will lead the change of microbial morphology in systems. In order to increase the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, it is necessary to understand the role of the total solids content on the behavior of the microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion of organic matter from wet to dry technology. The performances of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste with different total solids contents from 5% to 20% were compared and the microbial communities in reactors were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing technology. Three stable anaerobic digestion processes were achieved for food waste biodegradation and methane generation. Better performances mainly including volatile solids reduction and methane yield were obtained in the reactors with higher total solids content. Pyrosequencing results revealed significant shifts in bacterial community with increasing total solids contents. The proportion of phylum Chloroflexi decreased obviously with increasing total solids contents while other functional bacteria showed increasing trend. Methanosarcina absolutely dominated in archaeal communities in three reactors and the relative abundance of this group showed increasing trend with increasing total solids contents. These results revealed the effects of the total solids content on the performance parameters and the behavior of the microbial communities involved in the anaerobic digestion of food waste from wet to dry technologies. PMID:25051352

  18. Laboratory Study of Chemical Speciation of Mercury in Lake Sediment and Water under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Regnell, Olof; Tunlid, Anders

    1991-01-01

    Chemical speciation and partitioning of radiolabeled HgCl2 were studied in model aquatic systems consisting of undisturbed eutrophic lake sediment and water in plastic cylinders. The cylinders were either gradually made anaerobic by a gentle flow of N2-CO2 or kept aerobic by air flow. The proportion of methylated 203Hg was significantly higher, in both water and sediment, in the anaerobic systems than in the aerobic systems. The composition and total concentration of fatty acids originating from bacterial phospholipids, as well as the concentration of vitamin B12, including related cobalamins, were similar in sediments from the anaerobic and aerobic systems. Bacterial cell numbers were, on average, 3.6 times higher in the anaerobic water columns than in the aerobic ones. Volatilization of 203Hg occurred in all systems except in an autoclaved control and was of similar magnitudes in the anaerobic and aerobic systems. Incorporation of 203Hg into the sediment was significantly faster in the aerobic systems than in the anaerobic systems. These results suggest that episodes of anoxia in bottom waters and sediment cause an increase in net mercury methylation and, hence, an increase in bioavailable mercury. PMID:16348444

  19. The determination of the real nano-scale sizes of bacteria in chernozem during microbial succession by means of hatching of a soil in aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbacheva, M.

    2012-04-01

    M.A. Gorbacheva,L.M. Polyanskaya The Faculty of Soil Science, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow,119991,Russia In recent years there's been particular attention paid to the smallest life's forms- bacteria which size can be measured in nanometer. These are the forms of bacteria with diameter of 5-200 nm. Theoretical calculations based on the content of the minimum number of DNA, enzyme, lipids in and ribosome in cells indicates impossibility of existence of a living cells within diameter less than 300 nm. It is theoretically possible for a living cell to exist within possible diameter of approximately 140 nm. Using a fluorescence microscope there's been indicated in a number of samples from lakes, rivers, soil, snow and rain water that 200 nm is the smallest diameter of a living cell. Supposingly, such a small size of bacteria in soil is determined by natural conditions which limit their development by nutritious substances and stress-factors. Rejuvenescence of nanobacteria under unfavourable natural conditions and stress-factors is studied in laboratory environment. The object of the current study has become the samples of typical arable chernozem of the Central Chernozem State Biosphere Reserve in Kursk. The detailed morphological description of the soil profile and its basic analytical characteristics are widely represented in scientific publications. The soil is characterized by a high carbon content which makes up 3,96% ,3,8% , and 2,9% for the upper layers of the A horizon, and 0,79% for the layer of the B horizon. A microbial succession was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by means of experiments with microcosms in upper A horizons and B horizon of a chernozem. The final aim is to identify the cells size of bacteria in aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions in chernozem during the microbial succession, by dampening and application of chitin by means of «cascade filtration» method. The study of the microcosms is important for

  20. [Influence of extracellular polymeric substance on enzyme hydrolysis of sludge under anaerobic condition].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Jun; Yang, Qi; Luo, Kun

    2011-08-01

    The effect of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) on the enzymatic solubilisation of sludge and the changes of chemical components was investigated. Sludge solubilization with and without EPS was studied in the enzymatic system, and in the normal system without enzyme addition, respectively. The result indicated that only EPS could be hydrolyzed when the enzyme addition less than 20 mg/g, while the cell lysis occurred significantly with the doses of enzymes increasing. Treatment with lysozyme for the original sludge was proved to have a higher hydrolysis efficiency, and the SCOD/TCOD rate reached up to 28.14%. And at the enzyme dosage of 60 mg/g, the VSS removal rate increased to 51.66% and the concentration of DNA attained 68.34 mg/g (calculated by VSS) after 48 h reaction, which were 29.01% and 59.63 mg/g higher than the control test, respectively, and were 24.86% and 53.39 mg/g higher than that with EPS removed in advance, respectively. Meanwhile, NH4+ -N, PO4(3-)-P and SCOD showed high dissolution efficiency, and the maximal concentrations achieved to 503 mg/L, 78.9 mg/L and 3171 mg/L, respectively. After removal of extracellular polymers, higher lysis efficiency was also observed by protease and cellulose, by which VSS reduction rate reached to 49.95% and 39.85%, respectively. The concentration of DNA showed a correlation coefficient of more than 0.9 with the concentrations of SCOD, NH4+ -N and PO4(3-)-P. And the highest hydrolysis rate obtained in 6 hours, which was about 3 hours earlier than the control test. Moreover, under those condition, sludge hydrolyzation could be well realized by only small amount of the enzyme addition.

  1. Effects of temperature on anaerobic decomposition of high-molecular weight organic matter under sulfate-reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Takato; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2013-03-01

    Most sedimentary mineralization occurs along coasts under anaerobic conditions. In the absence of oxygen, high-molecular weight organic matter in marine sediments is gradually decomposed by hydrolysis, fermentation and sulfate reduction. Because of the different responses of the respective steps to temperature, degradation may be specifically slowed or stopped in certain step. To evaluate the effect of temperature on cellobiose degradation, culture experiments were performed at six different temperatures (3 °C, 8 °C, 13 °C, 18 °C, 23 °C, and 28 °C) under sulfate-reducing conditions. This study measured the concentrations of sulfide, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and organic acids during that degradation. Degradation patterns were divided into three temperature groups: 3 °C, 8/13 °C, and 18/23/28 °C. The decrease in DOC proceeded in two steps, except at 3 °C. The length of the stagnant phase separating these two steps differed greatly between temperatures of 8/13 °C and 18/23/28 °C. In the first step, organic carbon was consumed by hydrolysis, fermentation and sulfate reduction. In the second step, acetate accumulated during the first step was oxidized by sulfate reduction. Bacterial communities in the cultures were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE); the major differences among the three temperature groups were attributed to shifts in acetate-using sulfate reducers of the genus Desulfobacter. This suggests that temperature characteristics of dominant acetate oxidizers are important factors in determining the response of carbon flow in coastal marine sediments in relation to the changes in temperature.

  2. Kinetics of Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of 6-line ferrihydrite under anaerobic flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Marcus, M.A.; Bargar, J.R.

    2010-04-01

    The readsorption of ferrous ions produced by the abiotic and microbially-mediated reductive dissolution of iron oxy-hydroxides drives a series of transformations of the host minerals. To further understand the mechanisms by which these transformations occur and their kinetics within a microporous flow environment, flow-through experiments were conducted in which capillary tubes packed with ferrihydrite-coated glass spheres were injected with inorganic Fe(II) solutions under circumneutral pH conditions at 25 C. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to identify the secondary phase(s) formed and to provide data for quantitative kinetic analysis. At concentrations at and above 1.8 mM Fe(II) in the injection solution, magnetite was the only secondary phase formed (no intermediates were detected), with complete transformation following a nonlinear rate law requiring 28 hours and 150 hours of reaction at 18 and 1.8 mM Fe(II), respectively. However, when the injection solution consisted of 0.36 mM Fe(II), goethite was the predominant reaction product and formed much more slowly according to a linear rate law, while only minor magnetite was formed. When the rates are normalized based on the time to react half of the ferrihydrite on a reduced time plot, it is apparent that the 1.8 mM and 18 mM input Fe(II) experiments can be described by the same reaction mechanism, while the 0.36 input Fe(II) experiment is distinct. The analysis of the transformation kinetics suggest that the transformations involved an electron transfer reaction between the aqueous as well as sorbed Fe(II) and ferrihydrite acting as a semiconductor, rather than a simple dissolution and recrystallization mechanism. A transformation mechanism involving sorbed inner sphere Fe(II) alone is not supported, since the essentially equal coverage of sorption sites in the 18 mM and 1.8 mM Fe(II) injections cannot explain the difference in the transformation rates observed.

  3. Dissolution Coupled Biodegradation of Pce by Inducing In-Situ Biosurfactant Production Under Anaerobic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, J.; Nambi, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have proven to enhance the bioavailability and thereby elevate the rate of degradation of Light Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) such as crude oil and petroleum derivatives. In spite of their superior characteristics, use of these biomolecules for remediation of Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) such as chlorinated solvents is still not clearly understood. In this present study, we have investigated the fate of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by inducing in-situ biosurfactants production, a sustainable option which hypothesizes increase in bioavailability of LNAPLs. In order to understand the effect of biosurfactants on dissolution and biodegradation under the inducement of in-situ biosurfactant production, batch experiments were conducted in pure liquid media. The individual influence of each process such as biosurfactant production, dissolution of PCE and biodegradation of PCE were studied separately for getting insights on the synergistic effect of each process on the fate of PCE. Finally the dissolution coupled biodegradation of non aqueous phase PCE was studied in conditions where biosurfactant production was induced by nitrate limitation. The effect of biosurfactants was differentiated by repeating the same experiments were the biosurfactant production was retarded. The overall effect of in-situ biosurfactant production process was evaluated by use of a mathematical model. The process of microbial growth, biosurfactant production, dissolution and biodegradation of PCE were translated as ordinary differential equations. The modelling exercise was mainly performed to get insight on the combined effects of various processes that determine the concentration of PCE in its aqueous and non-aqueous phases. Model simulated profiles of PCE with the kinetic coefficients evaluated earlier from individual experiments were compared with parameters fitted for observations in experiments with dissolution coupled biodegradation process using optimization

  4. Energy- and CO2-reduction potentials by anaerobic treatment of wastewater and organic kitchen wastes in consideration of different climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Weichgrebe, D; Urban, I; Friedrich, K

    2008-01-01

    The classical municipal wastewater treatment in Germany consists of an aerobic carbon and nitrogen elimination and mostly an anaerobic sludge treatment. Organic kitchen wastes from separate waste collection as well as yard wastes are converted mostly in composting plants to soil conditioner. With these conventional types of treatment, the energy potential in waste and wastewater is lost due to aerobic material conversion. In this article three scenarios for the treatment of municipal wastewater and waste are compared on the subject of energy efficiency and useable potential: Sc1. the classical wastewater treatment and the composting of the organic waste fraction, Sc2. the anaerobic treatment of wastewater combined with deammonification and the digestion of the organic waste fraction, and Sc3. a mutual anaerobic treatment of wastewater and waste as co-digestion with deammonification. The calculation of energy and CO2-balance considers different climatic conditions. In case of using anaerobic treatment, not only the energy balance will be positive, also the CO2-balance is improved by the substitution of fossil fuels with generated biogas.

  5. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ...

  6. Hydrogen Photoproduction by Nutrient-Deprived Chalamydomonas reinhardtii Cells Immobilized Within Thin Alginate Films Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kosourov, S. N.; Seibert, M.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique for immobilizing H{sub 2}-photoproducing green algae within a thin (<400 {micro}m) alginate film has been developed. Alginate films with entrapped sulfur/phosphorus-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, strain cc124, cells demonstrate (a) higher cell density (up to 2,000 {micro}g Chl mL{sup -1} of matrix), (b) kinetics of H{sub 2} photoproduction similar to sulfur-deprived suspension cultures, (c) higher specific rates (up to 12.5 {micro}mol mg{sup -1} Chl h{sup -1}) of H{sub 2} evolution, (d) light conversion efficiencies to H{sub 2} of over 1% and (e) unexpectedly high resistance of the H{sub 2}-photoproducing system to inactivation by atmospheric O{sub 2}. The algal cells, entrapped in alginate and then placed in vials containing 21% O{sub 2} in the headspace, evolved up to 67% of the H{sub 2} gas produced under anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that the lower susceptibility of the immobilized algal H{sub 2}-producing system to inactivation by O{sub 2} depends on two factors: (a) the presence of acetate in the medium, which supports higher rates of respiration and (b) the capability of the alginate polymer itself to effectively separate the entrapped cells from O{sub 2} in the liquid and headspace and restrict O{sub 2} diffusion into the matrix. The strategy presented for immobilizing algal cells within thin polymeric matrices shows the potential for scale-up and possible future applications.

  7. Tolerance of anaerobic conditions caused by flooding during germination and early growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Miro, Berta; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2013-01-01

    Rice is semi-aquatic, adapted to a wide range of hydrologies, from aerobic soils in uplands to anaerobic and flooded fields in waterlogged lowlands, to even deeply submerged soils in flood-prone areas. Considerable diversity is present in native rice landraces selected by farmers over centuries. Our understanding of the adaptive features of these landraces to native ecosystems has improved considerably over the recent past. In some cases, major genes associated with tolerance have been cloned, such as SUB1A that confers tolerance of complete submergence and SNORKEL genes that control plant elongation to escape deepwater. Modern rice varieties are sensitive to flooding during germination and early growth, a problem commonly encountered in rainfed areas, but few landraces capable of germination under these conditions have recently been identified, enabling research into tolerance mechanisms. Major QTLs were also identified, and are being targeted for molecular breeding and for cloning. Nevertheless, limited progress has been made in identifying regulatory processes for traits that are unique to tolerant genotypes, including faster germination and coleoptile elongation, formation of roots and leaves under hypoxia, ability to catabolize starch into simple sugars for subsequent use in glycolysis and fermentative pathways to generate energy. Here we discuss the state of knowledge on the role of the PDC-ALDH-ACS bypass and the ALDH enzyme as the likely candidates effective in tolerant rice genotypes. Potential involvement of factors such as cytoplasmic pH regulation, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species scavenging and other metabolites is also discussed. Further characterization of contrasting genotypes would help in elucidating the genetic and biochemical regulatory and signaling mechanisms associated with tolerance. This could facilitate breeding rice varieties suitable for direct seeding systems and guide efforts for improving waterlogging tolerance in other crops

  8. Performance evaluation of a completely stirred anaerobic reactor treating pig manure at a low range of mesophilic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianbin; Dong, Renjie; Clemens, Joachim; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The biogas process can run stably at 20 °C at extremely low OLR after long-term acclimation of bacteria. • A biogas plant running at 28 °C seems as efficient as that operated at 38 °C at low OLR of 1.3 g ODM L{sup −1} d{sup −1}. • Lower temperature operation is inadvisable for the commercial biogas plant running at rather high OLR. • The estimated sludge yield at 28 °C is higher than that at 38 °C. - Abstract: Many Chinese biogas plants run in the lower range of mesophilic conditions. This study evaluated the performance of a completely stirred anaerobic reactor treating pig manure at different temperatures (20, 28 and 38 °C). The start-up phase of the reactor at 20 °C was very long and extremely poor performance was observed with increasing organic loading rate (OLR). At an OLR of 4.3 g ODM L{sup −1} d{sup −1}, methane production at 28 °C was comparable (3% less) with that at 38 °C, but the risk of acidification was high at 28 °C. At low OLR (1.3 g ODM L{sup −1} d{sup −1}), the biogas process appeared stable at 28 °C and gave same methane yields as compared to the reactor operating at 38 °C. The estimated sludge yield at 28 °C was 0.065 g VSS g{sup −1} COD{sub removed,} which was higher than that at 38 °C (0.016 g VSS g{sup −1} COD{sub removed})

  9. Tolerance of anaerobic conditions caused by flooding during germination and early growth in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Miro, Berta; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2013-01-01

    Rice is semi-aquatic, adapted to a wide range of hydrologies, from aerobic soils in uplands to anaerobic and flooded fields in waterlogged lowlands, to even deeply submerged soils in flood-prone areas. Considerable diversity is present in native rice landraces selected by farmers over centuries. Our understanding of the adaptive features of these landraces to native ecosystems has improved considerably over the recent past. In some cases, major genes associated with tolerance have been cloned, such as SUB1A that confers tolerance of complete submergence and SNORKEL genes that control plant elongation to escape deepwater. Modern rice varieties are sensitive to flooding during germination and early growth, a problem commonly encountered in rainfed areas, but few landraces capable of germination under these conditions have recently been identified, enabling research into tolerance mechanisms. Major QTLs were also identified, and are being targeted for molecular breeding and for cloning. Nevertheless, limited progress has been made in identifying regulatory processes for traits that are unique to tolerant genotypes, including faster germination and coleoptile elongation, formation of roots and leaves under hypoxia, ability to catabolize starch into simple sugars for subsequent use in glycolysis and fermentative pathways to generate energy. Here we discuss the state of knowledge on the role of the PDC-ALDH-ACS bypass and the ALDH enzyme as the likely candidates effective in tolerant rice genotypes. Potential involvement of factors such as cytoplasmic pH regulation, phytohormones, reactive oxygen species scavenging and other metabolites is also discussed. Further characterization of contrasting genotypes would help in elucidating the genetic and biochemical regulatory and signaling mechanisms associated with tolerance. This could facilitate breeding rice varieties suitable for direct seeding systems and guide efforts for improving waterlogging tolerance in other crops.

  10. Influence of aerobic and anaerobic conditions on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in Luria-Bertani broth, farm-yard manure and slurry.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander V; van Overbeek, Leo; Termorshuizen, Aad J; van Bruggen, Ariena H C

    2011-03-01

    The influence of aerobic and anaerobic conditions on the survival of the enteropathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella serovar Typhimurium was investigated in microcosms with broth, cattle manure or slurry. These substrates were inoculated with a green fluorescent protein transformed strain of the enteropathogens at 10(7) cells g(-1) dry weight. Survival data was fitted to the Weibull model. The survival curves in aerobic conditions generally showed a concave curvature, while the curvature was convex in anaerobic conditions. The estimated survival times showed that E. coli O157:H7 survived significantly longer under anaerobic than under aerobic conditions. Survival ranged from approximately. 2 weeks for aerobic manure and slurry to more than six months for anaerobic manure at 16 °C. On average, in 56.3% of the samplings, the number of recovered E. coli O157:H7 cells by anaerobic incubation of Petri plates was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in comparison with aerobic incubation. Survival of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium was not different between aerobic and anaerobic storage of LB broth or manure as well as between aerobic and anaerobic incubation of Petri dishes. The importance of changes in microbial community and chemical composition of manure and slurry was distinguished for the survival of E. coli O157:H7 in different oxygen conditions.

  11. Decrease of U(VI) Immobilization Capability of the Facultative Anaerobic Strain Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 under Anoxic Conditions Due to Strongly Reduced Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of a facultative anaerobic bacterial isolate named Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 with U(VI) were studied under oxic and anoxic conditions in order to assess the influence of the oxygen-dependent cell metabolism on microbial uranium mobilization and immobilization. We demonstrated that aerobically and anaerobically grown cells of Paenibacillus sp. JG-TB8 accumulate uranium from aqueous solutions under acidic conditions (pH 2 to 6), under oxic and anoxic conditions. A combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods revealed that the speciation of U(VI) associated with the cells of the strain depend on the pH as well as on the aeration conditions. At pH 2 and pH 3, uranium was exclusively bound by organic phosphate groups provided by cellular components, independently on the aeration conditions. At higher pH values, a part (pH 4.5) or the total amount (pH 6) of the dissolved uranium was precipitated under oxic conditions in a meta-autunite-like uranyl phosphate mineral phase without supplying an additional organic phosphate substrate. In contrast to that, under anoxic conditions no mineral formation was observed at pH 4.5 and pH 6, which was clearly assigned to decreased orthophosphate release by the cells. This in turn was caused by a suppression of the indigenous phosphatase activity of the strain. The results demonstrate that changes in the metabolism of facultative anaerobic microorganisms caused by the presence or absence of oxygen can decisively influence U(VI) biomineralization. PMID:25157416

  12. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has

  13. Effect of anaerobic soil disinfestation and vermicompost on soilborne phytopathogenic agents under tree-crop nursery conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) is a fumigation-independent management strategy for controlling soilborne pathogens. Walnut nurseries currently employ preplant fumigation to control soilborne phytopathogens and weeds, and may be amenable to use ASD instead. We investigated the potential of ASD a...

  14. Anaerobic Conditions Promote Expression of Sfp Fimbriae and Adherence of Sorbitol-Fermenting Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:NM to Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Müsken, Anne; Bielaszewska, Martina; Greune, Lilo; Schweppe, Christian H.; Müthing, Johannes; Schmidt, Herbert; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Karch, Helge; Zhang, Wenlan

    2008-01-01

    The sfp gene cluster, unique to sorbitol-fermenting (SF) enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:NM strains, encodes fimbriae that mediate mannose-resistant hemagglutination in laboratory E. coli strains but are not expressed in wild-type SF EHEC O157:NM strains under standard laboratory conditions. We investigated whether Sfp fimbriae are expressed under conditions that mimic the intestinal environment and whether they contribute to the adherence of SF EHEC O157:NM strains to human intestinal epithelial cells. The transcription of sfpA (encoding the major fimbrial subunit) was upregulated in all strains investigated, and all expressed SfpA and possessed fimbriae that reacted with an anti-SfpA antibody when the strains were grown on solid media under anaerobic conditions. Sfp expression was absent under aerobic conditions and in liquid media. Sfp upregulation under anaerobic conditions was significantly higher on blood agar and a medium simulating the colonic environment than on a medium simulating the ileal environment (P < 0.05). The induction of Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains correlates with increased adherence to Caco-2 and HCT-8 cells. Our data indicate that the expression of Sfp fimbriae in SF E. coli O157:NM strains is induced under conditions resembling those of the natural site of infection and that Sfp fimbriae may contribute to the adherence of the organisms to human intestinal epithelium. PMID:18083855

  15. Impact of high external circulation ratio on the performance of anaerobic reactor treating coal gasification wastewater under thermophilic condition.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shengyong; Han, Hongjun; Zhuang, Haifeng; Hou, Baolin; Li, Kun

    2015-09-01

    A laboratory-scale external circulation anaerobic reactor (ECAR) was developed to treat actual coal gasification wastewater. The external circulation ratio (R) was selected as the main operating variable for analysis. From the results, with the hydraulic retention time of 50h, pH > 8.0 and R of 3, the COD, total phenols, volatile phenol and NH4(+)-N removal efficiencies were remarkably increased to 10 ± 2%, 22 ± 5%, 18 ± 1%, and -1 ± 2%, respectively. Besides, increasing R resulted in more transformation from bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to free EPS in the liquid and the particle size distribution of anaerobic granular sludge accumulated in the middle size range of 1.0-2.5mm. Results showed the genus Saccharofermentans dominanted in the ECAR and the bacterial community shift was observed at different external circulation ratio, influencing the pollutants removal profoundly.

  16. Biodegradation of polyacrylamide by anaerobic digestion under mesophilic condition and its performance in actual dewatered sludge system.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaohu; Luo, Fan; Yi, Jing; He, Qunbiao; Dong, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) used in sludge dewatering widely exists in high-solid anaerobic digestion. Degradation of polyacrylamide accompanied with accumulation of its toxic monomer is important to disposition of biogas residues. The potential of anaerobic digestion activity in microbial utilization of PAM was investigated in this study. The results indicated that the utilization rate of PAM (as nitrogen source) was influenced by accumulation of ammonia, while cumulative removal of amide group was accorded with zeroth order reaction in actual dewatered system. The adjoining amide group can combined into ether group after biodegradation. PAM can be broken down in different position of its carbon chain backbone. In actual sludge system, the hydrolytic PAM was liable to combined tyrosine-rich protein to form colloid complex, and then consumed as carbon source to form monomer when easily degradable organics were exhausted. The accumulation of acrylamide was leveled off ultimately, accompanied with the yield of methane.

  17. The effects of aerobic and anaerobic exercise conditioning on resting metabolic rate and the thermic effect of a meal.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, W D; Hyner, G C; Lyle, R M; Corrigan, D; Bottoms, G; Melby, C L

    1994-12-01

    This study examined resting metabolic rate (RMR) and thermic effect of a meal (TEM) among athletes who had participated in long-term anaerobic or aerobic exercise. Nine collegiate wrestlers were matched for age, weight, and fat-free weight with 9 collegiate swimmers. Preliminary testing included maximal oxygen consumption, maximal anaerobic capacity (MAnC) for both the arms and the legs, and percent body fat. On two separate occasions, RMR and TEM were measured using indirect calorimetry. VO2max was significantly higher in the swimmers while MAnC was significantly higher in the wrestlers for both the arms and the legs. RMR adjusted for fat-free weight was not significantly different between groups. The differences in total and percentage of TEM between the groups were not statistically significant, and there were no differences in baseline thyroid hormones. These data suggest that despite significant differences in VO2max and WAnT values following long-term aerobic and anaerobic exercise training, resting energy expenditure does not differ between these college athletes. PMID:7874150

  18. Positive feedback of crop residue incorporation on dissolved organic carbon contents under anaerobic conditions in temperate rice paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Sodano, Marcella; Bertora, Chiara; Lerda, Cristina; Sacco, Dario; Celi, Luisella

    2016-04-01

    Rice paddy soils are generally characterized by large concentrations and fluxes of DOC in comparison to other ecosystems. Our recent studies have shown that the combination of relatively high pore-water DOC concentrations under anoxic soil conditions (>10-20 mg C l‑1) and important percolation fluxes of water during field flooding may contribute significant organic C inputs into the subsoil (18-51 g C m‑2) over the cropping season. Crop residues incorporated into the soil after harvest represent the main input of organic C into paddy soils, returning about 200-300 g C m‑2 y‑1 in single-cropped rice paddies. The anaerobic decomposition of these residues may supply important amounts of DOC to soil pore waters. Moreover, the supply of electron donors with the input of residue-derived labile OM may further increase DOC contents by stimulating the microbially-catalyzed reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides under anoxic conditions, and release of DOC previously stabilized on the mineral matrix (i.e. positive feedback). This could have important implications on organic C inputs into the subsoil as well as substrate availability for methane production. We therefore hypothesized that crop residue management practices that influence the amount of labile organic matter present in the soil at the time of field flooding may strongly influence soil solution DOC concentrations as well as the positive feedback on the release of soil-derived DOC. We tested this hypothesis at field-scale by evaluating variations in the contents and quality of DOC above and beneath the plough pan over the cropping season as a function of crop residue management practices involving: tillage and crop residue incorporation in spring (SPR), tillage and crop residue incorporation in spring, dry seeding and 1 month delayed flooding (DRY), tillage and crop residue incorporation in autumn (AUT), and straw removal after harvest and tillage in spring (REM). Moreover, we linked changes in DOC

  19. Positive feedback of crop residue incorporation on dissolved organic carbon contents under anaerobic conditions in temperate rice paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Sodano, Marcella; Bertora, Chiara; Lerda, Cristina; Sacco, Dario; Celi, Luisella

    2016-04-01

    Rice paddy soils are generally characterized by large concentrations and fluxes of DOC in comparison to other ecosystems. Our recent studies have shown that the combination of relatively high pore-water DOC concentrations under anoxic soil conditions (>10-20 mg C l-1) and important percolation fluxes of water during field flooding may contribute significant organic C inputs into the subsoil (18-51 g C m-2) over the cropping season. Crop residues incorporated into the soil after harvest represent the main input of organic C into paddy soils, returning about 200-300 g C m-2 y-1 in single-cropped rice paddies. The anaerobic decomposition of these residues may supply important amounts of DOC to soil pore waters. Moreover, the supply of electron donors with the input of residue-derived labile OM may further increase DOC contents by stimulating the microbially-catalyzed reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides under anoxic conditions, and release of DOC previously stabilized on the mineral matrix (i.e. positive feedback). This could have important implications on organic C inputs into the subsoil as well as substrate availability for methane production. We therefore hypothesized that crop residue management practices that influence the amount of labile organic matter present in the soil at the time of field flooding may strongly influence soil solution DOC concentrations as well as the positive feedback on the release of soil-derived DOC. We tested this hypothesis at field-scale by evaluating variations in the contents and quality of DOC above and beneath the plough pan over the cropping season as a function of crop residue management practices involving: tillage and crop residue incorporation in spring (SPR), tillage and crop residue incorporation in spring, dry seeding and 1 month delayed flooding (DRY), tillage and crop residue incorporation in autumn (AUT), and straw removal after harvest and tillage in spring (REM). Moreover, we linked changes in DOC

  20. Anaerobic respiration and antioxidant responses of Corythucha ciliata (Say) adults to heat-induced oxidative stress under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Wei, He-Ping; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    High temperature often induces oxidative stress and antioxidant response in insects. This phenomenon has been well documented under controlled laboratory conditions, but whether it happens under fluctuating field conditions is largely unknown. In this study, we used an invasive lace bug (Corythucha ciliata) as a model species to compare the effects of controlled thermal treatments (2 h at 33-43 °C with 2 °C intervals in the laboratory) and naturally fluctuating thermal conditions (08:00-14:00 at 2-h intervals (29.7-37.2 °C) on a hot summer day in a field in Shanghai, China) on lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) was the marker) and anaerobic respiration (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was the marker), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), and glutathione reductase (GR). The results show that MDA concentration increased significantly in response to heat stresses with similar trend in the laboratory and field. LDH activities did not significantly vary across temperatures in the laboratory-exposed individuals, but they significantly increased by rising temperature in the field. The activities or concentrations of SOD, CAT, GSH, and GR all significantly increased with increasing temperature in the two populations. These findings indicate that high temperature induces oxidative stress, resulting in high anaerobic respiration and antioxidant defenses in C. ciliata under both the laboratory and field conditions, which likely provide a defense mechanism against oxidative damage due to the accumulation of ROS.

  1. The effect of salinization and freshening events in coastal aquifers on nutrient characteristics as deduced from column experiments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russak, A.; Sivan, O.; Herut, B.; Lazar, B.; Yechieli, Y.

    2015-10-01

    This study experimentally quantified the effect of seawater intrusion (salinization) and freshening events in coastal aquifers on nutrient (N, P and DSi) dynamics across the fresh-saline groundwater interface. Laboratory column experiments were conducted under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in order to simulate the processes occurring in the fresh-saline interface. They were performed with aquifer sediments, simulating the natural conditions during alterations of natural fresh groundwater to seawater and vice versa. The salinization and freshening experiments showed that NH4+ and PO43- and DSi were affected mainly by ion exchange processes while microbial activity controlled the nitrogen species NO3- and NO2-. Due to the cation exchange, salinization generated enrichment (above the expected conservative behavior) of NH4+, up to 80 μmol L-1 (an order of magnitude higher than in seawater or fresh groundwater). Under anaerobic conditions NO3- was removed by denitrification, as demonstrated by the decrease in NO3- concentrations, the increase in NO2- concentrations, and the increase in δ15N by 15-25‰. Clear evidence was shown for anion exchange of PO43-, which competes with HCO3- and boron on adsorption sites. DSi seems to take part in the exchange process, similar to PO43-.

  2. Rhamnolipid-dependent spreading growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on a high-agar medium: marked enhancement under CO2-rich anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Takashi; Tanikawa, Taichiro; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Chihiro; Ando, Yumi; Matsushita, Mitsugu; Nakagawa, Yoji; Matsuyama, Tohey

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobiosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in infected organs is now gaining attention as a unique physiological feature. After anaerobic cultivation of P. aeruginosa wild type strain PAO1 T, we noticed an unexpectedly expanding colony on a 1.5% agar medium. The basic factors involved in this spreading growth were investigated by growing the PAO1 T strain and its isogenic mutants on a Davis high-agar minimal synthetic medium under various experimental conditions. The most promotive environment for this spreading growth was an O(2)-depleted 8% CO(2) condition. From mutational analysis of this spreading growth, flagella and type IV pili were shown to be ancillary factors for this bacterial activity. On the other hand, a rhamnolipid-deficient rhlA mutant TR failed to exhibit spreading growth on a high-agar medium. Complementation of the gene defect of the mutant TR with a plasmid carrying the rhlAB operon resulted in the restoration of the spreading growth. In addition, an external supply of rhamnolipid or other surfactants (surfactin from Bacillus subtilis or artificial product Tween 80) also restored the spreading growth of the mutant TR. Such activity of surfactants on bacterial spreading on a hard-agar medium was unique to P. aeruginosa under CO(2)-rich anaerobic conditions.

  3. Bioenergy production from diluted poultry manure and microbial consortium inside Anaerobic Sludge Bed Reactor at sub-mesophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Jaxybayeva, Aigerim; Yangin-Gomec, Cigdem; Cetecioglu, Zeynep; Ozbayram, E Gozde; Yilmaz, Fatih; Ince, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, anaerobic treatability of diluted chicken manure (with an influent feed ratio of 1 kg of fresh chicken manure to 6 L of tap water) was investigated in a lab-scale anaerobic sludge bed (ASB) reactor inoculated with granular seed sludge. The ASB reactor was operated at ambient temperature (17-25°C) in order to avoid the need of external heating up to higher operating temperatures (e.g., up to 35°C for mesophilic digestion). Since heat requirement for raising the temperature of incoming feed for digestion is eliminated, energy recovery from anaerobic treatment of chicken manure could be realized with less operating costs. Average biogas production rates were calculated ca. 210 and 242 L per kg of organic matter removed from the ASB reactor at average hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 13 and 8.6 days, respectively. Moreover, average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of ca. 89% was observed with suspended solids removal more than 97% from the effluent of the ASB reactor. Influent ammonia, on the other hand, did not indicate any free ammonia inhibition due to dilution of the raw manure while pH and alkalinity results showed stability during the study. Microbial quantification results indicated that as the number of bacterial community decreased, the amount of Archaea increased through the effective digestion volume of the ASB reactor. Moreover, the number of methanogens displayed an uptrend like archaeal community and a strong correlation (-0.645) was found between methanogenic community and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration especially acetate. PMID:25065830

  4. Germination of Echinochloa crus-galli (Barnyard Grass) Seeds under Anaerobic Conditions : Respiration and Response to Metabolic Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, R A; Rumpho, M E; Vanderzee, D

    1983-07-01

    Echinochloa crus-galli L. Beauv., a rice-field weed, can germinate and grow for extended periods of time in an anaerobic environment. Compared to pea, which does not germinate under anaerobiosis, the evolution of CO(2) in Echinochloa and rice is lower and the peak rate of CO(2) evolution is delayed when germinated without oxygen. The plants studied also differ with respect to their respiration ratio ([CO(2)] N(2)/[CO(2)] air) and metabolism used during the early stages of germination. Echinochloa does not increase its glycolytic rate under anaerobiosis, whereas pentose phosphate pathway activity appears to increase during the first 40 to 50 hours of germination.Based on its response to metabolic inhibitors (NaF, dinitrophenol, and malonate), anaerobic metabolism in Echinochloa proceeds primarily through glycolysis, with partial operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and little or no oxidative phosphorylation. Also, Echinochloa is sensitive to CN during aerobic germination, whereas rice appears to be able to shift to CN-insensitive electron transport. Finally, the effectiveness of cyanide and azide on inhibiting germination of Echinochloa in N(2), but not CO, suggests that cytochrome oxidase is not used to reoxidize pyridine nucleotides in the absence of oxygen. The possible existence of an alternate electron acceptor is discussed.

  5. Anaerobic Process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Ju, Mei-Ting; Li, Wei-Zun; Liu, Le; Wang, Yan-Nan; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. Pretreatment Organic waste Multiple-stage co-digestion Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:27620085

  6. Anaerobic treatment of rice winery wastewater in an upflow filter packed with steel slag under different hydraulic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeadam; Kim, Jaai; Hwang, Seokhwan; Lee, Changsoo

    2015-10-01

    Rice-washing drainage (RWD), a strong organic wastewater, was anaerobically treated using an upflow filter filled with blast-furnace slag. The continuous performance of the reactor was examined at varying hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The reactor achieved 91.7% chemical oxygen demand removal (CODr) for a 10-day HRT (0.6 g COD/Ld organic loading rate) and maintained fairly stable performance until the HRT was shortened to 2.2 days (CODr > 84%). Further decreases in HRT caused process deterioration (CODr < 50% and pH < 5.5 for a 0.7-day HRT). The methane production rate increased with decreasing HRT to reach the peak level for a 1.3-day HRT, whereas the yield was significantly greater for 3.4-day or longer HRTs. The substrate removal and methane production kinetics were successfully evaluated, and the generated kinetic models produced good performance predictions. The methanogenic activity of the reactor likely relies on the filter biofilm, with Methanosaeta being the main driver.

  7. [Comparison of morphology, physiology and mineral element contents among genotypes of sesame with different tolerance to waterlogging under anaerobic condition].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenquan; Zhang, Fusuo; Zheng, Yongzhan; Mei, Hongxian

    2002-04-01

    The morphological and physiological indexes and the mineral element contents in different organs of 4 genotypes of sesame were examined under controlled oxygen supply. The number of adventitious roots of flooding tolerant varieties, Wild No. 7 and Yuzhi No. 1, increased 4-5 fold, the activity of ADH enhanced about twice, but the net photosynthetic rate (Pn) decreased slightly. There were significant increase in Ca and P and little decrease in K in roots, and decrease in other elements in roots and 8 elements in stems and leaves. As for less flooding-tolerant genotypes, Danbackaggce and Suiping Xiaozhihuang, however, the number of adventitious roots increased little, the activity of ADH enhanced 5-9 folds, and Pn decreased by 50-60%. An increase in Ca and P, and a significant reduction in K was found in roots. It was concluded that the waterlogging tolerance of sesame depended firstly on the structural adaptation, then on the anoxia metabolism, and that Ca and P may play an important role in the metabolic adaptation to the anaerobic environment for plant survival.

  8. The possible reduction pathways of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by sulfide under simulated anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Hua; Feng, Hua-jun; Liu, Shao-ying; Wang, Chao-jun; Zhang, Yuan; Gao, Yan-ni; Li, Wen-bing; Yao, Jun; Wang, Mei-zhen; Shen, Dong-sheng

    2011-01-01

    To predict the final fate of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its intermediates in an anaerobic fermentative solution containing reduced sulfur species and to provide a basis for the adoption of remediation methods, we investigated the pathways of TNT (TNT(0) = 50 mg/L) reduction by Na(2)S at 30 ± 1 °C in an acetic acid-sodium bicarbonate buffer. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used to identify TNT metabolites at different reaction times. The law of growth and decline of TNT and its metabolites was determined with time. The LC/MS result, combined with the physicochemical characteristics of related products and information from the literature, indicated possible TNT conversion pathways. Sulfide can initiate both nitroreduction and denitration of TNT simultaneously. Nitroreduction led to the accumulation of primary intermediates 4-hydroxylaminodinitrotoluene and 4-aminodinitrotoluene, whereas denitration resulted in the production of unidentified substances with molecular weight less than that of TNT. Also, polyreaction between the above intermediates formed many unidentified substances. Humification was concluded to be the best choice for remediation of TNT-contaminated soil and water due to the formation of intermediates with stable, intact aromatic systems. However, the denitration pathway of TNT offered the possibility of mineralization. PMID:22170844

  9. Anaerobic treatment of rice winery wastewater in an upflow filter packed with steel slag under different hydraulic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yeadam; Kim, Jaai; Hwang, Seokhwan; Lee, Changsoo

    2015-10-01

    Rice-washing drainage (RWD), a strong organic wastewater, was anaerobically treated using an upflow filter filled with blast-furnace slag. The continuous performance of the reactor was examined at varying hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The reactor achieved 91.7% chemical oxygen demand removal (CODr) for a 10-day HRT (0.6 g COD/Ld organic loading rate) and maintained fairly stable performance until the HRT was shortened to 2.2 days (CODr > 84%). Further decreases in HRT caused process deterioration (CODr < 50% and pH < 5.5 for a 0.7-day HRT). The methane production rate increased with decreasing HRT to reach the peak level for a 1.3-day HRT, whereas the yield was significantly greater for 3.4-day or longer HRTs. The substrate removal and methane production kinetics were successfully evaluated, and the generated kinetic models produced good performance predictions. The methanogenic activity of the reactor likely relies on the filter biofilm, with Methanosaeta being the main driver. PMID:26117235

  10. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  11. The use of laboratory scale reactors to predict sensitivity to changes in operating conditions for full-scale anaerobic digestion treating municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    McLeod, James D; Othman, Maazuza Z; Beale, David J; Joshi, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge is highly complex and prone to inhibition, which can cause major issues for digester operators. The result is that there have been numerous investigations into changes in operational conditions, however to date all have focused on the qualitative sensitivities, neglecting the quantitative. This study therefore aimed to determine the quantitative sensitivities by using factorial design of experiments and small semi continuous reactors. Analysis showed total and volatile solids removals are chiefly influenced by retention time, with 79% and 59% of the observed results being attributed to retention time respectively, whereas biogas was mainly influenced by loading rate, 38%, and temperature, 22%. Notably the regression model fitted to the experimental data predicted full-scale performance with a high level of precision, indicating that small reactors are subject to the same sensitivity of full-scale digesters and thus can be used to predict changes loading, retention time, and temperature.

  12. [Potential difference across the membrane of subcellular particles. V. Generation of potential differences by mitochondria and submitochondrial particles under anaerobic conditions].

    PubMed

    Liberman, E A; Vladimirova, M A; Tsofina, L M

    1977-01-01

    It is shown by the mehtod of penetrating ions that Site O and I of the respiratory chain of submitochondrial particles are able to generate a membrane potential of the normal value under anaerobic conditons. When succinate is an electron donor and ferricyanide-an acceptor (Site II), the oxygen addition sharply increases the membrane potential at pH above 7.5 and does not change or even decreases it in reaction conditions more acid than pH 6.5. The generation of the membrane potential at low pH and in the absence of oxygen is predicted by the chemielectric hypothesis and cannot be explained by the chemiosmotic one. Mitochondria usually generate the membrane potential without O2 at pH 7.5 in the presence of ferricyanide when the substrate concentration exceeds 5 mM.

  13. Anaerobic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, E.R.; Humphrey, W.J.; Cave, J.P.

    1982-12-28

    This invention provides for the anaerobic treatment of acidic petrochemical wastes in an anaerobic filter at high loadings and high recycle rates. The effluent from the top of the filter passes into a gas-disengaging/solids-settling zone containing a quiescent body of the effluent liquid. The settled solids are withdrawn and recycled to the base of the filter together with fresh acidic waste and an inorganic alkaline material (preferably magnesium oxide or carbonate) to maintain a neutral pH. The liquid portion of the effluent is sent to an aerobic digester to remove the rest of the organic material, which is used to support the growth of bacteria and fed back to the anaerobic system.

  14. Effects of electron acceptors on removal of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, resistance genes and class 1 integrons under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Heyang; Miller, Jennifer H; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M; Pruden, Amy; He, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic biotechnologies can effectively remove antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but there is a need to better understand the mechanisms. Here we employ bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as a platform to investigate the fate of a native tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant Escherichia coli strain and its ARGs. The E. coli strain carrying intI1, sulI and tet(E) was isolated from domestic wastewater and dosed into a tubular BES. The BES was first operated as a microbial fuel cell (MFC), with aeration in the cathode, which resulted in enhanced removal of E. coli and ARGs by ~2 log (i.e., order of magnitude) when switched from high current to open circuit operation mode. The BES was then operated as a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to exclude the effects of oxygen diffusion, and the removal of E. coli and ARGs during the open circuit configuration was again 1-2 log higher than that at high current mode. Significant correlations of E. coli vs. current (R(2)=0.73) and ARGs vs. E. coli (R(2) ranged from 0.54 to 0.87), and the fact that the BES substrate contained no electron acceptors, implied that the persistence of the E. coli and its ARGs was determined by the availability of indigenous electron acceptors in the BES, i.e., the anode electrode or the electron shuttles generated by the exoelectrogens. Subsequent experiments with pure-culture tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant E. coli being incubated in a two-chamber MEC and serum bottles demonstrated that the E. coli could survive by respiring anode electrode and/or electron shuttles released by exoelectrogens, and ARGs persisted with their host E. coli.

  15. Constitutive expression of Campylobacter jejuni truncated hemoglobin CtrHb improves the growth of Escherichia coli cell under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiang-Ke; Xiong, Wei; Xu, Li; Li, Jia; Zhao, Xiu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria hemoglobin could bind to the oxygen, transfer it from the intracellular microenvironment to the respiration process and sustain the energy for the metabolism and reproduction of cells. Heterologous expression of bacteria hemoglobin gene could improve the capacity of the host on oxygen-capturing and allow it to grow even under microaerophilic condition. To develop a system based on hemoglobin to help bacteria cells overcome the oxygen shortage in fermentation, in this study, Campylobacter jejuni truncated hemoglobin (CtrHb) gene was synthesized and expressed under the control of constitutive expression promoters P2 and P(SPO1-II) in Escherichia coli. As showed by the growth curves of the two recombinants P2-CtrHb and P(SPO1-II)-CtrHb, constitutive expression of CtrHb improved cell growth under aerobic shaking-flasks, anaerobic capped-bottles and bioreactor conditions. According to the NMR analysis, this improvement might come from the expression of hemoglobin which could boost the metabolism of cells by supplying more oxygen to the respiratory chain processes. Through semi-quantitative RT-PCR and CO differential spectrum assays, we further discussed the connection between the growth patterns of the recombinants, the expression level of CtrHb and oxygen binding capacity of CtrHb in cells. Based on the growth patterns of these recombinants in bioreactor, a possible choice on different type of recombinants under specific fermentation conditions was also suggested in this study.

  16. Constitutive expression of Campylobacter jejuni truncated hemoglobin CtrHb improves the growth of Escherichia coli cell under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiang-Ke; Xiong, Wei; Xu, Li; Li, Jia; Zhao, Xiu-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria hemoglobin could bind to the oxygen, transfer it from the intracellular microenvironment to the respiration process and sustain the energy for the metabolism and reproduction of cells. Heterologous expression of bacteria hemoglobin gene could improve the capacity of the host on oxygen-capturing and allow it to grow even under microaerophilic condition. To develop a system based on hemoglobin to help bacteria cells overcome the oxygen shortage in fermentation, in this study, Campylobacter jejuni truncated hemoglobin (CtrHb) gene was synthesized and expressed under the control of constitutive expression promoters P2 and P(SPO1-II) in Escherichia coli. As showed by the growth curves of the two recombinants P2-CtrHb and P(SPO1-II)-CtrHb, constitutive expression of CtrHb improved cell growth under aerobic shaking-flasks, anaerobic capped-bottles and bioreactor conditions. According to the NMR analysis, this improvement might come from the expression of hemoglobin which could boost the metabolism of cells by supplying more oxygen to the respiratory chain processes. Through semi-quantitative RT-PCR and CO differential spectrum assays, we further discussed the connection between the growth patterns of the recombinants, the expression level of CtrHb and oxygen binding capacity of CtrHb in cells. Based on the growth patterns of these recombinants in bioreactor, a possible choice on different type of recombinants under specific fermentation conditions was also suggested in this study. PMID:26047918

  17. Anaerobic transformation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa, C.F.; Roopathy, R.

    1995-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic tempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic microorganisms. In many cases attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions results in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. Trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitrate from trinitrotoluene is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the production of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. This presentation will review the data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT and other nitroaromatics.

  18. Anaerobic treatment of tequila vinasses under seasonal operating conditions: start-up, normal operation and restart-up after a long stop and starvation period.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui-Jáuregui, J A; Méndez-Acosta, H O; González-Álvarez, V; Snell-Castro, R; Alcaraz-González, V; Godon, J J

    2014-09-01

    This study examines the performance of an anaerobic fixed-film bioreactor under seasonal operating conditions prevailing in medium and small size Tequila factories: start-up, normal operation and particularly, during the restart-up after a long stop and starvation period. The proposed start-up procedure attained a stable biofilm in a rather short period (28 days) despite unbalanced COD/N/P ratio and the use of non-acclimated inoculum. The bioreactor was restarted-up after being shut down for 6 months during which the inoculum starved. Even when biofilm detachment and bioreactor clogging were detected at the very beginning of restart-up, results show that the bioreactor performed better as higher COD removal and methane yield were attained. CE-SSCP and Q-PCR analyses, conducted on the biofilm prokaryotic communities for each operating condition, confirmed that the high COD removal results after the bioreactor clogging and the severe starvation period were mainly due to the stable archaeal and resilient bacterial populations.

  19. Activated sludge mass reduction and biodegradability of the endogenous residues by digestion under different aerobic to anaerobic conditions: Comparison and modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, C G; Fall, C; Olguín, M T

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to identify suitable conditions for the in-situ reduction of excess sludge production by intercalated digesters in recycle-activated sludge (RAS) flow. The objective was to compare and model biological sludge mass reduction and the biodegradation of endogenous residues (XP) by digestion under hypoxic, aerobic, anaerobic, and five intermittent-aeration conditions. A mathematical model based on the heterotrophic endogenous decay constant (bH) and including the biodegradation of XP was used to fit the long-term data from the digesters to identify and estimate the parameters. Both the bH constant (0.02-0.05 d(-1)) and the endogenous residue biodegradation constant (bP, 0.001-0.004 d(-1)) were determined across the different mediums. The digesters with intermittent aeration cycles of 12 h-12 h and 5 min-3 h (ON/OFF) were the fastest, compared to the aerobic reactor. The study provides a basis for rating RAS-digester volumes to avoid the accumulation of XP in aeration tanks.

  20. Activated sludge mass reduction and biodegradability of the endogenous residues by digestion under different aerobic to anaerobic conditions: Comparison and modeling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, C G; Fall, C; Olguín, M T

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to identify suitable conditions for the in-situ reduction of excess sludge production by intercalated digesters in recycle-activated sludge (RAS) flow. The objective was to compare and model biological sludge mass reduction and the biodegradation of endogenous residues (XP) by digestion under hypoxic, aerobic, anaerobic, and five intermittent-aeration conditions. A mathematical model based on the heterotrophic endogenous decay constant (bH) and including the biodegradation of XP was used to fit the long-term data from the digesters to identify and estimate the parameters. Both the bH constant (0.02-0.05 d(-1)) and the endogenous residue biodegradation constant (bP, 0.001-0.004 d(-1)) were determined across the different mediums. The digesters with intermittent aeration cycles of 12 h-12 h and 5 min-3 h (ON/OFF) were the fastest, compared to the aerobic reactor. The study provides a basis for rating RAS-digester volumes to avoid the accumulation of XP in aeration tanks. PMID:26720137

  1. Biogas production from co-digestion of corn stover and chicken manure under anaerobic wet, hemi-solid, and solid state conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yeqing; Zhang, Ruihong; Chen, Chang; Liu, Guangqing; He, Yanfeng; Liu, Xiaoying

    2013-12-01

    Corn stover (CS) and chicken manure (CM) are ubiquitous agricultural wastes at low cost and have the potential to achieve a nutrient-balance when mixed together to produce biomethane via anaerobic digestion (AD). The main objective of this work was to investigate methane production at different CS to CM ratios and to evaluate the process stability under wet (W-AD), hemi-solid state (HSS-AD) and solid state (SS-AD) conditions. Results showed that synergistic effects were found when mixing two substrates at CS:CM ratios of 3:1 and 1:1 (on volatile solid basis). The highest methane yield of 218.8 mL/g VS added was achieved in W-AD at CS:CM ratio of 3:1. In SS-AD, the highest volumetric methane productivity of 14.2L methane/L reactor volume was found at CS:CM of 1:1. The results of this work provide useful information to improve the efficiency and stability of co-digestion of CS and CM under different AD conditions.

  2. PCB breakdown by anaerobic microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Recently, altered PCB cogener distribution patterns observed in anaerobic sediment samples from the upper Hudson River are being attributed to biologically mediated reductive dechlorination. The authors report their successful demonstration of biologically mediated reductive dechlorination of an Aroclor mixture. In their investigation, they assessed the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated Hudson River sediments (60-562 ppm PCBs) to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 under anaerobic conditions by eluting microorganisms from the PCB- contaminated sediments and transferring them to a slurry of reduced anaerobic mineral medium and PCB-free sediments in tightly stoppered bottles. They observed dechlorination to be the most rapid at the highest PCB concentration tried by them.

  3. Anaerobic Biodegradation Of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Under Iron-Reducing Conditions In Batch And Continuous-Flow Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of biodegradation of the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under iron-reducing conditions was explored in batch and continuous-flow systems. A porous pot completely-mixed reactor was seeded with diverse cultures and operated under iron-reducing...

  4. Microbial aerobic and anaerobic degradation of acrylamide in sludge and water under environmental conditions--case study in a sand and gravel quarry.

    PubMed

    Guezennec, A G; Michel, C; Ozturk, S; Togola, A; Guzzo, J; Desroche, N

    2015-05-01

    Polyacrylamides (PAMs) are used in sand and gravel quarries as water purification flocculants for recycling process water in a recycling loop system where the flocculants remove fine particles in the form of sludge. The PAM-based flocculants, however, contain residual amounts of acrylamide (AMD) that did not react during the polymerization process. This acrylamide is released into the environment when the sludge is discharged into a settling basin. Here, we explore the microbial diversity and the potential for AMD biodegradation in water and sludge samples collected in a quarry site submitted to low AMD concentrations. The microbial diversity, analyzed by culture-dependent methods and the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis approach, reveals the presence of Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, and Actinobacteria, among which some species are known to have an AMD biodegradation activity. Results also show that the two main parts of the water recycling loop-the washing process and the settling basin-display significantly different bacterial profiles. The exposure time with residual AMD could, thus, be one of the parameters that lead to a selection of specific bacterial species. AMD degradation experiments with 0.5 g L(-1) AMD showed a high potential for biodegradation in all parts of the washing process, except the make-up water. The AMD biodegradation potential in samples collected from the washing process and settling basin was also analyzed taking into account on-site conditions: low (12 °C) and high (25 °C) temperatures reflecting the winter and summer seasons, and AMD concentrations of 50 μg L(-1). Batch tests showed rapid (as little as 18 h) AMD biodegradation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions at both the winter and summer temperatures, although there was a greater lag time before activity started with the AMD biodegradation at 12 °C. This study, thus, demonstrates that bacteria present in sludge and water samples exert an in situ and rapid

  5. Comparative Analysis of Performance and Microbial Characteristics Between High-Solid and Low-Solid Anaerobic Digestion of Sewage Sludge Under Mesophilic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Yi, Jing; Yang, Dianhai

    2016-01-01

    High-solid anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge achieves highly efficient volatile solid reduction, and production of volatile fatty acid (VFA) and methane compared with conventional low-solid anaerobic digestion. In this study, the potential mechanisms of the better performance in high-solid anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge were investigated by using 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing and real-time PCR to analyze the microbial characteristics in sewage sludge fermentation reactors. The results obtained by 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing revealed that the phyla Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes were the dominant functional microorganisms in high-solid and low-solid anaerobic systems. Meanwhile, the real-time PCR assays showed that high-solid anaerobic digestion significantly increased the number of total bacteria, which enhanced the hydrolysis and acidification of sewage sludge. Further study indicated that the number of total archaea (dominated by Methanosarcina) in a high-solid anaerobic fermentation reactor was also higher than that in a low-solid reactor, resulting in higher VFA consumption and methane production. Hence, the increased key bacteria and methanogenic archaea involved in sewage sludge hydrolysis, acidification, and methanogenesis resulted in the better performance of high-solid anaerobic sewage sludge fermentation.

  6. The potential of oxygen to improve the stability of anaerobic reactors during unbalanced conditions: results from a pilot-scale digester treating sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Ramos, I; Fdz-Polanco, M

    2013-07-01

    A well-functioning pilot reactor treating sewage sludge at approximately 4.4 NL/m(3)/d of oxygen supply and 18d of hydraulic retention time (HRT) was subjected to a hydraulic overload to investigate whether oxygen benefits successful operation in stressful circumstances. Only a mild imbalance was caused, which was overcome without deterioration in the digestion performance. Volatile solids (VS) removal was 45% and 43% at 18 and 14 d of HRT, respectively. Biogas productivity remained around 546 NmL/gVS, but it was slightly higher during the period of imbalance. Thereafter, similar performances were achieved. Under anaerobic conditions, VS removal and biogas productivity were respectively 41% and 525 NmL/gVS, hydrogen partial pressure rose, and acetic acid formation became less favourable. Oxygen seemed to form a more stable digestion system, which meant increased ability to deal successfully with overloads. Additionally, it improved the biogas quality; methane concentration was negligibly lower, while hydrogen sulphide and oxygen remained around 0.02 and 0.03%v/v, respectively.

  7. [Effects of the thiol reagent dithiothreitol on the oxidation-reduction potential and the growth of Escherichia coli in anaerobic conditions at different pH].

    PubMed

    Kirakosian, G; Bagramian, K; Trchunian, A

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the oxidation-reduction potential of medium during the growth of Escherichia coli bacteria under anaerobic conditions in the pH range 5.5-7.5 were studied. It was shown that dithiothreitol, a reducer of thiol groups, at a concentration of 3 mM decreased the initial value of oxidation-reduction potential to negative values of -60 to -220 mV, increased the duration of the lag growth phase, decreased the growth rate, and lowered the acidification of the medium and accumulation of potassium ions independently of pH. The value of the potential in the presence of 3 mM dithiothreitol decreased by 15-20 mV both at alkaline and acidic pH. Dithiothreitol at a concentration of 10 mM stopped molecular hydrogen production at pH 5.5 only. The effects of dithiothreitol on the oxidation-reduction potential and bacterial growth were probably associated with changes in the state of thiol groups in membrane proteins, which affects the generation of membrane potential, proton secretion from cells, K+ accumulation in bacteria, and the activity of membrane-associated enzymes.

  8. FeS-coated sand for removal of arsenic(III) under anaerobic conditions in permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Soo; Gallegos, Tanya J; Demond, Avery H; Hayes, Kim F

    2011-01-01

    Iron sulfide (as mackinawite, FeS) has shown considerable promise as a material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions. However, as a nanoparticulate material, synthetic FeS is not suitable for use in conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). This study developed a methodology for coating a natural silica sand to produce a material of an appropriate diameter for a PRB. Aging time, pH, rinse time, and volume ratios were varied, with a maximum coating of 4.0 mg FeS/g sand achieved using a pH 5.5 solution at a 1:4 volume ratio (sand: 2 g/L FeS suspension), three days of aging and no rinsing. Comparing the mass deposited on the sand, which had a natural iron-oxide coating, with and without chemical washing showed that the iron-oxide coating was essential to the formation of a stable FeS coating. Scanning electron microscopy images of the FeS-coated sand showed a patchwise FeS surface coating. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a partial oxidation of the Fe(II) to Fe(III) during the coating process, and some oxidation of S to polysulfides. Removal of As(III) by FeS-coated sand was 30% of that by nanoparticulate FeS at pH 5 and 7. At pH 9, the relative removal was 400%, perhaps due to the natural oxide coating of the sand or a secondary mineral phase from mackinawite oxidation. Although many studies have investigated the coating of sands with iron oxides, little prior work reports coating with iron sulfides. The results suggest that a suitable PRB material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions can be produced through the deposition of a coating of FeS onto natural silica sand with an iron-oxide coating.

  9. FeS-coated sand for removal of arsenic(III) under anaerobic conditions in permeable reactive barriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Han, Y.-S.; Gallegos, T.J.; Demond, A.H.; Hayes, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron sulfide (as mackinawite, FeS) has shown considerable promise as a material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions. However, as a nanoparticulate material, synthetic FeS is not suitable for use in conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). This study developed a methodology for coating a natural silica sand to produce a material of an appropriate diameter for a PRB. Aging time, pH, rinse time, and volume ratios were varied, with a maximum coating of 4.0 mg FeS/g sand achieved using a pH 5.5 solution at a 1:4 volume ratio (sand: 2 g/L FeS suspension), three days of aging and no rinsing. Comparing the mass deposited on the sand, which had a natural iron-oxide coating, with and without chemical washing showed that the iron-oxide coating was essential to the formation of a stable FeS coating. Scanning electron microscopy images of the FeS-coated sand showed a patchwise FeS surface coating. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a partial oxidation of the Fe(II) to Fe(III) during the coating process, and some oxidation of S to polysulfides. Removal of As(III) by FeS-coated sand was 30% of that by nanoparticulate FeS at pH 5 and 7. At pH 9, the relative removal was 400%, perhaps due to the natural oxide coating of the sand or a secondary mineral phase from mackinawite oxidation. Although many studies have investigated the coating of sands with iron oxides, little prior work reports coating with iron sulfides. The results suggest that a suitable PRB material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions can be produced through the deposition of a coating of FeS onto natural silica sand with an iron-oxide coating. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal decarboxylation. The microbial consortia will be developed using a fermentor system first under batch and then in a continuous system. The main objectives for this quarter were to develop microbial consortia that would decarboxylate coal and isolate potential anaerobic microorganisms with decarboxylating, ability from these enriched microbial consortia, to continue to compare the known cultures with reward to their ability to decarboxylate coal, and to characterize the anaerobically biotreated coal using FTIR to confirm decarboxylation of coal. Significant achievements during the period include: coal decarboxylation was possible only under anaerobic conditions. microbial consortia that can anaerobically decarboxylate coal have been developed using anaerobic vials and batch fermentor system, and loss of carboxyl groups in biotreated coal has been confirmed by FT-IR.

  11. Anaerobic Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  12. Effect of music on anaerobic exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Atan, T

    2013-03-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to "slow rhythm music", "fast rhythm music" or "no music". 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  13. Application of the IWA ADM1 model to simulate anaerobic co-digestion of organic waste with waste activated sludge in mesophilic condition.

    PubMed

    Derbal, K; Bencheikh-Lehocine, M; Cecchi, F; Meniai, A-H; Pavan, P

    2009-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion model no. 1 model of international water association was applied to a full scale anaerobic co-digestion process for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes along with activated sludge wastes originating from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. This operation was carried out in a digester of 2000 m(3) in volume. It is operates at an average hydraulic retention time of 26.9 days with an average organic loading rate of 1.01 kg TVS/m(3) day, at a temperature of 37 degrees C with an average gas production rate of 0.296 m(3)/m(3) day. The aim of the present study is to compare the results obtained from the simulation with the experimental values. The simulated results showed a good fit for pH, methane and carbon dioxide percentages, biogas volume, chemical oxygen demand, total volatile fatty acids, inorganic nitrogen and inorganic carbon.

  14. The curing agent sodium nitrite, used in the production of fermented sausages, is less inhibiting to the bacteriocin-producing meat starter culture Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Verluyten, Jurgen; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-07-01

    Curvacin A is a listericidal bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain isolated from fermented sausage. The response of this strain to an added curing agent (sodium nitrite) in terms of cell growth and bacteriocin production was investigated in vitro by laboratory fermentations with modified MRS broth. The strain was highly sensitive to nitrite; even a concentration of 10 ppm of curing agent inhibited its growth and both volumetric and specific bacteriocin production. A meat simulation medium containing 5 ppm of sodium nitrite was tested to investigate the influence of the gas phase on the growth and bacteriocin production of L. curvatus LTH 1174. Aerating the culture during growth had no effect on biomass formation, but the oxidative stress caused a higher level of specific bacteriocin production and led to a metabolic shift toward acetic acid production. Anaerobic conditions, on the other hand, led to an increased biomass concentration and less growth inhibition. Also, higher maximum volumetric bacteriocin activities and a higher level of specific bacteriocin production were obtained in the presence of sodium nitrite than in fermentations under aerobic conditions or standard conditions of air supply. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of the curing agent is at least partially masked under anaerobic conditions. PMID:12839751

  15. The curing agent sodium nitrite, used in the production of fermented sausages, is less inhibiting to the bacteriocin-producing meat starter culture Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Verluyten, Jurgen; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-07-01

    Curvacin A is a listericidal bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain isolated from fermented sausage. The response of this strain to an added curing agent (sodium nitrite) in terms of cell growth and bacteriocin production was investigated in vitro by laboratory fermentations with modified MRS broth. The strain was highly sensitive to nitrite; even a concentration of 10 ppm of curing agent inhibited its growth and both volumetric and specific bacteriocin production. A meat simulation medium containing 5 ppm of sodium nitrite was tested to investigate the influence of the gas phase on the growth and bacteriocin production of L. curvatus LTH 1174. Aerating the culture during growth had no effect on biomass formation, but the oxidative stress caused a higher level of specific bacteriocin production and led to a metabolic shift toward acetic acid production. Anaerobic conditions, on the other hand, led to an increased biomass concentration and less growth inhibition. Also, higher maximum volumetric bacteriocin activities and a higher level of specific bacteriocin production were obtained in the presence of sodium nitrite than in fermentations under aerobic conditions or standard conditions of air supply. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of the curing agent is at least partially masked under anaerobic conditions.

  16. Anaerobic microbial transformations in subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollag, J.M.; Berry, D.F.; Chanmugathas, P.

    1985-04-01

    The first draft of a literature review article entitled, ''Metabolism of Homocyclic (Benzenoid) and Heterocyclic Aromatic Compounds by Microorganisms Under Anaerobic Conditions'' is completed. The article covers biodegradation of both heterocyclic and homocyclic aromatic compounds under a variety of conditions including nitrate reducing, fermentation, sulfate reducing, and methanogensis. Laboratory experiments have been designed to study the anaerobic biotransformation processes involving organic substance derived from energy residual wastes. The test compounds selected for the initial anaerobic biodegradation experiments include aniline, indole, and pyridine. A Hungate apparatus is presently in operation.

  17. Use of 13C Labeled Carbon Tetrachloride to Demonstrate the Transformation to Carbon Dioxide under Anaerobic Conditions in a Continuous Flow Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.

    2012-12-01

    The demonstration of transformation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CAHs) in the subsurface is a challenge, especially when the products are carbon dioxide (CO2) and chloride ion. The groundwater contaminant carbon tetrachloride (CT) is of particular interest since a broad range of transformation products can be potentially formed under anaerobic conditions. The ability to demonstrate the transformation of CT to CO2 as a non toxic endproduct, is also of great interest. Results will be presented from a continuous flow column study where 13C labeled CT was used to demonstrate its transformation to CO2. The column was packed with a quartz sand and bioaugmented the Evanite Culture (EV) that is capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) to ethene. The column was continously fed a synthetic groundwater that was amended with PCE (0.10 mM) and either formate (1.5 mM) or lactate (1.1 mM), which ferments to produce hydrogen (H2) as the ultimate electron donor. Earlier CT transformation studies with the column, in the absence of sulfate reduction, and with formate added as a donor found CT (0.015 mM) was over 98% transformed with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) (0.003 mM) and with a transient detection of chloromethane (CM). Methane and carbon disulfide, as potential products, were not detected. Neither CT nor CF inhibited the reductive dehalogenation of PCE to ethene. A series of transient studies conducted after these initial CT transformation tests, but in the absence of CT, showed formate remained an effective substrate for maintaining sulfate reduction and PCE transformation. Lactate, which was effectively fermented prior to CT addition, was not effectively fermented, with propionate accumulating as a fermentation product. When lactate was added, PCE was mainly transformed to cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and VC, and sulfate reduction did not occur. In order to restore effective lactate fermentation the column was then bioaugmented with an EV culture that

  18. Inhibition of anaerobic digestion process: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Cheng, Jay J; Creamer, Kurt S

    2008-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an attractive waste treatment practice in which both pollution control and energy recovery can be achieved. Many agricultural and industrial wastes are ideal candidates for anaerobic digestion because they contain high levels of easily biodegradable materials. Problems such as low methane yield and process instability are often encountered in anaerobic digestion, preventing this technique from being widely applied. A wide variety of inhibitory substances are the primary cause of anaerobic digester upset or failure since they are present in substantial concentrations in wastes. Considerable research efforts have been made to identify the mechanism and the controlling factors of inhibition. This review provides a detailed summary of the research conducted on the inhibition of anaerobic processes. The inhibitors commonly present in anaerobic digesters include ammonia, sulfide, light metal ions, heavy metals, and organics. Due to the difference in anaerobic inocula, waste composition, and experimental methods and conditions, literature results on inhibition caused by specific toxicants vary widely. Co-digestion with other waste, adaptation of microorganisms to inhibitory substances, and incorporation of methods to remove or counteract toxicants before anaerobic digestion can significantly improve the waste treatment efficiency.

  19. Anaerobic digestion of horse dung mixed with different bedding materials in an upflow solid-state (UASS) reactor at mesophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Böske, Janina; Wirth, Benjamin; Garlipp, Felix; Mumme, Jan; Van den Weghe, Herman

    2014-04-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the use of upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) digestion for treating horse manure. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests conducted for varying mixtures of dung (hay and silage feed) and bedding material (wheat straw, flax, hemp, wood chips) showed that straw mixed with hay horse dung has the highest potential of [Formula: see text] . Continuous mesophilic digestion was conducted for 238 days using a single-stage UASS reactor (27 L) and a two-stage UASS system with an anaerobic filter (AF, 21 L). Increasing the organic loading rate (OLR) from 2.5 to 4.5 g vs L(-1)d(-1) enhanced the methane rate of the single-stage reactor from 0.262 to 0.391 LL(-1)d(-1) while the methane yield declined from 104.8 to 86.9 L kg vs(-1). The two-stage system showed similar yields. Thus, for solid-state digestion of horse manure a single-stage UASS reactor appears sufficient.

  20. Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as a catalyst to enhance the reductive decolourisation of the azo dyes Reactive Red 2 and Congo Red under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Costa, M C; Mota, S; Nascimento, R F; Dos Santos, A B

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the catalytic effect of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to enhance the reductive decolourisation of the azo dyes Reactive Red 2 and Congo Red in batch and continuous-flow experiments. While testing the anaerobic sludge 1 in assays free of AQDS, the highest values for the first-order kinetic constant (k1) were found with co-substrates formate and glucose. In the assays that contained 50 microM of AQDS, the k1 values increased with all co-substrates tested, increasing by 3.5-fold when ethanol was the electron donor. The upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors R1 (AQDS-free) and R2 (AQDS-supplemented) reached excellent decolourisation efficiencies (higher than 90%) even for the high Congo Red concentration tested (1.2 mM). However, electron donor depletion in the influent drastically decreased the colour removal capacity in both bioreactors. Reactor R2 presented higher stability and decolourisation efficiency compared to R1, indicating that the addition of a redox mediator can be valuable for treating dye-coloured wastewaters. PMID:19717298

  1. Aerobic and anaerobic cellulase production by Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Willink, Fillip Wolfgang; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2016-10-01

    Cellulomonas uda (DSM 20108/ATCC 21399) is one of the few described cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. Based on these characteristics, we initiated a physiological study of C. uda with the aim to exploit it for cellulase production in simple bioreactors with no or sporadic aeration. Growth, cellulase activity and fermentation product formation were evaluated in different media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in experiments where C. uda was exposed to alternating aerobic/anaerobic growth conditions. Here we show that C. uda behaves as a true facultative anaerobe when cultivated on soluble substrates such as glucose and cellobiose, but for reasons unknown cellulase activity is only induced under aerobic conditions on insoluble cellulosic substrates and not under anaerobic conditions. These findings enhance knowledge on the limited number of described facultative cellulolytic anaerobes, and in addition it greatly limits the utility of C. uda as an 'easy to handle' cellulase producer with low aeration demands.

  2. Aerobic and anaerobic cellulase production by Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Willink, Fillip Wolfgang; Ingvorsen, Kjeld

    2016-10-01

    Cellulomonas uda (DSM 20108/ATCC 21399) is one of the few described cellulolytic facultative anaerobes. Based on these characteristics, we initiated a physiological study of C. uda with the aim to exploit it for cellulase production in simple bioreactors with no or sporadic aeration. Growth, cellulase activity and fermentation product formation were evaluated in different media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and in experiments where C. uda was exposed to alternating aerobic/anaerobic growth conditions. Here we show that C. uda behaves as a true facultative anaerobe when cultivated on soluble substrates such as glucose and cellobiose, but for reasons unknown cellulase activity is only induced under aerobic conditions on insoluble cellulosic substrates and not under anaerobic conditions. These findings enhance knowledge on the limited number of described facultative cellulolytic anaerobes, and in addition it greatly limits the utility of C. uda as an 'easy to handle' cellulase producer with low aeration demands. PMID:27154570

  3. A Putative ABC Transporter Permease Is Necessary for Resistance to Acidified Nitrite and EDTA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa under Aerobic and Anaerobic Planktonic and Biofilm Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Cameron; Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Lau, Gee W.; Browne, Tristan; Cox, Kevin; Paul, Andrew T.; Ko, Seung-Hyun B.; Mortensen, Joel E.; Lam, Joseph S.; Muruve, Daniel A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an important airway pathogen of cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive disease patients. Multiply drug resistant PA is becoming increasing prevalent and new strategies are needed to combat such insidious organisms. We have previously shown that a mucoid, mucA22 mutant PA is exquisitely sensitive to acidified nitrite (A-NO2−, pH 6.5) at concentrations that are well tolerated in humans. Here, we used a transposon mutagenesis approach to identify PA mutants that are hypersensitive to A-NO2−. Among greater than 10,000 mutants screened, we focused on PA4455, in which the transposon was found to disrupt the production of a putative cytoplasmic membrane-spanning ABC transporter permease. The PA4455 mutant was not only highly sensitive to A-NO2−, but also the membrane perturbing agent, EDTA and the antibiotics doxycycline, tigecycline, colistin, and chloramphenicol, respectively. Treatment of bacteria with A-NO2− plus EDTA, however, had the most dramatic and synergistic effect, with virtually all bacteria killed by 10 mM A-NO2−, and EDTA (1 mM, aerobic, anaerobic). Most importantly, the PA4455 mutant was also sensitive to A-NO2− in biofilms. A-NO2− sensitivity and an anaerobic growth defect was also noted in two mutants (rmlC and wbpM) that are defective in B-band LPS synthesis, potentially indicating a membrane defect in the PA4455 mutant. Finally, this study describes a gene, PA4455, that when mutated, allows for dramatic sensitivity to the potential therapeutic agent, A-NO2− as well as EDTA. Furthermore, the synergy between the two compounds could offer future benefits against antibiotic resistant PA strains. PMID:27064218

  4. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  5. [Effect of carbon substrate concentration on N2, N2O, NO, CO2, and CH4 emissions from a paddy soil in anaerobic condition].

    PubMed

    Chen, Nuo; Liao, Ting-ting; Wang, Rui; Zheng, Xun-hua; Hu, Rong-gui; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the effects of carbon and nitrogen substrates concentrations on the emissions of denitrification gases including nitrogen (N2) , nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from anaerobic paddy soils is believed to be helpful for development of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies. Moreover, understanding the quantitative dependence of denitrification products compositions on carbon substrate concentration could provide some key parameters or parameterization scheme for developing process-oriented model(s) of nitrogen transformation. Using a silt loam soil collected from a paddy field, we investigated the influence of carbon substrate concentration on the emissions of the denitrification gases, CO2 and CH4 from anaerobically incubated soils by setting two treatments: control (CK) with initial soil nitrate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations of ~ 50 mg.kg-1 and -28 mg kg-1 , respectively; and DOC added (C + ) with initial soil nitrate and DOC concentrations of ~50 mg.kg-1 and ~300 mg.kg-1 , respectively. The emissions of denitrification gases, CO2 and CH4, as well as concentrations of carbon and nitrogen substrates for each treatment were dynamically measured, using the gas-flow-soil-core technique and a paralleling substrate monitoring system. The results showed that CH4 emission was not observed in CK treatment while observed in C treatment. Aggregate emission of greenhouse gases for C + treatment was significantly higher comparing with the CK treatment (P <0. 01). The mass fractions of NO, N20 and N2 emissions in total nitrogen gases emissions were approximately 9% , 35% and 56% for CK treatment, respectively; and approximately 31% , 50% and 19% for C+ treatment, respectively, with significant differences between these two treatments (P < 0.01). The results indicated that carbon substrate concentrations can significantly change the composition of nitrogen gas emissions. The results also implicated

  6. Enhancement in hydrogen production by thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge--optimization of treatment conditions.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Vinay Kumar; Angériz Campoy, Rubén; Álvarez-Gallego, C J; Romero García, L I

    2014-07-01

    Batch dry-thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion (55°C) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and sewage sludge (SS) for hydrogen production was studied under several sludge combinations (primary sludge, PS; waste activated sludge, WAS; and mixed sludge, MS), TS concentrations (10-25%) and mixing ratios of OFMSW and SS (1:1, 2.5:1, 5:1, 10:1). The co-digestion of OFMSW and SS showed a 70% improvement in hydrogen production rate over the OFMSW fermentation only. The co-digestion of OFMSW with MS showed 47% and 115% higher hydrogen production potential as compared with OFMSW+PS and OFMSW+WAS, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 51 mL H2/g VS consumed was observed at TS concentration of 20% and OFMSW to MS mixing ratio of 5:1, respectively. The acetic and butyric acids were the main acids in VFAs evolution; however, the higher butyric acid evolution indicated that the H2 fermentation was butyrate type fermentation.

  7. Sub-critical filtration conditions of commercial hollow-fibre membranes in a submerged anaerobic MBR (HF-SAnMBR) system: the effect of gas sparging intensity.

    PubMed

    Robles, A; Ruano, M V; García-Usach, F; Ferrer, J

    2012-06-01

    A submerged anaerobic MBR demonstration plant with two commercial hollow-fibre ultrafiltration systems (PURON®, Koch Membrane Systems, PUR-PSH31) was operated using municipal wastewater at high levels of mixed liquor total solids (MLTS) (above 22 g L(-1)). A modified flux-step method was applied to assess the critical flux (J(C)) at different gas sparging intensities. The results showed a linear dependency between J(C) and the specific gas demand per unit of membrane area (SGD(m)). J(C) ranged from 12 to 19 LMH at SGD(m) values of between 0.17 and 0.5 Nm(3) h(-1) m(-2), which are quite low in comparison to aerobic MBR. Long-term trials showed that the membranes operated steadily at fluxes close to the estimated J(C), which validates the J(C) obtained by this method. After operating the membrane for almost 2 years at sub-critical levels, no irreversible fouling problems were detected, and therefore, no chemical cleaning was conducted.

  8. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-06-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. PMID:1100671

  9. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-01-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. Images PMID:1100671

  10. An Effective Method to Detect Volatile Intermediates Generated in the Bioconversion of Coal to Methane by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry after In-Situ Extraction Using Headspace Solid-Phase Micro-Extraction under Strict Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianmin; Wang, Baoyu; Tai, Chao; Wu, Li; Zhao, Han; Guan, Jiadong; Chen, Linyong

    2016-01-01

    Bioconversion of coal to methane has gained increased attention in recent decades because of its economic and environmental advantages. However, the mechanism of this process is difficult to study in depth, partly because of difficulties associated with the analysis of intermediates generated in coal bioconversion. In this investigation, we report on an effective method to analyze volatile intermediates generated in the bioconversion of coal under strict anaerobic conditions. We conduct in-situ extraction of intermediates using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction followed by detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioconversion simulation equipment was modified and combined with a solid-phase micro-extraction device. In-situ extraction could be achieved by using the combined units, to avoid a breakdown in anaerobic conditions and to maintain the experiment continuity. More than 30 intermediates were identified qualitatively in the conversion process, and the variation in trends of some typical intermediates has been discussed. Volatile organic acids (C2–C7) were chosen for a quantitative study of the intermediates because of their importance during coal bioconversion to methane. Fiber coating, extraction time, and solution acidity were optimized in the solid-phase micro-extraction procedure. The pressure was enhanced during the bioconversion process to investigate the influence of headspace pressure on analyte extraction. The detection limits of the method ranged from 0.0006 to 0.02 mmol/L for the volatile organic acids and the relative standard deviations were between 4.6% and 11.5%. The volatile organic acids (C2–C7) generated in the bioconversion process were 0.01–1.15 mmol/L with a recovery range from 80% to 105%. The developed method is useful for further in-depth research on the bioconversion of coal to methane. PMID:27695055

  11. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  12. [Characteristics of N2, N2O, NO, CO2 and CH4 Emissions in Anaerobic Condition from Sandy Loam Paddy Soil].

    PubMed

    Cao, Na; Wang, Rui; Liao, Ting-ting; Chen, Nuo; Zheng, Xun-hua; Yao, Zhi-sheng; Zhang, Hai; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the characteristics of the production of nitrogen gases (N2, N2O and NO), CO2 and CH4 in anaerobic paddy soils is not only a prerequisite for an improved mechanistic understanding of key microbial processes involved in the production of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG), but might also provide the basis for designing greenhouse gas mitigation strategies. Moreover, quantifying the composition fractions of denitrification gaseous products is of key importance for improving parameterization schemes of microbial processes in process-oriented models which are increasingly used for assessing soil GHG emissions at site and national scales. In our experiments we investigated two sandy loam soils from two paddy fields. The initial concentrations of soil nitrate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were set at approximately 50 mg.kg-1 and mg.kg-1, respectively, by adding a mixture solution of KNO3 and glucose. The emissions of N2, N2O NO, CO2 and CH4, as well as concentrations of carbon and nitrogen substrates for each soil sample were measured simultaneously, using a gas-flow-soil-core technique and a paralleling substrate monitoring system. The results showed that the accumulative emissions of N2, N2O and NO of the two soil samples for the entire incubation period were 6 - 8, 20, and 15 - 18 mg.kg-1, respectively. By measuring the cumulative emissions of denitrification gases (N, = N2 + N2O + NO) we were able to explain 95% to 98% of observed changes in s1ifr nilrate concentrations. The mass fractions of N2, N2O and NO emissions to Nt were approximately 15% -19%, 47% -49%, and 34% -36%, respectively. Thus, in our experiments N2O and NO were the main products of denitrification for the entire incubation period. However, as the temporal courses of hourly or daily production of the denitrification gases showed, NO production dominated and peaked firstly, and then N2O, before finally N2 became the dominant product. Our results show the high temporal dynamic of

  13. [Characteristics of N2, N2O, NO, CO2 and CH4 Emissions in Anaerobic Condition from Sandy Loam Paddy Soil].

    PubMed

    Cao, Na; Wang, Rui; Liao, Ting-ting; Chen, Nuo; Zheng, Xun-hua; Yao, Zhi-sheng; Zhang, Hai; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the characteristics of the production of nitrogen gases (N2, N2O and NO), CO2 and CH4 in anaerobic paddy soils is not only a prerequisite for an improved mechanistic understanding of key microbial processes involved in the production of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG), but might also provide the basis for designing greenhouse gas mitigation strategies. Moreover, quantifying the composition fractions of denitrification gaseous products is of key importance for improving parameterization schemes of microbial processes in process-oriented models which are increasingly used for assessing soil GHG emissions at site and national scales. In our experiments we investigated two sandy loam soils from two paddy fields. The initial concentrations of soil nitrate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were set at approximately 50 mg.kg-1 and mg.kg-1, respectively, by adding a mixture solution of KNO3 and glucose. The emissions of N2, N2O NO, CO2 and CH4, as well as concentrations of carbon and nitrogen substrates for each soil sample were measured simultaneously, using a gas-flow-soil-core technique and a paralleling substrate monitoring system. The results showed that the accumulative emissions of N2, N2O and NO of the two soil samples for the entire incubation period were 6 - 8, 20, and 15 - 18 mg.kg-1, respectively. By measuring the cumulative emissions of denitrification gases (N, = N2 + N2O + NO) we were able to explain 95% to 98% of observed changes in s1ifr nilrate concentrations. The mass fractions of N2, N2O and NO emissions to Nt were approximately 15% -19%, 47% -49%, and 34% -36%, respectively. Thus, in our experiments N2O and NO were the main products of denitrification for the entire incubation period. However, as the temporal courses of hourly or daily production of the denitrification gases showed, NO production dominated and peaked firstly, and then N2O, before finally N2 became the dominant product. Our results show the high temporal dynamic of

  14. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  15. Anaerobic Metabolism and Bioremediation of Explosives-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boopathy, Raj

    Nitroaromatic compounds pollute soil, water, and food via use of pesticides, plastics, pharmaceuticals, landfill dumping of industrial wastes, and the military use of explosives. Biotransformation of trinitrotoluene and other nitroaromatics by aerobic bacteria in the laboratory has been frequently reported, but the anaerobic bacterial metabolism of nitroaromatics has not been studied as extensively perhaps due to the difficulty in working with anaerobic cultures and the slow growth of anaerobes. Sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria can metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment.

  16. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

  17. Adaptation of a coculture technique to the Minitek anaerobe system.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Z; Lannigan, R; Bürger, H; Groves, D

    1985-01-01

    A method to produce anaerobic conditions by coculture with a nonfermentative organism was utilized in conjunction with the Minitek anaerobe system (BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) for identification of anaerobic bacteria from clinical specimens. With the coculture method, the Minitek anaerobe identification tests could be incubated under aerobic conditions. In 1,900 individual biochemical reactions, 1,826 (96%) were identical whether anaerobic conditions were achieved by conventional or coculture techniques. In comparison with the reference identification (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg), both systems of incubation identified 91 of 99 strains (92%) correctly. The method of incubation had an effect on identification to the genus level in 1 of 99 (1%) strains and to the species level in 3 of 99 (3%) strains. PMID:3886697

  18. Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation and Soil Borne Pest Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD; also referred to as Biological Soil Disinfestation (BSD)) is a pre-plant soil treatment method developed to control plant disease and manage yield decline in many crop production systems. The practice involves induction of anaerobic soil conditions by increasing m...

  19. Atmospheric vs. anaerobic processing of metabolome samples for the metabolite profiling of a strict anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sooah; Kwon, Min-A; Jung, Young Hoon; Shin, Yong-An; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2014-12-01

    Well-established metabolome sample preparation is a prerequisite for reliable metabolomic data. For metabolome sampling of a Gram-positive strict anaerobe, Clostridium acetobutylicum, fast filtration and metabolite extraction with acetonitrile/methanol/water (2:2:1, v/v) at -20°C under anaerobic conditions has been commonly used. This anaerobic metabolite processing method is laborious and time-consuming since it is conducted in an anaerobic chamber. Also, there have not been any systematic method evaluation and development of metabolome sample preparation for strict anaerobes and Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, metabolome sampling and extraction methods were rigorously evaluated and optimized for C. acetobutylicum by using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, in which a total of 116 metabolites were identified. When comparing the atmospheric (i.e., in air) and anaerobic (i.e., in an anaerobic chamber) processing of metabolome sample preparation, there was no significant difference in the quality and quantity of the metabolomic data. For metabolite extraction, pure methanol at -20°C was a better solvent than acetonitrile/methanol/water (2:2:1, v/v/v) at -20°C that is frequently used for C. acetobutylicum, and metabolite profiles were significantly different depending on extraction solvents. This is the first evaluation of metabolite sample preparation under aerobic processing conditions for an anaerobe. This method could be applied conveniently, efficiently, and reliably to metabolome analysis for strict anaerobes in air.

  20. Microbial Internal Storage Alters the Carbon Transformation in Dynamic Anaerobic Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Batstone, Damien; Zhao, Bai-Hang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-08-01

    Microbial internal storage processes have been demonstrated to occur and play an important role in activated sludge systems under both aerobic and anoxic conditions when operating under dynamic conditions. High-rate anaerobic reactors are often operated at a high volumetric organic loading and a relatively dynamic profile, with large amounts of fermentable substrates. These dynamic operating conditions and high catabolic energy availability might also facilitate the formation of internal storage polymers by anaerobic microorganisms. However, so far information about storage under anaerobic conditions (e.g., anaerobic fermentation) as well as its consideration in anaerobic process modeling (e.g., IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, ADM1) is still sparse. In this work, the accumulation of storage polymers during anaerobic fermentation was evaluated by batch experiments using anaerobic methanogenic sludge and based on mass balance analysis of carbon transformation. A new mathematical model was developed to describe microbial storage in anaerobic systems. The model was calibrated and validated by using independent data sets from two different anaerobic systems, with significant storage observed, and effectively simulated in both systems. The inclusion of the new anaerobic storage processes in the developed model allows for more successful simulation of transients due to lower accumulation of volatile fatty acids (correction for the overestimation of volatile fatty acids), which mitigates pH fluctuations. Current models such as the ADM1 cannot effectively simulate these dynamics due to a lack of anaerobic storage mechanisms.

  1. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  2. Mutagenicity of anaerobic fenitrothion metabolites after aerobic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Taku; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Saeki, Ryo; Inoue, Takanobu

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed that the mutagenicity of fenitrothion increases during anaerobic biodegradation, suggesting that this insecticide's mutagenicity could effectively increase after it pollutes anaerobic environments such as lake sediments. To investigate possible changes to the mutagenicity of fenitrothion under aerobic conditions after it had already been increased by anaerobic biodegradation, batch incubation cultures were maintained under aerobic conditions. The mutagenicity, which had increased during anaerobic biodegradation, decreased under aerobic conditions with aerobic or facultative bacteria, but did not disappear completely in 22 days. In contrast, it did not change under aerobic conditions without bacteria or under continued anaerobic conditions. These observations suggest that the mutagenicity of anaerobically metabolized fenitrothion would not necessarily decrease after it arrives in an aerobic environment: this would depend on the presence of suitable bacteria. Therefore, fenitrothion-derived mutagenic compounds may pollute the water environment, including our drinking water sources, after accidental pollution of aerobic waters. Although amino-fenitrothion generated during anaerobic biodegradation of fenitrothion was the principal mutagen, non-trivial contributions of other, unidentified metabolites to the mutagenicity were also observed. PMID:16263383

  3. Energy transduction by anaerobic ferric iron respiration in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pronk, J.T.; Liem, K.; Bos, P.; Kuenen, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    Formate-grown cells of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic acidophile Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were capable of formate- and elemental sulfur-dependent reduction of ferric iron under anaerovic conditions. Under aerobic conditions, both oxygen and ferric iron could be simultaneously used as electron acceptors. To investigate whether anaerobic ferric iron respiration by T. ferrooxidans is an energy-transducing process, uptake of amino acids was studied. Glycine uptake by starved cells did not occur in the absence of an electron donor, neither under aerobic conditions nor under anaerobic conditions. Uptake of glycine could be driven by formate- and ferrous iron-dependent oxygen uptake. Under anaerobic conditions, ferric iron respiration with the electron donors formate and elemental sulfur could energize glycine uptake. Glycine uptake was inhibited by the uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. The results indicate that anaerobic ferric iron respiration can contribute to the energy budget of T. ferrooxidans.

  4. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged p...

  5. Staged anaerobic reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.A.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an anaerobic biological reactor for digesting organic substances, particularly high strength industrial and municipal sewage, and producing commercial quality methane. The reactor consists of: a unitary vessel for containing liquid carrying the organic substances to be digested and has a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet; a device for maintaining the liquid in the vessel at a desired level; the capability of dividing the vessel into separate environmentally isolated compartments, adapted to contain a level of liquid having a gas space located above. Each of the compartments is primarily dedicated to the digestion of organic substances by a respectively different microorganism. At least one of the organisms is an acid forming type that digests organic substances and in so doing evolves CO/sub 2/ gas. At least one other of the microorganisms is a type that digests organic substances and in so doing evolves a relatively high quality methane gas; a method for establishing and maintaining the optimum environmental conditions within each of the respective compartments to promote the unique biological activity within that compartment; a way to regulate the pH level; a set of gas operated mixers in each compartment of the vessel for mixing the liquid contained therein to maintain a homogenous mixture; a way for delivering the CO/sub 2/ gas from one compartment to the mixer in the other compartment; a way for flowing and agitating the liquid from the inlet through the environmentally isolated compartments in a predetermined sequence to the outlet; and a method for collecting and removing methane gas evolved in the vessel.

  6. Developments of anaerobic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.; Jones, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Two modifications of anaerobic fermentation of biomass were studied: separation of acid and CH4 phases of the anaerobic process used in CH4 production from the biomass and the use of attached growth methanogenesis. A continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was used for the acid phase. Effluent from the acid reactor was fed simultaneously to a conventional CSTR and an anaerobic rotating biological contactor (ARBC) operating in parallel for the CH4 phase. The temperature of all the reactors was 35 plus or minus 1 degree, the pH of the acid phase was 4.3, and the CH4 phase was studied at pH 7.5. The retention time for the acid phase CSTR was 4.5 h, and that for the ARBC and CSTR in the CH4 phase was 36 h.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa anaerobic respiration in biofilms: relationships to cystic fibrosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Hennigan, Robert F; Hilliard, George M; Ochsner, Urs A; Parvatiyar, Kislay; Kamani, Moneesha C; Allen, Holly L; DeKievit, Teresa R; Gardner, Paul R; Schwab, Ute; Rowe, John J; Iglewski, Barbara H; McDermott, Timothy R; Mason, Ronald P; Wozniak, Daniel J; Hancock, Robert E W; Parsek, Matthew R; Noah, Terry L; Boucher, Richard C; Hassett, Daniel J

    2002-10-01

    Recent data indicate that cystic fibrosis (CF) airway mucus is anaerobic. This suggests that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in CF reflects biofilm formation and persistence in an anaerobic environment. P. aeruginosa formed robust anaerobic biofilms, the viability of which requires rhl quorum sensing and nitric oxide (NO) reductase to modulate or prevent accumulation of toxic NO, a byproduct of anaerobic respiration. Proteomic analyses identified an outer membrane protein, OprF, that was upregulated approximately 40-fold under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Further, OprF exists in CF mucus, and CF patients raise antisera to OprF. An oprF mutant formed poor anaerobic biofilms, due, in part, to defects in anaerobic respiration. Thus, future investigations of CF pathogenesis and therapy should include a better understanding of anaerobic metabolism and biofilm development by P. aeruginosa.

  8. Comparison of Aerobic and Anaerobic Biodegradation of Sugarcane Vinasse.

    PubMed

    Mota, V T; Araújo, T A; Amaral, M C S

    2015-07-01

    Vinasse is the main liquid waste from ethanol production, and it has a considerable pollution potential. Biological treatment is a promising alternative to reduce its organic load. The aim of this study was to analyze the biodegradation of sugarcane juice vinasse in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The content of carbohydrates, proteins and volatile fatty acids was evaluated. Vinasse samples showed a high biodegradability (>96.5 %) and low percentage of inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) (<3.2 %) in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The rates of substrate utilization were slightly higher in aerobic reactors, but COD stabilization occurred simultaneously in the anaerobic reactors, confirming its suitability for anaerobic digestion. Inert COD in anaerobic conditions was lower than in aerobic conditions. On the other hand, COD from metabolic products in the anaerobic reactors was higher than in the aerobic ones, indicating an increased release of soluble microbial products (SMPs) by anaerobic microorganisms. The results indicated that carbohydrates were satisfactorily degraded and protein-like substances were the major components remaining after biological degradation of vinasse. PMID:25957273

  9. Fermentation and growth response of a primary poultry isolate of Salmonella typhimurium grown under strict anaerobic conditions in continuous culture and amino acid-limited batch culture.

    PubMed

    Maciorowski, K G; Nisbet, D J; Ha, S D; Corrier, D E; DeLoach, J R; Ricke, S C

    1997-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a significant hazard to consumer health that is carried asymptomatically in poultry gastrointestinal tracts. Nurmi cultures may prevent Salmonella colonization in young chicks, but the mechanism of competitive exclusion is unclear. Modeling Salmonella's metabolism in pure culture may allow for greater definition in choosing strains for Nurmi cultures. The growth rates and affinity constants of S. typhimurium growing in amino acid-limited conditions were determined in batch culture and compared to primary poultry isolates of cecal strains. Serine and NH4Cl were the best N sources for growth of all organisms tested in this study. The fermentation response of S. typhimurium was also monitored in continuous culture at a slow dilution rate of 0.021 h-1. S. typhimurium was found to adapt to VL media, with trends in protein disappearance, Yglucose, and Yprotein. This may show that amino acid or protein concentrations may be an integral component of the initial establishment of S. typhimurium in the cecum.

  10. Fermentation and growth response of a primary poultry isolate of Salmonella typhimurium grown under strict anaerobic conditions in continuous culture and amino acid-limited batch culture.

    PubMed

    Maciorowski, K G; Nisbet, D J; Ha, S D; Corrier, D E; DeLoach, J R; Ricke, S C

    1997-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium is a significant hazard to consumer health that is carried asymptomatically in poultry gastrointestinal tracts. Nurmi cultures may prevent Salmonella colonization in young chicks, but the mechanism of competitive exclusion is unclear. Modeling Salmonella's metabolism in pure culture may allow for greater definition in choosing strains for Nurmi cultures. The growth rates and affinity constants of S. typhimurium growing in amino acid-limited conditions were determined in batch culture and compared to primary poultry isolates of cecal strains. Serine and NH4Cl were the best N sources for growth of all organisms tested in this study. The fermentation response of S. typhimurium was also monitored in continuous culture at a slow dilution rate of 0.021 h-1. S. typhimurium was found to adapt to VL media, with trends in protein disappearance, Yglucose, and Yprotein. This may show that amino acid or protein concentrations may be an integral component of the initial establishment of S. typhimurium in the cecum. PMID:9192013

  11. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    PubMed

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  12. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, Anders S; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2003-04-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) found in wastewater is removed in the wastewater treatment facilities by sorption and aerobic biodegradation. The anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has not been shown to contribute to the removal. The concentration of LAS based on dry matter typically increases during anaerobic stabilization due to transformation of easily degradable organic matter. Hence, LAS is regarded as resistant to biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. We present data from a lab-scale semi-continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) spiked with linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C12 LAS), which show that C12 LAS was biodegradable under methanogenic conditions. Sorption of C12 LAS on sewage sludge was described with a Freundlich isotherm. The C12 LAS sorption was determined with different concentrations of total solids (TS). In the semi-continuously stirred tank reactor, 18% of the added C12 LAS was bioavailable and 20% was biotransformed when spiking with 100 mg/L of C12 LAS and a TS concentration of 14.2 mg/L. Enhanced bioavailability of C12 LAS was obtained in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor inoculated with granular sludge and sewage sludge. Biodegradation under thermophilic conditions was 37% with LAS as sole carbon source. Benzaldehyde was produced in the UASB reactor during LAS transformation.

  13. The effect of microbial sulfidogenesis on the stability of As-Fe coprecipitate with low Fe/As molar ratio under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaofeng; He, Xin Yu; Pan, Rongrong; Xu, Liying; Wang, Xin; Jia, Yongfeng

    2016-04-01

    The effect of microbial sulfidogenesis on As transformation and mobilization in solid phase with low Fe/As ratio is still not well known. In this study, microbial transformation and mobilization of As in the As-Fe coprecipitate with different sulfate levels were investigated using chemical extraction and K-edge XANES of As and S. Results showed that approximately 2.7, 24.4, and 83.7 % of total As were released into the aqueous phase in the low-, mid-, and high-sulfate treatments, respectively, indicating that the presence of large amounts of sulfate could enhance microbial arsenic mobilization in the As-Fe coprecipitate. In the low-sulfate treatment, As mobilization was primarily attributed to the reductive dissolution of the Fe (oxy)hydroxides and the As reduction and desorption. In the mid- and high-sulfate treatments, the reduction of arsenate and ferric iron was significantly enhanced. Complete ferric iron reduction was observed in the solid phase, implying that Fe (oxy)hydroxide was transformed to secondary minerals and may be the one of the primary causes for the enhanced As mobilization. Thermodynamic calculations predicted the formation of thioarsenite species after 35 days of incubation based on the concentration of dissolved As(III) and S(-II). Since thioarsenic species is more mobile, its formation may be one of the most important factors enhancing the As release in the high-sulfate system. The result of this study is of significance to completely predict the environmental behavior of As associated with Fe (hydr)oxides in the presence of microbial sulfidogenesis under anoxic conditions. PMID:26676545

  14. Anaerobic infections in the head and neck region.

    PubMed

    Tabaqchali, S

    1988-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria form the predominant flora of the oral cavity, outnumbering facultative organisms by 10-1,000: 1. The type of anaerobic bacteria and their concentration depend on the anatomical site and the degree of anaerobiosis in the different sites in the mouth. Three groups of anaerobic bacteria inhabit the oral cavity; the strict anaerobes, the moderate anaerobes, and the microaerophilic group of organisms. The majority of anaerobic bacterial infections occurring in the region of the mouth, head and neck are caused by the commensal flora. These infections include dental and periodontal disease where the predominant organisms are Bacteroides species, Veillonella, Bifidobacteria, Peptococcus, Peptostreptococcus and Propionibacterium species. More recently, Bacteroides endontalis has been isolated from a periapical abscess of endodontal origin and B. gingivalis, B. intermedius, Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans and Wollinella species in chronic periodontal disease. Treponema species and other strict anaerobes are seen in smears of severe periodontal disease and acute necrotising gingivitis, but have not yet been isolated in pure culture. Until such time, their role in disease remains uncertain. Fusobacterium nucleatum is specially associated with severe orofacial infections which may extend into the mediastinum. Other anaerobic infections include chronic otitis media, chronic sinusitis and mastoiditis, and brain abscess. Treatment of these conditions should include the use of beta-lactamase resistant antimicrobials, such as clindamycin or one of the nitroimidazoles with penicillin.

  15. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  16. Anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds: a genetic and genomic view.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F; Valderrama, J Andrés; Barragán, María J L; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach.

  17. The anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, C.J.; Boone, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  18. Anaerobic biodegradation of chloroform under methanogenic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Devesh, M.T.; Gupta, M.; Suidan, M.T.; Sayles, G.D.

    1994-12-31

    The degradation of chloroform is studied for two different methanogenic cultures grown on acetate and methanol exclusively, as the primary substrates. In chemostats, chloroform was fed at different concentrations as high as 2,000 {micro}g/l along with the primary substrate and chloroform degradation greater than 98% was observed. The kinetics of degradation of chloroform and the primary substrate were investigated using BMP tests and it was seen that the methanol-fed methanogenic culture exhibited higher rates of chloroform degradation than the acetate-fed methanogenic culture. Besides, chloroform inhibited acetate degradation at any concentration while methanol inhibition was observed only for chloroform concentrations higher than 800 {micro}g/l.

  19. Calorimetric studies of the growth of anaerobic microbes.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hideo; Maeda, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Akiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    This article aims to validate the use of calorimetry to measure the growth of anaerobic microbes. It has been difficult to monitor the growth of strict anaerobes while maintaining optimal growth conditions. Traditionally, optical density and ATP concentration are usually used as measures of the growth of anaerobic microbes. However, to take these measurements it is necessary to extract an aliquot of the culture, which can be difficult while maintaining anaerobic conditions. In this study, calorimetry was used to continuously and nondestructively measure the heat generated by the growth of anaerobic microbes as a function of time. Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Clostridium cellulovorans were used as representative anaerobic microbes. Using a multiplex isothermal calorimeter, we observed that peak time (tp) of C. acetobutylicum heat evolution increased as the inoculation rate decreased. This strong correlation between the inoculation rate and tp showed that it was possible to measure the growth rate of anaerobic microbes by calorimetry. Overall, our results showed that there is a very good correlation between heat evolution and optical density/ATP concentration, validating the use of the method. PMID:27012376

  20. Calorimetric studies of the growth of anaerobic microbes.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hideo; Maeda, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Akiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    This article aims to validate the use of calorimetry to measure the growth of anaerobic microbes. It has been difficult to monitor the growth of strict anaerobes while maintaining optimal growth conditions. Traditionally, optical density and ATP concentration are usually used as measures of the growth of anaerobic microbes. However, to take these measurements it is necessary to extract an aliquot of the culture, which can be difficult while maintaining anaerobic conditions. In this study, calorimetry was used to continuously and nondestructively measure the heat generated by the growth of anaerobic microbes as a function of time. Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium beijerinckii, and Clostridium cellulovorans were used as representative anaerobic microbes. Using a multiplex isothermal calorimeter, we observed that peak time (tp) of C. acetobutylicum heat evolution increased as the inoculation rate decreased. This strong correlation between the inoculation rate and tp showed that it was possible to measure the growth rate of anaerobic microbes by calorimetry. Overall, our results showed that there is a very good correlation between heat evolution and optical density/ATP concentration, validating the use of the method.

  1. Anaerobic transformations and bioremediation of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J F; Pietari, J M

    2000-02-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic compounds, notably the chlorinated solvents, are common contaminants in soil and groundwater at hazardous waste sites. While these compounds are often recalcitrant, under favorable conditions they can be transformed and degraded through microbially mediated processes. There is great interest in understanding the transformations that are observed at contaminated sites and in manipulating these systems to achieve remediation. An important class of transformations occurs in anaerobic environments. Many of the transformations are reductive, and many yield useful energy to specific anaerobic bacteria. They include reductive dechlorination, dehydrochlorination and dichloroelemination. Of these, reductive dechlorination is often a growth-supporting reaction, while the others may be abiological or catalyzed by biological molecules. The reactions may result in chlorinated products, but there are often reaction sequences leading to completely dechlorinated products. The behavior of carbon tetrachloride (CT), 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA) and the chloroethenes, perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), illustrate the range of anaerobic transformations that are possible, as well as the limited transformation that often is seen in the environment. CT undergoes reductive and substitutive reactions that are catalyzed by biological molecules but do not support bacterial growth. The anaerobic degradation of TeCA, which is a major contaminant at a site near Tacoma, WA, USA, provides examples of each type of transformation, and the products formed are consistent with the chlorinated compounds that are found in groundwater extraction wells. A laboratory study, using anaerobic sludge that had been fed chlorinated compounds, a cell-free extract from the sludge, and killed controls, showed that TeCA was transformed to four products and that these were further transformed, suggesting that it might be possible to degrade TeCA to innocuous products

  2. Anaerobic biodegradation of surrogate naphthenic acids.

    PubMed

    Clothier, Lindsay N; Gieg, Lisa M

    2016-03-01

    Surface bitumen extraction from the Alberta's oil sands region generates large settling basins known as tailings ponds. The oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) stored in these ponds contain solid and residual bitumen-associated compounds including naphthenic acids (NAs) that can potentially be biodedgraded by indigenous tailings microorganisms. While the biodegradation of some NAs is known to occur under aerobic conditions, little is understood about anaerobic NA biodegradation even though tailings ponds are mainly anoxic. Here, we investigated the potential for anaerobic NA biodegradation by indigenous tailings microorganisms. Enrichment cultures were established from anoxic tailings that were amended with 5 single-ringed surrogate NAs or acid-extractable organics (AEO) from OSPW and incubated under nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Surrogate NA depletion was observed under all anaerobic conditions tested to varying extents, correlating to losses in the respective electron acceptor (sulfate or nitrate) or the production of predicted products (Fe(II) or methane). Tailings-containing cultures incubated under the different electron-accepting conditions resulted in the enrichment and putative identification of microbial community members that may function in metabolizing surrogate NAs under the various anoxic conditions. In addition, more complex NAs (in the form of AEO) was observed to drive sulfate and iron reduction relative to controls. Overall, this study has shown that simple surrogate NAs can be biodegraded under a variety of anoxic conditions, a key first step in understanding the potential anaerobic metabolism of NAs in oil sands tailings ponds and other industrial wastewaters. PMID:26724449

  3. Anaerobic Antimicrobial Therapy After Necrotizing Enterocolitis in VLBW Infants

    PubMed Central

    Autmizguine, Julie; Hornik, Christoph P.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Laughon, Matthew M.; Clark, Reese H.; Cotten, C. Michael; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of anaerobic antimicrobial therapy for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) on clinical outcomes in very low birth weight (≤1500 g) infants. METHODS: We identified very low birth weight infants with NEC from 348 US NICUs from 1997 to 2012. Anaerobic antimicrobial therapy was defined by antibiotic exposure on the first day of NEC. We matched (1:1) infants exposed to anaerobic antimicrobial therapy with infants who were not exposed by using a propensity score stratified by NEC severity (medical and surgical). The primary composite outcome was in-hospital death or intestinal stricture. We assessed the relationship between anaerobic antimicrobial therapy and outcome by using a conditional logistic regression on the matched cohort. RESULTS: A total of 1390 infants exposed to anaerobic antimicrobial therapy were matched with 1390 infants not exposed. Mean gestational age and birth weight were 27 weeks and 946 g, respectively, and were similar in both groups. We found no significant difference in the combined outcome of death or strictures, but strictures as a single outcome were more common in the anaerobic antimicrobial therapy group (odds ratio 1.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.11–2.72). Among infants with surgical NEC, mortality was less common with anaerobic antimicrobial therapy (odds ratio 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.52–0.95). CONCLUSIONS: Anaerobic antimicrobial therapy was not associated with the composite outcome of death or strictures but was associated with an increase in intestinal strictures. This higher incidence of intestinal strictures may be explained by the fact that death is a competing outcome for intestinal strictures, and mortality was slightly lower in the anaerobic cohort. Infants with surgical NEC who received anaerobic antimicrobial therapy had lower mortality. PMID:25511117

  4. Improve bio-activity of anaerobic sludge by low energy ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yichun; Li, Xin; Du, Maoan; Liu, Zuwen; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    This research focused on ultrasound-enhanced bio-activity of anaerobic sludge. Low energy ultrasound irradiation can increase the bio-activity of anaerobic sludge. Ultrasonic parameter, characteristics of anaerobic sludge and experimental conditions are important parameters which affect the enhancement effect on anaerobic sludge. In order to assess the effects of characteristics of anaerobic sludge and experimental conditions on ultrasonic irradiation of anaerobic sludge, experiments with different characteristics of anaerobic sludge were carried out and analyzed with the content of coenzyme F420 and dehydrogenase activity (DHA). The results showed that anaerobic sludge bio-activity was impacted by the initial temperature, initial chemical oxygen demand (COD), sludge concentration, and stirring during the ultrasonic process. Optimal performance was achieved when sound frequency, power density, and ultrasonic irradiation period was 20 kHz, 0.1 W/mL, and 10 min, respectively, under which the wastewater COD removal efficiency was increased by 12.9 percentage points. The results indicated that low temperature could affect the anaerobic sludge irradiation effect, while intermittent stirring could enhance the bio-activity of anaerobic sludge irradiation effect and low substrate concentration improved anaerobic sludge activity by ultrasound. PMID:26676010

  5. Improve bio-activity of anaerobic sludge by low energy ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yichun; Li, Xin; Du, Maoan; Liu, Zuwen; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    This research focused on ultrasound-enhanced bio-activity of anaerobic sludge. Low energy ultrasound irradiation can increase the bio-activity of anaerobic sludge. Ultrasonic parameter, characteristics of anaerobic sludge and experimental conditions are important parameters which affect the enhancement effect on anaerobic sludge. In order to assess the effects of characteristics of anaerobic sludge and experimental conditions on ultrasonic irradiation of anaerobic sludge, experiments with different characteristics of anaerobic sludge were carried out and analyzed with the content of coenzyme F420 and dehydrogenase activity (DHA). The results showed that anaerobic sludge bio-activity was impacted by the initial temperature, initial chemical oxygen demand (COD), sludge concentration, and stirring during the ultrasonic process. Optimal performance was achieved when sound frequency, power density, and ultrasonic irradiation period was 20 kHz, 0.1 W/mL, and 10 min, respectively, under which the wastewater COD removal efficiency was increased by 12.9 percentage points. The results indicated that low temperature could affect the anaerobic sludge irradiation effect, while intermittent stirring could enhance the bio-activity of anaerobic sludge irradiation effect and low substrate concentration improved anaerobic sludge activity by ultrasound.

  6. Neural fuzzy modeling of anaerobic biological wastewater treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.H.; Zhang, X.

    1999-12-01

    Anaerobic biological wastewater treatment systems are difficult to model because their performance is complex and varies significantly with different reactor configurations, influent characteristics, and operational conditions. Instead of conventional kinetic modeling, advanced neural fuzzy technology was employed to develop a conceptual adaptive model for anaerobic treatment systems. The conceptual neural fuzzy model contains the robustness of fuzzy systems, the learning ability of neural networks, and can adapt to various situations. The conceptual model was used to simulate the daily performance of two high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment systems with satisfactory results obtained.

  7. Diversity Profile of Microbes Associated with Anaerobic Sulfur Oxidation in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor Treating Municipal Sewage.

    PubMed

    Aida, Azrina A; Kuroda, Kyohei; Yamamoto, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Akinobu; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We herein analyzed the diversity of microbes involved in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor used for treating municipal sewage under low-temperature conditions. Anaerobic sulfur oxidation occurred in the absence of oxygen, with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors; however, reactor performance parameters demonstrated that anaerobic conditions were maintained. In order to gain insights into the underlying basis of anaerobic sulfur oxidation, the microbial diversity that exists in the UASB sludge was analyzed comprehensively to determine their identities and contribution to sulfur oxidation. Sludge samples were collected from the UASB reactor over a period of 2 years and used for bacterial 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and next-generation sequencing analyses. T-RFLP and sequencing results both showed that microbial community patterns changed markedly from day 537 onwards. Bacteria belonging to the genus Desulforhabdus within the phylum Proteobacteria and uncultured bacteria within the phylum Fusobacteria were the main groups observed during the period of anaerobic sulfur oxidation. Their abundance correlated with temperature, suggesting that these bacterial groups played roles in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in UASB reactors.

  8. Characterizing the anaerobic response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic (induced by 8 h of argon bubbling) conditions were isolated and analyzed using comparative proteomics. A total of 2315 proteins were identified. Further analysis based on spectral counting clearly localized 606 of these proteins to the chloroplast, including many proteins of the fermentative metabolism. Comparative quantitative analyses were performed with the chloroplast-localized proteins using stable isotopic labeling of amino acids ([(13)C(6)]arginine/[(12)C(6)]arginine in an arginine auxotrophic strain). The quantitative data confirmed proteins previously characterized as induced at the transcript level as well as identified several new proteins of unknown function induced under anaerobic conditions. These proteins of unknown function provide new candidates for further investigation, which could bring insights for the engineering of hydrogen-producing alga strains. PMID:20190198

  9. Process configuration role in anaerobic biotransformations

    SciTech Connect

    Speece, R.E.

    1998-07-01

    Defining the environmental conditions which would enable anaerobic processes to consistently produce effluents containing only non-detectable concentrations of degradable organics would remove one of the main drawbacks to wider application of this important treatment technology. Recently specific metabolic intermediates formed in the anaerobic biotransformation of complex organics have been found to enhance or curtail process performance. Using acrylate and acrolein as representative hazardous chemicals, modifications in staging and reactor operation procedures have been observed in the author's laboratory to profoundly impact the rate and completeness of the biotransformation process. Specific metabolic intermediates formed in the biotransformation of complex substrates to a large extent will control a given process performance and process configuration greatly impacts the metabolic pathway, thus impacting the intermediates formed as well. There is a growing body of literature to indicate that process performance in anaerobic biotransformation is greatly impacted by reactor configuration. There is also some evidence that metabolic precursors impact the subsequent efficiency of conversion of volatile fatty acids (VFA) ultimately to CH{sub 4}. But although profound differences in the performance of anaerobic biotransformation are reported for various process configurations, there are no published criteria to guide the rational design of stages/phased processes. Clarification of the relative merits of single stage, two stage, two phase, granules and biofilms as well as CSTR and plug flow modes in the biotransformation of hazardous pollutants would be foundational for future research and development.

  10. Automated equipment for anaerobic sludge parameters determination.

    PubMed

    Fdz-Polanco, F; Nieto, P; Pérez Elvira, S; van der Zee, F P; Fdz-Polanc, M; García, P A

    2005-01-01

    Methanogenic activity, anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity are key parameters in the design and operation of anaerobic bioreactors. A large variety of methods exist for the determination of these parameters but a normalized method has not been established so far. This paper presents the development of an automated manometric system for the determination of these anaerobic sludge parameters. The system is based on monitoring the production of methane by using a pressure transducer that measures the pressure in a gas-collecting chamber of known adjustable volume, which is independent of the space where biogas production takes place. The evolution of pressure generated by the accumulation of methane relates to the conversion of COD. In this way, the methanogenic activity of the sludge can be determined, as well as the biodegradability of solids and liquid, as well as the methanogenic toxicity of compounds. The equipment permits gas sampling, as well as extraction and introduction of liquid, without losing the anaerobic conditions. Various assays have been conducted to test the reliability and reproducibility of the obtained results, showing a high level of both. The methanogenic activities obtained in the assays ranged between 0.1 and 1.8 g COD g(-1) VSS d(-1), and the biodegradability of the organic compounds tested ranged between 20 and 90%.

  11. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  12. Modeling for Anaerobic Fixed-Bed Biofilm Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B. Y. M.; Pfeffer, J. T.

    1989-06-01

    The specific objectives of this research were: 1. to develop an equilibrium model for chemical aspects of anaerobic reactors; 2. to modify the equilibrium model for non-equilibrium conditions; 3. to incorporate the existing biofilm models into the models above to study the biological and chemical behavior of the fixed-film anaerobic reactors; 4. to experimentally verify the validity of these models; 5. to investigate the biomass-holding ability of difference packing materials for establishing reactor design criteria.

  13. Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes.

    PubMed

    López Torres, M; Espinosa Lloréns, Ma del C

    2008-11-01

    The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH)2), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH)2/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m3CH4/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW. PMID:18068345

  14. Effect of alkaline pretreatment on anaerobic digestion of solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Torres, M. Espinosa Llorens, Ma. del C.

    2008-11-15

    The introduction of the anaerobic digestion for the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is currently of special interest. The main difficulty in the treatment of this waste fraction is its biotransformation, due to the complexity of organic material. Therefore, the first step must be its physical, chemical and biological pretreatment for breaking complex molecules into simple monomers, to increase solubilization of organic material and improve the efficiency of the anaerobic treatment in the second step. This paper describes chemical pretreatment based on lime addition (Ca(OH){sub 2}), in order to enhance chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization, followed by anaerobic digestion of the OFMSW. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in completely mixed reactors, 1 L capacity. Optimal conditions for COD solubilization in the first step of pretreatment were 62.0 mEq Ca(OH){sub 2}/L for 6.0 h. Under these conditions, 11.5% of the COD was solubilized. The anaerobic digestion efficiency of the OFMSW, with and without pretreatment, was evaluated. The highest methane yield under anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste was 0.15 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/kg volatile solids (VS), 172.0% of the control. Under that condition the soluble COD and VS removal were 93.0% and 94.0%, respectively. The results have shown that chemical pretreatment with lime, followed by anaerobic digestion, provides the best results for stabilizing the OFMSW.

  15. Anaerobically expressed Escherichia coli genes identified by operon fusion techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Choe, M; Reznikoff, W S

    1991-01-01

    Genes that are expressed under anaerobic conditions were identified by operon fusion techniques with a hybrid bacteriophage of lambda and Mu, lambda placMu53, which creates transcriptional fusions to lacZY. Cells were screened for anaerobic expression on XG medium. Nine strains were selected, and the insertion point of the hybrid phage in each strain was mapped on the Escherichia coli chromosome linkage map. The anaerobic and aerobic expression levels of these genes were measured by beta-galactosidase assays in different medium conditions and in the presence of three regulatory mutations (fnr, narL, and rpoN). The anaerobically expressed genes (aeg) located at minute 99 (aeg-99) and 75 (aeg-75) appeared to be partially regulated by fnr, and aeg-93 is tightly regulated by fnr. aeg-60 requires a functional rpoN gene for its anaerobic expression. aeg-46.5 is repressed by narL. aeg-65A and aeg-65C are partially controlled by fnr but only in media containing nitrate or fumarate. aeg-47.5 and aeg-48.5 were found to be anaerobically induced only in rich media. The effects of a narL mutation on aeg-46.5 expression were observed in all medium conditions regardless of the presence or absence of nitrate. This suggests that narL has a regulatory function in the absence of exogenously added nitrate. PMID:1917846

  16. Improvement of anaerobic digestion of sludge.

    PubMed

    Dohányos, M; Zábranská, J; Kutil, J; Jenícek, P

    2004-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion improvement can be accomplished by different methods. Besides optimization of the process conditions, pretreatment of input sludge and increase of process temperature is frequently used. The thermophilic process brings a higher solids reduction and biogas production, a high resistance to foaming, no problems with odour, better pathogens destruction and an improvement of the energy balance of the whole treatment plant. Disintegration of excess activated sludge in a lysate centrifuge was proved to cause increase of biogas production in full-scale conditions. The rapid thermal conditioning of digested sludge is an acceptable method of particulate matter disintegration and solubilization. PMID:15259942

  17. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  18. Characteristics, Process Parameters, and Inner Components of Anaerobic Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelgadir, Awad; Chen, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianshe; Xie, Xuehui; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Heng; Liu, Na

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic bioreactor applies the principles of biotechnology and microbiology, and nowadays it has been used widely in the wastewater treatment plants due to their high efficiency, low energy use, and green energy generation. Advantages and disadvantages of anaerobic process were shown, and three main characteristics of anaerobic bioreactor (AB), namely, inhomogeneous system, time instability, and space instability were also discussed in this work. For high efficiency of wastewater treatment, the process parameters of anaerobic digestion, such as temperature, pH, Hydraulic retention time (HRT), Organic Loading Rate (OLR), and sludge retention time (SRT) were introduced to take into account the optimum conditions for living, growth, and multiplication of bacteria. The inner components, which can improve SRT, and even enhance mass transfer, were also explained and have been divided into transverse inner components, longitudinal inner components, and biofilm-packing material. At last, the newly developed special inner components were discussed and found more efficient and productive. PMID:24672798

  19. Decolourisation of textile wastewater in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Spagni, Alessandro; Casu, Stefania; Grilli, Selene

    2012-08-01

    Azo dye decolourisation can be easily achieved by biological reduction under anaerobic conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactors (SAMBRs) for the decolourisation of dyeing wastewater containing azo dyes. The reactive orange 16 was used as model of an azo dye. The results demonstrated that very high decolourisation (higher than 99%) can be achieved by SAMBRs. Although decolourisation was not significantly influenced by the azo dye concentrations up to 3.2 g L(-1), methane production was greatly inhibited (up to 80-85%). Since volatile fatty acids accumulated in the treatment system with the azo dye concentration increase, methanogenes seem to be the most sensitive microbial populations of the anaerobic ecological community. The results demonstrated that anaerobic process combined with membrane filtration can deal with highly concentrated wastewaters that result from stream separation of industrial discharges.

  20. Oxygen tolerance capacity of upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) with anaerobic filter (AF) system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yao; Jost, Carsten; Mumme, Jan; Wang, Kaijun; Linke, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate the oxygen tolerance capacity of upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) with anaerobic filter (AF) system, the effect of microaeration on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of maize straw was investigated under batch conditions and in the UASS with AF system. Aeration intensities of 0-431mL O2/gvs were conducted as pretreatment under batch conditions. Aeration pretreatment obviously enhanced anaerobic digestion and an aeration intensity of 431mL O2/gvs increased the methane yield by 82.2%. Aeration intensities of 0-355mL O2/gvs were conducted in the process liquor circulation of the UASS with AF system. Dissolved oxygen (DO) of UASS and AF reactors kept around 1.39±0.27 and 0.99±0.38mg/L, respectively. pH was relatively stable around 7.11±0.04. Volatile fatty acids and soluble chemical oxygen demand concentration in UASS reactor were higher than those in AF reactor. Methane yield of the whole system was almost stable at 85±7mL/gvs as aeration intensity increased step by step. The UASS with AF system showed good oxygen tolerance capacity.

  1. Oxygen tolerance capacity of upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) with anaerobic filter (AF) system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yao; Jost, Carsten; Mumme, Jan; Wang, Kaijun; Linke, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate the oxygen tolerance capacity of upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) with anaerobic filter (AF) system, the effect of microaeration on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of maize straw was investigated under batch conditions and in the UASS with AF system. Aeration intensities of 0-431mL O2/gvs were conducted as pretreatment under batch conditions. Aeration pretreatment obviously enhanced anaerobic digestion and an aeration intensity of 431mL O2/gvs increased the methane yield by 82.2%. Aeration intensities of 0-355mL O2/gvs were conducted in the process liquor circulation of the UASS with AF system. Dissolved oxygen (DO) of UASS and AF reactors kept around 1.39±0.27 and 0.99±0.38mg/L, respectively. pH was relatively stable around 7.11±0.04. Volatile fatty acids and soluble chemical oxygen demand concentration in UASS reactor were higher than those in AF reactor. Methane yield of the whole system was almost stable at 85±7mL/gvs as aeration intensity increased step by step. The UASS with AF system showed good oxygen tolerance capacity. PMID:27372134

  2. Anaerobic bioventing of unsaturated zone contaminated with DDT and DNT.

    PubMed

    Shah, J K; Sayles, G D; Suidan, M T; Mihopoulos, P; Kaskassian, S

    2001-01-01

    Initial degradation of highly chlorinated compounds and nitroaromatic compounds found in munition waste streams is accelerated under anaerobic conditions followed by aerobic treatment of the degradation products. The establishment of anaerobic environment in a vadose zone can be accomplished by feeding appropriate anaerobic gas mixture, i.e., "anaerobic bioventing". The gas mixture contains an electron donor for the reduction of these compounds. Lab scale study was conducted to evaluate potential of anaerobic bioventing for the treatment of an unsaturated zone contaminated with 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT). Hydrogen was used as the electron donor. Using the soil columns innoculate with anaerobic microorganisms, it was observed that by feeding a gas mixture of 1% hydrogen, 1% carbon dioxide and nitrogen, methanogenic conditions were established and DDT was reductively dechlorinated. 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD) accumulated as the intermediate product. The half life of DDT was calculated to be 8.5 months. DNT completely disappeared after six months of operation and no intermediates could be detected.

  3. Metabolic models to investigate energy limited anaerobic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Premier, G C; Guwy, A J; Dinsdale, R; Kleerebezem, R

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is shifting from a philosophy of solely pollutants removal to a philosophy of combined resource recovery and waste treatment. Simultaneous wastewater treatment with energy recovery in the form of energy rich products, brings renewed interest to non-methanogenic anaerobic bioprocesses such as the anaerobic production of hydrogen, ethanol, solvents, VFAs, bioplastics and even electricity from microbial fuel cells. The existing kinetic-based modelling approaches, widely used in aerobic and methanogenic wastewater treatment processes, do not seem adequate in investigating such energy limited microbial ecosystems. The great diversity of similar microbial species, which share many of the fermentative reaction pathways, makes quantify microbial groups very difficult and causes identifiability problems. A modelling approach based on the consideration of metabolic reaction networks instead of on separated microbial groups is suggested as an alternative to describe anaerobic microbial ecosystems and in particular for the prediction of product formation as a function of environmental conditions imposed. The limited number of existing relevant fermentative pathways in conjunction with the fact that anaerobic reactions proceed very close to thermodynamic equilibrium reduces the complexity of such approach and the degrees of freedom in terms of product formation fluxes. In addition, energy limitation in these anaerobic microbial ecosystems makes plausible that selective forces associated with energy further define the system activity by favouring those conversions/microorganisms which provide the most energy for growth under the conditions imposed. PMID:19809129

  4. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Wellinger, A.

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  5. Subculturing of a polychlorinated biphenyl-dechlorinating anaerobic enrichment on solid media.

    PubMed Central

    May, H D; Boyle, A W; Price, W A; Blake, C K

    1992-01-01

    An anaerobic culture capable of dechlorinating polychlorinated biphenyls was subcultured under strict anaerobic conditions on solid media containing sterilized river sediment. The dechlorination activity was transferred as a bacterial colony on a solid medium three times. After two transfers on solid medium, the culture was no longer methanogenic but still dechlorinated a mixture of tri- and tetrachlorobiphenyls. This demonstrates that anaerobic bacteria are responsible for the polychlorinated biphenyl dechlorination and can be grown without polychlorinated biphenyl on solid media. PMID:1476444

  6. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  7. Redesigning Escherichia coli metabolism for anaerobic production of isobutanol.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Cong T; Li, Johnny; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2011-07-01

    Fermentation enables the production of reduced metabolites, such as the biofuels ethanol and butanol, from fermentable sugars. This work demonstrates a general approach for designing and constructing a production host that uses a heterologous pathway as an obligately fermentative pathway to produce reduced metabolites, specifically, the biofuel isobutanol. Elementary mode analysis was applied to design an Escherichia coli strain optimized for isobutanol production under strictly anaerobic conditions. The central metabolism of E. coli was decomposed into 38,219 functional, unique, and elementary modes (EMs). The model predictions revealed that during anaerobic growth E. coli cannot produce isobutanol as the sole fermentative product. By deleting 7 chromosomal genes, the total 38,219 EMs were constrained to 12 EMs, 6 of which can produce high yields of isobutanol in a range from 0.29 to 0.41 g isobutanol/g glucose under anaerobic conditions. The remaining 6 EMs rely primarily on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) and are typically inhibited under anaerobic conditions. The redesigned E. coli strain was constrained to employ the anaerobic isobutanol pathways through deletion of 7 chromosomal genes, addition of 2 heterologous genes, and overexpression of 5 genes. Here we present the design, construction, and characterization of an isobutanol-producing E. coli strain to illustrate the approach. The model predictions are evaluated in relation to experimental data and strategies proposed to improve anaerobic isobutanol production. We also show that the endogenous alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase AdhE is the key enzyme responsible for the production of isobutanol and ethanol under anaerobic conditions. The glycolytic flux can be controlled to regulate the ratio of isobutanol to ethanol production.

  8. Identification of a conserved protein involved in anaerobic unsaturated fatty acid synthesis in Neiserria gonorrhoeae: implications for facultative and obligate anaerobes that lack FabA.

    PubMed

    Isabella, Vincent M; Clark, Virginia L

    2011-10-01

    Transcriptome analysis of the facultative anaerobe, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, revealed that many genes of unknown function were induced under anaerobic conditions. Mutation of one such gene, NGO1024, encoding a protein belonging to the 2-nitropropane dioxygenase-like superfamily of proteins, was found to result in an inability of gonococci to grow anaerobically. Anaerobic growth of an NG1024 mutant was restored upon supplementation with unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), but not with the saturated fatty acid palmitate. Gonococcal fatty acid profiles confirmed that NGO1024 was involved in UFA synthesis anaerobically, but not aerobically, demonstrating that gonococci contain two distinct pathways for the production of UFAs, with a yet unidentified aerobic mechanism, and an anaerobic mechanism involving NGO1024. Expression of genes involved in classical anaerobic UFA synthesis, fabA, fabM and fabB, was toxic in gonococci and unable to complement a NGO1024 mutation, suggesting that the chemistry involved in gonococcal anaerobic UFA synthesis is distinct from that of the classical pathway. NGO1024 homologues, which we suggest naming UfaA, form a distinct lineage within the 2-nitropropane dioxygenase-like superfamily, and are found in many facultative and obligate anaerobes that produce UFAs but lack fabA, suggesting that UfaA is part of a widespread pathway involved in UFA synthesis. PMID:21895795

  9. Anaerobic Metabolism of Indoleacetate

    PubMed Central

    Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Thomas, Markus; Scharf, Gernot; Kockelkorn, Daniel; Knapp, Bettina; Schühle, Karola; Heider, Johann

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic metabolism of indoleacetate (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Azoarcus evansii was studied. The strain oxidized IAA completely and grew with a generation time of 10 h. Enzyme activities that transformed IAA were present in the soluble cell fraction of IAA-grown cells but were 10-fold downregulated in cells grown on 2-aminobenzoate or benzoate. The transformation of IAA did not require molecular oxygen but required electron acceptors like NAD+ or artificial dyes. The first products identified were the enol and keto forms of 2-oxo-IAA. Later, polar products were observed, which could not yet be identified. The first steps likely consist of the anaerobic hydroxylation of the N-heterocyclic pyrrole ring to the enol form of 2-oxo-IAA, which is catalyzed by a molybdenum cofactor-containing dehydrogenase. This step is probably followed by the hydrolytic ring opening of the keto form, which is catalyzed by a hydantoinase-like enzyme. A comparison of the proteome of IAA- and benzoate-grown cells identified IAA-induced proteins. Owing to the high similarity of A. evansii with strain EbN1, whose genome is known, we identified a cluster of 14 genes that code for IAA-induced proteins involved in the early steps of IAA metabolism. These genes include a molybdenum cofactor-dependent dehydrogenase of the xanthine oxidase/aldehyde dehydrogenase family, a hydantoinase, a coenzyme A (CoA) ligase, a CoA transferase, a coenzyme B12-dependent mutase, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a fusion protein of an enoyl-CoA hydratase and a 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, a beta-ketothiolase, and a periplasmic substrate binding protein for ABC transport as well as a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. Five predicted enzymes form or act on CoA thioesters, indicating that soon after the initial oxidation of IAA and possibly ring opening, CoA thioesters are formed, and the carbon skeleton is rearranged, followed by a CoA-dependent thiolytic

  10. Application of Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 for simulating anaerobic mesophilic sludge digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Carlos Esquerre, Karla Matos Queiroz, Luciano

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The behavior of a anaerobic reactor was evaluated through modeling. • Parametric sensitivity analysis was used to select most sensitive of the ADM1. • The results indicate that the ADM1 was able to predict the experimental results. • Organic load rate above of 35 kg/m{sup 3} day affects the performance of the process. - Abstract: Improving anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge by monitoring common indicators such as volatile fatty acids (VFAs), gas composition and pH is a suitable solution for better sludge management. Modeling is an important tool to assess and to predict process performance. The present study focuses on the application of the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) to simulate the dynamic behavior of a reactor fed with sewage sludge under mesophilic conditions. Parametric sensitivity analysis is used to select the most sensitive ADM1 parameters for estimation using a numerical procedure while other parameters are applied without any modification to the original values presented in the ADM1 report. The results indicate that the ADM1 model after parameter estimation was able to predict the experimental results of effluent acetate, propionate, composites and biogas flows and pH with reasonable accuracy. The simulation of the effect of organic shock loading clearly showed that an organic shock loading rate above of 35 kg/m{sup 3} day affects the performance of the reactor. The results demonstrate that simulations can be helpful to support decisions on predicting the anaerobic digestion process of sewage sludge.

  11. Isolation and characterisation of non-anaerobic butanol-producing symbiotic system TSH06.

    PubMed

    Wang, Genyu; Wu, Pengfei; Liu, Ya; Mi, Shuo; Mai, Shuai; Gu, Chunkai; Wang, Gehua; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan; Børresen, Børre Tore; Mellemsæther, Evy; Kotlar, Hans Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Butanol-producing microorganisms are all obligate anaerobes. In this study, a unique symbiotic system TSH06 was isolated to be capable of producing butanol under non-anaerobic condition. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) revealed that two strains coexist in TSH06. The two strains were identical to Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus cereus, respectively. They were isolated individually and named as C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2. C. acetobutylicum TSH1 is a butanol-producing, obligate anaerobic strain. Facultative anaerobic B. cereus TSH2 did not possess the ability of butanol production; however, it offered C. acetobutylicum TSH1 the viability under non-anaerobic condition. Moreover, B. cereus TSH2 enhanced butanol yield and speed of fermentation. TSH06 produced 12.97 g/L butanol and 15.39 g/L total solvent under non-anaerobic condition, which is 25 and 24 %, respectively, higher than those of C. acetobutylicum TSH1. In addition, TSH06 produced butanol faster under non-anaerobic condition than under anaerobic condition. Butanol accounted for more than 80 % of total solvent, which is higher than the known report. TSH06 was stable during passage. In all, TSH06 is a promising candidate for industrialisation of biobutanol with high yield, high butanol proportion, easy-handling and time-saving system. These results demonstrated the potential advantage of symbiosis. This study also provides a promising strategy for butanol fermentation. PMID:26272091

  12. Isolation and characterisation of non-anaerobic butanol-producing symbiotic system TSH06.

    PubMed

    Wang, Genyu; Wu, Pengfei; Liu, Ya; Mi, Shuo; Mai, Shuai; Gu, Chunkai; Wang, Gehua; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jianan; Børresen, Børre Tore; Mellemsæther, Evy; Kotlar, Hans Kristian

    2015-10-01

    Butanol-producing microorganisms are all obligate anaerobes. In this study, a unique symbiotic system TSH06 was isolated to be capable of producing butanol under non-anaerobic condition. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) revealed that two strains coexist in TSH06. The two strains were identical to Clostridium acetobutylicum and Bacillus cereus, respectively. They were isolated individually and named as C. acetobutylicum TSH1 and B. cereus TSH2. C. acetobutylicum TSH1 is a butanol-producing, obligate anaerobic strain. Facultative anaerobic B. cereus TSH2 did not possess the ability of butanol production; however, it offered C. acetobutylicum TSH1 the viability under non-anaerobic condition. Moreover, B. cereus TSH2 enhanced butanol yield and speed of fermentation. TSH06 produced 12.97 g/L butanol and 15.39 g/L total solvent under non-anaerobic condition, which is 25 and 24 %, respectively, higher than those of C. acetobutylicum TSH1. In addition, TSH06 produced butanol faster under non-anaerobic condition than under anaerobic condition. Butanol accounted for more than 80 % of total solvent, which is higher than the known report. TSH06 was stable during passage. In all, TSH06 is a promising candidate for industrialisation of biobutanol with high yield, high butanol proportion, easy-handling and time-saving system. These results demonstrated the potential advantage of symbiosis. This study also provides a promising strategy for butanol fermentation.

  13. Anaerobic propane oxidation in marine hydrocarbon seep sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quistad, Steven D.; Valentine, David L.

    2011-04-01

    Propane (C 3H 8) is an abundant hydrocarbon in subsurface reservoirs with significance to atmospheric chemistry and to marine biogeochemistry. The anaerobic oxidation of propane coupled to sulfate reduction may prevent sub-seafloor accumulations of propane from entering the ocean and atmosphere. Anaerobic oxidation of propane has recently been demonstrated in cultures of novel sulfate-reducing bacteria, but has not been directly demonstrated or quantified in nature. In this work we describe a method involving incubation with 13C-propane to quantify rates of anaerobic oxidation of propane in anoxic sediment, and we conclusively demonstrate the oxidation of propane under sulfidic conditions in fresh sediments of a marine hydrocarbon seep. Observed rates of anaerobic oxidation of propane adhere to first-order kinetic behavior, enabling the modification of this method for whole core rate determinations. Whole core rates in nine cores from two hydrocarbon seeps measured 0.04-2100 nmoles C 3H 8 cm -3 day -1 by this method. The seep persistently supplied with more propane displayed substantially higher rates of anaerobic oxidation of propane, by 1-2 orders of magnitude when averaged over the top 10-cm, suggesting the development of the microbial community is strongly modulated by the availability of propane. This work is the first to estimate rates for anaerobic oxidation of propane in any environment, and demonstrates the potential importance of the process as a filter for preventing propane from entering the ocean and atmosphere.

  14. [Anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass with animal digestion mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Zhang, Pan-Yue; Guo, Jian-Bin; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2013-02-01

    Lignocellulosic material is the most abundant renewable resource in the earth. Herbivores and wood-eating insects are highly effective in the digestion of plant cellulose, while anaerobic digestion process simulating animal alimentary tract still remains inefficient. The digestion mechanisms of herbivores and wood-eating insects and the development of anaerobic digestion processes of lignocellulose were reviewed for better understanding of animal digestion mechanisms and their application in design and operation of the anaerobic digestion reactor. Highly effective digestion of lignocellulosic materials in animal digestive system results from the synergistic effect of various digestive enzymes and a series of physical and biochemical reactions. Microbial fermentation system is strongly supported by powerful pretreatment, such as rumination of ruminants, cellulase catalysis and alkali treatment in digestive tract of wood-eating insects. Oxygen concentration gradient along the digestive tract may stimulate the hydrolytic activity of some microorganisms. In addition, the excellent arrangement of solid retention time, digesta flow and end product discharge enhance the animal digestion of wood cellulose. Although anaerobic digestion processes inoculated with rumen microorganisms based rumen digestion mechanisms were developed to treat lignocellulose, the fermentation was more greatly limited by the environmental conditions in the anaerobic digestion reactors than that in rumen or hindgut. Therefore, the anaerobic digestion processes simulating animal digestion mechanisms can effectively enhance the degradation of wood cellulose and other organic solid wastes.

  15. Comparison of aerobic and anaerobic biotreatment of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Borglin, Sharon E; Hazen, Terry C; Oldenburg, Curtis M; Zawislanski, Peter T

    2004-07-01

    To increase the operating lifetime of landfills and to lower leachate treatment costs, an increasing number of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are being managed as either aerobic or anaerobic bioreactors. Landfill gas composition, respiration rates, and subsidence were measured for 400 days in 200-L tanks filled with fresh waste materials to compare the relative effectiveness of the two treatments. Tanks were prepared to provide the following conditions: (1) air injection and leachate recirculation (aerobic), (2) leachate recirculation (anaerobic), and (3) no treatment (anaerobic). Respiration tests on the aerobic wet tank showed a steady decrease in oxygen consumption rates from 1.3 mol/day at 20 days to 0.1 mol/day at 400 days. Aerobic wet tanks produced, on average, 6 mol of carbon dioxide (CO2)/kg of MSW as compared with anaerobic wet tanks, which produced 2.2 mol methane/kg of MSW and 2.0 mol CO2/kg methane. Over the test period, the aerobic tanks settled on average 35%, anaerobic tanks settled 21.7%, and the no-treatment tank settled 7.5%, equivalent to overall mass loss in the corresponding reactors. Aerobic tanks reduced stabilization time and produced negligible odor compared with anaerobic tanks, possibly because of the 2 orders of magnitude lower leachate ammonia levels in the aerobic tank. Both treatment regimes provide the opportunity for disposal and remediation of liquid waste.

  16. [Evaluation for anaerobic culture system: Anoxomat Mart II].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuji; Sasaki, Hiromi; Furuhata, Yukie; Tazawa, Yoko; Horiuchi, Hajime; Okada, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Anoxomat Mart II (Mart Microbiology BV, Lichtenvooorde, Netherlands, Central Scientific Commerce Inc., Tokyo, Japan) is an anaerobic jar apparatus which uses a vacuum pump in combination with catalyst as gas replacement procedure to remove all traces of oxygen. As we had a chance to use Anoxomat Mart II, we compared it with other two anaerobic culture methods; namely AnaeroPack anaero (Mitsubishi Gas Chemical Co., Tokyo, Japan) which employs anaerobic jar method, and Concept400 (RUSKINN TECHNOLOGY LTD, England; Central Scientific Commerce INc., Tokyo, Japan) which uses anaerobic chamber method. We used 10 different species of anaerobic bacteria obtained from ATCC. One strain each of 10 species was cultured and examined for measurement of the sensitibity of an anaerobic indicator, th number of bacteria after 48 hour culture, the diameter of colonies, and MIC value. As a result, the time to reach the anaerobic condition was around 30 minutes by the Mart II against around 60 minutes by the AnaeroPack anaero. There was no difference concerning the number of bacteria after 48 hour culture among three methods. But anaerobic bacteria cultured by Mart II tended to make bigger colonies compared to other two methods in the 5 strains out of 9, except for one strain in which the diameter of colonies could not be measured. On the other hand, the comparison of MIC value showed good correlation in 11 antibiotics out of 12 among three methods. The MIC value of 11 antibiotics fitted within 1-fold difference, and 2-fold difference was observed in only one antibiotic. Mart II is so small that it does cheep consumables. From these reasons, we concluded that Mart II can be one of the useful anerobic culture methods.

  17. What are the differences between aerobic and anaerobic toxic effects of sulfonamides on Escherichia coli?

    PubMed

    Qin, Mengnan; Lin, Zhifen; Wang, Dali; Long, Xi; Zheng, Min; Qiu, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria in the environment face the threat of antibiotics. However, most studies investigating the toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics have been conducted on microorganisms in aerobic conditions, while studies examining the anaerobic toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics are still limited. In this study, we determined the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities of sulfonamides (SAs) on Escherichia coli. Next, a comparison of the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities indicated that the SAs could be divided into three groups: Group I: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)>log(1/EC50-aerobic) (EC50-anaerobic/EC50-aerobic, the median effective concentration under anaerobic/aerobic conditions), Group II: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)≈log(1/EC50-aerobic), and Group III: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)anaerobic toxicities will benefit environmental science, and the results of this study will serve as a reference for the risk assessment of chemicals in the environment.

  18. Effects of anaerobic processing of soybean seeds on the properties of tofu.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kenji; Takaki, Saki; Shimada, Kazuko; Hajika, Makita

    2011-01-01

    Oxygenation of lipids during the processing soybeans affects the flavor properties of soy products. We prepared tofu under anaerobic conditions and then evaluated its sensory properties and the compositions of volatiles and oxidized lipids. Anaerobic processing resulted in tofu with less intense richness (kokumi) concomitant with reductions in the amounts of oxidized lipids and volatile compounds.

  19. Dance--Aerobic and Anaerobic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlette

    1984-01-01

    This article defines and explains aerobic exercise and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Various studies on dancers are cited indicating that dance is an anaerobic activity with some small degree of aerobic benefit. (DF)

  20. Bioenergy from anaerobically treated wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Breweries and other processing plants including dairy cooperatives, sugar plants, grain mills, gasohol plants, etc., produce wastewater containing complex organic matter, either in solution or as volatile suspended solids, which can be treated anaerobically to effectively reduce the pollutants by 85-95% and generate a CH4 containing gas. An example anaerobic plant to serve a 10 to the power of 6-bbl brewery is discussed.

  1. Performance and characteristics of an anaerobic baffled reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianlong; Huang, Yongheng; Zhao, Xuan

    2004-06-01

    The performance and the characteristics of a laboratory scale anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) were investigated using synthetic wastewater. The experimental results showed that among different volatile fatty acids (VFAs), acetate was the main intermediate of acidogenic degradation of glucose. The VFA concentration decreased longitudinally down the reactor. The analysis of the biogas composition revealed that methane concentration increased steadily from compartment 1 to 5, while hydrogen content decreased in the first compartments. There was no detectable hydrogen in the last two compartments. The methane-producing activity of anaerobic sludge in different compartments depended on the substrate, which suggests that the proper anaerobic consortium in each separate compartment was developed according to the substrate(s) availability and the specific environmental conditions. The ABR has the potential to provide a higher efficiency at higher loading rates and be applicable for extreme environmental conditions and inhibitory compounds.

  2. Prevailing Torque Locking Feature in Threaded Fasteners Using Anaerobic Adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Alan; Hess, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results from tests to assess the use of anaerobic adhesive for providing a prevailing torque locking feature in threaded fasteners. Test procedures are developed and tests are performed on three fastener materials, four anaerobic adhesives, and both unseated assembly conditions. Five to ten samples are tested for each combination. Tests for initial use, reuse without additional adhesive, and reuse with additional adhesive are performed for all samples. A 48-hour cure time was used for all initial use and reuse tests. Test data are presented as removal torque versus removal angle with the specification required prevailing torque range added for performance assessment. Percent specification pass rates for the all combinations of fastener material, adhesive, and assembly condition are tabulated and reveal use of anaerobic adhesive as a prevailing torque locking feature is viable. Although not every possible fastener material and anaerobic adhesive combination provides prevailing torque values within specification, any combination can be assessed using the test procedures presented. Reuse without additional anaerobic adhesive generally provides some prevailing torque, and in some cases within specification. Reuse with additional adhesive often provides comparable removal torque data as in initial use.

  3. Anaerobic waste digestion in Germany--status and recent developments.

    PubMed

    Weiland, P

    2000-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment processes are especially suited for the utilization of wet organic wastes from agriculture and industry as well as for the organic part of source-separated household wastes. Anaerobic degradation is a very cost-effective method for treating biogenic wastes because the formed biogas can be used for heat and electricity production and the digester residues can be recycled to agriculture as a secondary fertilizer. Anaerobic technology will also be used for the common treatment of wastes together with renewable energy crops in order to reduce the CO2-emissions according the Kyoto protocol. Various process types are applied in Germany which differ in material, reaction conditions and in the form of the used reactor systems. The widespread introduction of anaerobic digestion in Germany has shown that biogenic organic wastes are a valuable source for energy and nutrients. Anaerobic waste treatment is done today in approx. 850 biogas plants on small farm scale as well as on large industrial scale with the best beneficial and economic outcome. Due to some new environmental protection acts which promote the recycling of wastes and their utilization for renewable energy formation it can be expected that several hundreds new biogas plants will be built per year in Germany. In order to use the synergetic effects of a combined fermentation of wastes and energy crops new process types must be developed in order to optimize the substrate combinations and the process conditions for maximum biodegradation.

  4. Anaerobic Growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum via Mixed-Acid Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Andrea; Koch-Koerfges, Abigail; Krumbach, Karin; Brocker, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a model organism in microbial biotechnology, is known to metabolize glucose under oxygen-deprived conditions to l-lactate, succinate, and acetate without significant growth. This property is exploited for efficient production of lactate and succinate. Our detailed analysis revealed that marginal growth takes place under anaerobic conditions with glucose, fructose, sucrose, or ribose as a carbon and energy source but not with gluconate, pyruvate, lactate, propionate, or acetate. Supplementation of glucose minimal medium with tryptone strongly enhanced growth up to a final optical density at 600 nm (OD600) of 12, whereas tryptone alone did not allow growth. Amino acids with a high ATP demand for biosynthesis and amino acids of the glutamate family were particularly important for growth stimulation, indicating ATP limitation and a restricted carbon flux into the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle toward 2-oxoglutarate. Anaerobic cultivation in a bioreactor with constant nitrogen flushing disclosed that CO2 is required to achieve maximal growth and that the pH tolerance is reduced compared to that under aerobic conditions, reflecting a decreased capability for pH homeostasis. Continued growth under anaerobic conditions indicated the absence of an oxygen-requiring reaction that is essential for biomass formation. The results provide an improved understanding of the physiology of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions. PMID:26276118

  5. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low-rank coals. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal decarboxylation. The microbial consortia will be developed using a fermentor system first under batch and then in a continuous system. The main objectives for this quarter were to develop microbial consortia that would decarboxylate coal and isolate potential anaerobic microorganisms with decarboxylating, ability from these enriched microbial consortia, to continue to compare the known cultures with reward to their ability to decarboxylate coal, and to characterize the anaerobically biotreated coal using FTIR to confirm decarboxylation of coal. Significant achievements during the period include: coal decarboxylation was possible only under anaerobic conditions. microbial consortia that can anaerobically decarboxylate coal have been developed using anaerobic vials and batch fermentor system, and loss of carboxyl groups in biotreated coal has been confirmed by FT-IR.

  6. Anaerobic mineralization of vinyl chloride in Fe(III)-reducing, aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Within anaerobic aquifer systems, reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated ethenes commonly results in the accumulation of vinyl chloride, which is highly toxic and carcinogenic to humans. Anaerobic reduction of vinyl chloride is considered to be slow and incomplete. Here, we provide the first evidence for anaerobic oxidation of vinyl chloride under Fe(III)reducing conditions. Addition of chelated Fe(III) (as Fe-EDTA) to anaerobic aquifer microcosms resulted in mineralization of up to 34% of [1,2- 14C]vinyl chloride within 84 h. The results indicate that vinyl chloride can be mineralized under anaerobic, Fe(III)-reducing conditions and that the bioavailability of Fe(III) is an important factor affecting the rates of mineralization.

  7. Anaerobic glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Modig, Tobias; Granath, Katarina; Adler, Lennart; Lidén, Gunnar

    2007-05-01

    Glycerol formation is vital for reoxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form; NADH) under anaerobic conditions and for the hyperosmotic stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, relatively few studies have been made on hyperosmotic stress under anaerobic conditions. To study the combined effect of salt stress and anaerobic conditions, industrial and laboratory strains of S. cerevisiae were grown anaerobically on glucose in batch-cultures containing 40 g/l NaCl. The time needed for complete glucose conversion increased considerably, and the specific growth rates decreased by 80-90% when the cells were subjected to the hyperosmotic conditions. This was accompanied by an increased yield of glycerol and other by-products and reduced biomass yield in all strains. The slowest fermenting strain doubled its glycerol yield (from 0.072 to 0.148 g/g glucose) and a nearly fivefold increase in acetate formation was seen. In more tolerant strains, a lower increase was seen in the glycerol and in the acetate, succinate and pyruvate yields. Additionally, the NADH-producing pathway from acetaldehyde to acetate was analysed by overexpressing the stress-induced gene ALD3. However, this had no or very marginal effect on the acetate and glycerol yields. In the control experiments, the production of NADH from known sources well matched the glycerol formation. This was not the case for the salt stress experiments in which the production of NADH from known sources was insufficient to explain the formed glycerol.

  8. Anaerobic digestion of cassava wastewater pre-treated by fungi.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Paula Loureiro; Colman-Novaes, Thais Adriana; Obregão, Laynara Dayene Soares; Boncz, Marc Árpád

    2013-04-01

    Cassava wastewater (cww) contains high concentrations of easily acidifying compounds, requiring a buffered system to allow a stable operation during anaerobic digestion (AD). The possibility to include a preliminary one-step fungi treatment aimed at raising the pH and buffering the cww prior to AD was studied. Preliminary tests were performed with a naturally grown fungal mixed culture, under aerated (AE), non-aerated (NAE) and initially oxygen-deprived (IOD) conditions. The cww was pre-treated by the NAE condition, until reaching a soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 10 g L(-1) and pH 6.4 (batch A) and pH 5.7 (batch B). The fungal mixed culture showed ability to biodegrade the cww with initial pH of 4.4 and 14,500 mg COD L(-1), raising the pH over 8.5, with only 13 % of COD remaining within 27 days for both AE and NAE condition. The fungal pre-treated-cww (FPTcww) was subjected to anaerobic digestion under different buffered (CaCO3 and NaHCO3) and non-buffered conditions. The FPTcww with initial pH at 6.4 provided stability during the anaerobic biodegradability tests, showing the possibility of system operation without buffer addition, with final pH around 7. The application of a fungal pre-treatment can be a promising strategy to permit the anaerobic digestion of carbohydrate-rich wastewaters.

  9. Use of Presumpto Plates to identify anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, D N; Wiggs, L S; Miller, P H; Srivastava, P U; Miller, J M

    1995-01-01

    Identification of anaerobic bacteria requires special media and growth conditions that contribute to a higher cost per identification than that for aerobic isolates. Newer rapid methods streamline the identification process, but confirmation to the species level is often difficult. The Presumpto Plate method for the identification of commonly encountered anaerobes consists of three quadrant plates, each containing four conventional media, that result in the generation of 21 test parameters: growth on Lombard-Dowell medium; production of indole, indole derivative, catalase, lecithinase, and lipase; proteolysis of milk, H2S, and esculin; growth on 20% bile; precipitate on bile; DNase, glucose, casein, starch, and gelatin hydrolysis; and fermentation of lactose, mannitol, and rhamnose. Identification charts were developed by using the results from 2,300 anaerobic isolates. Because conventional media were used, there was a high degree of agreement between the Presumpto Plate method and the reference method when testing commonly encountered anaerobes. The Presumpto Plate method is as accurate as commercially available enzyme systems for the identification of many anaerobic species but is less expensive to perform. PMID:7615728

  10. Use of Presumpto Plates to identify anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Whaley, D N; Wiggs, L S; Miller, P H; Srivastava, P U; Miller, J M

    1995-05-01

    Identification of anaerobic bacteria requires special media and growth conditions that contribute to a higher cost per identification than that for aerobic isolates. Newer rapid methods streamline the identification process, but confirmation to the species level is often difficult. The Presumpto Plate method for the identification of commonly encountered anaerobes consists of three quadrant plates, each containing four conventional media, that result in the generation of 21 test parameters: growth on Lombard-Dowell medium; production of indole, indole derivative, catalase, lecithinase, and lipase; proteolysis of milk, H2S, and esculin; growth on 20% bile; precipitate on bile; DNase, glucose, casein, starch, and gelatin hydrolysis; and fermentation of lactose, mannitol, and rhamnose. Identification charts were developed by using the results from 2,300 anaerobic isolates. Because conventional media were used, there was a high degree of agreement between the Presumpto Plate method and the reference method when testing commonly encountered anaerobes. The Presumpto Plate method is as accurate as commercially available enzyme systems for the identification of many anaerobic species but is less expensive to perform.

  11. Anaerobic Metabolism in Haloferax Genus: Denitrification as Case of Study.

    PubMed

    Torregrosa-Crespo, J; Martínez-Espinosa, R M; Esclapez, J; Bautista, V; Pire, C; Camacho, M; Richardson, D J; Bonete, M J

    2016-01-01

    A number of species of Haloferax genus (halophilic archaea) are able to grow microaerobically or even anaerobically using different alternative electron acceptors such as fumarate, nitrate, chlorate, dimethyl sulphoxide, sulphide and/or trimethylamine. This metabolic capability is also shown by other species of the Halobacteriaceae and Haloferacaceae families (Archaea domain) and it has been mainly tested by physiological studies where cell growth is observed under anaerobic conditions in the presence of the mentioned compounds. This work summarises the main reported features on anaerobic metabolism in the Haloferax, one of the better described haloarchaeal genus with significant potential uses in biotechnology and bioremediation. Special attention has been paid to denitrification, also called nitrate respiration. This pathway has been studied so far from Haloferax mediterranei and Haloferax denitrificans mainly from biochemical point of view (purification and characterisation of the enzymes catalysing the two first reactions). However, gene expression and gene regulation is far from known at the time of writing this chapter.

  12. Induction of anaerobic, photoautotrophic growth in the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica.

    PubMed Central

    Oren, A; Padan, E

    1978-01-01

    Anaerobic photoautotrophic growth of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica was demonstrated under nitrogen in the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (5micron), a constant concentration of Na2S (2.5 mM), and constant pH (7.3). The photoanaerobic growth rate (2 days doubling time) was similar to that obtained under oxygenic photoautotrophic growth conditions. The potential of oxygenic photosynthesis is constitutive in the cells; that of anoxygenic photosynthesis is rapidly (2 h) induced in the presence of Na2S in the light in a process requiring protein synthesis. The facultative anaerobic phototrophic growth physiology exhibited by O. limnetica would seem to represent an intermediate physiological pattern between the obligate anaerobic one of photosynthetic bacteria and the oxygenic one of eucaryotic algae. PMID:415043

  13. Model selection, identification and validation in anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Donoso-Bravo, Andres; Mailier, Johan; Martin, Cristina; Rodríguez, Jorge; Aceves-Lara, César Arturo; Vande Wouwer, Alain

    2011-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion enables waste (water) treatment and energy production in the form of biogas. The successful implementation of this process has lead to an increasing interest worldwide. However, anaerobic digestion is a complex biological process, where hundreds of microbial populations are involved, and whose start-up and operation are delicate issues. In order to better understand the process dynamics and to optimize the operating conditions, the availability of dynamic models is of paramount importance. Such models have to be inferred from prior knowledge and experimental data collected from real plants. Modeling and parameter identification are vast subjects, offering a realm of approaches and methods, which can be difficult to fully understand by scientists and engineers dedicated to the plant operation and improvements. This review article discusses existing modeling frameworks and methodologies for parameter estimation and model validation in the field of anaerobic digestion processes. The point of view is pragmatic, intentionally focusing on simple but efficient methods. PMID:21920578

  14. Anaerobic Metabolism in Haloferax Genus: Denitrification as Case of Study.

    PubMed

    Torregrosa-Crespo, J; Martínez-Espinosa, R M; Esclapez, J; Bautista, V; Pire, C; Camacho, M; Richardson, D J; Bonete, M J

    2016-01-01

    A number of species of Haloferax genus (halophilic archaea) are able to grow microaerobically or even anaerobically using different alternative electron acceptors such as fumarate, nitrate, chlorate, dimethyl sulphoxide, sulphide and/or trimethylamine. This metabolic capability is also shown by other species of the Halobacteriaceae and Haloferacaceae families (Archaea domain) and it has been mainly tested by physiological studies where cell growth is observed under anaerobic conditions in the presence of the mentioned compounds. This work summarises the main reported features on anaerobic metabolism in the Haloferax, one of the better described haloarchaeal genus with significant potential uses in biotechnology and bioremediation. Special attention has been paid to denitrification, also called nitrate respiration. This pathway has been studied so far from Haloferax mediterranei and Haloferax denitrificans mainly from biochemical point of view (purification and characterisation of the enzymes catalysing the two first reactions). However, gene expression and gene regulation is far from known at the time of writing this chapter. PMID:27134021

  15. Anaerobic biotransformation of organoarsenical pesticides monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Yenal, U.; Feld, J.A.; Kopplin, M.; Gandolfi, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) are extensively utilized as pesticides, introducing large quantities of arsenic into the environment. Once released into the environment, these organoarsenicals are subject to microbial reactions. Aerobic biodegradation of MMAV and DMAV has been evaluated, but little is known about their fate in anaerobic environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biotransformation of MMAV and DMAV in anaerobic sludge. Biologically mediated conversion occurred under methanogenic or sulfate-reducing conditions but not in the presence of nitrate. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) was consistently observed as an important metabolite of MMAV degradation, and it was recovered in molar yields ranging from 5 to 47%. The main biotransformation product identified from DMAV metabolism was MMAV, which was recovered in molar yields ranging from 8 to 65%. The metabolites indicate that reduction and demethylation are important steps in the anaerobic bioconversion of MMAV and DMAV, respectively. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  16. Treatment of slaughterhouse wastewaters using anaerobic filters.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Sandra Luz; Torretta, Vincenzo; Minguelac, Jésus Vázquez; Siñeriz, Faustino; Raboni, Massimo; Copelli, Sabrina; Rada, Elena Cristina; Ragazzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a laboratory-scale experimentation allowed comparing the performances of two upflow anaerobic packed-bed filters filled with different packing materials and operating at mesophilic conditions (30 degreeC) for treating slaughterhouse wastewaters. Methane production was experimentally evaluated considering different volumetric organic loading rates as well as feeding overloading conditions. Although filter performances declined with loading rates higher than 6 kg CODin m-3 d-1 , the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency remained always above 60%. The experimental results allowed for determining kinetic parameters for bacterial growth rate and methane production, following Monod and Chen-Hashimoto models, respectively. Results demonstrated that the reactors reached a cellular retention time significantly greater than the hydraulic retention time. The kinetic parameter values (Ks, l/max) revealed the low microorganisms' affinity for the substrate and confirmed the moderate biodegradability of slaughterhouse wastewater. The kinetic analysis also allowed the comparison of the filters performances with another anaerobic system and the assessment of the parameters useful for real-scale plant design. The system design, applied to a medium-sized Argentinean slaughterhouse, demonstrated to (i) be energetically self-sufficient and (ii) contribute to the plant's water heating requirements. PMID:24600871

  17. Obligate anaerobes in clinical veterinary practice.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, D C; Biberstein, E L; Jang, S S

    1979-01-01

    Clinical specimens obtained from domestic animals were examined to determine the relative prevalence of obligate anaerobic bacteria and the species represented. Of 3,167 samples cultured anaerobically as well as aerobically, 2,234 were bacteriologically positive. Of these positive samples, 583 (26%) contained species of obligate anaerobic bacteria in a total of 641 isolates. Most positive samples contained anaerobes admixed with aerobic species, although 6% of such samples yielded pure cultures of obligate anaerobes. The most common sites from which anaerobes were isolated were abscesses (32% of abscesses cultured contained species of obligate anaerobes), peritoneal exudates (24%), and pleural effusions (20%). Bacteroides melaninogenicus, Bacteroides spp., Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, and Bacteroides ruminicola accounted in the aggregate for approximately 50% of all anaerobic isolates. Bacteroides fragilis accounted for 1% of all the isolates, and members of the genus Clostridium accounted for 8%. PMID:511987

  18. The Transition from Aerobic to Anaerobic Metabolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, James S.; McLellan, Thomas H.

    1980-01-01

    The transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is discussed. More research is needed on different kinds of athletes and athletic activities and how they may affect aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms. (CJ)

  19. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new.

  20. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new. PMID:27415771

  1. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  2. Anaerobic biodegradation of explosives and related compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria : a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C. F.; Manning, J.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Notre Dame

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, research on microbial degradation of explosives and nitroaromatic compounds has increased. Most studies of the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used aerobic microorganisms. Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Few review papers exist, and those deal mainly with aerobic bacterial degradation of explosives; none deals with anaerobic bacteria. In this paper, we review the anaerobic metabolic processes in the degradation of explosives and nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions.

  3. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Bailey, V.L.; Plymale, A.E.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2006-04-05

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by co-disposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Pu(IV)-EDTA is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds. Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) is likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions and the anaerobic biodegradation of Pu-EDTA. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV), the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA, how the Pu(III)-EDTA competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, soluble Pu(III)-EDTA under anaerobic conditions would require anaerobic degradation of the EDTA to limit Pu(III) transport. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have never been isolated. Recent results have shown that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(IV) was provided as insoluble PuO2. The highest rate of Pu(IV) reduction was with the addition of AQDS, an electron shuttle. Of the total amount of Pu solubilized (i.e., soluble through a 0.36 nm filter), approximately 70% was Pu(III). The amount of soluble Pu was between 4.8 and 3.2 micromolar at day 1 and 6, respectively, indicating rapid reduction. The micromolar Pu is significant since the drinking water limit for Pu is 10{sup -12} M. On-going experiments are investigating the influence of EDTA on the rate of Pu reduction and the stability of the formed Pu(III). We have also

  4. Treatment of packaging board whitewater in anaerobic/aerobic biokidney.

    PubMed

    Alexandersson, T; Malmqvist, A

    2005-01-01

    Whitewater from production of packaging board was treated in a combined anaerobic/aerobic biokidney, both in laboratory scale and pilot plant experiments. Both the laboratory experiments and the pilot plant trial demonstrate that a combined anaerobic/aerobic process is suitable for treating whitewater from a packaging mill. It is also possible to operate the process at the prevailing whitewater temperature. In the laboratory under mesophilic conditions the maximal organic load was 12 kg COD/m3*d on the anaerobic reactor and 6.7 kg COD/m3*d on the aerobic reactor. This gave a hydraulic retention time, HRT, in the anaerobic reactor of 10 hours and 2 hours in the aerobic reactor. The reduction of COD was between 85 and 90% after the first stage and the total reduction was between 88 to 93%. Under thermophilic conditions in the laboratory the organic load was slightly lower than 9.6 COD/m3*d and between 10 and 16 COD/m3*d, respectively. The HRT was 16.5 and 3.4 hours and the removal was around 75% after the anaerobic reactor and 87% after the total process. For the pilot plant experiment at a mill the HRT in the anaerobic step varied between 3 and 17 hours and the corresponding organic load between 4 and 44 kg COD/m3*d. The HRT in the aerobic step varied between 1 and 6 hours and the organic load between 1.5 and 26 kg COD/m3*d. The removal of soluble organic matter was 78% in the anaerobic step and 86% after the combined treatment at the lowest loading level. The removal efficiency at the highest loading level was about 65% in the anaerobic step and 77% after the aerobic step. In the pilot plant trial the removal efficiency was not markedly affected by the variations in whitewater composition that were caused by change of production. The variations, however, made the manual control of the nutrient dosage inadequate and resulted in large variations in effluent nutrient concentration. This demonstrates the need for an automatic nutrient dosage system. The first step

  5. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    Life evolved and flourished in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). As the O2 content of the atmosphere rose to the present level of 21% beginning about two billion years ago, anaerobic metabolism was gradually supplanted by aerobic metabolism. Anaerobic environments have persisted on Earth despite the transformation to an oxidized state because of the combined influence of water and organic matter. Molecular oxygen diffuses about 104 times more slowly through water than air, and organic matter supports a large biotic O2 demand that consumes the supply faster than it is replaced by diffusion. Such conditions exist in wetlands, rivers, estuaries, coastal marine sediments, aquifers, anoxic water columns, sewage digesters, landfills, the intestinal tracts of animals, and the rumen of herbivores. Anaerobic microsites are also embedded in oxic environments such as upland soils and marine water columns. Appreciable rates of aerobic respiration are restricted to areas that are in direct contact with air or those inhabited by organisms that produce O2.Rising atmospheric O2 reduced the global area of anaerobic habitat, but enhanced the overall rate of anaerobic metabolism (at least on an area basis) by increasing the supply of electron donors and acceptors. Organic carbon production increased dramatically, as did oxidized forms of nitrogen, manganese, iron, sulfur, and many other elements. In contemporary anaerobic ecosystems, nearly all of the reducing power is derived from photosynthesis, and most of it eventually returns to O2, the most electronegative electron acceptor that is abundant. This photosynthetically driven redox gradient has been thoroughly exploited by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms for metabolism. The same is true of hydrothermal vents (Tunnicliffe, 1992) and some deep subsurface environments ( Chapelle et al., 2002), where thermal energy is the ultimate source of the reducing power.Although anaerobic habitats are currently a small fraction of Earth

  6. Inhibition of biogas production by alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS) in a screening test for anaerobic biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Teresa; Campos, Encarna; Dalmau, Manel; Illán, Patricia; Sánchez-Leal, Joaquin

    2006-02-01

    The effect of the inoculum source on the digestion of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) under anaerobic conditions has been investigated. The potential for primary and ultimate LAS biodegradation of anaerobic sludge samples obtained from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of different geographical locations was studied applying a batch test system. It was found that only 4-22% of the LAS added to the batch anaerobic digesters was primarily transformed suggesting a poor primary degradation of the LAS molecule in anaerobic discontinuous systems. Regarding ultimate biodegradation, the addition of LAS to the batch anaerobic digesters caused a reduction on the extent of biogas production. Significant differences in the inhibition extent of the biogas production were observed (4-26%) depending on the sludge used as inoculum. Effect of the surfactant on the anaerobic microorganisms was correlated with its concentration in the aqueous phase. Sorption of LAS on anaerobic sludge affects its toxicity by depletion of the available fraction of the surfactant. LAS content on sludge was related to the total amount of calcium and magnesium extractable ions. The presence of divalent cations promote the association of LAS with anaerobic sludge reducing its bioavailability and the extent of its inhibitory effect on the biogas production. PMID:16453170

  7. [Study on technological characters of anaerobic-aerobic bioreactor landfill].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhu-Lei; Zhou, Chuan-Bin; Liu, Ting; Jiang, Juan; Cao, Li; Lü, Zhi-Zhong; Li, Xi-Kun; Li, Xiao-Bao

    2007-04-01

    A technology of anaerobic-aerobic landfill bioreactor aimed at reusing landfill site is studied, and it's based on landfill bioreactor technology. A set of stimulating equipment is designed, and the technology characters are studied. In the anaerobic period, technological conditions are controlled by the means of leachate recirculation. The main experimental results are: pH, R1 rises to 6.7 - 7.8 in 6 weeks, and R2 is under 6.8 in 17 weeks; COD concentration of leachate, R1 declines to 10 617 mg/L in 13 weeks, while R2 rises to 60 000 mg/L in 5 weeks, and keeps stabilization in long time; the cumulating methane production, R1 reaches 44% in 8 weeks, while R2 almost cannot produce methane. The stabilization can be evaluated by pH of leachate, COD and BOD5/COD decreasing ratio, and cumulating methane production. They are main evidences to transform anaerobic period to aerobic period. In the aerobic period, odor and moisture are reduced by the means of aeration. The main experimental results are: ammonia concentration reduces to 1.16 mg/m3 in 19 days, and the odor concentration reduces to 19 in 23 days; the moisture of the wastes reduces to 26% in 14 days. The technological indexes to evaluate finishing of this period can be determined by the ultimately purpose of exploited wastes. Numerical modeling has been researched with the use of experimental data. The succession of microbes in the anaerobic-aerobic course is studied by RISA (ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) analysis. There are 4 preponderant groups in this course, and some facultative anaerobes play important roles in the transition of anaerobic period to aerobic period.

  8. Hydroponic system for the treatment of anaerobic liquid.

    PubMed

    Krishnasamy, K; Nair, J; Bäuml, B

    2012-01-01

    The effluent from anaerobic digestion process has high concentrations of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, essential for plant growth but is not suitable for direct disposal or application due to high chemical oxygen demand (COD), low dissolved oxygen (DO), odour issues and is potentially phytotoxic. This research explored the optimum conditions of anaerobic effluent for application and dilutions of the effluent required to obtain better plant growth. A small-scale hydroponic system was constructed in a glasshouse to test different concentrations of anaerobic effluent against a commercial hydroponic medium as the control for the growth of silverbeet. It was found that the survival of silverbeet was negatively affected at 50% concentration due to low DO and NH(4) toxicity. The concentration of 20% anaerobic liquid was found to be the most efficient with highest foliage yield and plant growth. The hydroponic system with 20% concentrated effluent had better utilisation of nutrients for plant growth and a COD reduction of 95% was achieved during the 50-day growth period. This preliminary evaluation revealed that the growth and development of silverbeet was significantly lower in anaerobic effluent compared with a commercial hydroponic plant growth solution. The nutrient quality of anaerobic effluent could be highly variable with the process and the waste material used and dilution may depend on the nutrient content of the effluent. It is recommended that, a pre-treatment of the effluent to increase DO and reduce ammonium content is required before plant application, and simple dilution by itself is not suitable for optimum plant growth in a hydroponic system.

  9. Potential Application of Anaerobic Extremophiles for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    During substrate fermentation many anaerobes produce the hydrogen as a waste product, which often regulates the growth of the cultures as an inhibitor. In nature the hydrogen is usually removed from the ecosystem due to its physical properties or by consumption of hydrogen by secondary anaerobes, which sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors as is seen in the classical example in anaerobic microbial communities via the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur- reducers. It was demonstrated previously on mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH that bacterial hydrogen production could provide an alternative energy source. But at neutral pH the original cultures can easily be contaminated by methanogens, a most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and the cultivation of human pathogens on a global scale is very dangerous. In our laboratory, experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria that excrete hydrogen as the end metabolic product were performed at different temperature regimes. Mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacterial cultures have been studied and compared for the most effective hydrogen production. For high-mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many methanogens are known to exist. Furthermore, the development of pathogenic contaminant microorganisms is virtually impossible: carbonate-saturated solutions are used as antiseptics in medicine. Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as most safe process for global Scale industry in future. Here we present experimental data on the rates of hydrogen productivity for mesophilic, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirocheta americana ASpG1 and moderately thermophilic, alkaliphilic, facultative anaerobe Anoxybacillus pushchinoensis K1 and

  10. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1μg/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  11. Determining anaerobic capacity in sporting activities.

    PubMed

    Noordhof, Dionne A; Skiba, Philip F; de Koning, Jos J

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic capacity/anaerobically attributable power is an important parameter for athletic performance, not only for short high-intensity activities but also for breakaway efforts and end spurts during endurance events. Unlike aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity cannot be easily quantified. The 3 most commonly used methodologies to quantify anaerobic capacity are the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit method, the critical power concept, and the gross efficiency method. This review describes these methods, evaluates if they result in similar estimates of anaerobic capacity, and highlights how anaerobic capacity is used during sporting activities. All 3 methods have their own strengths and weaknesses and result in more or less similar estimates of anaerobic capacity but cannot be used interchangeably. The method of choice depends on the research question or practical goal.

  12. Processing anaerobic sludge for extended storage as anaerobic digester inoculum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Zicari, Steven M; Cui, Zongjun; Zhang, Ruihong

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge was processed to reduce the volume and moisture content in order to reduce costs for storing and transporting the sludge as microbial inoculum for anaerobic digester startup. The moisture content of the sludge was reduced from 98.7% to 82.0% via centrifugation and further to 71.5% via vacuum evaporation. The processed sludge was stored for 2 and 4 months and compared with the fresh sludge for the biogas and methane production using food waste and non-fat dry milk as substrates. It was found that fresh unprocessed sludge had the highest methane yield and the yields of both unprocessed and processed sludges decreased during storage by 1-34%, however processed sludges seemed to regain some activity after 4 months of storage as compared to samples stored for only 2 months. Maximum methane production rates obtained from modified Gompertz model application also increased between the 2-month and 4-month processed samples.

  13. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannert, A.; Bogen, C.; Esperschütz, J.; Koubová, A.; Buegger, F.; Fischer, D.; Radl, V.; Fuß, R.; Chroňáková, A.; Elhottová, D.; Šimek, M.; Schloter, M.

    2012-10-01

    While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore, anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labelled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III) were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1ω7 PLFAs. These lipids were also found as most 13C-enriched fatty acids by Raghoebarsing et al. (2006) after addition of 13CH4 to an enrichment culture coupling denitrification of nitrate to anaerobic oxidation of methane. This might be an indication for anaerobic oxidation of methane by relatives of "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" in the investigated grassland soil under the conditions of the incubation experiment.

  14. Anaerobic methanotrophy in tidal wetland: Effects of electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands have been considered to represent the largest natural source of methane emission, contributing substantially to intensify greenhouse effect. Despite in situ methanogenesis fueled by organic degradation, methanotrophy also plays a vital role in controlling the exact quantity of methane release across the air-sediment interface. As wetlands constantly experience various disturbances of anthropogenic activities, biological burrowing, tidal inundation, and plant development, rapid elemental turnover would enable various electron acceptors available for anaerobic methanotrophy. The effects of electron acceptors on stimulating anaerobic methanotrophy and the population compositions involved in carbon transformation in wetland sediments are poorly explored. In this study, sediments recovered from tidally influenced, mangrove covered wetland in northern Taiwan were incubated under the static conditions to investigate whether anaerobic methanotrophy could be stimulated by the presence of individual electron acceptors. Our results demonstrated that anaerobic methanotrophy was clearly stimulated in incubations amended with no electron acceptor, sulfate, or Fe-oxyhydroxide. No apparent methane consumption was observed in incubations with nitrate, citrate, fumarate or Mn-oxides. Anaerobic methanotrophy in incubations with no exogenous electron acceptor appears to proceed at the greatest rates, being sequentially followed by incubations with sulfate and Fe-oxyhydroxide. The presence of basal salt solution stimulated methane oxidation by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition to the direct impact of electron acceptor and basal salts, incubations with sediments retrieved from low tide period yielded a lower rate of methane oxidation than from high tide period. Overall, this study demonstrates that anaerobic methanotrophy in wetland sediments could proceed under various treatments of electron acceptors. Low sulfate content is not a critical factor in inhibiting methane

  15. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2005-04-18

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH){sub 3}(s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop

  16. Active dehydration impairs upper and lower body anaerobic muscular power.

    PubMed

    Jones, Leon C; Cleary, Michelle A; Lopez, Rebecca M; Zuri, Ron E; Lopez, Richard

    2008-03-01

    We examined the effects of active dehydration by exercise in a hot, humid environment on anaerobic muscular power using a test-retest (euhydrated and dehydrated) design. Seven subjects (age, 27.1 +/- 4.6 years; mass, 86.4 +/- 9.5 kg) performed upper and lower body Wingate anaerobic tests prior to and after a 1.5-hour recovery from a heat stress trial of treadmill exercise in a hot, humid environment (33.1 +/- 3.1C = 55.1 +/- 8.9% relative humidity) until a 3.1 +/- 0.3% body mass loss was achieved. Dehydration was confirmed by a significant body mass loss (P < 0.001), urine color increase (P = 0.004), and urine specific gravity increase (P = 0.041). Motivation ratings were not significantly different (P = 0.059), and fatigue severity was significantly (P = 0.009) increased 70% in the dehydrated compared to the euhydrated condition. Compared to the euhydrated condition, the dehydrated condition mean power was significantly (P = 0.014) decreased 7.17% in the upper body and 19.20% in the lower body. Compared to the euhydrated condition, the dehydrated condition peak power was significantly (P = 0.013) decreased 14.48% in the upper body and 18.36% in the lower body. No significant differences between the euhydrated and dehydrated conditions were found for decrease in power output (P = 0.219, power = 0.213). Our findings suggest that dehydration of 2.9% body mass decreases the ability to generate upper and lower body anaerobic power. Coaches and athletes must understand that sports performance requiring anaerobic strength and power can be impaired by inadequate hydration and may contribute to increased susceptibility to musculoskeletal injury.

  17. Plant pathogenic anaerobic bacteria use aromatic polyketides to access aerobic territory.

    PubMed

    Shabuer, Gulimila; Ishida, Keishi; Pidot, Sacha J; Roth, Martin; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hertweck, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Around 25% of vegetable food is lost worldwide because of infectious plant diseases, including microbe-induced decay of harvested crops. In wet seasons and under humid storage conditions, potato tubers are readily infected and decomposed by anaerobic bacteria (Clostridium puniceum). We found that these anaerobic plant pathogens harbor a gene locus (type II polyketide synthase) to produce unusual polyketide metabolites (clostrubins) with dual functions. The clostrubins, which act as antibiotics against other microbial plant pathogens, enable the anaerobic bacteria to survive an oxygen-rich plant environment. PMID:26542569

  18. Selective production of lactic acid in continuous anaerobic acidogenesis by extremely low pH operation.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yuya; Tada, Kiyoshi; Kanno, Tohru; Horiuchi, Jun-Ichi

    2012-11-01

    The selective production of lactic acid by anaerobic acidogenesis with low pH control was examined using a chemostat culture. By decreasing culture pH to 3.5 in a chemostat culture containing mixed microbial populations for anaerobic acidogenesis, heterolactic fermentation became dominant, resulting in the selective production of lactic acid and ethanol. This phenomenon was reversible between the acidic and neutral conditions, and was not affected by the dilution rate. The extremely low pH operation was effective for selective lactic acid production in anaerobic acidogenesis.

  19. Potential application of anaerobic extremophiles for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-11-01

    In processes of the substrate fermentation most anaerobes produce molecular hydrogen as a waste end product, which often controls the culture growth as an inhibitor. Usually in nature the hydrogen is easily removed from an ecosystem, due to its physical features, and an immediate consumption by the secondary anaerobes that sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors; a classical example of this kind of substrate competition in anaerobic microbial communities is the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur-reducers. Previously, on the mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH, it was demonstrated that bacterial hydrogen production could provide a good alternative energy source. At neutral pH the original cultures could easily contaminated by methanogens, and the most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and furthermore, the cultivation with pathogenic contaminants on an industrial scale would create an unsafe situation. In our laboratory the experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria producing hydrogen as an end metabolic product were performed at different conditions. The mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic and obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirochaeta americana ASpG1T was studied and various cultivation regimes were compared for the most effective hydrogen production. In a highly mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many known methanogens are capable of growth, and the probability of developing pathogenic contaminants is theoretically is close to zero (in medicine carbonate- saturated solutions are applied as antiseptics). Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as a safe and economical process for large-scale industrial bio-hydrogen production in the future. Here we present and discuss the experimental data

  20. [Anaerobic bacteria 150 years after their discovery by Pasteur].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Sánchez, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Ángel; García-Merino, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In 2011 we celebrated the 150th anniversary of the discovery of anaerobic bacteria by Louis Pasteur. The interest of the biomedical community on such bacteria is still maintained, and is particularly focused on Clostridium difficile. In the past few years important advances in taxonomy have been made due to the genetic, technological and computing developments. Thus, a significant number of new species related to human infections have been characterised, and some already known have been reclassified. At pathogenic level some specimens of anaerobic microflora, that had not been isolated from human infections, have been now isolated in some clinical conditions. There was emergence (or re-emergence) of some species and clinical conditions. Certain anaerobic bacteria have been associated with established infectious syndromes. The virulence of certain strains has increased, and some hypotheses on their participation in certain diseases have been given. In terms of diagnosis, the routine use of MALDI-TOF has led to a shortening of time and a cost reduction in the identification, with an improvement directly related to the improvement of data bases. The application of real-time PCR has been another major progress, and the sequencing of 16srRNA gene and others is currently a reality for several laboratories. Anaerobes have increased their resistance to antimicrobial agents, and the emergence of resistance to carbapenems and metronidazole, and multi-resistance is a current reality. In this situation, linezolid could be an effective alternative for Bacteroides. Fidaxomicin is the only anti-anaerobic agent introduced in the recent years, specifically for the diarrhoea caused by C.difficile. Moreover, some mathematical models have also been proposed in relation with this species.

  1. Anaerobic Sulfur Metabolism Coupled to Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in the Extremophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Héctor; Mangold, Stefanie; Denis, Yann; Ñancucheo, Ivan; Esparza, Mario; Johnson, D. Barrie; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Dopson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Gene transcription (microarrays) and protein levels (proteomics) were compared in cultures of the acidophilic chemolithotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans grown on elemental sulfur as the electron donor under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, using either molecular oxygen or ferric iron as the electron acceptor, respectively. No evidence supporting the role of either tetrathionate hydrolase or arsenic reductase in mediating the transfer of electrons to ferric iron (as suggested by previous studies) was obtained. In addition, no novel ferric iron reductase was identified. However, data suggested that sulfur was disproportionated under anaerobic conditions, forming hydrogen sulfide via sulfur reductase and sulfate via heterodisulfide reductase and ATP sulfurylase. Supporting physiological evidence for H2S production came from the observation that soluble Cu2+ included in anaerobically incubated cultures was precipitated (seemingly as CuS). Since H2S reduces ferric iron to ferrous in acidic medium, its production under anaerobic conditions indicates that anaerobic iron reduction is mediated, at least in part, by an indirect mechanism. Evidence was obtained for an alternative model implicating the transfer of electrons from S0 to Fe3+ via a respiratory chain that includes a bc1 complex and a cytochrome c. Central carbon pathways were upregulated under aerobic conditions, correlating with higher growth rates, while many Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle components were upregulated during anaerobic growth, probably as a result of more limited access to carbon dioxide. These results are important for understanding the role of A. ferrooxidans in environmental biogeochemical metal cycling and in industrial bioleaching operations. PMID:23354702

  2. Cellulase production by the anaerobic digestion process

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.W.; van den Berg, L.

    1981-01-01

    An anaerobic digestion process is described for the production of cellulolytic enzymes using a methanogenic cellulose-enrichment culture. After a heat treatment designed to destroy all but spore-forming bacteria, this culture produced cellulase from a variety of cellulosic materials as well as from cellobiose. The enzyme system contained endo- and exoglucanase, acted on filter paper, and showed cellobiase and xylanase activities. It was stable at 2/sup 0/C under aerobic conditions and showed a pH optimum at 5 and a temperature optimum at 50/sup 0/C. Endoglucanase and filter paper activities were mostly exogenic, whereas cellobiase and xylanase activities were cell associated. The cellulolytic activity produced by this mixed culture was comparable to that of commercially available fungal preparations, and the process could be useful as an alternate source for these enzymes.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of brewery byproducts

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, J.D.; Kormi, I.

    1981-01-01

    Energy recovery in the brewery industry by mesophilic anaerobic digesion of process by-products is technically feasible. The maximum achievable loading rate is 6g dry substrate/L-day. CH4 gas production declines as the loading rate increases in the range 2-6 g/L day. CH4 production increases in the range 8-15 days; optimal design criteria are a 10-day detention time with a loading rate of 6 g dry substrate/L day.

  4. Waste degradation and gas production with enzymatic enhancement in anaerobic and aerobic landfill bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hettiaratchi, J P A; Jayasinghe, P A; Bartholameuz, E M; Kumar, S

    2014-05-01

    The presence of lignin is the limiting factor at later stages of biodegradation of municipal solid waste under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Supplying enzymes into the system could facilitate lignin degradation, thereby aiding anaerobic and aerobic waste degradation processes. A comprehensive set of laboratory experiments were conducted under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions to evaluate the feasibility of using enzymes in accelerating lignin-rich waste degradation. After 30 days of anaerobic operation, MnP and LiP enzyme treated reactors produced 36 and 23 times higher cumulative methane (CH4), respectively, compared to that of the control reactor devoid of enzyme treatments. The carbon dioxide (CO2) yield of MnP enhanced aerobic reactor showed more than two-fold increase.

  5. L-serine enhances the anaerobic lactate metabolism of Veillonella dispar ATCC 17745.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, E

    1987-06-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, the rate of metabolism of lactate by starved resting cells of Veillonella dispar ATCC 17745 was very low. Because pyruvate was metabolized well by the starved cells, oxidation of lactate to pyruvate, which is the first step of the lactate metabolism, must have been limited in the cells. In the starved cells, the levels of the metabolic intermediates, oxalacetate or fumarate, of which reductions to malate or to succinate could be coupled with lactate oxidation to pyruvate and initiate lactate metabolism, were quite low, suggesting that these had been reduced during the starvation steps under strictly anaerobic conditions. Thus, the starved cells were unable to start the anaerobic lactate metabolism because of shortage of such reducible substrates. L-serine greatly enhanced anaerobic lactate metabolism of the starved cells. This enhancement may have been due to metabolism of L-serine itself and conversion to oxalacetate and fumarate, which made it possible to begin lactate oxidation.

  6. Waste degradation and gas production with enzymatic enhancement in anaerobic and aerobic landfill bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hettiaratchi, J P A; Jayasinghe, P A; Bartholameuz, E M; Kumar, S

    2014-05-01

    The presence of lignin is the limiting factor at later stages of biodegradation of municipal solid waste under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Supplying enzymes into the system could facilitate lignin degradation, thereby aiding anaerobic and aerobic waste degradation processes. A comprehensive set of laboratory experiments were conducted under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions to evaluate the feasibility of using enzymes in accelerating lignin-rich waste degradation. After 30 days of anaerobic operation, MnP and LiP enzyme treated reactors produced 36 and 23 times higher cumulative methane (CH4), respectively, compared to that of the control reactor devoid of enzyme treatments. The carbon dioxide (CO2) yield of MnP enhanced aerobic reactor showed more than two-fold increase. PMID:24684817

  7. Anaerobic ponds treatment of starch wastewater: case study in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rajbhandari, B K; Annachhatre, A P

    2004-11-01

    Anaerobic ponds are particularly effective in treating high-strength wastewater containing biodegradable solids as they achieve the dual purpose of particulate settlement and organic removal. Performance of an anaerobic pond system for treatment of starch wastewater containing high organic carbon, biodegradable starch particulate matter and cyanide was assessed under tropical climate conditions. Approximately 5000 m3/d of wastewater from starch industry was treated in a series of anaerobic ponds with a total area of 7.39 ha followed by facultative ponds with an area of 29.11 ha. Overall COD and TSS removal of over 90% and CN removal of 51% was observed. Active biomass obtained from the anaerobic ponds sediments and bulk liquid layer exhibited specific methanogenic activity of 20.7 and 11.3 ml CH4/g VSS d, respectively. The cyanide degradability of sludge at initial cyanide concentration of 10 and 20 mg/l were determined to be 0.43 and 0.84 mg CN-/g VSS d, respectively. A separate settling column experiment with starch wastewater revealed that a settling time of approximately 120 min is sufficient to remove 90-95% of the influent TSS.

  8. Degradation potential and growth of anaerobic bacteria in produced water.

    PubMed

    Vieira, D S; Sérvulo, E F C; Cammarota, M C

    2005-08-01

    The efficiency of an anaerobic biological treatment for the reduction of essential contaminants of produced water from an offshore oilfield was investigated using a microbial consortium enriched with sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Experiments were conducted in a bench bioreactor at 35 degrees C, 250 rpm, with intermittent purges of N2 gas in order to establish anaerobic conditions and to remove the H2S generated. The results showed that pH control effectively influenced the activity of the anaerobic bacteria leading to COD removal of 57%. Meanwhile, pH control was found to have no influence on the removal efficiencies of oil and grease and total phenols. In all experiments, removals of oil and grease and total phenols of 60% and 58-67%, respectively, were obtained after a 15-day process. In studies carried out with biomass reuse the reductions obtained were 61% for oil and grease and 78% for total phenols over the same period. Such results point to the technical feasibility of anaerobic biodegradation for oilfield wastewater treatment. PMID:16128390

  9. Improving products of anaerobic sludge digestion by microaeration.

    PubMed

    Jenicek, P; Celis, C A; Krayzelova, L; Anferova, N; Pokorna, D

    2014-01-01

    Biogas, digested sludge and sludge liquor are the main products of anaerobic sludge digestion. Each of the products is influenced significantly by specific conditions of the digestion process. Therefore, any upgrade of the digestion technology must be considered with regard to quality changes in all products. Microaeration is one of the methods used for the improvement of biogas quality. Recently, microaeration has been proved to be a relatively simple and highly efficient biological method of sulfide removal in the anaerobic digestion of biosolids, but little attention has been paid to comparing the quality of digested sludge and sludge liquor in the anaerobic and microaerobic digestion and that is why this paper primarily deals with this area of research. The results of the long-term monitoring of digested sludge quality and sludge liquor quality in the anaerobic and microaerobic digesters suggest that products of both technologies are comparable. However, there are several parameters in which the 'microaerobic' products have a significantly better quality such as: sulfide (68% lower) and soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) (33% lower) concentrations in the sludge liquor and the lower foaming potential of the digested sludge. PMID:24569280

  10. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    PubMed

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry.

  11. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    PubMed

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry. PMID:27191559

  12. High-rate anaerobic treatment of domestic wastewater at ambient operating temperatures: A review on benefits and drawbacks.

    PubMed

    Gomec, Cigdem Yangin

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge on high-rate anaerobic sewage treatment at ambient operating temperatures while presenting the benefits and drawbacks. Since domestic sewage is reported as the main point-source pollutant on a global scale, its treatment deserves ample research. In most of the cities and towns of some developing countries, wastewater produced in households is still discharged into the nearest water body without subjected any treatment. Therefore, simple, affordable, and effective sewage treatment systems are required. Anaerobic digestion of wastewater is reported as a sustainable alternative as recovery of energy is provided while nutrients are preserved for reuse. Anaerobic sewage treatment is certainly not limited to regions of hot climates but it also offers treatment potential in sub-tropical and even in moderate climatic regions due to their favorable temperature conditions. Since many sewage-like dilute wastewaters are discharged at low ambient temperatures especially under moderate climate conditions (15 to 20 degrees C), heating the wastewater to maintain mesophilic conditions (35 degrees C) for anaerobic treatment necessitates high energy and certainly high operating costs. Thus, the development of anaerobic treatment systems operated at ambient temperatures without doubt will have a great ecological and economic impact. High-rate anaerobic treatment systems, especially upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, have been occupying a noticeable position for sewage treatment in several tropical countries where artificial heating can be eliminated. However, in spite of their undeniable advantages, there are certain drawbacks of anaerobic sewage treatment at low operating temperatures which should be clarified. Among them, the main concern for anaerobic treatment application is its producing effluents that barely comply with the standarts for reuse in agriculture or discharge to the environment. Therefore, the effluents from

  13. Key geochemical factors regulating Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hui; Taillefert, Martial

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of Mn(IV) oxides coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of NH4+ has been proposed for more than a decade to contribute to the fixed nitrogen pool in marine sediments, yet the existence of this process is still under debate. In this study, surface sediments from an intertidal salt marsh were incubated with MnO2 in the presence of elevated concentrations of NH4+ to test the hypothesis that the reduction of Mn(IV) oxides catalyzes anaerobic NH4+ oxidation to NO2- or NO3-. Geochemical factors such as the ratio of Mn(IV) to NH4+, the type of Mn(IV) oxides (amorphous or colloidal MnO2), and the redox potential of the sediment significantly affect the activity of anaerobic nitrification. Incubations show that the net production of NO3- is stimulated under anaerobic conditions with external addition of colloidal but not amorphous MnO2 and is facilitated by the presence of high concentrations of NH4+. Mass balance calculations demonstrate that anaerobic NH4+ oxidation contributes to the net consumption of NH4+, providing another piece of evidence for the occurrence of Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments. Finally, anaerobic nitrification is stimulated by the amendment of small concentrations of NO3- or the absence of sulfate reduction, suggesting that moderately reducing conditions favor anaerobic NH4+ oxidation. Overall, these findings suggest that Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in suboxic sediments with high N/Mn concentration ratios and highly reactive manganese oxides may be an important source of NO2- and NO3- for subsequent marine nitrogen loss via denitrification or anammox.

  14. Molecular characterization of anaerobic sulfur-oxidizing microbial communities in up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating municipal sewage.

    PubMed

    Aida, Azrina A; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masamitsu; Ono, Shinya; Nakamura, Akinobu; Takahashi, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    A novel wastewater treatment system consisting of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor with sulfur-redox reaction was developed for treatment of municipal sewage under low-temperature conditions. In the UASB reactor, a novel phenomenon of anaerobic sulfur oxidation occurred in the absence of oxygen, nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors. The microorganisms involved in anaerobic sulfur oxidation have not been elucidated. Therefore, in this study, we studied the microbial communities existing in the UASB reactor that probably enhanced anaerobic sulfur oxidation. Sludge samples collected from the UASB reactor before and after sulfur oxidation were used for cloning and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of the 16S rRNA genes of the bacterial and archaeal domains. The microbial community structures of bacteria and archaea indicated that the genus Smithella and uncultured bacteria within the phylum Caldiserica were the dominant bacteria groups. Methanosaeta spp. was the dominant group of the domain archaea. The T-RFLP analysis, which was consistent with the cloning results, also yielded characteristic fingerprints for bacterial communities, whereas the archaeal community structure yielded stable microbial community. From these results, it can be presumed that these major bacteria groups, genus Smithella and uncultured bacteria within the phylum Caldiserica, probably play an important role in sulfur oxidation in UASB reactors.

  15. Navigating wastewater energy recovery strategies: a life cycle comparison of anaerobic membrane bioreactor and conventional treatment systems with anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam L; Stadler, Lauren B; Cao, Ling; Love, Nancy G; Raskin, Lutgarde; Skerlos, Steven J

    2014-05-20

    The objective of this study was to evaluate emerging anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology in comparison with conventional wastewater energy recovery technologies. Wastewater treatment process modeling and systems analyses were combined to evaluate the conditions under which AnMBR may produce more net energy and have lower life cycle environmental emissions than high rate activated sludge with anaerobic digestion (HRAS+AD), conventional activated sludge with anaerobic digestion (CAS+AD), and an aerobic membrane bioreactor with anaerobic digestion (AeMBR+AD). For medium strength domestic wastewater treatment under baseline assumptions at 15 °C, AnMBR recovered 49% more energy as biogas than HRAS+AD, the most energy positive conventional technology considered, but had significantly higher energy demands and environmental emissions. Global warming impacts associated with AnMBR were largely due to emissions of effluent dissolved methane. For high strength domestic wastewater treatment, AnMBR recovered 15% more net energy than HRAS+AD, and the environmental emissions gap between the two systems was reduced. Future developments of AnMBR technology in low energy fouling control, increased flux, and management of effluent methane emissions would make AnMBR competitive with HRAS+AD. Rapid advancements in AnMBR technology must continue to achieve its full economic and environmental potential as an energy recovery strategy for domestic wastewater.

  16. Acclimation strategy to increase phenol tolerance of an anaerobic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Madigou, Céline; Poirier, Simon; Bureau, Chrystelle; Chapleur, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    A wide variety of inhibitory substances can induce anaerobic digester upset or failure. In this work the possibility to improve the resistance of an anaerobic microbiota to a common pollutant, the phenol, was evaluated in a lab-scale semi-continuous bioreactor. An acclimation strategy, consisting in a regular step-wise adaptation of the microbiota to stressful condition was employed. Degradation performances were monitored and molecular tools (16S sequencing and ARISA fingerprinting technique) were used to track changes in the microbial community. The acclimation strategy progressively minimized the effect of phenol on degradation performances. After 3 successive disturbance episodes, microbiota resistance was considerably developed and total inhibition threshold increased from 895 to 1942mg/L of phenol. Microbiota adaptation was characterized by the selection of the most resistant Archaea OTU from Methanobacterium genus and an important elasticity of Bacteria, especially within Clostridiales and Bacteroidales orders, that probably enabled the adaptation to more and more stressful conditions. PMID:27233100

  17. Sediment bacterial communities associated with anaerobic biodegradation of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuyin; Wang, Zhao; He, Tao; Dai, Yu; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the endocrine-disrupting chemicals that are ubiquitous in aquatic environments. Biodegradation is a major way to clean up the BPA pollution in sediments. However, information on the effective BPA biodegradation in anaerobic sediments is still lacking. The present study investigated the biodegradation potential of BPA in river sediment under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions. After 120-day incubation, a high removal of BPA (93 or 89%) was found in sediment microcosms (amended with 50 mg kg(-1) BPA) under these two anaerobic conditions. Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis indicated that Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, and Actinobacteria were the major bacterial groups in BPA-degrading sediments. The shift in bacterial community structure could occur with BPA biodegradation.

  18. Ecology and application of haloalkaliphilic anaerobic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Sousa, João A B; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Bijmans, Martijn F M; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M

    2015-11-01

    Haloalkaliphilic microorganisms that grow optimally at high-pH and high-salinity conditions can be found in natural environments such as soda lakes. These globally spread lakes harbour interesting anaerobic microorganisms that have the potential of being applied in existing technologies or create new opportunities. In this review, we discuss the potential application of haloalkaliphilic anaerobic microbial communities in the fermentation of lignocellulosic feedstocks material subjected to an alkaline pre-treatment, methane production and sulfur removal technology. Also, the general advantages of operation at haloalkaline conditions, such as low volatile fatty acid and sulfide toxicity, are addressed. Finally, an outlook into the main challenges like ammonia toxicity and lack of aggregation is provided. PMID:26359181

  19. A novel fast mass transfer anaerobic inner loop fluidized bed biofilm reactor for PTA wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingwen; Zhao, Jinlong; Li, Kai; Xie, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a fast mass transfer anaerobic inner loop fluidized bed biofilm reactor (ILFBBR) was developed to improve purified terephthalic acid (PTA) wastewater treatment. The emphasis of this study was on the start-up mode of the anaerobic ILFBBR, the hydraulic loadings and the operation stability. The biological morphology of the anaerobic biofilm in the reactors was also analyzed. The anaerobic column could operate successfully for 46 days due to the pre-aerating process. The anaerobic column had the capacity to resist shock loadings and maintained a high stable chemical oxygen demand (COD) and terephthalic acid removal rates at a hydraulic retention time of 5-10 h, even under conditions of organic volumetric loadings as high as 28.8 kg COD·m(-3).d(-1). The scanning electron microscope analysis of the anaerobic carrier demonstrated that clusters of prokaryotes grew inside of pores and that the filaments generated by pre-aeration contributed to the anaerobic biofilm formation and stability. PMID:27642828

  20. Influence of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis on anaerobic respiration, biofilm formation and motility in Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Andreae, Clio A; Titball, Richard W; Butler, Clive S

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is closely related to Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. B. pseudomallei can survive and persist within a hypoxic environment for up to one year and has been shown to grow anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. Currently, little is known about the role of anaerobic respiration in pathogenesis of melioidosis. Using B. thailandensis as a model, a library of 1344 transposon mutants was created to identify genes required for anaerobic nitrate respiration. One transposon mutant (CA01) was identified with an insertion in BTH_I1704 (moeA), a gene required for the molybdopterin biosynthetic pathway. This pathway is involved in the synthesis of a molybdopterin cofactor required for a variety of molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductase. Disruption of molybdopterin biosynthesis prevented growth under anaerobic conditions, when using nitrate as the sole terminal electron acceptor. Defects in anaerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, motility and biofilm formation were observed for CA01. Mutant complementation with pDA-17:BTH_I1704 was able to restore anaerobic growth on nitrate, nitrate reductase activity and biofilm formation, but did not restore motility. This study highlights the potential importance of molybdoenzyme-dependent anaerobic respiration in the survival and virulence of B. thailandensis.

  1. Growth and Methane Oxidation Rates of Anaerobic Methanotrophic Archaea in a Continuous-Flow Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Girguis, Peter R.; Orphan, Victoria J.; Hallam, Steven J.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea have recently been identified in anoxic marine sediments, but have not yet been recovered in pure culture. Physiological studies on freshly collected samples containing archaea and their sulfate-reducing syntrophic partners have been conducted, but sample availability and viability can limit the scope of these experiments. To better study microbial anaerobic methane oxidation, we developed a novel continuous-flow anaerobic methane incubation system (AMIS) that simulates the majority of in situ conditions and supports the metabolism and growth of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea. We incubated sediments collected from within and outside a methane cold seep in Monterey Canyon, Calif., for 24 weeks on the AMIS system. Anaerobic methane oxidation was measured in all sediments after incubation on AMIS, and quantitative molecular techniques verified the increases in methane-oxidizing archaeal populations in both seep and nonseep sediments. Our results demonstrate that the AMIS system stimulated the maintenance and growth of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea, and possibly their syntrophic, sulfate-reducing partners. Our data demonstrate the utility of combining physiological and molecular techniques to quantify the growth and metabolic activity of anaerobic microbial consortia. Further experiments with the AMIS system should provide a better understanding of the biological mechanisms of methane oxidation in anoxic marine environments. The AMIS may also enable the enrichment, purification, and isolation of methanotrophic archaea as pure cultures or defined syntrophic consortia. PMID:12957936

  2. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannert, A.; Bogen, C.; Esperschütz, J.; Koubová, A.; Buegger, F.; Fischer, D.; Radl, V.; Fuß, R.; Chroňáková, A.; Elhottová, D.; Šimek, M.; Schloter, M.

    2012-04-01

    While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle-overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labeled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III) were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1ω7 PLFAs. These lipids were found in Gram-negative microorganisms and anaerobes. The fact that these lipids are also typical for type I methanotrophs, known as aerobic methane oxidizers, might indicate a link between aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation.

  3. A novel fast mass transfer anaerobic inner loop fluidized bed biofilm reactor for PTA wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingwen; Zhao, Jinlong; Li, Kai; Xie, Shitao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a fast mass transfer anaerobic inner loop fluidized bed biofilm reactor (ILFBBR) was developed to improve purified terephthalic acid (PTA) wastewater treatment. The emphasis of this study was on the start-up mode of the anaerobic ILFBBR, the hydraulic loadings and the operation stability. The biological morphology of the anaerobic biofilm in the reactors was also analyzed. The anaerobic column could operate successfully for 46 days due to the pre-aerating process. The anaerobic column had the capacity to resist shock loadings and maintained a high stable chemical oxygen demand (COD) and terephthalic acid removal rates at a hydraulic retention time of 5-10 h, even under conditions of organic volumetric loadings as high as 28.8 kg COD·m(-3).d(-1). The scanning electron microscope analysis of the anaerobic carrier demonstrated that clusters of prokaryotes grew inside of pores and that the filaments generated by pre-aeration contributed to the anaerobic biofilm formation and stability.

  4. When Worlds Collide: Microbial Ecophysiology at the Aerobic/Anaerobic Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girguis, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The aerobic/anaerobic interface is a transition zone, where conditions, from chemical concentrations to pH, vary along the oxycline. It has long been known that microbes flourish at such interfaces, presumably due to the potential energy available from catalyzing reduction-oxidation reactions using chemicals derived from the anaerobic and aerobic milieus. Indeed, some studies suggest that both microbial diversity and activity is greatest in such settings, and evidenced by the 2-10 fold greater cell abundances associated with such transition zones. That said, the nature of microbial activity found in such transition zones, and the precise extent of their activity, is usually poorly constrained. At hydrothermal vents, for example, scientists have found that distinct communities are associated with each microhabitat, yet our recent studies have shown that canonical anaerobic microbes are found to be active in fully aerobic waters, seemingly well beyond the aerobic/anaerobic interface. Moreover, our research has also shown that the activity of microbes at the aerobic/anaerobic interface can -through extracellular electron transfer- directly influence the activity of microbes in canonically reduced or oxidized habitats. Here we will present these results and discuss the implications for our understanding of how aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities are physiologically coupled across the aerobic/anaerobic interface.

  5. Study of the role of anaerobic metabolism in succinate production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Yoshinori; Kaida, Kenichi; Hayakawa, Atsushi; Fukui, Keita; Nishio, Yousuke; Hashiguchi, Kenichi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Matsui, Kazuhiko; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Sode, Koji

    2014-09-01

    Succinate is a core biochemical building block; optimizing succinate production from biomass by microbial fermentation is a focus of basic and applied biotechnology research. Lowering pH in anaerobic succinate fermentation culture is a cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach to reducing the use of sub-raw materials such as alkali, which are needed for neutralization. To evaluate the potential of bacteria-based succinate fermentation under weak acidic (pH <6.2) and anaerobic conditions, we characterized the anaerobic metabolism of Enterobacter aerogenes AJ110637, which rapidly assimilates glucose at pH 5.0. Based on the profile of anaerobic products, we constructed single-gene knockout mutants to eliminate the main anaerobic metabolic pathways involved in NADH re-oxidation. These single-gene knockout studies showed that the ethanol synthesis pathway serves as the dominant NADH re-oxidation pathway in this organism. To generate a metabolically engineered strain for succinate production, we eliminated ethanol formation and introduced a heterogeneous carboxylation enzyme, yielding E. aerogenes strain ΔadhE/PCK. The strain produced succinate from glucose with a 60.5% yield (grams of succinate produced per gram of glucose consumed) at pH <6.2 and anaerobic conditions. Thus, we showed the potential of bacteria-based succinate fermentation under weak acidic conditions.

  6. Some studies on anaerobic decomposition of leucaena leucocephala leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Torane, J.V.; Lokhande, C.D.; Pawar, S.H. )

    1990-01-01

    Batch type anaerobic decomposition process in leucaena leucocephala plant material (leaves) has been carried out under mesophilic conditions (below 35{degrees}C). The results of studies involving variations in pH, conductivity, temperature, and optical density of digester slurry for four weeks are reported. The gas production rate was also studied which reveals that the use of leucaena leucocephala for biogas production will be helpful.

  7. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  8. Basic Laboratory Culture Methods for Anaerobic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Herbert J.

    Oxygen is either limiting or absent in many ecosystems. Anaerobic bacteria are often key players in such environments and these organisms have important roles in geo-elemental cycling, agriculture, and medicine. The metabolic versatility of anaerobes is exploited in a variety of industrial processes including fermented food production, biochemical synthesis, and bioremediation. There has been recent considerable interest in developing and enhancing technologies that employ anaerobes as biocatalysts. The study of anaerobic bacteria requires specialized techniques, and specific methods are described for the culture and manipulation of these microbes.

  9. Kinetics of thermophilic anaerobes in fixed-bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Perez, M; Romero, L I; Sales, D

    2001-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to estimate growth kinetic constants and the concentration of "active" attached biomass in two anaerobic thermophilic reactors which contain different initial sizes of immobilized anaerobic mixed cultures and decompose distillery wastewater. This paper studies the substrate decomposition in two lab-scale fixed-bed reactors operating at batch conditions with corrugated tubes as support media. It can be demonstrated that high micro-organisms-substrate ratios favor the degradation activity of the different anaerobic cultures, allowing the stable operation without lag-phases and giving better quality in effluent. The kinetic parameters obtained--maximum specific growth rates (mu(max)), non-biodegradable substrate (S(NB)) and "active or viable biomass" concentrations (X(V0))--were obtained by applying the Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz], with COD as substrate and methane (CH4) as the main product of the anaerobic process. This method is suitable to calculate and to differentiate the main kinetic parameters of both the total anaerobic mixed culture and the methanogenic population. Comparison of experimental measured concentration of volatile attached solids (VS(att)) in both reactors with the estimated "active" biomass concentrations obtained by applying Romero kinetic model [L.I. Romero, 1991. Desarrollo de un modelo matemático general para los procesos fermentativos, Cinética de la degradación anaerobia, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Cádiz (Spain), Serv. Pub. Univ. Cádiz] shows that a large amount of inert matter is present in the fixed-bed reactor. PMID:11513409

  10. Fermentation and anaerobic respiration by Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.E.; Weaver, P.F.

    1982-01-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas capsulata were able to grow anaerobically in the dark either by a strict mixed-acid fermentation of sugars or, in the presence of an appropriate electron acceptor, by an energy-linked anaerobic respiration. Both species fermented fructose without the addition of accessory oxidants, but required the initial presence of bicarbonate before fermentative growth could begin. Major products of R. rubrum fermentation were succinate, acetate, propionate, formate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide; R. capsulata produced major amounts of lactate, acetate, succinate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. R. rubrum and R. capsulata were also capable of growing strictly through anaerobic, respiratory mechanisms. Nonfermentable substrates, such as succinate, malate, or acetate, supported growth only in the presence of an electron acceptor such as dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine oxide. Carbon dioxide and succinate plus dimethyl sulfoxide were produced during growth of R. rubrum and R. capsulata on succinate plus dimethyl sulfoxides. Molar growth yields from cultures grown anaerobically in the dark on fructose plus dimethyl sulfoxide were 3.8 to 4.6 times higher than values obtained from growth on fructose alone and were 56 to 6o% of thevalues obtained from aerobic, respiratory growth with fructose. Likewise, molar growth yields from anaerobic, respiratory growth conditions with succinate plus dimethyl sulfoxide were 51 to 54% of the values obtained from aerobic, respiratory growth with succinate. The data indicate that dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine oxide as a terminal oxidant is approximately 33 to 41% as efficient as O/sub 2/ in conserving energy through electron transport-linked respiration.

  11. Fermentation and Anaerobic Respiration by Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, J. E.; Weaver, P. F.

    1982-01-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas capsulata were able to grow anaerobically in the dark either by a strict mixed-acid fermentation of sugars or, in the presence of an appropriate electron acceptor, by an energy-linked anaerobic respiration. Both species fermented fructose without the addition of accessory oxidants, but required the initial presence of bicarbonate before fermentative growth could begin. Major products of R. rubrum fermentation were succinate, acetate, propionate, formate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide; R. capsulata produced major amounts of lactate, acetate, succinate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. R. rubrum and R. capsulata were also capable of growing strictly through anaerobic, respiratory mechanisms. Nonfermentable substrates, such as succinate, malate, or acetate, supported growth only in the presence of an electron acceptor such as dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine oxide. Carbon dioxide and dimethyl sulfide were produced during growth of R. rubrum and R. capsulata on succinate plus dimethyl sulfoxide. Molar growth yields from cultures grown anaerobically in the dark on fructose plus dimethyl sulfoxide were 3.8 to 4.6 times higher than values obtained from growth on fructose alone and were 56 to 60% of the values obtained from aerobic, respiratory growth with fructose. Likewise, molar growth yields from anaerobic, respiratory growth conditions with succinate plus dimethyl sulfoxide were 51 to 54% of the values obtained from aerobic, respiratory growth with succinate. The data indicate that dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine oxide as a terminal oxidant is approximately 33 to 41% as efficient as O2 in conserving energy through electron transport-linked respiration. PMID:6798016

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACILLUS MOJAVENSIS STRAIN JF-2 FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCTION FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McInerney; M. Folmsbee; D. Nagle

    2004-05-31

    Our work focuses on the use of microorganisms to recover petroleum hydrocarbons that remain entrapped after current recovery technologies reach their economic limit. Capillary forces between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are largely responsible for trapping the hydrocarbons in the pores of the rock and large reductions in the interfacial tension between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (1-3, 10, 11). Microorganisms produce a variety of biosurfactants (4), several of which generate the ultra low interfacial tensions needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (4, 5, 8). In particular, the lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 reduces the interfacial tension between hydrocarbon and aqueous phases to very low levels (<0.016 mN/m) (8) (9). B. mojavensis JF-2 grows under the environmental conditions found in many oil reservoirs, i. e., anaerobic, NaCl concentrations up to 80 g l{sup -1}, and temperatures up to 45 C (6, 7), making it ideally suited for in situ applications. However, anaerobic growth of B. mojavensis JF-2 was inconsistent and difficult to replicate, which limited its use for in situ applications. Our initial studies revealed that enzymatic digests, such as Proteose Peptone, were required for anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2. Subsequent purification of the growth-enhancing factor in Proteose Peptone resulted in the identification of the growth-enhancing factor as DNA or deoxyribonucleosides. The addition of salmon sperm DNA, herring sperm DNA, E. coli DNA or synthetic DNA (single or double stranded) to Medium E all supported anaerobic growth of JF-2. Further, we found that JF-2 required all four deoxyribonucleosides (deoxyadeonosine, deoxyguanosine, deoxycytidine and thymidine) for growth under strict anaerobic conditions. The requirement for the deoxyribonucleosides did not occur under aerobic growth conditions. DNA was not used as a sole energy source; sucrose was required

  13. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor--a review.

    PubMed

    Bal, A S; Dhagat, N N

    2001-04-01

    means that a sudden increase in the easily degradable organics will result in increased acid production with subsequent accumulation of acids. This inhibits the methanogenesis step. Acclimatization of the microorganisms to a substrate has been reported to take more than five weeks. Sufficiently acclimated bacteria have shown greater stability towards stress-inducing events such as hydraulic overloads, fluctuations in temperature, fluctuations in volatile acid and ammonia concentrations etc. Several environmental factors can affect anaerobic digestion, by altering the parameters such as specific growth rate, decay rate, gas production, substrate utilization, start-up and response to changes in input. It has long been recognized that an anaerobic process is in many ways ideal for wastewater treatment and has following merits: A high degree of waste stabilization A low production of excess A low nutrient requirements No oxygen requirement Production of methane gas Anaerobic microorganisms, especially methanogens have a slow growth rate. At lower HRTs, the possibility of washout of biomass is more prominent. This makes it difficult to maintain the effective number of useful microorganisms in the system. To maintain the population of anaerobes, large reactor volumes or higher HRTs are required. This may ultimately provide longer SRTs upto 20 days for high rate systems. Thus, provision of larger reactor volumes or higher HRTs ultimately lead to higher capital cost. Among notable disadvantages, it has low synthesis/reaction rate hence long start up periods and difficulty in recovery from upset conditions. Special attention is, therefore, warranted towards, controlling the factors that affect process adversely; important among them being environmental factors such as temperature, pH and concentration of toxic substances. The conventional anaerobic treatment process consists of a reactor containing waste and biological solids (bacteria) responsible for the digestion process

  14. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor--a review.

    PubMed

    Bal, A S; Dhagat, N N

    2001-04-01

    means that a sudden increase in the easily degradable organics will result in increased acid production with subsequent accumulation of acids. This inhibits the methanogenesis step. Acclimatization of the microorganisms to a substrate has been reported to take more than five weeks. Sufficiently acclimated bacteria have shown greater stability towards stress-inducing events such as hydraulic overloads, fluctuations in temperature, fluctuations in volatile acid and ammonia concentrations etc. Several environmental factors can affect anaerobic digestion, by altering the parameters such as specific growth rate, decay rate, gas production, substrate utilization, start-up and response to changes in input. It has long been recognized that an anaerobic process is in many ways ideal for wastewater treatment and has following merits: A high degree of waste stabilization A low production of excess A low nutrient requirements No oxygen requirement Production of methane gas Anaerobic microorganisms, especially methanogens have a slow growth rate. At lower HRTs, the possibility of washout of biomass is more prominent. This makes it difficult to maintain the effective number of useful microorganisms in the system. To maintain the population of anaerobes, large reactor volumes or higher HRTs are required. This may ultimately provide longer SRTs upto 20 days for high rate systems. Thus, provision of larger reactor volumes or higher HRTs ultimately lead to higher capital cost. Among notable disadvantages, it has low synthesis/reaction rate hence long start up periods and difficulty in recovery from upset conditions. Special attention is, therefore, warranted towards, controlling the factors that affect process adversely; important among them being environmental factors such as temperature, pH and concentration of toxic substances. The conventional anaerobic treatment process consists of a reactor containing waste and biological solids (bacteria) responsible for the digestion process

  15. Anaerobes unleashed: Aerobic fuel cells of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Zhang, Pei; Franks, Ashley E.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    One of the limitations of power generation with microbial fuel cells is that the anode must typically be maintained under anaerobic conditions. When oxygen is present in the anode chamber microorganisms oxidize the fuel with the reduction of oxygen rather than electron transfer to the anode. A system in which fuel is provided from within a graphite anode and diffuses out to the outer surface of the anode was designed to overcome these limitations. A biofilm of Geobacter sulfurreducens strain KN400, pregrown on the surface of a graphite electrode in a traditional two-chambered system with an anaerobic anode chamber and acetate as an external fuel source, produced current just as well under aerobic conditions when acetate was provided via diffusion from an internal concentrated acetate solution. No acetate was detectable in the external medium. In contrast, aerobic systems in which acetate was provided in the external medium completely failed within 48 h. Internally fed anodes colonized by a strain of KN400 adapted to grow at marine salinities produced current in aerobic seawater as well as an anaerobic anode system. The ability to generate current with an anode under aerobic conditions increases the potential applications and design options for microbial fuel cells.

  16. Studies on upflow anaerobic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandani, Nanik Sobhraj

    The thesis presents a critical review of the available literature on the various studies carried out on various aspects of Upflow Anaerobic Filter (UAF) throughout the world. Young and McCarty (1969) did the pioneering work in developing UAF in 1969, since then several studies have been carried out by different researchers using different substrates under different operating conditions and variety of supporting media. However, the most significant modification of the original reactor developed by Young and McCarty (1968), has been the development and use of high porosity media. The use of high porosity media, in fact, has changed the character of the reactor, from basically a fixed film reactor to a fixed film reactor in which the contribution by the suspended bio-solids, entrapped in the numerous media pores, in the substrate removal is quite significant that is to say that the reactor no longer remains a biological reactor which can be modeled and designed on the basis of biofilm kinetics only. The thesis presents an attempt to validate the developed mathematical model(s) by using the laboratory scale reactor performance data and the calculated values of reaction kinetic and bio-kinetic constants. To simplify the verification process, computer programmes have been prepared using the "EXCELL" software and C language. The results of the "EXCELL" computer program runs are tabulated at table no. 7.1 to 7.5. The verification of various mathematical models indicate that the model III B, i.e. Non ideal plug flow model assumed to consist of Complete Mix Reactors in series based on reaction kinetics, gives results with least deviation from the real situation. An interesting observation being that the model offers least deviation or nearly satisfies the real situation for a particular COD removal efficiency, for a particular OLR, eg. the least deviations are obtained at COD removal efficiency of 89% for OLR 2, 81.5% for OLR 4, 78.5% for OLR 6 . However, the use of the

  17. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Luying

    2009-11-20

    The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

  18. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

    1992-12-22

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

  19. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

  20. Comparison of Leachate Quality from Aerobic and Anaerobic Municipal Solid Waste Bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borglin, S. E.; Hazen, T. C.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2002-12-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills are becoming a drain on the resources of local municipalities as the requirements for stabilization and containment become increasingly stringent. Current regulations limit the moisture in the landfill to minimize leachate production and lower the potential for release of leachate to the environment. Recent research has shown that addition and recycling of moisture in the waste optimizes the biodegradation of stabilization and also provides a means for leachate treatment. This study compares the characteristics of leachate produced from aerobic and anaerobic laboratory bioreactors, and leachate collected from a full-scale anaerobic bioreactor. The laboratory reactors consisted of 200-liter tanks filled with fresh waste materials with the following conditions: (a) aerobic (air injection with leachate recirculation), (b) anaerobic (leachate recirculation). The leachate from the reactors was monitored for metals, nutrients, organic carbon, and microbiological activity for up to 500 days. Leachate from the aerobic tank had significantly lower concentrations of all potential contaminants, both organic and metal, after only a few weeks of operation. Metals leaching was low throughout the test period for the aerobic tanks, and decreased over time for the anaerobic tanks. Organic carbon as measured by BOD, COD, TOC, and COD were an order of magnitude higher in the leachate from the anaerobic system. Microbiological assessment by lipid analysis, enzyme activity assays, and cell counts showed high biomass and diversity in both the aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors, with higher activity in the anaerobic leachate. Results from the full-scale anaerobic bioreactor were not significantly different from those of the laboratory anaerobic bioreactor. The reduction in noxious odors was a significant advantage of the aerobic system. These results suggest that aerobic management of landfills could reduce or eliminate the need for leachate treatment

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis as a Model Organism for Assessing Interaction of Anaerobic Bacteria with Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Wunsch, Christopher M; Lewis, Janina P

    2015-12-17

    Anaerobic bacteria far outnumber aerobes in many human niches such as the gut, mouth, and vagina. Furthermore, anaerobic infections are common and frequently of indigenous origin. The ability of some anaerobic pathogens to invade human cells gives them adaptive measures to escape innate immunity as well as to modulate host cell behavior. However, ensuring that the anaerobic bacteria are live during experimental investigation of the events may pose challenges. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is capable of invading a variety of eukaryotic non-phagocytic cells. This article outlines how to successfully culture and assess the ability of P. gingivalis to invade human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Two protocols were developed: one to measure bacteria that can successfully invade and survive within the host, and the other to visualize bacteria interacting with host cells. These techniques necessitate the use of an anaerobic chamber to supply P. gingivalis with an anaerobic environment for optimal growth. The first protocol is based on the antibiotic protection assay, which is largely used to study the invasion of host cells by bacteria. However, the antibiotic protection assay is limited; only intracellular bacteria that are culturable following antibiotic treatment and host cell lysis are measured. To assess all bacteria interacting with host cells, both live and dead, we developed a protocol that uses fluorescent microscopy to examine host-pathogen interaction. Bacteria are fluorescently labeled with 2',7'-Bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and used to infect eukaryotic cells under anaerobic conditions. Following fixing with paraformaldehyde and permeabilization with 0.2% Triton X-100, host cells are labeled with TRITC phalloidin and DAPI to label the cell cytoskeleton and nucleus, respectively. Multiple images taken at different focal points (Z-stack) are obtained for temporal

  2. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W; Scheckel, Kirk G; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag(+) under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10-15nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5mgL(-1), the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100mgL(-1) as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag(+). Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100mgL(-1) as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. PMID:27016684

  3. Anaerobic and aerobic/anaerobic treatment for tetrachloroethylene (PCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Guiot, S.R.; Kuang, X.; Beaulieu, C.; Corriveau, A.; Hawari, J.

    1995-12-31

    The reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was studied in a laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor using sucrose, lactic acid, propionic acid, and methanol as cosubstrates. Parallel experiments were performed to compare the novel coupled anaerobic/aerobic reactor with the conventional UASB. More than 95% of PCE was transformed in both reactors. Complete dechlorination in the UASB reactor decreased with increased PCE loading, declining from 45 to 19%. Minor concentrations of trichloroethylene and of undegraded PCE were detected in the liquid effluent throughout the experiment. Dichloroethylene was the dominant metabolite of all PCE loads, while vinyl chloride was not detected in the liquid effluent. For both reactor types, increased PCE loading led to lower chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rates caused by a decrease in the specific acetate utilization rate. This, combined with a decline of the specific total PCE dechlorination activity, may cause long-term stability problems in the UASB reactor. The coupled reactor demonstrated higher specific PCE degradation rates at all PCE loading levels and a higher specific total dechlorination rate at the highest PCE loading. These characteristics may promote long-term stability of the coupled reactor system.

  4. Anaerobic Digestion Facility : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Office of Engineering and Construction.

    1984-08-09

    Beneficial and adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed Anaerobic Digestion Facility located near the South Fork Chehalis River, in Boistfort Prairie, Lewis County, Washington, were evaluated. The proposed process would eliminate some animal waste pollution within the area, and also use methane created during the process to power an engine/generator. In addition, the process will permit dairy operators to recycle currently underutilized resources, namely fiber for bedding solids and nutrients for fertilizers. The impacts examined include air quality, water resources, soils, vegetation and wildfire, land use, noise, cultural resources, visual impacts, recreation, and wastes and polychlorinated biphenyls. (ACR)

  5. Targeting solid tumors with non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Fujimori, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayuki; Tsutsui, Hiroko; Shimatani, Yuko; Seki, Keiichi; Amano, Jun

    2010-09-01

    Molecular-targeting drugs with fewer severe adverse effects are attracting great attention as the next wave of cancer treatment. There exist, however, populations of cancer cells resistant to these drugs that stem from the instability of tumor cells and/or the existence of cancer stem cells, and thus specific toxicity is required to destroy them. If such selectivity is not available, these targets may be sought out not by the cancer cell types themselves, but rather in their adjacent cancer microenvironments by means of hypoxia, low pH, and so on. The anaerobic conditions present in malignant tumor tissues have previously been regarded as a source of resistance in cancer cells against conventional therapy. However, there now appears to be a way to make use of these limiting factors as a selective target. In this review, we will refer to several trials, including our own, to direct attention to the utilizable anaerobic conditions present in malignant tumor tissues and the use of bacteria as carriers to target them. Specifically, we have been developing a method to attack solid cancers using the non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic bacterium Bifidobacterium longum as a vehicle to selectively recognize and target the anaerobic conditions in solid cancer tissues. We will also discuss the existence of low oxygen pressure in tumor masses in spite of generally enhanced angiogenesis, overview current cancer therapies, especially the history and present situation of bacterial utility to treat solid tumors, and discuss the rationality and future possibilities of this novel mode of cancer treatment.

  6. Activity of the Escherichia coli mutT mutator allele in an anaerobic environment.

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, R G; Erickson, J A; Isbell, R J

    1994-01-01

    Mutation frequencies for an Escherichia coli mutT strain were measured in both aerobic and anaerobic environments. When cells were grown in a rich medium (L broth), mutation frequencies were similar in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In contrast, when grown in a minimal medium, mutT anaerobic mutation frequencies were reduced dramatically compared with aerobic values, which were similar to L broth frequencies. L broth mutT cultures treated with a commercial enzyme complex that reduces free oxygen in the medium also showed strongly reduced anaerobic mutation frequencies. These results indicate that the biological role of the MutT protein is to prevent oxidative damage from becoming mutagenic. PMID:8002599

  7. Grey water treatment in a series anaerobic--aerobic system for irrigation.

    PubMed

    Abu Ghunmi, Lina; Zeeman, Grietje; Fayyad, Manar; van Lier, Jules B

    2010-01-01

    This study aims at treatment of grey water for irrigation, focusing on a treatment technology that is robust, simple to operate and with minimum energy consumption. The result is an optimized system consisting of an anaerobic unit operated in upflow mode, with a 1 day operational cycle, a constant effluent flow rate and varying liquid volume. Subsequent aerobic step is equipped with mechanical aeration and the system is insulated for sustaining winter conditions. The COD removal achieved by the anaerobic and aerobic units in summer and winter are 45%, 39% and 53%, 64%, respectively. Sludge in the anaerobic and aerobic reactor has a concentration of 168 and 8 mg VSL(-1), respectively. Stability of sludge in the anaerobic and aerobic reactors is 80% and 93%, respectively, based on COD. Aerobic effluent quality, except for pathogens, agrees with the proposed irrigation water quality guidelines for reclaimed water in Jordan.

  8. Rheological behaviors of anaerobic granular sludge in a spiral symmetry stream anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoguang; Dai, Ruobin; Xiang, Xinyi; Ma, Chengyu; Li, Gang; Hu, Tao; Xu, Zhengqi; Abdelgadir, Awad

    2015-01-01

    The rheological behaviors of the anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) in a spiral symmetry stream anaerobic bioreactor (SSSAB) were investigated. Shear-thinning behavior, thixotropic behavior, concentration-viscosity behavior and temperature-viscosity behavior were evaluated based on the constitutive equation of the AGS. The results indicated that the Herschel-Bulkley model was able to adequately describe the constitutive relation of AGS in the SSSAB. The AGS also showed shear-thinning behavior as well as thixotropic behavior. The critical shear rate and network strength of the AGS were 61.8 s(-1) and 497.0 W m(-3), respectively. The relationship between the apparent viscosity and the sludge concentration was illustrated and explained by the Woodcock formula. The relationship between apparent viscosity of the AGS and temperature could be modeled using the Arrhenius equation. The AGS was significantly thermo-sensitive and its mean energy of activation was 14.640 kJ mol(-1). Notably, it was necessary to consider such behaviors in the hydrodynamic modeling of SSSAB in which shear condition, sludge concentration and temperature were in non-uniform distribution.

  9. Rheological behaviors of anaerobic granular sludge in a spiral symmetry stream anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoguang; Dai, Ruobin; Xiang, Xinyi; Ma, Chengyu; Li, Gang; Hu, Tao; Xu, Zhengqi; Abdelgadir, Awad

    2015-01-01

    The rheological behaviors of the anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) in a spiral symmetry stream anaerobic bioreactor (SSSAB) were investigated. Shear-thinning behavior, thixotropic behavior, concentration-viscosity behavior and temperature-viscosity behavior were evaluated based on the constitutive equation of the AGS. The results indicated that the Herschel-Bulkley model was able to adequately describe the constitutive relation of AGS in the SSSAB. The AGS also showed shear-thinning behavior as well as thixotropic behavior. The critical shear rate and network strength of the AGS were 61.8 s(-1) and 497.0 W m(-3), respectively. The relationship between the apparent viscosity and the sludge concentration was illustrated and explained by the Woodcock formula. The relationship between apparent viscosity of the AGS and temperature could be modeled using the Arrhenius equation. The AGS was significantly thermo-sensitive and its mean energy of activation was 14.640 kJ mol(-1). Notably, it was necessary to consider such behaviors in the hydrodynamic modeling of SSSAB in which shear condition, sludge concentration and temperature were in non-uniform distribution. PMID:26247766

  10. Anaerobic bacteria in the gut of terrestrial isopod Crustacean Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    Kostanjsek, R; Lapanje, A; Rupnik, M; Strus, J; Drobne, D; Avgustin, G

    2004-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria from Porcellio scaber hindgut were identified and, subsequently, isolated using molecular approach. Phylogenetic affiliation of bacteria associated with the hindgut wall was determined by analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences which were retrieved directly from washed hindguts of P. scaber. Sequences from bacteria related to obligate anaerobic bacteria from genera Bacteroides and Enterococcus were retrieved, as well as sequences from 'A1 subcluster' of the wall-less mollicutes. Bacteria from the genus Desulfotomaculum were isolated from gut wall and cultivated under anaerobic conditions. In contrast to previous reports which suggested the absence of anaerobic bacteria in the isopod digestive system due to short retention time of the food in the tube-like hindgut, frequent renewal of the gut cuticle during the moulting process, and unsuccessful attempts to isolate anaerobic bacteria from this environment our results indicate the presence of resident anaerobic bacteria in the gut of P. scaber, in spite of apparently unsuitable, i.e. predominantly oxic, conditions.

  11. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    PubMed

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities.

  12. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    PubMed

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities. PMID:21165797

  13. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  14. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  15. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  16. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  17. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  18. Factor Analysis of Various Anaerobic Power Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, James M.; And Others

    A study investigated the relationship between selected anthropometric variables and of numerous anaerobic power tests with measures obtained on an isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty-one male college students performed several anaerobic power tests, including: the vertical jump using the Lewis formula; the Margaria-Kalamen stair climb test; the Wingate…

  19. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  20. Anaerobic acidogenesis of dairy manure

    SciTech Connect

    Krones, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if high rate acidogenic fermentation of dairy manure was possible, Whole dairy manure was ground and diluted to 4% total solids and fed to a 10 L anaerobic chemostat operating at 35C and with hydraulic retention times varying between 6 and 50 hours. Several physical and organic parameters of the influent and effluent were measured and compared. The results indicated that the manure was too refractory for high rate liquefaction and hydrolysis. A second experiment was conducted using the same techniques and substrate but varying the substrate pH between 5 and 7. The objectives were to further investigate the pH sensitivity of the acidogenic process and to determine if, by introducing a substrate with a low pH, acidogenesis might proceed more efficiently. The primary result of decreasing the pH was a smaller proportion of methane and an increased proportion of hydrogen in the gas. Liquefaction and hydrolysis continued to be rate limiting and appeared to be a major impediment to two phase anaerobic treatment of dairy manure.

  1. Anaerobic digestion for household organics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, R.; Kelleher, M.

    1995-04-01

    Considerable success in using anaerobic technology for processing household organics is being reported by several recently constructed facilities in Europe. Organic residuals collected separately in a Belgian town are processed to produce biogas and a compost-like material in less than one month. The dry anaerobic conversion process (DRANCO) was developed by Organic Waste Systems (OWS) in the 1980s, with the collaboration of Professor Willy Verstraete at the University of Ghent`s Laboratory of Applied Microbial Ecology. The patented process converts solid and semisolid organic residuals into biogas (for energy recovery) and a stable humus like product. The plant has competing odor sources such as the active landfill and the surrounding farmland - in fact, the smell of livestock manure is quite prevalent in this heavily agricultural area. Addition of the nonrecyclable paper fraction to the feedstock improves the carbon/nitrogen ratio, soaks up moisture, and absorbs odor. The entire Brecht facility does not occupy much space and total material retention time at the site is one month, compared to a number of months for aerobic systems. It also has a low staffing requirement, provides energy self-sufficiency, and the final soil enhancement product meets established quality standards.

  2. Aerobic and anaerobic growth of Paracoccus denitrificans on methanol.

    PubMed

    Bamforth, C W; Quayle, J R

    1978-10-01

    1. The dye-linked methanol dehydrogenase from Paracoccus denitrificans grown aerobically on methanol has been purified and its properties compared with similar enzymes from other bacteria. It was shown to be specific and to have high affinity for primary alcohols and formaldehyde as substrate, ammonia was the best activator and the enzyme could be linked to reduction of phenazine methosulphate. 2. Paracoccus denitrificans could be grown anaerobically on methanol, using nitrate or nitrite as electron acceptor. The methanol dehydrogenase synthesized under these conditions could not be differentiated from the aerobically-synthesized enzyme. 3. Activities of methanol dehydrogenase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase were measured under aerobic and anaerobic growth conditions. 4. Difference spectra of reduced and oxidized cytochromes in membrane and supernatant fractions of methanol-grown P. denitrificans were measured. 5. From the results of the spectral and enzymatic analyses it has been suggested that anaerobic growth on methanol/nitrate is made possible by reduction of nitrate to nitrite using electrons derived from the pyridine nucleotide-linked dehydrogenations of formaldehyde and formate, the nitrite so produced then functioning as electron acceptor for methanol dehydrogenase via cytochrome c and nitrite reductase. PMID:718372

  3. Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.R. . E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk; Lang, N.L.; Cheung, K.H.M.; Spanoudaki, K.

    2005-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log{sub 10} reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms.

  4. Anaerobic transformations of complex organic compounds in subsurface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, B.L. )

    1988-09-01

    This study was initiated following increased observations of man-made organic chemicals in groundwater. In the US, over 40% of the population depends on groundwater for drinking purposes. Soil is often the receptacle for organic chemicals, and there is a danger that they may reach the groundwater in a toxic form. Once contamination of the soil and vadose water has occurred, the compound may not be detected and/or degraded for decades. Limited, if any, information is available on the biotic-abiotic transformations of complex organic compounds in subsurface soils. The purpose of this study was to determine for each test compound (phenothiazine, 1-chloronaphthalene, 2-trifluoromethyl phenothiazine, 2-chloro-5 trifluoromethyl benzophenone and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime} tetrachlorobiphenyl) the following: (A) the soil sorption capacity for untreated subsurface soil, acid-treated, base-treated, mercuric chloride-treated, and calcium chloride treated subsurface soil; (B) transformation of the test compound in EPA soft water under anaerobic biotic and abiotic conditions; (C) transformation of the test compound in subsurface soils microcosms under anaerobic biotic and abiotic conditions; and (D) comparison of the results form the soil and water anaerobic biotic and abiotic studies.

  5. Toxicants inhibiting anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being used to treat wastes from many sources because of its manifold advantages over aerobic treatment, e.g. low sludge production and low energy requirements. However, anaerobic digestion is sensitive to toxicants, and a wide range of compounds can inhibit the process and cause upset or failure. Substantial research has been carried out over the years to identify specific inhibitors/toxicants, and their mechanism of toxicity in anaerobic digestion. In this review we present a detailed and critical summary of research on the inhibition of anaerobic processes by specific organic toxicants (e.g., chlorophenols, halogenated aliphatics and long chain fatty acids), inorganic toxicants (e.g., ammonia, sulfide and heavy metals) and in particular, nanomaterials, focusing on the mechanism of their inhibition/toxicity. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms behind inhibition/toxicity will enhance the wider application of anaerobic digestion. PMID:25457225

  6. Toxicants inhibiting anaerobic digestion: a review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly being used to treat wastes from many sources because of its manifold advantages over aerobic treatment, e.g. low sludge production and low energy requirements. However, anaerobic digestion is sensitive to toxicants, and a wide range of compounds can inhibit the process and cause upset or failure. Substantial research has been carried out over the years to identify specific inhibitors/toxicants, and their mechanism of toxicity in anaerobic digestion. In this review we present a detailed and critical summary of research on the inhibition of anaerobic processes by specific organic toxicants (e.g., chlorophenols, halogenated aliphatics and long chain fatty acids), inorganic toxicants (e.g., ammonia, sulfide and heavy metals) and in particular, nanomaterials, focusing on the mechanism of their inhibition/toxicity. A better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms behind inhibition/toxicity will enhance the wider application of anaerobic digestion.

  7. Spectrum and treatment of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobes are the most predominant components of the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are a frequent cause of endogenous bacterial infections. Anaerobic infections can occur in all body locations: the central nervous system, oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin, and soft tissues. Treatment of anaerobic infection is complicated by their slow growth in culture, by their polymicrobial nature and by their growing resistance to antimicrobials. Antimicrobial therapy is frequently the only form of therapy needed, whereas in others it is an important adjunct to drainage and surgery. Because anaerobes generally are isolated mixed with aerobes, the antimicrobial chosen should provide for adequate coverage of both. The most effective antimicrobials against anaerobes are: metronidazole, the carbapenems (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem, ertapenem), chloramphenicol, the combinations of a penicillin and a beta-lactamase inhibitors (ampicillin or ticarcillin plus clavulanate, amoxicillin plus sulbactam, piperacillin plus tazobactam), tigecycline, cefoxitin and clindamycin. PMID:26620376

  8. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future.

  9. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future. PMID:27005786

  10. Medium factors on anaerobic production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and a simplifying medium for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Jidong; Han, Siqin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Aerobic production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was extensively studied. But effect of medium composition on anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa was unknown. A simplifying medium facilitating anaerobic production of rhamnolipid is urgently needed for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Medium factors affecting anaerobic production of rhamnolipid were investigated using P. aeruginosa SG (Genbank accession number KJ995745). Medium composition for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa is different from that for aerobic production of rhamnolipid. Both hydrophobic substrate and organic nitrogen inhibited rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions. Glycerol and nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen source. The commonly used N limitation under aerobic conditions was not conducive to rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions because the initial cell growth demanded enough nitrate for anaerobic respiration. But rhamnolipid was also fast accumulated under nitrogen starvation conditions. Sufficient phosphate was needed for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) are required for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Results will contribute to isolation bacteria strains which can anaerobically produce rhamnolipid and medium optimization for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Based on medium optimization by response surface methodology and ions composition of reservoir formation water, a simplifying medium containing 70.3 g/l glycerol, 5.25 g/l NaNO3, 5.49 g/l KH2PO4, 6.9 g/l K2HPO4·3H2O and 0.40 g/l MgSO4 was designed. Using the simplifying medium, 630 mg/l of rhamnolipid was produced by SG, and the anaerobic culture emulsified crude oil to EI24 = 82.5 %. The simplifying medium was promising for in situ MEOR applications.

  11. Medium factors on anaerobic production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and a simplifying medium for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Jidong; Han, Siqin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Aerobic production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was extensively studied. But effect of medium composition on anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa was unknown. A simplifying medium facilitating anaerobic production of rhamnolipid is urgently needed for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Medium factors affecting anaerobic production of rhamnolipid were investigated using P. aeruginosa SG (Genbank accession number KJ995745). Medium composition for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa is different from that for aerobic production of rhamnolipid. Both hydrophobic substrate and organic nitrogen inhibited rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions. Glycerol and nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen source. The commonly used N limitation under aerobic conditions was not conducive to rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions because the initial cell growth demanded enough nitrate for anaerobic respiration. But rhamnolipid was also fast accumulated under nitrogen starvation conditions. Sufficient phosphate was needed for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) are required for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Results will contribute to isolation bacteria strains which can anaerobically produce rhamnolipid and medium optimization for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Based on medium optimization by response surface methodology and ions composition of reservoir formation water, a simplifying medium containing 70.3 g/l glycerol, 5.25 g/l NaNO3, 5.49 g/l KH2PO4, 6.9 g/l K2HPO4·3H2O and 0.40 g/l MgSO4 was designed. Using the simplifying medium, 630 mg/l of rhamnolipid was produced by SG, and the anaerobic culture emulsified crude oil to EI24 = 82.5 %. The simplifying medium was promising for in situ MEOR applications. PMID:26925616

  12. Field experiment, anaerobic biodegradation of highly chlorinated aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, J.; Baek, N.; Coates, M.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the field experiment is to evaluate the effectiveness of anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated benzenes and toluenes. Excavated soil from a chemical manufacturing site was saturated to maintain anaerobic conditions and treated with nutrients (butyrate, yeast extract, and glucose). One sample was treated with nutrients and microbial inoculation. Preliminary results for the first 24 weeks showed that higher chlorinated benzene concentrations are reduced with an increase of concentrations of lower halogenated species, resulting from deahalogenation. No significant change in the concentrations of chlorinated toluenes was observed during this period. This is consistent with earlier laboratory work in which benzene dehalogenation preceded toluene dehalogenation. Rapid consumption of butyrate and sulfate was also observed.

  13. Anaerobic cultures from preserved tissues of baby mammoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Fisher, Daniel; Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-10-01

    Microbiological analysis of several cold-preserved tissue samples from the Siberian baby mammoth known as Lyuba revealed a number of culturable bacterial strains that were grown on anaerobic media at 3 oC. Lactic acid produced by LAB (lactic acid bacteria) group, usually by members of the genera Carnobacterium and Lactosphera, appears to be a wonderful preservative that keeps other bacteria from colonizing a system. Permafrost and lactic acid preserved the body of this one month-old baby mammoth and kept it in exceptionally good condition, resulting in this mammoth being the most complete sample of the species ever recovered. The diversity of novel psychrophilic anaerobic isolates was expressed on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic levels. Here, we discuss the specifics of the isolation of new psychrophilic strains, differentiation from trivial contamination, and preliminary results for characterization of the cultures.

  14. Anaerobic Cultures from Preserved Tissues of Baby Mammoth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Microbiological analysis of several cold-preserved tissue samples from the Siberian baby mammoth known as Lyuba revealed a number of culturable bacterial strains that were grown on anaerobic media at 4 C. Lactic acid produced by LAB (lactic acid bacteria) group, usually by members of the genera Carnobacterium and Lactosphera, appears to be a wonderful preservative that prevents other bacteria from over-dominating a system. Permafrost and lactic acid preserved the body of this one-month old baby mammoth and kept it in exceptionally good condition, resulting in this mammoth being the most complete such specimen ever recovered. The diversity of novel anaerobic isolates was expressed on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic levels. Here we discuss the specifics of the isolation of new strains, differentiation from trivial contamination, and preliminary results for the characterization of cultures.

  15. Waste heat utilization in an anaerobic digestion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissevain, Brett

    Anaerobic digestion has great potential as an energy source. Not only does it provide an effective method for waste mitigation, but it has the potential to generate significant quantities of fuel and electricity. In order to ensure efficient digestion and biomass utilization, however, the system must be continuously maintained at elevated temperatures. It is technically feasible to supplement such a system with outside energy, but it is more cost effective to heat the system using only the produced biogas. While there is considerable literature covering the theory of anaerobic digestion, there are very few practical studies to show how heat utilization affects system operation. This study considers the effect of major design variables (i.e. heat exchanger efficiencies and biogas conditioning) on promoting a completely self-sustaining digestion system. The thesis considers a real world system and analyzes how it can be improved to avoid the need of an external energy source.

  16. In situ methane enrichment in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Hayes, T D; Isaacson, H R; Pfeffer, J T; Liu, Y M

    1990-01-01

    A major cost consideration in the use of anaerobic digestion to convert biomass and waste to utility-grade gas is the expense of separating CO(2) from the product gas. Anaerobic digestion has a number of inherent properties that can be exploited to increase the methane content of the gas directly produced by the digester, the most important of which is the high solubility of CO(2)(40-60 times that of methane) in water under digestion conditions. The methane enrichment concept examined in this study involved the recirculation of a liquid stream from the digester through a CO(2) desorption process and the return of the liquid stream back to the digester for absorption of additional CO(2) produced by the conversion of organic materials. A steady-state equilibrium model predicted that a digester gas methane content exceeding 94% could be achieved with this scheme using modest recirculation rates provided a desorption process could be designed to achieve a 60+% CO(2) removal efficiency in the degassing of the liquid recycle stream. Using fixed-film laboratory digesters operated on synthetic feedstocks, the technique of methane enrichment was tested under pressurized and unpressurized conditions. A 93 + 2% methane gas stream was produced from a volatile-acid-fed bench-scale digester simulating the methanogenic stage of two-phase digestion under conditions of (1) a pH swing achieved without caustic addition that allowed digestion at pH 7. 5 and air stripping at pH 6. 5-7. 0, (2) digester pressurization to 30 psig, and (3) a recycle rate of 0. 33 L/L reactor/day. Significant but lower levels of methane enrichment were achieved with the single-stage digester at the low experimental recycle rate. However, the narrow range among all experiments of CO(2) desorption efficiencies achieved in air stripping the recycle stream (35-60% CO(2) removal) suggests that comparable methane enrichment-may be achieved with unpressurized single-stage digestion using greater recycle rates. A

  17. Anaerobic digestion technology in poultry and livestock waste treatment--a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sakar, Suleyman; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Kocak, Emel

    2009-02-01

    A literature review has been undertaken to investigate the performance of the different anaerobic process configurations and operational conditions used in poultry and livestock waste treatment. The results of the extensive literature review showed that a wide range of different reactor volumes varying from 100 mL to 95 m3 were utilized in the investigation of anaerobic processing of poultry manure. Retention times studied were between 13.2 h and 91 days. Most of studies were carried out under mesophilic conditions maintained between 25 and 35 degrees C. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals and organic loading rate (OLR) ranged from 32 to 78%, and from 1.1 to 2.9 kg COD m(-3) day(-1), respectively. Biogas yields were achieved between 180 mL g(-1) COD added and 74 m3 day(-1) for a wide range of different reactor configurations. Up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) seems to be a suitable process for the treatment of poultry manure wastewater and the liquid fraction of hen manure, due to its ability to maintain a sufficient amount of active biomass. The literature review showed that various reactor configurations such as fixed-film reactor, attached-film bioreactor, anaerobic rotating biological reactor, batch reactors, downflow anaerobic filter, fixed dome plant, UASB, continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR), up-flow anaerobic filter (UAF), temperature-phased anaerobic digestion (TPAD), anaerobic hybrid reactor (AHR), and two-stage anaerobic systems are well suited to anaerobic processing of cattle manure. At both mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, high COD removals (87-95%) were achieved for treatment of cattle manure wastewaters. The COD and volatile solids (VS) reductions obtained were 37.9 to 94% and 9.6 to 92%, respectively. During the studies, OLR and retention times ranged between 0.117 and 7.3 g VS L(-1) day(-1) and between 0.5 and 140 days, respectively. In anaerobic processing of cattle manure, methane yields between 48 mmol CH4 L(-1) and 4681.3 m

  18. Redesigning Escherichia coli Metabolism for Anaerobic Production of Isobutanol▿†

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Cong T.; Li, Johnny; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Fermentation enables the production of reduced metabolites, such as the biofuels ethanol and butanol, from fermentable sugars. This work demonstrates a general approach for designing and constructing a production host that uses a heterologous pathway as an obligately fermentative pathway to produce reduced metabolites, specifically, the biofuel isobutanol. Elementary mode analysis was applied to design an Escherichia coli strain optimized for isobutanol production under strictly anaerobic conditions. The central metabolism of E. coli was decomposed into 38,219 functional, unique, and elementary modes (EMs). The model predictions revealed that during anaerobic growth E. coli cannot produce isobutanol as the sole fermentative product. By deleting 7 chromosomal genes, the total 38,219 EMs were constrained to 12 EMs, 6 of which can produce high yields of isobutanol in a range from 0.29 to 0.41 g isobutanol/g glucose under anaerobic conditions. The remaining 6 EMs rely primarily on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) and are typically inhibited under anaerobic conditions. The redesigned E. coli strain was constrained to employ the anaerobic isobutanol pathways through deletion of 7 chromosomal genes, addition of 2 heterologous genes, and overexpression of 5 genes. Here we present the design, construction, and characterization of an isobutanol-producing E. coli strain to illustrate the approach. The model predictions are evaluated in relation to experimental data and strategies proposed to improve anaerobic isobutanol production. We also show that the endogenous alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase AdhE is the key enzyme responsible for the production of isobutanol and ethanol under anaerobic conditions. The glycolytic flux can be controlled to regulate the ratio of isobutanol to ethanol production. PMID:21642415

  19. Metagenome of an Anaerobic Microbial Community Decomposing Poplar Wood Chips

    SciTech Connect

    van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L. L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S. Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

    2012-05-01

    This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to

  20. Isolation of Anaerobic Bacteria from Human Gingiva and Mouse Cecum by Means of a Simplified Glove Box Procedure1

    PubMed Central

    Aranki, Alexander; Syed, Salam A.; Kenney, Ernest B.; Freter, Rolf

    1969-01-01

    An anaerobic glove box constructed of clear flexible vinyl plastic is described. It is sufficiently inexpensive and simple in operation to be used not only in research but also in a clinical laboratory by technicians without special training. Conventional bacteriological techniques may be used inside the glove box for culturing and transferring anaerobic bacteria. The box may be heated to 37 C and thus serve as an anaerobic incubator as well, permitting inspection of cultures at any time. Media may be prepared and agar plates may be poured on the laboratory bench in the conventional manner. An overlay of trace amounts of palladium black catalyst over plated agar media reduces the medium to an oxidation-reduction (O-R) potential of - 300 mv within 2 days after introduction into the glove box. In spite of its greater simplicity, the system matched or excelled the roll tube method with respect to all parameters tested, including O-R potential obtainable in the media, O2 concentration in the gas phase, and efficiency in isolating anaerobic bacteria from the mouse cecum. Comparative studies indicate that the conventional anaerobic jar method was inadequate for the isolation of strict anaerobes from human gingival specimens and from the mouse cecum. This was due to the exposure of specimens and media to air during plating on the open laboratory bench. Anaerobic jars were adequate for maintaining the proper conditions for growth of anaerobic bacteria once these had been established in the glove box. Images PMID:4890748

  1. Starvation response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in anaerobic nitrogen- or carbon-limited chemostat cultures.

    PubMed

    Thomsson, Elisabeth; Gustafsson, Lena; Larsson, Christer

    2005-06-01

    Anaerobic starvation conditions are frequent in industrial fermentation and can affect the performance of the cells. In this study, the anaerobic carbon or nitrogen starvation response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated for cells grown in anaerobic carbon or nitrogen-limited chemostat cultures at a dilution rate of 0.1 h(-1) at pH 3.25 or 5. Lactic or benzoic acid was present in the growth medium at different concentrations, resulting in 16 different growth conditions. At steady state, cells were harvested and then starved for either carbon or nitrogen for 24 h under anaerobic conditions. We measured fermentative capacity, glucose uptake capacity, intracellular ATP content, and reserve carbohydrates and found that the carbon, but not the nitrogen, starvation response was dependent upon the previous growth conditions. All cells subjected to nitrogen starvation retained a large portion of their initial fermentative capacity, independently of previous growth conditions. However, nitrogen-limited cells that were starved for carbon lost almost all their fermentative capacity, while carbon-limited cells managed to preserve a larger portion of their fermentative capacity during carbon starvation. There was a positive correlation between the amount of glycogen before carbon starvation and the fermentative capacity and ATP content of the cells after carbon starvation. Fermentative capacity and glucose uptake capacity were not correlated under any of the conditions tested. Thus, the successful adaptation to sudden carbon starvation requires energy and, under anaerobic conditions, fermentable endogenous resources. In an industrial setting, carbon starvation in anaerobic fermentations should be avoided to maintain a productive yeast population.

  2. Starvation Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Grown in Anaerobic Nitrogen- or Carbon-Limited Chemostat Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Thomsson, Elisabeth; Gustafsson, Lena; Larsson, Christer

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic starvation conditions are frequent in industrial fermentation and can affect the performance of the cells. In this study, the anaerobic carbon or nitrogen starvation response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated for cells grown in anaerobic carbon or nitrogen-limited chemostat cultures at a dilution rate of 0.1 h−1 at pH 3.25 or 5. Lactic or benzoic acid was present in the growth medium at different concentrations, resulting in 16 different growth conditions. At steady state, cells were harvested and then starved for either carbon or nitrogen for 24 h under anaerobic conditions. We measured fermentative capacity, glucose uptake capacity, intracellular ATP content, and reserve carbohydrates and found that the carbon, but not the nitrogen, starvation response was dependent upon the previous growth conditions. All cells subjected to nitrogen starvation retained a large portion of their initial fermentative capacity, independently of previous growth conditions. However, nitrogen-limited cells that were starved for carbon lost almost all their fermentative capacity, while carbon-limited cells managed to preserve a larger portion of their fermentative capacity during carbon starvation. There was a positive correlation between the amount of glycogen before carbon starvation and the fermentative capacity and ATP content of the cells after carbon starvation. Fermentative capacity and glucose uptake capacity were not correlated under any of the conditions tested. Thus, the successful adaptation to sudden carbon starvation requires energy and, under anaerobic conditions, fermentable endogenous resources. In an industrial setting, carbon starvation in anaerobic fermentations should be avoided to maintain a productive yeast population. PMID:15932996

  3. Anaerobic Co-Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Anaerobic Pathogens - A New In Vitro Model System

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel, Katja; Biedermann, Anne; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Lang, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Background Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. Methodology/Principal Findings We established a model system with oral pathogenic bacterial species and eukaryotic cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. The facultative anaerobe bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were studied. Their effects on hMSCs and primary as well as permanent gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22, HGPEC) were comparatively analyzed. We show that hMSCs cope with anoxic conditions, since 40% vital cells remain after 72 h of anaerobic culture. The Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells are significantly more sensitive to lack of oxygen. All bacterial species reveal a comparatively low adherence to and internalization into hMSCs (0.2% and 0.01% of the initial inoculum, respectively). In comparison, the Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells present better targets for bacterial adherence and internalization. The production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8 is higher in both gingival epithelial cell lines compared to hMSCs and Fusobacterium nucleatum induce a time-dependent cytokine secretion in both cell lines. Porphyromonas gingivalis is less effective in stimulating secretion of IL-8 in the co-cultivation experiments. Conclusions/significance HMSCs are suitable for use in anoxic regions of the oral cavity. The interaction with local pathogenic bacteria does not result in massive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. The test system established in this study allowed further investigation of parameters prior to set up of oral hMSC in vivo

  4. Anaerobic filter for biogas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavadej, S.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory study evaluated the performance of an anaerobic filter in producing biogas from pig waste with 30,000 mg/l of COD. The filter packing was bamboo rings of 1 and 1/2 in. diameter, 1 in. long; the bamboo-bed filter operated satisfactorily in a wide COD loading range of 3.74-15.65 kg/cu m/d which corresponds to the hydraulic retention of 8.47 to 1.68 days. At the optimum loading of 7.299 kg COD/cu m/d, the largest gas rate of 0.212 cu m/kg of COD was produced. The required volume of the digester for 1.2 cu m/d of gas production would be only 1.5 cu m; in practical applications, consideration should be given to the gas collecting system and clogging problems.

  5. Anaerobic Degradation of Phenolic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schink, B.; Philipp, B.; Müller, J.

    Mononuclear aromatic compounds are degraded anaerobically through three main pathways, the benzoyl-CoA pathway, the resorcinol pathway, and the phloroglucinol pathway. Various modification reactions channel a broad variety of mononuclear aromatics including aromatic hydrocarbons into either one of these three pathways. Recently, a further pathway was discovered with hydroxyhydroquinone as central intermediate through which especially nitrate-reducing bacteria degrade phenolic compounds and some hydroxylated benzoates. Comparison of the various strategies taken for the degradation of aromatics in the absence of oxygen demonstrates that the biochemistry of breakdown of these compounds is determined largely by the overall reaction energetics and, more precisely, by the redox potentials of the electron acceptor systems used. Nitrate reducers differ in their strategies significantly from those used by sulfate-reducing or fermenting bacteria.

  6. Positional Role Differences in the Aerobic and Anaerobic Power of Elite Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Pojskić, Haris; Šeparović, Vlatko; Užičanin, Edin; Muratović, Melika; Mačković, Samir

    2015-12-22

    The aim of the present study was to compare the aerobic and anaerobic power and capacity of elite male basketball players who played multiple positions. Fifty-five healthy players were divided into the following three different subsamples according to their positional role: guards (n = 22), forwards (n = 19) and centers (n = 14). The following three tests were applied to estimate their aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities: the countermovement jump (CMJ), a multistage shuttle run test and the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST). The obtained data were used to calculate the players' aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities. To determine the possible differences between the subjects considering their different positions on the court, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni post-hoc test for multiple comparisons was used. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the different groups of players in eleven out of sixteen measured variables. Guards and forwards exhibited greater aerobic and relative values of anaerobic power, allowing shorter recovery times and the ability to repeat high intensity, basketball-specific activities. Centers presented greater values of absolute anaerobic power and capacities, permitting greater force production during discrete tasks. Coaches can use these data to create more individualized strength and conditioning programs for different positional roles. PMID:26839622

  7. Towards the definition of a core of microorganisms involved in anaerobic digestion of sludge.

    PubMed

    Rivière, Delphine; Desvignes, Virginie; Pelletier, Eric; Chaussonnerie, Sébastien; Guermazi, Sonda; Weissenbach, Jean; Li, Tianlun; Camacho, Patricia; Sghir, Abdelghani

    2009-06-01

    The microbial consortium involved in anaerobic digestion has not yet been precisely characterized and this process remains a 'black box' with limited efficiency. In this study, seven anaerobic sludge digesters were selected based on technology, type of sludge, process and water quality. The prokaryotic community of these digesters was examined by constructing and analysing a total of 9890 16S rRNA gene clones. Libraries were constructed using primers specific for the Bacteria and Archaea domains for each digester, respectively. After phylogenetic affiliation, the libraries were compared using statistical tools to determine the similarities or differences among the seven digesters. Results show that the prokaryotic community of an anaerobic digester is composed of phylotypes commonly found in all anaerobic digesters sampled and also of specific phylotypes. The Archaea community is represented by an equilibrium among a restricted number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs). These OTUs are affiliated with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales and Arc I phylogenetic groups. Statistical analysis revealed that the Bacteria community can be described as a three component model: one-third making up a core group of phylotypes common to most of the digesters, one-third are phylotypes shared among a few digesters and another one-third are specific phylotypes. The core group is composed of only six OTUs affiliated with Chloroflexi, Betaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Synergistetes. Its role in anaerobic degradation appears critical to investigate. This comparison of anaerobic digester populations is a first step towards a future understanding of the relationship among biodiversity, operating conditions and digester efficiency.

  8. Positional Role Differences in the Aerobic and Anaerobic Power of Elite Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Pojskić, Haris; Šeparović, Vlatko; Užičanin, Edin; Muratović, Melika; Mačković, Samir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the aerobic and anaerobic power and capacity of elite male basketball players who played multiple positions. Fifty-five healthy players were divided into the following three different subsamples according to their positional role: guards (n = 22), forwards (n = 19) and centers (n = 14). The following three tests were applied to estimate their aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities: the countermovement jump (CMJ), a multistage shuttle run test and the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST). The obtained data were used to calculate the players’ aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities. To determine the possible differences between the subjects considering their different positions on the court, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni post-hoc test for multiple comparisons was used. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the different groups of players in eleven out of sixteen measured variables. Guards and forwards exhibited greater aerobic and relative values of anaerobic power, allowing shorter recovery times and the ability to repeat high intensity, basketball-specific activities. Centers presented greater values of absolute anaerobic power and capacities, permitting greater force production during discrete tasks. Coaches can use these data to create more individualized strength and conditioning programs for different positional roles. PMID:26839622

  9. Anaerobic digestion of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates: biodegradation kinetics and metabolite analysis.

    PubMed

    García, M T; Campos, E; Ribosa, I; Latorre, A; Sánchez-Leal, J

    2005-09-01

    In the present work the effect of the alkyl chain length and the position of the sulfophenyl substituent of the linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) on their anaerobic biodegradability have been investigated. Degradation kinetics of the linear alkyl benzene sulfonates homologues, 2phiC10LAS, 2phiC12LAS and 2phiC14LAS, have been studied. It has been also investigated the effect of the isomer type on the degradation rate of the LAS molecule through the comparative study of the 2phiC10LAS and 5phiC10LAS isomers. Batch anaerobic biodegradation tests were performed using sludge from the anaerobic digester of a wastewater treatment plant as microorganisms source. Ultimate biodegradation was evaluated from the biogas production whereas primary biodegradation was determined by specific analysis of the surfactant. LAS homologues and isomers showed a negligible primary biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, analysis of sulfophenyl carboxilates (SPC) by LC-MS indicated a low and constant level of these LAS degradation metabolites over the test period. These data are consistent with a minimal transformation of the LAS parent molecule in the anaerobic digesters. On the other hand, the addition of the shortest alkyl chain length homologues, decyl and dodecylbenzene sulfonates, reduces the biogas production whereas the most hydrophobic homologue, the tetradecylbenzene sulfonate, enhances the biogas production. This LAS homologue seems to increase the availability of organic compounds sorbed on the anaerobic sludge promoting their biodegradation.

  10. Positional Role Differences in the Aerobic and Anaerobic Power of Elite Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Pojskić, Haris; Šeparović, Vlatko; Užičanin, Edin; Muratović, Melika; Mačković, Samir

    2015-12-22

    The aim of the present study was to compare the aerobic and anaerobic power and capacity of elite male basketball players who played multiple positions. Fifty-five healthy players were divided into the following three different subsamples according to their positional role: guards (n = 22), forwards (n = 19) and centers (n = 14). The following three tests were applied to estimate their aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities: the countermovement jump (CMJ), a multistage shuttle run test and the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST). The obtained data were used to calculate the players' aerobic and anaerobic power and capacities. To determine the possible differences between the subjects considering their different positions on the court, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Bonferroni post-hoc test for multiple comparisons was used. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the different groups of players in eleven out of sixteen measured variables. Guards and forwards exhibited greater aerobic and relative values of anaerobic power, allowing shorter recovery times and the ability to repeat high intensity, basketball-specific activities. Centers presented greater values of absolute anaerobic power and capacities, permitting greater force production during discrete tasks. Coaches can use these data to create more individualized strength and conditioning programs for different positional roles.

  11. Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety and Anaerobic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Vardar, Selma Arzu; Öztürk, Levent; Kurt, Cem; Bulut, Erdogan; Sut, Necdet; Vardar, Erdal

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1) following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements), (2) following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3) following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02) whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance. Key pointsShort time total sleep deprivation (30 hours) increases state anxiety without any competition stress.Anaerobic performance parameters such as peak power, mean power and minimum power may not show a distinctive difference from anaerobic performance in a normal sleep day despite the high anxiety level induced by short time sleep deprivation.Partial sleep deprivation does not affect anxiety level and anaerobic performance of the next day. PMID:24149488

  12. Metabolic Regulation as a Consequence of Anaerobic 5-Methylthioadenosine Recycling in Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    North, Justin A.; Sriram, Jaya; Chourey, Karuna; Ecker, Christopher D.; Sharma, Ritin; Wildenthal, John A.; Hettich, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodospirillum rubrum possesses a novel oxygen-independent, aerobic methionine salvage pathway (MSP) for recycling methionine from 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA), the MTA-isoprenoid shunt. This organism can also metabolize MTA as a sulfur source under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that the MTA-isoprenoid shunt may also function anaerobically as well. In this study, deep proteomics profiling, directed metabolite analysis, and reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed metabolic changes in response to anaerobic growth on MTA versus sulfate as sole sulfur source. The abundance of protein levels associated with methionine transport, cell motility, and chemotaxis increased in the presence of MTA over that in the presence of sulfate. Purine salvage from MTA resulted primarily in hypoxanthine accumulation and a decrease in protein levels involved in GMP-to-AMP conversion to balance purine pools. Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) metabolic protein levels for lipid metabolism were lower in abundance, whereas poly-β-hydroxybutyrate synthesis and storage were increased nearly 10-fold. The known R. rubrum aerobic MSP was also shown to be upregulated, to function anaerobically, and to recycle MTA. This suggested that other organisms with gene homologues for the MTA-isoprenoid shunt may also possess a functioning anaerobic MSP. In support of our previous findings that ribulose-1,5-carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is required for an apparently purely anaerobic MSP, RubisCO transcript and protein levels both increased in abundance by over 10-fold in cells grown anaerobically on MTA over those in cells grown on sulfate, resulting in increased intracellular RubisCO activity. These results reveal for the first time global metabolic responses as a consequence of anaerobic MTA metabolism compared to using sulfate as the sulfur source. PMID:27406564

  13. EVALUATION OF THE TEA TREE OIL ACTIVITY TO ANAEROBIC BACTERIA--IN VITRO STUDY.

    PubMed

    Ziółkowska-Klinkosz, Marta; Kedzia, Anna; Meissner, Hhenry O; Kedzia, Andrzej W

    2016-01-01

    The study of the sensitivity to tea tree oil (Australian Company TTD International Pty. Ltd. Sydney) was carried out on 193 strains of anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients with various infections within the oral cavity and respiratory tracts. The susceptibility (MIC) of anaerobes was determined by means of plate dilution technique in Brucella agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated sheep blood, menadione and hemin. Inoculum contained 10(5) CFU per spot was cultured with Steers replicator upon the surface of agar with various tea tree oil concentrations or without oil (anaerobes growth control). Incubation the plates was performed in anaerobic jars under anaerobic conditions at 37 degrees C for 48 h. MIC was defined as the lowest concentrations of the essential oil completely inhibiting growth of anaerobic bacteria. Test results indicate, that among Gram-negative bacteria the most sensitive to essential oil were strains of Veillonella and Porphyromonas species. Essential oil in low concentrations (MIC in the range of = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) inhibited growth of accordingly 80% and 68% strains. The least sensitive were strains of the genus Tannerella, Parabacteroides and Dialister (MIC 1.0 - 2.0 mg/mL). In the case of Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria the tea tree oil was the most active to strains of cocci of the genus Anaerococcus and Ruminococcus (MIC in range = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) or strains of rods of the genus Eubacterium and Eggerthella (MIC = 0.25 mg/mL). Among Gram-positive rods the least sensitive were the strains of the genus Bifidobacterium ( MIC = 2.0 mg/mL). The tea tree oil was more active to Gram-positive than to Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria.

  14. Modeling and Application of a Rapid Fluorescence-Based Assay for Biotoxicity in Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2015-11-17

    The sensitivity of anaerobic digestion metabolism to a wide range of solutes makes it important to be able to monitor toxicants in the feed to anaerobic digesters to optimize their operation. In this study, a rapid fluorescence measurement technique based on resazurin reduction using a microplate reader was developed and applied for the detection of toxicants and/or inhibitors to digesters. A kinetic model was developed to describe the process of resazurin reduced to resorufin, and eventually to dihydroresorufin under anaerobic conditions. By modeling the assay results of resazurin (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mM) reduction by a pure facultative anaerobic strain, Enterococcus faecalis, and fresh mixed anaerobic sludge, with or without 10 mg L(-1) spiked pentachlorophenol (PCP), we found it was clear that the pseudo-first-order rate constant for the reduction of resazurin to resorufin, k1, was a good measure of "toxicity". With lower biomass density and the optimal resazurin addition (0.1 mM), the toxicity of 10 mg L(-1) PCP for E. faecalis and fresh anaerobic sludge was detected in 10 min. By using this model, the toxicity differences among seven chlorophenols to E. faecalis and fresh mixed anaerobic sludge were elucidated within 30 min. The toxicity differences determined by this assay were comparable to toxicity sequences of various chlorophenols reported in the literature. These results suggest that the assay developed in this study not only can quickly detect toxicants for anaerobic digestion but also can efficiently detect the toxicity differences among a variety of similar toxicants.

  15. Anaerobic bioremediation of hexavalent uranium in groundwater by reductive precipitation with methanogenic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rodriguez, Aida; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2010-04-01

    Uranium has been responsible for extensive contamination of groundwater due to releases from mill tailings and other uranium processing waste. Past evidence has confirmed that certain bacteria can enzymatically reduce soluble hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) to insoluble tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) under anaerobic conditions in the presence of appropriate electron donors. This paper focuses on the evaluation of anaerobic granular sludge as a source of inoculum for the bioremediation of uranium in water. Batch experiments were performed with several methanogenic anaerobic granular sludge samples and different electron donors. Abiotic controls consisting of heat-killed inoculum and non-inoculated treatments confirmed the biological removal process. In this study, unadapted anaerobic granular sludge immediately reduced U(VI), suggesting an intrinsic capacity of the sludge to support this process. The high biodiversity of anaerobic granular sludge most likely accounts for the presence of specific microorganisms capable of reducing U(VI). Oxidation by O(2) was shown to resolubilize the uranium. This observation combined with X-ray diffraction evidence of uraninite confirmed that the removal during anaerobic treatment was due to reductive precipitation. The anaerobic removal activity could be sustained after several respikes of U(VI). The U(VI) removal was feasible without addition of electron donors, indicating that the decay of endogenous biomass substrates was contributing electron equivalents to the process. Addition of electron donors, such as H(2) stimulated the removal of U(VI) to varying degrees. The stimulation was greater in sludge samples with lower endogenous substrate levels. The present work reveals the potential application of anaerobic granular sludge for continuous bioremediation schemes to treat uranium-contaminated water.

  16. EVALUATION OF THE TEA TREE OIL ACTIVITY TO ANAEROBIC BACTERIA--IN VITRO STUDY.

    PubMed

    Ziółkowska-Klinkosz, Marta; Kedzia, Anna; Meissner, Hhenry O; Kedzia, Andrzej W

    2016-01-01

    The study of the sensitivity to tea tree oil (Australian Company TTD International Pty. Ltd. Sydney) was carried out on 193 strains of anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients with various infections within the oral cavity and respiratory tracts. The susceptibility (MIC) of anaerobes was determined by means of plate dilution technique in Brucella agar supplemented with 5% defibrinated sheep blood, menadione and hemin. Inoculum contained 10(5) CFU per spot was cultured with Steers replicator upon the surface of agar with various tea tree oil concentrations or without oil (anaerobes growth control). Incubation the plates was performed in anaerobic jars under anaerobic conditions at 37 degrees C for 48 h. MIC was defined as the lowest concentrations of the essential oil completely inhibiting growth of anaerobic bacteria. Test results indicate, that among Gram-negative bacteria the most sensitive to essential oil were strains of Veillonella and Porphyromonas species. Essential oil in low concentrations (MIC in the range of = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) inhibited growth of accordingly 80% and 68% strains. The least sensitive were strains of the genus Tannerella, Parabacteroides and Dialister (MIC 1.0 - 2.0 mg/mL). In the case of Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria the tea tree oil was the most active to strains of cocci of the genus Anaerococcus and Ruminococcus (MIC in range = 0.12 - 0.5 mg/mL) or strains of rods of the genus Eubacterium and Eggerthella (MIC = 0.25 mg/mL). Among Gram-positive rods the least sensitive were the strains of the genus Bifidobacterium ( MIC = 2.0 mg/mL). The tea tree oil was more active to Gram-positive than to Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. PMID:27180431

  17. Metabolic regulation as a consequence of anaerobic 5-methylthioadenosine recycling in Rhodospirillum rubrum

    DOE PAGES

    North, Justin A.; Sriram, Jaya; Chourey, Karuna; Ecker, Christopher D.; Sharma, Ritin; Wildenthal, John A.; Hettich, Robert L.; Tabita, F. Robert

    2016-07-12

    Rhodospirillum rubrum possesses a novel oxygen-independent, aerobic methionine salvage pathway (MSP) for recycling methionine from 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA), the MTA-isoprenoid shunt. This organism can also metabolize MTA as a sulfur source under anaerobic conditions, suggesting that the MTA-isoprenoid shunt may also function anaerobically as well. In this study, deep proteomics profiling, directed metabolite analysis, and reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed metabolic changes in response to anaerobic growth on MTA versus sulfate as sole sulfur source. The abundance of protein levels associated with methionine transport, cell motility, and chemotaxis increased in the presence of MTA over that in the presence ofmore » sulfate. Purine salvage from MTA resulted primarily in hypoxanthine accumulation and a decrease in protein levels involved in GMP-to-AMP conversion to balance purine pools. Acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) metabolic protein levels for lipid metabolism were lower in abundance, whereas poly-β-hydroxybutyrate synthesis and storage were increased nearly 10-fold. The known R. rubrum aerobic MSP was also shown to be upregulated, to function anaerobically, and to recycle MTA. This suggested that other organisms with gene homologues for the MTA-isoprenoid shunt may also possess a functioning anaerobic MSP. In support of our previous findings that ribulose-1,5-carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is required for an apparently purely anaerobic MSP, RubisCO transcript and protein levels both increased in abundance by over 10-fold in cells grown anaerobically on MTA over those in cells grown on sulfate, resulting in increased intracellular RubisCO activity. Lastly, these results reveal for the first time global metabolic responses as a consequence of anaerobic MTA metabolism compared to using sulfate as the sulfur source.« less

  18. Energy from anaerobic methane production. [Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    Since 1970 Swedish researchers have been testing the ANAMET (anaerobic-aerobic-methane) process, which involves converting industrial wastewaters via an initial anaerobic microbiological step followed by an aerobic one. Recycling the biomass material in each step allows shorter hydraulic retention times without decreasing stability or solids reduction. Since the first ANAMET plants began operating at a Swedish sugar factory in 1972, 17 more plants have started up or are under construction. Moreover, the ANAMET process has engendered to offshoot BIOMET (biomass-methane) process, a thermophilic anaerobic scheme that can handle sugar-beet pulp as well as grass and other soft, fast-growing biomasses.

  19. Fate of Trace Metals in Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Fermoso, F G; van Hullebusch, E D; Guibaud, G; Collins, G; Svensson, B H; Carliell-Marquet, C; Vink, J P M; Esposito, G; Frunzo, L

    2015-01-01

    A challenging, and largely uncharted, area of research in the field of anaerobic digestion science and technology is in understanding the roles of trace metals in enabling biogas production. This is a major knowledge gap and a multifaceted problem involving metal chemistry; physical interactions of metal and solids; microbiology; and technology optimization. Moreover, the fate of trace metals, and the chemical speciation and transport of trace metals in environments--often agricultural lands receiving discharge waters from anaerobic digestion processes--simultaneously represents challenges for environmental protection and opportunities to close process loops in anaerobic digestion.

  20. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Proteome during Anaerobic Growth‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Guina, Tina; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Nguyen, Hai; Eng, Jimmy; Miller, Samuel I.

    2005-01-01

    Isotope-coded affinity tag analysis and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry were used to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins expressed during anaerobic growth. Out of the 617 proteins identified, 158 were changed in abundance during anaerobic growth compared to during aerobic growth, including proteins whose increased expression was expected based on their role in anaerobic metabolism. These results form the basis for future analyses of alterations in bacterial protein content during growth in various environments, including the cystic fibrosis airway. PMID:16291692

  1. Cellulose fermentation by nitrogen-fixing anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Canale-Parola, E.

    1992-12-13

    In anaerobic natural environments cellulose is degraded to methane, carbon dioxide and other products by the combined activities of many diverse microorganisms. We are simulating processes occurring in natural environments by constructing biologically-defined, stable, heterogeneous bacterial communities (consortia) that we use as in vitro systems for quantitative studies of cellulose degradation under conditions of combined nitrogen deprivation. These studies include the investigation of (i) metabolic interactions among members of cellulose-degrading microbial populations, and (ii) processes that regulate the activity or biosynthesis of cellulolytic enzymes. In addition, we are studying the sensory mechanisms that, in natural environments, may enable motile cellulolytic bacteria to migrate toward cellulose. This part of our work includes biochemical characterization of the cellobiose chemoreceptor of cellulolytic bacteria. Finally, an important aspect of our research is the investigation of the mechanisms by which multienzyme complexes of anaerobic bacteria catalyze the depolymerization of crystalline cellulose and of other plant cell wall polysacchaddes. The research will provide fundamental information on the physiology and ecology of cellulose-fermenting, N{sub 2}-fixing bacteria, and on the intricate processes involved in C and N cycling in anaerobic environments. Furthermore, the information will be valuable for the development of practical applications, such as the conversion of plant biomass (e.g., agricultural, forestry and municipal wastes) to automotive fuels such as ethanol.

  2. Anaerobic digestion of yard waste with hydrothermal pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangliang; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Zhikai; Xu, Guangwen

    2014-03-01

    The digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass is limited by its high content of refractory components. The objective of this study is to investigate hydrothermal pretreatment and its effects on anaerobic digestion of sorted organic waste with submerged fermentation. Hydrothermal pretreatment (HT) was performed prior to anaerobic digestion, and three agents were examined for the HT: hot compressed water, alkaline solution, and acidic solution. The concentrations of glucose and xylose were the highest in the sample pretreated in acidic solution. Compared with that of the untreated sample, the biogas yields from digesting the samples pretreated in alkaline solution, acidic solution, and hot water increased by 364, 107, and 79%, respectively. The decrease of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in liquid phase followed the same order as for the biogas yield. The initial ammonia content of the treated samples followed the order sample treated in acidic solution > sample treated in alkaline solution > sample treated in hot water. The concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were low, indicating that the anaerobic digestion process was running at continuously stable conditions.

  3. Anaerobic Mercury Methylation and Demethylation by Geobacter bemidjiensis Bem

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Xia; Liu, Yurong; Johs, Alexander; Zhao, Linduo; Wang, Tieshan; Yang, Ziming; Lin, Hui; Elias, Dwayne A.; Pierce, Eric M.; Liang, Liyuan; et al

    2016-03-28

    Two competing processes controlling the net production and bioaccumulation of neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) in natural ecosystems are microbial methylation and demethylation. Though mercury (Hg) methylation by anaerobic microorganisms and demethylation by aerobic Hg-resistant bacteria have both been extensively studied, little attention has been given to MeHg degradation by anaerobic bacteria, particularly the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter bemidjensis Bem. Here we report, for the first time, that the strain G. bemidjensis Bem can methylate inorganic Hg and degrade MeHg concurrently under anoxic conditions. Our results suggest that G. bemidjensis cells utilize a reductive demethylation pathway to degrade MeHg, with elemental Hg(0) asmore » the major reaction product, possibly due to the presence of homologs encoding both organo-mercurial lyase (MerB) and mercuric reductase (MerA) in this organism. In addition, the cells can mediate multiple reactions including Hg/MeHg sorption, Hg reduction and oxidation, resulting in both time and concentration dependent Hg species transformations. Moderate concentrations (10 500 M) of Hg-binding ligands such as cysteine enhance Hg(II) methylation but inhibit MeHg degradation. These findings indicate a cycle of methylation and demethylation among anaerobic bacteria and suggest that mer-mediated demethylation may play a role in the net balance of MeHg production in anoxic water and sediments.« less

  4. Control strategy for maximum anaerobic co-digestion performance.

    PubMed

    García-Gen, Santiago; Rodríguez, Jorge; Lema, Juan M

    2015-09-01

    A control strategy for optimising the performance of anaerobic co-digestion in terms of methane productivity, digestate quality and process stability is presented. A linear programming approach is adopted to calculate the feeding of multiple substrates for maximum methane productivity, subjected to restrictions based on experimental and heuristic knowledge. Process stability is quantitatively assessed by an empirical diagnosis function comparing alkalinity ratio measurements against reference values (outputs between (-1,1]). A second empirical diagnosis function is defined to compare methane flow rate measurements against a reference value of maximum capacity (outputs between (0,1]). A variable-gain control function (outputs between (-1,1]), derived from the diagnosis functions, is defined to determine the quantitative change applied to the most active constraint of the substrate blend optimisation problem leading to a new set-point of feeding substrates blend. The control strategy works in a closed-loop architecture under which the process performance for each blend of substrates is continuously assessed. The system was successfully validated in a 1 m(3) hybrid Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket - Anaerobic Filter (UASB-AF) reactor, treating blends of substrates (gelatine, glycerine and pig manure supernatant) at OLR values between 0.71 and 6.33 gCOD/L d over a period of 210 days at mesophilic conditions. PMID:26001824

  5. Anaerobic Mercury Methylation and Demethylation by Geobacter bemidjiensis Bem.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xia; Liu, Yurong; Johs, Alexander; Zhao, Linduo; Wang, Tieshan; Yang, Ziming; Lin, Hui; Elias, Dwayne A; Pierce, Eric M; Liang, Liyuan; Barkay, Tamar; Gu, Baohua

    2016-04-19

    Microbial methylation and demethylation are two competing processes controlling the net production and bioaccumulation of neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) in natural ecosystems. Although mercury (Hg) methylation by anaerobic microorganisms and demethylation by aerobic Hg-resistant bacteria have both been extensively studied, little attention has been given to MeHg degradation by anaerobic bacteria, particularly the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter bemidjiensis Bem. Here we report, for the first time, that the strain G. bemidjiensis Bem can mediate a suite of Hg transformations, including Hg(II) reduction, Hg(0) oxidation, MeHg production and degradation under anoxic conditions. Results suggest that G. bemidjiensis utilizes a reductive demethylation pathway to degrade MeHg, with elemental Hg(0) as the major reaction product, possibly due to the presence of genes encoding homologues of an organomercurial lyase (MerB) and a mercuric reductase (MerA). In addition, the cells can strongly sorb Hg(II) and MeHg, reduce or oxidize Hg, resulting in both time and concentration-dependent Hg species transformations. Moderate concentrations (10-500 μM) of Hg-binding ligands such as cysteine enhance Hg(II) methylation but inhibit MeHg degradation. These findings indicate a cycle of Hg methylation and demethylation among anaerobic bacteria, thereby influencing net MeHg production in anoxic water and sediments. PMID:27019098

  6. Biogas by semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunsheng; Su, Haijia; Wang, Zhenbin; Tan, Tianwei; Qin, Peiyong

    2015-04-01

    The semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of food waste was investigated in 1-L and 20-L continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs), to identify the optimum operation condition and the methane production of the semi-continuous anaerobic process. Results from a 1-L digester indicated that the optimum organic loading rate (OLR) for semi-continuous digestion is 8 g VS/L/day. The corresponding methane yield and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction were 385 mL/g VS and 80.2 %, respectively. Anaerobic digestion was inhibited at high OLRs (12 and 16 g VS/L/day), due to volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation. Results from a 20-L digester indicated that a higher methane yield of 423 mL/g VS was obtained at this larger scale. The analysis showed that the methane production at the optimum OLR fitted well with the determined kinetics equation. An obvious decrease on the methane content was observed at the initial of digestion. The increased metabolization of microbes and the activity decrease of methanogen caused by VFA accumulation explained the lower methane content at the initial of digestion.

  7. Microbial Ecology of Anaerobic Digesters: The Key Players of Anaerobiosis

    PubMed Central

    Ali Shah, Fayyaz; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Ahmad Asad, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the method of wastes treatment aimed at a reduction of their hazardous effects on the biosphere. The mutualistic behavior of various anaerobic microorganisms results in the decomposition of complex organic substances into simple, chemically stabilized compounds, mainly methane and CO2. The conversions of complex organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 are possible due to the cooperation of four different groups of microorganisms, that is, fermentative, syntrophic, acetogenic, and methanogenic bacteria. Microbes adopt various pathways to evade from the unfavorable conditions in the anaerobic digester like competition between sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane forming bacteria for the same substrate. Methanosarcina are able to use both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic pathways for methane production. This review highlights the cellulosic microorganisms, structure of cellulose, inoculum to substrate ratio, and source of inoculum and its effect on methanogenesis. The molecular techniques such as DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) utilized for dynamic changes in microbial communities and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) that deal with taxonomy and interaction and distribution of tropic groups used are also discussed. PMID:24701142

  8. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Tomanicek, Stephen J; Johs, Alexander; Feng, Xinbin; Elias, Dwayne A; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2013-08-04

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  9. Isolation of an aerobic vinyl chloride oxidizer from anaerobic groundwater.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Heather; Rogers, Rebecca; Freedman, David L; Zinder, Stephen H

    2014-11-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC) is a known human carcinogen and common groundwater contaminant. Reductive dechlorination of VC to non-toxic ethene under anaerobic conditions has been demonstrated at numerous hazardous waste sites. However, VC disappearance without stoichiometric production of ethene has also been observed at some sites and in microcosms. In this study we identify an organism responsible for this observation in presumably anaerobic microcosms and conclude that oxygen was not detectable based on a lack of color change from added resazurin. This organism, a Mycobacterium sp. closely related to known VC oxidizing strains, was present in high numbers in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from a groundwater microcosm. Although the oxidation/reduction indicator resazurin remained in the clear reduced state in these studies, these results suggest inadvertent oxygen contamination occurred. This study helps to elucidate the dynamic behavior of chlorinated ethenes in contaminated groundwater, through the isolation of a strictly aerobic organism that may be responsible for at least some disappearance of VC without the concomitant production of ethene in groundwater considered anaerobic.

  10. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Johs, Alexander; Feng, Xinbin; Elias, Dwayne A.; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2013-09-01

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulphuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings, we show that D.desulphuricans ND132 can both oxidize and methylate elemental mercury. We find that the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is about one-third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidize, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulphurreducens PCA is able to oxidize and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  11. Anaerobic degradation of alkylated benzenes in denitrifying laboratory aquifer columns.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, E P; Zeyer, J; Eicher, P; Schwarzenbach, R P

    1988-02-01

    Toluene and m-xylene were rapidly mineralized in an anaerobic laboratory aquifer column operated under continuous-flow conditions with nitrate as an electron acceptor. The oxidation of toluene and m-xylene was coupled with the reduction of nitrate, and mineralization was confirmed by trapping 14CO2 evolved from 14C-ring-labeled substrates. Substrate degradation also took place when nitrous oxide replaced nitrate as an electron acceptor, but decomposition was inhibited in the presence of molecular oxygen or after the substitution of nitrate by nitrite. The m-xylene-adapted microorganisms in the aquifer column degraded toluene, benzaldehyde, benzoate, m-toluylaldehyde, m-toluate, m-cresol, p-cresol, and p-hydroxybenzoate but were unable to metabolize benzene, naphthalene, methylcyclohexane, and 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane. Isotope-dilution experiments suggested benzoate as an intermediate formed during anaerobic toluene metabolism. The finding that the highly water-soluble nitrous oxide served as electron acceptor for the anaerobic mineralization of some aromatic hydrocarbons may offer attractive options for the in situ restoration of polluted aquifers.

  12. Influence of music on Wingate Anaerobic Test performance.

    PubMed

    Pujol, T J; Langenfeld, M E

    1999-02-01

    While several studies have investigated the effects of music on cardiovascular endurance performance and perceived exertion during exercise of moderate intensity, few studies have investigated such effects on supramaximal exercise bouts. The purpose of the present study was to assess whether music affects performance on the Wingate Anaerobic Test. Each of the 12 men and 3 women were required to report to the laboratory on two occasions, once for tests in the music condition and once for tests in the nonmusic condition. Conditions were randomly ordered. All music selections were set at the same tempo. On each test day subjects performed a series of three Wingate Anaerobic Tests with 30-sec. rests in between. On Test 3 subjects were asked to continue pedaling until fatigued. Mean Power Output, Maximum Power Output, Minimum Power Output, and Fatigue Index were compared between conditions for each test using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Time to fatigue on Trial 3 compared by analysis of variance gave no significant differences between conditions for any measures.

  13. The regulatory role of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Wei; He, Ying; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is a global regulator that controls bacterial iron homeostasis. In this study, a fur deletion mutant of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. Physiological studies revealed that the growth rate of this mutant under aerobic conditions was only slightly lower than that of wild type (WT), but severe growth defects were observed under anaerobic conditions when different electron acceptors (EAs) were provided. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that Fur is involved not only in classical iron homeostasis but also in anaerobic respiration. Fur exerted pleiotropic effects on the regulation of anaerobic respiration by controlling anaerobic electron transport, the heme biosynthesis system, and the cytochrome c maturation system. Biochemical assays demonstrated that levels of c-type cytochromes were lower in the fur mutant, consistent with the transcriptional profiling. Transcriptomic analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a primary regulation network for Fur in WP3. These results suggest that Fur may act as a sensor for anoxic conditions to trigger and influence the anaerobic respiratory system.

  14. Degradative capacities and bioaugmentation potential of an anaerobic benzene-degrading bacterium strain DN11

    SciTech Connect

    Yuki Kasai; Yumiko Kodama; Yoh Takahata; Toshihiro Hoaki; Kazuya Watanabe

    2007-09-15

    Azoarcus sp. strain DN11 is a denitrifying bacterium capable of benzene degradation under anaerobic conditions. The present study evaluated strain DN11 for its application to bioaugmentation of benzene-contaminated underground aquifers. Strain DN11 could grow on benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and benzoate as the sole carbon and energy sources under nitrate-reducing conditions, although o- and p-xylenes were transformed in the presence of toluene. Phenol was not utilized under anaerobic conditions. Kinetic analysis of anaerobic benzene degradation estimated its apparent affinity and inhibition constants to be 0.82 and 11 {mu}M, respectively. Benzene-contaminated groundwater taken from a former coal-distillation plant site in Aichi, Japan was anaerobically incubated in laboratory bottles and supplemented with either inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and nitrate) alone, or the nutrients plus strain DN11, showing that benzene was significantly degraded only when DN11 was introduced. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, and quantitative PCR revealed that DN11 decreased after benzene was degraded. Following the decrease in DN11 16S rRNA gene fragments corresponding to bacteria related to Owenweeksia hongkongensis and Pelotomaculum isophthalicum, appeared as strong bands, suggesting possible metabolic interactions in anaerobic benzene degradation. Results suggest that DN11 is potentially useful for degrading benzene that contaminates underground aquifers at relatively low concentrations. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Anaerobic Central Metabolic Pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Reinterpreted in the Light of Isotopic Metabolite Labeling▿

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Meadows, Adam L.; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic or oxygen-limited conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes, in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine to form serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate and glycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine its use of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, we grew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source, with either trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor. Analysis of cellular metabolites indicated that a large percentage (>70%) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate or pyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other key metabolites indicate that under anaerobic conditions, although glyoxylate synthesized from the isocitrate lyase reaction can be converted to glycine, a complete serine-isocitrate pathway is not present and serine/glycine is, in fact, oxidized via a highly reversible degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significant activity in the anapleurotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase) reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observed to be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of a complete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under certain anaerobic conditions, e.g., TMAO-reducing conditions. PMID:17114268

  16. Nitrate removal by organotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria with C2/C3 fatty acid in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuhai; Li, Dong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Huiping; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process, a harsh ratio of nitrite to ammonia in influent was demanded, and the max nitrogen removal efficiency could only achieve to 89%, both of which limited the development of Anammox. The aim of this work was to study the nitrate removal by organotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) with C2/C3 fatty acid in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. In this study, organotrophic AAOB was successfully enriched by adding acetate and propionate with the total organic carbon to nitrogen (TOC/N) ratio of 0.1. In the condition of low substrate, the TN removal efficiency reached 90%, with the effluent TN of around 11.8 mg L(-1). After the addition of acetate and propionate, the predominant species in Anammox granular sludge transformed to Candidatus Jettenia that belonging to organotrophic AAOB from the Candidatus Kuenenia relating to general AAOB. PMID:26151852

  17. Antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schuetz, Audrey N

    2014-09-01

    Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can be severe and life-threatening. Susceptibility testing of anaerobes is not frequently performed in laboratories, but such testing is important to direct appropriate therapy. Anaerobic resistance is increasing globally, and resistance trends vary by geographic region. An overview of a variety of susceptibility testing methods for anaerobes is provided, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are reviewed. Specific clinical situations warranting anaerobic susceptibility testing are discussed.

  18. Anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate using an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor with microbial sulfate reduction.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Olfa Ben Dhia; Bouallagui, Hassib; Cayol, Jean-luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Hamdi, Moktar

    2009-08-15

    This study evaluated the anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate and sulfate reduction as a function of COD/(SO(4)(2-)) ratio in an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The reactor, which was inoculated with a mixed consortium, was operated under a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 days. We investigated the effect of COD/(SO(4)(2-)) ratio variation on the sulfate reduction efficiency, hydrogen sulfide production, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, conductivity, and pH variation. The best reactor performance, with significant sulfate reduction efficiency and COD removal efficiency of 91% and 87%, respectively, was reached under a COD/(SO(4)(2-)) ratio of 1.17. Under these conditions, microscopic analysis showed the abundance of vibrios and rod-shaped bacterial cells. Two anaerobic bacteria were isolated from the reactor sludge. Phylogenetic studies performed on these strains identified strain A1 as affiliated to Clostridium genus and strain H1 as a new species of sulfate-reducing bacteria affiliated to the Desulfovibrio genus. The closest phylogenetic relative of strain H1 was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, at 96% similarity for partial 16S RNA gene sequence data. Physiological and metabolic characterization was performed for this strain.

  19. Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation (ASD) Combined with Soil Solarization for Root-Knot Nematode Control in Vegetable and Ornamental Crops in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) combined with soil solarization continues to be evaluated for management of plant-parasitic nematodes in vegetable and ornamental crops in Florida. ASD combines organic amendments and soil saturation to stimulate microbial activity and create anaerobic conditions...

  20. Anaerobic sludge digestion with a biocatalytic additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Fedde, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of a lactobacillus additive an anaerobic sludge digestion under normal, variable, and overload operating conditions. The additive was a whey fermentation product of an acid-tolerant strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus fortified with CaCO/sub 3/, (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/, ferrous lactate, and lactic acid. The lactobacillus additive is multifunctional in nature and provides growth factors, metabolic intermediates, and enzymes needed for substrate degradation and cellular synthesis. The experimental work consisted of several pairs of parallel mesophilic (35/sup 0/C) digestion runs (control and test) conducted in five experimental phases. Baseline runs without the additive showed that the two experimental digesters had the same methane content, gas production rate (GPR), and ethane yield. The effect of the additive was to increase methane yield and GPR by about 5% (which was statistically significant) during digester operation at a loading rate (LR) of 3.2 kg VS/m/sup 3/-day and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 14 days. Data collected from the various experimental phases showed that the biochemical additive increased methane yield, gas production rate, and VS reduction, and decreased volatile acids accumulation. In addition, it enhanced digester buffer capacity and improved the fertilizer value and dewatering characteristics of the digested residue.

  1. Parasite ova in anaerobically digested sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Arther, R.G.; Fitzgerald, P.R.; Fox, J.C.

    1981-08-01

    The Metropolitan Sanitary District of Greater Chicago produces anaerobically digested wastewater sludge from a 14-day continuous-flow process maintained at 35 degrees Celcius. Some of the sludge is ultimately applied to strip-mined lands in Central Illinois (Fulton County) as a soil conditioner and fertilizer. Parasitic nematode ova were isolated from f