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Sample records for anaerobic respiration isolation

  1. Alkaline Anaerobic Respiration: Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Roh, Yul; Carroll, Susan L.; Blair, Benjamin; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2004-01-01

    Iron-reducing enrichments were obtained from leachate ponds at the U.S. Borax Company in Boron, Calif. Based on partial small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (approximately 500 nucleotides), six isolates shared 98.9% nucleotide identity. As a representative, the isolate QYMF was selected for further analysis. QYMF could be grown with Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(III)-EDTA, Co(III)-EDTA, or Cr(VI) as electron acceptors, and yeast extract and lactate could serve as electron donors. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.5 to 11.0 (optimum, pH 9.5), a sodium chloride range of 0 to 80 g/liter (optimum, 20 g/liter), and a temperature range of 4 to 45°C (optimum, approximately 35°C), and iron precipitates were formed. QYMF was a strict anaerobe that could be grown in the presence of borax, and the cells were straight rods that produced endospores. Sodium chloride and yeast extract stimulated growth. Phylogenetic analysis of the SSU rRNA gene indicated that the bacterium was a low-G+C gram-positive microorganism and had 96 and 92% nucleotide identity with Alkaliphilus transvaalensis and Alkaliphilus crotonatoxidans, respectively. The major phospholipid fatty acids were 14:1, 16:1ω7c, and 16:0, which were different from those of other alkaliphiles but similar to those of reported iron-reducing bacteria. The results demonstrated that the isolate might represent a novel metal-reducing alkaliphilic species. The name Alkaliphilus metalliredigens sp. nov. is proposed. The isolation and activity of metal-reducing bacteria from borax-contaminated leachate ponds suggest that bioremediation of metal-contaminated alkaline environments may be feasible and have implications for alkaline anaerobic respiration. PMID:15345448

  2. Isolation, growth, and metabolism of an obligately anaerobic, selenate- respiring bacterium, strain SES-3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Blum, J.S.; Culbertson, C.W.; Visscher, P.T.; Miller, L.G.; Dowdle, P.; Strohmaier, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    A gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, motile vibrio was isolated from a selenate-respiring enrichment culture. The isolate, designated strain SES-3, grew by coupling the oxidation of lactate to acetate plus CO2 with the concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite or of nitrate to ammonium. No growth was observed on sulfate or selenite, but cell suspensions readily reduced selenite to elemental selenium (Se0). Hence, SES-3 can carry out a complete reduction of selenate to Se0. Washed cell suspensions of selenate- grown cells did not reduce nitrate, and nitrate-grown cells did not reduce selenate, indicating that these reductions are achieved by separate inducible enzyme systems. However, both nitrate-grown and selenate-grown cells have a constitutive ability to reduce selenite or nitrite. The oxidation of [14C]lactate to 14CO2 coupled to the reduction of selenate or nitrate by cell suspensions was inhibited by CCCP (carbonyl cyanide m- chlorophenylhydrazone), cyanide, and azide. High concentrations of selenite (5 mM) were readily reduced to Se0 by selenate-grown cells, but selenite appeared to block the synthesis of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Tracer experiments with [75Se]selenite indicated that cell suspensions could achieve a rapid and quantitative reduction of selenite to Se0. This reduction was totally inhibited by sulfite, partially inhibited by selenate or nitrite, but unaffected by sulfate or nitrate. Cell suspensions could reduce thiosulfate, but not sulfite, to sulfide. These results suggest that reduction of selenite to Se0 may proceed, in part, by some of the components of a dissimilatory system for sulfur oxyanions.

  3. Tellurite-, tellurate-, and selenite-based anaerobic respiration by strain CM-3 isolated from gold mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Maltman, Chris; Piercey-Normore, Michele D; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    The newly discovered strain CM-3, a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium from gold mine tailings of the Central Mine in Nopiming Provincial Park, Canada, is capable of dissimilatory anaerobic reduction of tellurite, tellurate, and selenite. CM-3 possesses very high level resistance to these oxides, both aerobically and anaerobically. During aerobic growth, tellurite and tellurate resistance was up to 1500 and 1000 µg/ml, respectively. In the presence of selenite, growth occurred at the highest concentration tested, 7000 µg/ml. Under anaerobic conditions, resistance was decreased to 800 µg/ml for the Te oxides; however, much like under aerobic conditions, growth with selenite still took place at 7000 µg/ml. In the absence of oxygen, CM-3 couples oxide reduction to an increase in biomass. Following an initial drop in viable cells, due to switching from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, there was an increase in CFU/ml greater than one order of magnitude in the presence of tellurite (6.6 × 10(3)-8.6 × 10(4) CFU/ml), tellurate (4.6 × 10(3)-1.4 × 10(5) CFU/ml), and selenite (2.7 × 10(5)-5.6 × 10(6) CFU/ml). A control culture without metalloid oxides showed a steady decrease in CFU/ml with no recovery. ATP production was also increased in the presence of each oxide, further indicating anaerobic respiration. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a 99.0 % similarity of CM-3 to Pseudomonas reactans.

  4. [Isolation and characterization of a facultative anaerobe Pantoea agglomerans MFC-3 and its humic substance-and Fe(III) - respiring activity].

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Yuan; Li, Fang-Bai; Zhou, Shun-Gui; Zhuang, Li; Wang, Yue-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    A strain of humic substance- and Fe(III)- reducing bacterium was isolated from the subterranean forest sediment and designated as MFC-3. The strain is facultative anaerobic, Gram-negative, motile and rod (1.0-3.0 microm long, 0.5-1.0 microm wide) and identified as Pantoea agglomerans with the 16S rDNA sequence analyses. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate its humic substance-and Fe(III)-respiring activity. The results showed that MFC-3 was capable of anaerobic respiration on anthraquinone-2,6-disulphonate (AQDS) as the sole terminal electron acceptor with glucose as the electron donor. Within 48 h, MFC-3 could reduce 0.3 mmol x L(-1) AQDS at the expense of 4.5 mmol x L(-1) glucose, and the population of bacteria was increased by 7 times. The strain could use sucrose, glucose, citrate, lactate and formate as electron donors for anaerobic respiration, and the reduction rates of AQDS ranked as sucrose (77%) > glucose (66%) > citrate (50%) > lactate (33%) > glycerol (25%) > formate (17%). MFC-3 can also effectively reduce four types of Fe(III) oxides. After 25 d, the total Fe(II) concentration in the tests of using ferrihydrite, alpha-FeOOH, gamma-FeOOH or alpha-Fe2 O3 as electron acceptor reached 2.5, 2.1, 2.3 and 0.8 mmol x L(-1), respectively. As a strain of environmental origin, MFC-3 is quite useful for the study of extracellular respiration and bioremediation of chlorinated organic pollutants in Fe(III)/humic substance-rich environments.

  5. Identification of Anaerobic Selenate-Respiring Bacteria from Aquatic Sediments▿

    PubMed Central

    Narasingarao, Priya; Häggblom, Max M.

    2007-01-01

    The diversity population of microorganisms with the capability to use selenate as a terminal electron acceptor, reducing it to selenite and elemental selenium by the process known as dissimilatory selenate reduction, is largely unknown. The overall objective of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of anaerobic biotransformation of selenium in the environment, particularly anaerobic respiration, and to characterize the microorganisms catalyzing this process. Here, we demonstrate the isolation and characterization of four novel anaerobic dissimilatory selenate-respiring bacteria enriched from a variety of sources, including sediments from three different water bodies in Chennai, India, and a tidal estuary in New Jersey. Strains S5 and S7 from India, strain KM from the Meadowlands, NJ, and strain pn1, categorized as a laboratory contaminant, were all phylogenetically distinct, belonging to various phyla in the bacterial domain. The 16S rRNA gene sequence shows that strain S5 constitutes a new genus belonging to Chrysiogenetes, while strain S7 belongs to the Deferribacteres, with greater than 98% 16S rRNA gene similarity to Geovibrio ferrireducens. Strain KM is related to Malonomonas rubra, Pelobacter acidigallici, and Desulfuromusa spp., with 96 to 97% 16S rRNA gene similarity. Strain pn1 is 99% similar to Pseudomonas stutzeri. Strains S5, S7, and KM are obligately anaerobic selenate-respiring microorganisms, while strain pn1 is facultatively anaerobic. Besides respiring selenate, all these strains also respire nitrate. PMID:17435005

  6. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stams, A J M; Oude Elferink, S J W H; Westermann, P

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic consortia. Despite the potentially adverse effects, only few inorganic electron acceptors potentially utilizable for anaerobic respiration have been investigated with respect to negative interactions in anaerobic digesters. In this chapter we review competitive and inhibitory interactions between anaerobic respiring populations and methanogenic consortia in bioreactors. Due to the few studies in anaerobic digesters, many of our discussions are based upon studies of defined cultures or natural ecosystems.

  7. Molecular AND logic gate based on bacterial anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Arugula, Mary Anitha; Shroff, Namita; Katz, Evgeny; He, Zhen

    2012-10-21

    Enzyme coding genes that integrate information for anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were used as input for constructing an AND logic gate. The absence of one or both genes inhibited electrochemically-controlled anaerobic respiration, while wild type bacteria were capable of accepting electrons from an electrode for DMSO reduction.

  8. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  9. The Energetics of Aerobic versus Anaerobic Respiration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champion, Timothy D.; Schwenz, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Background information, laboratory procedures, and a discussion of the results of an experiment designed to investigate the difference in energy gained from the aerobic and anaerobic oxidation of glucose are presented. Sample experimental and calculated data are included. (CW)

  10. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  11. [Anaerobic humus respiration by Shewanella cinica D14T].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-cheng; Hong, Yi-guo; Luo, Wei; Chen, Xing-juan; Sun, Guo-ping; Xu, Mei-ying; Guo, Jun; Cen, Ying-hua

    2006-12-01

    Experimental results suggested Shewanella cinica D14T is capable of humus respiration utilizing various organic acids and some important environmental pollutants (e.g., toluene. etc) as electron donors and AQS or AQDS as a sole terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic condition. The dissimilatory reduction of 1mmol/L AQDS can couple to the production of enough ATP to support cell growth about 60 generations; The oxidization of electron donors was coupled to the reduction of humus, as reduced humus increased corresponding with increasing of electron donor; The typical inhibitors such as Cu2+ which inhibited Fe-S center, Stigmatellin which was methyl-naphthoquinone model, Dicumarol which inhibited oxidized methyl-naphthoquinone transform to reduced one, Metyrapone which was specific inhibitor for P450 enzyme blocked the humus respiration seriously. These were powerful evidences for humus-respiration by D14.

  12. Anaerobic respiration on tellurate and other metalloids in bacteria from hydrothermal vent fields in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Csotonyi, Julius T; Stackebrandt, Erko; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports the discovery of anaerobic respiration on tellurate by bacteria isolated from deep ocean (1,543 to 1,791 m) hydrothermal vent worms. The first evidence for selenite- and vanadate-respiring bacteria from deep ocean hydrothermal vents is also presented. Enumeration of the anaerobic metal(loid)-resistant microbial community associated with hydrothermal vent animals indicates that a greater proportion of the bacterial community associated with certain vent fauna resists and reduces metal(loid)s anaerobically than aerobically, suggesting that anaerobic metal(loid) respiration might be an important process in bacteria that are symbiotic with vent fauna. Isolates from Axial Volcano and Explorer Ridge were tested for their ability to reduce tellurate, selenite, metavanadate, or orthovanadate in the absence of alternate electron acceptors. In the presence of metal(loid)s, strains showed an ability to grow and produce ATP, whereas in the absence of metal(loid)s, no growth or ATP production was observed. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone depressed metal(loid) reduction. Anaerobic tellurate respiration will be a significant component in describing biogeochemical cycling of Te at hydrothermal vents.

  13. Enrichment and isolation of Bacillus beveridgei sp. nov., a facultative anaerobic haloalkaliphile from Mono Lake, California, that respires oxyanions of tellurium, selenium, and arsenic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baesman, S.M.; Stolz, J.F.; Kulp, T.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Mono Lake sediment slurries incubated with lactate and tellurite [Te(IV)] turned progressively black with time because of the precipitation of elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. An enrichment culture was established from these slurries that demonstrated Te(IV)-dependent growth. The enrichment was purified by picking isolated black colonies from lactate/Te(IV) agar plates, followed by repeated streaking and picking. The isolate, strain MLTeJB, grew in aqueous Te(IV)-medium if provided with a small amount of sterile solid phase material (e.g., agar plug; glass beads). Strain MLTeJB grew at high concentrations of Te(IV) (~8 mM) by oxidizing lactate to acetate plus formate, while reducing Te(IV) to Te(0). Other electron acceptors that were found to sustain growth were tellurate, selenate, selenite, arsenate, nitrate, nitrite, fumarate and oxygen. Notably, growth on arsenate, nitrate, nitrite and fumarate did not result in the accumulation of formate, implying that in these cases lactate was oxidized to acetate plus CO2. Strain MLTeJB is a low G + C Gram positive motile rod with pH, sodium, and temperature growth optima at 8.5-9.0, 0.5-1.5 M, and 40??C, respectively. The epithet Bacillus beveridgei strain MLTeJBT is proposed. ?? 2009 Springer.

  14. Enrichment and isolation of Bacillus beveridgei sp. nov., a facultative anaerobic haloalkaliphile from Mono Lake, California, that respires oxyanions of tellurium, selenium, and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Baesman, S M; Stolz, J F; Kulp, T R; Oremland, Ronald S

    2009-07-01

    Mono Lake sediment slurries incubated with lactate and tellurite [Te(IV)] turned progressively black with time because of the precipitation of elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. An enrichment culture was established from these slurries that demonstrated Te(IV)-dependent growth. The enrichment was purified by picking isolated black colonies from lactate/Te(IV) agar plates, followed by repeated streaking and picking. The isolate, strain MLTeJB, grew in aqueous Te(IV)-medium if provided with a small amount of sterile solid phase material (e.g., agar plug; glass beads). Strain MLTeJB grew at high concentrations of Te(IV) (~8 mM) by oxidizing lactate to acetate plus formate, while reducing Te(IV) to Te(0). Other electron acceptors that were found to sustain growth were tellurate, selenate, selenite, arsenate, nitrate, nitrite, fumarate and oxygen. Notably, growth on arsenate, nitrate, nitrite and fumarate did not result in the accumulation of formate, implying that in these cases lactate was oxidized to acetate plus CO(2). Strain MLTeJB is a low G + C Gram positive motile rod with pH, sodium, and temperature growth optima at 8.5-9.0, 0.5-1.5 M, and 40 degrees C, respectively. The epithet Bacillus beveridgei strain MLTeJB(T) is proposed.

  15. Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii gen. nov., sp. nov., a halophilic anaerobe from Dead Sea sediments that respires selenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, Blum J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oren, A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    We isolated an obligately anaerobic halophilic bacterium from the Dead Sea that grew by respiration of selenate. The isolate, designated strain DSSe-1, was a gram-negative, non-motile rod. It oxidized glycerol or glucose to acetate+CO2 with concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite plus elemental selenium. Other electron acceptors that supported anaerobic growth on glycerol were nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide; nitrite, arsenate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite or sulfate could not serve as electron acceptors. Growth on glycerol in the presence of nitrate occurred over a salinity range from 100 to 240 g/l, with an optimum at 210 g/l. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggests that strain DSSe-1 belongs to the order Halanaerobiales, an order of halophilic anaerobes with a fermentative or homoacetogenic metabolism, in which anaerobic respiratory metabolism has never been documented. The highest 16S rRNA sequence similarity (90%) was found with Acetohalobium arabaticum (X89077). On the basis of physiological properties as well as the relatively low homology of 16S rRNA from strain DSSe-1 with known genera, classification in a new genus within the order Halanaerobiales, family Halobacteroidaceae is warranted. We propose the name Selenihalanaerobacter shriftii. Type strain is strain DSSe-1 (ATCC accession number BAA-73).

  16. The respiration pattern as an indicator of the anaerobic threshold.

    PubMed

    Mirmohamadsadeghi, Leila; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Lemay, Mathieu; Deriaz, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    The anaerobic threshold (AT) is a good index of personal endurance but needs a laboratory setting to be determined. It is important to develop easy AT field measurements techniques in order to rapidly adapt training programs. In the present study, it is postulated that the variability of the respiratory parameters decreases with exercise intensity (especially at the AT level). The aim of this work was to assess, on healthy trained subjects, the putative relationships between the variability of some respiration parameters and the AT. The heart rate and respiratory variables (volume, rate) were measured during an incremental exercise performed on a treadmill by healthy moderately trained subjects. Results show a decrease in the variance of 1/tidal volume with the intensity of exercise. Consequently, the cumulated variance (sum of the variance measured at each level of the exercise) follows an exponential relationship with respect to the intensity to reach eventually a plateau. The amplitude of this plateau is closely related to the AT (r=-0.8). It is concluded that the AT is related to the variability of the respiration.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa anaerobic respiration in biofilms: relationships to cystic fibrosis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Hennigan, Robert F; Hilliard, George M; Ochsner, Urs A; Parvatiyar, Kislay; Kamani, Moneesha C; Allen, Holly L; DeKievit, Teresa R; Gardner, Paul R; Schwab, Ute; Rowe, John J; Iglewski, Barbara H; McDermott, Timothy R; Mason, Ronald P; Wozniak, Daniel J; Hancock, Robert E W; Parsek, Matthew R; Noah, Terry L; Boucher, Richard C; Hassett, Daniel J

    2002-10-01

    Recent data indicate that cystic fibrosis (CF) airway mucus is anaerobic. This suggests that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in CF reflects biofilm formation and persistence in an anaerobic environment. P. aeruginosa formed robust anaerobic biofilms, the viability of which requires rhl quorum sensing and nitric oxide (NO) reductase to modulate or prevent accumulation of toxic NO, a byproduct of anaerobic respiration. Proteomic analyses identified an outer membrane protein, OprF, that was upregulated approximately 40-fold under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Further, OprF exists in CF mucus, and CF patients raise antisera to OprF. An oprF mutant formed poor anaerobic biofilms, due, in part, to defects in anaerobic respiration. Thus, future investigations of CF pathogenesis and therapy should include a better understanding of anaerobic metabolism and biofilm development by P. aeruginosa.

  18. The effect of metabolic inhibitors on the development of respiration in anaerobically grown yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, W.; Tustanoff, E. R.

    1966-01-01

    1. Iodoacetate and fluoride did not prevent the development of respiration in aerobically grown yeast. 2. The effect of dinitrophenol suggested that phosphorylation developed simultaneously with respiration in anaerobically grown yeast, but the effect of oligomycin suggested that the phosphorylation and oxidation were not tightly coupled. 3. Inhibitors of electron transport showed that both the respiratory peak and the subsequent respiration were cyanide-sensitive, but the peak respiration was insensitive to antimycin. 4. Of the inhibitors of protein or RNA synthesis tested, only p-fluorophenylalanine inhibited the development of respiration. The results are not consistent with a new synthesis of mitochondria. 5. 2-Phenylethanol inhibited the development of respiration in anaerobically grown yeast and also yeast growth. Other inhibitors of DNA synthesis had no effect on the development of respiration. 6. The relevance of the results to mitochondrial morphogenesis is discussed. PMID:4290405

  19. Bacterial Drug Tolerance under Clinical Conditions Is Governed by Anaerobic Adaptation but not Anaerobic Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Hemsley, Claudia M.; Luo, Jamie X.; Andreae, Clio A.; Butler, Clive S.; Soyer, Orkun S.

    2014-01-01

    Noninherited antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of genetically identical bacteria displays phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics. We show here that compared to Escherichia coli, the clinically relevant genus Burkholderia displays much higher levels of cells that tolerate ceftazidime. By measuring the dynamics of the formation of drug-tolerant cells under conditions that mimic in vivo infections, we show that in Burkholderia bacteria, oxygen levels affect the formation of these cells. The drug-tolerant cells are characterized by an anaerobic metabolic signature and can be eliminated by oxygenating the system or adding nitrate. The transcriptome profile suggests that these cells are not dormant persister cells and are likely to be drug tolerant as a consequence of the upregulation of anaerobic nitrate respiration, efflux pumps, β-lactamases, and stress response proteins. These findings have important implications for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections and the methodologies and conditions that are used to study drug-tolerant and persister cells in vitro. PMID:25049258

  20. Bacterial drug tolerance under clinical conditions is governed by anaerobic adaptation but not anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Claudia M; Luo, Jamie X; Andreae, Clio A; Butler, Clive S; Soyer, Orkun S; Titball, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Noninherited antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of genetically identical bacteria displays phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics. We show here that compared to Escherichia coli, the clinically relevant genus Burkholderia displays much higher levels of cells that tolerate ceftazidime. By measuring the dynamics of the formation of drug-tolerant cells under conditions that mimic in vivo infections, we show that in Burkholderia bacteria, oxygen levels affect the formation of these cells. The drug-tolerant cells are characterized by an anaerobic metabolic signature and can be eliminated by oxygenating the system or adding nitrate. The transcriptome profile suggests that these cells are not dormant persister cells and are likely to be drug tolerant as a consequence of the upregulation of anaerobic nitrate respiration, efflux pumps, β-lactamases, and stress response proteins. These findings have important implications for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections and the methodologies and conditions that are used to study drug-tolerant and persister cells in vitro. Copyright © 2014 Hemsley et al.

  1. Influence of the molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis on anaerobic respiration, biofilm formation and motility in Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Andreae, Clio A; Titball, Richard W; Butler, Clive S

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is closely related to Burkholderia pseudomallei, a bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. B. pseudomallei can survive and persist within a hypoxic environment for up to one year and has been shown to grow anaerobically in the presence of nitrate. Currently, little is known about the role of anaerobic respiration in pathogenesis of melioidosis. Using B. thailandensis as a model, a library of 1344 transposon mutants was created to identify genes required for anaerobic nitrate respiration. One transposon mutant (CA01) was identified with an insertion in BTH_I1704 (moeA), a gene required for the molybdopterin biosynthetic pathway. This pathway is involved in the synthesis of a molybdopterin cofactor required for a variety of molybdoenzymes, including nitrate reductase. Disruption of molybdopterin biosynthesis prevented growth under anaerobic conditions, when using nitrate as the sole terminal electron acceptor. Defects in anaerobic respiration, nitrate reduction, motility and biofilm formation were observed for CA01. Mutant complementation with pDA-17:BTH_I1704 was able to restore anaerobic growth on nitrate, nitrate reductase activity and biofilm formation, but did not restore motility. This study highlights the potential importance of molybdoenzyme-dependent anaerobic respiration in the survival and virulence of B. thailandensis. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Anaerobic respiration: In vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against mitochondriate Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Farooq, Maria; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protist pathogen that is responsible for serious human and animal infection. Being one of the most frequently isolated protists from the environment, it is likely that it readily encounters microaerophilic environments. For respiration under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions in several amitochondriate protists, decarboxylation of pyruvate is catalyzed by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase instead of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In support, Nitazoxanide, an inhibitor of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, is effective and non-mutagenic clinically against a range of amitochondriate protists, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The overall aim of the present study was to determine in vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Acanthamoeba castellanii. At micromolar concentrations, the findings revealed that Nitazoxanide neither affected A. castellanii growth or viability nor amoeba-mediated host cell monolayer damage in vitro or extracellular proteolytic activities. Similarly, microaerophilic conditions alone had no significant effects. In contrast, microaerophilic conditions together with Nitazoxanide showed amoebicidal effects and inhibited A. castellanii-mediated host cell monolayer damage as well as extracellular proteases. Using encystation assays, it was observed that Nitazoxanide inhibited trophozoite transformation into cysts both under aerophilic and microaerophilic conditions. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cysts with Nitazoxanide inhibited A. castellanii excystation. These findings are important in the identification of potential targets that could be useful against parasite-specific respiration as well as to understand the basic biology of the life cycle of Acanthamoeba. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions.

  4. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  5. Contribution of cell elongation to the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mi Young; Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2011-01-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer lining the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airway. However, molecular basis behind this anaerobiosis-triggered robust biofilm formation is not clearly defined yet. Here, we identified a morphological change naturally accompanied by anaerobic respiration in P. aeruginosa and investigated its effect on the biofilm formation in vitro. A standard laboratory strain, PAO1 was highly elongated during anaerobic respiration compared with bacteria grown aerobically. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that cell elongation likely occurred as a consequence of defective cell division. Cell elongation was dependent on the presence of nitrite reductase (NIR) that reduces nitrite (NO(2) (-)) to nitric oxide (NO) and was repressed in PAO1 in the presence of carboxy-PTIO, a NO antagonist, demonstrating that cell elongation involves a process to respond to NO, a spontaneous byproduct of the anaerobic respiration. Importantly, the non-elongated NIR-deficient mutant failed to form biofilm, while a mutant of nitrate reductase (NAR) and wild type PAO1, both of which were highly elongated, formed robust biofilm. Taken together, our data reveal a role of previously undescribed cell biological event in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and suggest NIR as a key player involved in such process.

  6. Contribution of Cell Elongation to the Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Anaerobic Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer lining the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airway. However, molecular basis behind this anaerobiosis-triggered robust biofilm formation is not clearly defined yet. Here, we identified a morphological change naturally accompanied by anaerobic respiration in P. aeruginosa and investigated its effect on the biofilm formation in vitro. A standard laboratory strain, PAO1 was highly elongated during anaerobic respiration compared with bacteria grown aerobically. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that cell elongation likely occurred as a consequence of defective cell division. Cell elongation was dependent on the presence of nitrite reductase (NIR) that reduces nitrite (NO2−) to nitric oxide (NO) and was repressed in PAO1 in the presence of carboxy-PTIO, a NO antagonist, demonstrating that cell elongation involves a process to respond to NO, a spontaneous byproduct of the anaerobic respiration. Importantly, the non-elongated NIR-deficient mutant failed to form biofilm, while a mutant of nitrate reductase (NAR) and wild type PAO1, both of which were highly elongated, formed robust biofilm. Taken together, our data reveal a role of previously undescribed cell biological event in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and suggest NIR as a key player involved in such process. PMID:21267455

  7. Activation of Cholera Toxin Production by Anaerobic Respiration of Trimethylamine N-oxide in Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Yongjin; Bari, Wasimul; Yoon, Mi Young; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Sang Cheol; Lee, Hyung-il; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes cholera. Although the pathogenesis caused by this deadly pathogen takes place in the intestine, commonly thought to be anaerobic, anaerobiosis-induced virulence regulations are not fully elucidated. Anerobic growth of the V. cholerae strain, N16961, was promoted when trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) was used as an alternative electron acceptor. Strikingly, cholera toxin (CT) production was markedly induced during anaerobic TMAO respiration. N16961 mutants unable to metabolize TMAO were incapable of producing CT, suggesting a mechanistic link between anaerobic TMAO respiration and CT production. TMAO reductase is transported to the periplasm via the twin arginine transport (TAT) system. A similar defect in both anaerobic TMAO respiration and CT production was also observed in a N16961 TAT mutant. In contrast, the abilities to grow on TMAO and to produce CT were not affected in a mutant of the general secretion pathway. This suggests that V. cholerae may utilize the TAT system to secrete CT during TMAO respiration. During anaerobic growth with TMAO, N16961 cells exhibit green fluorescence when stained with 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, a specific dye for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, CT production was decreased in the presence of an ROS scavenger suggesting a positive role of ROS in regulating CT production. When TMAO was co-administered to infant mice infected with N16961, the mice exhibited more severe pathogenic symptoms. Together, our results reveal a novel anaerobic growth condition that stimulates V. cholerae to produce its major virulence factor. PMID:23019319

  8. Activation of cholera toxin production by anaerobic respiration of trimethylamine N-oxide in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Yongjin; Bari, Wasimul; Yoon, Mi Young; Go, Junhyeok; Kim, Sang Cheol; Lee, Hyung-Il; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2012-11-16

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that causes cholera. Although the pathogenesis caused by this deadly pathogen takes place in the intestine, commonly thought to be anaerobic, anaerobiosis-induced virulence regulations are not fully elucidated. Anerobic growth of the V. cholerae strain, N16961, was promoted when trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) was used as an alternative electron acceptor. Strikingly, cholera toxin (CT) production was markedly induced during anaerobic TMAO respiration. N16961 mutants unable to metabolize TMAO were incapable of producing CT, suggesting a mechanistic link between anaerobic TMAO respiration and CT production. TMAO reductase is transported to the periplasm via the twin arginine transport (TAT) system. A similar defect in both anaerobic TMAO respiration and CT production was also observed in a N16961 TAT mutant. In contrast, the abilities to grow on TMAO and to produce CT were not affected in a mutant of the general secretion pathway. This suggests that V. cholerae may utilize the TAT system to secrete CT during TMAO respiration. During anaerobic growth with TMAO, N16961 cells exhibit green fluorescence when stained with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, a specific dye for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, CT production was decreased in the presence of an ROS scavenger suggesting a positive role of ROS in regulating CT production. When TMAO was co-administered to infant mice infected with N16961, the mice exhibited more severe pathogenic symptoms. Together, our results reveal a novel anaerobic growth condition that stimulates V. cholerae to produce its major virulence factor.

  9. Anaerobic growth and potential for amino acid production by nitrate respiration in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Seiki; Ohnishi, Junko; Komatsu, Tomoha; Masaki, Tatsuya; Sen, Kikuo; Ikeda, Masato

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen limitation is a crucial problem in amino acid fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum. Toward this subject, our study was initiated by analysis of the oxygen-requiring properties of C. glutamicum, generally regarded as a strict aerobe. This organism formed colonies on agar plates up to relatively low oxygen concentrations (0.5% O(2)), while no visible colonies were formed in the absence of O(2). However, in the presence of nitrate (NO3-), the organism exhibited limited growth anaerobically with production of nitrite (NO2-), indicating that C. glutamicum can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor. Assays of cell extracts from aerobic and hypoxic cultures yielded comparable nitrate reductase activities, irrespective of nitrate levels. Genome analysis revealed a narK2GHJI cluster potentially relevant to nitrate reductase and transport. Disruptions of narG and narJ abolished the nitrate-dependent anaerobic growth with the loss of nitrate reductase activity. Disruption of the putative nitrate/nitrite antiporter gene narK2 did not affect the enzyme activity but impaired the anaerobic growth. These indicate that this locus is responsible for nitrate respiration. Agar piece assays using L-lysine- and L-arginine-producing strains showed that production of both amino acids occurred anaerobically by nitrate respiration, indicating the potential of C. glutamicum for anaerobic amino acid production.

  10. The regulatory role of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Wei; He, Ying; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is a global regulator that controls bacterial iron homeostasis. In this study, a fur deletion mutant of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. Physiological studies revealed that the growth rate of this mutant under aerobic conditions was only slightly lower than that of wild type (WT), but severe growth defects were observed under anaerobic conditions when different electron acceptors (EAs) were provided. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that Fur is involved not only in classical iron homeostasis but also in anaerobic respiration. Fur exerted pleiotropic effects on the regulation of anaerobic respiration by controlling anaerobic electron transport, the heme biosynthesis system, and the cytochrome c maturation system. Biochemical assays demonstrated that levels of c-type cytochromes were lower in the fur mutant, consistent with the transcriptional profiling. Transcriptomic analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a primary regulation network for Fur in WP3. These results suggest that Fur may act as a sensor for anoxic conditions to trigger and influence the anaerobic respiratory system.

  11. The Regulatory Role of Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) during Anaerobic Respiration of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin-Wei; He, Ying; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is a global regulator that controls bacterial iron homeostasis. In this study, a fur deletion mutant of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. Physiological studies revealed that the growth rate of this mutant under aerobic conditions was only slightly lower than that of wild type (WT), but severe growth defects were observed under anaerobic conditions when different electron acceptors (EAs) were provided. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that Fur is involved not only in classical iron homeostasis but also in anaerobic respiration. Fur exerted pleiotropic effects on the regulation of anaerobic respiration by controlling anaerobic electron transport, the heme biosynthesis system, and the cytochrome c maturation system. Biochemical assays demonstrated that levels of c-type cytochromes were lower in the fur mutant, consistent with the transcriptional profiling. Transcriptomic analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a primary regulation network for Fur in WP3. These results suggest that Fur may act as a sensor for anoxic conditions to trigger and influence the anaerobic respiratory system. PMID:24124499

  12. Dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors in anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Schicklberger, Marcus; Gescher, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    An extension of the respiratory chain to the cell surface is necessary to reduce extracellular electron acceptors like ferric iron or manganese oxides. In the past few years, more and more compounds were revealed to be reduced at the surface of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and the list does not seem to have an end so far. Shewanella as well as Geobacter strains are model organisms to discover the biochemistry that enables the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular electron acceptors. In both cases, c-type cytochromes are essential electron-transferring proteins. They make the journey of respiratory electrons from the cytoplasmic membrane through periplasm and over the outer membrane possible. Outer membrane cytochromes have the ability to catalyze the last step of the respiratory chains. Still, recent discoveries provided evidence that they are accompanied by further factors that allow or at least facilitate extracellular reduction. This review gives a condensed overview of our current knowledge of extracellular respiration, highlights recent discoveries, and discusses critically the influence of different strategies for terminal electron transfer reactions.

  13. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-06-24

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  14. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-07-01

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well-studied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c‐type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, James K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Summary Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c‐type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c‐type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr ‐1, 36 in‐frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c‐type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c‐type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well‐studied c‐type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr ‐1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c‐type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis. PMID:21255343

  16. Taurine reduction in anaerobic respiration of Bilophila wadsworthia RZATAU.

    PubMed

    Laue, H; Denger, K; Cook, A M

    1997-05-01

    Organosulfonates are important natural and man-made compounds, but until recently (T. J. Lie, T. Pitta, E. R. Leadbetter, W. Godchaux III, and J. R. Leadbetter. Arch. Microbiol. 166:204-210, 1996), they were not believed to be dissimilated under anoxic conditions. We also chose to test whether alkane- and arenesulfonates could serve as electron sinks in respiratory metabolism. We generated 60 anoxic enrichment cultures in mineral salts medium which included several potential electron donors and a single organic sulfonate as an electron sink, and we used material from anaerobic digestors in communal sewage works as inocula. None of the four aromatic sulfonates, the three unsubstituted alkanesulfonates, or the N-sulfonate tested gave positive enrichment cultures requiring both the electron donor and electron sink for growth. Nine cultures utilizing the natural products taurine, cysteate, or isethionate were considered positive for growth, and all formed sulfide. Two clearly different pure cultures were examined. Putative Desulfovibrio sp. strain RZACYSA, with lactate as the electron donor, utilized sulfate, aminomethanesulfonate, taurine, isethionate, and cysteate, converting the latter to ammonia, acetate, and sulfide. Strain RZATAU was identified by 16S rDNA analysis as Bilophila wadsworthia. In the presence of, e.g., formate as the electron donor, it utilized, e.g., cysteate and isethionate and converted taurine quantitatively to cell material and products identified as ammonia, acetate, and sulfide. Sulfite and thiosulfate, but not sulfate, were utilized as electron sinks, as was nitrate, when lactate was provided as the electron donor and carbon source. A growth requirement for 1,4-naphthoquinone indicates a menaquinone electron carrier, and the presence of cytochrome c supports the presence of an electron transport chain. Pyruvate-dependent disappearance of taurine from cell extracts, as well as formation of alanine and release of ammonia and acetate, was

  17. Aerobically respiring prokaryotic strains exhibit a broader temperature–pH–salinity space for cell division than anaerobically respiring and fermentative strains

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jesse P.; Dobinson, Luke; Freeman, Kenneth; McKenzie, Ross; Wyllie, Dale; Nixon, Sophie L.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes on the Earth operate within a parameter space that is constrained by physical and chemical extremes. Aerobic respiration can result in adenosine triphosphate yields up to over an order of magnitude higher than those attained anaerobically and, under certain conditions, may enable microbial multiplication over a broader range of extremes than other modes of catabolism. We employed growth data published for 241 prokaryotic strains to compare temperature, pH and salinity values for cell division between aerobically and anaerobically metabolizing taxa. Isolates employing oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor exhibited a considerably more extensive three-dimensional phase space for cell division (90% of the total volume) than taxa using other inorganic substrates or organic compounds as the electron acceptor (15% and 28% of the total volume, respectively), with all groups differing in their growth characteristics. Understanding the mechanistic basis of these differences will require integration of research into microbial ecology, physiology and energetics, with a focus on global-scale processes. Critical knowledge gaps include the combined impacts of diverse stress parameters on Gibbs energy yields and rates of microbial activity, interactions between cellular energetics and adaptations to extremes, and relating laboratory-based data to in situ limits for cell division. PMID:26354829

  18. Aerobically respiring prokaryotic strains exhibit a broader temperature-pH-salinity space for cell division than anaerobically respiring and fermentative strains.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jesse P; Dobinson, Luke; Freeman, Kenneth; McKenzie, Ross; Wyllie, Dale; Nixon, Sophie L; Cockell, Charles S

    2015-09-06

    Biological processes on the Earth operate within a parameter space that is constrained by physical and chemical extremes. Aerobic respiration can result in adenosine triphosphate yields up to over an order of magnitude higher than those attained anaerobically and, under certain conditions, may enable microbial multiplication over a broader range of extremes than other modes of catabolism. We employed growth data published for 241 prokaryotic strains to compare temperature, pH and salinity values for cell division between aerobically and anaerobically metabolizing taxa. Isolates employing oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor exhibited a considerably more extensive three-dimensional phase space for cell division (90% of the total volume) than taxa using other inorganic substrates or organic compounds as the electron acceptor (15% and 28% of the total volume, respectively), with all groups differing in their growth characteristics. Understanding the mechanistic basis of these differences will require integration of research into microbial ecology, physiology and energetics, with a focus on global-scale processes. Critical knowledge gaps include the combined impacts of diverse stress parameters on Gibbs energy yields and rates of microbial activity, interactions between cellular energetics and adaptations to extremes, and relating laboratory-based data to in situ limits for cell division. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Transport, anoxia and energy control on anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis in anoxic peat soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaiuti, Simona; Blodau, Christian; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2017-04-01

    In deep and permanently water saturated peat deposits, extremely low diffusive transport and concomitant build-up of metabolic end-products, i.e of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and methane (CH4), have been found to slow-down anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis. Such accumulation of DIC and CH4 lowers the Gibbs free energy yield of terminal respiration and methanogenesis, which can inhibit the course of anaerobic metabolic processes. In particular, this affects terminal steps of the breakdown of organic carbon (C), such as methanogenesis, acetogenesis and fermentation processes, which occur near thermodynamic minimum energy thresholds. This effect is thus of critical importance for the long-term C sequestration, as the slow-down of decomposition ultimately regulates the long-term fate of C in deep peat deposits. The exact controls of this observed slow-down of organic matter mineralization are not yet fully understood. Moreover, altered patterns of water or gas transport due to predicted changes in climate may affect these controls in peat soils. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate how burial of peat leads to an inactivation of anaerobic decomposition and to investigate the effects of advective water transport and persistently anoxic conditions on anaerobic decomposition, temporal evolution of thermodynamic energy yields to methanogenesis and methanogenic pathways. To this end, we conducted a column experiment with homogenized, ombrotrophic peat over a period of 300 days at 20˚ C. We tested i) a control treatment under diffusive transport only, ii) an advective flow treatment with a flow of 10 mm d-1, and iv) an anoxic treatment to evaluate changes in decomposition in absence of oxygen in the unsaturated zone of the cores. A slow-down of anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis generally set in at larger depths after 150 days at CH4 concentrations of 0.6-0.9 mmol L-1 and DIC concentrations of 6-12 mmol L-1. This effect occurred at higher

  20. Distinct and diverse anaerobic respiration of methanogenic community in response to MnO2 nanoparticles in anaerobic digester sludge.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Qiao, Sen; Yu, Cong; Tian, Yihui; Yang, Yue; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-10-15

    Recently, the influence of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion has drawn much attention, however, the changes in NPs and functioning consortia within the methanogenic community are usually not investigated. Therefore, the methanogenesis performance, NPs transformation and methanogenic community development in anaerobic digester sludge under MnO2 NP supplementation were demonstrated in this study. MnO2 NPs (400 mg/gVSS) stimulated the methane (CH4) yield by 42% for a final CH4 proportion of 81.8% of the total gas production. Meanwhile, the coenzyme F420 and INT-electron transport system activities showed positive correlation with MnO2 concentration. Microbial Mn reduction and oxidation occurred in conjunction with methanogenesis, resulting in transformation of the shape of the MnO2 NPs from wire-like to globular particles. Microbial community analysis indicated that the relative abundances of genera Methanobacterium, Methanosaeta, and Methanosarcina were higher in the presence of MnO2 NPs. Moreover, a new and different crucial synergy within the methanogenic community was formed with low-abundance consortia driving Mn respiration coupled to methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion. To our knowledge, this is the first report on transformation of metal oxides NPs combined with syntrophic community development in studies focusing on methanogenesis in response to NPs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Gene expression profiling of Corynebacterium glutamicum during Anaerobic nitrate respiration: induction of the SOS response for cell survival.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Taku; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2011-03-01

    The gene expression profile of Corynebacterium glutamicum under anaerobic nitrate respiration revealed marked differences in the expression levels of a number of genes involved in a variety of cellular functions, including carbon metabolism and respiratory electron transport chain, compared to the profile under aerobic conditions using DNA microarrays. Many SOS genes were upregulated by the shift from aerobic to anaerobic nitrate respiration. An elongated cell morphology, similar to that induced by the DivS-mediated suppression of cell division upon cell exposure to the DNA-damaging reagent mitomycin C, was observed in cells subjected to anaerobic nitrate respiration. None of these transcriptional and morphological differences were observed in a recA mutant strain lacking a functional RecA regulator of the SOS response. The recA mutant cells additionally showed significantly reduced viability compared to wild-type cells similarly grown under anaerobic nitrate respiration. These results suggest a role for the RecA-mediated SOS response in the ability of cells to survive any DNA damage that may result from anaerobic nitrate respiration in C. glutamicum.

  2. Anaerobic soil volume as a major controlling factor for soil denitrification and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reent Köster, Jan; Tong, Bingxin; Grosz, Balázs; Burkart, Stefan; Ruoss, Nicolas; Well, Reinhard

    2017-04-01

    Gas diffusion in soil is a key variable to control denitrification and its N2O to N2 product ratio since it affects two major proximal denitrification factors, i.e. the concentrations of O2 and of N2O. Gas diffusivity is governed by the structure and the state of water saturation of the pore system. At a given O2 consumption rate decreasing diffusivity causes an enhanced anaerobic soil volume where denitrification can occur. Gas diffusivity is generally quantified as bulk diffusion coefficients that represent the lineal diffusive gas flux through the soil matrix. However, the spatial distribution of respiratory O2 consumption and denitrification - and hence the local concentration of O2 and N2O - is highly non-homogeneous. Knowledge of the anaerobic soil volume fraction (ansvf) has been proposed as a key control on denitrification, and has subsequently been used in many denitrification models. The ansvf has previously been quantified by direct measurement of O2 distribution in individual soil aggregates using microsensors. The measured ansvf corresponded to modelled values based on measured aggregate diffusivity and respiration, but was not yet correlated with measured denitrification rates. In the present ongoing study, we are incubating soil cores amended with nitrate and organic litter in an automated mesocosm system under aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions. An N2 depleted incubation atmosphere and the 15N labeled soil nitrate pool facilitate quantification of the N2 production in the soil by IRMS, and fluxes of N2O and CO2 are monitored via gas chromatography. The ansvf and the measured denitrification and respiration rates will then be used for model validation. During the session we will present first results of this study.

  3. Anaerobic Respiration Using a Complete Oxidative TCA Cycle Drives Multicellular Swarming in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Engstrom, Michael D.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. PMID:23111869

  4. Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

    2006-01-01

    Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

  5. Anaerobic respiration using a complete oxidative TCA cycle drives multicellular swarming in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Alteri, Christopher J; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Engstrom, Michael D; Mobley, Harry L T

    2012-10-30

    Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. Bacterial locomotion and the existence of microbes were the first scientific

  6. Siderophores Are Not Involved in Fe(III) Solubilization during Anaerobic Fe(III) Respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fennessey, Christine M.; Jones, Morris E.; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. ΔSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. ΔSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. PMID:20190086

  7. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  8. Involvement of a membrane-bound class III adenylate cyclase in regulation of anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Charania, M A; Brockman, K L; Zhang, Y; Banerjee, A; Pinchuk, G E; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  9. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  10. Enrichment and analysis of anode-respiring bacteria from diverse anaerobic inocula.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Joseph F; Parameswaran, Prathap; Kang, Dae-Wook; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Torres, César I

    2012-09-18

    One of the limitations currently faced by microbial electrochemical cell (MXC) technologies lies in the shortage of different organisms capable of forming a biofilm and channeling electrons from substrates to the anode at high current densities. Using a poised anode (-0.30 V vs Ag/AgCl) and acetate as the electron donor in a MXC, we demonstrated the presence of highly efficient anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) able to produce high current densities (>1.5 A/m(2) anode) in seven out of thirteen environmental samples. These included marshes, lake sediments, saline microbial mats, and anaerobic soils obtained from geographically diverse locations. Our microbial ecology analysis, using pyrosequencing, shows that bacteria related to the genus Geobacter, a known and commonly found ARB, dominate only two of the biofilm communities producing high current; other biofilm communities contained different known and/or novel ARB. The presence of ARB in geographically diverse locations indicates that ARB thrive in a wide range of ecosystems. Studying ARB from different environmental conditions will allow us to better understand the ubiquity of anode respiration, compare the capabilities of different ARB consortia, and find ARB with useful metabolic capacities for future applications.

  11. Natural organic matter as electron acceptor: experimental evidence for its important role in anaerobic respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Maximilian Peter; Sander, Michael; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Hupfer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Microbial respiration is a key driver of element cycling in oxic and anoxic environments. Upon depletion of oxygen as terminal electron acceptor (TEA), a number of anaerobic bacteria can employ alternative TEA for intracellular energy generation. Redox active quinone moieties in dissolved organic matter (DOM) are well known electron acceptors for microbial respiration. However, it remains unclear whether quinones in adsorbed and particulate OM accept electrons in a same way. In our studies we aim to understand the importance of natural organic matter (NOM) as electron acceptors for microbial energy gain and its possible implications for methanogenesis. Using a novel electrochemical approach, mediated electrochemical reduction and -oxidation, we can directly quantify reduced hydroquinone and oxidized quionone moieties in dissolved and particulate NOM samples. In a mesocosm experiment, we rewetted sediment and peat soil and followed electron transfer to the inorganic and organic electron acceptors over time. We found that inorganic and organic electron acceptor pools were depleted over the same timescales. More importantly, we showed that organic, NOM-associated electron accepting moieties represent as much as 21 40% of total TEA inventories. These findings support earlier studies that propose that the reduction of quinone moieties in particulate organic matter competitively suppresses methanogenesis in wetland soils. Our results indicate that electron transfer to organic, particulate TEA in inundated ecosystems has to be accounted for when establishing carbon budgets in and projecting greenhouse gas emissions from these systems.

  12. Peptide Inhibitors Targeting the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Pivotal Anaerobic Respiration Factor AniA.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Aleksandra E; Mills, Robert H; Weber, Jacob V; Hamza, Adel; Passow, Bryan W; Romaine, Andrew; Williamson, Zachary A; Reed, Robert W; Zielke, Ryszard A; Korotkov, Konstantin V

    2017-08-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, which is highly prevalent worldwide and has a major impact on reproductive and neonatal health. The superbug status of N. gonorrhoeae necessitates the development of drugs with different mechanisms of action. Here, we focused on targeting the nitrite reductase AniA, which is a pivotal component of N. gonorrhoeae anaerobic respiration and biofilm formation. Our studies showed that gonococci expressing AniA containing the altered catalytic residues D137A and H280A failed to grow under anaerobic conditions, demonstrating that the nitrite reductase function is essential. To facilitate the pharmacological targeting of AniA, new crystal structures of AniA were refined to 1.90-Å and 2.35-Å resolutions, and a phage display approach with libraries expressing randomized linear dodecameric peptides or heptameric peptides flanked by a pair of cysteine residues was utilized. Biopanning experiments led to the identification of 29 unique peptides, with 1 of them, C7-3, being identified multiple times. Evaluation of their ability to interact with AniA using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and computational docking studies revealed that C7-3 was the most promising inhibitor, binding near the type 2 copper site of the enzyme, which is responsible for interaction with nitrite. Subsequent enzymatic assays and biolayer interferometry with a synthetic C7-3 and its derivatives, C7-3m1 and C7-3m2, demonstrated potent inhibition of AniA. Finally, the MIC50 value of C7-3 and C7-3m2 against anaerobically grown N. gonorrhoeae was 0.6 mM. We present the first peptide inhibitors of AniA, an enzyme that should be further exploited for antigonococcal drug development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. The multidrug efflux pump MdtEF protects against nitrosative damage during the anaerobic respiration in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiliang; Xiao, Minfeng; Horiyama, Tsukasa; Zhang, Yinfeng; Li, Xuechen; Nishino, Kunihiko; Yan, Aixin

    2011-07-29

    Drug efflux represents an important protection mechanism in bacteria to withstand antibiotics and environmental toxic substances. Efflux genes constitute 6-18% of all transporters in bacterial genomes, yet the expression and functions of only a handful of them have been studied. Among the 20 efflux genes encoded in the Escherichia coli K-12 genome, only the AcrAB-TolC system is constitutively expressed. The expression, activities, and physiological functions of the remaining efflux genes are poorly understood. In this study we identified a dramatic up-regulation of an additional efflux pump, MdtEF, under the anaerobic growth condition of E. coli, which is independent of antibiotic exposure. We found that expression of MdtEF is up-regulated more than 20-fold under anaerobic conditions by the global transcription factor ArcA, resulting in increased efflux activity and enhanced drug tolerance in anaerobically grown E. coli. Cells lacking mdtEF display a significantly decreased survival rate under the condition of anaerobic respiration of nitrate. Deletion of the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of indole, tnaAB, or replacing nitrate with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor during the anaerobic respiration restores the decreased survival of ΔmdtEF cells. Moreover, ΔmdtEF cells are susceptible to indole nitrosative derivatives, a class of toxic byproducts formed and accumulated within E. coli when the bacterium respires nitrate under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, we conclude that the multidrug efflux pump MdtEF is up-regulated during the anaerobic physiology of E. coli to protect the bacterium from nitrosative damage through expelling the nitrosyl indole derivatives out of the cells.

  14. Cholera toxin production during anaerobic trimethylamine N-oxide respiration is mediated by stringent response in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Mi Young; Bari, Wasimul; Go, Junhyeok; Min, Kyung Bae; Raskin, David M; Lee, Kang-Mu; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2014-05-09

    As a facultative anaerobe, Vibrio cholerae can grow by anaerobic respiration. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly promoted during anaerobic growth using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of TMAO-stimulated CT production and uncovered the crucial involvement of stringent response in this process. V. cholerae 7th pandemic strain N16961 produced a significantly elevated level of ppGpp, the bacterial stringent response alarmone, during anaerobic TMAO respiration. Bacterial viability was impaired, and DNA replication was also affected under the same growth condition, further suggesting that stringent response is induced. A ΔrelA ΔspoT ppGpp overproducer strain produced an enhanced level of CT, whereas anaerobic growth via TMAO respiration was severely inhibited. In contrast, a ppGpp-null strain (ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV) grew substantially better, but produced no CT, suggesting that CT production and bacterial growth are inversely regulated in response to ppGpp accumulation. Bacterial capability to produce CT was completely lost when the dksA gene, which encodes a protein that works cooperatively with ppGpp, was deleted. In the ΔdksA mutant, stringent response growth inhibition was alleviated, further supporting the inverse regulation of CT production and anaerobic growth. In vivo virulence of ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV or ΔdksA mutants was significantly attenuated. The ΔrelA ΔspoT mutant maintained virulence when infected with exogenous TMAO despite its defective growth. Together, our results reveal that stringent response is activated under TMAO-stimulated anaerobic growth, and it regulates CT production in a growth-dependent manner in V. cholerae.

  15. The Multidrug Efflux Pump MdtEF Protects against Nitrosative Damage during the Anaerobic Respiration in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiliang; Xiao, Minfeng; Horiyama, Tsukasa; Zhang, Yinfeng; Li, Xuechen; Nishino, Kunihiko; Yan, Aixin

    2011-01-01

    Drug efflux represents an important protection mechanism in bacteria to withstand antibiotics and environmental toxic substances. Efflux genes constitute 6–18% of all transporters in bacterial genomes, yet the expression and functions of only a handful of them have been studied. Among the 20 efflux genes encoded in the Escherichia coli K-12 genome, only the AcrAB-TolC system is constitutively expressed. The expression, activities, and physiological functions of the remaining efflux genes are poorly understood. In this study we identified a dramatic up-regulation of an additional efflux pump, MdtEF, under the anaerobic growth condition of E. coli, which is independent of antibiotic exposure. We found that expression of MdtEF is up-regulated more than 20-fold under anaerobic conditions by the global transcription factor ArcA, resulting in increased efflux activity and enhanced drug tolerance in anaerobically grown E. coli. Cells lacking mdtEF display a significantly decreased survival rate under the condition of anaerobic respiration of nitrate. Deletion of the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of indole, tnaAB, or replacing nitrate with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor during the anaerobic respiration restores the decreased survival of ΔmdtEF cells. Moreover, ΔmdtEF cells are susceptible to indole nitrosative derivatives, a class of toxic byproducts formed and accumulated within E. coli when the bacterium respires nitrate under anaerobic conditions. Taken together, we conclude that the multidrug efflux pump MdtEF is up-regulated during the anaerobic physiology of E. coli to protect the bacterium from nitrosative damage through expelling the nitrosyl indole derivatives out of the cells. PMID:21642439

  16. Cholera Toxin Production during Anaerobic Trimethylamine N-Oxide Respiration Is Mediated by Stringent Response in Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Taek; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Mi Young; Bari, Wasimul; Go, Junhyeok; Min, Kyung Bae; Raskin, David M.; Lee, Kang-Mu; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2014-01-01

    As a facultative anaerobe, Vibrio cholerae can grow by anaerobic respiration. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly promoted during anaerobic growth using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of TMAO-stimulated CT production and uncovered the crucial involvement of stringent response in this process. V. cholerae 7th pandemic strain N16961 produced a significantly elevated level of ppGpp, the bacterial stringent response alarmone, during anaerobic TMAO respiration. Bacterial viability was impaired, and DNA replication was also affected under the same growth condition, further suggesting that stringent response is induced. A ΔrelA ΔspoT ppGpp overproducer strain produced an enhanced level of CT, whereas anaerobic growth via TMAO respiration was severely inhibited. In contrast, a ppGpp-null strain (ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV) grew substantially better, but produced no CT, suggesting that CT production and bacterial growth are inversely regulated in response to ppGpp accumulation. Bacterial capability to produce CT was completely lost when the dksA gene, which encodes a protein that works cooperatively with ppGpp, was deleted. In the ΔdksA mutant, stringent response growth inhibition was alleviated, further supporting the inverse regulation of CT production and anaerobic growth. In vivo virulence of ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV or ΔdksA mutants was significantly attenuated. The ΔrelA ΔspoT mutant maintained virulence when infected with exogenous TMAO despite its defective growth. Together, our results reveal that stringent response is activated under TMAO-stimulated anaerobic growth, and it regulates CT production in a growth-dependent manner in V. cholerae. PMID:24648517

  17. Isolation and Cr(VI) reduction characteristics of quinone respiration in Mangrovibacter plantisponsor strain CR1.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jing; Li, Zifu; Xu, Zhifang; Guo, Jianbo; Hu, Zhenzhen; Guo, Yankai; Li, Min; Yang, Jingliang

    2016-07-01

    A Cr(VI)-reducing Mangrovibacter plantisponsor strain, CR1, was isolated from tannery effluent sludge and had quinone respiration characteristics. Its chromate (CrO4 (2-) ) resistance, quinone respiration characteristics, and Cr(VI) reduction efficiencies were evaluated in detail. Strain CR1 exhibited a high Cr(VI) resistance with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 32 mM in LB medium, and its quinone respiration could occur when an electron donor and strain CR1 both existed in the reaction system. Cr(VI) reduction by strain CR1 was significantly enhanced by a factor of 0.4-4.3 with five different quinone compounds: anthraquinone-2,7-disulfonate, anthraquinone-1-sulfonate, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate, and anthraquinone-1,5-disulfonate. AQS was the best electron shuttle among them, and the greatest enhancement to the Cr(VI) bio-reduction was achieved with 0.96 mM AQS. The correlation between the reaction constant k (mg Cr(VI) g(-1) dry cell weight H(-1) ) and thermodynamic temperature T (K) was expressed as an Arrhenius equation lnk=-7662.9/T+27.931(R2=0.9486); the activation energy Ea was 63.71 kJ mol(-1) , and the pre-exponential factor A was 1.35 × 10(12)  mg Cr(VI) g(-1) dry cell weight H(-1) . During the Cr(VI) reduction process, the pH tended to become neutral, and the oxidation-reduction potential decreased to -440 mV. The efficient reduction of Cr(VI) mediated by a quinone respiration strain shows potential for the rapid anaerobic removal of Cr(VI). © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Dunn, Anne K; Stabb, Eric V

    2010-05-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated the repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and P(arcA)-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends the characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background.

  19. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Septer, Alecia N.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Dunn, Anne K.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and ParcA-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background. PMID:20298504

  20. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform by trichloroethene respiring anaerobic mixed cultures and supernatant.

    PubMed

    Vickstrom, Kyle E; Azizian, Mohammad F; Semprini, Lewis

    2017-09-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chloroform (CF) were transformed in batch reactor experiments conducted with anaerobic dechlorinating cultures and supernatant (ADC + S) harvested from continuous flow reactors. The Evanite (EV) and Victoria/Stanford (VS) cultures, capable of respiring trichloroethene (TCE), 1,2-cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and vinyl chloride (VC) to ethene (ETH), were grown in continuous flow reactors receiving an influent feed of saturated TCE (10 mM; 60 mEq) and formate (45 mM; 90 mEq) but no CT or CF. Cells and supernatant were harvested from the chemostats and inoculated into batch reactors at the onset of each experiment. CT transformation was complete following first order kinetics with CF, DCM and CS2 as the measurable transformation products, representing 20-40% of the original mass of CT, with CO2 likely the unknown transformation product. CF was transformed to DCM and likely CO2 at an order of magnitude rate lower than CT, while DCM was not further transformed. An analytical first order model including multiple key reactions effectively simulated CT transformation, product formation and transformation, and provided reasonable estimates of transformation rate coefficients. Biotic and abiotic treatments indicated that CT was mainly transformed via abiotic processes. However, the presence of live cells was associated with the transformation of CF to DCM. In biotic tests both TCE and CT were simultaneously transformed, with TCE transformed to ETH and approximately 15-53% less CF formed via CT transformation. A 14-day exposure to CF (CFmax = 1.4 μM) reduced all rates of chlorinated ethene respiration by a factor of 10 or greater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Systems-level analysis of Escherichia coli response to silver nanoparticles: the roles of anaerobic respiration in microbial resistance.

    PubMed

    Du, Huamao; Lo, Tat-Ming; Sitompul, Johnner; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2012-08-10

    Despite extensive use of silver nanoparticles for antimicrobial applications, cellular mechanisms underlying microbial response to silver nanoparticles remain to be further elucidated at the systems level. Here, we report systems-level response of Escherichia coli to silver nanoparticles using transcriptome-based biochemical and phenotype assays. Notably, we provided the evidence that anaerobic respiration is induced upon exposure to silver nanoparticles. Further we showed that anaerobic respiration-related regulators and enzymes play an important role in E. coli resistance to silver nanoparticles. In particular, our results suggest that arcA is essential for resistance against silver NPs and the deletion of fnr, fdnH and narH significantly increases the resistance. We envision that this study offers novel insights into modes of antimicrobial action of silver nanoparticles, and cellular mechanisms contributing to the development of microbial resistance to silver nanoparticles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anaerobic Respiration on Self-Doped Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Impact of Chemical Structure.

    PubMed

    Kirchhofer, Nathan D; McCuskey, Samantha R; Mai, Cheng-Kang; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2017-06-01

    We probe anaerobic respiration of bacteria in the presence of conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). Three different CPEs were used to probe how structural variations impact biocurrent generation from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. For the self-doped anionic CPE only, absorption spectroscopy shows that the addition of S. oneidensis MR-1 leads to the disappearance of the polaron (radical cation) band at >900 nm and an increase in the band at 735 nm due to the neutral species, consistent with electron transfer from microbe to polymer. Microbial three-electrode electrochemical cells (M3Cs) show an increase in the current generated by S. oneidensis MR-1 with addition of the self-doped CPE relative to other CPEs and controls. These experiments combined with in situ cyclic voltammetry suggest that the doped CPE facilitates electron transport to electrodes and reveal structure-function relationships relevant to developing materials for biotic/abiotic interfaces. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  4. A novel regulatory circuit to control indole biosynthesis protects Escherichia coli from nitrosative damages during the anaerobic respiration of nitrate.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yong; Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2017-02-01

    Indole is a widely distributed microbial secondary metabolite. It mediates a broad range of physiological processes in both its producing and surrounding species. Yet, indole biosynthesis during the anaerobiosis of bacteria remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we find that while indole production is promoted during fermentation and anaerobic respiration of fumarate and trimethylamine N-oxide in E. coli, its biosynthesis is repressed during anaerobic respiration of nitrate especially during exponential growth. We show that expression of the indole biosynthetic operon tnaCAB is repressed under this condition by the two component systems NarXL and NarPQ in the global regulator FNR dependent manner. During stationary growth phase of nitrate respiration, indole biosynthesis is derepressed. However, cellular indole concentration remains low. We demonstrate that this is due to the rapid conversion of indole into mutagenic indole nitrosative derivatives under this condition. Consistent with this, a supplement of exogenous indole during nitrate respiration causes elevated mutation frequencies in E. coli cells lacking the detoxifying efflux genes mdtEF, and ectopic over-expression of tnaAB genes decreases the fitness of E. coli to this physiological condition. Together, these results suggest that indole production is tuned to the bioenergetics activities of E. coli to facilitate its adaptation and fitness. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Substrate-level phosphorylation is the primary source of energy conservation during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kristopher A; Flynn, Jeffrey M; Naranjo, Belén; Shikhare, Indraneel D; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    It is well established that respiratory organisms use proton motive force to produce ATP via F-type ATP synthase aerobically and that this process may reverse during anaerobiosis to produce proton motive force. Here, we show that Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a nonfermentative, facultative anaerobe known to respire exogenous electron acceptors, generates ATP primarily from substrate-level phosphorylation under anaerobic conditions. Mutant strains lacking ackA (SO2915) and pta (SO2916), genes required for acetate production and a significant portion of substrate-level ATP produced anaerobically, were tested for growth. These mutant strains were unable to grow anaerobically with lactate and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with substrate-level phosphorylation yielding a significant amount of ATP. Mutant strains lacking ackA and pta were also shown to grow slowly using N-acetylglucosamine as the carbon source and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with some ATP generation deriving from the Entner-Doudoroff pathway with this substrate. A deletion strain lacking the sole F-type ATP synthase (SO4746 to SO4754) demonstrated enhanced growth on N-acetylglucosamine and a minor defect with lactate under anaerobic conditions. ATP synthase mutants grown anaerobically on lactate while expressing proteorhodopsin, a light-dependent proton pump, exhibited restored growth when exposed to light, consistent with a proton-pumping role for ATP synthase under anaerobic conditions. Although S. oneidensis requires external electron acceptors to balance redox reactions and is not fermentative, we find that substrate-level phosphorylation is its primary anaerobic energy conservation strategy. Phenotypic characterization of an ackA deletion in Shewanella sp. strain MR-4 and genomic analysis of other sequenced strains suggest that this strategy is a common feature of Shewanella.

  6. Diversity and ubiquity of bacteria capable of utilizing humic substances as electron donors for anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Coates, John D; Cole, Kimberly A; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 x 10(1) in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 x 10(6) in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N(2). Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  7. Diversity and Ubiquity of Bacteria Capable of Utilizing Humic Substances as Electron Donors for Anaerobic Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Coates, John D.; Cole, Kimberly A.; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M.; Achenbach, Laurie A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 × 101 in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 × 106 in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N2. Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  8. Effect of crataemon on the respiration of isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ivancheva, E; Tomov, T; Russanov, E

    1976-01-01

    Crataemon is a drug containing the total mixture of flavonoids isolated from the leaves of Crataegus minogina. Crataemon causes activation and inhibition of the respiration of isolated liver and heart mitochondria, with different time and dose dependence and with different sensitivity to EDTA. The activating effect develops immediately, it is caused by small doses of crataemon, it is lacking in uncoupled mitochondria and completely abolished by EDTA. The inhibitory effect develops immediately or after the activation phase, it is caused by higher doses and the degree and the latency period depend on the dose. This effect is due to the action of crataemon on the flavoprotein-cytochrome c section of the electron transport chain. The inhibitory effect is partly abolished by EDTA. These effects are explained by the presence of at least two crataemon components: EDTA-sensitive and EDTA-insensitive. The EDTA-sensitive component is determined as a zinc-flavonoid complex. In small doses it uncouples oxidative phosphorylation, while large doses inhibit the electron transport between flavoprotein and cytochrome c. The EDTA-insensitive component causes only inhibition of the electron transport in the same part of the chain and manifests its effect in the higher doses.

  9. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M; Gilbert, Jack A; Kostka, Joel E

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  10. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M.; Gilbert, Jack A.; ...

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiablemore » carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.« less

  11. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xueju; Handley, Kim M.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2015-12-01

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  12. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from anaerobic empyema.

    PubMed

    Mayall, B C; Snashall, E A; Peel, M M

    1998-11-01

    We report the isolation of Clostridium tetani (along with Fusobacterium mortiferum) from empyema pus. The patient, a 68 year old retired farmer from rural NSW, had recently undergone cholecystectomy, had heart failure and developed an empyema. He improved after drainage of the empyema and penicillin therapy, but died suddenly during convalescence.

  13. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-09-18

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression.

  14. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression. PMID:26381456

  15. [Effects of D-arginine on polyamine content and anaerobic respiration metabolism of cucumber seedling roots under hypoxia stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hu, Xiao-hui; Guo, Shi-rong; Jia, Yong-xia; Du, Chang-xia

    2007-02-01

    By the method of solution culture, this paper studied the effects of D-arginine on the seedling roots polyamine content and anaerobic respiration metabolism of two cucumber ( Cucumis Sativus L. ) cultivars Zhongnong No. 8 and Lübachun No. 4 differed in hypoxia tolerance. The results showed that under hypoxia stress, the putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) contents in the seedling roots of test cultivars increased significantly, and anaerobic respiration accelerated. The ethanol fermentation activity was higher in the seedling roots of hypoxia-tolerant cultivar Lübachun No. 4 than in those of hypoxia-sensitive cultivar Zhongnong No. 8, while lactate fermentation activity had an opposite trend. Comparing with treatment hypoxia, hypoxia plus D -arginine decreased the Put, Spd and Spm contents in roots significantly, enhanced the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the contents of ethanol and lactate, and inhibited plant growth. Exogenous Put application lessened the effects of D-arginine. Higher level of polyamines in roots could have great benefits for cucumber seedlings to improve their resistance to hypoxia stress.

  16. Gaseous elemental mercury emissions and CO(2) respiration rates in terrestrial soils under controlled aerobic and anaerobic laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Obrist, Daniel; Faïn, Xavier; Berger, Carsen

    2010-03-01

    Mercury (Hg) levels in terrestrial soils are linked to the presence of organic carbon (C). Carbon pools are highly dynamic and subject to mineralization processes, but little is known about the fate of Hg during decomposition. This study evaluated relationships between gaseous Hg emissions from soils and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) respiration under controlled laboratory conditions to assess potential losses of Hg to the atmosphere during C mineralization. Results showed a linear correlation (r(2)=0.49) between Hg and CO(2) emissions in 41 soil samples, an effect unlikely to be caused by temperature, radiation, different Hg contents, or soil moisture. Stoichiometric comparisons of Hg/C ratios of emissions and underlying soil substrates suggest that 3% of soil Hg was subject to evasion. Even minute emissions of Hg upon mineralization, however, may be important on a global scale given the large Hg pools sequestered in terrestrial soils and C stocks. We induced changes in CO(2) respiration rates and observed Hg flux responses, including inducement of anaerobic conditions by changing chamber air supply from N(2)/O(2) (80% and 20%, respectively) to pure N(2). Unexpectedly, Hg emissions almost quadrupled after O(2) deprivation while oxidative mineralization (i.e., CO(2) emissions) was greatly reduced. This Hg flux response to anaerobic conditions was lacking when repeated with sterilized soils, possibly due to involvement of microbial reduction of Hg(2+) by anaerobes or indirect abiotic effects such as alterations in soil redox conditions. This study provides experimental evidence that Hg volatilization, and possibly Hg(2+) reduction, is related to O(2) availability in soils from two Sierra Nevada forests. If this result is confirmed in soils from other areas, the implication is that Hg volatilization from terrestrial soils is partially controlled by soil aeration and that low soil O(2) levels and possibly low soil redox potentials lead to increased Hg volatilization from

  17. The contribution of genes required for anaerobic respiration to the virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum for chickens.

    PubMed

    Paiva, J B; Penha Filho, R A C; Pereira, E A; Lemos, M V F; Barrow, P A; Lovell, M A; Berchieri, A

    2009-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG) is an intracellular pathogen of chickens. To survive, to invade and to multiply in the intestinal tract and intracellularly it depends on its ability to produce energy in anaerobic conditions. The fumarate reductase (frdABCD), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) reductase (dmsABC), and nitrate reductase (narGHIJ) operons in Salmonella Typhimurium (STM) encode enzymes involved in anaerobic respiration to the electron acceptors fumarate, DMSO, TMAO, and nitrate, respectively. They are regulated in response to nitrate and oxygen availability and changes in cell growth rate. In this study mortality rates of chickens challenged with mutants of Salmonella Gallinarum, which were defective in utilising anaerobic electron acceptors, were assessed in comparison to group of bird challenged with wild strain. The greatest degree of attenuation was observed with mutations affecting nitrate reductase (napA, narG) with additional attenuations induced by a mutation affecting fumarate reductase (frdA) and a double mutant (dmsA torC) affecting DMSO and TMAO reductase.

  18. Dissimilatory Reduction of Elemental Selenium to Selenide in Sediments and Anaerobic Cultures of Selenium Respiring Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbel, M. J.; Switzer-Blum, J.; Oremland, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    Selenium contaminated environments often contain elemental Se (Se0) in their sediments that originates from dissimilatory reduction of Se oxyanions. The forms of Se in sedimentary rocks similarly contain high proportions of Se0, but much of the Se is also in the form of metal selenides, Se-2. It is not clear if the occurrence of these selenides is due to microbial reduction of Se0, or some other biological or chemical process. In this investigation we examined the possibility that bacterial respiratory reduction of Se0 to Se-2 could explain the presence of the latter species in sedimentary rocks. We conducted incubations of anoxic sediment slurries amended with different forms of Se0. High levels of Se0 (mM) were added to San Francisco Bay sediments in order to enhance the detection of soluble HSe-, which was precipitated with Cu2+ then redissolved and quantified by ICP-MS. Concentrations of HSe- were highest in live samples amended with red amorphous Se0 formed by either microbial reduction of Se+4 ("biogenic Se0") or by chemical oxidation of H2Se(g) ("chem. Se0"); very little HSe- was formed in those amended with black crystalline Se0, indicating the general lack of reactivity of this allotrope. Controls poisoned with 10% formalin did not produce HSe- from additions of chem. Se0. Reduction of both forms of red amorphous Se0 to HSe- occurred vigorously in growing cultures of Bacillus selenitireducens, an anaerobic halophile previously isolated from sediments of Mono Lake, CA. Up to 73% and 68% of red amorphous, biogenic Se0 or chem. Se0, respectively, was reduced to HSe- during growth of B. selenitireducens, (incubation time ~ 200 hrs): oxidation of lactate to acetate as well as cell density increases indicated that a dissimilatory reduction pathway was likely. Reduction was most enhanced when cells were previously grown on elemental sulfur or Se+4. In contrast to the growth experiments, washed cell suspensions of B. selenitireducens exhibited no HSe- production

  19. [2, 4, 6-Trichlorophenol Mineralization Promoted by Anaerobic Reductive Dechlorination of Acclimated Sludge and Extracellular Respiration Dechlorination Pathway].

    PubMed

    Song, Jia-xiu; Li, Ling; Sheng, Fan-fan; Guo, Cui-xiang; Zhang, Yong-ming; Li, Zu-yuan; Wang, Tian-li

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic conditions, the acclimation of activated sludge was studied with sodium lactate as the electron donor and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol as the electron acceptor. Metabolic characteristics of dechlorination were the focus of this study. The result showed highly efficient dechlorination on 2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol that the conversion rate reached to 100% in 9 - 24 h when initial concentrations of sodium lactate and 2,4, 6-trichlorophenol were 20 mmol x L(-1) and 40 - 80 μmol x L(-1), respectively. The intermediate product 2,4-dichlorophenol was found in low concentration (< 4.22 μmol x L(-1)). And 4-chlorophenol and phenol were the main products. Ortho chlorophenol (2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol, 2, 4-dichlorophenol) can be converted rapidly by acclimated sludge, while the further conversion of 4-chlorophenol and phenol was limited. The residues of anaerobic metabolism were degraded by aerobic sludge, among which 4-chlorophenol (initial concentration of 33 mol x L(-1)) removal rate was up to 100% under aerobic conditions. The acclimated bacteria can rapidly transfer Fe(III) and humus (AQDS) into reductive Fe(II) and AQH2DS which indicated that the dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria was enriched in the acclimated sludge. The electron mediator [Fe(III) and AQDS] significantly accelerated the dechlorination rate. The acclimated sludge could perform extracellular respiration dechlorination with electron mediators.

  20. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  1. Biophysical Characterization of Iron in Mitochondria Isolated from Respiring and Fermenting Yeast†

    PubMed Central

    Garber-Morales, Jessica; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P.; Miao, Ren; Guo, Yisong; Münck, Eckard; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The distributions of Fe in mitochondria isolated from respiring, respiro-fermenting, and fermenting yeast cells were determined by an integrative biophysical approach involving Mössbauer and electronic absorption spectroscopies, EPR and ICP-MS. Approximately 40% of the Fe in mitochondria from respiring cells was present in respiration-related proteins. The concentration and distribution of Fe in respiro-fermenting mitochondria, where both respiration and fermentation occur concurrently, was similar to that of respiring mitochondria. The concentration of Fe in fermenting mitochondria was also similar, but the distribution differed dramatically. Here, respiration-related Fe-containing proteins were diminished ca. 3-fold, while nonheme HS FeII species, nonheme mononuclear HS FeIII, and FeIII nanoparticles dominated. These changes were rationalized by a model in which the pool of nonheme HS FeII ions serves as feedstock for Fe/S cluster and heme biosynthesis. The absolute concentrations of respiration-related protein complexes were estimated. PMID:20536189

  2. Anaerobic

    MedlinePlus

    ... more prolonged exercise like walking or jogging. Anaerobic reactions are faster. We need them during shorter, more intense activities like sprinting. Anaerobic exercise leads to a buildup of lactic acid in our tissues. We need oxygen to remove ...

  3. Molecular characterization and biological response to respiration inhibitors of Pyricularia isolates from ctenanthe and rice plants.

    PubMed

    Paplomatas, Epaminondas J; Pappas, Athanasios C; Syranidou, Elene

    2005-07-01

    The molecular profile and the biological response of isolates of Pyricularia oryzae Cavara obtained from ctenanthe to two strobilurins (azoxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl) and the phenylpyridinamine fungicide fluazinam were characterized, and compared with isolates from rice plants. Five different isozymes (alpha-esterase, lactate, malate, isocitrate and sorbitol dehydrogenases) and five random decamer primers for RAPD-PCR were used to generate molecular markers. Using unweighted pair-group with arithmetic average analysis, ctenanthe isolates were found to form a separate group distinct from that of the rice isolates for both sets of markers. Amplified polymorphic sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome b that were digested with Fnu4HI or StyI revealed no differences among Pyricularia isolates at amino acid positions 143 or 129 which confer resistance to strobilurins in several fungi. In absence of the alternative respiration inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) the three fungicides showed inferior and variable efficacy, with a trend toward the rice isolate being less sensitive. The addition of SHAM enhanced the effectiveness of all fungicides against isolates regardless of their origin. Appressorium formation was the most vulnerable target of action of the respiration inhibitors and azoxystrobin the most effective. This is the first report of a comparison between the molecular profiles and sensitivities to respiration inhibitors for Pyricularia oryzae isolates from a non-gramineous host and from rice.

  4. Polyglutamine expansion inhibits respiration by increasing reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, Kasturi L.; Wu, Guanghong; Strittmatter, Warren J.; Burke, James R. . E-mail: james.burke@duke.edu

    2006-03-10

    Huntington's disease results from expansion of the polyglutamine (PolyQ) domain in the huntingtin protein. Although the cellular mechanism by which pathologic-length PolyQ protein causes neurodegeneration is unclear, mitochondria appear central in pathogenesis. We demonstrate in isolated mitochondria that pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits ADP-dependent (state 3) mitochondrial respiration. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is not due to reduction in the activities of electron transport chain complexes, mitochondrial ATP synthase, or the adenine nucleotide translocase. We show that pathologic-length PolyQ protein increases the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria. Impairment of state 3 mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is reversed by addition of the antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine or cytochrome c. We propose a model in which pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits mitochondrial function by inducing oxidative stress.

  5. Denitrifying community in coastal sediments performs aerobic and anaerobic respiration simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Hannah K; Ahmerkamp, Soeren; Lavik, Gaute; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Graf, Jon; Klatt, Judith M; Holtappels, Moritz; Walpersdorf, Eva; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2017-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) input to the coastal oceans has increased considerably because of anthropogenic activities, however, concurrent increases have not occurred in open oceans. It has been suggested that benthic denitrification in sandy coastal sediments is a sink for this N. Sandy sediments are dynamic permeable environments, where electron acceptor and donor concentrations fluctuate over short temporal and spatial scales. The response of denitrifiers to these fluctuations are largely unknown, although previous observations suggest they may denitrify under aerobic conditions. We examined the response of benthic denitrification to fluctuating oxygen concentrations, finding that denitrification not only occurred at high O2 concentrations but was stimulated by frequent switches between oxic and anoxic conditions. Throughout a tidal cycle, in situtranscription of genes for aerobic respiration and denitrification were positively correlated within diverse bacterial classes, regardless of O2 concentrations, indicating that denitrification gene transcription is not strongly regulated by O2 in sandy sediments. This allows microbes to respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions, but also means that denitrification is utilized as an auxiliary respiration under aerobic conditions when imbalances occur in electron donor and acceptor supply. Aerobic denitrification therefore contributes significantly to N-loss in permeable sediments making the process an important sink for anthropogenic N-inputs.

  6. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of As(V) Respiration / As Resistance Bacteria From Arsenic-Contaminated Groundwater in Blackfoot Disease Region in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C.; Hsiao, S.; Liu, C.; Liao, C.; Chang, F.; Liao, V. H.

    2006-12-01

    Arsenic concerns range from local to international. The contamination of groundwater with arsenic is a major concern to public health in many countries. Arsenic problems in groundwater in Taiwan were first recognized during the 1960s and then Taiwan becomes the classic area for the study of Blackfoot disease and a number of other typical health problems including cancers. However, both the biogeochemistry of the groundwater and the mineral sources of arsenic in Taiwan are poorly defined at present. Increasing evidence suggest that the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic is significant dependent on microbial transformations which affect the distribution and the mobility of arsenic species in the environment. Known arsenic transforming bacteria possess diverse mechanisms for either oxidizing As(III) or reducing As(V), including energy generation and detoxification. To date, although a number of phylogenetically diverse As(V)-reducing bacteria have been isolated, studies on molecular basis of As(V) respiration are limited. In this study, the isolation and molecular characterization of relationship between As(V) respiration and As resistance were investigated. Forty-nine strains were isolated in the presence of 10 mM As(V) under anaerobic condition from arsenic-contaminated groundwater in Blackfoot disease region in Taiwan. ArrA and ArsR were used as marker genes for As(V) respiration and As resistance, respectively, by means of PCR. Of these isolated strains, one designed as L6510 was selected for further investigation because it appears to contain both ArrA and ArsR genes. Moreover, L6510 was able to grow under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Resistance tests showed that L6510 was able to resist the high concentrations of As(V) and As(III) when grown in LB medium. Together, L6510 might possess both As(V) respiration and As resistance pathways. Further investigations including As(V) respiration, phylogenetic analysis, growth characteristics, and transposon mutagenesis

  7. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  8. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  9. Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride by Tetrachloroethene and Trichloroethene Respiring Anaerobic Mixed Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickstrom, K. E.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater contaminant with the potential to form a broad range of transformation products. Of the possible biochemical pathways through which CT can be degraded, reductive dehalogenation to less chlorinated compounds and mineralization to carbon dioxide (CO2) appear to be the most frequently utilized pathways by anaerobic organisms. Results will be presented from batch experiments of CT degradation by the Evanite (EV), Victoria Strain (VS) and Point Mugu (PM) anaerobic dechlorinating cultures. The cultures are grown in chemostats and are capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene by halorespiration via reductive dehalogenase enzymes. For the batch CT transformation tests, the cells along with supernatant were harvested from chemostats fed PCE or TCE, but never CT. The batch reactors were initially fed 0.0085 mM CT and an excess of formate (EV and VS) or lactate (PM) as electron donor. Transformation of CT was 100% with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) and undetected products. Multiple additions of CT showed a slowing of pseudo first-order CT transformation rates across all cultures. Batch reactors were then established and fed 0.085 mM CT with an excess of electron donor in order to better quantify the reductive pathway. CT was transformed to CF and dichloromethane (DCM), with trace amounts of chloromethane (CM) detected. Between 60-90% of the mass added to the system was accounted for, showing that the majority of the carbon tetrachloride present is being reductively dehalogenated. Results from batch reactors that were poisoned using sodium azide, and from reactors not provided electron donor will be presented to distinguish between biotic and abiotic reactions. Furthermore, results from reactors prepared with acetylene (a potent, reversible inhibitor of reductive dehalogenases (1)) will be presented as a means of identifying the enzymes involved in the

  10. Proteomic analysis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae biofilms shows shift to anaerobic respiration and changes in nutrient transport and outermembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nancy J; Steichen, Christopher T; Schilling, Birgit; Post, Deborah M B; Niles, Richard K; Bair, Thomas B; Falsetta, Megan L; Apicella, Michael A; Gibson, Bradford W

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of gonorrhea, can form biofilms in vitro and in vivo. In biofilms, the organism is more resistant to antibiotic treatment and can serve as a reservoir for chronic infection. We have used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to compare protein expression in biofilm and planktonic organisms. Two parallel populations of N. gonorrhoeae strain 1291, which is an arginine auxotroph, were grown for 48 h in continuous-flow chambers over glass, one supplemented with (13)C(6)-arginine for planktonic organisms and the other with unlabeled arginine for biofilm growth. The biofilm and planktonic cells were harvested and lysed separately, and fractionated into three sequential protein extracts. Corresponding heavy (H) planktonic and light (L) biofilm protein extracts were mixed and separated by 1D SDS-PAGE gels, and samples were extensively analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Overall, 757 proteins were identified, and 152 unique proteins met a 1.5-fold cutoff threshold for differential expression with p-values <0.05. Comparing biofilm to planktonic organisms, this set included 73 upregulated and 54 downregulated proteins. Nearly a third of the upregulated proteins were involved in energy metabolism, with cell envelope proteins making up the next largest group. Of the downregulated proteins, the largest groups were involved in protein synthesis and energy metabolism. These proteomics results were compared with our previously reported results from transcriptional profiling of gonococcal biofilms using microarrays. Nitrite reductase and cytochrome c peroxidase, key enzymes required for anaerobic growth, were detected as highly upregulated in both the proteomic and transcriptomic datasets. These and other protein expression changes observed in the present study were consistent with a shift to anaerobic respiration in gonococcal biofilms, although changes in membrane proteins not explicitly related

  11. Systematic genomic analysis reveals the complementary aerobic and anaerobic respiration capacities of the human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Thiele, Ines

    2014-01-01

    Because of the specific anatomical and physiological properties of the human intestine, a specific oxygen gradient builds up within this organ that influences the intestinal microbiota. The intestinal microbiome has been intensively studied in recent years, and certain respiratory substrates used by gut inhabiting microbes have been shown to play a crucial role in human health. Unfortunately, a systematic analysis has not been previously performed to determine the respiratory capabilities of human gut microbes (HGM). Here, we analyzed the distribution of aerobic and anaerobic respiratory reductases in 254 HGM genomes. In addition to the annotation of known enzymes, we also predicted a novel microaerobic reductase and novel thiosulfate reductase. Based on this comprehensive assessment of respiratory reductases in the HGM, we proposed a number of exchange pathways among different bacteria involved in the reduction of various nitrogen oxides. The results significantly expanded our knowledge of HGM metabolism and interactions in bacterial communities.

  12. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  13. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin K; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-12-28

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  14. Genomic analysis of anaerobic respiration in the archaeon Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1: dimethyl sulfoxide and trimethylamine N-oxide as terminal electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jochen A; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2005-03-01

    We have investigated anaerobic respiration of the archaeal model organism Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 by using phenotypic and genetic analysis, bioinformatics, and transcriptome analysis. NRC-1 was found to grow on either dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as the sole terminal electron acceptor, with a doubling time of 1 day. An operon, dmsREABCD, encoding a putative regulatory protein, DmsR, a molybdopterin oxidoreductase of the DMSO reductase family (DmsEABC), and a molecular chaperone (DmsD) was identified by bioinformatics and confirmed as a transcriptional unit by reverse transcriptase PCR analysis. dmsR, dmsA, and dmsD in-frame deletion mutants were individually constructed. Phenotypic analysis demonstrated that dmsR, dmsA, and dmsD are required for anaerobic respiration on DMSO and TMAO. The requirement for dmsR, whose predicted product contains a DNA-binding domain similar to that of the Bat family of activators (COG3413), indicated that it functions as an activator. A cysteine-rich domain was found in the dmsR gene, which may be involved in oxygen sensing. Microarray analysis using a whole-genome 60-mer oligonucleotide array showed that the dms operon is induced during anaerobic respiration. Comparison of dmsR+ and DeltadmsR strains by use of microarrays showed that the induction of the dmsEABCD operon is dependent on a functional dmsR gene, consistent with its action as a transcriptional activator. Our results clearly establish the genes required for anaerobic respiration using DMSO and TMAO in an archaeon for the first time.

  15. Genomic Analysis of Anaerobic Respiration in the Archaeon Halobacterium sp. Strain NRC-1: Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Trimethylamine N-Oxide as Terminal Electron Acceptors†

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jochen A.; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated anaerobic respiration of the archaeal model organism Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 by using phenotypic and genetic analysis, bioinformatics, and transcriptome analysis. NRC-1 was found to grow on either dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as the sole terminal electron acceptor, with a doubling time of 1 day. An operon, dmsREABCD, encoding a putative regulatory protein, DmsR, a molybdopterin oxidoreductase of the DMSO reductase family (DmsEABC), and a molecular chaperone (DmsD) was identified by bioinformatics and confirmed as a transcriptional unit by reverse transcriptase PCR analysis. dmsR, dmsA, and dmsD in-frame deletion mutants were individually constructed. Phenotypic analysis demonstrated that dmsR, dmsA, and dmsD are required for anaerobic respiration on DMSO and TMAO. The requirement for dmsR, whose predicted product contains a DNA-binding domain similar to that of the Bat family of activators (COG3413), indicated that it functions as an activator. A cysteine-rich domain was found in the dmsR gene, which may be involved in oxygen sensing. Microarray analysis using a whole-genome 60-mer oligonucleotide array showed that the dms operon is induced during anaerobic respiration. Comparison of dmsR+ and ΔdmsR strains by use of microarrays showed that the induction of the dmsEABCD operon is dependent on a functional dmsR gene, consistent with its action as a transcriptional activator. Our results clearly establish the genes required for anaerobic respiration using DMSO and TMAO in an archaeon for the first time. PMID:15716436

  16. Cellulase and Sugar Formation by Bacteroides cellulosolvens, a Newly Isolated Cellulolytic Anaerobe

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Christine; Khan, A. W.

    1984-01-01

    A newly isolated mesophilic anaerobe, Bacteroides cellulosolvens, has the ability to produce cellulase and to degrade cellulose to cellobiose and glucose. It does not utilize glucose, and it lacks β-glucosidase activity. This anaerobe appears to degrade cellulose to cellobiose by cellulase action, and the presence of cells appears necessary for the formation of glucose. PMID:16346612

  17. Mechanism and Consequences of Anaerobic Respiration of Cobalt by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Heidi H.; Gilbert, Alan; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria from the genus Shewanella are the most diverse respiratory organisms studied to date and can utilize a variety of metals and metal(loid)s as terminal electron acceptors. These bacteria can potentially be used in bioremediation applications since the redox state of metals often influences both solubility and toxicity. Understanding molecular mechanisms by which metal transformations occur and the consequences of by-products that may be toxic to the organism and thus inhibitory to the overall process is significant to future applications for bioremediation. Here, we examine the ability of Shewanella oneidensis to catalyze the reduction of chelated cobalt. We describe an unexpected ramification of [Co(III)-EDTA]− reduction by S. oneidensis: the formation of a toxic by-product. We found that [Co(II)-EDTA]2−, the product of [Co(III)-EDTA]− respiration, inhibited the growth of S. oneidensis strain MR-1 and that this toxicity was partially abolished by the addition of MgSO4. We demonstrate that [Co(III)-EDTA]− reduction by S. oneidensis requires the Mtr extracellular respiratory pathway and associated pathways required to develop functional Mtr enzymes (the c-type cytochrome maturation pathway) and ensure proper localization (type II secretion). The Mtr pathway is known to be required for a variety of substrates, including some chelated and insoluble metals and organic compounds. Understanding the full substrate range for the Mtr pathway is crucial for developing S. oneidensis strains as a tool for bioremediation. PMID:18836009

  18. What iron minerals contribute to anaerobic respiration in peats differing in maturity on the Arctic Coastal Plain ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masue-Slowey, Y.; Wagner, F. E.; Lipson, D.; Raab, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial Fe-reduction accounts for 30-60% of ecosystem respiration in drained thaw-lake tundra of the Arctic Coastal Plain. Near Barrow, we collected diffraction, Fe-XANES, Moessbauer spectra (RT and liqHe), and wet-chemical data on the Fe mineralogy of DTLB over an age gradient from 0 - 5500 y BP to delineate the important phases involved in microbial cycling of Fe. Soils were cored frozen in early June of 2010/ 2011, wrapped/ transported to CA by overnight express. Cores varying in age since formation were further sectioned, and transferred to an anaerobic hood for size-fractionation based on settling velocity, and subjected to bulk XRD at SSRL. Fe-XANES of both clay-separates and bulk soil were collected at BL 4-1. Subsamples were packed into anaerobic vials and sent for Moessbauer spectroscopy. Present in bulk soils of all ages by XRD were quartz, albite and vermiculite. Additional smectitic minerals, goethite and Fe-phosphates were evident in some basin classes, esp. Young and Medium. XANES confirmed wet-chem results of a highly-reduced state for Fe in bulk soils, and fits of XAFS indicated goethite as 20% of the reactive Fe-pool among basin-age classes. The most abundant Fe-containing minerals in clay fractions (Old and Young soils) were a ferrosmectite, or hornblende-derived mineral. (Fig.1) MB spectra from various depths of an Old Basin (300-2000 yrs BP) - the DTLB class of greatest areal extent -- revealed largely reduced Fe pools (50-60%), with goethite and a Fhd-like component visible (~23%). LHe spectra indicated the presence of goethite as ~ 20% of the MB-visible pool (Fig 2). Two prominent quadrupole doublets had QS=3.24 mm/s; IS = 1.10 mm/s and QS = 2.84; IS=1.05 mm/s, respectively, and upon oxidation, demonstrated divergent kinetics. We attribute the doublet with lower splitting to the ferrosmectite component visible by XAFS. Although previous sequential extractions of Barrow soil minerals suggested a sizeable component of siderites (indeed geochem

  19. Assessment of respiration in isolated plant mitochondria using Clark-type electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Richard P; Millar, A Harvey; Taylor, Nicolas L

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration involves two key gas exchanges, the consumption of oxygen and the release of carbon dioxide. The ability to measure the consumption of oxygen via Clark-type electrodes has been one of the key techniques for advancing our knowledge of mitochondrial function in whole organisms, tissue samples, cells, and isolated subcellular fractions. In plants, oxygen electrode analyses provided the first evidence for some of the unique respiratory properties of plant mitochondria. This chapter briefs the principles of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation, how oxygen consumption measurements can be used to assess the quality of isolated mitochondrial preparations, and how these measurements can answer important questions in plant biochemistry and physiology. Finally, it presents instructions on assembling the oxygen electrode apparatus and how to conduct various assays.

  20. Differences in nitric oxide steady states between arginine, hypoxanthine, uracil auxotrophs (AHU) and non-AHU strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae during anaerobic respiration in the presence of nitrite.

    PubMed

    Barth, Kenneth; Clark, Virginia L

    2008-08-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae can grow by anaerobic respiration using nitrite as an alternative electron acceptor. Under these growth conditions, N. gonorrhoeae produces and degrades nitric oxide (NO), an important host defense molecule. Laboratory strain F62 has been shown to establish and maintain a NO steady-state level that is a function of the nitrite reductase/NO reductase ratio and is independent of cell number. The nitrite reductase activities (122-197 nmol NO2 reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1)) and NO reductase activities (88-155 nmol NO reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1)) in a variety of gonococcal clinical isolates were similar to the specific activities seen in F62 (241 nmol NO2 reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1) and 88 nmol NO reduced x min(-1) x OD600(-1), respectively). In seven gonococcal strains, the NO steady-state levels established in the presence of nitrite were similar to that of F62 (801-2121 nmol x L-1 NO), while six of the strains, identified as arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil auxotrophs (AHU), that cause asymptomatic infection in men had either two- to threefold (373-579 nmol x L-1 NO) or about 100-fold (13-24 nmol x L-1 NO) lower NO steady-state concentrations. All tested strains in the presence of a NO donor, 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazono)bis-ethanimine/NO, quickly lowered and maintained NO levels in the noninflammatory range of NO (<300 nmol x L-1). The generation of a NO steady-state concentration was directly affected by alterations in respiratory control in both F62 and an AHU strain, although differences in membrane function are suspected to be responsible for NO steady-state level differences in AHU strains.

  1. Control of respiration in the isolated central nervous system of the neonatal opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Eugenín, J; Nicholls, J G

    2000-11-15

    Respiration represents an unusual motor activity with respect to its development. As newly born mammals enter the world, their limb movements are not coordinated; time and experience are required for effective performance to be achieved. Yet the rhythm of respiration is of necessity functionally perfected and unfailing at birth. Inspiratory and expiratory motor neurons are already able to fire at appropriate rates, under the command of rhythmically active neurons in the medulla. In this review, we discuss refinements of control present in the newborn opossum, particularly with respect to mechanisms that allow adaptation of respiration to changes in the level of activity or in the outside environment. Our own studies have been aimed at analyzing respiration at the earliest stages, and at establishing the way in which important variables influence inspiration and expiration. To this end, we have used the central nervous system (CNS) of a neonatal opossum, isolated in its entirety and maintained in culture. Although the opossum is unable to walk and highly immature at birth, its respiration is regular and unfailing. The isolated CNS survives, undergoes development, and maintains its neural activity and fine structure in vitro. Moreover, fictive respiration persists for over a day or longer at rates similar to those of the intact pup. The effects of altered pH, of increased temperature, and of drugs known to alter respiratory rhythm in intact animals can be measured directly, by electrical recordings made from medullary neurons or ventral roots. As in a slice, fluids of different composition can be applied focally, through micropipettes to the surface of the ventral medulla, or diffusely to the brainstem, With highly localized application of procaine hydrochloride (2%) to selected areas of the ventral medulla, the respiratory rhythm is reduced or abolished. As in adult mammals, both the rate and the amplitude of respiration simultaneously increase in response to

  2. Strictly anaerobic halophiles isolated from canned Swedish fermented herrings (Surströmming).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kimura, B; Fujii, T

    2000-03-10

    Strictly anaerobic halophiles were isolated from canned Swedish fermented herrings (Surströmming). All isolates were phenotypically uniform with some exceptions and were identified as the genus Haloanaerobium and assigned to either Haloanaerobium praevalens or Haloanaerobiuim alcaliphilum. A comparative analysis of 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the representative strain S-8 of the isolates was identical to that of Haloanaerobium praevalens DSM 2228T. Furthermore, this strain exhibited high levels (> 80%) of DNA-DNA homology with Haloanaerobium praevalens DSM 2228T. This is a novel report of halophilic anaerobes isolated from a food product. Such anaerobes may contribute to the intense flavor and the swollen can characteristics of Swedish fermented herring.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria in Ontario, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Marchand-Austin, Alex; Rawte, Prasad; Toye, Baldwin; Jamieson, Frances B; Farrell, David J; Patel, Samir N

    2014-08-01

    The local epidemiology of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in anaerobic bacteria is important in guiding the empiric treatment of infections. However, susceptibility data are very limited on anaerobic organisms, particularly among non-Bacteroides organisms. To determine susceptibility profiles of clinically-significant anaerobic bacteria in Ontario Canada, anaerobic isolates from sterile sites submitted to Public Health Ontario Laboratory (PHOL) for identification and susceptibility testing were included in this study. Using the E-test method, isolates were tested for various antimicrobials including, penicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and metronidazole. The MIC results were interpreted based on guidelines published by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Of 2527 anaerobic isolates submitted to PHOL, 1412 were either from sterile sites or bronchial lavage, and underwent susceptibility testing. Among Bacteroides fragilis, 98.2%, 24.7%, 1.6%, and 1.2% were resistant to penicillin, clindamycin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and metronidazole, respectively. Clostridium perfringens was universally susceptible to penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem, whereas 14.2% of other Clostridium spp. were resistant to penicillin. Among Gram-positive anaerobes, Actinomyces spp., Parvimonas micra and Propionibacterium spp. were universally susceptible to β-lactams. Eggerthella spp., Collinsella spp., and Eubacterium spp. showed variable resistance to penicillin. Among Gram-negative anaerobes, Fusobacterium spp., Prevotella spp., and Veillonella spp. showed high resistance to penicillin but were universally susceptible to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. The detection of metronidazole resistant B. fragilis is concerning as occurrence of these isolates is extremely rare. These data highlight the importance of ongoing surveillance to provide clinically relevant information to clinicians for empiric management of

  4. Analysis of MSW full-scale facilities based on anaerobic digestion and/or composting using respiration indices as performance indicators.

    PubMed

    Colón, J; Ponsá, S; Álvarez, C; Vinot, M; Lafuente, F J; Gabriel, D; Sánchez, A

    2017-07-01

    The Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC) forces European States to reduce the amount of biodegradable municipal waste landfilled to 35% of 1995 levels. Mechanical-Biological Treatment (MBT) plants are the main alternative to waste incineration and landfilling. In this work, the waste treatment efficiency of six full-scale MBT facilities has been analysed using respiration indices (Dynamic Respiration Index and Cumulative Oxygen Consumption) to monitor plant performance. MBTs relying on anaerobic digestion plus composting achieved a high grade of stability on final compost (0.24±0.09mgO2g(-1)DMh(-1) and 20±9mgO2g(-1)DM for dynamic respiration and cumulative consumption, respectively). On the contrary, MBTs relying only on composting showed a poor performance (1.3±0.2mgO2g(-1)DMh(-1) and 104±18mgO2g(-1)DM for dynamic respiration and cumulative consumption, respectively). These results highlight the usefulness of respirometric balances to assess the performance of MBT full-scale plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine but not Glutamate Support Depolarization-Induced Increased Respiration in Isolated Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Andersen, Vibe H; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-01-01

    Synaptosomes prepared from various aged and gene modified experimental animals constitute a valuable model system to study pre-synaptic mechanisms. Synaptosomes were isolated from whole brain and the XFe96 extracellular flux analyzer (Seahorse Bioscience) was used to study mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic rate in presence of different substrates. Mitochondrial function was tested by sequentially exposure of the synaptosomes to the ATP synthase inhibitor, oligomycin, the uncoupler FCCP (carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone) and the electron transport chain inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A. The synaptosomes exhibited intense respiratory activity using glucose as substrate. The FCCP-dependent respiration was significantly higher with 10 mM glucose compared to 1 mM glucose. Synaptosomes also readily used pyruvate as substrate, which elevated basal respiration, activity-dependent respiration induced by veratridine and the respiratory response to uncoupling compared to that obtained with glucose as substrate. Also lactate was used as substrate by synaptosomes but in contrast to pyruvate, mitochondrial lactate mediated respiration was comparable to respiration using glucose as substrate. Synaptosomal respiration using glutamate and glutamine as substrates was significantly higher compared to basal respiration, whereas oligomycin-dependent and FCCP-induced respiration was lower compared to the responses obtained in the presence of glucose as substrate. We provide evidence that synaptosomes are able to use besides glucose and pyruvate also the substrates lactate, glutamate and glutamine to support their basal respiration. Veratridine was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate, lactate and glutamine and FCCP was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate and lactate. This was not the case when glutamate was the only energy substrate.

  6. Fermentative characteristics and fibrolytic activities of anaerobic gut fungi isolated from wild and domestic ruminants.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyam S; Kamra, Devki N; Sastry, Vadali R B

    2010-08-01

    Fermentative characteristics and fibrolytic enzyme activities of anaerobic gut fungi from wild (17 isolates) and domestic ruminants (15 isolates) were examined. In a medium containing 0.5% wheat straw and 0.02% cellobiose as energy source, activities of carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase), avicelase, xylanase, acetyl esterase and protease produced by the fungal isolates were investigated. Average activity of CMCase (17.4 vs. 8.25 mIU ml(-1)), acetyl esterase (134 vs. 57 mIU ml(-1)) and protease (4400 vs. 1683 mIU ml(-1)) were significantly higher in isolates from wild ruminants than those from domestic ruminants. Xylanase and avicelase activities were comparable. When compared irrespective of source, fungal isolates having monocentric growth pattern produced more fibrolytic enzymes than isolates having polycentric growth pattern. CMCase, xylanase, avicelase activities were highest in Neocallimastix isolates. Acetyl esterase activity was highest in Piromyces and Neocallimastix isolates. Protease activity was highest in Piromyces isolates followed closely by Neocallimastix isolates. Between isolates from wild and domestic ruminants few differences were observed in pattern of carbohydrate utilisation and end products of fermentation. Inter-strain differences in the end product formation were apparent. All of the isolates produced acetate, lactate and formate; only a few isolates produced succinate. For isolation of superior fibrolytic isolates of anaerobic fungi, greater emphasis should be given to the screening of enzyme activities of isolates of genera Neocallimastix and Piromyces.

  7. Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Wound Isolates of Obligate Anaerobes from Combat Casualties

    PubMed Central

    White, Brian K.; Mende, Katrin; Weintrob, Amy C.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Zera, Wendy C.; Lu, Dan; Bradley, William; Tribble, David R.; Schnaubelt, Elizabeth R.; Murray, Clinton K.

    2015-01-01

    Data from recent conflicts related to war wounds and obligate anaerobes are limited. We define the epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of obligate anaerobes from Iraq and Afghanistan casualties (6/2009–12/2013), as well as their association with clinical outcomes. Susceptibility against eleven antibiotics (7 classes) was tested. Overall, 59 patients had 119 obligate anaerobes identified (83 were first isolates). Obligate anaerobes were isolated 7–13 days post-injury, primarily from lower extremity wounds (43%), and were largely Bacteroides spp. (42%) and Clostridium spp. (19%). Patients with pelvic wounds were more likely to have Bacteroides spp. and concomitant resistant gram-negative aerobes. Seventy-three percent of isolates were resistant to ≥1 antimicrobials. Bacteroides spp. demonstrated the most resistance (16% of first isolates). Patients with resistant isolates had similar outcomes to those with susceptible strains. Serial recovery of isolates occurred in 15% of patients and was significantly associated with isolation of Bacteroides spp., along with resistant gram-negative aerobes. PMID:26607420

  8. Engineering a synthetic anaerobic respiration for reduction of xylose to xylitol using NADH output of glucose catabolism by Escherichia coli AI21.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Andrew; Garza, Erin; Manow, Ryan; Wang, Jinhua; Gao, Yuanyuan; Grayburn, Scott; Zhou, Shengde

    2016-04-16

    Anaerobic rather than aerobic fermentation is preferred for conversion of biomass derived sugars to high value redox-neutral and reduced commodities. This will likely result in a higher yield of substrate to product conversion and decrease production cost since substrate often accounts for a significant portion of the overall cost. To this goal, metabolic pathway engineering has been used to optimize substrate carbon flow to target products. This approach works well for the production of redox neutral products such as lactic acid from redox neutral sugars using the reducing power NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced) generated from glycolysis (2 NADH per glucose equivalent). Nevertheless, greater than two NADH per glucose catabolized is needed for the production of reduced products (such as xylitol) from redox neutral sugars by anaerobic fermentation. The Escherichia coli strain AI05 (ΔfrdBC ΔldhA ΔackA Δ(focA-pflB) ΔadhE ΔptsG ΔpdhR::pflBp 6-(aceEF-lpd)), previously engineered for reduction of xylose to xylitol using reducing power (NADH equivalent) of glucose catabolism, was further engineered by 1) deleting xylAB operon (encoding for xylose isomerase and xylulokinase) to prevent xylose from entering the pentose phosphate pathway; 2) anaerobically expressing the sdhCDAB-sucABCD operon (encoding for succinate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase) to enable an anaerobically functional tricarboxcylic acid cycle with a theoretical 10 NAD(P)H equivalent per glucose catabolized. These reducing equivalents can be oxidized by synthetic respiration via xylose reduction, producing xylitol. The resulting strain, AI21 (pAI02), achieved a 96 % xylose to xylitol conversion, with a yield of 6 xylitol per glucose catabolized (molar yield of xylitol per glucose consumed (YRPG) = 6). This represents a 33 % improvement in xylose to xylitol conversion, and a 63 % increase in xylitol yield per glucose catabolized over

  9. Isolation, Culture Characteristics, and Identification of Anaerobic Bacteria from the Chicken Cecum

    PubMed Central

    Salanitro, J. P.; Fairchilds, I. G.; Zgornicki, Y. D.

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the anaerobic cecal microflora of the 5-week-old chicken were made to determine a suitable roll-tube medium for enumeration and isolation of the bacterial population, to determine effects of medium components on recovery of total anaerobes, and to identify the predominant bacterial groups. The total number of microorganisms in cecal contents determined by direct microscope cell counts varied (among six samples) from 3.83 × 1010 to 7.64 × 1010 per g. Comparison of different nonselective media indicated that 60% of the direct microscope count could be recovered with a rumen fluid medium (M98-5) and 45% with medium 10. Deletion of rumen fluid from M98-5 reduced the total anaerobic count by half. Colony counts were lower if chicken cecal extract was substituted for rumen fluid in M98-5. Supplementing medium 10 with liver, chicken fecal, or cecal extracts improved recovery of anaerobes slightly. Prereduced blood agar media were inferior to M98-5. At least 11 groups of bacteria were isolated from high dilutions (10-9) of cecal material. Data on morphology and physiological and fermentation characteristics of 90% of the 298 isolated strains indicated that these bacteria represented species of anaerobic gram-negative cocci, facultatively anaerobic cocci and streptococci, Peptostreptococcus, Propionibacterium, Eubacterium, Bacteroides, and Clostridium. The growth of many of these strains was enhanced by rumen fluid, yeast extract, and cecal extract additions to basal media. These studies indicate that some of the more numerous anaerobic bacteria present in chicken cecal digesta can be isolated and cultured when media and methods that have been developed for ruminal bacteria are employed. PMID:4596749

  10. APPLICATIONS OF THE PLASTIC FILM TECHNIQUE IN THE ISOLATION AND STUDY OF ANAEROBIC BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Shank, J. L.

    1963-01-01

    Shank, J. L. (Swift & Co., Chicago, Ill.). Applications of the plastic film technique in the isolation and study of anaerobic bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 86:95–100. 1963.—The use of plastic films as oxygen barriers on the surface of agar pour plates, in conjunction with thioglycolate and other selective and differential agents, allows the primary isolation and enumeration of clostridia and other anaerobes. Quantitative studies reveal little if any inhibition of the test organisms under these conditions, and toxin production, where it occurs, is shown to be virtually unimpaired. Images PMID:14051828

  11. Anaerobic respiration and antioxidant responses of Corythucha ciliata (Say) adults to heat-induced oxidative stress under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Wei, He-Ping; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    High temperature often induces oxidative stress and antioxidant response in insects. This phenomenon has been well documented under controlled laboratory conditions, but whether it happens under fluctuating field conditions is largely unknown. In this study, we used an invasive lace bug (Corythucha ciliata) as a model species to compare the effects of controlled thermal treatments (2 h at 33-43 °C with 2 °C intervals in the laboratory) and naturally fluctuating thermal conditions (08:00-14:00 at 2-h intervals (29.7-37.2 °C) on a hot summer day in a field in Shanghai, China) on lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) was the marker) and anaerobic respiration (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was the marker), as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), and glutathione reductase (GR). The results show that MDA concentration increased significantly in response to heat stresses with similar trend in the laboratory and field. LDH activities did not significantly vary across temperatures in the laboratory-exposed individuals, but they significantly increased by rising temperature in the field. The activities or concentrations of SOD, CAT, GSH, and GR all significantly increased with increasing temperature in the two populations. These findings indicate that high temperature induces oxidative stress, resulting in high anaerobic respiration and antioxidant defenses in C. ciliata under both the laboratory and field conditions, which likely provide a defense mechanism against oxidative damage due to the accumulation of ROS.

  12. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways, alternative respiration and enterotoxin genes in anaerobic growth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, M; Abee, T

    2009-09-01

    To assess genes specifically activated during anaerobic growth that are involved in metabolism and pathogenesis of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Growth under anaerobic conditions in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth revealed a reduced growth rate and lower yield as compared to growth under aerobic conditions. Subsequently, comparative transcriptome analysis showed specific genes induced under anaerobic conditions. These included novel genes identified for anaerobic growth of B. cereus, encoding metabolic pathways, such as the arginine deiminase pathway (ArcABDC), formate dehydrogenase (FdhF) and pyruvate formate lyase (Pfl), and alternative respiratory proteins, such as arsenate reductases. Notably, haemolytic enzyme encoding genes were induced during anaerobic growth, and enterotoxin genes were induced in high cell density transition and stationary phases of aerobic cultures. These data point to induction of stress adaptation and pathogenicity factors and rearrangements of expression of metabolic pathways in response to oxygen limitations in B. cereus. The reported changes in gene expression show that the foodborne pathogen B. cereus can adjust to anaerobic conditions, such as encountered in the human GI-tract.

  14. Peptoniphilus methioninivorax sp. nov., A Novel Gram-Positive Anaerobic Coccus Isolated from Retail Ground Beef

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Strain NRRL B-23883 was isolated from retail ground beef as part of a study on the genetic diversity of Clostridium perfringens. The strain was found to be a strictly anaerobic, gram-type positive coccus that was able to utilize peptone as a sole carbon source. Subsequent to sequencing the 16S rib...

  15. Isolation, characterization, and ecology of sulfur-respiring crenarchaea inhabiting acid-sulfate-chloride-containing geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Jackson, Robert A; Encarnacion, Gem; Zahn, James A; Beard, Trevor; Leavitt, William D; Pi, Yundan; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Pearson, Ann; Geesey, Gill G

    2007-10-01

    Elemental sulfur (S(0)) is associated with many geochemically diverse hot springs, yet little is known about the phylogeny, physiology, and ecology of the organisms involved in its cycling. Here we report the isolation, characterization, and ecology of two novel, S(0)-reducing Crenarchaea from an acid geothermal spring referred to as Dragon Spring. Isolate 18U65 grows optimally at 70 to 72 degrees C and at pH 2.5 to 3.0, while isolate 18D70 grows optimally at 81 degrees C and pH 3.0. Both isolates are chemoorganotrophs, dependent on complex peptide-containing carbon sources, S(0), and anaerobic conditions for respiration-dependent growth. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) containing four to six cyclopentyl rings were present in the lipid fraction of isolates 18U65 and 18D70. Physiological characterization suggests that the isolates are adapted to the physicochemical conditions of Dragon Spring and can utilize the natural organic matter in the spring as a carbon and energy source. Quantitative PCR analysis of 16S rRNA genes associated with the S(0) flocs recovered from several acid geothermal springs using isolate-specific primers indicates that these two populations together represent 17 to 37% of the floc-associated DNA. The physiological characteristics of isolates 18U65 and 18D70 are consistent with their potential widespread distribution and putative role in the cycling of sulfur in acid geothermal springs throughout the Yellowstone National Park geothermal complex. Based on phenotypic and genetic characterization, the designations Caldisphaera draconis sp. nov. and Acidilobus sulfurireducens sp. nov. are proposed for isolates 18U65 and 18D70, respectively.

  16. Isolation, Characterization, and Ecology of Sulfur-Respiring Crenarchaea Inhabiting Acid-Sulfate-Chloride-Containing Geothermal Springs in Yellowstone National Park▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Eric S.; Jackson, Robert A.; Encarnacion, Gem; Zahn, James A.; Beard, Trevor; Leavitt, William D.; Pi, Yundan; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Pearson, Ann; Geesey, Gill G.

    2007-01-01

    Elemental sulfur (S0) is associated with many geochemically diverse hot springs, yet little is known about the phylogeny, physiology, and ecology of the organisms involved in its cycling. Here we report the isolation, characterization, and ecology of two novel, S0-reducing Crenarchaea from an acid geothermal spring referred to as Dragon Spring. Isolate 18U65 grows optimally at 70 to 72°C and at pH 2.5 to 3.0, while isolate 18D70 grows optimally at 81°C and pH 3.0. Both isolates are chemoorganotrophs, dependent on complex peptide-containing carbon sources, S0, and anaerobic conditions for respiration-dependent growth. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) containing four to six cyclopentyl rings were present in the lipid fraction of isolates 18U65 and 18D70. Physiological characterization suggests that the isolates are adapted to the physicochemical conditions of Dragon Spring and can utilize the natural organic matter in the spring as a carbon and energy source. Quantitative PCR analysis of 16S rRNA genes associated with the S0 flocs recovered from several acid geothermal springs using isolate-specific primers indicates that these two populations together represent 17 to 37% of the floc-associated DNA. The physiological characteristics of isolates 18U65 and 18D70 are consistent with their potential widespread distribution and putative role in the cycling of sulfur in acid geothermal springs throughout the Yellowstone National Park geothermal complex. Based on phenotypic and genetic characterization, the designations Caldisphaera draconis sp. nov. and Acidilobus sulfurireducens sp. nov. are proposed for isolates 18U65 and 18D70, respectively. PMID:17720836

  17. Isolation and Characterization of an Enterobacter cloacae Strain That Reduces Hexavalent Chromium under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pi-Chao; Mori, Tsukasa; Komori, Kohya; Sasatsu, Masanori; Toda, Kiyoshi; Ohtake, Hisao

    1989-01-01

    An Enterobacter cloacae strain (HO1) capable of reducing hexavalent chromium (chromate) was isolated from activated sludge. This bacterium was resistant to chromate under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Only the anaerobic culture of the E. cloacae isolate showed chromate reduction. In the anaerobic culture, yellow turned white with chromate and the turbidity increased as the reduction proceeded, suggesting that insoluble chromium hydroxide was formed. E. cloacae is likely to utilize toxic chromate as an electron acceptor anaerobically because (i) the anaerobic growth of E. cloacae HO1 accompanied the decrease of toxic chromate in culture medium, (ii) the chromate-reducing activity was rapidly inhibited by oxygen, and (iii) the reduction occurred more rapidly in glycerol- or acetate-grown cells than in glucose-grown cells. The chromate reduction in E. cloacae HO1 was observed at pH 6.0 to 8.5 (optimum pH, 7.0) and at 10 to 40°C (optimum, 30°C). PMID:16347962

  18. Comparative genomic analysis of regulation of anaerobic respiration in ten genomes from three families of gamma-proteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Gerasimova, Anna V; Mironov, Andrey A; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2007-01-01

    Background Gamma-proteobacteria, such as Escherichia coli, can use a variety of respiratory substrates employing numerous aerobic and anaerobic respiratory systems controlled by multiple transcription regulators. Thus, in E. coli, global control of respiration is mediated by four transcription factors, Fnr, ArcA, NarL and NarP. However, in other Gamma-proteobacteria the composition of global respiration regulators may be different. Results In this study we applied a comparative genomic approach to the analysis of three global regulatory systems, Fnr, ArcA and NarP. These systems were studied in available genomes containing these three regulators, but lacking NarL. So, we considered several representatives of Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae and Yersinia spp. As a result, we identified new regulon members, functioning in respiration, central metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, citrate cicle, metabolism of pyruvate and lactate), metabolism of carbohydrates and fatty acids, transcriptional regulation and transport, in particular: the ATP synthase operon atpIBEFHAGCD, Na+-exporting NADH dehydrogenase operon nqrABCDEF, the D-amino acids dehydrogenase operon dadAX. Using an extension of the comparative technique, we demonstrated taxon-specific changes in regulatory interactions and predicted taxon-specific regulatory cascades. Conclusion A comparative genomic technique was applied to the analysis of global regulation of respiration in ten gamma-proteobacterial genomes. Three structurally different but functionally related regulatory systems were described. A correlation between the regulon size and the position of a transcription factor in regulatory cascades was observed: regulators with larger regulons tend to occupy top positions in the cascades. On the other hand, there is no obvious link to differences in the species' lifestyles and metabolic capabilities. PMID:17313674

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of regulation of anaerobic respiration in ten genomes from three families of gamma-proteobacteria (Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae).

    PubMed

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Gerasimova, Anna V; Mironov, Andrey A; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2007-02-21

    Gamma-proteobacteria, such as Escherichia coli, can use a variety of respiratory substrates employing numerous aerobic and anaerobic respiratory systems controlled by multiple transcription regulators. Thus, in E. coli, global control of respiration is mediated by four transcription factors, Fnr, ArcA, NarL and NarP. However, in other Gamma-proteobacteria the composition of global respiration regulators may be different. In this study we applied a comparative genomic approach to the analysis of three global regulatory systems, Fnr, ArcA and NarP. These systems were studied in available genomes containing these three regulators, but lacking NarL. So, we considered several representatives of Pasteurellaceae, Vibrionaceae and Yersinia spp. As a result, we identified new regulon members, functioning in respiration, central metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, citrate cicle, metabolism of pyruvate and lactate), metabolism of carbohydrates and fatty acids, transcriptional regulation and transport, in particular: the ATP synthase operon atpIBEFHAGCD, Na+-exporting NADH dehydrogenase operon nqrABCDEF, the D-amino acids dehydrogenase operon dadAX. Using an extension of the comparative technique, we demonstrated taxon-specific changes in regulatory interactions and predicted taxon-specific regulatory cascades. A comparative genomic technique was applied to the analysis of global regulation of respiration in ten gamma-proteobacterial genomes. Three structurally different but functionally related regulatory systems were described. A correlation between the regulon size and the position of a transcription factor in regulatory cascades was observed: regulators with larger regulons tend to occupy top positions in the cascades. On the other hand, there is no obvious link to differences in the species' lifestyles and metabolic capabilities.

  20. Anaerobic facultative bacteria isolated from the gut of rabbits fed different diets.

    PubMed

    Canganella, F; Zirletta, G; Gualterio, L; Massa, S; Trovatelli, L D

    1992-11-01

    Anaerobic facultative bacteria colonizing the intestinal tract of conventional rabbits fed three different diets (standard pellet, hay and pellet/hay mixture) were enumerated in brain heart infusion agar. Colony counts recovered from homogenized samples of small intestine, caecum and rectum differed with reference to the diet given. Among anaerobic groups, identified from rabbit fed pellet/hay mixture, Enterococci (E. faecalis, E. avium, E. faecium and E. durans) represented the predominant flora. Enterobacters (E. cloacae and E. aerogenes) accounted for about 10 to 25% of the bacteria in the rectum and colon respectively, whereas Staphylococci (S. intermedius, S. epidermidis and S. lentus) represented 11% of the bacteria isolated from colon.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of a Novel Facultative Anaerobic Filamentous Fungus from Japanese Rice Field Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tonouchi, Akio

    2009-01-01

    A novel filamentous fungus strain designated RB-1 was isolated into pure culture from Japanese rice field soil through an anaerobic role tube technique. The strain is a mitosporic fungus that grows in both aerobic and strict anaerobic conditions using various mono-, di-, tri-, and polysaccharides with acetate and ethanol productions. The amount of acetate produced was higher than that of ethanol in both aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The characteristic verrucose or punctuate conidia of RB-1 closely resembled those of some strains of the genus Thermomyces, a thermophilic or mesophilic anamorphic ascomycete. However, based on phylogenetic analysis with the small subunit (SSU) and large subunit (LSU) rDNA sequences, RB-1 was characterized as a member of the class Lecanoromycetes of the phylum Ascomycota. Currently, RB-1 is designated as an anamorphic ascomycete and is phylogenetically considered an incertae sedis within the class Lecanoromycetes. PMID:20148171

  2. Occurrence and molecular characterization of cultivable mesophilic and thermophilic obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from paper mills.

    PubMed

    Suihko, Maija-Liisa; Partanen, Laila; Mattila-Sandholm, Tiina; Raaska, Laura

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the cultivable obligate anaerobic bacterial population in paper mill environments. A total of 177 anaerobically grown bacterial isolates were screened for aerotolerance, from which 67 obligate anaerobes were characterized by automated ribotyping and 41 were further identified by partial 16S rDNA sequencing. The mesophilic isolates indicated 11 different taxa (species) within the genus Clostridium and the thermophilic isolates four taxa within the genus Thermoanaerobacterium and one within Thermoanaerobacter (both formerly Clostridium). The most widespread mesophilic bacterium was closely related to C. magnum and occurred in three of four mills. One mill was contaminated with a novel mesophilic bacterium most closely related to C. thiosulfatireducens. The most common thermophile was T. thermosaccharolyticum, occurring in all four mills. The genetic relationships of the mill isolates to described species indicated that most of them are potential members of new species. On the basis of identical ribotypes clay could be identified to be the contamination source of thermophilic bacteria. Automated ribotyping can be a useful tool for the identification of clostridia as soon as comprehensive identification libraries are available.

  3. Isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants with altered mitochondrial respiration by chlorophyll fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Horrion, Bastien; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-12-10

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism for studying energetic metabolism. Most mitochondrial respiratory-deficient mutants characterized to date have been isolated on the basis of their reduced ability to grow in heterotrophic conditions. Mitochondrial deficiencies are usually partly compensated by adjustment of photosynthetic activity and more particularly by transition to state 2. In this work, we explored the opportunity to select mutants impaired in respiration and/or altered in dark metabolism by measuring maximum photosynthetic efficiency by chlorophyll fluorescence analyses (FV/FM). Out of about 2900 hygromycin-resistant insertional mutants generated from wild type or from a mutant strain deficient in state transitions (stt7 strain), 22 were found to grow slowly in heterotrophic conditions and 8 of them also showed a lower FV/FM value. Several disrupted coding sequences were identified, including genes coding for three different subunits of respiratory-chain complex I (NUO9, NUOA9, NUOP4) or for isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Overall, the comparison of respiratory mutants obtained in wild-type or stt7 genetic backgrounds indicated that the FV/FM value can be used to isolate mutants severely impaired in dark metabolism.

  4. Isolation of Strain MLTeJB From Mono Lake, California, a Dissimilatory Tellurite Respiring Prokaryote.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baesman, S. M.; Oremland, R. S.

    2007-12-01

    Previous investigations on the dissimilatory reduction of Te-oxyanions have been constrained by the inhibtory effects of circa 1.0 mM concentrations of either Te(IV) or Te(VI) upon growth of established cultures. Therefore we initiated new enrichments using anoxic Mono Lake mud supplemented with 10 mM Te(IV) as the electron acceptor and lactate as the electron donor. Sediments turned black with time owing to the formation of Te(0), microscopic examination of which confirmed the presence of both shards, rosettes, and nanospheres of Te(0). The enrichment was subcultured several times in liquid medium and then streaked onto solid medium and incubated in an anaerobic chamber. Isolated black colonies were re-streaked several times, and thence inoculated into liquid medium. However, growth in liquid medium required the presence of a small amount of solid phase, which included a plug of either agar, phytagel, or glass beads. Growth resulted in oxidation of lactate to acetate, formate and CO2 with the reduction of Te(IV) to Te(0). The isolate, strain MLTeJB was a non-motile rod that stained Gram positive, and formed copious exogenous deposits of Te(0) nano-shards and rosettes. Further details on the physiology of this organism will be presented.

  5. Isolation of a tannic acid-degrading Streptococcus sp. from an anaerobic shea cake digester.

    PubMed

    Nitiema, L W; Dianou, D; Simpore, J; Karou, S D; Savadogo, P W; Traore, A S

    2010-01-01

    An anaerobic digester fed with shea cake rich in tannins and phenolic compounds rich-shea cake and previously inoculated with anaerobic sludge from the pit of a slaughterhouse, enabled six months acclimatization of the bacteria to aromatic compounds. Afterwards, digester waste water samples were subject to successive culture on media with 1 g L(-1) tannic acid allowing the isolation of a bacterial strain coded AB. Strain AB was facultatively anaerobic, mesophilic, non-motile, non-sporulating, catalase and oxidase negative bacterium, namely strain AB, was isolated from an anaerobic digester fed with shea cake rich in tannins and phenolic compounds, after inoculation with anaerobic sludge from the pit of a slaughterhouse and enrichment on tannic acid. The coccoid cells occurred in pair, short or long chains and stained Gram-positive. Strain AB fermented a wide range of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, galactose, raffinose, arabinose, sucrose, maltose, lactose, starch and cellulose. Optimum growth occurred with glucose and tannic acid at 37 degrees C and pH 8. The pH, temperature and salt concentration for growth ranged from 5 to 9, 20 to 45 degrees C and 0 to 15 g L(-1), respectively. Strain AB converted tannic acid to gallic acid. These features were similar to those of the Streptococcus genus. The determination of tannic acid hydrolysis end products, ability to utilize various organic acids, alcohols and peptides, GC% of the DNA, the sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization will permit to confirm this affiliation and to determine the species.

  6. In vitro activities of 10 antimicrobial agents against bacterial vaginosis-associated anaerobic isolates from pregnant Japanese and Thai women.

    PubMed Central

    Puapermpoonsiri, S; Watanabe, K; Kato, N; Ueno, K

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activities of 10 antimicrobial agents against 159 bacterial vaginosis-associated anaerobic isolates from pregnant Japanese and Thai women were determined. Clindamycin, imipenem, cefmetazole, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and metronidazole were highly active against all anaerobic isolates except Prevotella bivia and Mobiluncus species, which were resistant to amoxicillin and metronidazole, respectively. Cefotiam, ceftazidime, and ofloxacin were variably effective, while cefaclor was the least effective agent. PMID:9333068

  7. In vitro activities of 10 antimicrobial agents against bacterial vaginosis-associated anaerobic isolates from pregnant Japanese and Thai women.

    PubMed

    Puapermpoonsiri, S; Watanabe, K; Kato, N; Ueno, K

    1997-10-01

    The in vitro activities of 10 antimicrobial agents against 159 bacterial vaginosis-associated anaerobic isolates from pregnant Japanese and Thai women were determined. Clindamycin, imipenem, cefmetazole, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and metronidazole were highly active against all anaerobic isolates except Prevotella bivia and Mobiluncus species, which were resistant to amoxicillin and metronidazole, respectively. Cefotiam, ceftazidime, and ofloxacin were variably effective, while cefaclor was the least effective agent.

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria play a significant role in many endogenous polymicrobial infections. Since antimicrobial resistance among anaerobes has increased worldwide, it is useful to provide local susceptibility data to guide empirical therapy. The present study reports recent data on the susceptibility of clinically relevant anaerobes in a University Hospital Centre (UHC) Split, Croatia. A total of 63 Gram-negative and 59 Gram-positive anaerobic clinical isolates from various body sites were consecutively collected from January to December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using standardized methods and interpreted using EUCAST criteria. Patient's clinical and demographic data were recorded by clinical microbiologist. Among 35 isolates of Bacteroides spp., 97.1% were resistant to penicillin (PCN), 5.7% to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), 8.6% to piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP), 29.0% to clindamycin (CLI) and 2.9% to metronidazole (MZ). Percentages of susceptible strains to imipenem (IPM), meropenem (MEM) and ertapenem (ETP) were 94.3. Resistance of other Gram-negative bacilli was 76.0% to PCN, 8.0% to AMC, 12.0% to TZP, 28.0% to CLI and 8% to MZ. All other Gram-negative strains were fully susceptible to MEM and ETP, while 96.0% were susceptible to IPM. Clostridium spp. isolates were 100% susceptible to all tested antibiotics except to CLI (two of four tested isolates were resistant). Propionibacterium spp. showed resistance to CLI in 4.3%, while 100% were resistant to MZ. Among other Gram-positive bacilli, 18.2% were resistant to PCN, 9.1% to CLI and 54.5% to MZ, while 81.8% of isolates were susceptible to carbapenems. Gram-positive cocci were 100% susceptible to all tested antimicrobials except to MZ, where 28.6% of resistant strains were recorded. Abdomen was the most common source of isolates (82.5%). The most prevalent types of infection were abscess (22.1%), sepsis (14.8%), appendicitis (13.9%) and peritonitis (6.6%). Twenty four patients (19

  9. Molecular and Stable Isotope Investigation of Nitrite Respiring Bacterial Communities Capable of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) and Denitrifying Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (DAMO) in Nitrogen Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Hirsch, M.; Taylor, J.; Smith, R. L.; Repert, D.; Tobias, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) and denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) are two recently discovered N2 production pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. ANAMMOX has been relatively well investigated in various aquatic ecosystems, while DAMO has been examined only in freshwater wetlands. However, neither ANAMMOX nor DAMO have been studied in groundwater ecosystems as microbial N removal processes where they could compliment or compete with denitrification to remediate N contaminated aquifers. Thus, we conducted molecular and stable isotope analyses to detect and measure ANAMMOX and DAMO in a nitrogen contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The study site has a plume of nitrogen contaminated groundwater as a result of continuous discharge of treated wastewater over 60 years. Groundwater was collected from multiport sampling devices installed at two sites, near the waste-water disposal location (A) and more than 3 km down gradient (B) along the contamination plume. Biomass was collected from water samples for DNA extraction and 15N tracer incubation experiments. PCR with specific 16S rRNA gene primers detected the presence of ANAMMOX and DAMO bacteria at both sites. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the ANAMMOX community at site A was most associated with Kuenenia spp. while site B had a community more closely related to Brocadia spp. The DAMO communities at the two sites were quite different based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The communities at site B are closely associated with Candidatus “Methylomirabilis oxyfera”, which is the first enriched DAMO culture. Most of the 16S rRNA sequences detected in site A were related to those found in other DAMO enrichment cultures established from a eutrophic ditch sediment. In order to determine active members of ANAMMOX communities, the transcriptional expression of hydrazine oxidase (hzo) and hydrazine hydrolase (hh) genes was examined at both sites. In addition, 15N tracer

  10. Anaerobic and aerobic degradation of pyridine by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, S K; Lee, G M; Yoon, J H; Park, Y H; Bae, H S; Lee, S T

    1997-01-01

    New denitrifying bacteria that could degrade pyridine under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were isolated from industrial wastewater. The successful enrichment and isolation of these strains required selenite as a trace element. These isolates appeared to be closely related to Azoarcus species according to the results of 16S rRNA sequence analysis. An isolated strain, pF6, metabolized pyridine through the same pathway under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Since pyridine induced NAD-linked glutarate-dialdehyde dehydrogenase and isocitratase activities, it is likely that the mechanism of pyridine degradation in strain pF6 involves N-C-2 ring cleavage. Strain pF6 could degrade pyridine in the presence of nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide as electron acceptors. In a batch culture with 6 mM nitrate, degradation of pyridine and denitrification were not sensitively affected by the redox potential, which gradually decreased from 150 to -200 mV. In a batch culture with the nitrate concentration higher than 6 mM, nitrite transiently accumulated during denitrification significantly inhibited cell growth and pyridine degradation. Growth yield on pyridine decreased slightly under denitrifying conditions from that under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, when the pyridine concentration used was above 12 mM, the specific growth rate under denitrifying conditions was higher than that under aerobic conditions. Considering these characteristics, a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium, strain pF6, has advantages over strictly aerobic bacteria in field applications. PMID:9212408

  11. The tetraheme cytochrome CymA is required for anaerobic respiration with dimethyl sulfoxide and nitrite in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Schwalb, Carsten; Chapman, Stephen K; Reid, Graeme A

    2003-08-12

    The tetraheme c-type cytochrome, CymA, from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has previously been shown to be required for respiration with Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate [Myers, C. R., and Myers, J. M. (1997) J. Bacteriol. 179, 1143-1152]. It is located in the cytoplasmic membrane where the bulk of the protein is exposed to the periplasm, enabling it to transfer electrons to a series of redox partners. We have expressed and purified a soluble derivative of CymA (CymA(sol)) that lacks the N-terminal membrane anchor. We show here, by direct measurements of electron transfer between the purified proteins, that CymA(sol) efficiently reduces S. oneidensis fumarate reductase. This indicates that no further proteins are required for electron transfer between the quinone pool and fumarate if we assume direct reduction of CymA by quinols. By expressing CymA(sol) in a mutant lacking CymA, we have shown that this soluble form of the protein can complement the defect in fumarate respiration. We also demonstrate that CymA is essential for growth with DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) and for reduction of nitrite, implicating CymA in at least five different electron transfer pathways in Shewanella.

  12. Shewanella putrefaciens produces an Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligand during anaerobic respiration on insoluble Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S; Carey, Elizabeth; Burns, Justin L; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of Fe(III) reduction was investigated using voltammetric techniques in anaerobic incubations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 supplemented with Fe(III) citrate or a suite of Fe(III) oxides as terminal electron acceptor. Results indicate that organic complexes of Fe(III) are produced during the reduction of Fe(III) at rates that correlate with the reactivity of the Fe(III) phase and bacterial cell density. Anaerobic Fe(III) solubilization activity is detected with either Fe(III) oxides or Fe(III) citrate, suggesting that the organic ligand produced is strong enough to destabilize Fe(III) from soluble or solid Fe(III) substrates. Results also demonstrate that Fe(III) oxide dissolution is not controlled by the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the Fe(III) oxides. Instead, the chemical reaction between the endogenous organic ligand is only affected by the number of reactive surface sites available to S. putrefaciens. This report describes the first application of voltammetric techniques to demonstrate production of soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes by any Fe(III)-reducing microorganism and is the first report of a Fe(III)-solubilizing ligand generated by a metal-reducing member of the genus Shewanella.

  13. Anaerobic gut fungi: Advances in isolation, culture, and cellulolytic enzyme discovery for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, Charles H; Solomon, Kevin V; Henske, John K; Theodorou, Michael K; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2014-08-01

    Anaerobic gut fungi are an early branching family of fungi that are commonly found in the digestive tract of ruminants and monogastric herbivores. It is becoming increasingly clear that they are the primary colonizers of ingested plant biomass, and that they significantly contribute to the decomposition of plant biomass into fermentable sugars. As such, anaerobic fungi harbor a rich reservoir of undiscovered cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes that can potentially transform the conversion of lignocellulose into bioenergy products. Despite their unique evolutionary history and cellulolytic activity, few species have been isolated and studied in great detail. As a result, their life cycle, cellular physiology, genetics, and cellulolytic metabolism remain poorly understood compared to aerobic fungi. To help address this limitation, this review briefly summarizes the current body of knowledge pertaining to anaerobic fungal biology, and describes progress made in the isolation, cultivation, molecular characterization, and long-term preservation of these microbes. We also discuss recent cellulase- and cellulosome-discovery efforts from gut fungi, and how these interesting, non-model microbes could be further adapted for biotechnology applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Isolation and partial characterization of bacteria in an anaerobic consortium that mineralizes 3-chlorobenzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, D.R.; Tiedje, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    A methanogenic consortium able to use 3-chlorobenzoic acid as its sole energy and carbon source was enriched from anaerobic sewage sludge. Seven bacteria were isolated from the consortium in mono- or coculture. They included: one dechlorinating bacterium, one benzoate-oxidizing bacterium, two butyrate-oxidizing bacteria, two H/sub 2/-consuming methanogens (methanospirillum hungatei PM-1 and Methanobacterium sp. strain PM-2), and a sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp.). The dechlorinating bacterium was a gram-negative, obligate anaerobe with a unique collar surrounding the cell. A medium containing rumen fluid supported minimal growth; pyruvate was the only substrate found to increase growth. The bacterium had a generation time of 4 to 5 days. 3-Chlorobenzoate was dechlorinated stoichiometrically to benzoate, which accumulated in the medium; the rate of dechlorination was ca. 0.1 pmol bacterium/sup -1/ day/sup -1/. The benzoate-oxidizing bacterium was a gram-negative, obligate anaerobe and could only be grown as a syntroph. Benzoate was the only substrate observed to support growth, and, when grown in coculture with M. hungatei, it was fermented to acetate and CH/sub 4/. One butyrate-oxidizing bacterium was a gram-negative, non-sporeforming, obligate anaerobe; the other was a gram-positive, sporeforming, obligate anaerobe. Both could only be grown as syntrophs. The substrates observed to support growth of both bacteria were butyrate, 2-DL-methylbutyrate, valerate, and caproate; isobutyrate supported growth of only the sporeforming bacterium. Fermentation products were acetate and CH/sub 4/ or acetate, propionate, and CH/sub 4/ when grown in coculture with M. hungatei. A mutualism among at least the dechlorinating, benzoate-oxidizing, and methane-forming members was apparently required for utilization of the 3-chlorobenzoate substrate. 21 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weigel, W A; Demuth, D R; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, M D

    2015-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, WA; Demuth, DR; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, MD

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. PMID:25923132

  17. Biofilm growth kinetics of a monomethylamine producing Alphaproteobacteria strain isolated from an anaerobic reactor.

    PubMed

    Jopia, Paz; Ruiz-Tagle, Nathaly; Villagrán, Marcelo; Sossa, Katherine; Pantoja, Silvio; Rueda, Luis; Urrutia-Briones, Homero

    2010-02-01

    Industrial fishing effluents are characterized by high loads of protein and sulfate that stimulate the activity of proteolytic and sulfate reducing bacteria during anaerobic digestion. Their metabolic products (NH3 and H2S respectively) have a well-known detrimental effect on the activity of methanogens. Since methylamine is a carbon source used by methylaminotrophic methane producing archaea (mMPA) but not by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), enriched mMPA anaerobic biofilms have been developed on ceramics. We propose that methylated amines could be produced in the biofilm by using betaine, a known precursor of methylamine, as a carbon and energy source. We isolated an anaerobic betainotrophic methylaminogenic bacterial strain (bMB) from an anaerobic bioreactor, using betaine as the only carbon and energy source. This strain was identified by a standard biochemical test (API 20NE), cloning, and 16S rDNA sequencing. bMB biofilm structure and biofilm growth kinetic parameters were determined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the Gompertz growth model, respectively. Monomethylamine production was determined by infrared spectroscopy and by high pressure liquid chromatography. The isolated bMB strain was determined as Stappia stellulata (Proteobacteria phylum). It was able to form biofilm on ceramics and its kinetic growth parameters resulted in: maximum biofilm bacterial count (A) of 6.25 x 10(8) UFC/cm(2) and maximum specific growth rate (mu(m)) of 0.0221/h. Production of monomethylamine was about 4.027 atogram/cell/day (at/cell/day) after 15 days of incubation in biofilms. This study confirms the adhesion capacity of this bMB strain on ceramic supports, assuring that monomethylamine production in biofilms could be enriched with mMPA that use monomethylamine. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov., a novel acidotolerant sulfur-respiring bacterium isolated from acidic river sediments.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Anna P; Brienza, Claudio; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2016-03-01

    A novel acidotolerant and moderately thermophilic sulfur-reducing bacterium was isolated from sediments of the Tinto River (Spain), an extremely acidic environment. Strain TR1T stained Gram-negative, and was obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming and motile. Cells were short rods (1.5-2 × 0.5-0.7 μm), appearing singly or in pairs. Strain TR1T was catalase-negative and slightly oxidase-positive. Urease activity and indole formation were absent, but gelatin hydrolysis was present. Growth was observed at 20-52 °C with an optimum close to 50 °C, and a pH range of 3-7 with optimum between pH 6 and 6.5. Yeast extract was essential for growth, but extra vitamins were not required. In the presence of sulfur, strain TR1T grew with acetate, formate, lactate, pyruvate, stearate, arginine and H2/CO2. All substrates were completely oxidized and H2S and CO2 were the only metabolic products detected. Besides elemental sulfur, thiosulfate was used as an electron acceptor. The isolate also grew by disproportionation of elemental sulfur. The predominant cellular fatty acids were saturated components: C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and C18 : 0. The only quinone component detected was menaquinone MK-7(H2). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34 mol%. The isolate is affiliated to the genus Desulfurella of the class Deltaproteobacteria, sharing 97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the four species described in the genus Desulfurella. Considering the distinct physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain TR1T represents a novel species within the genus Desulfurella, for which the name Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TR1T ( = DSM 29984T = JCM 30680T).

  19. Anaerobic respiration of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 requires psrA, a homolog of the phsA gene of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2009-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO3(2-)), thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)), tetrathionate (S4O6(2-)), and elemental sulfur (S(0)). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S(0) and S2O3(2-) respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S(0) and S2O3(2-) yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S(0) or S2O3(2-) as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O3(2-) terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS-] or SO3(2-)) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S(0) respiration.

  20. Anaerobic Respiration of Elemental Sulfur and Thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Requires psrA, a Homolog of the phsA Gene of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium LT2▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Justin L.; DiChristina, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO32−), thiosulfate (S2O32−), tetrathionate (S4O62−), and elemental sulfur (S0). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S0 and S2O32− respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S0 and S2O32− yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S0 or S2O32− as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O32− terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS−] or SO32−) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S0 respiration. PMID:19542325

  1. Isolation of bacteria from diabetic foot ulcers with special reference to anaerobe isolation by simple two-step combustion technique in candle jar

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Jayeeta; Mukherjee, Poulami; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Maiti, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives: Although polymicrobial infections involving both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria are very common in diabetic foot ulcers, in many centres of developing countries, anaerobes are rarely isolated due to technical difficulties. This can be overcome by using a new simple, innovative technique of a combination of candle combustion and use of acidified copper-coated steel wool, as reported here. Methods: In-house developed method was used in a prospective clinico-microbiological study for anaerobes from randomly selected 43 patients with diabetic foot ulcers along with conventional method of anaerobic culture in GasPak system and aerobic culture by standard laboratory procedures. For primary isolation of anaerobes, Brucella blood agar supplemented with hemin (5 μg/ml) and menadione (1 μg/ml) was used. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed by the standard disc diffusion method for aerobes and E-test method for anaerobes. Results: All the 43 samples were culture positive, of which aerobic Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) predominated, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus and diphtheroids. Anaerobes isolated from 21 samples were Peptostreptococcus, Bacteroides, Porphyromonas, Veillonella spp. and Clostridium perfringens by both GasPak and in-house developed and modified candle jar techniques. Imipenem and metronidazole were most sensitive while clindamycin, penicillin and cefoxitin were least sensitive drugs for anaerobes. Aerobic GNB were found to be multidrug resistant, especially to penicillin and cephalosporins. The most sensitive drug was piperacillin-tazobactam. Interpretation & conclusions: For isolation of anaerobes from clinical specimens such as diabetic foot ulcers, modified candle jar technique was found to be as reliable as GasPak system. This modified technique needs to be tested for many other clinical materials which are not yet evaluated. PMID:28574021

  2. In vitro activity of moxifloxacin against 923 anaerobes isolated from human intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Warren, Yumi A; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Merriam, C Vreni; Fernandez, Helen

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro activity of moxifloxacin against 923 recent anaerobic isolates obtained from pretreatment cultures in patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections was studied using the CLSI M11-A-6 agar dilution method. Moxifloxacin was active against 87% (96 of 110) Bacteroides fragilis strains at < or = 1 microg/ml and 87% (79 of 90) B. thetaiotaomicron strains at < or = 2 microg/ml. Species variation was seen, with B. uniformis, B. vulgatus, Clostridium clostridioforme, and C. symbiosum being least susceptible and accounting for most of the resistant isolates; excluding the aforementioned four resistant species, 86% (303 of 363) of Bacteroides species isolates and 94% (417 of 450) of all other genera and species were susceptible to < or = 2 microg/ml of moxifloxacin. Overall, moxifloxacin was active against 763 of 923 (83%) of strains at < or = 2 microg/ml, supporting its use as a monotherapy for some community-acquired intra-abdominal infections.

  3. The contribution of aerobic and anaerobic respiration to intestinal colonization and virulence for Salmonella typhimurium in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Paul Andrew; Berchieri, Angelo; Freitas Neto, Oliveiro Caetano de; Lovell, Margaret

    2015-10-01

    The basic mechanism whereby Salmonella serovars colonize the chicken intestine remains poorly understood. Previous studies have indicated that proton-translocating proteins utilizing oxygen as terminal electron acceptor do not appear to be of major importance in the gut of the newly hatched chicken and consequently they would be even less significant during intestinal colonization of more mature chickens where the complex gut microflora would trap most of the oxygen in the lumen. Consequently, alternative electron acceptors may be more significant or, in their absence, substrate-level phosphorylation may also be important to Salmonella serovars in this environment. To investigate this we constructed mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium defective in various aspects of oxidative or substrate-level phosphorylation to assess their role in colonization of the chicken intestine, assessed through faecal shedding, and virulence. Mutations affecting use of oxygen or alternative electron acceptors did not eliminate faecal shedding. By contrast mutations in either pta (phosphotransacetylase) or ackA (acetate kinase) abolished shedding. The pta but not the ackA mutation also abolished systemic virulence for chickens. An additional ldhA (lactate dehydrogenase) mutant also showed poor colonizing ability. We hypothesise that substrate-level phosphorylation may be more important than respiration using oxygen or alternative electron acceptors for colonization of the chicken caeca.

  4. Anaerobic High-Throughput Cultivation Method for Isolation of Thermophiles Using Biomass-Derived Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Allman, Steve L; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Elkins, James G

    2012-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) techniques have been developed for sorting mesophilic organisms, but the difficulty increases if the target microbes are thermophilic anaerobes. We demonstrate a reliable, high-throughput method of screening thermophilic anaerobic organisms using FCM and 96-well plates for growth on biomass-relevant substrates. The method was tested using the cellulolytic thermophiles Clostridium ther- mocellum (Topt = 55 C), Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis (Topt = 78 C) and the fermentative hyperthermo- philes, Pyrococcus furiosus (Topt = 100 C) and Thermotoga maritima (Topt = 80 C). Multi-well plates were incubated at various temperatures for approximately 72 120 h and then tested for growth. Positive growth resulting from single cells sorted into individual wells containing an anaerobic medium was verified by OD600. Depending on the growth substrate, up to 80 % of the wells contained viable cultures, which could be transferred to fresh media. This method was used to isolate thermophilic microbes from Rabbit Creek, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming. Substrates for enrichment cultures including crystalline cellulose (Avicel), xylan (from Birchwood), pretreated switchgrass and Populus were used to cultivate organisms that may be of interest to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  5. Bacteroides luti sp. nov., an anaerobic, cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacterium isolated from methanogenic sludge.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Kaneshige, Masami; Nakamura, Akinobu; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    A mesophilic, anaerobic, cellulolytic and xylanolytic strain, UasXn-3T, was isolated from anaerobic granular sludge in a mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor, which was used to treat municipal sewage. The cells were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, and non-spore-forming rods. The optimal temperature for growth was 37-40 °C and the optimal pH for growth was pH 6.5-7.0. Strain UasXn-3T could grow on several polysaccharides and sugars, including cellulose, cellobiose, xylan, xylose, glucose, fructose, arabinose, mannose, raffinose, trehalose and starch. The DNA G+C content was 44.4 mol%. On the basis of comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain UasXn-3T was identified as a member of the genus Bacteroides and most closely related to Bacteroides oleiciplenus, B. intestinalis, B. cellulosilyticus and B. graminisolvens (sequence similarities of 91.3-91.6%). Since the genetic and phenotypic properties suggest that strain UasXn-3T represents a novel species, we propose the name Bacteroides luti sp. nov. The type strain is UasXn-3T (=JCM 19020T=DSM 26991T).

  6. Aerobic and Anaerobic Toluene Degradation by a Newly Isolated Denitrifying Bacterium, Thauera sp. Strain DNT-1

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Yoshifumi; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Uenishi, Hiroshi; Uchihashi, Yasumitsu; Hiraishi, Akira; Yukawa, Hideaki; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo

    2004-01-01

    A newly isolated denitrifying bacterium, Thauera sp. strain DNT-1, grew on toluene as the sole carbon and energy source under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. When this strain was cultivated under oxygen-limiting conditions with nitrate, first toluene was degraded as oxygen was consumed, while later toluene was degraded as nitrate was reduced. Biochemical observations indicated that initial degradation of toluene occurred through a dioxygenase-mediated pathway and the benzylsuccinate pathway under aerobic and denitrifying conditions, respectively. Homologous genes for toluene dioxygenase (tod) and benzylsuccinate synthase (bss), which are the key enzymes in aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation, respectively, were cloned from genomic DNA of strain DNT-1. The results of Northern blot analyses and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR suggested that transcription of both sets of genes was induced by toluene. In addition, the tod genes were induced under aerobic conditions, whereas the bss genes were induced under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. On the basis of these results, it is concluded that strain DNT-1 modulates the expression of two different initial pathways of toluene degradation according to the availability of oxygen in the environment. PMID:15006757

  7. Hydrogen-dependent growth of Escherichia coli in anaerobic respiration and the presence of hydrogenases with different functions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, I; Ishimoto, M

    1978-09-01

    E. coli K10 was found to grow anaerobically on molecular hydrogen by reducing nitrate, fumarate, and trimethylamine N-oxide when peptone was added to the culture medium. Molar growth yields based on consumed hydrogen estimated from the amounts of reduction products were all 7.8 g cells/mol, suggesting that 1 mol of ATP was produced in the oxidation of 1 mol of hydrogen. Hydrogenase activity measured in terms of hydrogen evolution was several times higher in cells grown on glucose than in cells grown on hydrogen in the presence of fumarate and trimethylamine N-oxide, while hydrogenase activity measured in terms of hydrogen uptake was unchanged in both cases. The ratio of hydrogenase activities measured in terms of hydrogen uptake and evolution was also high in the extract and centrifugal fractions from cells grown in hydrogen. The soluble fraction and trypsin digest of the precipitate at 100,000 X g were subjected to polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and hydrogenase bands were stained by reduction of benzyl viologen with hydrogen and by oxidation of reduced methyl viologen. The resulting patterns suggest that multiple forms of hydrogenase are present and that the amounts of forms functioning in hydrogen evolution were greatly decresed in cells grown on hydrogen in the presence of acceptors.

  8. [Isolation, Identification and Characteristic Analysis of an Oil-producing Chlorella sp. Tolerant to High-strength Anaerobic Digestion Effluent].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuang; Wang, Wen-guo; Ma, Dan-wei; Tang, Xiao-yu; Hu, Qi-chun

    2015-07-01

    A Chlorella strain tolerant to high-strength anaerobic digestion effluent was isolated from the anaerobic digestion effluent with a long-term exposure to air. The strain was identified as a Chlorella by morphological and molecular biological methods, and named Chlorella sp. BWY-1, The anaerobic digestion effluent used in this study was from a biogas plant with the raw materials of swine wastewater after solid-liquid separation. The Chlorella regularis (FACHB-729) was used as the control strain. The comparative study showed that Chlorella sp, BWY-Ihad relatively higher growth rate, biomass accumulation capacity and pollutants removal rate in BG11. and different concentrations of anaerobic digestion effluent. Chlorella sp. BWY-1 had the highest growth rate and biomass productivity (324.40 mg.L-1) in BG11, but its lipid productivity and lipid content increased with the increase of anaerobic digestion effluent concentration, In undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent, the lipid productivity and lipid content of Chlorella sp. BWY-1 were up to 44. 43% and 108. 70 mg.L-1, respectively. Those results showed that the isolated algal strain bad some potential applications in livestock wastewater treatment and bioenergy production, it could be combined with a solid-liquid separation, anaerobic fermentation and other techniques for processing livestock wastewater and producing biodiesel.

  9. Dehalogenimonas formicexedens sp. nov., a chlorinated alkane-respiring bacterium isolated from contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Key, Trent A; Bowman, Kimberly S; Lee, Imchang; Chun, Jongsik; Albuquerque, Luciana; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2017-05-01

    A strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming bacterium designated NSZ-14T, isolated from contaminated groundwater in Louisiana (USA), was characterized using a polyphasic approach. Strain NSZ-14T reductively dehalogenated a variety of polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes, producing ethene from 1,2-dichloroethane, propene from 1,2-dichloropropane, a mixture of cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethene from 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, vinyl chloride from 1,1,2-trichloroethane and allyl chloride (3-chloro-1-propene) from 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Formate or hydrogen could both serve as electron donors. Dechlorination occurred between pH 5.5 and 7.5 and over a temperature range of 20-37 °C. Major cellular fatty acids included C18 : 1ω9c, C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis indicated that the strain clusters within the class Dehalococcoidia of the phylum Chloroflexi, most closely related to but distinct from type strains of the species Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens (97.63 % similarity) and Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens (95.05 %). A complete genome sequence determined for strain NSZ-14T revealed a DNA G+C content of 53.96 mol%, which was corroborated by HPLC (54.1±0.2 mol% G+C). Genome-wide comparisons based on average nucleotide identity by orthology and estimated DNA-DNA hybridization values combined with phenotypic and chemotaxonomic traits and phylogenetic analysis indicate that strain NSZ-14T represents a novel species within the genus Dehalogenimonas, for which the name Dehalogenimonas formicexedens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NSZ-14T (=HAMBI 3672T=JCM 19277T=VKM B-3058T). An emended description of Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens is also provided.

  10. Anaerobic respiration sustains mitochondrial membrane potential in a prolyl hydroxylase pathway-activated cancer cell line in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji; Sato, Michihiko

    2014-02-15

    To elucidate how tumor cells produce energy in oxygen-depleted microenvironments, we studied the possibility of mitochondrial electron transport without oxygen. We produced well-controlled oxygen gradients (ΔO2) in monolayer-cultured cells. We then visualized oxygen levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΦm) in individual cells by using the red shift of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and a cationic fluorescent dye, respectively. In this two-dimensional tissue model, ΔΦm was abolished in cells >500 μm from the oxygen source [the anoxic front (AF)], indicating limitations in diffusional oxygen delivery. This result perfectly matched GFP-determined ΔO2. In cells pretreated with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), a prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) inhibitor, the AF was expanded to 1,500-2,000 μm from the source. In these cells, tissue ΔO2 was substantially decreased, indicating that PHD pathway activation suppressed mitochondrial respiration. The expansion of the AF and the reduction of ΔO2 were much more prominent in a cancer cell line (Hep3B) than in the equivalent fibroblast-like cell line (COS-7). Hence, the results indicate that PHD pathway-activated cells can sustain ΔΦm, despite significantly decreased electron flux to complex IV. Complex II inhibition abolished the effect of DMOG in expanding the AF, although tissue ΔO2 remained shallow. Separate experiments demonstrated that complex II plays a substantial role in sustaining ΔΦm in DMOG-pretreated Hep3B cells with complex III inhibition. From these results, we conclude that PHD pathway activation can sustain ΔΦm in an otherwise anoxic microenvironment by decreasing tissue ΔO2 while activating oxygen-independent electron transport in mitochondria.

  11. ANAEROBIC RESISTANCE TO HIGH LEVELS OF CADMIUM AND OTHER TOXIC METALS IN A FACULTATIVE ANAEROBE ISOLATED FROM PRISTINE SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SHARMA,P.K.; VAIRAVAMURTHY,A.; KIELECZAWA,J.

    1999-06-20

    The authors have isolated many Cd (II) resistant bacterial strains from relatively pristine sediments collected from salt marshes in Shelter Island, New York. Detailed studies are being performed on one isolate, strain Cd-1. Strain Cd-1 is metabolically diverse, halotolerant, Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe. It can resist high amounts of Cd (II), Cr (VI), As (V), Se (IV), Co (II), Pb (II), or Zn (II) under defined anaerobic conditions. With pyruvate as the energy source, Cd-1 can grow well at examined Cd (II) concentrations ranging up to 15 mM. It can resist Cd (II) with or without marine level NaCl concentration, under acidic or neutral conditions. It can resist Cd (II) under aerobic conditions as well. These features are novel for a heavy metal resistant bacterium.

  12. [Isolation, identification and enzyme characterization of a thermophilic cellulolytic anaerobic bacterium].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinping; Ma, Shichun; Sun, Yingjie; Huang, Yan; Deng, Yu

    2012-09-04

    To identify a thermophilic bacterium from horse manure to degrade cellulose efficiently, and to enrich microbial resources producing cellulolytic ethanol by co-culturing with thermophilic ethanol producing bacterium. We used Hungate anaerobic technique to isolate a strain named as HCp from horse manure mixed culture; its phylogeny was identified through 16S rDNA sequencing. Enzymatic assays were determined using DNS method. The isolated HCp cells were straight with rods size of(0.35-0.50) microm x (2.42-6.40) microm, in the form of single or paring. This strain belongs to a strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium, it is able to form spores, shows motile ability and resistance to neomycin. The strain could degrade filter paper cellulose, cellulose powder, microcrystalline cellulose, cotton wool, rice straw and gelatin, and it was also able to utilize abundant saccharides as substrates such as cellobiose, glucose, xylose, xylan, raffinose, maltose, sorbose, fructose and galactose. The growth pH ranges from 6.5 to 8.5, temperature from 35 to 70 degrees C and concentration of NaCl on cellulose from 0% to 1.0%, while the optima of pH 6.85, 60 degreesC and 0.2% NaCl. Under the optimal growth conditions, the filter paper cellulose degradation rate was up to 90.40% after 10 days. The optimum temperatures for FPA, CMCase, beta-glucosidase and xylanase were 70 degrees C, 70 degrees C, 70 degrees C, and 60 degrees C respectively. CMCase activity was found with high thermal stability. The phylogenetic analysis based on partial 16S rDNA revealed that HCp was close to Acetivibrio cellulolyticus and A. cellulosolvens with 97.5% sequence similarities. Strain HCp is thermophilic, efficiently cellulolytic anaerobe. It is able to utilize vast substrates and produce highly thermostable enzymes. It is a potential bacterium that can be used for cellulolytic ethanol production.

  13. Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Derived from Patients with Cystic Fibrosis under Aerobic, Anaerobic, and Biofilm Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Dominic; Rose, Barbara; Pajkos, Aniko; Robinson, Michael; Bye, Peter; Bell, Scott; Elkins, Mark; Thompson, Barbara; MacLeod, Colin; Aaron, Shawn D.; Harbour, Colin

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have determined that Pseudomonas aeruginosa can live in a biofilm mode within hypoxic mucus in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). P. aeruginosa grown under anaerobic and biofilm conditions may better approximate in vivo growth conditions in the CF airways, and combination antibiotic susceptibility testing of anaerobically and biofilm-grown isolates may be more relevant than traditional susceptibility testing under planktonic aerobic conditions. We tested 16 multidrug-resistant isolates of P. aeruginosa derived from CF patients using multiple combination bactericidal testing to compare the efficacies of double and triple antibiotic combinations against the isolates grown under traditional aerobic planktonic conditions, in planktonic anaerobic conditions, and in biofilm mode. Both anaerobically grown and biofilm-grown bacteria were significantly less susceptible (P < 0.01) to single and combination antibiotics than corresponding aerobic planktonically grown isolates. Furthermore, the antibiotic combinations that were bactericidal under anaerobic conditions were often different from those that were bactericidal against the same organisms grown as biofilms. The most effective combinations under all conditions were colistin (tested at concentrations suitable for nebulization) either alone or in combination with tobramycin (10 μg ml−1), followed by meropenem combined with tobramycin or ciprofloxacin. The findings of this study illustrate that antibiotic sensitivities are dependent on culture conditions and highlight the complexities of choosing appropriate combination therapy for multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa in the CF lung. PMID:16207967

  14. [Respiration and oxidative phosphorylation in isolated liver cells under freezing conditions].

    PubMed

    Kudokotseva, E V; Gordienko, A D; Belouc, A M

    1980-01-01

    Respiration and oxidative phosphorylation of hepatocytes were studied as affected by low temperatures and cryoprotectors. Fast freezing of these cells down to -196 degrees C with the presence of mentioned substances causes considerable destruction of their structures. The intensity of the oxygen endogenic uptake lowers significantly, respiration and oxidative phosphorylation become uncoupled. Two-stage freezing down to -196 degrees C also causes a complete uncoupling of the oxidation and phosphorylation processes in the hepatocyte mitochondria. When freezing hepatocytes down to -196 degrees C by the multistage programme with the presence of cryoprotectors in a 10% concentration, the mitochondria retain 20, 30 and 40% of their functional properties, respectively.

  15. Differences in nitric oxide steady-states between arginine, hypoxanthine, uracil auxotrophs (AHU) and non-AHU strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae during anaerobic respiration in the presence of nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Kenneth; Clark, Virginia L.

    2008-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae can grow by anaerobic respiration using nitrite as an alternative electron acceptor. Under these growth conditions, N. gonorrhoeae produces and degrades nitric oxide (NO), an important host defense molecule. Laboratory strain F62 has been shown to establish and maintain a NO steady-state level that is a function of the nitrite reductase/nitric oxide reductase ratio and is independent of cell number. The nitrite reductase activities (122–197 nmoles NO2 reduced/ min-OD600) and nitric oxide reductase activities (88–155 nmoles NO reduced/ min-OD600) in a variety of gonococcal clinical isolates were similar to the specific activities seen in F62 (241 nmoles NO2 reduced/ min-OD and 88 nmoles NO reduced/ min-OD, respectively). In 7 gonococcal strains, the NO steady state levels established in the presence of nitrite were similar to that of F62 (801–2121 nM NO), while 6 of the strains, identified as arginine, hypoxanthine, and uracil auxotrophs (AHU), that cause asymptomatic infection in men, had either a 2- to 3-fold (373–579 nM NO) or about 100-fold (13–24 nM NO) lower NO steady state concentrations. All tested strains in the presence of a NO-donor, DETA/NO, quickly lowered and maintained NO levels in the non-inflammatory range of NO (<300 nM). The generation of a NO steady-state concentration was directly affected by alterations in respiratory control in both F62 and an AHU strain, although differences in membrane function are suspected to be responsible for NO steady-state level differences in AHU strains. PMID:18772926

  16. Isolation and characterization of a sulfur-oxidizing chemolithotroph growing on crude oil under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yumiko; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2003-01-01

    Molecular approaches have shown that a group of bacteria (called cluster 1 bacteria) affiliated with the epsilon subclass of the class Proteobacteria constituted major populations in underground crude-oil storage cavities. In order to unveil their physiology and ecological niche, this study isolated bacterial strains (exemplified by strain YK-1) affiliated with the cluster 1 bacteria from an oil storage cavity at Kuji in Iwate, Japan. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that its closest relative was Thiomicrospira denitrificans (90% identity). Growth experiments under anaerobic conditions showed that strain YK-1 was a sulfur-oxidizing obligate chemolithotroph utilizing sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and hydrogen as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor. Oxygen also supported its growth only under microaerobic conditions. Strain YK-1 could not grow on nitrite, and nitrite was the final product of nitrate reduction. Neither sugars, organic acids (including acetate), nor hydrocarbons could serve as carbon and energy sources. A typical stoichiometry of its energy metabolism followed an equation: S(2-) + 4NO(3)(-) --> SO(4)(2-) + 4NO(2)(-) (Delta G(0) = -534 kJ mol(-1)). In a difference from other anaerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, this bacterium was sensitive to NaCl; growth in medium containing more than 1% NaCl was negligible. When YK-1 was grown anaerobically in a sulfur-depleted inorganic medium overlaid with crude oil, sulfate was produced, corresponding to its growth. On the contrary, YK-1 could not utilize crude oil as a carbon source. These results suggest that the cluster 1 bacteria yielded energy for growth in oil storage cavities by oxidizing petroleum sulfur compounds. Based on its physiology, ecological interactions with other members of the groundwater community are discussed.

  17. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  18. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance of aerobes and facultative anaerobes isolated from the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    GAETTI-JARDIM, Ellen Cristina; MARQUETI, Antônio Carlos; FAVERANI, Leonardo Perez; GAETTI-JARDIM JÚNIOR, Elerson

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the resistance to antimicrobials of aerobes and facultative anaerobes isolated from patients wearing complete dentures, patients with gingivitis and periodontitis, and periodontally health subjects. Material and methods Three hundred and four isolates were tested. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the drugs were evaluated through the agar dilution method using Mueller-Hinton agar. Results The most active antimicrobial drugs were the carbapenems (meropenem and imipenem), and resistance to these drugs was restrict to 1.6-2.3% of the isolates, as well as ciprofloxacin and rifampin. Microbial resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, cephalothin, amikacin, chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid was particularly high. In most cases, the resistance to β-lactams was mediated by the production of hydrolytic enzymes, especially in gram-negative enteric rods, while enterococci did not evidence production of these enzymes. The association amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was not effective in 28.3% of the tested isolates. Conclusions The results of this investigation confirmed that the oral cavity of patients with periodontitis and gingivitis, and particularly edentulous patients wearing complete dentures, could harbor microorganisms with several antimicrobial resistance markers, and these microorganisms are frequently implicated in multiresistant, systemic, oral or nosocomial infections. PMID:21308284

  20. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Lloyd, Jonathan. R.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV) by U(VI)- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI) as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI), via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV) uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI) phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions. PMID:26132209

  1. Thermophilic and cellulolytic consortium isolated from composting plants improves anaerobic digestion of cellulosic biomass: Toward a microbial resource management approach.

    PubMed

    Kinet, R; Destain, J; Hiligsmann, S; Thonart, P; Delhalle, L; Taminiau, B; Daube, G; Delvigne, F

    2015-01-01

    A cellulolytic consortium was isolated from a composting plant in order to boost the initial hydrolysis step encountered in anaerobic digestion. Improvement of the cellulose degradation, as well as biogas production, was observed for the cultures inoculated with the exogenous consortium. Metagenomics analyses pointed out a weak richness (related to the number of OTUs) of the exogenous consortium induced by the selective pressure (cellulose as sole carbon source) met during the initial isolation steps. Main microbial strains determined were strictly anaerobic and belong to the Clostridia class. During cellulose anaerobic degradation, pH drop induced a strong modification of the microbial population. Despite the fact that richness and evenness were very weak, the exogenous consortium was able to adapt and to maintain the cellulolytic degradation potential. This important result point out the fact that simplified microbial communities could be used in order to increase the robustness of mixed cultures involved in environmental biotechnology.

  2. Susceptibilities of anaerobic bacteria isolated from animals with ovine foot rot to 28 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Piriz, S; Cuenca, R; Valle, J; Vadillo, S

    1992-01-01

    The agar dilution method was used to determine the inhibitory activities of 28 antimicrobial agents against 35 strains of the genus Peptostreptococcus, 4 strains of the species Peptococcus niger, 20 strains of the species Megasphaera elsdenii, 7 strains from the species Acidaminococcus fermentans, 8 strains of the genus Clostridium, 11 strains of the genus Eubacterium, and 1 strain of the species Propionibacterium acidipropionici, all of which were isolated from 125 clinical cases of ovine foot rot between January 1987 and December 1988. The three unreidopenicillins studied proved to be the most active antimicrobial agents, with a high percentage of strains being susceptible at a concentration of 64 micrograms/ml. Penicillin G, ampicillin, and the three cephalosporins studied also had good activity. Fosfomycin showed a high degree of activity among the 116 anaerobic bacteria tested. PMID:1590689

  3. Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. an obliqately anaerobic bacterium isolated from a remote Amazonian community in Peru

    PubMed Central

    O’Neal, Lindsey; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J.; Tito, Raul Y.; Ozga, Andrew T.; Polo, Susan I.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Lawson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic Gram-stain positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium designated NE08VT, was isolated from a fecal sample of an individual residing in a remote Amazonian community in Peru. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed the organism belonged to the genus Clostridium and is most closely related to Clostridium vulturis (97.4% sequence similarity) and was further characterized using biochemical and chemotaxonomic methods. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso C13:0 and C16:0 with a genomic DNA G + C content of 31.6 mol%. Fermentation products during growth on glucose were acetate and butyrate. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic information, strain NE08V was identified as representing a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NE08VT (DSM 23598T = CCUG 59712T). PMID:26123611

  4. Asiatic acid uncouples respiration in isolated mouse liver mitochondria and induces HepG2 cells death.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yapeng; Liu, Siyuan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Dang; Gao, Jing; Zhu, Li

    2016-09-05

    Asiatic acid, one of the triterpenoid components isolated from Centella asiatica, has received increasing attention due to a wide variety of biological activities. To date, little is known about its mechanisms of action. Here we examined the cytotoxic effect of asiatic acid on HepG2 cells and elucidated some of the underlying mechanisms. Asiatic acid induced rapid cell death, as well as mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dissipation, ATP depletion and cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. In mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, asiatic acid treatment significantly stimulated the succinate-supported state 4 respiration rate, dissipated the MMP, increased Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, decreased ATP content and promoted cytochrome c release, indicating the uncoupling effect of asiatic acid. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by succinate-supported mitochondrial respiration was also significantly inhibited by asiatic acid. In addition, asiatic acid inhibited Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling but did not induce mitochondrial swelling in hyposmotic potassium acetate medium which suggested that asiatic acid may not act as a protonophoric uncoupler. Inhibition of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) or blockade of adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) attenuated the effect of asiatic acid on MMP dissipation, Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial respiration and HepG2 cell death. When combined inhibition of UCPs and ANT, asiatic acid-mediated uncoupling effect was noticeably alleviated. These results suggested that both UCPs and ANT partially contribute to the uncoupling properties of asiatic acid. In conclusion, asiatic acid is a novel mitochondrial uncoupler and this property is potentially involved in its toxicity on HepG2 cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a Molecular System for Studying Microbial Arsenate Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltikov, C. W.; Newman, D. K.

    2002-12-01

    The toxic element arsenic is a major contaminant of many groundwaters and surface waters throughout the world. Arsenic enrichment is primarily of geological origin resulting from weathering processes and geothermal activity. Not surprisingly, microorganisms inhabiting anoxic arsenic-contaminated environments have evolved to exploit arsenate during respiration. Numerous bacteria have been isolated that use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor for respiratory growth. The diversity of this metabolism appears to be widespread throughout the microbial tree of life, suggesting respiratory arsenate reduction is ancient in origin. Yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms for how these organisms respire arsenate. We have developed a model system in Shewanella trabarsenatis, strain ANA-3, a facultative anaerobe that respires arsenate and tolerates high concentrations of arsenite (10 mM). Through loss-of-function studies, we have identified genes involved in both arsenic resistance and arsenate respiration. The genes that confer resistance to arsenic are homologous to the well-characterized ars operon of E. coli. However, the respiratory arsenate reductase is predicted to encode a novel protein that shares homologous regions (~ 40 % similarity) to molybdopterin anaerobic reductases specific for DMSO, thiosulfate, nitrate, and polysulfide. I will discuss our emerging model for how strain ANA-3 respires arsenate and the relationship between arsenite resistance and arsenate respiration. I will also highlight the relevance of this type of analysis for biogeochemical studies.

  6. Saccharofermentans acetigenes gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium isolated from sludge treating brewery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuangya; Niu, Lili; Zhang, Yongxiang

    2010-12-01

    A spore-forming anaerobic bacterium, designated strain P6(T), was isolated from the sludge of an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating brewery wastewater. Cells were Gram-positive, oval and 0.6-0.9 μm by 1.2-1.8 μm in size. Growth was observed at 20-42 °C and at pH 5.0-7.5. It fermented several hexoses, polysaccharides and alcohols. Sucrose and aesculin could also be fermented. The main end products of fermentation from glucose were acetate, lactate and fumarate; trace CO(2) and H(2) were also produced. The DNA G+C content of strain P6(T) was 55.6 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0), anteiso-C(15 : 0) and iso-C(14 : 0) 3-OH. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain P6(T) represented a novel phyletic sublineage in clostridial cluster III, and showed <91 % similarity to the type strains of recognized species in this cluster. Phenotypically, the new isolate was distinguished from its phylogenetic relatives (e.g. Clostridium straminisolvens, Clostridium thermocellum, Acetivibrio cellulolyticus and Clostridium aldrichii) by producing acid from glucose and its inability to degrade cellulose. On the basis of evidence from this polyphasic study, strain P6(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Saccharofermentans acetigenes gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Saccharofermentans acetigenes is P6(T) (=JCM 14006(T) =AS 1.5064(T)).

  7. Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, xylanolytic bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    PubMed

    Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-06-01

    A hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium, designated D2C22(T), was isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma in north-east Algeria. The isolate was a Gram-stain-positive, non-sporulating, non-motile rod, appearing singly or in pairs (0.3-0.4 × 8.0-9.0 µm). Strain D2C22(T) grew anaerobically at 45-85 °C (optimum 65 °C), at pH 5-9 (optimum pH 6.8) and with 0-20 g NaCl l(-1). Strain D2C22(T) used glucose, galactose, lactose, fructose, ribose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, cellobiose, mannose, melibiose, sucrose, xylan and pyruvate (only in the presence of yeast extract or biotrypticase) as electron donors. The end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, lactate, CO2 and H2. Nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfate and sulfite were not used as electron acceptors. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 41.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain D2C22(T) was most closely related to Caldicoprobacter oshimai JW/HY-331(T), Caldicoprobacter algeriensis TH7C1(T) and Acetomicrobium faecale DSM 20678(T) (95.5, 95.5 and 95.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain D2C22(T) is proposed to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Caldicoprobacter within the order Clostridiales, for which the name Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D2C22(T) (=DSM 24605(T)=JCM 17646(T)).

  8. Evaluation of the new RapID-ANA II system for the identification of clinical anaerobic isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Marler, L M; Siders, J A; Wolters, L C; Pettigrew, Y; Skitt, B L; Allen, S D

    1991-01-01

    The RapID-ANA II System (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Inc., Atlanta, Ga.) is a recently revised and marketed 4-h system for the identification of anaerobic bacteria. The system was compared with conventional identification methods for its ability to identify 566 clinical anaerobic isolates. Overall, the system identified correctly to genus and species 68% of the total isolates (62% of 204 gram-negative bacilli, 70% of 69 nonsporeforming gram-positive bacilli, 74% of 130 Clostridium isolates, and 72% of 163 anaerobic cocci), without the use of additional tests. With the additional tests suggested by the manufacturer, 78% of the total isolates were identified correctly to species. The routine use of a few simple and practical tests (e.g., egg yolk agar for Clostridium spp.), in addition to the RapID-ANA II, would improve significantly the accuracy of the system in the identification of anaerobic bacteria. This second-generation system offers a number of improvements over the original system, including an updated data base and the option of overnight refrigeration of the system before the addition of reagents. PMID:2056052

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of an Anaerobic and Extremophilic Bacterium, Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis, Isolated from a Geothermal Hot Stream

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Yong-Jik; Park, Gun-Seok; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Lee, Sang Jun; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Caldanaerobacter yonseiensis is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, spore-forming bacterium, which was isolated from a geothermal hot stream in Indonesia. This bacterium utilizes xylose and produces a variety of proteases. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of C. yonseiensis, which reveals insights into the pentose phosphate pathway and protein degradation metabolism in thermophilic microorganisms. PMID:24201201

  10. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source.

  11. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov.: A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1, was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.22 x 10-15 micron. Growth was observed over the temperature range of 10 C to 44 C (optimum 37 C), NaCl concentration range of greater than 1 - 12 % (wt/vol) (optimum 3%), and pH range 7.5 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. Main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain AspG1 is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species among the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA_392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  12. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov.: A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1, was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.22 x 10-15 micron. Growth was observed over the temperature range of 10 C to 44 C (optimum 37 C), NaCl concentration range of greater than 1 - 12 % (wt/vol) (optimum 3%), and pH range 7.5 - 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. Main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain AspG1 is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species among the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA_392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  13. Moryella indoligenes gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Jean-Philippe; K'ouas, Guylène; Han, Xiang Y

    2007-04-01

    Three Gram-positive, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacteria with pointed ends were isolated from clinical specimens. The organisms were weakly saccharolytic and produced indole, acetate, butyrate and lactate as major metabolic end products. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the isolates had no known close relatives among recognized bacteria but that they exhibited a phylogenetic association with Clostridium rRNA cluster XIVa [as defined by Collins, M. D. et al. (1994). Int J Syst Bacteriol 44, 812-826]. The closest recognized relatives were the type strains of Clostridium clostridioforme, Clostridium bolteae and Clostridium asparagiforme (16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 90.2-91.4 %). These results suggest that these three clinical isolates represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Moryella indoligenes gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Moryella indoligenes is AIP 220.04(T) (=CIP 109174(T)=CCUG 52648(T)).

  14. Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from coastal sediment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Liu, Qian-Qian; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2015-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile and pink-pigmented bacterium, designated strain HF08(T), was isolated from marine sediment of the coast of Weihai, China. Cells were rod-shaped, and oxidase- and catalase-positive. The isolate grew optimally at 33 °C, at pH 7.5-8.0 and with 2-3% (w/v) NaCl. The dominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C14 : 0. Menaquinone 7 (MK-7) was the major respiratory quinone and the DNA G+C content was 44.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate was a member of the class Bacteroidia, and shared 88-90% sequence similarity with the closest genera Sunxiuqinia, Prolixibacter, Draconibacterium, Mariniphaga and Meniscus. Based on the phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence presented, a novel species in a new genus of the family Prolixibacteraceae is proposed, with the name Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Roseimarinus sediminis is HF08(T) ( = KCTC 42261(T) = CICC 10901(T)).

  15. Iron corrosion activity of anaerobic hydrogen-consuming microorganisms isolated from oil facilities.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that anaerobic hydrogen-consuming microorganisms generally promote iron corrosion. We isolated 26 hydrogen-consuming microorganisms (acetogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and methanogens) from oil facilities in Japan using hydrogen as an electron donor. The iron corrosion activities of these microorganisms were examined using iron (Fe0) granules as the sole electron donor. Almost all the isolates consumed hydrogen that was chemically generated from iron granules but did not induce significant iron corrosion. The amount of corroded iron in the cultures of these organisms was less than 2-fold that in an abiotic chemical corrosion reaction. These results indicated that hydrogen consumption did not strongly stimulate iron corrosion. On the other hand, one isolate, namely, Methanococcus maripaludis Mic1c10, considerably corroded iron: this phenomenon was not accompanied by hydrogen consumption, methane formation, or cell growth. This finding also provided strong evidence that M. maripaludis Mic1c10 produced some material that caused iron to corrode.

  16. Identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fedorko, D P; Drake, S K; Stock, F; Murray, P R

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) for the rapid identification of anaerobic bacteria that had been isolated from clinical specimens and previously identified by 16s rRNA sequencing. The Bruker Microflex MALDI-TOF instrument with the Biotyper Software was used. We tested 152 isolates of anaerobic bacteria from 24 different genera and 75 different species. A total of 125 isolates (82%) had Biotyper software scores greater than 2.0 and the correct identification to genus and species was made by MALDI-TOF for 120 (79%) of isolates. Of the 12 isolates with a score between 1.8 and 2.0, 2 (17%) organisms were incorrectly identified by MALDI-TOF. Only 15 (10%) isolates had a score less than 1.8 and MALDI-TOF gave the wrong genus and species for four isolates, the correct genus for two isolates, and the correct genus and species for nine isolates. Therefore, we found the Bruker MALDI-TOF MicroFlex LT with an expanded database and the use of bacteria extracts rather than whole organisms correctly identified 130 of 152 (86%) isolates to genus and species when the cut-off for an acceptable identification was a spectrum score ≥1.8.

  17. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  18. Anaerobranca zavarzinii sp. nov., an anaerobic, alkalithermophilic bacterium isolated from Kamchatka thermal fields.

    PubMed

    Kevbrin, Vadim; Boltyanskaya, Yulia; Garnova, Elena; Wiegel, Juergen

    2008-06-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, alkalithermophilic, chemo-organotrophic bacterium was isolated from a small and very shallow geothermally heated pool at Pushino (Kamchatka, Far East Russia). The bacterium, designated strain JW/VK-KS5Y(T), was a Gram staining negative, Gram type positive rod. The cells were sometimes branched, with a tendency to grow in long chains, and were non-sporulating and non-motile. The shortest observed doubling time was 28 min when the novel strain was grown at 54-60 degrees C in 120 mM sodium carbonate-containing medium at pH(25 degrees C) 8.5-9.0. The novel bacterium grew on yeast extract and soytone as sole carbon and energy sources but could also use fumarate, thiosulfate and sulfur as electron acceptors. The DNA G+C content was 32.5 mol%. Based on phylogenetic, DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic data, it was concluded that isolate JW/VK-KS5Y(T) (=VKM B-2436(T)=DSM 18970(T)) represents the type strain of a novel species, Anaerobranca zavarzinii sp. nov.

  19. Selenate reduction to elemental selenium by anaerobic bacteria in sediments and culture: biogeochemical significance of a novel, sulfate-independent respiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Hollibaugh, James T.; Maest, Ann S.; Presser, Theresa S.; Miller, Laurence G.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    Interstitial water profiles of SeO42−, SeO32−, SO42−, and Cl− in anoxic sediments indicated removal of the seleno-oxyanions by a near-surface process unrelated to sulfate reduction. In sediment slurry experiments, a complete reductive removal of SeO42− occurred under anaerobic conditions, was more rapid with H2 or acetate, and was inhibited by O2, NO3−, MnO2, or autoclaving but not by SO42− or FeOOH. Oxidation of acetate in sediments could be coupled to selenate but not to molybdate. Reduction of selenate to elemental selenium was determined to be the mechanism for loss from solution. Selenate reduction was inhibited by tungstate and chromate but not by molybdate. A small quantity of the elemental selenium precipitated into sediments from solution could be resolublized by oxidation with either nitrate or FeOOH, but not with MnO2. A bacterium isolated from estuarine sediments demonstrated selenate-dependent growth on acetate, forming elemental selenium and carbon dioxide as respiratory end products. These results indicate that dissimilatory selenate reduction to elemental selenium is the major sink for selenium oxyanions in anoxic sediments. In addition, they suggest application as a treatment process for removing selenium oxyanions from wastewaters and also offer an explanation for the presence of selenite in oxic waters.

  20. Predominance of Enterobacteriaceae isolates in early positive anaerobic blood culture bottles in BacT/Alert system.

    PubMed

    Chiueh, Tzong-Shi; Lee, Shih-Yi; Tang, Sheng-Hui; Lu, Jang-Jih; Sun, Jun-Ren

    2013-03-01

    We collected and analyzed the time to detection (TTD) of blood cultures in the BacT/Alert automated system from 2002 to 2007. Among the 10,893 monomicrobial isolates from a total of 133,735 blood culture sets, the recoveries of aerobic bottles were compared with those of anaerobic bottles in this study. Significantly more Gram-positive cocci (except Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci), glucose nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria, and yeast were recovered from aerobic bottles than from anaerobic bottles. The average TTD was 19.0 hr and 20.1 hr for the aerobic and anaerobic bottles, respectively, and 96.8% of the microorganisms were detected within the first 72 hr. Of the 5,489 microorganisms recovered from both of the blood culture bottle pair, microbial growth was significantly more often detected first in the anaerobic bottles than the aerobic bottles for Enterobacteriaceae except Serratia marcescens, while S. aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were more often detected first in the aerobic bottles. According to these data, we conclude that the earlier positivity of anaerobic bottles is a useful marker for rapid presumptive identification of Enterobacteriaceae infection.

  1. Anaerobic bioremediation of RDX by ovine whole rumen fluid and pure culture isolates.

    PubMed

    Eaton, H L; Duringer, J M; Murty, L D; Craig, A M

    2013-04-01

    The ability of ruminal microbes to degrade the explosive compound hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in ovine whole rumen fluid (WRF) and as 24 bacterial isolates was examined under anaerobic conditions. Compound degradation was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identification of metabolites. Organisms in WRF microcosms degraded 180 μM RDX within 4 h. Nitroso-intermediates hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5-nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX) were present as early as 0.25 h and were detected throughout the 24-h incubation period, representing one reductive pathway of ring cleavage. Following reduction to MNX, peaks consistent with m/z 193 and 174 were also produced, which were unstable and resulted in rapid ring cleavage to a common metabolite consistent with an m/z of 149. These represent two additional reductive pathways for RDX degradation in ovine WRF, which have not been previously reported. The 24 ruminal isolates degraded RDX with varying efficiencies (0-96 %) over 120 h. Of the most efficient degraders identified, Clostridium polysaccharolyticum and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans subsp. desulfuricans degraded RDX when medium was supplemented with both nitrogen and carbon, while Anaerovibrio lipolyticus, Prevotella ruminicola, and Streptococcus bovis IFO utilized RDX as a sole source of nitrogen. This study showed that organisms in whole rumen fluid, as well as several ruminal isolates, have the ability to degrade RDX in vitro and, for the first time, delineated the metabolic pathway for its biodegradation.

  2. Haloimpatiens lingqiaonensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium isolated from paper-mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dildar; Zhang, Nai-Fang; Sun, Cong; Zhang, Wen-Wu; Han, Shuai-Bo; Pan, Jie; Wu, Min; Th, Dilbar; Zhu, Xu-Fen

    2015-11-11

    An anaerobic bacterium, strain ZC-CMC3T, was isolated from a wastewater sample in Zhejiang, China. Cells were Gram-positive, peritrichous, non-spore-forming and rod-shaped (0.6-1.2 × 2.9-5.1 μm). Strain ZC-CMC3T was able to grow at 25-48 °C (optimum 43 °C), and pH 5.5-8.0 (optimum pH 7.0). NaCl concentration range of growth was 0-3 % (w/v) with the optimum 0 %. Catalase- and Oxidase- negative. The major polar lipids of the isolate were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, several phospholipids and glycolipids. Main fermentation products from PYG medium were formate, acetate, lactate and ethanol. Substrates which could be utilized were peptone, tryptone, yeast extract and beef extract. No respiratory quinone was detected. The mainly fatty acids were C14:0, C16:0, C16:1 cis 7 and C16:1 cis 9. The DNA G+C content was 30.0 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate belonged to the family Clostridiaceae. The most closely phylogenetic related species was Oceanirhabdus sediminicola NH-JN4T (with 92.8 % sequence similarity) and Clostridium tepidiprofundi SG 508T (with 92.6 % sequence similarity). On the basis of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics, we propose that strain ZC-CMC3T as a novel species of a novel genus in the family Clostridiaceae, for which the name Haloimpatiens lingqiaonensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of type species is ZC-CMC3T (KCTC 15321T = JCM 19210T= CCTCC AB 2013104T).

  3. Isolation and characterization of an active mannanase-producing anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium tertium KT-5A, from lotus soil.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, N; Tokiwa, Y

    1998-03-01

    Of 10 strains of mannanase-producing anaerobic bacteria isolated from soils and methanogenic sludges, Clostridium tertium KT-5A, which was isolated from lotus soil, produced high amounts of extracellular beta-1,4-mannanase. The isolate was an aerotolerant anaerobe without quinon systems; the cell growth cultivated with no addition of reducing agents was also stable. High yields of mannanase were obtained by inducing enzyme production with galactomannan guar gum and beef extract/peptone as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. Fermentation end products on galactomannan fermentation were formate, acetate, lactate, butyrate, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The extracellular mannanase displayed high activity on galactomannans of locust bean gum galactose/mannose (G/M) ratio 1:4 and spino gum (G/M 1:3), but weak activity on guar gum galactomannan (G/M 1:2) and konjac glucomannan. As far as is known, this is the first report on the isolation of an active mannanase-producing anaerobic bacterium from natural environments.

  4. Caldithrix abyssi gen. nov., sp. nov., a nitrate-reducing, thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium isolated from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent, represents a novel bacterial lineage.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Kostrikina, Nadezhda A; Chernyh, Nikolai A; Pimenov, Nikolai V; Tourova, Tatyana P; Antipov, Alexei N; Spring, Stefan; Stackebrandt, Erko; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2003-01-01

    A novel, moderately thermophilic, strictly anaerobic, mixotrophic bacterium, designated strain LF13T, was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal chimney sample that was collected at a vent site at 14 degrees 45' N, 44 degrees 59' W on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Cells were Gram-negative, thin, non-motile rods of variable length. Strain LF13T grew optimally at pH 6.8-7.0 and 60 degrees C with 2.5% (w/v) NaCl. It grew chemo-organoheterotrophically, fermenting proteinaceous substrates, pyruvate and Casamino acids. The strain was able to grow by respiration, utilizing molecular hydrogen (chemolithoheterotrophically) or acetate as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor. Ammonium was formed in the course of denitrification. One-hundred milligrams of yeast extract per litre were required for growth of the strain. The G + C content of the genomic DNA of strain LF13T was 42.5 mol%. Neither 16S rDNA sequence similarity values nor phylogenetic analysis unambiguously related strain LF13T with members of any recognized bacterial phyla. On the basis of 16S rDNA sequence comparisons, and in combination with physiological and morphological traits, a novel genus, Caldithrix, is proposed, with strain LF13T (= DSM 13497T =VKM B-2286T) representing the type species, Caldithrix abyssi.

  5. Methanosarcina flavescens sp. nov., a methanogenic archaeon isolated from a full-scale anaerobic digester.

    PubMed

    Kern, Tobias; Fischer, Martin A; Deppenmeier, Uwe; Schmitz, Ruth A; Rother, Michael

    2016-03-01

    A novel, strictly anaerobic, methanogenic archaeon, strain E03.2, was isolated from a full-scale biogas plant in Germany. Cells were non-motile sarcina-like cocci, occurring in aggregates. Strain E03.2 grows autotrophically on H2 plus CO2, additionally cells can utilize acetate, methanol, moni-, di- and trimethylamine as carbon and energy sources; however, growth or methanogenesis on formate was not observed. Yeast extract and vitamins stimulate growth but were not mandatory.The optimal growth temperature was approximately 45 °C; maximal growth rates were obtained at pH about 7.0 at approximately 6.8 mM NaCl. The DNA G+C content of strain E03.2T was 41.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and mcrA gene sequences placed strain E03.2T within the genus Methanosarcina. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identity strain E03.2T was related to seven different Methanosarcina species, but most closely related to M. thermophila TM-1T. Phenotypical, physiological and genomic characteristics indicated that strain E03.2T represents a novel species. The name Methanosarcina flavescens sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species, with strain E03.2T (=DSM 100822 =JCM 30921) as the type strain.

  6. Study of novel pure culture HBCD-1, effectively degrading Hexabromocyclododecane, isolated from an anaerobic reactor.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xingxing; Huang, Xiangyan; Jing, Fei; Zhang, Zaili; Wei, Dongyang; Jia, Xiaoshan

    2015-06-01

    In this study, two pure strains, named HBCD-1 and HBCD-2, were isolated from a continuous anaerobic reactor over 300-days acclimation, which processed high capability of biodegrading Hexabromocyclododecane. Both of the two strains degraded HBCD diastereomers in different extents, especially strain HBCD-1, which interestingly degraded α-HBCD effectively. All of the degrading results were well fitted with the first-order kinetics model. By morphological observation and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strain HBCD-1 showed highest similarity with Achromobacter sp. Under the optimal culturing conditions of 30°C, pH 7 and the initial HBCD concentration of 500μg/L, the biodegradation rate of HBCD-1 reached 90% after 8days treatment. Moreover, during the biodegradation process by HBCD-1 strain, the concentration of bromide ion was lower than the theoretical value. Finally, 4 metabolites were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), as well as a biodegradation pathway was proposed.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a moderately thermophilic anaerobic alkaliphile, Clostridium paradoxum sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Youhong Li; Wiegel, J.; Mandelco, L.

    1993-07-01

    Alkaliphilic, moderately thermophilic anaerobic bacteria able to grow above pH 10.5 and 55{degrees}C were isolated from various sewage plants in the United States. The strains were motile with two to six peritrichous flagella and formed round to slightly oval terminal spores in terminally distended and slightly enlarged cells. Sporulated cells remained motile. The pH range for growth was between 7.0 and 11.1, with an optimum of around 10.1. At pH 10.1 the temperature range for growth was between 30 and 63{degrees}C, with an optimum of 56{degrees}C. The shortest observed doubling time (glucose) was around 16 min at 56{degrees}C and pH 10.1. No dissimilatory sulfate reduction was detected. The organism utilized glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose, and pyruvate but required yeast extract or tryptone for growth. Optimal NaCl concentrations for growth were between 50 and 200 mM. The guanine-plus-cytosine content was 30.0 {+-} 0.10 mol%. On the basis of unique properties and 16S rRNA analysis, the strains are placed in a new species, Clostridium paradoxum, referring to the unusual retainment of motility by sporulated cells. Strain JW-YL-7 (DSM 7308) is designated as the type strain.

  8. Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. an obliqately anaerobic bacterium isolated from a remote Amazonian community in Peru.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Lindsey; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J; Tito, Raul Y; Ozga, Andrew T; Polo, Susan I; Lewis, Cecil M; Lawson, Paul A

    2015-10-01

    A strictly anaerobic Gram-stain positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium designated NE08V(T), was isolated from a fecal sample of an individual residing in a remote Amazonian community in Peru. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed the organism belonged to the genus Clostridium and is most closely related to Clostridium vulturis (97.4% sequence similarity) and was further characterized using biochemical and chemotaxonomic methods. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso C13:0 and C16:0 with a genomic DNA G + C content of 31.6 mol%. Fermentation products during growth with PYG were acetate and butyrate. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic information, strain NE08V was identified as representing a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium amazonense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NE08V(T) (DSM 23598(T) = CCUG 59712(T)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mobilisporobacter senegalensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium isolated from tropical shea cake.

    PubMed

    Mbengue, Malick; Thioye, Abdoulaye; Labat, Marc; Casalot, Laurence; Joseph, Manon; Samb, Abdoulaye; Ben Ali Gam, Zouhaier

    2016-01-08

    A new Gram-stain positive, endospore-forming, strictly anaerobic bacterium, designated strain Gal1T was isolated from shea cake, a waste material from the production of shea-butter originating from Saraya, Senegal. The cells were rod-shaped slightly curved, motile with peritrichous flagella. The strain is oxidase negative and catalase-negative. Growth was observed at temperatures ranging from 15 to 45 °C (optimum 30 °C) and at pH 6.5-9.3 (optimum pH 7.8). The salinity range for growth was 0-3.5% of NaCl (optimum 1%). Yeast extract is required for growth. Strain Gal1T fermented various carbohydrates such as mannose, mannitol, arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, glucose, maltose, sucrose, trehalose and lactose as positive reactions and the major end products were ethanol and acetate. The only major cellular fatty acid was C16:0 (19.5%). The DNA base G+C content of strain Gal1T was 33.8 mol%. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was related respectively to Mobilitalea sibirica DSM 26468T with 94.27% similarity, Clostridium populeti ATTC 3225T with 93.94%, Clostridium aminovalericum DSM 1283T and Anaerosporobacter mobilis DSM 15930T with 93.63%. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and the results of biochemical and physiological tests, strain Gal1T was clearly distinguished from closely related genera, and the strain Gal1T can be assigned to a new genus for which the name Mobilisporobacter senegalensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Gal1T (= DSM 26537T, = JCM 18753T).

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Acetate-Utilizing Anaerobes from a Freshwater Sediment.

    PubMed

    Scholten, J.C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2000-12-01

    Acetate-degrading anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater sediment were quantified by the most probable number technique. From the highest dilutions a methanogenic, a sulfate-reducing, and a nitrate-reducing microorganism were isolated with acetate as substrate. The methanogen (culture AMPB-Zg) was non-motile and rod-shaped with blunted ends (0.5-1 mm x 3-4 mm long). Doubling times with acetate at 30-35 degrees C were 5.6-8.1 days. The methanogen grew only on acetate. Analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence showed that AMPB-Zg is closely related to Methanosaeta concilii. The isolated sulfate-reducing bacterium (strain ASRB-Zg) was rod-shaped with pointed ends (0.5-0.7 mm x 1.5-3.5 mm long), weakly motile, spore forming, and gram positive. At the optimum growth temperature of 30 degrees C the doubling times with acetate were 3.9-5.3 days. The bacterium grew on a range of organic acids, such as acetate, butyrate, fumarate, and benzoate, but did not grow autotrophically with H2, CO2, and sulfate. The closest relative of strain ASRB-Zg is Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans. The nitrate-reducing bacterium (strain ANRB-Zg) was rod-shaped (0.5-0.7 mm x 0.7-1 mm long), weakly motile, and gram negative. Optimum growth with acetate occurred at 20-25 degrees C. The bacterium grew on a range of organic substrates, such as acetate, butyrate, lactate, and glucose, and did grow autotrophically with H2, CO2, and oxygen but not with nitrate. In the presence of acetate and nitrate, thiosulfate was oxidized to sulfate. Phylogenetically, the closest relative of strain ANRB-Zg is Variovorax paradoxus.

  11. Fusibacter fontis sp. nov., a sulfur-reducing, anaerobic bacterium isolated from a mesothermic Tunisian spring.

    PubMed

    Fadhlaoui, Khaled; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Fauque, Guy; Hamdi, Moktar; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-10-01

    Strain KhalAKB1T, a mesophilic, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium, was isolated from water collected from a mesothermic Tunisian spring. Cells were Gram-staining-positive rods, occurring singly or in pairs and motile by one lateral flagellum. Strain KhalAKB1T grew at 15-45 °C (optimum 30 °C), at pH 5.5-8.5 (optimum pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0-35 g NaCl l- 1 (optimum 1 g NaCl l- 1). It fermented yeast extract and a wide range of carbohydrates including cellobiose, d-glucose, d-ribose, sucrose, d-xylose, maltose, d-galactose and starch as electron donors. Acetate, ethanol, CO2 and H2 were end products of glucose metabolism. It reduced elemental sulfur, but not sulfate, thiosulfate or sulfite, into sulfide. The DNA G+C content was 37.6 mol%. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggested Fusibacter bizertensis as the closest relative of this isolate (identity of 97.2 % to the type strain). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and genotypic taxonomic characteristics, strain KhalAKB1T is proposed to be assigned to a novel species within the genus Fusibacter, order Clostridiales, Fusibacter fontis sp. nov. The type strain is KhalAKB1T ( = DSM 28450T = JCM 19912T).

  12. Brassicibacter mesophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from food industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ming-Xu; Zhang, Wen-Wu; Zhang, Yan-Zhou; Tan, Hai-Qin; Zhang, Xin-Qi; Wu, Min; Zhu, Xu-Fen

    2012-12-01

    A novel mesophilic, strictly anaerobic bacterium, strain BM(T), was isolated from food industry wastewater. The cells were motile, non-spore-forming rods and stained Gram-negative. Growth of strain BM(T) was observed at 16-44 °C (optimum 37 °C) and pH 6.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.5). The NaCl concentration range for growth was 0-8% (optimum 1.5%, w/v). Strain BM(T) was chemo-organotrophic, using a few sugars and amino acids as sole carbon and energy sources. The fermentation products from peptone-yeast extract broth were propionate, formate, acetate, ethanol and isovalerate. Indole, NH(3) and H(2)S were produced from peptone. No respiratory quinones could be detected. The major fatty acids were iso-C(15:0) (39.3%), iso-C(15:0) dimethyl acetal (10.1%), anteiso-C(15:0) (7.6%), C(14:0) (6.1%) and C(16:0) (5.6%). The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol and a number of unidentified aminoglycolipids, glycolipids and phospholipids. The DNA G+C content was 28.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain BM(T) was related to various genera of the family Clostridiaceae, and its closest relatives were Sporosalibacterium faouarense SOL3f37(T) (94.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Proteiniborus ethanoligenes GW(T) (92.1%) and Clostridiisalibacter paucivorans 37HS60(T) (92.0%). In recognition of its distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, isolate BM(T) is proposed to represent a novel species of a new genus, Brassicibacter mesophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Brassicibacter mesophilus is BM(T) ( = JCM 16868(T)  = DSM 24659(T)).

  13. Trophic links between the acetogen Clostridium glycolicum KHa and the fermentative anaerobe Bacteroides xylanolyticus KHb, isolated from Hawaiian forest soil.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Sindy; Gössner, Anita S; Drake, Harold L

    2011-09-01

    Isolate KH was obtained from Hawaiian forest soil and found to be composed of two functionally linked anaerobes, KHa and KHb. Gene analyses (16S rRNA, fhs, cooS) identified KHa as an acetogenic strain of Clostridium glycolicum and KHb as Bacteroides xylanolyticus. KHb fermented xylan and other saccharides that KHa could not utilize and formed products (e.g., ethanol and H(2)) that supported the acetogenic growth of KHa.

  14. Clostridium huakuii sp. nov., an anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium isolated from methanogenic consortia.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zhiyong; Wang, Yanwei; Zhang, Chi; Song, Jinlong; Zhai, Yi; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Huimin; Chen, Xiaorong; Li, Yanting; Zhao, Bingqiang; Zhao, Bin

    2014-12-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, spore-forming, obligately anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium, designated LAM1030(T), was isolated from methanogenic consortia enriched from biogas slurry collected from the large-scale anaerobic digester of Modern Farming Corporation in Hebei Province, China. Cells of strain LAM1030(T) were motile, straight or spiral-rod-shaped. Strain LAM1030(T) could utilize glucose, fructose, maltose, galactose, lactose, sucrose, cellobiose, mannitol, pyruvate, succinic acid and tryptophan as the sole carbon source. Acetic acid, isovaleric acid and butanoic acid were the main products of glucose fermentation. Sodium sulfite was used as an electron acceptor. Growth of strain LAM1030(T) was completely inhibited by the addition of ampicillin, tetracycline, gentamicin or erythromycin at a concentration of 20 µg ml(-1). The main polar lipids of strain LAM1030(T) were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, 11 unknown glycolipids and two unknown phospholipids. No respiratory quinone was detected. The major fatty acids of strain LAM1030(T) were C16 : 0 (21.1 %), C14 : 0 (10.3 %), summed feature 9 (including C16:0 10-methyl and/or iso-C17:1 ω9c) (11.3% ), summed feature 3 (including C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω6c) (10.6% ) and iso-C15 : 0 (6.6 %). Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain LAM1030(T) belonged to the genus Clostridium and was most closely related to Clostridium subterminale DSM 6970(T), Clostridium thiosulfatireducens DSM 13105(T) and Clostridium sulfidigenes DSM 18982(T), with 97.0, 96.9 and 96.8 % similarity, respectively. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain LAM1030(T) was 31.2±0.3 mol%. On the basis of its phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characterization, strain LAM1030(T) is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium huakuii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LAM1030(T) ( = ACCC 00698(T

  15. Intra-Genomic Heterogeneity in 16S rRNA Genes in Strictly Anaerobic Clinical Isolates from Periodontal Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiazhen; Miao, Xinyu; Xu, Meng; He, Junlin; Xie, Yi; Wu, Xingwen; Chen, Gang; Yu, Liying; Zhang, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Members of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella and Fusobacterium are the predominant culturable obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontal abscesses. When determining the cumulative number of clinical anaerobic isolates from periodontal abscesses, ambiguous or overlapping signals were frequently encountered in 16S rRNA gene sequencing chromatograms, resulting in ambiguous identifications. With the exception of the genus Veillonella, the high intra-chromosomal heterogeneity of rrs genes has not been reported. Methods The 16S rRNA genes of 138 clinical, strictly anaerobic isolates and one reference strain were directly sequenced, and the chromatograms were carefully examined. Gene cloning was performed for 22 typical isolates with doublet sequencing signals for the 16S rRNA genes, and four copies of the rrs-ITS genes of 9 Prevotella intermedia isolates were separately amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared. Five conserved housekeeping genes, hsp60, recA, dnaJ, gyrB1 and rpoB from 89 clinical isolates of Prevotella were also amplified by PCR and sequenced for identification and phylogenetic analysis along with 18 Prevotella reference strains. Results Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes was apparent in clinical, strictly anaerobic oral bacteria, particularly in the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. One hundred out of 138 anaerobic strains (72%) had intragenomic nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple locations, and 13 strains (9.4%) had intragenomic insertions or deletions in the 16S rRNA gene. In the genera Prevotella and Veillonella, 75% (67/89) and 100% (19/19) of the strains had SNPs in the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Gene cloning and separate amplifications of four copies of the rrs-ITS genes confirmed that 2 to 4 heterogeneous 16S rRNA copies existed. Conclusion Sequence alignment of five housekeeping genes revealed that intra-species nucleotide similarities were very high in the genera Prevotella, ranging from 94.3–100%. However, the

  16. Intra-Genomic Heterogeneity in 16S rRNA Genes in Strictly Anaerobic Clinical Isolates from Periodontal Abscesses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiazhen; Miao, Xinyu; Xu, Meng; He, Junlin; Xie, Yi; Wu, Xingwen; Chen, Gang; Yu, Liying; Zhang, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella and Fusobacterium are the predominant culturable obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontal abscesses. When determining the cumulative number of clinical anaerobic isolates from periodontal abscesses, ambiguous or overlapping signals were frequently encountered in 16S rRNA gene sequencing chromatograms, resulting in ambiguous identifications. With the exception of the genus Veillonella, the high intra-chromosomal heterogeneity of rrs genes has not been reported. The 16S rRNA genes of 138 clinical, strictly anaerobic isolates and one reference strain were directly sequenced, and the chromatograms were carefully examined. Gene cloning was performed for 22 typical isolates with doublet sequencing signals for the 16S rRNA genes, and four copies of the rrs-ITS genes of 9 Prevotella intermedia isolates were separately amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared. Five conserved housekeeping genes, hsp60, recA, dnaJ, gyrB1 and rpoB from 89 clinical isolates of Prevotella were also amplified by PCR and sequenced for identification and phylogenetic analysis along with 18 Prevotella reference strains. Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes was apparent in clinical, strictly anaerobic oral bacteria, particularly in the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. One hundred out of 138 anaerobic strains (72%) had intragenomic nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple locations, and 13 strains (9.4%) had intragenomic insertions or deletions in the 16S rRNA gene. In the genera Prevotella and Veillonella, 75% (67/89) and 100% (19/19) of the strains had SNPs in the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Gene cloning and separate amplifications of four copies of the rrs-ITS genes confirmed that 2 to 4 heterogeneous 16S rRNA copies existed. Sequence alignment of five housekeeping genes revealed that intra-species nucleotide similarities were very high in the genera Prevotella, ranging from 94.3-100%. However, the inter-species similarities were

  17. Isolation and characterization of Dehalobacter sp. strain UNSWDHB capable of chloroform and chlorinated ethane respiration.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yie K; Holland, Sophie I; Ertan, Haluk; Manefield, Mike; Lee, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Dehalobacter sp. strain UNSWDHB can dechlorinate up to 4 mM trichloromethane at a rate of 0.1 mM per day to dichloromethane and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1 mM, 0.1 mM per day) with the unprecedented product profile of 1,2-dichloroethane and vinyl chloride. 1,1,1-trichloroethane and 1,1-dichloroethane were slowly utilized by strain UNSWDHB and were not completely removed, with minimum threshold concentrations of 0.12 mM and 0.07 mM respectively under growth conditions. Enzyme kinetic experiments confirmed strong substrate affinity for trichloromethane and 1,1,2-trichloroethane (Km  = 30 and 62 µM respectively) and poor substrate affinity for 1,1,1-trichloroethane and 1,1-dichloroethane (Km  = 238 and 837 µM respectively). Comparison of enzyme kinetic and growth data with other trichloromethane respiring organisms (Dehalobacter sp. strain CF and Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PR) suggests an adaptation of strain UNSWDHB to trichloromethane. The trichloromethane RDase (TmrA) expressed by strain UNSWDHB was identified by BN-PAGE and functionally characterized. Amino acid comparison of homologous RDases from all three organisms revealed only six significant amino acid substitutions/deletions, which are likely to be crucial for substrate specificity. Furthermore, strain UNSWDHB was shown to grow without exogenous supply of cobalamin confirming genomic-based predictions of a fully functional cobalamin synthetic pathway. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Degradation of Cyanophycin by Sedimentibacter hongkongensis Strain KI and Citrobacter amalonaticus Strain G Isolated from an Anaerobic Bacterial Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Obst, Martin; Krug, Andreas; Luftmann, Heinrich; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Using a combination of various enrichment techniques, the strictly anaerobic, gram-positive, endospore-forming bacterium Sedimentibacter hongkongensis strain KI as revealed by 16S rRNA analysis and the gram-negative enterobacterium Citrobacter amalonaticus strain G as revealed by physiological tests were isolated from an anaerobic cyanophycin (CGP)-degrading bacterial consortium. S. hongkongensis strain KI is the first anaerobic bacterium with the ability to hydrolyze CGP to β-Asp-Arg and β-Asp-Lys dipeptides, as revealed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. However, these primary accumulated hydrolysis products were only partially used by S. hongkongensis strain KI, and significant growth on CGP did not occur. On the other hand, C. amalonaticus strain G did not degrade CGP but grew on the β-linked iso-dipeptides formed in vitro by enzymatic CGP degradation or in vivo by metabolic activity of S. hongkongensis strain KI. Dipeptide utilization occurred at the highest rate if both strains were used in cocultivation experiments with CGP, indicating that cooperation between different bacteria occurs in anaerobic natural environments for complete CGP turnover. The amino acids obtained from the cleavage of dipeptides were fermented to ethanol, acetic acid, and succinic acid, as revealed by gas chromatographic analysis and by spectrophotometric enzyme assays. PMID:16000772

  19. Anaerobic Degradation of the Benzene Nucleus by a Facultatively Anaerobic Microorganism1

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barrie F.; Campbell, William L.; Chinoy, Ira

    1970-01-01

    A bacterium was isolated by elective culture with p-hydroxybenzoate as substrate and nitrate as electron acceptor. It grew either aerobically or anaerobically, by nitrate respiration, on a range of aromatic compounds. The organism was identified as a pseudomonad and was given the trivial name Pseudomonas PN-1. Benzoate and p-hydroxybenzoate were metabolized aerobically via protocatechuate, followed by meta cleavage catalyzed by protocatechuic acid-4,5-oxygenase, to yield α-hydroxy-γ-carboxymuconic semialdehyde. Pseudomonas PN-1 grew rapidly on p-hydroxybenzoate under strictly anaerobic conditions, provided nitrate was present, even though protocatechuic acid-4,5-oxygenase was repressed. Suspensions of cells grown anaerobically on p-hydroxybenzoate oxidized benzoate with nitrate and produced 4 to 5 μmoles of CO2 per μmole of benzoate added; these cells did not oxidize benzoate aerobically. The patterns of the oxidation of aromatic substrates with oxygen or nitrate by cells grown aerobically or anaerobically on different aromatic compounds indicated that benzoate rather than protocatechuate was a key intermediate in the early stages of anaerobic metabolism. It was concluded that the pathway for the anaerobic breakdown of the aromatic ring is different and quite distinct from the aerobic pathway. Mechanisms for the anaerobic degradation of the benzene nucleus by Pseudomonas PN-1 are discussed. PMID:5419260

  20. Proteiniclasticum ruminis gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic proteolytic bacterium isolated from yak rumen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kegui; Song, Lei; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2010-09-01

    Two strictly anaerobic, proteolytic bacterial strains, designated strain D3RC-2(T) and D3RC-3r, were isolated from a cellulose-degrading mixed culture enriched from yak rumen content. The strains were Gram-stain negative and non-spore-forming with cell sizes of 0.5-0.8 x 0.6-2.0 mum. The temperature range for growth was 24-46 degrees C (optimum 38-39 degrees C) and the pH range was between 5.6 and 8.7 (optimum 7.0-7.3). Both strains used soya peptone, tryptone, l-phenylalanine, l-leucine, l-methionine, l-serine, l-valine, l-threonine and l-histidine as carbon and nitrogen sources, but did not use any of the saccharides tested. The major fermentation products from PY medium were acetate, propionate and iso-butyrate. The DNA G+C contents of strains D3RC-2(T) and D3RC-3r were 41.0+/-0.1 mol% and 41.3+/-0.1 mol% (HPLC), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the two strains represented a new phyletic sublineage within the family Clostridiaceae, with <93.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to recognized species. On the basis of the phenotypic, genotypic and physiological evidence, strains D3RC-2(T) and D3RC-3r are proposed as representing a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Proteiniclasticum ruminis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is D3RC-2(T) (=AS 1.5057(T)=JCM 14817(T)).

  1. Dethiosulfovibrio salsuginis sp. nov., an anaerobic, slightly halophilic bacterium isolated from a saline spring.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cárdenas, C; López, G; Patel, B K C; Baena, S

    2010-04-01

    A mesophilic, strictly anaerobic, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated strain USBA 82(T), was isolated from a terrestrial saline spring in the Colombian Andes. The non-spore-forming curved rods (5-7 x 1.3 microm) with pointed or rounded ends, stained Gram-negative and were motile by means of laterally inserted flagella. The strain grew optimally at 30 degrees C (growth range 20-40 degrees C), pH 7.3 (growth range pH 5.5-8.5) and 2 % (w/v) NaCl (growth range 0.1-7 % NaCl). The strain fermented peptides, amino acids and a few organic acids, but growth was not observed on carbohydrates, alcohols or fatty acids. The strain reduced thiosulfate and sulfur to sulfide. Sulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as electron acceptors. On peptone alone, acetate, succinate, propionate and traces of ethanol were formed, but in the presence of thiosulfate, acetate and succinate were formed. The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was 52 mol% (T(m)). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain USBA 82(T) was affiliated to Dethiosulfovibrio peptidovorans within the phylum Synergistetes with a similarity value of approximately 93 %. Based on the differences between the new strain and the type species of the genus Dethiosulfovibrio, we suggest that strain USBA 82(T) represents a novel species of the genus for which the name Dethiosulfovibrio salsuginis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is USBA 82(T) (=DSM 21565(T)=KCTC 5659(T)).

  2. Akkermansia glycaniphila sp. nov., an anaerobic mucin-degrading bacterium isolated from reticulated python faeces.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; Aalvink, Steven; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-11-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, strictly anaerobic, oval-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (strain PytT) was isolated from reticulated python faeces. Strain PytT was capable of using mucin as sole carbon, energy and nitrogen source. Cells could grow singly, in pairs, and were also found to aggregate. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of filamentous structures connecting individual bacterial cells. Strain PytT could grow on a limited number of single sugars, including N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, glucose, lactose and galactose, but only when a plentiful protein source was provided. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed strain PytT to belong to the Verrucomicrobiae class I, family Akkermansiaceae, genus Akkermansia, with Akkermansia muciniphila MucT as the closest relative (94.4 % sequence similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization revealed low relatedness of 28.3 % with A. muciniphila MucT. The G+C content of DNA from strain PytT was 58.2 mol%. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) of the genome of strain PytT compared to the genome of strain MucT was 79.7 %. Chemotaxonomic data supported the affiliation of strain PytT to the genus Akkermansia. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and genetic characteristics, strain PytT represents a novel species of the genus Akkermansia, for which the name Akkermansia glycaniphila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PytT (=DSM 100705T=CIP 110913T).

  3. Exercise at anaerobic threshold intensity and insulin secretion by isolated pancreatic islets of rats

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; Paiva, Mauricio Ferreira; Mota, Clécia Alencar Soares; Ribeiro, Carla; de Almeida Leme, José Alexandre Curiacos; Luciano, Eliete

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acute exercise and exercise training at the anaerobic threshold (AT) intensity on aerobic conditioning and insulin secretion by pancreatic islets, adult male Wistar rats were submitted to the lactate minimum test (LMT) for AT determination. Half of the animals were submitted to swimming exercise training (trained), 1 h/day, 5 days/week during 8 weeks, with an overload equivalent to the AT. The other half was kept sedentary. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were submitted to an oral glucose tolerance test and to another LMT. Then, the animals were sacrificed at rest or immediately after 20 minutes of swimming exercise at the AT intensity for pancreatic islets isolation. At the end of the experiment mean workload (% bw) at AT was higher and blood lactate concentration (mmol/L) was lower in the trained than in the control group. Rats trained at the AT intensity showed no alteration in the areas under blood glucose and insulin during OGTT test. Islet insulin content of trained rats was higher than in the sedentary rats while islet glucose uptake did not differ among the groups. The static insulin secretion in response to the high glucose concentration (16.7 mM) of the sedentary group at rest was lower than the sedentary group submitted to the acute exercise and the inverse was observed in relation to the trained groups. Physical training at the AT intensity improved the aerobic condition and altered insulin secretory pattern by pancreatic islets. PMID:21099318

  4. Evidence for an anaerobic syntrophic benzoate degradation threshold and isolation of the syntrophic benzoate degrader

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, B.T.; McInerney, M.J.; Warikoo, V.

    1995-02-01

    An anaerobic, motile, gram-negative, rod-shaped, syntrophic. benzoate-degrading bacterium, strain SB. was isolated in pure culture with crotonate as the energy source. Benzoate was degraded only in association with an H{sub 2}-using bacterium. The kinetics of benzoate degradation by cell suspensions of strain SB in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G-11 was studied by using progress curve analysis. The coculture degraded benzoate to a threshold concentration of 214 nM to 6.5 {mu}M, with no further benzoate degradation observed even after extended incubation times. The value of the threshold depended on the amount of benzoate added and, consequently, the amount of acetate produced. The addition of sodium acetate. but not that of sodium chloride, affected the threshold value; higher acetate concentrations resulted in higher threshold values for benzoate. When a cell suspension that had reached a threshold benzoate concentration was reamended with benzoate, benzoate was used without a lag. The hydrogen partial pressure was very low and formate was not detected in cell suspensions that had degraded benzoate to a threshold value. The Gibbs free energy change calculations showed that the degradation of benzoate was favorable when the threshold was reached. These studies showed that the threshold for benzoate degradation was not caused by nutritional limitations. the loss of metabolic activity, or inhibition by hydrogen or formate. The data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the existence of a threshold, but a kinetic explanation based on acetate inhibition may also account for the existence of a threshold.

  5. Crassaminicella profunda gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic marine bacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Lakhal, Raja; Pradel, Nathalie; Postec, Anne; Ollivier, Bernard; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Godfroy, Anne; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Galés, Grégoire

    2015-09-01

    A novel, anaerobic, chemo-organotrophic bacterium, designated strain Ra1766H(T), was isolated from sediments of the Guaymas basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) taken from a depth of 2002  m. Cells were thin, motile, Gram-stain-positive, flexible rods forming terminal endospores. Strain Ra1766H(T) grew at temperatures of 25-45 °C (optimum 30 °C), pH 6.7-8.1 (optimum 7.5) and in a salinity of 5-60 g l(-1) NaCl (optimum 30 g l(-1)). It was an obligate heterotrophic bacterium fermenting carbohydrates (glucose and mannose) and organic acids (pyruvate and succinate). Casamino acids and amino acids (glutamate, aspartate and glycine) were also fermented. The main end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, butyrate, ethanol, H2 and CO2. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, fumarate, nitrate, nitrite and Fe(III) were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14  : 0, C16 : 1ω7, C16 : 1ω7 DMA and C16 : 0. The main polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 33.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain Ra1766H(T) was affiliated to cluster XI of the order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes. The closest phylogenetic relative of Ra1766H(T) was Geosporobacter subterraneus (94.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of phylogenetic inference and phenotypic properties, strain Ra1766H(T) ( = DSM 27501(T) = JCM 19377(T)) is proposed to be the type strain of a novel species of a novel genus, named Crassaminicella profunda.

  6. Isolation and characterization of xylan-degrading strains of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens from a napier grass-fed anaerobic digester

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, G.W.; Aldrich, H.C.; Williams, D.; Mannarelli, B.; Wilkie, A.; Hespell, R.B.; Smith, P.H.; Ingram, L.O.

    1988-05-01

    Six new xylanolytic bacterial strains have been isolated from a Napier grass-fed anaerobic digester. These strains were identified as Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and were similar in many respects to ruminal isolates described previously. The new isolates exhibited a high degree of DNA homology with several ruminal strains of B. fibrisolvens. Xylan or xylose was required to induce the production of enzymes for xylan degradation, xylanase and xylosidase. Production of these was repressed in the presence of glucose. Xylanase activity was predominantly extracellular, while that of xylosidases was cell associated. The new isolates of B. fibrisolvens grew well in defined medium containing xylan as the sole carbon source and did not produce obvious slime or capsular layers. These strains may be useful for future genetic investigations.

  7. Diversity of anaerobic heterotrophic thermophiles isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Wery, Nathalie; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Lesongeur, Françoise; Barbier, Georges

    2002-08-01

    Abstract During the 'MARVEL' oceanographical cruise performed in September 1997, samples were collected from the deep-sea vents of hydrothermal sites on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Eighty-four thermophilic and hyperthermophilic heterotrophic microorganisms were isolated using different culture media containing cellobiose, xylan, starch, lipidic or proteic substrates. These isolates were obtained in anaerobic conditions, at 65 degrees C, 85 degrees C and 95 degrees C. Fifty of them were classified using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis, random amplified polymorphic DNA and 16S rDNA sequencing. The strains classified have been assigned to the archaeal order Thermococcales and to the bacterial orders Thermotogales and Clostridiales. Variations in growth temperature and carbon sources were efficient enough to generate taxonomic diversity within enrichment cultures. Presumptive new genera and new species were isolated. Two isolates were confirmed as type strains of new species of new genera recently described: Marinitoga camini and Caloranaerobacter azorensis.

  8. Expression of Genes Involved in Iron and Sulfur Respiration in a Novel Thermophilic Crenarchaeon Isolated from Acid-Sulfate-Chloride Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozubal, M.; Macur, R.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2007-12-01

    Acidic geothermal springs within Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an excellent opportunity to study microbial populations and their relationship with geochemical processes such as redox cycling and biomineralization of iron. Fourteen acid-sulfate-chloride (ASC) and acid-sulfate (AS) geothermal springs located in (YNP) have been extensively characterized for aqueous chemistry, solid phase mineral deposition and microbial diversity and distribution. The oxidation of Fe(II) with oxygen as an electron acceptor is exergonic under these conditions, consequently, Fe(II) may be an important electron donor driving primary production in ASC and AS habitats, and products of biomineralization (e.g. Fe[III]-oxides of varying crystallinity and structure, as well as jarosite in some cases) are common in the outflow channels of these environments. Recently, we isolated a novel Metallosphaera-like microorganism (Metallosphaera strain MK1) from an ASC spring in Norris Geyser Basin, YNP. Clone libraries (16S rRNA gene) from multiple sites suggest that microorganisms closely related to strain MK1 (between 98-100 percent similarity) dominate many spring locations between 55-80 C. The in situ abiotic oxidation rate of Fe(II) has been shown to be very slow in these systems and Metallosphaera strain MK1 has been directly implicated in biotic Fe(II) oxidation. Metallosphaera strain MK1 has been submitted for full genome sequencing and is yielding gene sequences related to the terminal oxidases SOXABC and SOXM super-complex. In addition, sequences from a recently characterized terminal oxidase FOX complex involved in Fe(II) and pyrite oxidation from Sulfolobus metallicus have been found in Metallosphaera strain MK1. A protein complex analogous to Metallosphaera sedula has been identified in strain MK1 and this complex has also been expressed in cells grown on pyrite and Fe(II). Other sequences identified in Metallosphaera strain MK1 that are involved in respiration are the TQO

  9. Characterization of Sporohalobacter salinus sp. nov., an anaerobic, halophilic, fermentative bacterium isolated from a hypersaline lake.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah, Manel; Karray, Fatma; Mhiri, Najla; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Alazard, Didier; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-02-01

    Halophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative bacterial strains were isolated from a sediment sample taken from under the salt crust of El-Jerid hypersaline lake in southern Tunisia by using tryptone or glucose as the substrate. One strain, CEJFT1B(T), was characterized phenotypically and phylogenetically. Cells were non-motile, non-spore-forming, short rods. Strain CEJFT1B(T) was able to grow in the presence of 5-30 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 20 %) and at 30-60 °C (optimum 45 °C). It grew at pH 5.5-7.8 and the optimum pH for growth was 6.8. The isolate required yeast extract for growth. Substrates utilized by strain CEJFT1B(T) as the sole carbon source included glucose, fructose, sucrose, pyruvate, Casamino acids and starch. Individual amino acids such as glutamate, lysine, methionine, serine, tyrosine, and amino acid mixtures formed by the Stickland reaction such as alanine-glycine, valine-proline, leucine-proline, isoleucine-proline were also utilized. Products of glucose fermentation were acetate (major product), butyrate, H2 and CO2. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CEJFT1B(T) was 32.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain CEJFT1B(T) should be assigned to the genus Sporohalobacter. The sequence similarity between strain CEJFT1B(T) and Sporohalobacter lortetii was 98.5 %, but DNA-DNA hybridization between the two strains revealed a relatedness value of 56.4 %, indicating that they are not related at the species level. The combination of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization data, and differences in substrate utilization support the view that strain CEJFT1B(T) represents a novel species of the genus Sporohalobacter, for which the name Sporohalobacter salinus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CEJFT1B(T) ( = DSM 26781(T) = JCM 19279(T)).

  10. Role of phospholipase A2 in activation of isolated cardiomyocyte respiration in postinfarction cardiosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Egorova, M V; Afanas'ev, S A; Popov, S V

    2008-12-01

    The rate of oxygen consumption by isolated cardiomyocytes was studied in rats with experimental postinfarction cardiosclerosis. The increase in oxygen consumption under these condition was comparable to that in melittin- and arachidonic acid-induced activation of phospholipase A2 in cardiomyocytes of intact animals. Bromophenacyl bromide inhibition of phospholipase A2 in cardiomyocytes of rats with postinfarction cardiosclerosis led to reduction of oxygen consumption rate to values characteristic of intact animal cardiomyocytes. The results confirm the hypothesis according to which high oxygen consumption in postinfarction cardiosclerosis is related to increased activity of phospholipase A2.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a Klebsiella oxytoca strain for simultaneous azo-dye anaerobic reduction and bio-hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yu, Han-Qing; Wu, Chao

    2012-07-01

    A facultative anaerobic bacteria strain GS-4-08, isolated from an anaerobic sequence batch reactor for synthetic dye wastewater treatment, was investigated for azo-dye decolorization. This bacterium was identified as a member of Klebsiella oxytoca based on Gram staining, morphology characterization and 16S rRNA gene analysis. It exhibited a good capacity of simultaneous decolorization and hydrogen production in the presence of electron donor. The hydrogen production was less affected even at a high Methyl Orange (MO) concentration of 0.5 mM, indicating a superior tolerability of this strain to MO. This efficient bio-hydrogen production from electron donor can not only avoid bacterial inhibition due to accumulation of volatile fatty acids during MO decolorization, but also can recover considerable energy from dye wastewater.

  12. Isolation and characterization of anaerobic bacteria for symbiotic recycling of uric acid nitrogen in the gut of various termites.

    PubMed

    Thong-On, Arunee; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Noda, Satoko; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Kajiwara, Susumu; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of the nitrogenous waste uric acid (UA) of wood-feeding termites by their gut bacteria is one of the significant aspects of symbiosis for the conservation of nitrogen sources. Diverse anaerobic UA-degrading bacteria comprising 16 species were isolated from the gut of eight termite species, and were assigned to Clostridia, Enterobacteriaceae, and low G+C Gram-positive cocci. UA-degrading Clostridia had never been isolated from termite guts. UA-degrading ability was sporadically distributed among phylogenetically various culturable anaerobic bacteria from termite guts. A strain of Clostridium sp., which was commonly isolated from three termite species and represented a probable new species in cluster XIVa of clostridia, utilized UA as a nitrogen source but not as a sole carbon and energy source. This feature is in clear contrast to that of well-studied purinolytic clostridia or previously isolated UA degraders from termite guts, which also utilize UA as a sole carbon and energy source. Ammonia is the major nitrogenous product of UA degradation. Various purines stimulated the growth of this strain when added to an otherwise growth-limiting, nitrogen poor medium. The bacterial species involved the recycling of UA nitrogen in the gut microbial community of termites are more diverse in terms of both taxonomy and nutritional physiology than previously recognized.

  13. Thermanaeromonas burensis sp. nov., a thermophilic anaerobe isolated from a subterranean clay environment.

    PubMed

    Gam, Zouhaier Ben Ali; Daumas, Sylvie; Casalot, Laurence; Bartoli-Joseph, Manon; Necib, Sophia; Linard, Yannick; Labat, Marc

    2016-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic, thermophilic and halotolerant strain, designated IA106T, was isolated from the seepage water collected in a metal biocorrosion test at a depth of 490 m, in a 130-160 m thick, subterranean Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation (158-152 million years old) in northern France. This geological formation has been selected as the potential host rock for the French high-level nuclear waste repository. Cells of strain IA106T stained Gram-positive and were non-motile, spore-forming, straight rods (0.5 × 2-6 μm). The five major fatty acids were C16 : 0 (15.9 %), C18 : 0 (15.4 %), iso-C17 : 1 I and/or anteiso-C17 : 1 B(14.8 %), iso-C17 : 0 (14.7 %) and iso-C15 : 0 (13.0 %). Growth was observed at temperatures ranging from 55 to 70 °C and at pH 5.5-9. The salinity range for growth was 0-20 g NaCl 1- 1. Yeast extract was required for growth. Strain IA106T was able to grow on lactate and various sugars in the presence of thiosulfate as electron acceptor. Sulfate, sulfite, elemental sulfur, fumarate, nitrate and nitrite were not reduced. The DNA G+C content was 60.2 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain IA106T belonged to the family Thermoanaerobacteraceae, class Clostridia, phylum Firmicutes, and was most closely related to Thermanaeromonas toyohensis DSM 14490T (95.16 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons and physiological characteristics, strain IA106T represents a novel species of the genus Thermanaeromonas, for which the name Thermanaeromonas burensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IA106T ( = DSM 26576T = JCM 18718T).

  14. Salimesophilobacter vulgaris gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium isolated from paper-mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Zhou; Fang, Ming-Xu; Zhang, Wen-Wu; Li, Tian-Tian; Wu, Min; Zhu, Xu-Fen

    2013-04-01

    A novel anaerobic, heterotrophic bacterium, designated strain Zn2(T), was isolated from the wastewater of a paper mill in Zhejiang, China. Cells were gram-type-positive rods, 0.5-0.8 µm wide and 2-4 µm long, and were motile by a lateral flagellum. The ranges of temperature and pH for growth were 10-50 °C and pH 6.0-9.5. Optimal growth occurred at 35 °C and pH 7.3-7.5. The strain did not require NaCl for growth, but its inclusion in the medium improved growth (optimum concentration 6 %). Substrates utilized as sole carbon sources were peptone, tryptone, Casamino acids, D-xylose, salicin, glycerol, formate, acetate and propionate. The main products of carbohydrate fermentation were acetate, formate, propionate and lactate. Elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and Fe(III) were used as electron acceptors, but sulfate, sulfite, nitrate, nitrite and Mn(IV) were not. Growth was inhibited by the addition of 10 µg ampicillin, penicillin, tetracycline or chloramphenicol ml(-1). iso-C15 : 0, C14 : 0, C16 : 0, C16 : 1 cis9 and C18 : 1 cis9 were the major fatty acids. Strain Zn2(T) did not contain any detectable menaquinones or ubiquinones. The main polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, two unknown phospholipids and four unknown glycolipids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 37 mol%, as determined by HPLC. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain Zn2(T) was a member of family Clostridiaceae, and was most closely related to the type strains of Geosporobacter subterraneus, Thermotalea metallivorans and Caminicella sporogenes, showing 91.2, 90.3 and 91.1 % sequence similarity, respectively. On the basis of its phenotypic and genotypic properties, strain Zn2(T) is suggested to represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Salimesophilobacter vulgaris gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Salimesophilobacter vulgaris is Zn2(T) ( = DSM 24770(T)

  15. Oceanirhabdus sediminicola gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium isolated from sea sediment.

    PubMed

    Pi, Ruo-Xi; Zhang, Wen-Wu; Fang, Ming-Xu; Zhang, Yan-Zhou; Li, Tian-Tian; Wu, Min; Zhu, Xu-Fen

    2013-11-01

    A novel anaerobic bacterium, designated NH-JN4(T) was isolated from a sediment sample collected in the South China Sea. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming, peritrichous and rod-shaped (0.5-1.2×2.2-7 µm). The temperature and pH ranges for growth were 22-42 °C and pH 6.0-8.5. Optimal growth occurred at 34-38 °C and pH 6.5-7.0. The NaCl concentration range for growth was 0.5-6 % (w/v) with an optimum of 2.5 %. Catalase and oxidase were not produced. Substrates which could be utilized were peptone, tryptone, yeast extract, beef extract and glycine. Main fermentation products from PYG medium were formate, acetate, butyrate and ethanol. Strain NH-JN4(T) could utilize sodium sulfite as an electron acceptor. No respiratory quinone was detected. The predominant fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and C16 : 0 DMA. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and glycolipids. The DNA G+C content was 35.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain NH-JN4(T) was a member of family Clostridiaceae, and was most closely related to Clostridium limosum ATCC 25620(T), Clostridium proteolyticum DSM 3090(T), Clostridium histolyticum ATCC 19401(T) and Clostridium tepidiprofundi SG 508(T), showing 94.0, 93.0, 92.9 and 92.3 % sequence similarity, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic properties, strain NH-JN4(T) represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Clostridiaceae, for which the name Oceanirhabdus sediminicola gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is NH-JN4(T) ( = JCM 18501(T) = CCTCC AB 2013103(T) = KCTC 15322(T)).

  16. Caloramator quimbayensis sp. nov., an anaerobic, moderately thermophilic bacterium isolated from a terrestrial hot spring.

    PubMed

    Rubiano-Labrador, Carolina; Baena, Sandra; Díaz-Cárdenas, Carolina; Patel, Bharat K C

    2013-04-01

    An anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, terminal-spore-forming bacterium, designated strain USBA A(T), was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring located at an altitude of 2683 m in the Andean region of Colombia (04° 50' 14.0″ N 75° 32' 53.4″ W). Cells of strain USBA A(T) were Gram-stain-positive, straight to slightly curved rods (0.9×2.5 µm), that were arranged singly or in pairs, and were motile by means of flagella. Growth occurred at 37-55 °C and pH 6.0-8.0, with a doubling time of 2 h under the optimal conditions (50 °C and pH 7.0). Glucose fermentation in strain USBA A(T) required yeast extract or peptone (each at 0.2 %, w/v). The novel strain fermented sugars, amino acids, Casamino acids, propanol, propionate, starch and dextrin, but no growth was observed on galactose, lactose, xylose, histidine, serine, threonine, benzoate, butyrate, lactate, pyruvate, succinate, methanol, ethanol, glycerol, casein, gelatin or xylan. The end products of glucose fermentation were formate, acetate, ethanol and lactate. Strain USBA A(T) did not grow autotrophically (with CO2 as carbon source and H2 as electron donor) and did not reduce thiosulfate, sulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, vanadium (V) or Fe (III) citrate. Growth of strain USBA A(T) was inhibited by ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, penicillin and streptomycin (each at 10 µg ml(-1)). The predominant fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 32.6 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain USBA A(T) belonged in the phylum Firmicutes and that its closest relative was Caloramator viterbiensis JW/MS-VS5(T) (95.0 % sequence similarity). A DNA-DNA relatedness value of only 30 % was recorded in hybridization experiments between strain USBA A(T) and Caloramator viterbiensis DSM 13723(T). Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic evidence and the results of the DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, strain USBA A

  17. Clostridium punense sp. nov., an obligate anaerobe isolated from healthy human faeces.

    PubMed

    Lanjekar, Vikram Bholanath; Marathe, Nachiket Prakash; Shouche, Yogesh Shreepad; Ranade, Dilip Ramchandra

    2015-12-01

    An obligately anaerobic, rod-shaped (0.5-1.0 × 2.0-10.0 μm), Gram-stain-positive bacterium, occurring mainly singly or in pairs, and designated BLPYG-8T, was isolated from faeces of a healthy human volunteer aged 56 years. Cells were non-motile. Oval, terminal spores were formed that swell the cells. The strain was affiliated with the genus Clostridium sensu stricto (Clostridium rRNA cluster I) as revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Strain BLPYG-8T showed 97.3 to 97.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Clostridium sulfidigenes DSM 18982T, Clostridium subterminale DSM 6970T and Clostridium thiosulfatireducens DSM 13105T. DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic analysis showed that the strain was distinct from its closest relatives, C. sulfidigenes DSM 18982T, C. subterminale DSM 6970T, C. thiosulfatireducens DSM 13105T with 54.2, 53.9 and 53.3 % DNA-DNA relatedness, respectively. Strain BLPYG-8T grew in PYG broth at temperatures between 20 and 40 °C (optimum 37 °C). The strain utilized a range of amino acids as well as carbohydrates as a source of carbon and energy. Glucose fermentation resulted in the formation of volatile fatty acids mainly acetic acid, n-butyric acid and organic acids such as succinic and lactic acid. The DNA G+C content of strain BLPYG-8T was 44.1 mol%. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were C14 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis and specific phenotypic characteristics and/or DNA G+C content differentiated the strain from its closest relatives. On the basis of these data, strain BLPYG-8T represents a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium punense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BLPYG-8T ( = DSM 28650T = CCUG 64195T = MCC 2737T).

  18. Isolation of a Rhizobium phaseoli cytochrome mutant with enhanced respiration and symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Soberón, M; Williams, H D; Poole, R K; Escamilla, E

    1989-01-01

    Cultured cells of a Rhizobium phaseoli wild-type strain (CE2) possess b-type and c-type cytochromes and two terminal oxidases: cytochromes o and aa3. Cytochrome aa3 was partially expressed when CE2 cells were grown on minimal medium, during symbiosis, and in well-aerated liquid cultures in a complex medium (PY2). Two cytochrome mutants of R. phaseoli were obtained and characterized. A Tn5-mob-induced mutant, CFN4201, expressed diminished amounts of b-type and c-type cytochromes, showed an enhanced expression of cytochrome oxidases, and had reduced levels of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, succinate, and NADH oxidase activities. Nodules formed by this strain had no N2 fixation activity. The other mutant, CFN4205, which was isolated by nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, had reduced levels of cytochrome o and higher succinate oxidase activity but similar NADH and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine oxidase activities when compared with the wild-type strain. Strain CFN4205 expressed a fourfold-higher cytochrome aa3 content when cultured on minimal and complex media and had twofold-higher cytochrome aa3 levels during symbiosis when compared with the wild-type strain. Nodules formed by strain CFN4205 fixed 33% more N2 than did nodules formed by the wild-type strain, as judged by the total nitrogen content found in plants nodulated by these strains. Finally, low-temperature photodissociation spectra of whole cells from strains CE2 and CFN4205 reveal cytochromes o and aa3. Both cytochromes react with O2 at -180 degrees C to give a light-insensitive compound. These experiments identify cytochromes o and aa3 as functional terminal oxidases in R. phaseoli. PMID:2644201

  19. Thioarsenate Formation Coupled with Anaerobic Arsenite Oxidation by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Geng; Huang, Liuqin; Jiang, Hongchen; Peng, Yue’e; Guo, Wei; Chen, Ziyu; She, Weiyu; Guo, Qinghai; Dong, Hailiang

    2017-01-01

    Thioarsenates are common arsenic species in sulfidic geothermal waters, yet little is known about their biogeochemical traits. In the present study, a novel sulfate-reducing bacterial strain Desulfotomaculum TC-1 was isolated from a sulfidic hot spring in Tengchong geothermal area, Yunnan Province, China. The arxA gene, encoding anaerobic arsenite oxidase, was successfully amplified from the genome of strain TC-1, indicating it has a potential ability to oxidize arsenite under anaerobic condition. In anaerobic arsenite oxidation experiments inoculated with strain TC-1, a small amount of arsenate was detected in the beginning but became undetectable over longer time. Thioarsenates (AsO4-xSx2- with x = 1–4) formed with mono-, di- and tri-thioarsenates being dominant forms. Tetrathioarsenate was only detectable at the end of the experiment. These results suggest that thermophilic microbes might be involved in the formation of thioarsenates and provide a possible explanation for the widespread distribution of thioarsenates in terrestrial geothermal environments. PMID:28769902

  20. Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov., a Novel Facultative Anaerobic Nanoflagellate Isolated from the Meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Takahiko; Kondo, Ryuji

    2015-09-01

    A novel facultative anaerobic bacterivorous nanoflagellate was isolated from the water just below the permanent oxic-anoxic interface of the meromictic Lake Suigetsu, Japan. We characterized the isolate using light and transmission electron microscopy and molecular phylogenetic analyses inferred from 18S rDNA sequences. The phylogenetic analyses showed that the isolate belonged to class Placididea (stramenopiles). The isolate showed key ultrastructural features of the Placididea, such as flagellar hairs with two unequal terminal filaments, microtubular root 2 changing in shape from an arced to an acute-angled shape, and a lack of an x-fiber in root 2. However, the isolate had a single helix in the flagellar transition region, which is a double helix in the two known placidid nanoflagellates Placidia cafeteriopsis and Wobblia lunata. Moreover, the isolate had different intracellular features compared with these two genera, such as the arrangement of basal bodies, the components of the flagellar apparatus, the number of mitochondria, and the absence (or presence) of paranuclear bodies. The 18S rDNA sequence was also phylogenetically distant from the clades of the known Placididae W. lunata and P. cafeteriopsis. Consequently, the newly isolated nanoflagellate was described as Suigetsumonas clinomigrationis gen. et sp. nov. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Usefulness of the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system for identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lau, S K P; Ng, K H L; Woo, P C Y; Yip, K‐t; Fung, A M Y; Woo, G K S; Chan, K‐m; Que, T‐l

    2006-01-01

    Using full 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing as the gold standard, 20 non‐duplicating anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures were analysed by the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system. The MicroSeq system successfully identified 13 of the 20 isolates. Four and three isolates were misidentified at the genus and species level, respectively. Although the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system is better than three commercially available identification systems also evaluated, its database needs to be expanded for accurate identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli. PMID:16443743

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Natranaerobius trueperi DSM 18760(T), an Anaerobic, Halophilic, Alkaliphilic, Thermotolerant Bacterium Isolated from a Soda Lake.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaomeng; Liao, Ziya; Holtzapple, Mark; Hu, Qingping; Zhao, Baisuo

    2017-09-07

    The anaerobic, halophilic, alkaliphilic, thermotolerant bacterium Natranaerobius trueperi was isolated from a soda lake in Wadi An Natrun, Egypt. It grows optimally at 3.7 M Na(+), pH 9.5, and 43°C. The draft genome consists of 2.63 Mb and is composed of 2,681 predicted genes. Genomic analysis showed that various genes are potentially involved in the adaptation mechanisms for osmotic stress, pH homeostasis, and high temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Guo et al.

  3. High rate of non-susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin in anaerobic isolates: Data from a clinical laboratory from Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Sadia Omer; Jabeen, Kauser; Qaiser, Saba; Ahsan, Syed Tanwir; Khan, Erum; Zafar, Afia

    2015-06-01

    Due to increasing resistance amongst anaerobic pathogens periodic surveillance of resistance has been recommended in regional/local settings. Anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not routinely performed in many laboratories in Pakistan, hence absence of local data may lead to inappropriate empirical therapy in serious cases. 121 clinically significant anaerobic strains (26/121; 21% bacteremic isolates) were isolated and saved from 2010 to 2011. Susceptibility testing against metronidazole, clindamycin, co-amoxiclav, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, linezolid and gatifloxacin was performed by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). A high proportion of non-susceptible strains to metronidazole (10% of 121 isolates) and clindamycin (12% of 121 isolates) was seen, most noticeable in Bacteroides fragilis. Three Bacteroides species strains were non-susceptible to both metronidazole and clindamycin. One strain of Clostridium species was fully resistant to metronidazole and had intermediate resistance to clindamycin. No resistance to any of the other tested antibiotics was seen. Resistance to metronidazole was higher in bacteremic vs. non bacteremic isolates (p = value 0.07). In our setting where there is a high usage of empirical metronidazole and clindamycin for the treatment of serious anaerobic infections clinicians should be aware of increased resistance to these agents. Periodic surveillance of resistance to anti-anaerobic drugs especially metronidazole and clindamycin should be performed to generate antibiogram and guide appropriate empiric therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Discovery of anaerobic lithoheterotrophic haloarchaea, ubiquitous in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Messina, Enzo; Smedile, Francesco; Roman, Pawel; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, Maria Carmen; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N; Kublanov, Ilya V; Samarov, Nazar I; Toshchakov, Stepan V; La Cono, Violetta; Yakimov, Michail M

    2017-05-01

    Hypersaline anoxic habitats harbour numerous novel uncultured archaea whose metabolic and ecological roles remain to be elucidated. Until recently, it was believed that energy generation via dissimilatory reduction of sulfur compounds is not functional at salt saturation conditions. Recent discovery of the strictly anaerobic acetotrophic Halanaeroarchaeum compels to change both this assumption and the traditional view on haloarchaea as aerobic heterotrophs. Here we report on isolation and characterization of a novel group of strictly anaerobic lithoheterotrophic haloarchaea, which we propose to classify as a new genus Halodesulfurarchaeum. Members of this previously unknown physiological group are capable of utilising formate or hydrogen as electron donors and elemental sulfur, thiosulfate or dimethylsulfoxide as electron acceptors. Using genome-wide proteomic analysis we have detected the full set of enzymes required for anaerobic respiration and analysed their substrate-specific expression. Such advanced metabolic plasticity and type of respiration, never seen before in haloarchaea, empower the wide distribution of Halodesulfurarchaeum in hypersaline inland lakes, solar salterns, lagoons and deep submarine anoxic brines. The discovery of this novel functional group of sulfur-respiring haloarchaea strengthens the evidence of their possible role in biogeochemical sulfur cycling linked to the terminal anaerobic carbon mineralisation in so far overlooked hypersaline anoxic habitats.

  5. Interactions of Cd and Cu in anaerobic estuarine sediments. 2: Bioavailability, body burdens and respiration effects as related to geochemical partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, J.H.; Alden, R.W. III

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between Cd and Cu distribution in sediment geochemical fractions and their bioavailability was studied. A fine-sandy textured estuarine sediment was treated with all combinations of 0, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg Cd and 0, 12, and 25 mg/kg Cu using the chloride salts of each metal. Grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), and hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) were exposed to the treated sediments in aquaria with 20 ppt artificial seawater for 14 d. Sediments were sequentially extracted before and after organism exposure to determine the exchangeable, easily reducible, organic-sulfide, moderately reducible, and acid extractable phases. Low mortalities were observed for all organism types and none were attributable to any of the treatments. The Cd and Cu concentrations in the easily reducible and organic-sulfide phases were found to be significantly related to the bioavailability of these metals. The most highly significant relationship was established between Cd in the easily reducible phase and body burden of Cd in the blue mussel. Notable interactions were found between Cd and Cu in some of the geochemical phases, body burdens, and respiration rates. Metal uptake, respiration, and interactions were highly dependent on the test species. A significant correlation was found between increased body burden and depressed respiration for Cd but not for Cu. Multiple regression models are used to describe these relationships. It appears that the interactive responses in the organisms are driven primarily by the sediment geochemical effects and mediated by individual organism processes. These results underscore the necessity of multicomponent (multielement) studies in assessing the fate and effects of toxic elements in the environment.

  6. Antimicrobial resistance among anaerobes isolated from clinical specimens in Kuwait hospitals: comparative analysis of 11-year data.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Wafaa; Al Hashem, Ghayda; Rotimi, Vincent O

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to compare the antimicrobial resistance trends among clinically relevant anaerobes against 9 different antibiotics over two periods, 2008-2012 and 2002-2007. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by determining the MICs using E test method. The interpretation of results was according to the breakpoints recommended by the Clinical Laboratory and Standard Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). A total of 2240 clinically significant isolates were collected between 2008 and 2012 in four teaching hospitals in Kuwait. The commonest isolates were Bacteroides fragilis (40.4%), Prevotella bivia (18.6%), Peptostreptococcus spp. (13.8%) and Bacteroides ovatus (11.1%). According to CLSI and EUCAST breakpoints used for the 2008-2012 and 2002-2007 isolates, high resistance rates to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, clindamycin, penicillin and piperacillin were noted among the Gram-negative isolates. They ranged between 0 and 0-62.1 and 62.1%, and 0 and 0-59.1 and 62.1%, respectively against clindamycin, 0 and 0-34.5 and 45.3%, and 0 and 0-45 and 57.5%, respectively against piperacillin and 0 and 0-24.2 and 24.2%, and 0 and 0-23.1 and 30.6%, respectively against amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. The mean interpretative results by both CLSI and EUCAST during the 2008-2012 and 2002-2007 periods showed that the B. fragilis isolates were highly resistant to penicillin (100 vs 100%), clindamycin (43.7 vs 44.2%), piperacillin (35.8 vs 42.7%) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (13.2 vs 14%), respectively. When compared with 2002-2007, the CLSI, but not EUCAST, demonstrated statistically significant decreased resistance to clindamycin (P < 0.03). However, both interpretative criteria showed demonstrable statistically significant decrease in resistance rates to imipenem (P < 0.00097 vs P < 0.00074), meropenem (P < 0.000006 vs P < 0.0407) and piperacillin (P < 0.000017 vs P < 0.0461). Our data shows that

  7. Transcriptomic analysis of lignocellulosic biomass degradation by the anaerobic fungal isolate Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A.

    PubMed

    Couger, M B; Youssef, Noha H; Struchtemeyer, Christopher G; Liggenstoffer, Audra S; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi reside in the rumen and alimentary tract of herbivores where they play an important role in the digestion of ingested plant biomass. The anaerobic fungal isolate Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A is an efficient biomass degrader, capable of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions in multiple types of lignocellulosic biomass. To understand the mechanistic and regulatory basis of biomass deconstruction in anaerobic fungi, we analyzed the transcriptomic profiles of C1A when grown on four different types of lignocellulosic biomass (alfalfa, energy cane, corn stover, and sorghum) versus a soluble sugar monomer (glucose). A total of 468.2 million reads (70.2 Gb) were generated and assembled into 27,506 distinct transcripts. CAZyme transcripts identified included 385, 246, and 44 transcripts belonging to 44, 13, and 8 different glycoside hydrolases (GH), carbohydrate esterases, and polysaccharide lyases families, respectively. Examination of CAZyme transcriptional patterns indicates that strain C1A constitutively transcribes a high baseline level of CAZyme transcripts on glucose. Although growth on lignocellulosic biomass substrates was associated with a significant increase in transcriptional levels in few GH families, including the highly transcribed GH1 β-glucosidase, GH6 cellobiohydrolase, and GH9 endoglucanase, the transcriptional levels of the majority of CAZyme families and transcripts were not significantly altered in glucose-grown versus lignocellulosic biomass-grown cultures. Further, strain C1A co-transcribes multiple functionally redundant enzymes for cellulose and hemicellulose saccharification that are mechanistically and structurally distinct. Analysis of fungal dockerin domain-containing transcripts strongly suggests that anaerobic fungal cellulosomes represent distinct catalytic units capable of independently attacking and converting intact plant fibers to sugar monomers. Collectively, these

  8. Recognition of anaerobic bacterial isolates in vitro using electronic nose technology.

    PubMed

    Pavlou, A; Turner, A P F; Magan, N

    2002-01-01

    Use of an electronic nose (e.nose) system to differentiation between anaerobic bacteria grown in vitro on agar media. Cultures of Clostridium spp. (14 strains) and Bacteroides fragilis (12 strains) were grown on blood agar plates and incubated in sampling bags for 30 min before head space analysis of the volatiles. Qualitative analyses of the volatile production patterns was carried out using an e.nose system with 14 conducting polymer sensors. Using data analysis techniques such as principal components analysis (PCA), genetic algorithms and neural networks it was possible to differentiate between agar blanks and individual species which accounted for all the data. A total of eight unknowns were correctly discriminated into the bacterial groups. This is the first report of in vitro complex volatile pattern recognition and differentiation of anaerobic pathogens. These results suggest the potential for application of e.nose technology in early diagnosis of microbial pathogens of medical importance.

  9. Glycosaminoglycan-depolymerizing enzymes produced by anaerobic bacteria isolated from the human mouth.

    PubMed

    Tipler, L S; Embery, G

    1985-01-01

    A number of obligately anaerobic bacteria, some implicated in periodontal disease, were screened for their ability to produce enzymes capable of degrading hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4-sulphate. Two screening methods were used following anaerobic incubation at 37 degrees C for 7 days. One involved incorporating the respective substrates and bovine-serum albumin into agar plates and, after incubation, flooding the plates with 2 M acetic acid. Clear zones were produced around colonies which produced enzymes capable of depolymerizing the substrates. The second was a sensitive spectrophotometric procedure based on the ability of certain bacteria to produce eliminase enzymes, which degrade the substrates to unsaturated products having a characteristic u.v. absorption at 232 nm. Strains of Bacteroides gingivalis and Bacteroides melaninogenicus degraded both substrates whereas Bacteroides asaccharolyticus degraded neither substrate by either method. Some bacteria gave negative results with the plate method whereas the more sensitive spectrophotometric assay proved positive. The number of anaerobic bacteria capable of degrading hyaluronic acid and chondroitin-4-sulphate in vitro may therefore have been underestimated in previous studies.

  10. Thermostilla marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, facultatively anaerobic planctomycete isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Slobodkina, Galina B; Panteleeva, Angela N; Beskorovaynaya, Darya A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Slobodkin, Alexander I

    2016-02-01

    A novel thermophilic planctomycete (strain SVX8T) was isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal vent, Vulcano Island, Italy. The temperature range for growth was 30-68 °C, with an optimum at 55 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0-8.0. Growth was observed at NaCl concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 4.5 % (w/v) with an optimum at 2.5-3.5 % (w/v). The isolate grew anaerobically using a number of mono-, di- and polysaccharides as electron donors and nitrate or elemental sulfur as electron acceptors or by fermentation. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite; sulfur was reduced to sulfide. Strain SVX8T did not grow at atmospheric concentration of oxygen but grew microaerobically (up to 2 % oxygen in the gas phase). The G+C content of the DNA of strain SVX8T was 58.5 mol%. Based on phylogenetic position and phenotypic features, the new isolate is considered to represent a novel species belonging to a new genus in the order Planctomycetales, for which the name Thermostilla marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Thermostilla marina is SVX8T ( = JCM 19992T = VKM B-2881T). Strain SVX8T is the first thermophilic planctomycete isolated from a marine environment.

  11. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTR1T, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 microm. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 with optimum growth at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 degrees C and optimum growth occurred at 24 degrees C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5 % NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5 % (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTR1T was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99.8 % similarity between strain FTR1T and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39+/-1.5 % relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTR1T (=ATCC BAA-754T=JCM 12174T=CIP 108033T) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  12. Carnobacterium Pleistocaenium sp. nov.: A Novel Psychrotolerant, Facultative Anaerobe Isolated from Permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRIT1(sup T), was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 micrometers were observed. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 and optimum at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range of the new isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate requires NaCl (growth absent at 0 %) and growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum at 0.5% (w/v). The new isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were: acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampin, kanamycin, and gentamycin. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed 99.8% similarity of strain FTR1 with Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but the DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 5% homology. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the strain FTR1(sup T) (= ATCC BAA-754(sup T) = JSM 12174(sup T) is assigned to the new species of the genus Carnobacterium with proposed name Carnobacterium pleistocaenium sp. nov.

  13. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRl, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0(raised dot)6-0(raised dot)7 x 0(raised dot)9-1(raised dot)5 microns. Growth occurred within the pH range 6(raised dot)5-9(raised dot)5 with optimum growth at pH 7(raised dot)3-7(raised dot)5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0(raised dot)5% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16s rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99(raised dot)8% similarity between strain FTR1 and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 1(raised dot)5% relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTRl (= ATCC BAA-754T= JCM 12174T=CIP 108033) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  14. Carnobacterium Pleistocaenium sp. nov.: A Novel Psychrotolerant, Facultative Anaerobe Isolated from Permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRIT1(sup T), was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 micrometers were observed. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 and optimum at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range of the new isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate requires NaCl (growth absent at 0 %) and growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum at 0.5% (w/v). The new isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were: acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampin, kanamycin, and gentamycin. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed 99.8% similarity of strain FTR1 with Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but the DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 5% homology. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the strain FTR1(sup T) (= ATCC BAA-754(sup T) = JSM 12174(sup T) is assigned to the new species of the genus Carnobacterium with proposed name Carnobacterium pleistocaenium sp. nov.

  15. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTRl, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0(raised dot)6-0(raised dot)7 x 0(raised dot)9-1(raised dot)5 microns. Growth occurred within the pH range 6(raised dot)5-9(raised dot)5 with optimum growth at pH 7(raised dot)3-7(raised dot)5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 C and optimum growth occurred at 24 C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0(raised dot)5% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTRl was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16s rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99(raised dot)8% similarity between strain FTR1 and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39 plus or minus 1(raised dot)5% relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTRl (= ATCC BAA-754T= JCM 12174T=CIP 108033) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  16. Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov., a novel psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe isolated from permafrost of the Fox Tunnel in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Marsic, Damien; Bej, Asim; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    A novel, psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain FTR1T, was isolated from Pleistocene ice from the permafrost tunnel in Fox, Alaska. Gram-positive, motile, rod-shaped cells were observed with sizes 0.6-0.7 x 0.9-1.5 microm. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.5-9.5 with optimum growth at pH 7.3-7.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was 0-28 degrees C and optimum growth occurred at 24 degrees C. The novel isolate does not require NaCl; growth was observed between 0 and 5 % NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5 % (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemoorganoheterotroph that used as substrates sugars and some products of proteolysis. The metabolic end products were acetate, ethanol and CO2. Strain FTR1T was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 99.8 % similarity between strain FTR1T and Carnobacterium alterfunditum, but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated 39+/-1.5 % relatedness. On the basis of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that strain FTR1T (=ATCC BAA-754T=JCM 12174T=CIP 108033T) be assigned to the novel species Carnobacterium pleistocenium sp. nov.

  17. (Summer investigations into the isolation, cultivation and metabolism of anaerobes involved in biodegradation): Progress report, year 4, summer 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    In the laboratory our students were trained in modern techniques for the isolation and study of a wide variety of microbes from marine and brackish environments. Special emphasis was placed on anaerobes and archaebacteria. Microbial groups that were studied included the propionic bacteria, clostridia, methanogens, acetogens, hydrogen oxidizing anaerobes and aerobes, sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfur-reducing bacteria, anoxic photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, spirochetes, symbiotic and non-symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria, luminescent bacteria, iron bacteria, magnetic bacteria, and sulfur oxidizing bacteria. The permanent staff led discussions and presented lectures on the metabolism, physiology and biochemistry of the groups listed above. Material was also presented on motility and chemotaxis of bacteria, and particular emphasis was given to molecular approaches to studying evolution of bacteria. We also had five successful Microbiology Mini-symposia (see attached schedule). These one-day symposia involved lecture/seminar presentations by investigators involved in state-of-the-art working particularly exciting areas within the scope of our course.

  18. Biodegradation of kraft lignin by a newly isolated anaerobic bacterial strain, Acetoanaerobium sp. WJDL-Y2.

    PubMed

    Duan, J; Huo, X; Du, W J; Liang, J D; Wang, D Q; Yang, S C

    2016-01-01

    An anaerobic kraft lignin (KL)-degrading bacterial strain was isolated from sludge of a pulp and paper mill. It was characterized as Acetoanaerobium sp. WJDL-Y2 by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The maximum KL degradation capability of strain Y2 was determined to be 24·9% on a COD basis under an optimal condition with temperature of 31·5°C, initial pH of 6·8 and KL to nitrogen (as NH4 Cl) ratio of 6·5 by mass. Growth kinetic studies showed that the KL tolerance of strain Y2 was relatively high (Ki  = 8120·45 mg l(-1) ). Analysing KL degradation products by GC-MS revealed the formation of low-molecular-weight aromatic compounds (LMWACs), including benzene-propanoic acid, syringic acid and ferulic acid. This indicates that strain Y2 can oxidize lignin structure's p-hydroxyphenyl (H) units, guaiacyl (G) units and syringyl (S). In addition, the inoculated sample also contained low-molecular acid compounds, such as hexanoic acid, adipic acid and 2-hydroxybutyric acid, further validating strain Y2's ability to degrade KL. Kraft lignin containing effluents discharged from pulp and paper industries causes serious environmental pollution in developing countries. Due to the immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility, bacterial ligninolytic potential deserve to be studied for application in effluent treatment of pulp and paper industry. In this study, an anaerobic lignin-degrading bacterium, Acetoanaerobium sp. WJDL-Y2 (accession no. KF176997),was isolated from the sludge of a pulp and paper mill. Strain Y2 can play an important role in treating pulp and paper wastewater, as well as breaking down materials for biofuel and chemical production. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Isolation of the anaerobic intestinal spirochaete Brachyspira pilosicoli from long-term residents and Indonesian visitors to Perth, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Margawani, K Rini; Robertson, Ian D; Hampson, David J

    2009-02-01

    Brachyspira pilosicoli is an anaerobic spirochaete that colonizes the large intestine of humans and various species of animals and birds. The spirochaete is an important enteric pathogen of pigs and poultry, but its pathogenic potential in humans is less clear. In the current study, the occurrence of B. pilosicoli in faecal samples from 766 individuals in two different population groups in Perth, Western Australia, was investigated by selective anaerobic culture. Of 586 individuals who were long-term residents of Perth, including children, elderly patients in care and in hospital and individuals with gastrointestinal disease, only one was culture positive. This person had a history of diverticulitis. In comparison, faeces from 17 of 180 (9.4 %) Indonesians who were short- or medium-term visitors to Perth were positive for B. pilosicoli. The culture-positive individuals had been in the city for between 10 days and 4.5 years (median 5 months). Resampling of subsets of the Indonesians indicated that all negative people remained negative and that some positive individuals remained positive after 5 months. Two individuals had pairs of isolates recovered after 4 and 5 months that had the same PFGE types, whilst another individual had isolates with two different PFGE types that were identified 2 months apart. Individuals who were culture-positive were likely to have been either colonized in Indonesia before arriving in Perth or infected in Perth following contact with other culture-positive Indonesians with whom they socialized. Colonization with B. pilosicoli was not significantly associated with clinical signs at the time the individuals were tested, although faeces with wet-clay consistency were 1.5 times more likely (confidence interval 0.55-4.6) than normal faeces to contain B. pilosicoli.

  20. Calculibacillus koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing bacterium isolated from sediment of mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Min, Ui-Gi; Kim, So-Jeong; Hong, Heeji; Kim, Song-Gun; Gwak, Joo-Han; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, Jong-Geol; Na, Jeong-Geol; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-06-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium, strain B5(T), was isolated from sediment of an abandoned coal mine in Taebaek, Republic of Korea. Cells of strain B5(T) were non-spore-forming, straight, Gram-positive rods. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 30°C, respectively, while the strain was able to grow within pH and temperature ranges of 5.5-7.5 and 25-45°C, respectively. Growth of strain B5(T) was observed at NaCl concentrations of 0 to 6.0% (w/v) with an optimum at 3.0-4.0% (w/v). The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, an unknown phospholipid and three unknown polar lipids. Strain B5(T) grew anaerobically by reducing nitrate, nitrite, ferric-citrate, ferric-nitrilotriacetate, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in the presence of proteinaceous compounds, organic acids, and carbohydrates as electron donors. The isolate was not able to grow by fermentation. Strain B5(T) did not grow under aerobic or microaerobic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain B5(T) is most closely related to the genus Tepidibacillus (T. fermentans STGH(T); 96.3%) and Vulcanibacillus (V. modesticaldus BR(T); 94.6%). The genomic DNA G+C content (36.9 mol%) of strain B5(T) was higher than those of T. fermentans STGH(T) (34.8 mol%) and V. modesticaldus BR(T) (34.5 mol%). Based on its phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic properties, we describe a new species of a novel genus Calculibacillus, represented by strain B5(T) (=KCTC 15397(T) =JCM 19989(T)), for which we propose the name Calculibacillus koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov.

  1. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    van Passel, Mark W J; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Davenport, Karen Walston; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, John C; Han, Shunsheng; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikolaos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Richardson, P Paul; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke; Zoetendal, Erwin G

    2011-05-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Davenport, Karen W.; Sims, David; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Richardson, Paul; De Vos, Willem M.; Smidt, Hauke; Zoetendal, Erwin G.

    2011-01-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Type Strain Desulfuribacillus alkaliarsenatis AHT28, an Obligately Anaerobic, Sulfidogenic Bacterium Isolated from Russian Soda Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Abin, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Desulfuribacillus alkaliarsenatis AHT28T is an obligately anaerobic, sulfur- and arsenate-reducing haloalkaliphile that was isolated from Russian soda lake sediments. Here, we present the 3.1-Mb draft genome sequence for this strain, consisting of 36 contigs with a G+C content of 37.5% and 2,978 protein-coding sequences. PMID:27834702

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus Strain P1XP2, a Polysaccharide-Degrading, Thermophilic, Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium Isolated from a Commercial Bioreactor Degrading Food Waste

    PubMed Central

    Adelskov, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the ~5.8-Mb draft genome sequence of a moderately thermophilic, heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic bacterium, Paenibacillus strain P1XP2, identified genes for enzymes with the potential for degrading complex food wastes, a property consistent with the ecological habitat of the isolate. PMID:25635015

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus Strain P1XP2, a Polysaccharide-Degrading, Thermophilic, Facultative Anaerobic Bacterium Isolated from a Commercial Bioreactor Degrading Food Waste.

    PubMed

    Adelskov, Joseph; Patel, Bharat K C

    2015-01-29

    The analysis of the ~5.8-Mb draft genome sequence of a moderately thermophilic, heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic bacterium, Paenibacillus strain P1XP2, identified genes for enzymes with the potential for degrading complex food wastes, a property consistent with the ecological habitat of the isolate.

  6. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott; Elkins, James G; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Keller, Martin; Carroll, Sue L; Allman, Steve L; Podar, Mircea; Mosher, Jennifer J; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A

    2010-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47T, was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA. The isolate was a non-motile, non-spore forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 m long by 0.2 m wide and grew at temperatures between 55-85oC with the optimum at 78oC. The pH range for growth was 6.0-8.0 with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rates at 0.75 hr-1. The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass and Populus. OB47T was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbital, carboxymethylcellulose and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2 although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5 l batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol% and sequence analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene placed OB47T within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47T is the type stain (ATCC = ____, JCM = ____).

  7. Gelidivirgula Patagoniensis Gen. Nov., Sp. Nov., A Novel Psychrotolerant, Sporeforming Anaerobe Isolated from Magellanic Penguin Guano in Patagonia, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, psychrotrophic bacterium, strain PPP2(sup T), was isolated from guano of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) in Patagonia, Chile. The Gram-positive, sporeforming, straight rods with sizes 0.6-0.9 x 3.0-5.0 microns, are motile by peritrichous flagella. Growth was observed to occur within the pH range 6.0-9.5 (optimum pH x), and temperature range 2-28 C (optimum 20 C). The novel isolate does not require NaCl for growth, but is halotolerant and growth was observed between 0 and 7 % NaCl (w/v) with optimum at 0.5 % (w/v). The new isolate is a catalase negative chemoorganohetherotroph with fermentative metabolism and uses as substrates: peptone, Bacto-tryptone, Casamino acids, and yeast extract. The major metabolic products are: acetate, butyrate, ethanol, and hydrogen is a minor gas product.. Strain PPP2 was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampin, kanamycin, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the DNA is 43.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequences and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the strain PPP2(sup T) (= ATCC BAA-755(sup T) = JSM ...(sup T)) is assigned to the new genus Gelidivirgula gen. nov., as a representative of the new species, Gelidivirgula patagonensis sp. nov.

  8. Gelidivirgula Patagoniensis Gen. Nov., Sp. Nov., A Novel Psychrotolerant, Sporeforming Anaerobe Isolated from Magellanic Penguin Guano in Patagonia, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, psychrotrophic bacterium, strain PPP2(sup T), was isolated from guano of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) in Patagonia, Chile. The Gram-positive, sporeforming, straight rods with sizes 0.6-0.9 x 3.0-5.0 microns, are motile by peritrichous flagella. Growth was observed to occur within the pH range 6.0-9.5 (optimum pH x), and temperature range 2-28 C (optimum 20 C). The novel isolate does not require NaCl for growth, but is halotolerant and growth was observed between 0 and 7 % NaCl (w/v) with optimum at 0.5 % (w/v). The new isolate is a catalase negative chemoorganohetherotroph with fermentative metabolism and uses as substrates: peptone, Bacto-tryptone, Casamino acids, and yeast extract. The major metabolic products are: acetate, butyrate, ethanol, and hydrogen is a minor gas product.. Strain PPP2 was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampin, kanamycin, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the DNA is 43.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequences and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the strain PPP2(sup T) (= ATCC BAA-755(sup T) = JSM ...(sup T)) is assigned to the new genus Gelidivirgula gen. nov., as a representative of the new species, Gelidivirgula patagonensis sp. nov.

  9. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D; Mosher, Jennifer J; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Podar, Mircea; Carroll, Sue; Allman, Steve; Phelps, Tommy J; Keller, Martin; Elkins, James G

    2010-02-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47(T), was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY. The isolate was a nonmotile, non-spore-forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 microm long by 0.2 microm wide and grew at temperatures between 55 and 85 degrees C, with the optimum at 78 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 6.0 to 8.0, with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rate at 0.75 h(-1). The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass, and Populus. OB47(T) was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbitol, carboxymethylcellulose, and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth, and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2, although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5-liter batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol%, and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene placed OB47(T) within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47 is the type strain (ATCC BAA-2073).

  10. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an Anaerobic, Extremely Thermophilic, Cellulolytic Bacterium Isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park▿

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Mosher, Jennifer J.; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Podar, Mircea; Carroll, Sue; Allman, Steve; Phelps, Tommy J.; Keller, Martin; Elkins, James G.

    2010-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47T, was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY. The isolate was a nonmotile, non-spore-forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 μm long by 0.2 μm wide and grew at temperatures between 55 and 85°C, with the optimum at 78°C. The pH range for growth was 6.0 to 8.0, with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rate at 0.75 h−1. The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass, and Populus. OB47T was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbitol, carboxymethylcellulose, and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth, and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2, although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5-liter batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol%, and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene placed OB47T within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47 is the type strain (ATCC BAA-2073). PMID:20023107

  11. Anaerobranca californiensis sp. nov., an anaerobic, alkalithermophilic, fermentative bacterium isolated from a hot spring on Mono Lake.

    PubMed

    Gorlenko, Vladimir; Tsapin, Alexandre; Namsaraev, Zorigto; Teal, Tracy; Tourova, Tatyana; Engler, Diane; Mielke, Randy; Nealson, Kenneth

    2004-05-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, alkalithermophilic, chemo-organotrophic bacterium was isolated from the sediment of an alkaline hot spring located on Paoha Island in Mono Lake, California, USA. This rod-shaped bacterium was motile via peritrichous flagella. Isolated strains grew optimally in 5-25 g NaCl l(-1), at pH 9.0-9.5 and at a temperature of 58 degrees C and were fermentative and mainly proteolytic, utilizing peptone, Casamino acids and yeast extract. Optimal growth was seen in the presence of elemental sulfur, polysulfide or thiosulfate with concomitant reduction to hydrogen sulfide. Sulfite was also formed in an equal ratio to sulfide during reduction of thiosulfate. The novel isolate could also reduce Fe(III) and Se(IV) in the presence of organic matter. On the basis of physiological properties, 16S rRNA gene sequence and DNA-DNA hybridization data, strain PAOHA-1(T) (=DSM 14826(T)=UNIQEM 227(T)) belongs to the genus Anaerobranca and represents a novel species, Anaerobranca californiensis sp. nov.

  12. Thermosipho affectus sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, cellulolytic bacterium isolated from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Podosokorskaya, O A; Kublanov, I V; Reysenbach, A-L; Kolganova, T V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A

    2011-05-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, organotrophic bacterium, strain ik275mar(T), was isolated from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Cells were rods surrounded by a sheath-like structure (toga), 0.4-0.9 µm in width and 1.2-6.0 µm in length. Strain ik275mar(T) grew at 37-75 °C, pH 5.6-8.2 and at NaCl concentrations of 10-55 g l(-1). Under optimum conditions (70 °C, pH 6.6, NaCl 20 g l(-1)), doubling time was 32 min. The isolate was able to ferment carbohydrates including starch, cellulose and cellulose derivatives. Acetate, H(2) and CO(2) were the main products of glucose fermentation. G+C content of DNA was 27 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain ik275mar(T) is a member of the genus Thermosipho. 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with the other species of the genus Thermosipho ranged from 93.7 to 94.5 %. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and physiological properties of the novel isolate, we propose a novel species, Thermosipho affectus sp. nov., with type strain ik275mar(T) ( = DSM 23112(T)  = VKM B-2574(T)).

  13. Comparative in vitro activities of azithromycin, Bay y 3118, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and 11 other oral antimicrobial agents against 194 aerobic and anaerobic bite wound isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Nesbit, C A; Citron, D M

    1995-01-01

    The activities of sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, Bay y 3118, azithromycin, cefprozil, loracarbef, and nine other oral antimicrobial agents against 194 aerobic and anaerobic clinical bite wound isolates were determined by the agar dilution method. Sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and Bay y 3118 were active against all aerobic isolates (MICs at which 90% of the isolates are inhibited [MIC90], < or = 1.0 microgram/ml for sparfloxacin and levofloxacin and 0.1 microgram/ml for Bay y 3118) and many anaerobic isolates, with the exception of the fusobacteria. Azithromycin was more active than erythromycin by 1 to 2 dilutions against many aerobes, including Pasteurella multocida and Eikenella corrodens, and by 2 to 4 dilutions against anaerobic isolates. Cefprozil was more active (MIC90, < or = 1 microgram/ml) than loracarbef (MIC90, < or = 4 micrograms/ml) against aerobic gram-positive isolates, but both had poor activity (MIC90, > or = 16 micrograms/ml) against peptostreptococci. Both cefprozil and loracarbef had MIC90s of < or = 0.5 micrograms/ml against P. multocida. PMID:7625795

  14. BENTHIC MICROBIAL RESPIRATION IN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAIN, PIEDMONT, AND COASTAL PLAINS, STREAMS OF THE EASTERN USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our study had two objectives. First, in order to quantify the potential underestimation of community respiration caused by the exclusion of anaerobic processes, we compared benthic microbial respiration measured as 02 consumption with estimated based on DHA. Second, our previous ...

  15. BENTHIC MICROBIAL RESPIRATION IN APPALACHIAN MOUNTAIN, PIEDMONT, AND COASTAL PLAINS, STREAMS OF THE EASTERN USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our study had two objectives. First, in order to quantify the potential underestimation of community respiration caused by the exclusion of anaerobic processes, we compared benthic microbial respiration measured as 02 consumption with estimated based on DHA. Second, our previous ...

  16. Caloranaerobacter ferrireducens sp. nov., an anaerobic, thermophilic, iron (III)-reducing bacterium isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide deposits.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Xi; Jebbar, Mohamed; Alain, Karine; Shao, Zongze

    2015-06-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, iron-reducing bacterium (strain DY22619T) was isolated from a sulfide sample collected from an East Pacific Ocean hydrothermal field at a depth of 2901 m. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, motile rods (2-10 µm in length, 0.5 µm in width) with multiple peritrichous flagella. The strain grew at 40-70 °C inclusive (optimum 60 °C), at pH 4.5-8.5 inclusive (optimum pH 7.0) and with sea salts concentrations of 1-10 % (w/v) (optimum 3 % sea salts) and NaCl concentrations of 1.5-5.0 % (w/v) (optimum 2.5 % NaCl). Under optimal growth conditions, the generation time was around 55 min. The isolate was an obligate chemoorganoheterotroph, utilizing complex organic compounds, amino acids, carbohydrates and organic acids including peptone, tryptone, beef extract, yeast extract, alanine, glutamate, methionine, threonine, fructose, mannose, galactose, glucose, palatinose, rhamnose, turanose, gentiobiose, xylose, sorbose, pyruvate, tartaric acid, α-ketobutyric acid, α-ketovaleric acid, galacturonic acid and glucosaminic acid. Strain DY22619T was strictly anaerobic and facultatively dependent on various forms of Fe(III) as an electron acceptor: insoluble forms and soluble forms. It did not reduce sulfite, sulfate, thiosulfate or nitrate. The genomic DNA G+C content was 29.0 mol%. Phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that the closest relative of strain DY22619T was Caloranaerobacter azorensis MV1087T, sharing 97.41 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. On the basis of physiological distinctness and phylogenetic distance, the isolate is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Caloranaerobacter, for which the name Caloranaerobacterhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1601/nm.4081ferrireducens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DY22619T ( = JCM 19467T = DSM 27799T = MCCC1A06455T).

  17. Determination of antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria by E-test, ATB-ANA and agar dilution.

    PubMed

    Koru, Ozgur; Ozyurt, Mustafa

    2008-06-01

    A total of 60 anaerobic strains were isolated from 322 clinical specimens. These isolates were tested for susceptibility to seven antibiotics (penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, imipenem, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, clindamycin) by using ATB-ANA and Epsilometer test (E-test) strips and the results were compared with the gold standard agar dilution method. Imipenem was found as the most effective agent in vitro among the agents tested (100%). Susceptibility to penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefoxitin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole and clindamycin are 36.7%, 83.3%, 88.3%, 96.6%, 85% and 90%, respectively. E-test has showed a good correlation (r=0.62, p=0.001) statistically with the results of agar dilution (total agreement for all antibiotics changing between 90.01% and 98.45%) and a moderate correlation (r=0.45, p=0.048) with the results of ATB-ANA method (total agreement for all antibiotics changing between 75.46% and 98.76%). However, the routine use of agar dilution procedure is concluded to be cumbersome, whereas E-test method offers a reliable alternative.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of a New Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1 from an Anaerobic Digester Using Pig Slurry

    PubMed Central

    Battumur, Urantulkhuur; Yoon, Young-Man; Kim, Chang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A new methanogen was isolated from an anaerobic digester using pig slurry in South Korea. Only one strain, designated KOR-1, was characterized in detail. Cells of KOR-1 were straight or crooked rods, non-motile, 5 to 15 μm long and 0.7 μm wide. They stained Gram-positive and produced methane from H2+CO2 and formate. Strain KOR-1 grew optimally at 38°C. The optimum pH for growth was 7.0. The strain grew at 0.5% to 3.0% NaCl, with optimum growth at 2.5% NaCl. The G+C content of genomic DNA of strain KOR-1 was 41 mol%. The strain tolerated ampicillin, penicillin G, kanamycin and streptomycin but tetracycline inhibited cell growth. A large fragment of the 16S rRNA gene (~1,350 bp) was obtained from the isolate and sequenced. Comparison of 16S rRNA genes revealed that strain KOR–1 is related to Methanobacterium formicicum (98%, sequence similarity), Methanobacterium bryantii (95%) and Methanobacterium ivanovii (93%). Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced mcrA gene sequences confirmed the closest relative as based on mcrA gene sequence analysis was Methanobacterium formicicum strain (97% nucleic acid sequence identity). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain KOR-1 is proposed as a new strain within the genus Methanobacterium, Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1. PMID:26949961

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Anaerobic Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase, a Novel Mo-Fe-S Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hope A.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in anaerobic ethylbenzene mineralization in denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain EB1 is the oxidation of ethylbenzene to (S)-(−)-1-phenylethanol. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, which catalyzes this reaction, is a unique enzyme in that it mediates the stereoselective hydroxylation of an aromatic hydrocarbon in the absence of molecular oxygen. We purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase to apparent homogeneity and showed that the enzyme is a heterotrimer (αβγ) with subunit masses of 100 kDa (α), 35 kDa (β), and 25 kDa (γ). Purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase contains approximately 0.5 mol of molybdenum, 16 mol of iron, and 15 mol of acid-labile sulfur per mol of holoenzyme, as well as a molydopterin cofactor. In addition to ethylbenzene, purified ethylbenzene dehydrogenase was found to oxidize 4-fluoro-ethylbenzene and the nonaromatic hydrocarbons 3-methyl-2-pentene and ethylidenecyclohexane. Sequencing of the encoding genes revealed that ebdA encodes the α subunit, a 974-amino-acid polypeptide containing a molybdopterin-binding domain. The ebdB gene encodes the β subunit, a 352-amino-acid polypeptide with several 4Fe-4S binding domains. The ebdC gene encodes the γ subunit, a 214-amino-acid polypeptide that is a potential membrane anchor subunit. Sequence analysis and biochemical data suggest that ethylbenzene dehydrogenase is a novel member of the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes. PMID:11443088

  20. Isolation and characterization of an anaerobic, cellulolytic bacterium, Clostridium cellulovorans sp. nov

    SciTech Connect

    Sleat, R.; Mah, R.A.; Robinson, R.

    1984-07-01

    A new anaerobic, mesophilic, spore-forming cellulolytic bacterium is described. Cellulose is cleared within 24 to 48 h around colonies formed in cellulose agar roll tubes. Cells stain gram negative and are nonmotile rods which form oblong spores either centrally or subterminally in a clostridial swelling. Colonies are irregular with an opaque edge and a center devoid of both vegetative cells and spores. Cellulose, xylan, pectin, cellubiose, glucose, maltose, galactose, sucrose, lactose, and mannose serve as substrates for growth. H/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, acetate, butyrate, formate, and lactate are produced during fermentation of cellulose or cellobiose. The temperature and pH for optimum growth are 37/sup 0/C and 7.0, respectively. The DNA composition is 26 to 27 mol% guanine plus cytosine. This bacterium resembles Clostridium lochhheadii in morphological and some biochemical characteristics but is not identical to it. The name Clostridium cellulovorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 743B (ATCC 35296).

  1. Antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic bacteria isolated from primary dental root canal infections.

    PubMed

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2012-12-01

    Fourty-one bacterial strains isolated from infected dental root canals and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence were screened for the presence of 14 genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracycline and macrolides. Thirteen isolates (32%) were positive for at least one of the target antibiotic resistance genes. These strains carrying at least one antibiotic resistance gene belonged to 11 of the 26 (42%) infected root canals sampled. Two of these positive cases had two strains carrying resistance genes. Six out of 7 Fusobacterium strains harbored at least one of the target resistance genes. One Dialister invisus strain was positive for 3 resistance genes, and 4 other strains carried two of the target genes. Of the 6 antibiotic resistance genes detected in root canal strains, the most prevalent were blaTEM (17% of the strains), tetW (10%), and ermC (10%). Some as-yet-uncharacterized Fusobacterium and Prevotella isolates were positive for blaTEM, cfxA and tetM. Findings demonstrated that an unexpectedly large proportion of dental root canal isolates, including as-yet-uncharacterized strains previously regarded as uncultivated phylotypes, can carry antibiotic resistance genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, spore-forming acetogen isolated from Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, E. V.; Hoover, R. B.; Bej, A. K.; Marsic, D.; Detkova, E. N.; Whitman, W. B.; Krader, P.

    2003-01-01

    A novel extremely haloalkaliphilic, strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium strain APO was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, alkaline Mono Lake in California. The Gram-positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.55- 0.7x1.7-3.0 microns were motile by a single laterally attached flagellum. Strain APO was mesophilic (range 10-48 C, optimum of 37 C); halophilic (NaCl range 1-20% (w/v) with optimum of 3-5% (w/v), and alkaliphilic (pH range 8.0-10.5, optimum 9.5). The novel isolate required sodium ions in the medium. Strain APO was an organotroph with a fermentative type of metabolism and used the substrates peptone, bacto-tryptone, casamino acid, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The new isolate performed the Stickland reaction with the following amino acid pairs: proline + alanine, glycine + alanine, and tryptophan + valine. The main end product of growth was acetate. High activity of CO dehydrogenase and hydrogenase indicated the presence of a homoacetogenic, non-cycling acetyl-coA pathway. Strain APO was resistant to kanamycin but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). The sequence of the 16s rRNA gene of strain APO possessed 98.2% similarity with the sequence from Tindullia magadiensis Z-7934, but the DNA-DNA hybridization value between these organisms was only 55%. On the basis of these physiological and molecular properties, strain APO is proposed to be a novel species of the genus Tindallia with the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., (type strain APO = ATCC BAA-393 - DSM 14871).

  3. Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, spore-forming acetogen isolated from Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, E. V.; Hoover, R. B.; Bej, A. K.; Marsic, D.; Detkova, E. N.; Whitman, W. B.; Krader, P.

    2003-01-01

    A novel extremely haloalkaliphilic, strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium strain APO was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, alkaline Mono Lake in California. The Gram-positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.55- 0.7x1.7-3.0 microns were motile by a single laterally attached flagellum. Strain APO was mesophilic (range 10-48 C, optimum of 37 C); halophilic (NaCl range 1-20% (w/v) with optimum of 3-5% (w/v), and alkaliphilic (pH range 8.0-10.5, optimum 9.5). The novel isolate required sodium ions in the medium. Strain APO was an organotroph with a fermentative type of metabolism and used the substrates peptone, bacto-tryptone, casamino acid, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The new isolate performed the Stickland reaction with the following amino acid pairs: proline + alanine, glycine + alanine, and tryptophan + valine. The main end product of growth was acetate. High activity of CO dehydrogenase and hydrogenase indicated the presence of a homoacetogenic, non-cycling acetyl-coA pathway. Strain APO was resistant to kanamycin but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). The sequence of the 16s rRNA gene of strain APO possessed 98.2% similarity with the sequence from Tindullia magadiensis Z-7934, but the DNA-DNA hybridization value between these organisms was only 55%. On the basis of these physiological and molecular properties, strain APO is proposed to be a novel species of the genus Tindallia with the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., (type strain APO = ATCC BAA-393 - DSM 14871).

  4. Spirochaeta Americana Sp. Nov., A new Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The Gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.2 - 0.22 X 8-15 microns. Growth was observed over the following ranges: temperature 10 C to 44 C; optimum +37 C; NaCl concentration 2 - 12 % (w/v); optimum NaCl3 % and pH 8 - 10.5; optimum pH 9.5. The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. The main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain ASpG(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, and rifampin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%, genome size is 2.98 x l0(exp 9) Daltons, Tm of the genomic DNA is 68 +/- 2 C, and DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Spirocheta alkalica Strain Z-7491(sup T), exhibited 48.7% homology. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  5. Spirochaeta Americana Sp. Nov., A new Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochete Isolated from Soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, U.S.A. The Gram-negative cells are motile and spirochete-shaped with sizes of 0.2 - 0.22 X 8-15 microns. Growth was observed over the following ranges: temperature 10 C to 44 C; optimum +37 C; NaCl concentration 2 - 12 % (w/v); optimum NaCl3 % and pH 8 - 10.5; optimum pH 9.5. The novel isolate is strictly alkaliphilic, requires high concentrations of carbonate in the medium, and is capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch, and D-mannitol. The main end products of glucose fermentation are: H2, acetate, ethanol, and formate. Strain ASpG(sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, and rifampin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, gentamycin and tetracycline. The G+C content of its DNA is 58.5 mol%, genome size is 2.98 x l0(exp 9) Daltons, Tm of the genomic DNA is 68 +/- 2 C, and DNA-DNA hybridization with the most closely related species, Spirocheta alkalica Strain Z-7491(sup T), exhibited 48.7% homology. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, the isolate appears to be a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta; and the name Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., is proposed for the taxon (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC BAA-392(sup T) = DSMZ 14872(sup T)).

  6. Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, spore-forming acetogen isolated from Mono Lake in California.

    PubMed

    Pikuta, Elena V; Hoover, Richard B; Bej, Asim K; Marsic, Damien; Detkova, Ekaterina N; Whitman, William B; Krader, Paul

    2003-08-01

    A novel extremely haloalkaliphilic, strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium strain APO was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, alkaline Mono Lake in California. The Gram-positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.55-0.7x1.7-3.0 microm were motile by a single laterally attached flagellum. Strain APO was mesophilic (range 10-48 degrees C, optimum of 37 degrees C); halophilic (NaCl range 1-20% (w/v) with optimum of 3-5% (w/v), and alkaliphilic (pH range 8.0-10.5, optimum 9.5). The novel isolate required sodium ions in the medium. Strain APO was an organotroph with a fermentative type of metabolism and used the substrates peptone, bacto-tryptone, casamino acid, yeast extract, l-serine, l-lysine, l-histidine, l-arginine, and pyruvate. The new isolate performed the Stickland reaction with the following amino acid pairs: proline + alanine, glycine + alanine, and tryptophan + valine. The main end product of growth was acetate. High activity of CO dehydrogenase and hydrogenase indicated the presence of a homoacetogenic, non-cycling acetyl-CoA pathway. Strain APO was resistant to kanamycin but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of strain APO possessed 98.2% similarity with the sequence from Tindallia magadiensis Z-7934, but the DNA-DNA hybridization value between these organisms was only 55%. On the basis of these physiological and molecular properties, strain APO is proposed to be a novel species of the genus Tindallia with the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., (type strain APO = ATCC BAA-393 = DSM 14871).

  7. Anaerobic thermophilic culture

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A newly discovered thermophilic anaerobe is described that was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC 3/550. T. Ethanolicus is cultured in aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions and is used in a novel process for producing ethanol by subjecting carbohydrates, particularly the saccharides, to fermentation action of the new microorganism in a biologically pure culture.

  8. Production of toxaphene enantiomers by enantioselective HPLC after isolation of the compounds from an anaerobically degraded technical mixture.

    PubMed

    Vetter, W; Kirchberg, D

    2001-03-01

    Enantiomers of 12 chlorobornanes were separated on a chiral stationary HPLC phase. The investigated compounds included relevant chlorobornanes in technical toxaphene (Toxicant A and an unknown hepatachlorobornane), anaerobically mediated media such as sediment, soil, and sewage sludge (B6-923, B7-1001), as well as eight persistent compounds of technical toxaphene (CTTs) frequently detected in biological samples (B7-1000, B7-1453, B8-1412, B8-1413 or P-26, B8-1414 or P-40, B8-1945 or P-41, B8-2229 or P-44, and B9-1679 or P-50). Sufficient amounts of these 12 CTTs were not commercially available and had to be produced in our lab. Eight CTTs were obtained from sewage sludge that was spiked with technical toxaphene and kept under anaerobic conditions for four weeks. The samples were extracted with hexane followed by RP-HPLC fractionation. The resulting toxaphene pattern was significantly simpler than that of the technical mixture. CTTs that showed intense fragmentation in GC/ECNI-MS were preferably metabolized. Moreover, only one of the diastereomers that make Toxicant A (B8-806/B8-809 or P-42a/b) resisted degradation in sewage sludge. We found that the persistent component of Toxicant A is 2,2,5-endo,6-exo,8,9,9,10-octachlorobornane (B8-809 or P-42b). B9-1679 (P-50), B7-1453, and B8-1412 were earlier isolated from biological samples, and B7-1000 was isolated from naturally contaminated sediments. The fractions obtained after these procedures were suitable for enantioselective HPLC separations. The first eluting enantiomer was usually obtained as an enantiopure standard whereas the second eluting enantiomer also contained the other enantiomer. Attempts to determine the optical rotation with the help of a chiral HPLC detector failed. Elution orders of the enantiomers were established on three GC chiral stationary phases. Only the enantiomers of B7-1453 and B8-1945 (P-41) eluted in the same order from all CSPs while the others showed different enantiomer elution orders

  9. Bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cell using natural microflora and isolated pure culture bacteria from anaerobic palm oil mill effluent sludge.

    PubMed

    Nor, Muhamad Hanif Md; Mubarak, Mohd Fahmi Muhammad; Elmi, Hassan Sh Abdirahman; Ibrahim, Norahim; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abdul; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2015-08-01

    A double-chambered membrane microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed to investigate the potential use of natural microflora anaerobic palm oil mill effluent (POME) sludge and pure culture bacteria isolated from anaerobic POME sludge as inoculum for electricity generation. Sterilized final discharge POME was used as the substrate with no addition of nutrients. MFC operation using natural microflora anaerobic POME sludge showed a maximum power density and current density of 85.11mW/m(2) and 91.12mA/m(2) respectively. Bacterial identification using 16S rRNA analysis of the pure culture isolated from the biofilm on the anode MFC was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ZH1. The electricity generated in MFC using P. aeruginosa strain ZH1 showed maximum power density and current density of 451.26mW/m(2) and 654.90mA/m(2) respectively which were five times higher in power density and seven times higher in current density compared to that of MFC using anaerobic POME sludge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of temperature on complexes I and II mediated respiration, ROS generation and oxidative stress status in isolated gill mitochondria of the mud crab Scylla serrata.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Chainy, G B N

    2014-04-01

    Effects of fluctuations in habitat temperature (18-30°) on mitochondrial respiratory behavior and oxidative metabolic responses in the euryhaline ectotherm Scylla serrata are not fully understood. In the present study, effects of different temperatures ranging from 12 to 40°C on glutamate and succinate mediated mitochondrial respiration, respiratory control ratio (RCR), ATP generation rate, ratio for the utilization of phosphate molecules per atomic oxygen consumption (P/O), levels of lipid peroxidation and H2O2 in isolated gill mitochondria of S. serrata are reported. The pattern of variation in the studied parameters was similar for the two substrates at different temperatures. The values recorded for RCR (≥3) and P/O ratio (1.4-2.7) at the temperature range of 15-25°C were within the normal range reported for other animals (3-10 for RCR and 1.5-3 for P/O). Values for P/O ratio, ATP generation rate and RCR were highest at 18°C when compared to the other assay temperatures. However, at low and high extreme temperatures, i.e. at 12 and 40°C, states III and IV respiration rates were not clearly distinguishable from each other indicating that mitochondria were completely uncoupled. Positive correlations were noticed between temperature and the levels of both lipid peroxidation and H2O2. It is inferred that fluctuations on either side of ambient habitat temperature may adversely influence mitochondrial respiration and oxidative metabolism in S. serrata. The results provide baseline data to understand the impacts of acute changes in temperature on ectotherms inhabiting estuarine or marine environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Laboratory identification of anaerobic bacteria isolated on Clostridium difficile selective medium.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Cristina; Warszawski, Nathalie; Korsak, Nicolas; Taminiau, Bernard; Van Broeck, Johan; Delmée, Michel; Daube, Georges

    2016-06-01

    Despite increasing interest in the bacterium, the methodology for Clostridium difficile recovery has not yet been standardized. Cycloserine-cefoxitin fructose taurocholate (CCFT) has historically been the most used medium for C. difficile isolation from human, animal, environmental, and food samples, and presumptive identification is usually based on colony morphologies. However, CCFT is not totally selective. This study describes the recovery of 24 bacteria species belonging to 10 different genera other than C. difficile, present in the environment and foods of a retirement establishment that were not inhibited in the C. difficile selective medium. These findings provide insight for further environmental and food studies as well as for the isolation of C. difficile on supplemented CCFT.

  12. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  13. Light-enhanced dark respiration in leaves, isolated cells and protoplasts of various types of C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Parys, Eugeniusz; Jastrzebski, Hubert

    2006-04-01

    The rate of respiratory CO2 evolution from the leaves of Zea mays, Panicum miliaceum, and Panicum maximum, representing NADP-ME, NAD-ME, and PEP-CK types of C4 plants, respectively, was increased by approximately two to four times after a period of photosynthesis. This light-enhanced dark respiration (LEDR) was a function of net photosynthetic rate specific to plant species, and was depressed by 1% O2. When malate, aspartate, oxaloacetate or glycine solution at 50 mM concentration was introduced into the leaves instead of water, the rate of LEDR was enhanced, far less in Z. mays (by 10-25%) than in P. miliaceum (by 25-35%) or P. maximum (by 40-75%). The enhancement of LEDR under glycine was relatively stable over a period of 1 h, whereas the remaining metabolites caused its decrease following a transient increase. The metabolites reduced the net photosynthesis rate in the two Panicum species, but not in Z. mays, where this process was stimulated by glycine. The bundle sheath cells from P. miliaceum exhibited a higher rate of LEDR than those of Z. mays and P. maximum. Glycine had no effect on the respiration rate of the cells, but malate increased in cells of Z. mays and P. miliaceum by about 50% and 30%, respectively. With the exception of aspartate, which stimulated both the O2 evolution and O2 uptake in P. maximum, the remaining metabolites reduced photosynthetic O2 evolution from bundle sheath cells in Panicun species. The net O2 exchange in illuminated cells of Z. mays did not respond to CO2 or metabolites. Leaf mesophyll protoplasts of Z. mays and P. miliaceum, and bundle sheath protoplasts of Z. mays, which are unable to fix CO2 photosynthetically, also produced LEDR, but the mesophyll protoplasts, compared with bundle sheath protoplasts, required twice the time of illumination to obtain the maximal rate. The results suggest that the substrates for LEDR in C4 plants are generated during a period of illumination not only via the Calvin cycle reactions, but

  14. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic spirochaete isolated from soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microm. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 degrees C (optimum 37 degrees C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3% NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG(T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(T), revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(T) =ATCC BAA-392(T) = DSM 14872(T)).

  15. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic spirochaete isolated from soda Mono Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microm. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 degrees C (optimum 37 degrees C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3% NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG(T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(T), revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(T) =ATCC BAA-392(T) = DSM 14872(T)).

  16. Biodegradation of 17β-estradiol by bacteria isolated from deep sea sediments in aerobic and anaerobic media.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía; Louvado, António; Esteves, Valdemar I; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide; Cunha, Ângela

    2017-02-05

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are considered as high research priority being a source of potential adverse ecological health effects in environmental waters. 17β-Estradiol (E2), a recalcitrant natural estrogen, is typically encountered in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) at levels ranging 10-30ngL(-1) in the influent flow and 1-3ngL(-1) in the effluent flow. The exposure to even extremely low concentrations of E2 may interfere with the normal function of the endocrine system of organisms. In this study, five bacteria isolated from enrichment cultures of sediments of mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz (Moroccan-Iberian margin) were identified as aerobic E2 biodegraders, which produce low amounts of biotransformed estrone (E1). Analysis of 16S rDNA gene sequences identified three of them as Virgibacillus halotolerans, Bacillus flexus and Bacillus licheniformis. Among the set of strains, Bacillus licheniformis showed also ability to biodegrade E2 under anaerobic conditions.

  17. Characterization of Heterologously Expressed Acetyl Xylan Esterase1 Isolated from the Anaerobic Rumen Fungus Neocallimastix frontalis PMA02

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi; Song, Jaeyong; Park, Hong-Seog; Park, Hyunjin; Chang, Jongsoo

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl xylan esterase (AXE), which hydrolyzes the ester linkages of the naturally acetylated xylan and thus known to have an important role for hemicellulose degradation, was isolated from the anaerobic rumen fungus Neocallimastix frontatlis PMA02, heterologously expressed in Escherichi coli (E.coli) and characterized. The full-length cDNA encoding NfAXE1 was 1,494 bp, of which 978 bp constituted an open reading frame. The estimated molecular weight of NfAXE1 was 36.5 kDa with 326 amino acid residues, and the calculated isoelectric point was 4.54. The secondary protein structure was predicted to consist of nine α-helixes and 12 β-strands. The enzyme expressed in E.coli had the highest activity at 40°C and pH 8. The purified recombinant NfAXE1 had a specific activity of 100.1 U/mg when p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NA) was used as a substrate at 40°C, optimum temperature. The amount of liberated acetic acids were the highest and the lowest when p-NA and acetylated birchwood xylan were used as substrates, respectively. The amount of xylose released from acetylated birchwod xylan was increased by 1.4 fold when NfAXE1 was mixed with xylanase in a reaction cocktail, implying a synergistic effect of NfAXE1 with xylanase on hemicellulose degradation. PMID:27383808

  18. Isolation and characterization of Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium which reductively dechlorinates chlorophenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Utkin, I; Woese, C; Wiegel, J

    1994-10-01

    An organism that is able to reductively ortho-dechlorinate 2,4-dichlorophenol and 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate (3-Cl-4-OHPA) was isolated from a methanogenic lake sediment. This organism, an anaerobic, motile, Gram-type-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, grew in the presence of 0.1% yeast extract when pyruvate, lactate, formate, or hydrogen was used as the electron donor for reductive dehalogenation of 3-Cl-4-OHPA. Sulfite, thiosulfate, and sulfur were reduced to sulfide, nitrate was reduced to nitrite, and fumarate was reduced to succinate. Dissimilatory reduction of sulfate could not be demonstrated, and no adenylylsulfate reductase was detected with an immunoassay. The organism fermented two pyruvate molecules to one lactate molecule, one acetate molecule, and one carbon dioxide molecule. The pH and temperature optima for both growth and dechlorination of 3-Cl-4-OHPA were 7.5 and 38 degrees C, respectively. The doubling time under these conditions was approximately 3.5 h. On the basis of the results of a 16S rRNA analysis and the inability of the organism to use sulfate as an electron acceptor, strain JW/IU-DC1 is described as the type strain of the new taxon Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov.

  19. Spirochaeta americana sp. nov., a new haloalkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic spirochaete isolated from soda Mono Lake in California.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Richard B; Pikuta, Elena V; Bej, Asim K; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-05-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microm. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 degrees C (optimum 37 degrees C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3% NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG(T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(T), revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7%. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(T) =ATCC BAA-392(T) = DSM 14872(T)).

  20. Sulfurospirillum cavolei sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic sulfur-reducing bacterium isolated from an underground crude oil storage cavity.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yumiko; Ha, Le Thu; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2007-04-01

    A novel facultatively anaerobic sulfur-reducing bacterium, designated strain Phe91(T), was isolated from petroleum-contaminated groundwater in an underground crude oil storage cavity at Kuji in Iwate, Japan. Cells of strain Phe91(T) were slightly curved rods with single polar flagella. Optimum growth was observed at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. The novel strain utilized elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, sulfite, dithionite, arsenate, nitrate and DMSO as electron acceptors with lactate as an energy and carbon source, but nitrite was not utilized. Microaerophilic growth was also observed. Fumarate, pyruvate, lactate, malate, succinate, hydrogen (with acetate as a carbon source) and formate (with acetate) could serve as electron donors. Fumarate, pyruvate and malate were fermented. The DNA G+C content was 42.7 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, strain Phe91(T) was affiliated with the genus Sulfurospirillum in the class Epsilonproteobacteria and was most closely related to Sulfurospirillum deleyianum (sequence similarity 97 %). However, the DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain Phe91(T) and S. deleyianum was only 14 %. Based on the physiological and phylogenetic data, Phe91(T) should be classified as a representative of a novel species in the genus Sulfurospirillum; the name Sulfurospirillum cavolei sp. nov. is proposed, with Phe91(T) (=JCM 13918(T)=DSM 18149(T)) as the type strain.

  1. Rhizomicrobium electricum sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, fermentative, prosthecate bacterium isolated from a cellulose-fed microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yumiko; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2011-08-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, prosthecate bacterium, strain Mfc52(T), was isolated from a microbial fuel cell inoculated with soil and fed with cellulose as the sole fuel. Cells were Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, straight or slightly curved rods, and some of them had one or two polar prosthecae (stalks). Cells reproduced by binary fission or by budding from mother cells having prosthecae. Strain Mfc52(T) fermented various sugars and produced lactate, acetate and fumarate. Ferric iron, nitrate, oxygen and fumarate served as electron acceptors, while sulfate and malate did not. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite. The DNA G+C content was 64.7 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, strain Mfc52(T) was affiliated with the genus Rhizomicrobium in the class Alphaproteobacteria and most closely related to Rhizomicrobium palustre with a sequence similarity of 97 %. Based on these physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, the name Rhizomicrobium electricum sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is Mfc52(T) ( = JCM 15089(T)  = KCTC 5806(T)).

  2. Isolation and characterization of Keratinibaculum paraultunense gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium with keratinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Sun, Yingjie; Ma, Shichun; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Hui; Deng, Yu

    2013-08-01

    A novel thermophilic, anaerobic, keratinolytic bacterium designated KD-1 was isolated from grassy marshland. Strain KD-1 was a spore-forming rod with a Gram-positive type cell wall, but stained Gram-negative. The temperature, pH, and NaCl concentration range necessary for growth was 30-65 °C (optimum 55 °C), 6.0-10.5 (optimum 8.0-8.5), and 0-6% (optimum 0.2%) (w/v), respectively. Strain KD-1 possessed extracellular keratinase, and the optimum activity of the crude enzyme was pH 8.5 and 70 °C. The enzyme was identified as a thermostable serine-type protease. The strain was sensitive to rifampin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, and tetracycline and was resistant to erythromycin, neomycin, penicillin, and streptomycin. The main cellular fatty acid was predominantly C15:0 iso (64%), and the G+C content was 28 mol%. Morphological and physiological characterization, together with phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified KD-1 as a new species of a novel genus of Clostridiaceae with 95.3%, 93.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Clostridium ultunense BS(T) (DSM 10521(T)) and Tepidimicrobium xylanilyticum PML14(T) (= JCM 15035(T)), respectively. We propose the name Keratinibaculum paraultunense gen. nov., sp. nov., with KD-1 (=JCM 18769(T) =DSM 26752(T)) as the type strain.

  3. Alternative anaerobic enrichments to the bacteriological analytical manual culture method for isolation of Shigella sonnei from selected types of fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Andrew P; Thunberg, Richard L; Johnson, Mildred L; Hammack, Thomas S; Andrews, Wallace H

    2004-01-01

    Alternative methods of reducing oxygen during anaerobic enrichment in the Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) Shigella culture method were evaluated and compared to the current and less practical GasPak method. The alternative anaerobic methods included the use of reducing agents in Shigella broth and reducing culture container headspace volume to minimize atmospheric effects on oxygen concentration in Shigella broth during enrichment. The reducing agents evaluated were sodium thioglycollate, L-cystine, L-cysteine, titanium(III) citrate, and dithiothreitol, each at concentrations of 0.1, 0.05, and 0.01%. The use of Oxyrase for Broth with the enrichment medium (Shigella broth) was evaluated at concentrations of 10, 20 and 30 microL/mL. Recoveries of chill- and freeze-stressed S. sonnei strains 357 and 20143 were determined with each anaerobic method, including the GasPak method, using inoculation levels ranging from 10(0)to 10(3) cells. For each anaerobic method, strain, inoculation level, and stress type, 5 replicate enrichments were evaluated by streaking to MacConkey agar for isolation. The numbers of cultures with each method from which S. sonnei was isolated were used to compare the alternative anaerobic methods to the GasPak method. The alternative anaerobic method with which chill- and freeze-stressed S. sonnei strains 357 and 20143 were isolated most consistently was the use of Oxyrase for Broth in Shigella broth at a concentration of 20 microL/mL. This method was compared to the GasPak anaerobic method in evaluations on the recovery of S. sonnei strains 357 and 20143 from artificially contaminated test portions of parsley, cilantro, green onions, strawberries, carrots, and celery. A third anaerobic method included the use of 0.5 cm mineral oil overlay on cultures containing Oxyrase for Broth at concentrations of 20 microL/mL. Recovery rates of strain 357 were significantly greater (p < 0.05) with the GasPak method than with Oxyrase for Broth, with and

  4. Uptake of inorganic and organic nutrient species during cultivation of a Chlorella isolate in anaerobically digested dairy waste.

    PubMed

    Wahal, Shantanu; Viamajala, Sridhar

    2016-09-01

    A natural assemblage of microalgae from a facultative lagoon system treating municipal wastewater was enriched for growth in the effluents of an anaerobic digester processing dairy waste. A green microalga with close resemblance to Chlorella sp. was found to be dominant after multiple cycles of sub-culturing. Subsequently, the strain (designated as LLAI) was isolated and cultivated in 20× diluted digester effluents under various incident light intensities (255-1,100 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) ) to systematically assess growth and nutrient utilization. Our results showed that LLAI production increased with increasing incident light and a maximum productivity of 0.34 g L(-1) d(-1) was attained when the incident irradiance was 1,100 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) . Lack of growth in the absence of light indicated that the cultures did not grow heterotrophically on the organic compounds present in the medium. However, the cultures were able to uptake organic N and P under phototrophic conditions and our calculations suggest that the carbon associated with these organic nutrients contributed significantly to the production of biomass. Overall, under high light conditions, LLAI cultures utilized half of the soluble organic nitrogen and >90% of the ammonium, orthophosphate, and dissolved organic phosphorus present in the diluted waste. Strain LLAI was also found to accumulate triacylglycerides (TAG) even before the onset of nutrient limitation and a lipid productivity of 37 mg-TAG L(-1) d(-1) was measured in cultures incubated at an incident irradiance of 1,100 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) . The results of this study suggest that microalgae isolates from natural environments are well-suited for nutrient remediation and biomass production from wastewater containing diverse inorganic and organic nutrient species. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1336-1342, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Trichococcus Patagoniensis sp. nov., a Facultative Anaerobe that grows at -5 C, Isolated from Penguin Guano in Chilean Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul E.; Tang, Jane

    2006-01-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagGl(sup T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 micrometers were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 C, with optimum growth at 28-30 C. Strain PmagG1(sup T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5% (w/v). Strain PmagGl(sup T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and Con. Strain PmagG1(sup T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(sup T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(sup T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of less than 45 plus or minus 1%. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16s rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47 plus or minus 1.5%. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(sup T) (=ATCC BAA-756(sup T)=JCM 12176(sup T)=CIP 108035(sup T)) as the type strain.

  6. Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov., a facultative anaerobe that grows at -5 degrees C, isolated from penguin guano in Chilean Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Pikuta, Elena V; Hoover, Richard B; Bej, Asim K; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Krader, Paul E; Tang, Jane

    2006-09-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagG1(T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 mum were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 degrees C, with optimum growth at 28-30 degrees C. Strain PmagG1(T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5 % NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5 % (w/v). Strain PmagG1(T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and CO(2). Strain PmagG1(T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of <45+/-1 %. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16S rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47+/-1.5 %. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(T) (=ATCC BAA-756(T)=JCM 12176(T)=CIP 108035(T)) as the type strain.

  7. Trichococcus Patagoniensis sp. nov., a Facultative Anaerobe that grows at -5 C, Isolated from Penguin Guano in Chilean Patagonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul E.; Tang, Jane

    2006-01-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagGl(sup T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 micrometers were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 C, with optimum growth at 28-30 C. Strain PmagG1(sup T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5% (w/v). Strain PmagGl(sup T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and Con. Strain PmagG1(sup T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(sup T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(sup T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of less than 45 plus or minus 1%. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16s rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47 plus or minus 1.5%. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(sup T) (=ATCC BAA-756(sup T)=JCM 12176(sup T)=CIP 108035(sup T)) as the type strain.

  8. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of the gene (aniA) encoding the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1992-01-01

    When grown under anaerobic conditions, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, expresses several novel outer membrane proteins. One of these, Pan 1, has an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa in electrophoresis and is recognized by serum samples from patients with gonococcal infection. The presence of antibodies to this protein in patient sera suggests that Pan 1 is expressed during gonococcal infection and, more importantly, that N. gonorrhoeae grows anaerobically in vivo. We have cloned the Pan 1 structural gene, aniA, by screening a gonococcal lambda gt11 expression library with monospecific, polyclonal anti-Pan 1 antiserum. Three distinct immunoreactive recombinants, containing overlapping fragments of DNA, were isolated and confirmed to be coding for Pan 1 protein sequences. Northern (RNA blot) hybridization of an insert from an aniA recombinant to total gonococcal cellular RNA revealed the presence of a 1.5-kb transcript that was specific to RNA from anaerobically grown gonococci, indicating that the aniA gene is regulated at the transcriptional level and is monocistronic. To characterize the aniA gene, we have sequenced the entire 2-kb region spanned by the overlapping recombinants. We have also performed primer extension analysis on RNA isolated from aerobically and anaerobically grown gonococci in order to define the aniA promoter region. Two putative primer extension products specific to organisms grown anaerobically were identified by homology to known Escherichia coli promoter sequences, suggesting that the regulation of aniA expression involves multiple promoter regions. Images PMID:1383156

  9. Effect of phenolic monomers on biomass and hydrolytic enzyme activities of an anaerobic fungus isolated from wild nil gai (Baselophus tragocamelus).

    PubMed

    Paul, S S; Kamra, D N; Sastry, V R B; Sahu, N P; Kumar, A

    2003-01-01

    To test the anaerobic fungus, Piromyces sp. FNG5, for its tolerance to phenolic monomers released in the rumen by degradation of lignocellulosic poor-quality feeds. Effects of phenolic monomers on biomass and fibrolytic enzyme activities of a pure culture of lignocellulolytic anaerobic fungus (Piromyces sp. FNG5) isolated from faeces of wild nil gai (blue bull, Baselophus tragocamelus) were evaluated. There was a reduction in fungal biomass at 1 mm concentration of catechol with complete inhibition at 10 mm. p-Coumaric acid caused a reduction in biomass at 10 mm and no growth was observed above 20 mm concentration. The fungal isolate could tolerate up to 5 mm of ferulic acid without any reduction in biomass level, and was able to grow to some extent up to the highest level of ferulic acid tested (20 mm). Vanillic acid had no effect on biomass of the fungus even up to 50 mm level. The phenolic monomers varied in their potential to inhibit the secretion of carboxymethyl cellulase, xylanase, beta-glucosidase and acetyl esterase activities with catechol being the most inhibitory and vanillic acid being the least inhibitory. After 14 days of incubation, 38.49-65.14%p-Coumaric acid, 65.22-74.10% ferulic acid and 34.13-66.78% vanillic acid disappeared from the medium under anaerobic conditions. It is concluded that the anaerobic fungus Piromyces sp. FNG5 is tolerant to phenolic monomers and has ability to degrade them. Therefore, such anaerobic fungi may play an important role in fibre degradation in the rumen.

  10. Effect of bafilomycin and NAADP on membrane-associated ATPases and respiration of isolated mitochondria of the murine Nemeth-Kellner lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hreniukh, V; Bychkova, S; Kulachkovsky, O; Babsky, A

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the study was to estimate the effect of a selective V-type H(+) -ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) on energetic processes in NK/Ly cell by directly measuring the respiration of isolated mitochondria and ATPase activities. NAADP (7 μM) increased the activity of Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase in the postmitochondrial fraction of NK/Ly cells, but lower concentration of NAADP decreased it (0.1 and 1 μM). The increase the activity of plasma membrane Ca(2)(+) ATPase (PMCA) under NAADP application (1 and 7 μM) was observed. However, NAADP (1 μM) decreased activities of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2)(+) -ATPase (SERCA) and basal Mg(2)(+) -ATPase. Bafilomycin A1 (1 μM) increased the activity of Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase and potentiated the effect of NAADP (1 μM) on this pump. At the same time, bafilomycin A1 (1 μM) completely prevented all effects of NAADP (1 μM) on activities of PMCA, SERCA, and basal Mg(2)(+) -ATPase, confirming that these effects are dependent on acidic stores. Bafilomycin A1 or NAADP decreased respiratory and oxidative phosphorylation rates in NK/Ly mitochondria when α-ketoglutarate was used as substrate in contrast to succinate. Thus, α-ketoglutarate oxidation is more sensitive to bafilomycin A1 and NAADP influences compared with succinate oxidation. However, bafilomycin A1 + NAADP and any of these compounds separately lead to full uncoupling of mitochondria after ADP addition irrespectively to substrate used. Bafilomycin A1 affects isolated tumor mitochondria more effectively in combination with NAADP. Bafilomycin and NAADP alter some membrane-associated ATPases and inhibit respiration in mitochondria of the Nemeth-Kellner lymphoma.

  11. Evaluation of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci Isolated from Cancer Patients of the N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center.

    PubMed

    Shilnikova, Irina I; Dmitrieva, Natalia V

    2015-01-01

    In total, 81 nonduplicate gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) were involved in this study. The GPAC were isolated from samples collected from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014. Species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The majority of isolates were identified as Finegoldia magna (47%) and Peptoniphilus harei (28%). The susceptibility of six species of GPAC was determined for eight antibiotics according to E-test methodology. Furthermore, all isolates were susceptible to imipenem, vancomycin, and linezolid. Susceptibility to penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin varied for different species. One Finegoldia magna isolate was multidrug-resistant (i.e., parallel resistance to five antimicrobial agents, including metronidazole, was observed). Two Parvimonas micra isolates were highly resistant to metronidazole (MIC 256 μg/mL) but were sensitive to other tested antibiotics.

  12. Evaluation of Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci Isolated from Cancer Patients of the N. N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center

    PubMed Central

    Shilnikova, Irina I.; Dmitrieva, Natalia V.

    2015-01-01

    In total, 81 nonduplicate gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) were involved in this study. The GPAC were isolated from samples collected from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014. Species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The majority of isolates were identified as Finegoldia magna (47%) and Peptoniphilus harei (28%). The susceptibility of six species of GPAC was determined for eight antibiotics according to E-test methodology. Furthermore, all isolates were susceptible to imipenem, vancomycin, and linezolid. Susceptibility to penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin varied for different species. One Finegoldia magna isolate was multidrug-resistant (i.e., parallel resistance to five antimicrobial agents, including metronidazole, was observed). Two Parvimonas micra isolates were highly resistant to metronidazole (MIC 256 μg/mL) but were sensitive to other tested antibiotics. PMID:26798518

  13. The potential of bacteria isolated from ruminal contents of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep to hydrolyse seaweed components and produce methane by anaerobic digestion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Allan G; Withers, Susan; Sutherland, Alastair D

    2013-01-01

    The production of methane biofuel from seaweeds is limited by the hydrolysis of polysaccharides. The rumen microbiota of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep was studied for polysaccharidic bacterial isolates degrading brown-seaweed polysaccharides. Only nine isolates out of 65 utilized >90% of the polysaccharide they were isolated on. The nine isolates (eight Prevotella spp. and one Clostridium butyricum) utilized whole Laminaria hyperborea extract and a range of seaweed polysaccharides, including alginate (seven out of nine isolates), laminarin and carboxymethylcellulose (eight out of nine isolates); while two out of nine isolates additionally hydrolysed fucoidan to some extent. Crude enzyme extracts from three of the isolates studied further had diverse glycosidases and polysaccharidase activities; particularly against laminarin and alginate (two isolates were shown to have alginate lyase activity) and notably fucoidan and carageenan (one isolate). In serial culture rumen microbiota hydrolysed a range of seaweed polysaccharides (fucoidan to a notably lesser degree) and homogenates of L. hyperborea, mixed Fucus spp. and Ascophyllum nodosum to produce methane and acetate. The rumen microbiota and isolates represent potential adjunct organisms or enzymes which may improve hydrolysis of seaweed components and thus improve the efficiency of seaweed anaerobic digestion for methane biofuel production.

  14. The potential of bacteria isolated from ruminal contents of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep to hydrolyse seaweed components and produce methane by anaerobic digestion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Allan G; Withers, Susan; Sutherland, Alastair D

    2013-01-01

    The production of methane biofuel from seaweeds is limited by the hydrolysis of polysaccharides. The rumen microbiota of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep was studied for polysaccharidic bacterial isolates degrading brown-seaweed polysaccharides. Only nine isolates out of 65 utilized > 90% of the polysaccharide they were isolated on. The nine isolates (eight Prevotella spp. and one Clostridium butyricum) utilized whole Laminaria hyperborea extract and a range of seaweed polysaccharides, including alginate (seven out of nine isolates), laminarin and carboxymethylcellulose (eight out of nine isolates); while two out of nine isolates additionally hydrolysed fucoidan to some extent. Crude enzyme extracts from three of the isolates studied further had diverse glycosidases and polysaccharidase activities; particularly against laminarin and alginate (two isolates were shown to have alginate lyase activity) and notably fucoidan and carageenan (one isolate). In serial culture rumen microbiota hydrolysed a range of seaweed polysaccharides (fucoidan to a notably lesser degree) and homogenates of L. hyperborea, mixed Fucus spp. and Ascophyllum nodosum to produce methane and acetate. The rumen microbiota and isolates represent potential adjunct organisms or enzymes which may improve hydrolysis of seaweed components and thus improve the efficiency of seaweed anaerobic digestion for methane biofuel production. PMID:23170956

  15. In vitro efficacy of cefovecin against anaerobic bacteria isolated from subgingival plaque of dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Khazandi, Manouchehr; Bird, Philip S; Owens, Jane; Wilson, Gary; Meyer, James N; Trott, Darren J

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal disease is a common disease of dogs and cats often requiring antimicrobial treatment as an adjunct to mechanical debridement. However, correct compliance with oral antimicrobial therapy in companion animals is often difficult. Cefovecin is a recently introduced veterinary cephalosporin that has demonstrated prolonged concentrations in extracellular fluid, allowing for dosing intervals of up to 14 days. Subgingival samples were collected from the oral cavity of 29 dogs and eight cats exhibiting grade 2 or grade 3 periodontal disease. Samples were cultivated on Wilkin Chalgrens agar and incubated in an anaerobic chamber for seven days. Selected anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified to species level using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for cefovecin and six additional antimicrobials using the agar dilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The 65 clinical isolates were identified as Porphyromonas gulae (n = 45), Porphyromonas crevioricanis (n = 12), Porphyromonas macacae (n = 1), Porphyromonas cangingivalis (n = 1) Fusobacterium nucleatum (n = 2), Fusobacterium russii (n = 1) and Solobacterium moorei (n = 3). This is the first report of S. moorei being isolated from companion animals with periodontal disease. All isolates were highly susceptible to cefovecin, with a MIC90 of ≤0.125 μg/ml. Conversely, different resistance rates to ampicillin, amoxicillin and erythromycin between isolates were detected. Cefovecin is thus shown to be effective in vitro against anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

  16. Anaerobic biotransformation of high concentrations of chloroform by an enrichment culture and two bacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Shan, Huifeng; Kurtz, Harry D; Mykytczuk, Nadia; Trevors, Jack T; Freedman, David L

    2010-10-01

    A fermentative enrichment culture (designated DHM-1) was developed that is capable of cometabolically biotransforming high concentrations of chloroform (CF) to nontoxic end products. Two Pantoea spp. were isolated from DHM-1 that also possess this dechlorination capability. Following acclimation to increasing levels of CF, corn syrup-grown DHM-1 was able to transform over 500 mg/liter CF in the presence of vitamin B(12) (approximately 3% of CF on a molar basis) at a rate as high as 22 mg/liter/day in a mineral salts medium. CO, CO(2), and organic acids were the predominant biodegradation products, suggesting that hydrolytic reactions predominate during CF transformation. DHM-1 was capable of growing on corn syrup in the presence of high concentrations of CF (as may be present near contaminant source zones in groundwater), which makes it a promising culture for bioaugmentation. Strains DHM-1B and DHM-1T transform CF at rates similar to that of the DHM-1 enrichment culture. The ability of these strains to grow in the presence of high concentrations of CF appears to be related to alteration of membrane fluidity or homeoviscous and homeophasic adaptation.

  17. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles inhibit cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhimin; Morrow, Matthew P; Asefa, Tewodros; Sharma, Krishna K; Duncan, Cole; Anan, Abhishek; Penefsky, Harvey S; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effect of two types of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, MCM-41 and SBA-15, on mitochondrial O 2 consumption (respiration) in HL-60 (myeloid) cells, Jurkat (lymphoid) cells, and isolated mitochondria. SBA-15 inhibited cellular respiration at 25-500 microg/mL; the inhibition was concentration-dependent and time-dependent. The cellular ATP profile paralleled that of respiration. MCM-41 had no noticeable effect on respiration rate. In cells depleted of metabolic fuels, 50 microg/mL SBA-15 delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration by 12 min and 200 microg/mL SBA-15 by 34 min; MCM-41 also delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration. Neither SBA-15 nor MCM-41 affected cellular glutathione. Both nanoparticles inhibited respiration of isolated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

  18. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  19. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-01-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method. Images PMID:1100671

  20. Anaerobic bag culture method.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1975-06-01

    In a new method of anaerobic culture, a transparent, gas-impermeable bag is used and the anaerobic environment is established with copper sulfate-saturated steel wool. An Alka-Seltzer tablet generates carbon dioxide. The agar plate surface can be inspected through the bag at any time without interrupting the anaerobic atmosphere or disturbing other specimens. Methylene blue indicator strips are completely reduced by 4 h after the bag is set up and have remained reduced for as long as 3 weeks. Growth of 16 different stock culture anaerobes was generally equivalent by the bag and GasPak jar methods. Yield and growth of anaerobic isolates also were equivalent with 7 of 10 clinical specimens; from the other 3 specimens, 13 isolates were recovered, 5 by both the bag and jar methods and the rest by one method or the other. No consistent differences were found between the anaerobic bag and GasPak jar methods in the yield of anaerobes from clinical specimens. Early growth (24 h of incubation) of anaerobes from one specimen was detected with the bag method.

  1. The isolation and characterization of new C. thermocellum strains and the evaluation of multiple anaerobic digestion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wen

    The overall objective of my research was to improve the efficiencies of bioconversions that produce renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass. To this end, my studies addressed issues important to two promising strategies: consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and anaerobic digestion (AD). CBP achieves saccharolytic enzyme production, hydrolysis, and fermentation in a single step and is considered to be the most cost-effective model. Anaerobic bacteria that can be used in CBP are highly desirable. To that end, two thermophilic and cellulolytic bacterial strains were isolated and characterized (Chapter 3). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, both strains CS7 and CS8 are closely related to Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405. However, they had significantly higher specific cellulase activities and ethanol/acetate ratios than C. thermocellum ATCC 27405. As a result, CS7 and CS8 are two new highly cellulolytic and ethanologenic C. thermocellum strains, with application potentials in research and development of CBP. As some of the most promising AD processes, two temperature-phased AD (TPAD) systems, in comparison with a thermophilic single-stage AD (TSAD) system and a mesophilic two-stage AD (MTAD) system, were studied in treating high-strength dairy cattle manure. The TPAD systems, with the thermophilic digesters acidified (AT-TPAD, Chapter 4) or operated at neutral pH (NT-TPAD, Chapter 5), were optimized at the thermophilic temperature of 50°C and a volume ratio between the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of 1:2. Despite similar methane productions, the NT-TPAD system achieved significantly higher volatile solid (VS) removal than the AT-TPAD system and needed no external pH adjustments (Chapter 6). At the same overall OLR, the TSAD system achieved the highest performance, followed by the NT-TPAD and the MTAD systems (Chapter 7). Each digester harbored distinct yet dynamic microbial populations, some of which were significantly correlated or associated

  2. Ethanol and hydrogen production by two thermophilic, anaerobic bacteria isolated from Icelandic geothermal areas.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Perttu E P; Beck, Steinar R; Orlygsson, Jóhann; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2008-11-01

    Microbial fermentations are potential producers of sustainable energy carriers. In this study, ethanol and hydrogen production was studied by two thermophilic bacteria (strain AK15 and AK17) isolated from geothermal springs in Iceland. Strain AK15 was affiliated with Clostridium uzonii (98.8%), while AK17 was affiliated with Thermoanaerobacterium aciditolerans (99.2%) based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Both strains fermented a wide variety of sugar residues typically found in lignocellulosic materials, and some polysaccharides. In the batch cultivations, strain AK17 produced ethanol from glucose and xylose fermentations of up to 1.6 mol-EtOH/mol-glucose (80% of the theoretical maximum) and 1.1 mol-EtOH/mol-xylose (66%), respectively. The hydrogen yields by AK17 were up to 1.2 mol-H2/ mol-glucose (30% of the theoretical maximum) and 1.0 mol-H2/mol-xylose (30%). The strain AK15 produced hydrogen as the main fermentation product from glucose (up to 1.9 mol-H2/mol-glucose [48%]) and xylose (1.1 mol-H2/mol-xylose [33%]). The strain AK17 tolerated exogenously added ethanol up to 4% (v/v). The ethanol and hydrogen production performance from glucose by a co-culture of the strains AK15 and AK17 was studied in a continuous-flow bioreactor at 60 degrees C. Stable and continuous ethanol and hydrogen co-production was achieved with ethanol yield of 1.35 mol-EtOH/mol-glucose, and with the hydrogen production rate of 6.1 mmol/h/L (H2 yield of 0.80 mol-H2/mol-glucose). PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that the AK17 became the dominant bacterium in the bioreactor. In conclusion, strain AK17 is a promising strain for the co-production of ethanol and hydrogen with a wide substrate utilization spectrum, relatively high ethanol tolerance, and ethanol yields among the highest reported for thermoanaerobes.

  3. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Luying

    2009-11-20

    The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

  4. Cellulosibacter alkalithermophilus gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic alkalithermophilic, cellulolytic-xylanolytic bacterium isolated from soil of a coconut garden.

    PubMed

    Watthanalamloet, Amornrat; Tachaapaikoon, Chakrit; Lee, Yun Sik; Kosugi, Akihiko; Mori, Yutaka; Tanasupawat, Somboon; Kyu, Khin Lay; Ratanakhanokchai, Khanok

    2012-10-01

    An obligately anaerobic, cellulolytic-xylanolytic bacterium, designated strain A6(T), was isolated from soil of a coconut garden in the Bangkuntien district of Bangkok, Thailand. The strain was Gram-stain positive, catalase-negative, endospore-forming, motile and rod-shaped with a cell size of 0.2-0.3×2.0-3.0 µm. Optimal growth of strain A6(T) occurred at pH(55 °C) 9.5, 55 °C. Strain A6(T) fermented various carbohydrates, and the end products from the fermentation of cellobiose were acetate, ethanol, propionate and a small amount of butyrate. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(14:0) 3-OH, iso-C(15:0), iso-C(16:0) and C(16:0). The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. No respiratory quinones were detected. The DNA G+C content was 30.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strain represented a new phyletic sublineage within the family Clostridiaceae, with <93.0% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to recognized species of this family. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and physiological evidence, strain A6(T) represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Cellulosibacter alkalithermophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is A6(T) ( = TISTR 1915(T) = KCTC 5874(T)).

  5. Spirochaeta Americana sp. Nov., A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochaete Isolated from Soda Mona Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microns. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 C (optimum 37 C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3 % NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG1(sup T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(sup T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(sup T) revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7 %. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(sup T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC 13AA-392(sup T) = DSM 14872(sup T)).

  6. Spirochaeta Americana sp. Nov., A New Haloalkaliphilic, Obligately Anaerobic Spirochaete Isolated from Soda Mona Lake in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic spirochaete, strain ASpG1(sup T), was isolated from sediments of the alkaline, hypersaline Mono Lake in California, USA. Cells of the Gram-negative strain were motile and spirochaete-shaped with sizes of 0.2-0.22 x 8-18 microns. Growth of the strain was observed between 10 and 44 C (optimum 37 C), in 2-12% (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3 % NaCl) and between pH 8 and 10.5 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel strain was strictly alkaliphilic, required high concentrations of carbonates in the medium and was capable of utilizing D-glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, starch and D-mannitol. End products of glucose fermentation were H2, acetate, ethanol and formate. Strain ASpG1(sup T) was resistant to kanamycin and rifampicin, but sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The G + C content of its DNA was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis of strain ASpG1(sup T) with its most closely related species, Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491(sup T) revealed a hybridization value of only 48.7 %. On the basis of its physiological and molecular properties, strain ASpG1(sup T) appears to represent a novel species of the genus Spirochaeta, for which the name Spirochaeta americana is proposed (type strain ASpG1(sup T) = ATCC 13AA-392(sup T) = DSM 14872(sup T)).

  7. Thermotoga lettingae sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, methanol-degrading bacterium isolated from a thermophilic anaerobic reactor.

    PubMed

    Balk, Melike; Weijma, Jan; Stams, Alfons J M

    2002-07-01

    A novel, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, mobile, Gram-negative, thermophilic bacterium, strain TMOT, was isolated from a thermophilic sulfate-reducing bioreactor operated at 65 C with methanol as the sole substrate. The G+C content of the DNA of strain TMOT was 39.2 mol%. The optimum pH, NaCl concentration, and temperature for growth were 7.0, 1.0%, and 65 degrees C, respectively. Strain TMOT was able to degrade methanol to CO2 and H2 in syntrophic culture with Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus AH or Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii. Thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, Fe(III) and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate were able to serve as electron acceptors during methanol degradation. In the presence of thiosulfate or elemental sulfur, methanol was converted to CO2 and partly to alanine. In pure culture, strain TMOT was also able to ferment methanol to acetate, CO2 and H2. However, this degradation occurred slower than in syntrophic cultures or in the presence of electron acceptors. Yeast extract was required for growth. Besides growing on methanol, strain TMOT grew by fermentation on a variety of carbohydrates including monomeric and oligomeric sugars, starch and xylan. Acetate, alanine, CO2, H2, and traces of ethanol, lactate and alpha-aminobutyrate were produced during glucose fermentation. Comparison of 16S rDNA genes revealed that strain TMOT is related to Thermotoga subterranea (98%) and Thermotoga elfii (98%). The type strain is TMOT (= DSM 14385T = ATCC BAA-301T). On the basis of the fact that these organisms differ physiologically from strain TMOT, it is proposed that strain TMOT be classified as a new species, within the genus Thermotoga, as Thermotoga lettingae.

  8. Marinitoga arctica sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a Mid-Ocean Ridge vent field.

    PubMed

    Steinsbu, Bjørn O; Røyseth, Victoria; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Steen, Ida H

    2016-12-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, heterotrophic bacterium, designated 2PyrY55-1T, was isolated from the wall of an active hydrothermal white-smoker chimney in the Soria Moria vent field (71° N) at the Mohns Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. Cells of the strain were Gram-negative, motile rods that possessed a polar flagellum and a sheath-like outer structure ('toga'). Growth was observed at 45-70 °C (optimum 65 °C), at pH 5.0-7.5 (optimum pH 5.5) and in 1.5-5.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2.5 %). The strain grew on pyruvate, complex proteinaceous substrates and various sugars. Cystine and elemental sulfur were used as electron acceptors, and sulfide was then produced. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 27 mol% (Tm method). Cellular fatty acids included C16 : 0, C14 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH, C16 : 1ω9c, C18 : 1ω9c, C18 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and C12 : 0. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene showed that the strain belonged to the genus Marinitoga in the family Petrotogaceae. Based on the phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data, strain 2PyrY55-1T (=DSM 29778T=JCM 30566T) is the type strain of a novel species of the genus Marinitoga, for which the name Marinitoga arctica sp. nov. is proposed.

  9. Culturable prokaryotic diversity of deep, gas hydrate sediments: first use of a continuous high-pressure, anaerobic, enrichment and isolation system for subseafloor sediments (DeepIsoBUG)

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, R John; Sellek, Gerard; Webster, Gordon; Martin, Derek; Anders, Erik; Weightman, Andrew J; Sass, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments may contain depressurization-sensitive, anaerobic, piezophilic prokaryotes. To test this we developed the DeepIsoBUG system, which when coupled with the HYACINTH pressure-retaining drilling and core storage system and the PRESS core cutting and processing system, enables deep sediments to be handled without depressurization (up to 25 MPa) and anaerobic prokaryotic enrichments and isolation to be conducted up to 100 MPa. Here, we describe the system and its first use with subsurface gas hydrate sediments from the Indian Continental Shelf, Cascadia Margin and Gulf of Mexico. Generally, highest cell concentrations in enrichments occurred close to in situ pressures (14 MPa) in a variety of media, although growth continued up to at least 80 MPa. Predominant sequences in enrichments were Carnobacterium, Clostridium, Marinilactibacillus and Pseudomonas, plus Acetobacterium and Bacteroidetes in Indian samples, largely independent of media and pressures. Related 16S rRNA gene sequences for all of these Bacteria have been detected in deep, subsurface environments, although isolated strains were piezotolerant, being able to grow at atmospheric pressure. Only the Clostridium and Acetobacterium were obligate anaerobes. No Archaea were enriched. It may be that these sediment samples were not deep enough (total depth 1126–1527 m) to obtain obligate piezophiles. PMID:19694787

  10. Characterization of isolates of Eisenbergiella tayi, a strictly anaerobic Gram-stain variable bacillus recovered from human clinical materials in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Kathryn; Burdz, Tamara; Wiebe, Deborah; Balcewich, Brittany M; Zimmerman, Tina; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe; Hoang, Linda M N; Bernier, Anne-Marie

    2017-03-07

    Eisenbergiella gen. nov. was proposed in 2014 to describe an obligate anaerobic, structurally Gram-positive but Gram-stain-negative-appearing bacillus recovered from the blood culture of an elderly Israeli man. Here, we describe features for eight blood culture isolates as well one appendix-derived isolate, recovered from seven patients located in two Canadian provinces, which by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, were identifiable as Eisenbergiella tayi, the sole validly- named species in this genus. After whole genome sequencing, isolates were found to be essentially identical (96.8-98.7% identity) to each other and to E. tayi DSM 26961(T), after comparison using the ANIb tool and in silico DNA-DNA hydridization. All isolates were observed to have remarkably large genomes (7.1-8.3 Mb) with a G + C content of 46.5%-46.9%.

  11. BACTERIAL RESPIRATION OF ARSENIC AND SELENIUM. (R826105)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichme...

  12. Waiting to inhale: HIF-1 modulates aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Adam T; Johnson, Randall S

    2007-04-06

    The hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1 is known to promote anaerobic respiration during low oxygen conditions (hypoxia). In this issue, Fukuda et al. (2007) expand the range of HIF-1's functions by showing that it modulates aerobic respiration as well.

  13. BACTERIAL RESPIRATION OF ARSENIC AND SELENIUM. (R826105)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichme...

  14. Genomic characterization of three unique Dehalococcoides that respire on persistent polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanquan; Chng, Kern Rei; Wilm, Andreas; Zhao, Siyan; Yang, Kun-Lin; Nagarajan, Niranjan; He, Jianzhong

    2014-08-19

    Fastidious anaerobic bacteria play critical roles in environmental bioremediation of halogenated compounds. However, their characterization and application have been largely impeded by difficulties in growing them in pure culture. Thus far, no pure culture has been reported to respire on the notorious polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and functional genes responsible for PCB detoxification remain unknown due to the extremely slow growth of PCB-respiring bacteria. Here we report the successful isolation and characterization of three Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains that respire on commercial PCBs. Using high-throughput metagenomic analysis, combined with traditional culture techniques, tetrachloroethene (PCE) was identified as a feasible alternative to PCBs to isolate PCB-respiring Dehalococcoides from PCB-enriched cultures. With PCE as an alternative electron acceptor, the PCB-respiring Dehalococcoides were boosted to a higher cell density (1.2 × 10(8) to 1.3 × 10(8) cells per mL on PCE vs. 5.9 × 10(6) to 10.4 × 10(6) cells per mL on PCBs) with a shorter culturing time (30 d on PCE vs. 150 d on PCBs). The transcriptomic profiles illustrated that the distinct PCB dechlorination profile of each strain was predominantly mediated by a single, novel reductive dehalogenase (RDase) catalyzing chlorine removal from both PCBs and PCE. The transcription levels of PCB-RDase genes are 5-60 times higher than the genome-wide average. The cultivation of PCB-respiring Dehalococcoides in pure culture and the identification of PCB-RDase genes deepen our understanding of organohalide respiration of PCBs and shed light on in situ PCB bioremediation.

  15. Anoxybacillusgeothermalis sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, endospore-forming bacterium isolated from mineral deposits in a geothermal station.

    PubMed

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Jaussi, Marion; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Jeanneret, Nicole; Palmieri, Fabio; Palmieri, Ilona; Roussel-Delif, Ludovic; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Vetter, Alexandra; Chain, Patrick S; Regenspurg, Simona; Junier, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    A novel endospore-forming bacterium designated strain GSsed3T was isolated from deposits clogging aboveground filters from the geothermal power platform of Groß Schönebeck in northern Germany. The novel isolate was Gram-staining-positive, facultatively anaerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-positive. Optimum growth occurred at 60 °C, 0.5 % (w/v) NaCl and pH 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity indicated that strain GSsed3T belonged to the genus Anoxybacillus, and showed 99.8 % sequence similarity to Anoxybacillus rupiensis R270T, 98.2 % similarity to Anoxybacillus tepidamans GS5-97T, 97.9 % similarity to Anoxybacillus voinovskiensis TH13T, 97.7 % similarity to Anoxybacillus caldiproteolyticus DSM 15730T and 97.6 % similarity to Anoxybacillus amylolyticus MR3CT. DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) indicated only 16 % relatedness to Anoxybacillus rupiensis DSM 17127T. Furthermore, DDH estimation based on genomes analysis indicated only 19.9 % overall nucleotide similarity to Anoxybacillus amylolyticus DSM 15939T. The major respiratory menaquinone was MK-8. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phosphoglycolipid and one unknown phospholipid. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0, C16 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and anteiso-C17 : 0. The peptidoglycan type was A1γ meso-Dpm-direct. The genomic DNA G+C content of the strain was 46.9 mol%. The phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization indicated that strain GSsed3T differs from related species of the genus. Therefore, strain GSsed3T is considered to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Anoxybacillus, for which the name Anoxybacillus geothermalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Anoxybacillus geothermalis is GSsed3T (=CCOS808T =ATCC BAA2555T).

  16. Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a Novel Spore-Forming, Alkaliphilic Anaerobe Isolated from Owens Lake, California, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Itoh, Takashi; Krader, Paul; Whitman, William B.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    A novel, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium, strain SCAT, was isolated from mud sediments of a soda lake in California, USA. The rod-shaped cells were motile, Gram-positive, formed spores and were 0.4-0.5x2.5-5.0 micrometers in size. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.7-10.0 and was optimal at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth was 10-45 degrees C, with optimal growth at 35 degrees C. NaCl was required for growth. Growth occurred at 0.5-9.0% (w/v) NaCl and was optimal at 1-2% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that fermented sugars, proteolysis products, some organic and amino acids, glycerol, d-cellobiose and cellulose. It was also capable of growth by the Stickland reaction. Strain SCAT was sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin and gentamicin, but it was resistant to ampicillin and kanamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.2 mol%. Major fatty acid components were C14:0, iso-C15:0, C16:1omega9c and C16:0. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain SCAT showed a similarity of approximately 97% with the type strains of Clostridium formicaceticum and Clostridium aceticum in clostridial cluster XI and a similarity of less than 94.2% to any other recognized Clostridium species and those of related genera in this cluster. Strain SCAT was clearly differentiated from C. formicaceticum and C. aceticum based on comparison of their phenotypic properties and fatty acid profiles, as well as low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain SCAT and the type strains of these two species. Therefore, strain SCAT is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., in clostridial cluster XI. The type strain is SCAT (=ATCC BAA-1084T=JCM 12857T=DSM 17722T=CIP 107910T).

  17. Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a Novel Spore-Forming, Alkaliphilic Anaerobe Isolated from Owens Lake, California, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Itoh, Takashi; Krader, Paul; Whitman, William B.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    A novel, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium, strain SCAT, was isolated from mud sediments of a soda lake in California, USA. The rod-shaped cells were motile, Gram-positive, formed spores and were 0.4-0.5x2.5-5.0 micrometers in size. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.7-10.0 and was optimal at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth was 10-45 degrees C, with optimal growth at 35 degrees C. NaCl was required for growth. Growth occurred at 0.5-9.0% (w/v) NaCl and was optimal at 1-2% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that fermented sugars, proteolysis products, some organic and amino acids, glycerol, d-cellobiose and cellulose. It was also capable of growth by the Stickland reaction. Strain SCAT was sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin and gentamicin, but it was resistant to ampicillin and kanamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.2 mol%. Major fatty acid components were C14:0, iso-C15:0, C16:1omega9c and C16:0. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain SCAT showed a similarity of approximately 97% with the type strains of Clostridium formicaceticum and Clostridium aceticum in clostridial cluster XI and a similarity of less than 94.2% to any other recognized Clostridium species and those of related genera in this cluster. Strain SCAT was clearly differentiated from C. formicaceticum and C. aceticum based on comparison of their phenotypic properties and fatty acid profiles, as well as low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain SCAT and the type strains of these two species. Therefore, strain SCAT is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., in clostridial cluster XI. The type strain is SCAT (=ATCC BAA-1084T=JCM 12857T=DSM 17722T=CIP 107910T).

  18. Clostridium swellfunianum sp. nov., a novel anaerobic bacterium isolated from the pit mud of Chinese Luzhou-flavor liquor production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaolan; Huang, Dan; Liu, Laiyan; Zhang, Jin; Deng, Yu; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Wenxue; Wu, Zhengyun; Fan, Ao; Lai, Dengyi; Dai, Lirong

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-positive, strictly anaerobic, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain S11-3-10(T), was isolated from the pit mud used for Chinese Luzhou-flavor liquor production. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the strain formed a monophyletic clade with the closely related type strains of Clostridium cluster I and was most closely related to Clostridium amylolyticum JCM 14823(T) (94.38%). The temperature, pH, and NaCl range for growth was determined to be 20-45 °C (optimum 37 °C), 4.0-10.0 (optimum pH 7.3), and 0-3.0% (w/v), respectively. The strain was able to tolerate up to 7.5 % (v/v) ethanol. Yeast extract or peptone was found to be required for growth. Acids were found to be produced from glucose, mannose and trehalose. The major end products from glucose fermentation were identified as ethanol, acetate and hydrogen. The polar lipids were found to consist of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and unidentified phospholipids and polar lipids. The major fatty acids (>5%) were identified as iso-C(15:0), C(16:0), C(16:0)dma, C(14:0), anteiso-C(15:0) and iso-C(13:0). No respiratory quinone was detected. The diamino acid in the cell wall peptidoglycan was identified as meso-diaminopimelic acid and the whole-cell sugars were found to include galactose and glucose as major components. The DNA G+C content was determined to be 36.4 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic evidence, the isolate is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Clostridium for which the name Clostridium swellfunianum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S11-3-10(T) (=DSM 27788(T) = JCM 19606(T) = CICC 10730(T)).

  19. Isolation of a facultative anaerobic exoelectrogenic strain LZ-1 and probing electron transfer mechanism in situ by linking UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Deng, Dandan; Zhang, Yichi; Zhou, Wen; Jiang, Yujing; Liu, Ying

    2017-04-15

    A new facultative anaerobic exoelectrogenic strain LZ-1, belonging to Citrobacter freundii, has been isolated. This strain can produce current densities of 843.9 and 865.6μAcm(-2) using citrate or acetate as carbon source in a three-electrode configuration. The electricity generation performance was also analyzed in a dual-chamber MFC system, reaching a maximum power density of 1233mWm(-2). In addition to acetate and citrate, other carbon sources such as pyruvate, formate, acetate, citrate and fumarate could also be utilized to produce current by strain LZ-1. Data supports the presence of electroactive c-type cytochromes in C. freundii sp. when grown on ITO electrodes, by linking spectroscopy and electrochemistry in situ. Since facultative strains possess many desirable properties compared to anaerobic strains, strain LZ-1 represents a promising exoelectrogenic species in engineering of biological catalysts for microbial electrochemistry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation and characterization of Desulfocurvus thunnarius sp. nov., a sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treating cooking wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Olfa; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Bartoli, Manon; Hamdi, Moktar; Bouallagui, Hassib; Fauque, Guy; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-11-01

    A novel anaerobic, chemo-organotrophic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain Olac 40(T), was isolated from a Tunisian wastewater digestor. Cells were curved, motile rods or vibrios (5.0-7.0×0.5 µm). Strain Olac 40(T) grew at temperatures between 15 and 50 °C (optimum 40 °C), and between pH 5.0 and 9.0 (optimum pH 7.1). It did not require NaCl for growth but tolerated it up to 50 g l(-1) (optimum 2 g l(-1)). In the presence of sulfate or thiosulfate, strain Olac 40(T) used lactate, pyruvate and formate as energy sources. Growth was observed on H2 only in the presence of acetate as carbon source. In the presence of sulfate or thiosulfate, the end products of lactate oxidation were acetate, sulfide and CO2. Sulfate, thiosulfate and sulfite were used as terminal electron acceptors, but not elemental sulfur, nitrate or nitrite. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain Olac 40(T) was 70 mol%. The profile of polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, aminophospholipid and four phospholipids. The main fatty acids were C16 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain Olac 40(T) was affiliated with the family Desulfovibrionaceae within the class Deltaproteobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons and physiological characteristics, strain Olac 40(T) is proposed to be assigned to a novel species of the genus Desulfocurvus, for which the name Desulfocurvus thunnarius is proposed. The type strain is Olac 40(T) ( = DSM 26129(T) = JCM 18546(T)).

  1. Isolation of an arsenate-respiring bacterium from a redox front in an arsenic-polluted aquifer in West Bengal, Bengal Basin.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Thomas H; McArthur, John M; Sikdar, Pradip K; Santini, Joanne M

    2015-04-07

    Natural pollution of groundwater by arsenic adversely affects the health of tens of millions of people worldwide, with the deltaic aquifers of SE Asia being particularly polluted. The pollution is caused primarily by, or as a side reaction of, the microbial reduction of sedimentary Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides, but the organism(s) responsible for As release have not been isolated. Here we report the first isolation of a dissimilatory arsenate reducer from sediments of the Bengal Basin in West Bengal. The bacterium, here designated WB3, respires soluble arsenate and couples its reduction to the oxidation of acetate; WB3 is therefore implicated in the process of arsenic pollution of groundwater, which is largely by arsenite. The bacterium WB3 is also capable of reducing dissolved Fe(III) citrate, solid Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, and elemental sulfur, using acetate as the electron donor. It is a member of the Desulfuromonas genus and possesses a dissimilatory arsenate reductase that was identified using degenerate polymerase chain reaction primers. The sediment from which WB3 was isolated was brown, Pleistocene sand at a depth of 35.2 m below ground level (mbgl). This level was some 3 cm below the boundary between the brown sands and overlying reduced, gray, Holocene aquifer sands. The color boundary is interpreted to be a reduction front that releases As for resorption downflow, yielding a high load of labile As sorbed to the sediment at a depth of 35.8 mbgl and concentrations of As in groundwater that reach >1000 μg/L.

  2. Isolation and Genomic Characterization of ‘Desulfuromonas soudanensis WTL’, a Metal- and Electrode-Respiring Bacterium from Anoxic Deep Subsurface Brine

    PubMed Central

    Badalamenti, Jonathan P.; Summers, Zarath M.; Chan, Chi Ho; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Reaching a depth of 713 m below the surface, the Soudan Underground Iron Mine (Soudan, MN, USA) transects a massive Archaean (2.7 Ga) banded iron formation, providing a remarkably accessible window into the terrestrial deep biosphere. Despite organic carbon limitation, metal-reducing microbial communities are present in potentially ancient anoxic brines continuously emanating from exploratory boreholes on Level 27. Using graphite electrodes deposited in situ as bait, we electrochemically enriched and isolated a novel halophilic iron-reducing Deltaproteobacterium, ‘Desulfuromonas soudanensis’ strain WTL, from an acetate-fed three-electrode bioreactor poised at +0.24 V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode). Cyclic voltammetry revealed that ‘D. soudanensis’ releases electrons at redox potentials approximately 100 mV more positive than the model freshwater surface isolate Geobacter sulfurreducens, suggesting that its extracellular respiration is tuned for higher potential electron acceptors. ‘D. soudanensis’ contains a 3,958,620-bp circular genome, assembled to completion using single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing reads, which encodes a complete TCA cycle, 38 putative multiheme c-type cytochromes, one of which contains 69 heme-binding motifs, and a LuxI/LuxR quorum sensing cassette that produces an unidentified N-acyl homoserine lactone. Another cytochrome is predicted to lie within a putative prophage, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer plays a role in respiratory flexibility among metal reducers. Isolation of ‘D. soudanensis’ underscores the utility of electrode-based approaches for enriching rare metal reducers from a wide range of habitats. PMID:27445996

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Microbes Mediating Thermodynamically Favorable Coupling of Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane and Metal Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, J. B.; Reed, B. C.; Sarode, N. D.; Kretz, C. B.; Bray, M. S.; DiChristina, T. J.; Stewart, F. J.; Fowle, D. A.; Crowe, S.

    2014-12-01

    Methane is the third most reduced environmentally relevant electron donor for microbial metabolisms after organic carbon and hydrogen. In anoxic ecosystems, the major sink for methane is anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) mediated by syntrophic microbial consortia that couple AOM to reduction of an oxidized electron acceptor to yield free energy. In marine sediments, AOM is generally coupled to reduction of sulfate despite an extremely small amount of free energy yield because sulfate is the most abundant electron acceptor in seawater. While AOM coupled to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction (Fe- and Mn-AOM) is 10-30x more thermodynamically favorable than sulfate-AOM, and geochemical data suggests that it occurs in diverse environments, the microorganisms mediating Fe- and Mn-AOM remain unknown. Lake Matano, Indonesia is an ideal ecosystem to enrich for Fe- and Mn-AOM microbes because its anoxic ferruginous deep waters and sediments contain abundant Fe(III), Mn(IV) and methane, and extremely low sulfate and nitrate. Our research aims to isolate and characterize the microbes mediating Fe- and Mn-AOM from three layers of Lake Matano sediments through serial enrichment cultures in minimal media lacking nitrate and sulfate. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of sediment inoculum revealed the presence of the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter (5-10% total microbial community in shallow sediment and 35-60% in deeper sediment) as well as 1-2% Euryarchaeota implicated in methane cycling, including ANME-1 and 2d and Methanosarcinales. After 90 days of primary enrichment, all three sediment layers showed high levels of Fe(III) reduction (60-90 μM Fe(II) d-1) in the presence of methane compared to no methane and heat-killed controls. Treatments with added Fe(III) as goethite contained higher abundances of Geobacter than the inoculum (60-80% in all layers), suggesting that Geobacter may be mediating Fe(III) reduction in these enrichments. Quantification of AOM rates is underway, and

  4. Anaerobium acetethylicum gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic, gluconate-fermenting bacterium isolated from a methanogenic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Patil, Yogita; Junghare, Madan; Pester, Michael; Müller, Nicolai; Schink, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    A novel strictly anaerobic, mesophilic bacterium was enriched and isolated with gluconate as sole substrate from a methanogenic sludge collected from a biogas reactor. Cells of strain GluBS11T stained Gram-positive and were non-motile, straight rods, measuring 3.0-4.5 × 0.8-1.2 μm. The temperature range for growth was 15-37 °C, with optimal growth at 30 °C, the pH range was 6.5-8.5, with optimal growth at pH 7, and the generation time under optimal conditions was 60 min. API Rapid 32A reactions were positive for α-galactosidase, α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase and negative for catalase and oxidase. A broad variety of substrates was utilized, including gluconate, glucose, fructose, maltose, sucrose, lactose, galactose, melezitose, melibiose, mannitol, erythritol, glycerol and aesculin. Products of gluconate fermentation were ethanol, acetate, formate, H2 and CO2. Neither sulfate nor nitrate served as an electron acceptor. Predominant cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were C14 : 0, C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c/iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and C18 : 1ω7c. The DNA G+C content of strain GluBS11T was 44.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data revealed that strain GluBS11T is a member of subcluster XIVa within the order Clostridiales. The closest cultured relatives are Clostridium herbivorans (93.1 % similarity to the type strain), Clostridium populeti (93.3 %), Eubacterium uniforme (92.4 %) and Clostridium polysaccharolyticum (91.5 %). Based on this 16S rRNA gene sequence divergence (>6.5 %) as well as on chemotaxonomic and phenotypic differences from these taxa, strain GluBS11T is considered to represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Anaerobium acetethylicum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Anaerobium acetethylicum is GluBS11T ( = LMG 28619T = KCTC 15450T = DSM 29698T).

  5. Anoxybacter fermentans gen. nov., sp. nov., a piezophilic, thermophilic, anaerobic, fermentative bacterium isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang; Zhang, Zhao; Li, Xi; Zhang, Xiaobo; Cao, Junwei; Jebbar, Mohamed; Alain, Karine; Shao, Zongze

    2015-02-01

    A novel piezophilic, thermophilic, anaerobic, fermentative bacterial strain, designated strain DY22613(T), was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal sulfide deposit at the East Pacific Rise (GPS position: 102.6° W 3.1° S). Cells of strain DY22613(T) were long, motile rods (10 to 20 µm in length and 0.5 µm in width) with peritrichous flagella and were Gram-stain-negative. Growth was recorded at 44-72 °C (optimum 60-62 °C) and at hydrostatic pressures of 0.1-55 MPa (optimum 20 MPa). The pH range for growth was from pH 5.0 to 9.0 with an optimum at pH 7.0. Growth was observed in the presence of 1 to 8 % (w/v) sea salts and 0.65 to 5.2 % (w/v) NaCl, with optimum salt concentrations at 3.5 % for sea salts and at 2.3 % for NaCl. Under optimal growth conditions, the shortest generation time observed was 27 min (60 °C, 20 MPa). Strain DY22613(T) was heterotrophic, able to utilize complex organic compounds, amino acids, sugars and organic acids including peptone, tryptone, beef extract, yeast extract, alanine, glutamine, methionine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine, fructose, fucose, galactose, gentiobiose, glucose, mannose, melibiose, palatinose, rhamnose, turanose, pyruvate, lactic acid, methyl ester, erythritol, galacturonic acid and glucosaminic acid. Strain DY22613(T) was able to reduce Fe(III) compounds, including Fe(III) oxyhydroxide (pH 7.0), amorphous iron(III) oxide (pH 9.0), goethite (α-FeOOH, pH 12.0), Fe(III) citrate and elementary sulfur. Products of fermentation were butyrate, acetate and hydrogen. Main cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C14 : 0 3-OH and C14 : 0. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain DY22613(T) was 36.7 mol%. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strain forms a novel lineage within the class Clostridia and clusters with the order Haloanaerobiales (86.92 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The phylogenetic data suggest that the lineage represents at least a novel genus and species, for which the name Anoxybacter

  6. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum sp. strain 15-1 as a representative anaerobic toluene-degrader from a constructed wetland model.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Cifuentes, Ingrid; Martinez-Lavanchy, Paula M; Marin-Cevada, Vianey; Böhnke, Stefanie; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Jochen A; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2017-01-01

    Previously, Planted Fixed-Bed Reactors (PFRs) have been used to investigate microbial toluene removal in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands. Aerobic toluene degradation was predominant in these model systems although bulk redox conditions were hypoxic to anoxic. However, culture-independent approaches indicated also that microbes capable of anaerobic toluene degradation were abundant. Therefore, we aimed at isolating anaerobic-toluene degraders from one of these PFRs. From the obtained colonies which consisted of spirilli-shaped bacteria, a strain designated 15-1 was selected for further investigations. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene revealed greatest similarity (99%) with toluene-degrading Magnetospirillum sp. TS-6. Isolate 15-1 grew with up to 0.5 mM of toluene under nitrate-reducing conditions. Cells reacted to higher concentrations of toluene by an increase in the degree of saturation of their membrane fatty acids. Strain 15-1 contained key genes for the anaerobic degradation of toluene via benzylsuccinate and subsequently the benzoyl-CoA pathway, namely bssA, encoding for the alpha subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase, bcrC for subunit C of benzoyl-CoA reductase and bamA for 6-oxocyclohex-1-ene-1-carbonyl-CoA hydrolase. Finally, most members of a clone library of bssA generated from the PFR had highest similarity to bssA from strain 15-1. Our study provides insights about the physiological capacities of a strain of Magnetospirillum isolated from a planted system where active rhizoremediation of toluene is taking place.

  7. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum sp. strain 15-1 as a representative anaerobic toluene-degrader from a constructed wetland model

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Cifuentes, Ingrid; Martinez-Lavanchy, Paula M.; Marin-Cevada, Vianey; Böhnke, Stefanie; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Jochen A.

    2017-01-01

    Previously, Planted Fixed-Bed Reactors (PFRs) have been used to investigate microbial toluene removal in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands. Aerobic toluene degradation was predominant in these model systems although bulk redox conditions were hypoxic to anoxic. However, culture-independent approaches indicated also that microbes capable of anaerobic toluene degradation were abundant. Therefore, we aimed at isolating anaerobic-toluene degraders from one of these PFRs. From the obtained colonies which consisted of spirilli-shaped bacteria, a strain designated 15–1 was selected for further investigations. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene revealed greatest similarity (99%) with toluene-degrading Magnetospirillum sp. TS-6. Isolate 15–1 grew with up to 0.5 mM of toluene under nitrate-reducing conditions. Cells reacted to higher concentrations of toluene by an increase in the degree of saturation of their membrane fatty acids. Strain 15–1 contained key genes for the anaerobic degradation of toluene via benzylsuccinate and subsequently the benzoyl-CoA pathway, namely bssA, encoding for the alpha subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase, bcrC for subunit C of benzoyl-CoA reductase and bamA for 6-oxocyclohex-1-ene-1-carbonyl-CoA hydrolase. Finally, most members of a clone library of bssA generated from the PFR had highest similarity to bssA from strain 15–1. Our study provides insights about the physiological capacities of a strain of Magnetospirillum isolated from a planted system where active rhizoremediation of toluene is taking place. PMID:28369150

  8. The phylogeny of archaebacteria, including novel anaerobic thermoacidophiles in the light of RNA polymerase structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zillig, Wolfram; Schnabel, Ralf; Tu, Jenn; Stetter, Karl Otto

    1982-05-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of archaebacteria are distinct from those of eubacteria both in structure and in function. They show similarities to those of the eukaryotic cytoplasm. Extremely thermophilic anaerobic sulfur-respiring archaebacteria isolated from solfataric waters represent four different families, the Thermoproteaceae, the “stiff filaments”, the Desulfurococcaceae and the Thermococcaceae, of a novel order, Thermoproteales. Together with the Sulfolobales, they form the second branch of the urkingdom of the archaebacteria besides that of the methanogens and extreme halophiles. Thermoplasma appears isolated.

  9. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, Curcuma longa, and Camellia sinensis as irrigating solutions on isolated anaerobic bacteria from infected primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Dhariwal, Neha Shashikant; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Harakuni, Sheetal; Sogi, Suma; Assudani, Harsha G; Mistry, Laresh Naresh

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, most of the commercial intra-canal medicaments have cytotoxic reactions and because of their inability to eliminate bacteria from dentinal tubules, recent medicine has turned its attention to the usage of biologic medication prepared from natural plants. The literature to testify the efficacy of natural alternatives in primary teeth is meagre and its effects as irrigating solutions need to be evaluated. To evaluate the antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, ethanolic extracts of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and Camellia sinensis (green tea) as irrigating solutions against the anaerobic bacteria isolated from the root canals of infected primary teeth. Thirty patients were selected based on the selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were taken. Rubber dam isolation and working length estimation were done, following which thirty samples were taken from the root canals of infected primary teeth using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate transport medium. The bacteria were then isolated using standard microbiological protocols and were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing using the three test irrigants. SPSS 18 software using Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. The most commonly isolated bacteria included Porphyromonas sp., Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Sodium hypochlorite and C. longa (turmeric) showed good antibacterial effect and were effective against most of the isolated bacteria. There was statistically significant difference in the antibacterial effect among the three tested groups (P < 0.001). The least effective was C. sinensis (green tea). The infected primary teeth almost always present with a polymicrobial structure with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria. The chemo-mechanical preparation plays an important role in eradicating the population of predominant micro-organisms in treating these teeth with

  10. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-contaminated Leachate Ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Barry, Kerrie; Detter, J. C.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Israni, Sanjay; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Samual; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas S.; Bruce, David; Han, Cliff; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, Frank W.; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ye, Qi; Zhou, Jizhong; Richardson, P. M.; Fields, Matthew Wayne

    2016-11-03

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes. QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens Strain QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-Contaminated Leachate Ponds.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Detter, J C; Glavina Del Rio, T; Hammon, N; Israni, S; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Chertkov, O; Brettin, T; Bruce, D; Han, C; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F; Land, M L; Hauser, L; Kyrpides, N; Mikhailova, N; Ye, Q; Zhou, J; Richardson, P; Fields, M W

    2016-11-03

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens strain QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms. Copyright © 2016 Hwang et al.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens Strain QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-Contaminated Leachate Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, A.; Lucas, S.; Lapidus, A.; Barry, K.; Detter, J. C.; Glavina del Rio, T.; Hammon, N.; Israni, S.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Pitluck, S.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Bruce, D.; Han, C.; Schmutz, J.; Larimer, F.; Land, M. L.; Hauser, L.; Kyrpides, N.; Mikhailova, N.; Ye, Q.; Zhou, J.; Richardson, P.; Fields, M. W.

    2016-01-01

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens strain QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes. QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms. PMID:27811105

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-contaminated Leachate Ponds

    DOE PAGES

    Hwang, C.; Copeland, A.; Lucas, Susan; ...

    2016-11-03

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes. QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfotomaculum copahuensis Strain CINDEFI1 Isolated from the Geothermal Copahue System, Neuquén, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Urbieta, M. Sofía; Ee, Robson; Tan-Guan-Sheng, Adrian; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum copahuensis strain CINDEFI1 is a novel spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Copahue volcano area, Argentina. Here, we present its draft genome in which we found genes related with the anaerobic respiration of sulfur compounds similar to those present in the Copahue environment. PMID:27540078

  16. Anaerobic denitrification in fungi from the coastal marine sediments off Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Cathrine, Sumathi J; Raghukumar, Chandralata

    2009-01-01

    Denitrification is a microbial process during which nitrate or nitrite is reduced under anaerobic condition to gaseous nitrogen. The Arabian Sea contains one of the major pelagic denitrification zones and in addition to this, denitrification also takes places along the continental shelf. Prokaryotic microorganisms were considered to be the only players in this process. However recent studies have shown that higher microeukaryotes such as fungi can also adapt to anaerobic mode of respiration and reduce nitrate to harmful green house gases such as NO and N2O. In this study we examined the distribution and biomass of fungi in the sediments of the seasonal anoxic region off Goa from two stations. The sampling was carried out in five different periods from October 2005, when dissolved oxygen levels were near zero in bottom waters to March 2006. We isolated mycelial fungi, thraustochytrids and yeasts. Species of Aspergillus and thraustochytrids were dominant. Fungi were isolated under aerobic, as well as anaerobic conditions from different seasons. Four isolates were examined for their denitrification activity. Two cultures obtained from the anoxic sediments showed better growth under anaerobic condition than the other two cultures that were isolated from oxic sediments. Our preliminary results suggest that several species of fungi can grow under oxygen deficient conditions and participate in denitrification processes.

  17. Caldanaerovirga acetigignens gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic xylanolytic, alkalithermophilic bacterium isolated from Trego Hot Spring, Nevada, USA.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Isaac D; Ahmed, Sibtain; Zhao, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Romanek, Christopher S; Rohde, Manfred; Wiegel, Juergen

    2009-11-01

    An anaerobic thermophilic bacterium, designated strain JW/SA-NV4(T), was isolated from a xylan-supplemented enrichment culture from Trego hot spring located within the Black Rock Desert (NV, USA). Cells were generally straight or slightly bent rod-shaped, 0.4-0.8 microm in width and 3-6 microm in length during exponential growth. Cells from stationary phase were variable in size and shape, showing curved or bent morphology. Motility was not seen and flagella were not observed in electron micrographs. Sporulation was not observed. Strain JW/SA-NV4(T) stained Gram-negative but is phylogenetically Gram-type positive. Growth occurred at pH(25 degrees C) 6.8-8.8, with optimum growth at pH 8.4; no growth occurred at pH 9.0 or above or at 6.5 or below. With glucose or xylose as the carbon source, strain JW/SA-NV4(T) grew at 44-74 degrees C; no growth occurred at 76 degrees C or above or at 42 degrees C or below. However, the optimum temperature was 62 and 66 degrees C when grown on glucose and xylose, respectively. The shortest doubling time observed with glucose was approximately 4 h, and with xylose approximately 3.4 h. Strain JW/SA-NV4(T) tolerated an atmosphere containing up to 0.1 % O(2); no growth occurred at a gas atmosphere of 0.2 % O(2). Chemo-organotrophic growth occurred with xylose, glucose, mannose, xylan, pyruvate, fructose, ribose, Casamino acids, mannitol, tryptone, peptone, cellobiose and yeast extract. When grown in mineral media containing 1 g yeast extract l(-1) as an electron donor, thiosulfate and sulfur were reduced to sulfide. The G+C content of the DNA was 38.6 mol% (HPLC). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed strain JW/SA-NV4(T) within the order Thermoanaerobacterales and within the Thermoanaerobacterales Incertae Sedis Family III, specifically between taxa classified within the genera Thermosediminibacter and Thermovenabulum. The closest phylogenetic neighbours were Thermosediminibacter oceani JW/IW-1228P(T) (94.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence

  18. Sensitive and selective culture medium for detection of environmental Clostridium difficile isolates without requirement for anaerobic culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Cadnum, Jennifer L; Hurless, Kelly N; Deshpande, Abhishek; Nerandzic, Michelle M; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Donskey, Curtis J

    2014-09-01

    Effective and easy-to-use methods for detecting Clostridium difficile spore contamination would be useful for identifying environmental reservoirs and monitoring the effectiveness of room disinfection. Culture-based detection methods are sensitive for detecting C. difficile, but their utility is limited due to the requirement of anaerobic culture conditions and microbiological expertise. We developed a low-cost selective broth medium containing thioglycolic acid and l-cystine, termed C. difficile brucella broth with thioglycolic acid and l-cystine (CDBB-TC), for the detection of C. difficile from environmental specimens under aerobic culture conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of CDBB-TC (under aerobic culture conditions) were compared to those of CDBB (under anaerobic culture conditions) for the recovery of C. difficile from swabs collected from hospital room surfaces. CDBB-TC was significantly more sensitive than CDBB for recovering environmental C. difficile (36/41 [88%] versus 21/41 [51%], respectively; P = 0.006). C. difficile latex agglutination, an enzyme immunoassay for toxins A and B or glutamate dehydrogenase, and a PCR for toxin B genes were all effective as confirmatory tests. For 477 total environmental cultures, the specificity of CDBB-TC versus that of CDBB based upon false-positive yellow-color development of the medium without recovery of C. difficile was 100% (0 false-positive results) versus 96% (18 false-positive results), respectively. False-positive cultures for CDBB were attributable to the growth of anaerobic non-C. difficile organisms that did not grow in CDBB-TC. Our results suggest that CDBB-TC provides a sensitive and selective medium for the recovery of C. difficile organisms from environmental samples, without the need for anaerobic culture conditions. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Medium factors on anaerobic production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and a simplifying medium for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Jidong; Han, Siqin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Aerobic production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was extensively studied. But effect of medium composition on anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa was unknown. A simplifying medium facilitating anaerobic production of rhamnolipid is urgently needed for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Medium factors affecting anaerobic production of rhamnolipid were investigated using P. aeruginosa SG (Genbank accession number KJ995745). Medium composition for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa is different from that for aerobic production of rhamnolipid. Both hydrophobic substrate and organic nitrogen inhibited rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions. Glycerol and nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen source. The commonly used N limitation under aerobic conditions was not conducive to rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions because the initial cell growth demanded enough nitrate for anaerobic respiration. But rhamnolipid was also fast accumulated under nitrogen starvation conditions. Sufficient phosphate was needed for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) are required for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Results will contribute to isolation bacteria strains which can anaerobically produce rhamnolipid and medium optimization for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Based on medium optimization by response surface methodology and ions composition of reservoir formation water, a simplifying medium containing 70.3 g/l glycerol, 5.25 g/l NaNO3, 5.49 g/l KH2PO4, 6.9 g/l K2HPO4·3H2O and 0.40 g/l MgSO4 was designed. Using the simplifying medium, 630 mg/l of rhamnolipid was produced by SG, and the anaerobic culture emulsified crude oil to EI24 = 82.5 %. The simplifying medium was promising for in situ MEOR applications.

  20. Cloacibacillus evryensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel asaccharolytic, mesophilic, amino-acid-degrading bacterium within the phylum 'Synergistetes', isolated from an anaerobic sludge digester.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Akila; Chaussonnerie, Sébastien; Tarrade, Anne; Dauga, Catherine; Bouchez, Théodore; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Sghir, Abdelghani

    2008-09-01

    A novel anaerobic, mesophilic, amino-acid-utilizing bacterium, strain 158T, was isolated from an anaerobic digester of a wastewater treatment plant. Cells of strain 158T were non-motile, rod-shaped (2.0-3.0 x 0.8-1.0 microm) and stained Gram-negative. Optimal growth occurred at 37 degrees C and pH 7.0 in an anaerobic basal medium containing 1 % Casamino acids. Strain 158T fermented arginine, histidine, lysine and serine and showed growth on yeast extract, brain-heart infusion (BHI) medium and tryptone, but not on carbohydrates, organic acids or alcohols. The end products of degradation were: acetate, butyrate, H2 and CO2 from arginine; acetate, propionate, butyrate, H2 and CO2 from lysine; and acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, H2 and CO2 from histidine, serine, BHI medium, Casamino acids and tryptone. The DNA G+C content was 55.8 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain 158T showed only 92.6 % sequence similarity with that of Synergistes jonesii, the only described species of the 'Synergistes' group. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15:0) (16.63 %), iso-C(15:0) 3-OH (12.41 %) and C(17:1)omega6c (9.46 %) and the polar fatty acids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylmonomethylamine; these fatty acid profiles did not resemble those of any recognized bacterial species. Due to the considerable differences in genotypic, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics between strain 158T and those of its nearest relative, it is proposed that strain 158T represents a novel species in a new genus, Cloacibacillus evryensis gen. nov., sp. nov., in the phylum 'Synergistetes'. The type strain is 158T (=DSM 19522T=JCM 14828T).

  1. A fast and reliable procedure for spore collection from anaerobic fungi: Application for RNA uptake and long-term storage of isolates.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Shelby; Elledge, Nicole C; Hanafy, Radwa A; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Youssef, Noha

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic gut fungi (AGF) represent a basal fungal lineage (phylum Neocallimastigomycota) that resides in the rumen and alimentary tracts of herbivores. The AGF reproduce asexually, with a life cycle that involves flagellated zoospores released from zoosporangia followed by encystment, germination and the subsequent development of rhizomycelia. A fast and reliable approach for AGF spore collection is critical not only for developmental biology studies, but also for molecular biological (e.g. AMT-transformation and RNAi) approaches. Here, we developed and optimized a simple and reliable procedure for the collection of viable, competent, and developmentally synchronized AGF spores under strict anaerobic conditions. The approach involves growing AGF on agar medium in serum bottles under anaerobic conditions, and flooding the observed aerial growth to promote spore release from sporangia into the flooding suspension. The released spores are gently collected using a wide bore sterile needle. Process optimization resulted in the recovery of up to 7×10(9) spores per serum bottle. Further, the released spores exhibited synchronized development from flagellated spores to encysted spores and finally to germinating spores within 90min from the onset of flooding. At the germinating spore stage, the obtained spores were competent, and readily uptook small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligonucleotides. Finally, using multiple monocentric and polycentric AGF isolates, we demonstrate that AGF grown on agar surface could retain viability for up to 16weeks at 39°C, and hence this solid surface growth procedure represents a simple, cryopreservative- and freezing temperature-free approach for AGF storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Desulfotomaculum peckii sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic member of the genus Desulfotomaculum, isolated from an upflow anaerobic filter treating abattoir wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Jabari, Linda; Gannoun, Hana; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Hamdi, Moktar; Ollivier, Bernard; Fauque, Guy; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-06-01

    A novel anaerobic thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium designated strain LINDBHT1(T) was isolated from an anaerobic digester treating abattoir wastewaters in Tunisia. Strain LINDBHT1(T) grew at temperatures between 50 and 65 °C (optimum 55-60 °C), and at pH between 5.9 and 9.2 (optimum pH 6.0-6.8). Strain LINDBHT1(T) required salt for growth (1-40 g NaCl l(-1)), with an optimum of 20-30 g l(-1). In the presence of sulfate as terminal electron acceptor, strain LINDBHT1(T) used H2/CO2, propanol, butanol and ethanol as carbon and energy sources but fumarate, formate, lactate and pyruvate were not utilized. Butanol was converted to butyrate, while propanol and ethanol were oxidized to propionate and acetate, respectively. Sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate were utilized as terminal electron acceptors but elemental sulfur, iron (III), fumarate, nitrate and nitrite were not used. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.4 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the small-subunit rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain LINDBHT1(T) was affiliated to the genus Desulfotomaculum with the type strains of Desulfotomaculum halophilum and Desulfotomaculum alkaliphilum as its closest phylogenetic relatives (about 89% similarity). This strain represents a novel species of the genus Desulfotomaculum, Desulfotomaculum peckii sp. nov.; the type strain is LINDBHT1(T) (=DSM 23769(T)=JCM 17209(T)).

  3. Genome sequence of Phaeobacter daeponensis type strain (DSM 23529(T)), a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine sediment, and emendation of Phaeobacter daeponensis.

    PubMed

    Dogs, Marco; Teshima, Hazuki; Petersen, Jörn; Fiebig, Anne; Chertkov, Olga; Dalingault, Hajnalka; Chen, Amy; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A; Chain, Patrick; Detter, John C; Ivanova, Natalia; Lapidus, Alla; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Simon, Meinhard; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2013-10-16

    TF-218(T) is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter daeponensis Yoon et al. 2007, a facultatively anaerobic Phaeobacter species isolated from tidal flats. Here we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of this bacterium together with previously unreported aspects of its phenotype. We analyzed the genome for genes involved in secondary metabolite production and its anaerobic lifestyle, which have also been described for its closest relative Phaeobacter caeruleus. The 4,642,596 bp long genome of strain TF-218(T) contains 4,310 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes including four rRNA operons and consists of five replicons: one chromosome and four extrachromosomal elements with sizes of 276 kb, 174 kb, 117 kb and 90 kb. Genome analysis showed that TF-218(T) possesses all of the genes for indigoidine biosynthesis, and on specific media the strain showed a blue pigmentation. We also found genes for dissimilatory nitrate reduction, gene-transfer agents, NRPS/ PKS genes and signaling systems homologous to the LuxR/I system.

  4. Genome sequence of Phaeobacter daeponensis type strain (DSM 23529T), a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine sediment, and emendation of Phaeobacter daeponensis

    PubMed Central

    Dogs, Marco; Teshima, Hazuki; Petersen, Jörn; Fiebig, Anne; Chertkov, Olga; Dalingault, Hajnalka; Chen, Amy; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chain, Patrick; Detter, John C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Lapidus, Alla; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Simon, Meinhard; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    TF-218T is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter daeponensis Yoon et al. 2007, a facultatively anaerobic Phaeobacter species isolated from tidal flats. Here we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of this bacterium together with previously unreported aspects of its phenotype. We analyzed the genome for genes involved in secondary metabolite production and its anaerobic lifestyle, which have also been described for its closest relative Phaeobacter caeruleus. The 4,642,596 bp long genome of strain TF-218T contains 4,310 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes including four rRNA operons and consists of five replicons: one chromosome and four extrachromosomal elements with sizes of 276 kb, 174 kb, 117 kb and 90 kb. Genome analysis showed that TF-218T possesses all of the genes for indigoidine biosynthesis, and on specific media the strain showed a blue pigmentation. We also found genes for dissimilatory nitrate reduction, gene-transfer agents, NRPS/ PKS genes and signaling systems homologous to the LuxR/I system. PMID:24501652

  5. Sulfuricurvum kujiense gen. nov., sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an underground crude-oil storage cavity.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yumiko; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2004-11-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, strain YK-1(T), was isolated from an underground crude-oil storage cavity at Kuji in Iwate, Japan. The cells were motile, curved rods and had a single polar flagellum. Optimum growth occurred in a low-strength salt medium at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. It utilized sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and hydrogen as the electron donors and nitrate as the electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions, but it did not use nitrite. Oxygen also served as the electron acceptor under the microaerobic condition (O(2) in the head space 1 %). It did not grow on sugars, organic acids or hydrocarbons as carbon and energy sources. The DNA G+C content of strain YK-1(T) was 45 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence, showed that its closest relative was Thiomicrospira denitrificans in the 'Epsilonproteobacteria', albeit with low homology (90 %). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic data, strain YK-1(T) should be classified into a novel genus and species, for which the name Sulfuricurvum kujiense gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YK-1(T) (=JCM 11577(T)=MBIC 06352(T)=ATCC BAA-921(T)).

  6. Kraft Lignin Biodegradation by Dysgonomonas sp. WJDL-Y1, a New Anaerobic Bacterial Strain Isolated from Sludge of a Pulp and Paper Mill.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing; Liang, Jidong; Wang, Yiping; Du, Wenjing; Wang, Dongqi

    2016-10-28

    Wastewater containing kraft lignin (KL) discharged from pulp and paper industries could cause serious environmental contamination. Appropriate effluent treatment is required to reduce the pollution. Investigations on anaerobic bacteria capable of degrading KL are beneficial to both lignin removal and biofuel regeneration from the effluent. In this paper, an anaerobic strain capable of degrading KL was isolated from the sludge of a pulp and paper mill and identified as Dysgonomonas sp. WJDL-Y1 by 16S rRNA analysis. Optimum conditions for KL degradation by strain WJDL-Y1 were obtained at initial pH of 6.8, C:N ratio of 6 and temperature of 33°C, based on statistical analyses by response surface methodology. For a 1.2 g/l KL solution, a COD removal rate of 20.7% concomitant with biomass increase of 17.6% was achieved after 4 days of incubation under the optimum conditions. After the treatment by strain WJDL-Y1, KL was modified and degraded.

  7. Respiration in spiders (Araneae).

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Spiders (Araneae) are unique regarding their respiratory system: they are the only animal group that breathe simultaneously with lungs and tracheae. Looking at the physiology of respiration the existence of tracheae plays an important role in spiders with a well-developed tracheal system. Other factors as sex, life time, type of prey capture and the high ability to gain energy anaerobically influence the resting and the active metabolic rate intensely. Most spiders have metabolic rates that are much lower than expected from body mass; but especially those with two pairs of lungs. Males normally have higher resting rates than females; spiders that are less evolved and possess a cribellum have lower metabolic rates than higher evolved species. Freely hunting spiders show a higher energy turnover than spiders hunting with a web. Spiders that live longer than 1 year will have lower metabolic rates than those species that die after 1 year in which development and reproduction must be completed. Lower temperatures and starvation, which most spiders can cope with, will decrease the metabolic rate as well.

  8. Simple Method for Culturing Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. E.; Hunter, W. J.; Ryan, J. L.; Braude, A. I.

    1973-01-01

    A simple, effective method is needed for growing obligate anaerobes in the clinical laboratory. This report describes a pre-reduced anaerobic bottle that can be taken to the bedside for direct inoculation, provides a flat agar surface for evaluation of number and morphology of colonies, and can be incubated in conventional bacteriological incubators. Each anaerobic culture set consisted of two bottles containing brain heart infusion agar and CO2. Gentamicin sulfate (50 μg/ml) was added to one of these to inhibit facultative enteric bacilli. Comparison of the anaerobic bottles with an identical aerobic bottle which was also routinely inoculated permitted early identification of anaerobic colonies. Representative species of most anaerobic genera of proven pathogenicity for man have been isolated from this system during 10 months of routine use. Images PMID:4571657

  9. Anaerobic Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... doses of antibiotics taken by mouth for months. Bacteroides and Prevotella infections. Bacterial organisms from species called Bacteroides and Prevotella are anaerobic. They are common organisms ...

  10. Petrothermobacter organivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, strictly anaerobic bacterium of the phylum Deferribacteres isolated from a deep subsurface oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Tamazawa, Satoshi; Mayumi, Daisuke; Mochimaru, Hanako; Sakata, Susumu; Maeda, Haruo; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Ikarashi, Masayuki; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tamaki, Hideyuki

    2017-09-12

    A novel thermophilic, anaerobic, chemoheterotrophic, acetate-oxidizing and iron(III)-, manganese(IV)-, nitrate- and sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain ANAT, was isolated from a deep subsurface oil field in Japan (Yabase oil field, Akita Pref.). Cells of strain ANAT were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-spore forming and slightly curved or twisted rods (1.5-5.0 µm long and 0.6-0.7 µm wide). The isolate grew at 25-60 °C (optimum 55 °C) and pH 6.0-8.0 (optimum pH 7.0). The isolate was capable of reducing iron(III), manganese(IV), nitrate and sulfate as an electron acceptor. The isolate utilized a limited range of electron donors such as acetate, lactate, pyruvate and yeast extract for iron reduction. Strain ANAT also used pyruvate, fumarate, succinate, malate, yeast extract and peptone for fermentative growth. The major respiratory quinones were menaquinone-7(H8) and menaquinone-8. The strain contained C18 : 0, iso-C18 : 0 and C16 : 0 as the major cellular fatty acids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain ANAT was closely related to Calditerrivibrio nitroreducens in the phylum Deferribacteres with low sequence similarities (89.5 %), and formed a distinct clade within the family Deferribacteraceae. In addition, the isolate is the first sulfate-reducing member of the phylum Deferribacteres. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties, a novel genus and species, Petrothermobacter organivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed for the isolate (type strain=ANAT= NBRC 112621T=DSM 105015T).

  11. The first evidence of anaerobic CO oxidation coupled with H2 production by a hyperthermophilic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Tatyana G; Jeanthon, Christian; Kostrikina, Nadezhda A; Chernyh, Nikolai A; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Stackebrandt, Erko; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2004-08-01

    From 24 samples of hydrothermal venting structures collected at the East Pacific Rise (13 degrees N), 13 enrichments of coccoid cells were obtained which grew on CO, producing H2 and CO2 at 80 degrees C. A hyperthermophilic archaeon capable of lithotrophic growth on CO coupled with equimolar production of H2 was isolated. Based on its 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this organism was affiliated with the genus Thermococcus. Other strains of Thermococcales species ( Pyrococcus furiosus, Thermococcus peptonophilus, T. profundus, T. chitonophagus, T. stetteri, T. gorgonarius, T. litoralis, and T. pacificus) were shown to be unable to grow on CO. Searches in sequence databases failed to reveal deposited sequences of genes related to CO metabolism in Thermococcales. Our work provides the first evidence of anaerobic CO oxidation coupled with H2 production performed by an archaeon as well as the first documented case of lithotrophic growth of a Thermococcales representative.

  12. Oligosphaera ethanolica gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, carbohydrate-fermenting bacterium isolated from methanogenic sludge, and description of Oligosphaeria classis nov. in the phylum Lentisphaerae.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yan-Ling; Muramatsu, Mizuho; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Guo, Rong-Bo; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2013-02-01

    A mesophilic, obligately anaerobic, carbohydrate-fermenting bacterium, designated 8KG-4(T), was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating high-strength organic wastewater from salted vegetable production processes. Cells of strain 8KG-4(T) were non-motile, spherical and 0.7-1.5 µm in diameter (mean, 1.0 µm). Spore formation was not observed under any culture conditions tested. The strain grew optimally at 37 °C (range for growth 25-40 °C) and pH 7.0 (range, pH 6.5-7.5), and could grow fermentatively on glucose, ribose, xylose, galactose and sucrose. The main end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. Organic acids, alcohols and amino acids were not utilized for growth. Yeast extract was not required for growth. Nitrate, sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite and Fe(III) nitrilotriacetate were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 61.1 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate represented a previously uncultured lineage at the subphylum level within the phylum Lentisphaerae known as 'WWE2 subgroup I'. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(16 : 0), C(16 : 0) and anteiso-C(17 : 0). Respiratory quinones were not detected. The most abundant polar lipid of strain 8KG-4(T) was phosphatidylethanolamine. A novel genus and species, Oligosphaera ethanolica gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate strain 8KG-4(T) ( = JCM 17152(T) = DSM 24202(T)  = CGMCC 1.5160(T)). In addition, we formally propose Oligosphaeria classis nov. and the subordinate taxa Oligosphaerales order nov. and Oligosphaeraceae fam. nov.

  13. Balnearium lithotrophicum gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, strictly anaerobic, hydrogen-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph isolated from a black smoker chimney in the Suiyo Seamount hydrothermal system.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ken; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Horikoshi, Koki

    2003-11-01

    A novel, extremely thermophilic bacterium, designated strain 17S(T), was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney at the Suiyo Seamount in the Izu-Bonin Arc, Japan. The cells were rods with no apparent motility, most of which were narrow in the middle in the exponential-growth phase and had several polar flagella at both ends. Growth was observed between 45 and 80 degrees C (optimum temperature, 70-75 degrees C; doubling time, 80 min) and between pH 5.0 and 7.0 (optimum pH, 5.4). The isolate was a strictly anaerobic chemolithoautotroph that was capable of using molecular hydrogen as its sole energy source and carbon dioxide as its sole carbon source. Elemental sulfur (S(0)) was required for growth as an electron acceptor. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences indicated that the isolate was related to Thermovibrio ruber ED11/3LLK(T) and Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum BSA(T), whilst it appeared to be a novel lineage prior to the divergence of these genera. This isolate could also be differentiated from both T. ruber ED11/3LLK(T) and D. thermolithotrophum BSA(T) on the basis of physiological properties. The name Balnearium lithotrophicum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for this isolate (type strain, 17S(T)=JCM 11970(T)=ATCC BAA-736(T)).

  14. Genetic identification of three ABC transporters as essential elements for nitrate respiration in Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, C; Soppa, J

    1999-01-01

    More than 40 nitrate respiration-deficient mutants of Haloferax volcanii belonging to three different phenotypic classes were isolated. All 15 mutants of the null phenotype were complemented with a genomic library of the wild type. Wild-type copies of mutated genes were recovered from complemented mutants using two different approaches. The DNA sequences of 13 isolated fragments were determined. Five fragments were found to overlap; therefore nine different genomic regions containing genes essential for nitrate respiration could be identified. Three genomic regions containing genes coding for subunits of ABC transporters were further characterized. In two cases, genes coding for an ATP-binding subunit and a permease subunit were clustered and overlapped by four nucleotides. The third gene for a permease subunit had no additional ABC transporter gene in proximity. One ABC transporter was found to be glucose specific. The mutant reveals that the ABC transporter solely mediates anaerobic glucose transport. Based on sequence similarity, the second ABC transporter is proposed to be molybdate specific, explaining its essential role in nitrate respiration. The third ABC transporter is proposed to be anion specific. Genome sequencing has shown that ABC transporters are widespread in Archaea. Nevertheless, this study represents only the second example of a functional characterization. PMID:10430572

  15. Nosepiece respiration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, A. L.; Long, L. E.; Rice, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comfortable, inexpensive nosepiece respiration monitor produces rapid response signals to most conventional high impedance medical signal conditioners. The monitor measures respiration in a manner that produces a large signal with minimum delay.

  16. Respirator Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... it last? That depends on how much filtering capacity the respirator has and the amount of hazard ... and it will vary by each respirator model's capacities. That's why your emergency plan must include some ...

  17. Tindallia Californiensis sp. nov.: A New Halo-Alkaliphilic Primary Anaerobe, Isolated from Meromictic soda Mono Lake in California and the Correction of Diagnosis for Genus Tindallia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Kevbrin, Vadim; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul; Cleland, Dave; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel extremely halo-alkaliphilic, bacterium strain APO (sup T) was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, soda Mono Lake in California. Gram positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.6-0.7x 2.5-4.0 micrometers which occur singly, in pairs or short curved chains. Cells, are motile by singular subcentral flagellum. Strain APO (sup T) is mesophilic: growth was observed over the temperature range of +10 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range 1-20 %, wt/vol (optimum 3-5%, wt/vol) and pH range 8.0-11.0 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly halo-alkaliphilic, requires sodium chloride in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. Strain APO (sup T) is organo-heterotroph with fermentative type of metabolism, and uses as substrates: peptone, badotryptone, casamino acids, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The main end products of growth on peptone medium were: lactate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol. Strain APO (sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The sum of G+C in DNA is 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). On the bait of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Tindallia; and the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., is proposed for new isolate (type strain APO (sup T) - ATCC BAA_393(sup T) = DSMZ 14871 (sup T)).

  18. Tindallia Californiensis sp. nov.: A New Halo-Alkaliphilic Primary Anaerobe, Isolated from Meromictic soda Mono Lake in California and the Correction of Diagnosis for Genus Tindallia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Kevbrin, Vadim; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul; Cleland, Dave; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel extremely halo-alkaliphilic, bacterium strain APO (sup T) was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, soda Mono Lake in California. Gram positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.6-0.7x 2.5-4.0 micrometers which occur singly, in pairs or short curved chains. Cells, are motile by singular subcentral flagellum. Strain APO (sup T) is mesophilic: growth was observed over the temperature range of +10 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range 1-20 %, wt/vol (optimum 3-5%, wt/vol) and pH range 8.0-11.0 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly halo-alkaliphilic, requires sodium chloride in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. Strain APO (sup T) is organo-heterotroph with fermentative type of metabolism, and uses as substrates: peptone, badotryptone, casamino acids, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The main end products of growth on peptone medium were: lactate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol. Strain APO (sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The sum of G+C in DNA is 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). On the bait of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Tindallia; and the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., is proposed for new isolate (type strain APO (sup T) - ATCC BAA_393(sup T) = DSMZ 14871 (sup T)).

  19. Isolation of Three New Surface Layer Protein Genes (slp) from Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 14869 and Characterization of the Change in Their Expression under Aerated and Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jakava-Viljanen, Miia; Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Messner, Paul; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Palva, Airi

    2002-01-01

    Two new surface layer (S-layer) proteins (SlpB and SlpD) were characterized, and three slp genes (slpB, slpC, and slpD) were isolated, sequenced, and studied for their expression in Lactobacillus brevis neotype strain ATCC 14869. Under different growth conditions, L. brevis strain 14869 was found to form two colony types, smooth (S) and rough (R), and to express the S-layer proteins differently. Under aerobic conditions R-colony type cells produced SlpB and SlpD proteins, whereas under anaerobic conditions S-colony type cells synthesized essentially only SlpB. Anaerobic and aerated cultivations of ATCC 14869 cells in rich medium also resulted in S-layer protein patterns similar to those of the S- and R-colony type cells, respectively. Electron microscopy suggested the presence of only a single S-layer with an oblique structure on the cells of both colony forms. The slpB and slpC genes were located adjacent to each other, whereas the slpD gene was not closely linked to the slpB-slpC gene region. Northern analyses confirmed that both slpB and slpD formed a monocistronic transcription unit and were effectively expressed, but slpD expression was induced under aerated conditions. slpC was a silent gene under the growth conditions tested. The amino acid contents of all the L. brevis ATCC 14869 S-layer proteins were typical of S-layer proteins, whereas their sequence similarities with other S-layer proteins were negligible. The interspecies identity of the L. brevis S-layer proteins was mainly restricted to the N-terminal regions of those proteins. Furthermore, Northern analyses, expression of a PepI reporter protein under the control of the slpD promoter, and quantitative real-time PCR analysis of slpD expression under aerated and anaerobic conditions suggested that, in L. brevis ATCC 14869, the variation of S-layer protein content involves activation of transcription by a soluble factor rather than DNA rearrangements that are typical for most of the S-layer phase

  20. Characterization of Halanaerobaculum tunisiense gen. nov., sp. nov., a new halophilic fermentative, strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a hypersaline lake in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hedi, Abdeljabbar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Sadfi, Najla; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Ollivier, Bernard; Cayol, Jean-Luc

    2009-03-01

    A new halophilic anaerobe was isolated from the hypersaline surface sediments of El-Djerid Chott, Tunisia. The isolate, designated as strain 6SANG, grew at NaCl concentrations ranging from 14 to 30%, with an optimum at 20-22%. Strain 6SANG was a non-spore-forming, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, appearing singly, in pairs, or occasionally as long chains (0.7-1 x 4-13 microm) and showed a Gram-negative-like cell wall pattern. It grew optimally at pH values between 7.2 and 7.4, but had a very broad pH range for growth (5.9-8.4). Optimum temperature for growth was 42 degrees C (range 30-50 degrees C). Strain 6SANG required yeast extract for growth on sugars. Glucose, sucrose, galactose, mannose, maltose, cellobiose, pyruvate, and starch were fermented. The end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, butyrate, lactate, H(2), and CO(2). The G + C ratio of the DNA was 34.3 mol%. Strain 6SANG exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 91-92% with members of the genus Halobacteroides, H. halobius being its closest phylogenetic relative. Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, we propose that this bacterium be classified as a novel species of a novel genus, Halanaerobaculum tunisiense gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is 6SANG(T) (=DSM 19997(T)=JCM 15060(T)).

  1. Thermovirga lienii gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel moderately thermophilic, anaerobic, amino-acid-degrading bacterium isolated from a North Sea oil well.

    PubMed

    Dahle, Håkon; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2006-07-01

    A novel anaerobic, moderately thermophilic bacterium, strain Cas60314(T), was isolated from hot oil-well production water obtained from an oil reservoir in the North Sea. The cells were Gram-negative, motile, straight rods. The salinity and pH growth optima were 2.0-3.0 % NaCl and 6.5-7.0, respectively. The optimum temperature was 58 degrees C. Strain Cas60314(T) had a fermentative type of metabolism and utilized proteinous substrates, some single amino acids and a limited number of organic acids, but not sugars, fatty acids or alcohols. Cystine and elemental sulfur were reduced to sulfide. The G+C content of the DNA was 46.6 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic features, it is proposed that this isolate represents a novel genus and species with the name Thermovirga lienii gen. nov., sp. nov. within the family Syntrophomonadaceae. The proposed type strain is strain Cas60314(T) (=DSM 17291(T)=ATTC BAA-1197(T)).

  2. Mucinivorans hirudinis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, mucin-degrading bacterium isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michael C.; Bomar, Lindsey; Maltz, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Three anaerobic bacterial strains were isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana, using mucin as the primary carbon and energy source. These strains, designated M3T, M4 and M6, were Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming and non-motile. Cells were elongated bacilli approximately 2.4 µm long and 0.6 µm wide. Growth only occurred anaerobically under mesophilic and neutral pH conditions. All three strains could utilize multiple simple and complex sugars as carbon sources, with glucose fermented to acid by-products. The DNA G+C contents of strains M3T, M4 and M6 were 44.9, 44.8 and 44.8 mol%, respectively. The major cellular fatty acid of strain M3T was iso-C15 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the three strains shared >99 % similarity with each other and represent a new lineage within the family Rikenellaceae of the order Bacteroidales, phylum Bacteroidetes. The most closely related bacteria to strain M3T based on 16S rRNA gene sequences were Rikenella microfusus DSM 15922T (87.3 % similarity) and Alistipes finegoldii AHN 2437T (87.4 %). On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and physiological evidence, strains M3T, M4 and M6 are proposed as representing a novel species of a new genus within the family Rikenellaceae, for which the name Mucinivorans hirudinis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Mucinivorans hirudinis is M3T ( = ATCC BAA-2553T = DSM 27344T). PMID:25563920

  3. Aminobacterium thunnarium sp. nov., a mesophilic, amino acid-degrading bacterium isolated from an anaerobic sludge digester, pertaining to the phylum Synergistetes.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Olfa; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Bouallagui, Hassib; Hamdi, Moktar; Bonin, Patricia; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-02-01

    A new Gram-staining-positive, non-sporulating, mesophilic, amino acid-degrading anaerobic bacterium, designated strain OTA 102(T), was isolated from an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treating wastewater from cooking tuna. The cells were curved rods (0.6-2.5×0.5 µm) and occurred singly or in pairs. The strain was motile by means of one lateral flagellum. Strain OTA 102(T) grew at temperatures between 30 and 45 °C (optimum 40 °C), between pH 6.0 and 8.4 (optimum pH 7.2) and NaCl concentrations between 1 and 5 % (optimum 2 %, w/v). Strain OTA 102(T) required yeast extract for growth. Serine, threonine, glycine, cysteine, citrate, fumarate, α-ketoglutarate and pyruvate were fermented. When co-cultured with Methanobacterium formicicum as the hydrogen scavenger, strain OTA 102(T) oxidized alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartate, tyrosine, methionine, histidine and asparagine. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain OTA 102(T) was 41.7 mol%. The main fatty acid was iso-C15 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain OTA 102(T) was related to Aminobacterium colombiense and Aminobacterium mobile (95.5 and 95.2 % similarity, respectively), of the phylum Synergistetes. On the basis of phylogenetic, genetic and physiological characteristics, strain OTA 102(T) is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Aminobacterium, Aminobacterium thunnarium sp. nov. The type strain is OTA 102(T) ( = DSM 27500(T) = JCM 19320(T)).

  4. Anaerobic thermophilic bacteria isolated from a Venezuelan oil field and its potential use in microbial improved oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Trebbau, G.; Fernandez, B.; Marin, A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this work is to determine the ability of indigenous bacteria from a Venezuelan oil field to grow under reservoir conditions inside a porous media, and to produce metabolites capable of recovering residual crude oil. For this purpose, samples of formation waters from a central-eastern Venezuelan oil reservoir were enriched with different carbon sources and a mineral basal media. Formation water was used as a source of trace metals. The enrichments obtained were incubated at reservoir temperature (71{degrees}C), reservoir pressure (1,200 psi), and under anaerobic conditions for both outside and inside porous media (Berea core). Growth and metabolic activity was followed outside porous media by measuring absorbance at 660 nm, increases in pressure, and decreases in pH. Inside porous media bacterial activity was determined by visual examination of the produced waters (gas bubbles and bacterial cells). All the carbohydrates tested outside porous media showed good growth at reservoir conditions. The pH was lowered, gases such as CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} were identified by GC. Surface tension was lowered in some enrichments by 30% when compared to controls. Growth was decreased inside porous media, but gases were produced and helped displace oil. In addition, 10% residual oil was recovered from the Berea core. Mathematical modeling was applied to the laboratory coreflood experiment to evaluate the reproducibility of the results obtained.

  5. Isolation of a Star-Shaped Uranium(V/VI) Cluster from the Anaerobic Photochemical Reduction of Uranyl(VI).

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2016-11-07

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U(V) species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U(VI) /U(V) oxo cluster [U(UO2 )5 (μ3 -O)5 (PhCOO)5 (Py)7 ] (1). This cluster is only the second example of a U(VI) /U(V) cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U(V) center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U12(IV) U4(V) O24 cluster {[K(Py)2 ]2 [K(Py)]2 [U16 O24 (PhCOO)24 (Py)2 ]} (5).

  6. Comparative susceptibilities of 173 aerobic and anaerobic bite wound isolates to sparfloxacin, temafloxacin, clarithromycin, and older agents.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M

    1993-01-01

    The in vitro activities of sparfloxacin, temafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, cephalothin, penicillin G, and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid against 173 recent clinical bite wound isolates were determined by agar dilution. Sparfloxacin was active against all strains (MIC for 90% of strains tested, < or = 1 micrograms/ml) except for most fusobacteria and one-third of the Prevotella spp. The other fluoroquinolones had similar activities but higher MICs, especially for streptococci. Clarithromycin was more active against many isolates including Pasteurella multocida than erythromycin, with MICs of < or = 2 micrograms/ml (versus 4 micrograms/ml for erythromycin). PMID:8390810

  7. Identification of Electrode Respiring, Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacterial Strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2 Highlights the Untapped Potential for Environmental Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Venkidusamy, Krishnaveni; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2016-01-01

    Electrode respiring bacteria (ERB) possess a great potential for many biotechnological applications such as microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS) because of their exoelectrogenic capabilities to degrade xenobiotic pollutants. Very few ERB have been isolated from MERS, those exhibited a bioremediation potential toward organic contaminants. Here we report once such bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2, a facultative anaerobic bacterium isolated from a hydrocarbon fed MERS, showed a potent hydrocarbonoclastic behavior under aerobic and anaerobic environments. Distinct properties of the strain MK2 were anaerobic fermentation of the amino acids, electrode respiration, anaerobic nitrate reduction and the ability to metabolize n-alkane components (C8–C36) of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) including the biomarkers, pristine and phytane. The characteristic of diazoic dye decolorization was used as a criterion for pre-screening the possible electrochemically active microbial candidates. Bioelectricity generation with concomitant dye decolorization in MERS showed that the strain is electrochemically active. In acetate fed microbial fuel cells (MFCs), maximum current density of 273 ± 8 mA/m2 (1000 Ω) was produced (power density 113 ± 7 mW/m2) by strain MK2 with a coulombic efficiency of 34.8%. Further, the presence of possible alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and rubA) in the strain MK2 indicated that the genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation are of diverse origin. Such observations demonstrated the potential of facultative hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated environments. Identification of such a novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading ERB is likely to offer a new route to the sustainable bioremedial process of source zone contamination with simultaneous energy generation through MERS. PMID:28018304

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, an Anaerobic Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunbiao; Dong, Binbin; Liu, Qing; Chen, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft 2,261,881-bp genome sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. The sequence will be helpful for understanding the genetic and metabolic features, as well as potential biotechnological application in the genus Caloranaerobacter. PMID:26679595

  9. Chemoautotrophic production and respiration in the hyporheic zone of a sonoran desert stream

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.B. Jr.; Holmes, R.M.; Fisher, S.G.; Grimm, N.B.

    1994-12-31

    Chemoautotrophic production and respiration (aerobic and anaerobic) were examined along flowpaths in three subsystems in Sycamore Creek, Arizona. Chemoautotrophic production was highest where surface waters enter parafluvial sediments (64 to 76 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}) and lowest in anoxic bank sediments (14 to 16 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). Aerobic respiration was considerable greater than chemoautotrophy in oxygenated hyporheic and parafluvial zones (2,400 to 4,900 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). In anoxic bank sediments, respiration was also much greater than chemoautotrophy, but was entirely anaerobic (i.e., methane production; 3,500 mgC{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}d{sup {minus}1}). Weighting subsystems by areal extent, the largest proportion of aerobic respiration and chemoautotrophic production occurred in parafluvial sediments (64 to 76%), whereas anoxic bank sediments were most important for anaerobic respiration (94% of total anaerobic respiration). Overall, chemoautotrophic production was only 1.0 to 1.3% of respiration and methane production was only 5% of total sediment respiration.

  10. H(2)-CO(2)-Dependent Anaerobic O-Demethylation Activity in Subsurface Sediments and by an Isolated Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Suflita, J M

    1993-05-01

    The ability of microorganisms in sediments from the Atlantic Coastal Plain to biodegrade methoxylated aromatic compounds was examined. O-demethylation activity was detected in deep (121- and 406-m) sediments, as well as in the surface soil. A syringate-demethylating consortium, containing at least three types of bacteria, was enriched from a deep-sediment sample in a medium containing syringate as the sole organic carbon source and with a N(2)-CO(2) atmosphere. An isolate which demethylated syringate was obtained from the enrichment on an agar medium incubated under a H(2)-CO(2) but not a N(2)-CO(2) or N(2) atmosphere. O demethylation of syringate of this isolate was dependent on the presence of both H(2) and CO(2) in the gas phase. The metabolism of syringate occurred in a sequential manner: methylgallate accumulated transiently before it was converted to gallate. Mass balance analysis suggests that the stoichiometry of the reaction in this isolate proceeds in accordance with the following generalized equation: C(7)H(3)O(3)(OCH(3))(n) + nHCO(3) + nH(2) --> C(7)H(3)O(3)(OH)(n) + nCH(3)COO + nH(2)O.

  11. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  12. Novel anaerobic ultramicrobacteria belonging to the Verrucomicrobiales lineage of bacterial descent isolated by dilution culture from anoxic rice paddy soil.

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, P H; Schuhmann, A; Mörschel, E; Rainey, F A

    1997-01-01

    The use of dilution culture techniques to cultivate saccharolytic bacteria present in the anoxic soil of flooded rice microcosms allowed the isolation of three new strains of bacteria, typified by their small cell sizes, with culturable numbers estimated at between 1.2 x 10(5) and 7.3 x 10(5) cells per g of dry soil. The average cell volumes of all three strains were 0.03 to 0.04 microns3, and therefore they can be termed ultramicrobacteria or "dwarf cells." The small cell size is a stable characteristic, even when the organisms grow at high substrate concentrations, and thus is not a starvation response. All three strains have genomic DNA with a mol% G+C ratio of about 63, are gram negative, and are motile by means of a single flagellum. The three new isolates utilized only sugars and some sugar polymers as substrates for growth. The metabolism is strictly fermentative, but the new strains are oxygen tolerant. Sugars are metabolized to acetate, propionate, and succinate. Hydrogen production was not significant. In the presence of 0.2 atm of oxygen, the fermentation end products or ratios did not change. The phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence comparisons indicates that the new isolates belong to a branch of the Verrucomicrobiales lineage and are closely related to a cloned 16S rDNA sequence (PAD7) recovered from rice paddy field soil from Japan. The isolation of these three strains belonging to the order Verrucomicrobiales from a model rice paddy system, in which rice was grown in soil from an Italian rice field, provides some information on the possible physiology and phenotype of the organism represented by the cloned 16S rDNA sequence PAD7. The new isolates also extend our knowledge on the phenotypic and phylogenetic depths of members of the order Verrucomicrobiales, to date acquired mainly from cloned 16S rDNA sequences from soils and other habitats. PMID:9097435

  13. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  14. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed

    Nealson, K H; Moser, D P; Saffarini, D A

    1995-04-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  15. Aminocella lysinolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a L-lysine-degrading, strictly anaerobic bacterium in the class Clostridia isolated from a methanogenic reactor of cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Atsuko; Shibuya, Toru; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji

    2015-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WN037(T)) was isolated from a methanogenic reactor. Cells were Gram-positive rods. Strain WN037(T) was asaccharolytic. The strain fermented L-lysine in the presence of B-vitamin mixture or vitamin B12 and produced acetate and butyrate. L-arginine and casamino acids poorly supported the growth. Strain WN037(T) used neither other amino acids nor organic acids examined. The strain had C18:1 ω7c, C16:0 and C18:1 ω7c DMA as the predominant cellular fatty acids. The genomic DNA G + C content was 44.2 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain WN037(T) in the family Eubacteriaceae in the class Clostridia. The closest relative was Eubacterium pyruvativorans (sequence similarity, 92.8 %). Based on the comprehensive analyses, the novel genus and species, Aminocella lysinolytica gen. nov., sp. nov. was proposed to accommodate the strain. The type strain is WN037(T) (= JCM 19863(T) = DSM 28287(T)).

  16. Characterization of Alkaliphilus hydrothermalis sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic anaerobic bacterium, isolated from a carbonaceous chimney of the Prony hydrothermal field, New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Ben Aissa, Fatma; Postec, Anne; Erauso, Gaël; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, alkaliphilic, Gram-positive staining bacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal chimney in the Prony Bay, New Caledonia. This strain designated FatMR1(T) grew at temperatures from 20 to 55 °C (optimum 37 °C) and at pH between 7.5 and 10.5 (optimum 8.8-9). NaCl is not required for growth (optimum 0.2-0.5%), but is tolerated up to 3%. Sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite are not used as terminal electron acceptors. Strain FatMR1(T) fermented pyruvate, yeast extract, peptone and biotrypcase and used fructose as the only sugar. The main fermentation products from fructose and proteinaceous compounds (e.g. peptone and biotrypcase) were acetate, H2 and CO2. Crotonate was disproportionated to acetate and butyrate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14:0 and C16:0. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 37.1 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic, genetic, and physiological properties, strain FatMR1(T) (=DSM 25890(T), =JCM 18390(T)) belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, class Clostridia, order Clostridiales, is proposed as a novel species of the genus Alkaliphilus, A. hydrothermalis sp. nov.

  17. Ferredoxin and Formyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase: Comparative Studies with Clostridium acidiurici, Clostridium cylindrosporum, and Newly Isolated Anaerobic Uric Acid-Fermenting Strains

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Alexander B.; Rabinowitz, Jesse C.

    1977-01-01

    Six strains of Clostridium acidiurici and three strains of C. cylindrosporum were isolated from soil samples by enrichment culture with uric acid as the source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. The newly isolated strains were characterized by their spore morphology and the amounts of glycine and formate formed by the fermentation of uric acid. The strains were easily identified as belonging to one species or the other on the basis of spore morphology and formate production. The crystal properties and spectra of the native ferredoxins of all the strains isolated and the amino acid composition and partial carboxy-terminal sequence of all their apoferredoxins were determined. All the ferredoxins were tested for cross-reactivity with antiserum to C. acidiurici ferredoxin by microcomplement fixation. Five of the six C. acidiurici strains, which had ferredoxins with amino acid compositions identical to that from C. acidiurici, also showed immunological identity (immunological distance = 0.0). These results suggest sequence identity. The one strain with a different amino acid composition failed to show complete cross-reactivity. Two of the three C. cylindrosporum strains have ferredoxin amino acid compositions identical to that from C. cylindrosporum. The third strain had a minimum of five differences in sequence. All C. cylindrosporum strains had ferredoxins that differed considerably from C. acidiurici strains (minimum of eight to nine differences), and none of these ferredoxins cross-reacted with antisera to C. acidiurici ferredoxin. Antisera were prepared to formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase from C. acidiurici and C. cylindrosporum, and all possible comparisons were made by using immunodiffusion and microcomplement fixation. There is more intraspecies variation in the synthetases than in the ferredoxins; however, the results suggest considerable interspecies differences in both proteins. These results suggest a low degree of genomic relatedness between the two species

  18. Diversity of anaerobic halophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, Aharon; Oremland, Roland S.

    2000-12-01

    Life in the presence of high salt concentrations is compatible with life in the absence of oxygen. Halophilic and halotolerant anaerobic prokaryotes are found both in the archaeal and in the bacterial domain, and they display a great metabolic diversity. Many of the representatives of the Halobacteriales (Archaea), which are generally considered aerobes, have the potential of anaerobic growth. Some can use alternative electron acceptors such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine-N-oxide Halobacterium salinarum can also grow fermentatively on L-arginine, and bacteriorhodopsin-containing cells may even grow anaerobically, energized by light. Obligatory anaerobic halophilic methanogenic Archaea also exist. The bacterial domain contains many anaerobic halophiles, including sulfate reducers. There is also a group of specialized obligatory anaerobic Bacteria, phylogenetically clustering in the low G + C branch of the Firmicutes. Most representatives of this group (order Haloanaerobiales, families Haloanaerobiaceae and Halobacteroidaceae) are fermentative, using a variety of carbohydrates and amino acids. One species combines the potential for anaerobic growth at high salt concentrations with a preference for high temperatures. Others are homoacetogens; Acetohalobium arabaticum can grow anaerobically as a chemolithotroph, producing acetate from hydrogen and CO2. The Haloanaerobiales accumulate high concentrations of K+ and Cl- in their cytoplasm, thereby showing a strategy of salt adaptation similar to that used by the Halobacteriales. Recently a new representative of the Haloanaerobiales was isolated from bottom sediments of the Dead Sea (strain DSSe1), which grows anaerobically by oxidation of glycerol to acetate and CO2 while reducing selenate to selenite and elementary selenium. Other electron acceptors supporting anaerobic growth of this strain are nitrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide. The versatility of life at high salt concentrations with respect

  19. Whole-Genome Sequence of the Anaerobic Isosaccharinic Acid Degrading Isolate, Macellibacteroides fermentans Strain HH-ZS.

    PubMed

    Rout, Simon P; Salah, Zohier B; Charles, Christopher J; Humphreys, Paul N

    2017-08-01

    The ability of micro-organisms to degrade isosaccharinic acids (ISAs) while tolerating hyperalkaline conditions is pivotal to our understanding of the biogeochemistry associated within these environs, but also in scenarios pertaining to the cementitious disposal of radioactive wastes. An alkalitolerant, ISA degrading micro-organism was isolated from the hyperalkaline soils resulting from lime depositions. Here, we report the first whole-genome sequence, ISA degradation profile and carbohydrate preoteome of a Macellibacteroides fermentans strain HH-ZS, 4.08 Mb in size, coding 3,241 proteins, 64 tRNA, and 1 rRNA. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Isolation and characterization of two cDNA clones of anaerobically induced lactate dehydrogenase from barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Hondred, D.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    In barley roots during hypoxia, five lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozymes accumulate with a concomitant increase in enzyme activity ({approximately}20-fold). These isozymes are thought to be tetramers resulting from the random association of the products of two Ldh loci. To investigate this system, cDNA clones of LDH have been isolated from a {lambda}gt11 library using antiserum raised against barley LDH purified {approximately}3,000-fold and using nucleic acid probes synthesized by the polymerase chain reaction. Two cDNA clones were obtained (1,305 and 1,166 bp). The deduced amino acid sequences of the two barley LDHs are 96% identical to each other, and 50% and 40% identical to vertebrate and bacterial LDHs, respectively. Northern blots identified a single mRNA band ({approximately}1.5 kb) whose level rose 8-fold during hypoxia.

  1. Anaerobic Biotransformation of High Concentrations of Chloroform by an Enrichment Culture and Two Bacterial Isolates ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Huifeng; Kurtz, Harry D.; Mykytczuk, Nadia; Trevors, Jack T.; Freedman, David L.

    2010-01-01

    A fermentative enrichment culture (designated DHM-1) was developed that is capable of cometabolically biotransforming high concentrations of chloroform (CF) to nontoxic end products. Two Pantoea spp. were isolated from DHM-1 that also possess this dechlorination capability. Following acclimation to increasing levels of CF, corn syrup-grown DHM-1 was able to transform over 500 mg/liter CF in the presence of vitamin B12 (approximately 3% of CF on a molar basis) at a rate as high as 22 mg/liter/day in a mineral salts medium. CO, CO2, and organic acids were the predominant biodegradation products, suggesting that hydrolytic reactions predominate during CF transformation. DHM-1 was capable of growing on corn syrup in the presence of high concentrations of CF (as may be present near contaminant source zones in groundwater), which makes it a promising culture for bioaugmentation. Strains DHM-1B and DHM-1T transform CF at rates similar to that of the DHM-1 enrichment culture. The ability of these strains to grow in the presence of high concentrations of CF appears to be related to alteration of membrane fluidity or homeoviscous and homeophasic adaptation. PMID:20693443

  2. Isolation and screening of anaerobic Clostridia for characteristics useful in enhanced oil recovery. Final report, October 1983-February 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Grula, M.M.; Russell, H.H.

    1985-10-01

    Strains of Clostridium isolated and screened for properties thought to be useful in enhanced oil recovery have been tested for their reactions to high sodium chloride concentrations, with the ultimate goal of developing more salt-resistant strains. Gas and solvent production by certain high gas-producing strains has been tested in the presence of various pulverized cores. The minerals in these cores can enhance and prolong gas production, enhance or delay spore germination or growth and metabolism of the bacteria in situ. The presence of a source of nitrogen and of energy are essential for continued gas production. A sampling of viable bacteria present in connate water, holding tanks, and other sites near oil fields showed a majority to be Gram positive, aerobic strains. For downwell work with Clostridium, beet molasses is a generally good and economical source of energy. Tests of connate water for toxicity for strain to be used, in the medium to be used, are essential. We have achieved downwell fermentations, as shown by CO/sub 2/ and solvent production, and in one case a significantly increased oil production. 10 refs., 9 figs., 23 tabs.

  3. Raineyella antarctica gen. nov., sp. nov., a psychrotolerant, d-amino-acid-utilizing anaerobe isolated from two geographic locations of the Southern Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Pikuta, Elena Vladimirovna; Menes, Rodolfo Javier; Bruce, Alisa Michelle; Lyu, Zhe; Patel, Nisha B; Liu, Yuchen; Hoover, Richard Brice; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Lawson, Paul Alexander; Whitman, William Barney

    2016-12-01

    A Gram-stain-positive bacterium, strain LZ-22T, was isolated from a rhizosphere of moss Leptobryum sp. collected at the shore of Lake Zub in Antarctica. Cells were motile, straight or pleomorphic rods with sizes of 0.6-1.0×3.5-10 µm. The novel isolate was a facultatively anaerobic, catalase-positive, psychrotolerant mesophile. Growth was observed at 3-41 °C (optimum 24-28 °C), with 0-7 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0.25 %) and at pH 4.0-9.0 (optimum pH 7.8). The quinone system of strain LZ-22T possessed predominately menaquinone MK-9(H4). The genomic G+C content was 70.2 mol%. Strain 10J was isolated from a biofilm of sediment microbial fuel cell, in Uruguay and had 99 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to strain LZ-22T. DNA-DNA-hybridization values of 84 % confirmed that both strains belonged to the same species. Both strains grew on sugars, proteinaceous compounds, and some amino- and organic acids. Strain LZ-22T uniquely grew on D-enantiomers of histidine and valine while neglecting growth on L-enantiomers. Both strains were sensitive to most of the tested antibiotics but resistant to tested nitrofurans and sulfanilamides. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the strains were related to members of the family Propionibacteriaceae (~93-94 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) with formation of a separate branch within the radiation of the genera Granulicoccus and Luteococcus. Based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, we propose the affiliation of both strains into a novel species of a new genus. The name Raineyella antarctica gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for the novel taxon with the type strain LZ-22T (=ATCC TSD-18T=DSM 100494T=JCM 30886T).

  4. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum napEDABC genes encoding the periplasmic nitrate reductase are essential for nitrate respiration.

    PubMed

    Delgado, María J; Bonnard, Nathalie; Tresierra-Ayala, Alvaro; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Müller, Peter

    2003-12-01

    The napEDABC gene cluster that encodes the periplasmic nitrate reductase from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 has been isolated and characterized. napA encodes the catalytic subunit, and the napB and napC gene products are predicted to be a soluble dihaem c and a membrane-anchored tetrahaem c-type cytochrome, respectively. napE encodes a transmembrane protein of unknown function, and the napD gene product is a soluble protein which is assumed to play a role in the maturation of NapA. Western blots of the periplasmic fraction from wild-type cells grown anaerobically with nitrate revealed the presence of a protein band with a molecular size of about 90 kDa corresponding to NapA. A B. japonicum mutant carrying an insertion in the napA gene was unable to grow under nitrate-respiring conditions, lacked nitrate reductase activity, and did not show the 90 kDa protein band. Complementation of the mutant with a plasmid bearing the napEDABC genes restored both nitrate-dependent anaerobic growth of the cells and nitrate reductase activity. A membrane-bound and a periplasmic c-type cytochrome, with molecular masses of 25 kDa and 15 kDa, respectively, were not detected in the napA mutant strain incubated anaerobically with nitrate, which identifies those proteins as the NapC and the NapB components of the B. japonicum periplasmic nitrate reductase enzyme. These results suggest that the periplasmic nitrate reductase is the enzyme responsible for anaerobic growth of B. japonicum under nitrate-respiring conditions. The promoter region of the napEDABC genes has been characterized by primer extension. A major transcript initiates 66.5 bp downstream of the centre of a putative FNR-like binding site.

  5. Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic sulfate- and arsenate-respiring bacterium from Searles Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Jodi Switzer; Kulp, Thomas R.; Han, Sukkyun; Lanoil, Brian; Saltikov, Chad W.; Stolz, John F.; Miller, Laurence G.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    A haloalkaliphilic sulfate-respiring bacterium, strain SLSR-1, was isolated from a lactate-fed stable enrichment culture originally obtained from the extreme environment of Searles Lake, California. The isolate proved capable of growth via sulfate-reduction over a broad range of salinities (125–330 g/L), although growth was slowest at salt-saturation. Strain SLSR-1 was also capable of growth via dissimilatory arsenate-reduction and displayed an even broader range of salinity tolerance (50–330 g/L) when grown under these conditions. Strain SLSR-1 could also grow via dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. Growth experiments in the presence of high borate concentrations indicated a greater sensitivity of sulfate-reduction than arsenate-respiration to this naturally abundant anion in Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 contained genes involved in both sulfate-reduction (dsrAB) and arsenate respiration (arrA). Amplicons of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from DNA extracted from Searles Lake sediment revealed the presence of close relatives of strain SLSR-1 as part of the flora of this ecosystem despite the fact that sulfate-reduction activity could not be detected in situ. We conclude that strain SLSR-1 can only achieve growth via arsenate-reduction under the current chemical conditions prevalent at Searles Lake. Strain SLSR-1 is a deltaproteobacterium in the family Desulfohalobiacea of anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic bacteria, for which we propose the name Desulfohalophilus alkaliarsenatis gen. nov., sp. nov.

  6. Fibrolytic potential of anaerobic fungi (Piromyces sp.) isolated from wild cattle and blue bulls in pure culture and effect of their addition on in vitro fermentation of wheat straw and methane emission by rumen fluid of buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyam S; Deb, Sitangshu M; Punia, Balbir S; Singh, Dharminder; Kumar, Rajiv

    2010-05-01

    Ten isolates of anaerobic fungi of Piromyces genus from wild cattle and blue bulls (five isolates from each host species) were evaluated for their fibrolytic ability in pure culture, their suitability for use as a microbial additive in buffaloes and their effect on methane emission. In pure culture, only two out of five isolates from wild cattle degraded wheat straw efficiently, whereas all five isolates from wild blue bulls did. Isolate CF1 (from cattle) showed the highest apparent digestibility (53.4%), true digestibility (70.8%) and neutral detergent fibre digestibility (75.0%) of wheat straw after 5 days of incubation. When added to buffalo rumen fluid, all five isolates from cattle increased (P < 0.05) in vitro apparent digestibility of wheat straw compared with the control (received autoclaved culture), but all five isolates from blue bulls failed to influence in vitro digestibility of wheat straw. Isolate CF1 showed the highest stimulating effect on straw digestion by buffalo rumen fluid microbes and increased apparent digestibility (51.9 vs 29.4%, P < 0.05), true digestibility (57.9 vs 36.5%, P < 0.05) and neutral detergent fibre digestibility (51.5 vs 26.9%, P < 0.05) of wheat straw compared with the control after 24 h of fermentation. There were also significant increases in fungal count and enzyme activities of carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase in the CF1-added group compared with the control group. Gas and methane production g(-1) truly digested dry matter of straw were comparable among all groups including the control. Wild cattle and blue bulls harbour some anaerobic fungal strains with strong capability to hydrolyse fibre. The fungal isolate CF1 has high potential for use as a microbial feed additive in buffaloes to improve digestibility of fibrous feeds without increasing methane emission per unit of digested feed.

  7. Speech and respiration.

    PubMed

    Conrad, B; Schönle, P

    1979-04-12

    This investigation deals with the temporal aspects of air volume changes during speech. Speech respiration differs fundamentally from resting respiration. In resting respiration the duration and velocity of inspiration (air flow or lung volume change) are in a range similar to that of expiration. In speech respiration the duration of inspiration decreases and its velocity increases; conversely, the duration of expiration increases and the volume of air flow decreases dramatically. The following questions arise: are these two respiration types different entities, or do they represent the end points of a continuum from resting to speech respiration? How does articulation without the generation of speech sound affect breathing? Does (verbalized?) thinking without articulation or speech modify the breathing pattern? The main test battery included four tasks (spontaneous speech, reading, serial speech, arithmetic) performed under three conditions (speaking aloud, articulating subvocally, quiet performance by tryping to exclusively 'think' the tasks). Respiratory movements were measured with a chest pneumograph and evaluated in comparison with a phonogram and the identified spoken text. For quiet performance the resulting respiratory time ratio (relation of duration of inspiration versus expiration) showed a gradual shift in the direction of speech respiration--the least for reading, the most for arithmetic. This change was even more apparent for the subvocal tasks. It is concluded that (a) there is a gradual automatic change from resting to speech respiration and (b) the degree of internal verbalization (activation of motor speech areas) defines the degree of activation of the speech respiratory pattern.

  8. Voluntary use of respirators.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Lynn

    2009-11-01

    Allowing voluntary use of respirators can provide workers with an added level of comfort and relief from nuisance levels of particulates, gases, or vapors. But misuse can result in illness or injury to the worker. Understanding and following OSHA's guidelines on voluntary use of respirators is one of the many ways you help provide a safe workplace and ensure your employees stay healthy.

  9. EDKC Selectively Photosensitizes Respiration Of Malignant Cells In Vitro.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ara, G.; Lewandowski, L.; Oseroff, A. R.

    1989-03-01

    We have shown previously that the cationic cyanine dye, EDKC, which photosensitizes malignant cells in vitro and in vivo, blocks respiration in isolated murine liver mitochondria by preferentially inactivating Complex I mediated electron transport. The present work was directed towards examining whether the killing of malignant cells with EDKC and visible radiation was a result of irreparable damage to mitochondria of these cells. We report that EDKC selectively photosensitizes respiration of squamous carcinoma and melanoma cells in vitro. At 0.1 uM, the dye inhibited basal respiration, however, an uncoupler, FCCP, reverted the respiration rate to the control uncoupled rate. Furthermore, the basal respiration of control or EDKC treated cells was totally inhibited by oligomycin, an inhibitor of FoFiATPase, indicating that the respiration was coupled to phosphorylation. After irradiation with 700 + 20 nm light (14 J/cm2) in the presence of 0.1 uM dye, basal respiration was slightly enhanced compared to that of the dye treated cells, however, FCCP-stimulated respiration was drastically lowered. In addition, only 10-20% of the basal respiration was blocked by oligomycin, indicating that a major part of respiration was no longer coupled to phosphorylation. Furthermore, almost no recovery of the mitochondria! respiratory function was detected 6 hr after treatment. Respiration of an untransformed monkey kidney cell line (CV-1) was only minimally affected by ten fold higher dye concentration (1 uM) and 14 J/cm2 radiation.

  10. Geosporobacter ferrireducens sp. nov., an anaerobic iron-reducing bacterium isolated from an oil-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heeji; Kim, So-Jeong; Min, Ui-Gi; Lee, Yong-Jae; Kim, Song-Gun; Jung, Man-Young; Seo, Yong-Seok; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, an alkaliphilic and heterotrophic iron-reducing bacterial strain, IRF9(T), was isolated from an oil-contaminated soil in the Republic of Korea. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain IRF9(T) belongs to the genus Geosporobacter in the family Clostridiaceae and is most closely related to Geosporobacter subterraneus VNs68(T) (96.9 % sequence similarity). Cells of strain IRF9(T) were observed to be straight or curved rod-shaped, motile and Gram-negative. Optimal growth of strain IRF9(T) was observed at pH 9.0-9.5 and 40 °C. The strain was found to grow within pH and temperature ranges of 6.5-10.0 and 25-45 °C, respectively. NaCl was not required for growth. Fe(III), but not sulfate, thiosulfate or elemental sulfur can be used by strain IRF9(T) as an electron acceptor. A limited number of carbohydrates and amino acids, including D-glucose, D-fructose, D-mannitol, D-ribose and L-arginine, support growth of strain IRF9(T). The main fatty acids (>10 %) of strain IRF9(T) were identified as C14:0 (18.4 %), C16:1 cis9 (13.6 %), C16:0 (12.4 %) and C16:0 dimethyl acetal (17.7 %). Major respiratory quinone was identified as menaquinone MK-5 (V-H2). The main polar lipids were found to be phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content of strain IRF9(T) was determined to be 37.2 mol%, which is lower than that of G. subterraneus VNs68(T) (42.2 mol%). Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic studies, we conclude that strain IRF9(T) (=JCM 19987(T) = KCTC 15395(T)) represents a new species of the genus Geosporobacter, for which we propose the name Geosporobacter ferrireducens sp. nov.

  11. Role of Rhodobacter sp. Strain PS9, a Purple Non-Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Isolated from an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon, in Odor Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Young S.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Zahn, James A.; Boyd, Eric S.; de la Mora, Arlene; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2003-01-01

    Temporal pigmentation changes resulting from the development of a purple color in anaerobic swine waste lagoons were investigated during a 4-year period. The major purple photosynthetic bacterium responsible for these color changes and the corresponding reductions in odor was isolated from nine photosynthetic lagoons. By using morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic characterization methods we identified the predominant photosynthetic bacterium as a new strain of Rhodobacter, designated Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9. Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 is capable of photoorganotrophic growth on a variety of organic compounds, including all of the characteristic volatile organic compounds (VOC) responsible for the odor associated with swine production facilities (J. A. Zahn, A. A. DiSpirito, Y. S. Do, B. E. Brooks, E. E. Copper, and J. L. Hatfield, J. Environ. Qual. 30:624-634, 2001). The seasonal variations in airborne VOC emitted from waste lagoons showed that there was a 80 to 93% decrease in the concentration of VOC during a photosynthetic bloom. During the height of a bloom, the Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 population accounted for 10% of the total community and up to 27% of the eubacterial community based on 16S ribosomal DNA signals. Additional observations based on seasonal variations in meteorological, biological, and chemical parameters suggested that the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were correlated with lagoon water temperature and with the concentrations of sulfate and phosphate. In addition, the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were inversely correlated with the concentrations of protein and fluoride. PMID:12620863

  12. Isolation, oxygen sensitivity, and virulence of NADH oxidase mutants of the anaerobic spirochete Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, etiologic agent of swine dysentery.

    PubMed

    Stanton, T B; Rosey, E L; Kennedy, M J; Jensen, N S; Bosworth, B T

    1999-11-01

    Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, the etiologic agent of swine dysentery, uses the enzyme NADH oxidase to consume oxygen. To investigate possible roles for NADH oxidase in the growth and virulence of this anaerobic spirochete, mutant strains deficient in oxidase activity were isolated and characterized. The cloned NADH oxidase gene (nox; GenBank accession no. U19610) on plasmid pER218 was inactivated by replacing 321 bp of coding sequence with either a gene for chloramphenicol resistance (cat) or a gene for kanamycin resistance (kan). The resulting plasmids, respectively, pCmDeltaNOX and pKmDeltaNOX, were used to transform wild-type B. hyodysenteriae B204 cells and generate the antibiotic-resistant strains Nox-Cm and Nox-Km. PCR and Southern hybridization analyses indicated that the chromosomal wild-type nox genes in these strains had been replaced, through allelic exchange, by the inactivated nox gene containing cat or kan. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblot analysis revealed that both nox mutant cell lysates were missing the 48-kDa Nox protein. Soluble NADH oxidase activity levels in cell lysates of Nox-Cm and Nox-Km were reduced 92 to 96% compared to the activity level in parent strain B204. In an aerotolerance test, cells of both nox mutants were at least 100-fold more sensitive to oxygen exposure than were cells of the wild-type parent strain B204. In swine experimental infections, both nox mutants were less virulent than strain B204 in that fewer animals were colonized by the mutant cells and infected animals displayed mild, transient signs of disease, with no deaths. These results provide evidence that NADH oxidase serves to protect B. hyodysenteriae cells against oxygen toxicity and that the enzyme, in that role, contributes to the pathogenic ability of the spirochete.

  13. Proteinivorax tanatarense gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, proteolytic bacterium isolated from a decaying algal bloom, and proposal of Proteinivoraceae fam. nov.

    PubMed

    Kevbrin, Vadim; Boltyanskaya, Yulia; Zhilina, Tatjana; Kolganova, Tatjana; Lavrentjeva, Elena; Kuznetsov, Boris

    2013-09-01

    Two strains of a novel anaerobic, protein- and nucleoside-utilizing bacterium, Z-910(T) and Z-810, were isolated. The strains were spore-forming, mainly nonmotile rods, exhibiting positive Gram reaction with Gram-positive cell wall structure. The strains were mesophilic and haloalkaliphilic. Cultures used proteins and proteinaceous substrates as carbon, nitrogen, and energy sources. Both strains used also ribonucleosides, cellobiose, pyruvate, and glycerol. Ribose and nucleobases did not support growth. The fermentation products from all utilized substrates were identical but varied in content and included straight and branched acids, as well as hydrogen and ammonia. When grown on tryptone, strain Z-910(T) was able to reduce fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur. Neither nitrate nor sulfate was reduced. The DNA G + C content of strain Z-910(T) was 32.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity revealed that strains Z-910(T) and Z-810 represented a new branch within the order Clostridiales, with 90.2 % similarity to the nearest genus with a validly published name Anaerobranca gottschalkii DSM 13577(T). According to their physiological, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic properties, strains Z-910(T) and Z-810 represented a new genus and novel species, for which the name Proteinivorax tanatarense gen. nov., sp. nov. was proposed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the genera Proteinivorax gen. nov. and Anaerobranca formed a separate cluster within the order Clostridiales. The family Proteinivoraceae fam. nov. comprising the genera Proteinivorax gen. nov. and Anaerobranca was therefore proposed within the order Clostridiales of the phylum Firmicutes with Proteinivorax as a type genus of the new family.

  14. Microbial Iron Respiration Can Protect Steel from Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Dubiel, M.; Hsu, C. H.; Chien, C. C.; Mansfeld, F.; Newman, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the corrosion rate and corrosion potential as a function of time for these mutants in comparison to the wild type. Counter to prevailing theories of MC, our results indicate that biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria may reduce rather than accelerate the corrosion rate of steel. Corrosion inhibition appears to be due to reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions and increased consumption of oxygen, both of which are direct consequences of microbial respiration. PMID:11872499

  15. Acetobacteroides hydrogenigenes gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic hydrogen-producing bacterium in the family Rikenellaceae isolated from a reed swamp.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiao-Li; Tian, Qi; Zhang, Jie; Yuan, Xian-Zheng; Shi, Xiao-Shuang; Guo, Rong-Bo; Qiu, Yan-Ling

    2014-09-01

    A strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, carbohydrate-fermenting, hydrogen-producing bacterium, designated strain RL-C(T), was isolated from a reed swamp in China. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, catalase-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile rods measuring 0.7-1.0 µm in width and 3.0-8.0 µm in length. The optimum temperature for growth of strain RL-C(T) was 37 °C (range 25-40 °C) and pH 7.0-7.5 (range pH 5.7-8.0). The strain could grow fermentatively on yeast extract, tryptone, arabinose, glucose, galactose, mannose, maltose, lactose, glycogen, pectin and starch. The main end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, H2 and CO2. Organic acids, alcohols and amino acids were not utilized for growth. Yeast extract was not required for growth; however, it stimulated growth slightly. Nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur and Fe(III) nitrilotriacetate were not reduced as terminal electron acceptors. Aesculin was hydrolysed but not gelatin. Indole and H2S were produced from yeast extract. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 51.2 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and C16 : 0. The most abundant polar lipid of strain RL-C(T) was phosphatidylethanolamine. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate belongs to the uncultured Blvii28 wastewater-sludge group (http://www.arb-silva.de/) in the family Rikenellaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes, and shared low sequence similarities with the related species Alistipes shahii WAL 8301(T) (81.8 %), Rikenella microfusus ATCC 29728(T) (81.7 %) and Anaerocella delicata WN081(T) (80.9 %). On the basis of these data, a novel species in a new genus of the family Rikenellaceae is proposed, Acetobacteroides hydrogenigenes gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of the type species is RL-C(T) ( = JCM 17603(T) = DSM 24657(T) = CGMCC 1.5173(T)).

  16. In Vitro Activity of Pexiganan and 10 Comparator Antimicrobials against 234 Isolates, Including 93 Pasteurella Species and 50 Anaerobic Bacterial Isolates Recovered from Animal Bite Wounds.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Leoncio, Eliza S

    2017-06-01

    Animal bite wounds affect more than 5 million Americans annually, resulting in 300,000 emergency department visits, 10,000 hospitalizations, and an untold number of physician office visits. Various forms of topical therapy are empirically self-employed by many patients prior to seeking medical attention. Pexiganan, a 22-amino-acid synthetic cationic analogue of the peptide magainin II, acts by selectively damaging bacterial cell membranes. We determined the MICs for pexiganan and other antimicrobial agents often used for treatment of bite wounds. Most isolates were from U.S. patients, and ∼10% were from European and Canadian patients. The comparator antimicrobials studied were penicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin-tazobactam, meropenem, clindamycin, doxycycline, moxifloxacin, ceftriaxone, linezolid, and metronidazole. The MIC90s of pexiganan were 32 μg/ml (against Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida), 16 μg/ml (P. multocida subsp. septica, Pasteurella canis, and Pasteurella dagmatis), 8 μg/ml (Pasteurella stomatis), 8 μg/ml (Eikenella corrodens), 2 μg/ml (Neisseria weaveri, Neisseria zoodegmatis, and Moraxella canis-Moraxella lacunata group), 16 μg/ml (Bergeyella zoohelcum), 64 μg/ml (Bacteroides pyogenes), 4 μg/ml (Fusobacterium russii), 32 μg/ml (Fusobacterium canifelinum), and 64 μg/ml (Prevotella heparinolytica). The concentration of pexiganan in the cream used was 8,000 μg/ml, more than 60 to 100 times the highest MIC obtained. Pexiganan exhibited a broad range of antimicrobial activity, showing potential for treating animal bite infections. A clinical trial seems warranted. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Isolation and characterization of Thermanaerothrix daxensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium pertaining to the phylum "Chloroflexi", isolated from a deep hot aquifer in the Aquitaine Basin.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, Patrick; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Joseph, Manon; Guasco, Sophie; Hamaide, Francette; Biasutti, Sandra; Michotey, Valérie; Bonin, Patricia; Ollivier, Bernard

    2011-11-01

    A new strictly anaerobic thermophilic multicellular filamentous bacterium (0.2-0.3μm×>100μm), designated GNS-1(T), was isolated from a deep hot aquifer in France. It was non-motile, and stained Gram-negative. Optimal growth was observed at 65°C, pH 7.0, and 2gL(-1) of NaCl. Strain GNS-1(T) was chemoorganotrophic fermenting ribose, glucose, galactose, arabinose, fructose, mannose, maltose, sucrose, xylose, raffinose, pyruvate, and xylan. Yeast extract was required for growth. The end products of glucose fermentation were lactate, acetate, CO(2), and H(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 57.6mol%. Its closest phylogenetic relative was Bellilinea caldifistulae with 92.5% similarity. Based on phylogenetic, genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, strain GNS-1(T) (DSM 23592(T), JCM 16980(T)) is proposed to be assigned to a novel species of a novel genus within the class Anaerolineae (subphylum I), phylum "Chloroflexi", Thermanaerothrix daxensis gen. nov., sp. nov. The GenBank accession number is HM596746.

  18. Teaching Cellular Respiration & Alternate Energy Sources with a Laboratory Exercise Developed by a Scientist-Teacher Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Brandon; Mitton, Teri; Smith, Rosemary; Magnuson, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells are a current research area that harvests electricity from bacteria capable of anaerobic respiration. Graphite is an electrically conductive material that bacteria can respire on, thus it can be used to capture electrons from bacteria. When bacteria transfer electrons to graphite, an electrical potential is created that can…

  19. Teaching Cellular Respiration & Alternate Energy Sources with a Laboratory Exercise Developed by a Scientist-Teacher Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Brandon; Mitton, Teri; Smith, Rosemary; Magnuson, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells are a current research area that harvests electricity from bacteria capable of anaerobic respiration. Graphite is an electrically conductive material that bacteria can respire on, thus it can be used to capture electrons from bacteria. When bacteria transfer electrons to graphite, an electrical potential is created that can…

  20. Transcriptional regulation of dimethyl sulfoxide respiration in a haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qiuzi; Ito, Yoshiyasu; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Taketomo

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii can grow anaerobically by DMSO respiration. DMSO reductase was induced by DMSO respiration not only under anaerobic growth conditions but also in denitrifying cells of H. volcanii. Deletion of the dmsR gene, encoding a putative regulator for the DMSO reductase, resulted in the loss of anaerobic growth by DMSO respiration. Reporter experiments revealed that only the anaerobic condition was essential for transcription of the dmsEABCD genes encoding DMSO reductase and that transcription was enhanced threefold by supplementation of DMSO. In the ∆dmsR mutant, transcription of the dmsEABCD genes induced by the anaerobic condition was not enhanced by DMSO, suggesting that DmsR is a DMSO-responsive regulator. Transcriptions of the dmsR and mgd genes for Mo-bisMGD biosynthesis were regulated in the same manner as the dmsEABCD genes. These results suggest that the genetic regulation of DMSO respiration in H. volcanii is controlled by at least two systems: one is the DMSO-responsive DmsR, and the other is an unknown anaerobic regulator.

  1. Progesterone impairs cell respiration and suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport in isolated rat skeletal muscle: a non-genomic mechanism contributing to metabolic adaptation to late pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Gras, F; Brunmair, B; Quarré, L; Szöcs, Z; Waldhäusl, W; Fürnsinn, C

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to gain better insight into the mechanisms responsible for impaired glucose metabolism during late pregnancy. We explored the direct effects of progesterone on glucose metabolism of skeletal muscle. Specimens of skeletal muscle from untreated rats were incubated with progesterone and rates of substrate fluxes through the various pathways of glucose metabolism were analysed. Progesterone dose-dependently reduced the rates of glucose and pyruvate oxidation (insulin-stimulated rates after 5 h of exposure to 1 and 10 mumol/l progesterone: glucose oxidation, -6 +/- 4%, NS, and -39 +/- 4%, p < 0.001; pyruvate oxidation, -28 +/- 2% and -55 +/- 4%, p < 0.001 each) and increased lactate release (+28 +/- 4% and +58 +/- 9%, p < 0.005 each), which indicated inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory function. Impairment of cell respiration, e.g. by the specific inhibitor rotenone, is known to trigger a compensatory increase in glucose transport, but this response was blunted in the case of progesterone (change of glucose transport in response to 10 mumol/l progesterone vs 60 nmol/l rotenone, both causing a reduction in glucose oxidation by -39%: progesterone, +14 +/- 8% vs rotenone, +84 +/- 23%, p < 0.03). Further experiments dealt with the underlying mechanisms and revealed a rapid mode of action (50 mumol/l progesterone, reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation after 30 min: -29 +/- 7%, p < 0.01) not affected by blockers of gene expression or the nuclear progesterone receptor. Progesterone inhibits cell respiration and at the same time suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport, causing cellular carbohydrate deficiency in isolated rat skeletal muscle. This effect is mediated by a direct, rapid and non-genomic mechanism and could contribute to pregnancy-associated changes in glucose homeostasis.

  2. Respiration in Aquatic Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, John

    1985-01-01

    This article: (1) explains the respiratory patterns of several freshwater insects; (2) describes the differences and mechanisms of spiracular cutaneous, and gill respiration; and (3) discusses behavioral aspects of selected aquatic insects. (ML)

  3. Respiration in Aquatic Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, John

    1985-01-01

    This article: (1) explains the respiratory patterns of several freshwater insects; (2) describes the differences and mechanisms of spiracular cutaneous, and gill respiration; and (3) discusses behavioral aspects of selected aquatic insects. (ML)

  4. Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov., an anaerobic but low concentration oxygen adapted coccobacillus isolated from lizards (Pogona vitticeps) or human clinical specimens, and emended description of the genus Porphyromonas Shah and Collins 1988.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Kuwabara, Saki; Kania, Stephen A; Kato, Hisayuki; Hamagishi, Manami; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Sato, Takuichi; Tomida, Junko; Tanaka, Kaori; Bemis, David A

    2015-03-01

    During the process of identifying a Gram-negative coccobacillus isolated from a human clinical specimen, we found that the isolate's 16S rRNA gene had very close sequence identity with that of a variant Porphyromonas isolated from polymicrobial infections in the central bearded dragon, a species of lizard [2]. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the human isolate and of six isolates from lizards were nearly identical (99.9-100%). Phylogenetic analysis placed all of these isolates in a single phylogenetic cluster well separated from other species in the genus Porphyromonas. The closest species was Porphyromonas catoniae with 90.7-90.9% sequence identity, although there was less than 6% DNA similarity between the P. catoniae type strain and our representative isolates from lizards (PAGU 1787(T)) and human (PAGU 1776). These isolates could grow under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions (6% O2 atmosphere). The isolates were positive for catalase and very strong β-hemolytic activity, but did not show black or brown pigmentation. Biochemically, the isolates could be differentiated from closely related species by pyroglutamic acid arylamidase and glycine arylamidase activity, and some others. The fermentation products mainly included succinic acid and propionic acid. The major fatty acids detected in cells of the isolates were iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, and 3OH-iso-C17:0. The G+C content was 43.0 ± 0.62 mol%. The species name Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates with the type strain of PAGU 1787(T) (=MI 10-1288(T)=JCM 19732(T)=ATCC BAA-2643(T)).

  5. Falcatimonas natans gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic, amino-acid-decomposing bacterium isolated from a methanogenic reactor of cattle waste.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Misa; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji; Ueki, Atsuko

    2016-11-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WN011T) was isolated from a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms. Cells of the strain were Gram-stain-negative curved rods with a polar flagellum. Spores were not produced. The optimum temperature for growth was 35-37 °C and the optimum pH was 6.7. The strain did not utilize carbohydrates as growth substrates. The strain grew in PY medium and produced acetate, butyrate, isovalerate and H2 as well as propionate and isobutyrate as minor products. Amino acids (l-isoleucine, l-leucine, l-lysine, l-serine, l-threonine and l-valine) added to PY medium enhanced growth of the strain and increased the amounts of fermentation products. Oxidase, catalase and nitrate-reducing activities were negative. Hydrogen sulfide was produced. The genomic DNA G+C content was 38.8 mol%. Compounds related to iso-C15 : 0 (fatty acid, dimethylacetal and aldehyde) were detected as predominant components by the cellular fatty acids analysis. The diagnostic diamino acid of the cell-wall peptidoglycan was meso-diaminopimelic acid. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, three clones from wastewater were very closely related to strain WN011T (up to 99.9 % sequence similarity). The most closely related described species were those in cluster XIVa of the class Clostridia such as Ruminococcus gauvreauii (93.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Clostridium fimetarium (93.5 %) and Clostridium bolteae(93.5 %). Based on the distinct differences in phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics of strain WN011T from those of related species, it is concluded that strain WN011T represents a novel species of a new genus in the family Lachnospiraceae, for which the name Falcatimonas natans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is WN011T (=JCM 16476T=DSM 22923T).

  6. Anaerocella delicata gen. nov., sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic bacterium in the phylum Bacteroidetes isolated from a methanogenic reactor of cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kunihiro; Ueki, Atsuko; Ohtaki, Yoshimi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ueki, Katsuji

    2012-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WN081(T)) was isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms in Japan. Cells were Gram-staining negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming straight rods. The strain grew rather well on PY agar slants supplemented with a B-vitamin mixture as well as sugars (PYV4S medium) and made translucent and glossy colonies. Growth in liquid medium with the same composition, however, was scanty, and growth was not improved in spite of various additives to the medium. Strain WN081(T) produced small amounts of acetate, propionate, isobutyrate, butyrate, isovalerate and H(2) from PYV liquid medium. The strain did not use carbohydrates or organic acids. The pH range for growth was narrow (pH 6.8-8.2), having a pH optimum at 6.8-7.5. The temperature range for growth was 10-37°C, the optimum being 25-30°C. The strain was sensitive to bile, and did not have catalase or oxidase activities. Hydrogen sulfide was produced from L-cysteine and L-methionine as well as peptone. Indole was produced from L-tryptophan and peptone. The strain had iso-C(15:0) as the exclusively predominant cellular fatty acid (70%) together with some branched chain components (such as iso-C(15:0) DMA, iso-C(17:0) 3-OH and iso-C(15:0) aldehyde) as minor components. The genomic DNA G+C content was 32.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence placed strain WN081(T) in the phylum Bacteroidetes with rather low sequence similarities with the related species such as Rikenella microfusus (85.7% sequence similarity), Alistipes putredinis (85.5%) and Alistipes finegoldii (85.5%) in the family Rikenellaceae. Based on the phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses, the novel genus and species Anaerocella delicata gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the strain. The type strain is WN081(T) (= JCM 17049(T) = DSM 23595(T)).

  7. Species identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria: a comparison of two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry systems.

    PubMed

    Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Holm, Anette; Knudsen, Elisa; Andersen, Line Bisgaard; Jensen, Thøger Gorm; Kemp, Michael; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente; Møller, Jens Kjølseth

    2011-12-01

    We compared two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems (Shimadzu/SARAMIS and Bruker) on a collection of consecutive clinically important anaerobic bacteria (n = 290). The Bruker system had more correct identifications to the species level (67.2% versus 49.0%), but also more incorrect identifications (7.9% versus 1.4%). The system databases need to be optimized to increase identification levels. However, MALDI-TOF MS in its present version seems to be a fast and inexpensive method for identification of most clinically important anaerobic bacteria.

  8. Draft Genome of Thermanaerothrix daxensis GNS-1, a Thermophilic Facultative Anaerobe from the Chloroflexi Class Anaerolineae

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Laura A.; Ward, Lewis M.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2015-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Thermanaerothrix daxensis GNS-1, a thermophilic member of the Chloroflexi phylum. This organism was initially characterized as a nonmotile, strictly anaerobic fermenter; however, genome analysis demonstrates that it encodes genes for a flagellum and multiple pathways for aerobic and anaerobic respiration. PMID:26586891

  9. Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Jan; Sträuber, Heike; Kretzschmar, Jörg; Denysenko, Velina; Nelles, Michael

    2017-04-09

    The term anaerobic digestion usually refers to the microbial conversion of organic material to biogas, which mainly consists of methane and carbon dioxide. The technical application of the naturally-occurring process is used to provide a renewable energy carrier and - as the substrate is often waste material - to reduce the organic matter content of the substrate prior to disposal.Applications can be found in sewage sludge treatment, the treatment of industrial and municipal solid wastes and wastewaters (including landfill gas utilization), and the conversion of agricultural residues and energy crops.For biorefinery concepts, the anaerobic digestion (AD) process is, on the one hand, an option to treat organic residues from other production processes. Concomitant effects are the reduction of organic carbon within the treated substance, the conversion of nitrogen and sulfur components, and the production of an energy-rich gas - the biogas. On the other hand, the multistep conversion of complex organic material offers the possibility of interrupting the conversion chain and locking out intermediates for utilization as basic material within the chemical industry.

  10. Thermoanaerobacter uzonensis sp. nov., an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium isolated from a hot spring within the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Far East Russia.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Isaac D; Zhao, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Romanek, Christopher S; Rohde, Manfred; Wiegel, Juergen

    2008-11-01

    Several strains of heterotrophic, anaerobic thermophilic bacteria were isolated from hot springs of the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Far East Russia. Strain JW/IW010(T) was isolated from a hot spring within the West sector of the Eastern Thermal field, near Pulsating Spring in the Winding Creek area. Cells of strain JW/IW010(T) were straight to slightly curved rods, 0.5 mum in width and variable in length from 2 to 5 mum and occasionally up to 15 mum, and formed oval subterminal spores. Cells stained Gram-negative, but were Gram-type positive. Growth was observed between 32.5 and 69 degrees C with an optimum around 61 degrees C (no growth occurred at or below 30 degrees C, or at or above 72 degrees C). The pH(60 degrees C) range for growth was 4.2-8.9 with an optimum at 7.1 (no growth occurred at or below pH(60 degrees C) 3.9, or at 9.2 or above). The shortest observed doubling-time at pH(60 degrees C) 6.9 and 61 degrees C was 30 min. Strain JW/IW010(T) was chemo-organotrophic; yeast extract, peptone, Casamino acids and tryptone supported growth. Yeast extract was necessary for the utilization of non-proteinaceous substrates, and growth was observed with inulin, cellobiose, maltose, sucrose, glucose, fructose, galactose, mannose, xylose, trehalose, mannitol, pyruvate and crotonate. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain JW/IW010(T) was 33.6 mol% (HPLC method). The major phospholipid fatty acids were iso-15 : 0 (53.5 %), 15 : 0 (11.8 %), 16 : 0 (7.3 %), 10-methyl 16 : 0 (7.3 %) and anteiso-15 : 0 (5.3 %). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed strain JW/IW010(T) in the genus Thermoanaerobacter of the family 'Thermoanaerobacteriaceae' (Firmicutes), with Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens JW/SL-NZ826(T) (97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Thermoanaerobacter kivui DSM 2030(T) (94.5 %) as the closest phylogenetic relatives with validly published names. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain JW/IW010(T) and Thermoanaerobacter sulfurigignens JW/SL-NZ826

  11. Infected neonatal cephalohematomas caused by anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2005-01-01

    To present the microbiological and clinical features of six children with infected cephalohematomas (IC) caused by anaerobic bacteria. Presentation of a case series. Polymicrobial infection was present in all instances, where the number of isolates varied from two to four. Two patients had anaerobes only and the other four had mixed flora of strict anaerobes and facultatives. There were 16 bacterial isolates (12 anaerobic, 4 aerobic). The anaerobic isolates were Peptostreptococcus spp. (5 isolates), Prevotella spp. (4), Bacteroides fragilis group (2), and Propionibacterium acnes (1). The aerobic isolates were E. coli (2), Staphylococcus aureus (1) and group B streptococci (1). Blood cultures were positive for three patients. The most common predisposing conditions were vacuum extraction and amnionitis (4 instances of each), instrumental delivery (3), electronic fetal monitoring (2), prolonged delivery (1), and premature rupture of membranes (1). All patients underwent drainage, and four also had surgical incision and drainage of the IC. Osteomyelitis developed in one instance and scalp abscess developed in two patients, both of whom had electronic fetal monitoring. All patients eventually recovered from infection after receiving parenteral and subsequent oral antibiotic therapy for a total of 14-38 days. This study highlights the polymicrobial nature and potential importance of anaerobic bacteria in IC in newborns.

  12. Anaerobic thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-02-26

    The term "extremophile" was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of "extreme" environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally "hot environments" on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely

  13. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    PubMed Central

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has

  14. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1992-06-01

    A variety of different media were used to isolate facultatively (FAB) and obligately anaerobic bacteria (OAB). These bacteria were isolated from core subsamples obtained from boreholes at the Idaho National Engineering Lab. (INEL) or at the Hanford Lab. (Yakima). Core material was sampled at various depths to 600 feet below the surface. All core samples with culturable bacteria contained at least FAB making thisthe most common physiological type of anaerobic bacteria present in the deep subsurface at these two sites. INEL core samples are characterized by isolates of both FAB and OAB. No isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, or sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. Yakima core samples are characterized by a marked predominance of FAB in comparison to OAB. In addition, isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, and sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. The Yakima site has the potential for complete anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds whereas this potential appears to be lacking at INEL.

  15. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans‐Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Summary Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen‐dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene‐degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ‘key players’ of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:21450012

  16. Perspectives of the microbial carbon pump with special references to microbial respiration and ecological efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Jiao, N.

    2014-01-01

    Although respiration consumes fixed carbon and produce CO2, it provides energy for essential biological processes of an ecosystem, including the microbial carbon pump (MCP). In MCP-driving biotransformation of labile DOC to recalcitrant DOC (RDOC), microbial respiration provides the metabolic energy for environmental organic substrate sensing, cellular enzyme syntheses and catalytic processes such as uptake, secretion, modification, fixation and storage of carbon compounds. The MCP efficiency of a heterotrophic microorganism is thus related to its energy production efficiency and hence to its respiration efficiency. Anaerobically respiring microbes usually have lower energy production efficiency and lower energy-dependent carbon transformation efficiency, and consequently lower MCP efficiency at per cell level. This effect is masked by the phenomena that anoxic environments often store more organic matter. Here we point out that organic carbon preservation and RDOC production is different in mechanisms, and anaerobically respiring ecosystems could also have lower MCP ecological efficiency. Typical cases can be found in large river estuarine ecosystems. Due to strong terrigenous input of nutrients and organic matter, estuarine ecosystems usually experience intense heterotrophic respiration processes that rapidly consume dissolved oxygen, potentially producing hypoxic and anoxic zones in the water column. The lowered availability of dissolved oxygen and the excessive supply of nutrients such as nitrate from river input prompt enhanced anaerobic respiration processes. Thus, some nutrients may be consumed by anaerobically respiring heterotrophic microorganisms, instead of being utilized by phytoplankton for carbon fixation and primary production. In this situation, the ecological functioning of the estuarine ecosystem is altered and the ecological efficiency is lowered, as less carbon is fixed and less energy is produced. Ultimately this would have negatively impacts

  17. Olivine-respiring bacteria isolated from the rock-ice interface in a lava-tube cave, a Mars analog environment.

    PubMed

    Popa, Radu; Smith, Amy R; Popa, Rodica; Boone, Jane; Fisk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The boundary between ice and basalt on Earth is an analogue for some near-surface environments of Mars. We investigated neutrophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms from the basalt-ice interface in a lava tube from the Oregon Cascades with perennial ice. One of the isolates (Pseudomonas sp. HerB) can use ferrous iron Fe(II) from the igneous mineral olivine as an electron donor and O(2) as an electron acceptor. The optimum growth temperature is ∼12-14°C, but growth also occurs at 5°C. Bicarbonate is a facultative source of carbon. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. HerB as a chemolithotrophic iron oxidizer with olivine as the source of energy is favored in low O(2) conditions (e.g., 1.6% O(2)). Most likely, microbial oxidation of olivine near pH 7 requires low O(2) to offset the abiotic oxidation of iron. The metabolic capabilities of this bacterium would allow it to live in near-surface, icy, volcanic environments of Mars in the present or recent geological past and make this type of physiology a prime candidate in the search for life on Mars.

  18. Dissimilatory arsenate reduction with sulfide as electron donor: experiments with mono lake water and Isolation of strain MLMS-1, a chemoautotrophic arsenate respirer.

    PubMed

    Hoeft, Shelley E; Kulp, Thomas R; Stolz, John F; Hollibaugh, James T; Oremland, Ronald S

    2004-05-01

    Anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, can biologically reduce added arsenate without any addition of electron donors. Of the possible in situ inorganic electron donors present, only sulfide was sufficiently abundant to drive this reaction. We tested the ability of sulfide to serve as an electron donor for arsenate reduction in experiments with lake water. Reduction of arsenate to arsenite occurred simultaneously with the removal of sulfide. No loss of sulfide occurred in controls without arsenate or in sterilized samples containing both arsenate and sulfide. The rate of arsenate reduction in lake water was dependent on the amount of available arsenate. We enriched for a bacterium that could achieve growth with sulfide and arsenate in a defined, mineral medium and purified it by serial dilution. The isolate, strain MLMS-1, is a gram-negative, motile curved rod that grows by oxidizing sulfide to sulfate while reducing arsenate to arsenite. Chemoautotrophy was confirmed by the incorporation of H(14)CO(3)(-) into dark-incubated cells, but preliminary gene probing tests with primers for ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase did not yield PCR-amplified products. Alignment of 16S rRNA sequences indicated that strain MLMS-1 was in the delta-Proteobacteria, located near sulfate reducers like Desulfobulbus sp. (88 to 90% similarity) but more closely related (97%) to unidentified sequences amplified previously from Mono Lake. However, strain MLMS-1 does not grow with sulfate as its electron acceptor.

  19. Dissimilatory arsenate reduction with sulfide as electron donor: Experiments with Mono Lake water and isolation of strain MLMS-1, a chemoautotrophic arsenate respirer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoeft, S.E.; Kulp, T.R.; Stolz, J.F.; Hollibaugh, J.T.; Oremland, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    Anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, can biologically reduce added arsenate without any addition of electron donors. Of the possible in situ inorganic electron donors present, only sulfide was sufficiently abundant to drive this reaction. We tested the ability of sulfide to serve as an electron donor for arsenate reduction in experiments with lake water. Reduction of arsenate to arsenite occurred simultaneously with the removal of sulfide. No loss of sulfide occurred in controls without arsenate or in sterilized samples containing both arsenate and sulfide. The rate of arsenate reduction in lake water was dependent on the amount of available arsenate. We enriched for a bacterium that could achieve growth with sulfide and arsenate in a defined, mineral medium and purified it by serial dilution. The isolate, strain MLMS-1, is a gram-negative, motile curved rod that grows by oxidizing sulfide to sulfate while reducing arsenate to arsenite. Chemoautotrophy was confirmed by the incorporation of H14CO3- into dark-incubated cells, but preliminary gene probing tests with primers for ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase did not yield PCR-amplified products. Alignment of 16S rRNA sequences indicated that strain MLMS-1 was in the ??-Proteobacteria, located near sulfate reducers like Desulfobulbus sp. (88 to 90% similarity) but more closely related (97%) to unidentified sequences amplified previously from Mono Lake. However, strain MLMS-1 does not grow with sulfate as its electron acceptor.

  20. Dissimilatory arsenate reduction with sulfide as the electron donor--Experiments with Mono Lake water and isolation of strain MLMS-1, a chemoautotrophic arsenate-respirer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoeft, Shelley E.; Kulp, Thomas R.; Stolz, John F.; Hollibaugh, James T.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2004-01-01

    Anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, can biologically reduce added arsenate without any addition of electron donors. Of the possible in situ inorganic electron donors present, only sulfide was sufficiently abundant to drive this reaction. We tested the ability of sulfide to serve as an electron donor for arsenate reduction in experiments with lake water. Reduction of arsenate to arsenite occurred simultaneously with the removal of sulfide. No loss of sulfide occurred in controls without arsenate or in sterilized samples containing both arsenate and sulfide. The rate of arsenate reduction in lake water was dependent on the amount of available arsenate. We enriched for a bacterium that could achieve growth with sulfide and arsenate in a defined, mineral medium and purified it by serial dilution. The isolate, strain MLMS-1, is a gram-negative, motile curved rod that grows by oxidizing sulfide to sulfate while reducing arsenate to arsenite. Chemoautotrophy was confirmed by the incorporation of H14CO3− into dark-incubated cells, but preliminary gene probing tests with primers for ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase did not yield PCR-amplified products. Alignment of 16S rRNA sequences indicated that strain MLMS-1 was in the δ-Proteobacteria, located near sulfate reducers like Desulfobulbus sp. (88 to 90% similarity) but more closely related (97%) to unidentified sequences amplified previously from Mono Lake. However, strain MLMS-1 does not grow with sulfate as its electron acceptor.

  1. Olivine-Respiring Bacteria Isolated from the Rock-Ice Interface in a Lava-Tube Cave, a Mars Analog Environment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amy R.; Popa, Rodica; Boone, Jane; Fisk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The boundary between ice and basalt on Earth is an analogue for some near-surface environments of Mars. We investigated neutrophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms from the basalt-ice interface in a lava tube from the Oregon Cascades with perennial ice. One of the isolates (Pseudomonas sp. HerB) can use ferrous iron Fe(II) from the igneous mineral olivine as an electron donor and O2 as an electron acceptor. The optimum growth temperature is ∼12–14°C, but growth also occurs at 5°C. Bicarbonate is a facultative source of carbon. Growth of Pseudomonas sp. HerB as a chemolithotrophic iron oxidizer with olivine as the source of energy is favored in low O2 conditions (e.g., 1.6% O2). Most likely, microbial oxidation of olivine near pH 7 requires low O2 to offset the abiotic oxidation of iron. The metabolic capabilities of this bacterium would allow it to live in near-surface, icy, volcanic environments of Mars in the present or recent geological past and make this type of physiology a prime candidate in the search for life on Mars. Key Words: Extremophiles—Mars—Olivine—Iron-oxidizing bacteria—Redox. Astrobiology 12, 9–18. PMID:22165996

  2. Anaerobic growth of a "strict aerobe" (Bacillus subtilis).

    PubMed

    Nakano, M M; Zuber, P

    1998-01-01

    There was a long-held belief that the gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a strict aerobe. But recent studies have shown that B. subtilis will grow anaerobically, either by using nitrate or nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor, or by fermentation. How B. subtilis alters its metabolic activity according to the availability of oxygen and alternative electron acceptors is but one focus of study. A two-component signal transduction system composed of a sensor kinase, ResE, and a response regulator, ResD, occupies an early stage in the regulatory pathway governing anaerobic respiration. One of the essential roles of ResD and ResE in anaerobic gene regulation is induction of fnr transcription upon oxygen limitation. FNR is a transcriptional activator for anaerobically induced genes, including those for respiratory nitrate reductase, narGHJI.B. subtilis has two distinct nitrate reductases, one for the assimilation of nitrate nitrogen and the other for nitrate respiration. In contrast, one nitrite reductase functions both in nitrite nitrogen assimilation and nitrite respiration. Unlike many anaerobes, which use pyruvate formate lyase, B. subtilis can carry out fermentation in the absence of external electron acceptors wherein pyruvate dehydrogenase is utilized to metabolize pyruvate.

  3. Wetting increases respiration loss from the Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zona, Donatella; Lipson, David; Barott, Katie; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Oberbauer, Steven; Olivas, Paulo; Hastings, Steven; Hinzman, Larry; Oechel, Walter

    2010-05-01

    Numerous studies (Billings et al. 1982; Peterson et al. 1984; Oberbauer et al. 1991; Funk et al., 1994; Oechel et al., 1998) have demonstrated that decreasing soil moisture and increasing soil oxygen increase respiration loss in the Arctic tundra. Warming and drying of tundra soils due to climate change are assumed to increase greenhouse gas emissions and the potential for strong positive feedbacks on the climate of the Arctic. However, here we show that an increase in the water table can lead to the same result, increasing respiration. In the largest scale water table manipulation experiment ever performed in the Arctic tundra, we showed that increasing the water table to 7.5 cm above the surface caused the ecosystem to more than half its net C uptake (9 gCm-2season-1) compared to the 23 gCm-2season-1 of a control site where water table was about 2 cm below the surface. Standing water saturated the moss layer, increased the heat conduction into the soil, and lead to higher soil temperature, deeper thaw and, surprisingly, to higher respiration rates in the most anaerobic area of the manipulation experiment. Probably, the increase in thaw depth increased substrate availability and freed sufficient Fe(III) to act as an electron acceptor in place of oxygen for respiration and CO2 production in these anaerobic soils (Zehnder and Stumm 1988, Kappler et al. 2004, Lipson et al. in review). In contrast to the general assumption that aerobic peat soils release more CO2 than soils under anaerobic conditions (Billing et al., 1982; Funk et al., 1994; Bridgham et al., 1998), here we show that this is not always the case. That the increase in the water table can result in increased respiration, even under nearly fully anaerobic conditions, through previously underestimated pathways, highlights yet another unexpected positive feedback on climate change of carbon exchange in the Arctic. That anaerobic conditions do not necessarily prevent CO2 loss in permafrost areas has major

  4. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Hofman-Bang, J; Zheng, D; Westermann, P; Ahring, B K; Raskin, L

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible for these processes. Only a few percent of Bacteria and Archaea have so far been isolated, and almost nothing is known about the dynamics and interactions between these and other microorganisms. This lack of knowledge is most clearly exemplified by the sometimes unpredictable and unexplainable failures and malfunctions of anaerobic digesters occasionally experienced, leading to sub-optimal methane production and wastewater treatment. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we are able to determine which microorganisms are active, where they are active, and when they are active, but we still need to determine why and what they are doing. As genetic manipulations of anaerobes have been shown in only a few species permitting in-situ gene expression studies, the only way to elucidate the function of different microbes is to correlate the metabolic capabilities of isolated microbes in pure culture to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various specific nucleic acid probes are discussed and exemplified by studies of anaerobic granular sludge, biofilm and digester systems.

  5. Comparative In Vitro Activities of SMT19969, a New Antimicrobial Agent, against Clostridium difficile and 350 Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Aerobic and Anaerobic Intestinal Flora Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Merriam, C. Vreni

    2013-01-01

    The comparative in vitro activity of SMT19969, a novel, narrow-spectrum, nonabsorbable agent, was studied against 50 ribotype-defined Clostridium difficile strains, 174 Gram-positive and 136 Gram-negative intestinal anaerobes, and 40 Gram-positive aerobes. SMT19969 was one dilution more active against C. difficile isolates (MIC range, 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml; MIC90, 0.25 μg/ml), including ribotype 027 strains, than fidaxomicin (range, 0.06 to 1 μg/ml; MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml) and two to six dilutions lower than either vancomycin or metronidazole. SMT19969 and fidaxomicin were generally less active against Gram-negative anaerobes, especially the Bacteroides fragilis group species, than vancomycin and metronidazole, suggesting that SMT19969 has a lesser impact on the normal intestinal microbiota that maintain colonization resistance. SMT19969 showed limited activity against other Gram-positive anaerobes, including Bifidobacteria species, Eggerthella lenta, Finegoldia magna, and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, with MIC90s of >512, >512, 64, and 64 μg/ml, respectively. Clostridium species showed various levels of susceptibility, with C. innocuum being susceptible (MIC90, 1 μg/ml) and C. ramosum and C. perfringens being nonsusceptible (MIC90, >512 μg/ml). Activity against Lactobacillus spp. (range, 0.06 to >512 μg/ml; MIC90, >512 μg/ml) was comparable to that of fidaxomicin and varied by species and strain. Gram-positive aerobic cocci (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and streptococci) showed high SMT19969 MIC90 values (128 to >512 μg/ml). PMID:23877700

  6. Anaerobic bioprocessing of low rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.; Han, O.

    1991-01-01

    significant achievements were: (1) Coal decarboxylation was achieved by batch bioreactor systems using adapted anaerobic microbial consortium. (2) Two new isolates with coal decarboxylation potential were obtained from adapted microbial consortia. (3) CHN and TG anaysis of anaerobically biotreated coals have shown an increase in the H/C ratio and evolution rate of volatile carbon which could be a better feedstock for the liquefaction process.

  7. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The ars Detoxification System Is Advantageous but Not Required for As(V) Respiration by the Genetically Tractable Shewanella Species Strain ANA-3

    PubMed Central

    Saltikov, Chad W.; Cifuentes, Ana; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Newman, Dianne K.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenate [As(V); HAsO42−] respiration by bacteria is poorly understood at the molecular level largely due to a paucity of genetically tractable organisms with this metabolic capability. We report here the isolation of a new As(V)-respiring strain (ANA-3) that is phylogenetically related to members of the genus Shewanella and that also provides a useful model system with which to explore the molecular basis of As(V) respiration. This gram-negative strain stoichiometrically couples the oxidation of lactate to acetate with the reduction of As(V) to arsenite [As(III); HAsO2]. The generation time and lactate molar growth yield (Ylactate) are 2.8 h and 10.0 g of cells mol of lactate−1, respectively, when it is grown anaerobically on lactate and As(V). ANA-3 uses a wide variety of terminal electron acceptors, including oxygen, soluble ferric iron, oxides of iron and manganese, nitrate, fumarate, the humic acid functional analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate, and thiosulfate. ANA-3 also reduces As(V) to As(III) in the presence of oxygen and resists high concentrations of As(III) (up to 10 mM) when grown under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. ANA-3 possesses an ars operon (arsDABC) that allows it to resist high levels of As(III); this operon also confers resistance to the As-sensitive strains Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Escherichia coli AW3110. When the gene encoding the As(III) efflux pump, arsB, is inactivated in ANA-3 by a polar mutation that also eliminates the expression of arsC, which encodes an As(V) reductase, the resulting As(III)-sensitive strain still respires As(V); however, the generation time and the Ylactate value are two- and threefold lower, respectively, than those of the wild type. These results suggest that ArsB and ArsC may be useful for As(V)-respiring bacteria in environments where As concentrations are high, but that neither is required for respiration. PMID:12732551

  9. The ars detoxification system is advantageous but not required for As(V) respiration by the genetically tractable Shewanella species strain ANA-3.

    PubMed

    Saltikov, Chad W; Cifuentes, Ana; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Newman, Dianne K

    2003-05-01

    Arsenate [As(V); HAsO(4)(2-)] respiration by bacteria is poorly understood at the molecular level largely due to a paucity of genetically tractable organisms with this metabolic capability. We report here the isolation of a new As(V)-respiring strain (ANA-3) that is phylogenetically related to members of the genus Shewanella and that also provides a useful model system with which to explore the molecular basis of As(V) respiration. This gram-negative strain stoichiometrically couples the oxidation of lactate to acetate with the reduction of As(V) to arsenite [As(III); HAsO(2)]. The generation time and lactate molar growth yield (Y(lactate)) are 2.8 h and 10.0 g of cells mol of lactate(-1), respectively, when it is grown anaerobically on lactate and As(V). ANA-3 uses a wide variety of terminal electron acceptors, including oxygen, soluble ferric iron, oxides of iron and manganese, nitrate, fumarate, the humic acid functional analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate, and thiosulfate. ANA-3 also reduces As(V) to As(III) in the presence of oxygen and resists high concentrations of As(III) (up to 10 mM) when grown under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. ANA-3 possesses an ars operon (arsDABC) that allows it to resist high levels of As(III); this operon also confers resistance to the As-sensitive strains Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Escherichia coli AW3110. When the gene encoding the As(III) efflux pump, arsB, is inactivated in ANA-3 by a polar mutation that also eliminates the expression of arsC, which encodes an As(V) reductase, the resulting As(III)-sensitive strain still respires As(V); however, the generation time and the Y(lactate) value are two- and threefold lower, respectively, than those of the wild type. These results suggest that ArsB and ArsC may be useful for As(V)-respiring bacteria in environments where As concentrations are high, but that neither is required for respiration.

  10. Effects of cadmium on heart mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Kisling, G.M.; Kopp, S.J.; Paulson, D.J.; Tow, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effect of cadmium on isolated heart mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were rapidly prepared by polytroning hearts from male Sprague-Dawley rats in a 0.25 M Sucrose, 4 mM Tris, 1 mM EGTA, 0.2% BSA buffer (pH 7.4), followed by a two-part differential centrifugation. Mitochondria were resuspended in this same Tris-sucrose-BSA buffer minus EGTA and mitochondrial respiration was assayed using a Clark oxygen electrode system at a concentration of 0.5 mg total mitochondrial protein/ml assay buffer. At 5 x 10/sup -6/ M cadmium, mitochondrial state 3 respiration (pyruvate plus malate) was reduced to a level 74.8% of the control value. A 50% reduction in state 3 respiratory rate was achieved at a cadmium concentration of 8.75 x 10/sup -6/ M. The respiratory control ratio did not change significantly but at higher cadmium concentrations (< greater than or equal to 1.25 x 10/sup -5/ M) the ADP/O ratio was increased. None of the cadmium concentrations tested, from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ M, demonstrated an uncoupling response. These data suggest that cadmium acts strictly as an inhibitor of heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These results contrast those of earlier work involving liver mitochondria in which cadmium was reported to uncouple mitochondrial respiration.

  11. Anaerobic Catabolism of Aromatic Compounds: a Genetic and Genomic View

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, Manuel; Zamarro, María Teresa; Blázquez, Blas; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Juárez, Javier F.; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Barragán, María J. L.; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Aromatic compounds belong to one of the most widely distributed classes of organic compounds in nature, and a significant number of xenobiotics belong to this family of compounds. Since many habitats containing large amounts of aromatic compounds are often anoxic, the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds by microorganisms becomes crucial in biogeochemical cycles and in the sustainable development of the biosphere. The mineralization of aromatic compounds by facultative or obligate anaerobic bacteria can be coupled to anaerobic respiration with a variety of electron acceptors as well as to fermentation and anoxygenic photosynthesis. Since the redox potential of the electron-accepting system dictates the degradative strategy, there is wide biochemical diversity among anaerobic aromatic degraders. However, the genetic determinants of all these processes and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are much less studied. This review focuses on the recent findings that standard molecular biology approaches together with new high-throughput technologies (e.g., genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metagenomics) have provided regarding the genetics, regulation, ecophysiology, and evolution of anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways. These studies revealed that the anaerobic catabolism of aromatic compounds is more diverse and widespread than previously thought, and the complex metabolic and stress programs associated with the use of aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions are starting to be unraveled. Anaerobic biotransformation processes based on unprecedented enzymes and pathways with novel metabolic capabilities, as well as the design of novel regulatory circuits and catabolic networks of great biotechnological potential in synthetic biology, are now feasible to approach. PMID:19258534

  12. In situ spectroscopic investigation of hyperthermophilic metal-respiring archaea at high-temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménez, B.; Bureau, H.; Gouget, B.; Avoscan, L.; Simionovici, A.; Somogyi, A.

    2003-04-01

    The main issue of this study is developing methodologies that can improve abilities to characterize life in extreme habitats. In particular, it aims at evaluating the possibility of monitoring microorganisms mediated reactions involving metals by using non destructive X-ray microprobe combined with high pressure and temperature micro-reactors. The first step was dedicated to the study of metal-respiring organisms that achieve growth with oxyanions of arsenate and selenate as their electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic substrates or H2, forming elemental selenium or arsenite, respectively, as the reduction products. We focused on a strictly anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaea, Pyrobaculum arsenaticum, recently isolated and well adapted to high levels of arsenate and selenate (Huber et al., 2000, System. Appl. Microbiol., 23, 305). We report here the first in situ X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopic characterization of the oxidation state of selenium following microbial respiration at high temperature. A Basset-modified Hydrothermal Diamond Anvil Cell (HDAC) acts as anaerobic micro-reactor to reproduce extreme temperature and pressure conditions for life and allows, together with the direct visual observation of the organisms, the microbeam characterization of the changes of metal concentration and speciation induced by microbial activity. The measurements were performed at the ESRF on undulator beamline ID22. P. arsenaticum together with its culture medium, doped with selenate (50 μM), were loaded under N_2 atmosphere in the HDAC. High-resolution X-ray fluorescence and selenium K-edge XANES spectra were collected alternatively and continuously at high temperature (up to 95^oC), allowing for the time-resolved monitoring of the chemical evolution of the culture medium. Data processing is still in progress. In the long-term, our aim is, on one hand, to shed light on the tolerance in terms of temperature, pressure and metal

  13. Livestock Anaerobic Digester Database

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Anaerobic Digester Database provides basic information about anaerobic digesters on livestock farms in the United States, organized in Excel spreadsheets. It includes projects that are under construction, operating, or shut down.

  14. Biodegradation of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine and Its Mononitroso Derivative Hexahydro-1-Nitroso-3,5-Dinitro-1,3,5-Triazine by Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain SCZ-1 Isolated from an Anaerobic Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Shen; Halasz, Annamaria; Paquet, Louise; Beaulieu, Chantale; Hawari, Jalal

    2002-01-01

    In previous work, we found that an anaerobic sludge efficiently degraded hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), but the role of isolates in the degradation process was unknown. Recently, we isolated a facultatively anaerobic bacterium, identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae strain SCZ-1, using MIDI and the 16S rRNA method from this sludge and employed it to degrade RDX. Strain SCZ-1 degraded RDX to formaldehyde (HCHO), methanol (CH3OH) (12% of total C), carbon dioxide (CO2) (72% of total C), and nitrous oxide (N2O) (60% of total N) through intermediary formation of methylenedinitramine (O2NNHCH2NHNO2). Likewise, hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX) was degraded to HCHO, CH3OH, and N2O (16.5%) with a removal rate (0.39 μmol · h−1 · g [dry weight] of cells−1) similar to that of RDX (0.41 μmol · h−1 · g [dry weight] of cells−1) (biomass, 0.91 g [dry weight] of cells · liter−1). These findings suggested the possible involvement of a common initial reaction, possibly denitration, followed by ring cleavage and decomposition in water. The trace amounts of MNX detected during RDX degradation and the trace amounts of hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5-nitro-1,3,5-triazine detected during MNX degradation suggested that another minor degradation pathway was also present that reduced —NO2 groups to the corresponding —NO groups. PMID:12406722

  15. [Application of anaerobic bacteria detection in oral and maxillofacial infection].

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhen-ying; Lin, Qin; Meng, Yan-hong; He, Chun; Su, Jia-zeng; Peng, Xin

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the distribution and drug resistance of anaerobic bacteria in the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures from 61 specimens of pus from the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School of Stomatology were identified. The culture type was evaluated by API 20A kit and drug resistance test was performed by Etest method. The clinical data and antibacterial agents for the treatment of the 61 cases were collected, and the final outcomes were recorded. The bacteria cultures were isolated from all the specimens, with aerobic bacteria only in 6 cases (9.8%), anaerobic bacteria only in 7 cases (11.5%), and both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in 48 cases (78.7%). There were 55 infected cases (90.2%) with anaerobic bacteria, and 81 anaerobic bacteria stains were isolated. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram positive anaerobic bacteria could be found in Peptostreptococcus, Bifidobacterium and Pemphigus propionibacterium. No cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was detected in the above three Gram positive anaerobic bacteria. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram negative anaerobic bacteria could be detected in Porphyromonas and Prevotella. No metronidazole, cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was found in the two Gram negative anaerobic bacteria. In the study, 48 patients with oral and maxillofacial infection were treated according to the results of drug resistance testing, and the clinical cure rate was 81.3%. Mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures are very common in most oral and maxillofacial infection patients. Anaerobic bacteria culture and drug resistance testing play an important role in clinical treatment.

  16. A Diverse Community of Metal(loid) Oxide Respiring Bacteria Is Associated with Tube Worms in the Vicinity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Black Smoker Field.

    PubMed

    Maltman, Chris; Walter, Graham; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Epibiotic bacteria associated with tube worms living in the vicinity of deep sea hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean were investigated for the ability to respire anaerobically on tellurite, tellurate, selenite, selenate, metavanadate and orthovanadate as terminal electron acceptors. Out of 107 isolates tested, 106 were capable of respiration on one or more of these oxides, indicating that metal(loid) oxide based respiration is not only much more prevalent in nature than is generally believed, but also is an important mode of energy generation in the habitat. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed the bacterial community to be rich and highly diverse, containing many potentially new species. Furthermore, it appears that the worms not only possess a close symbiotic relationship with chemolithotrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, but also with the metal(loid) oxide transformers. Possibly they protect the worms through reduction of the toxic compounds that would otherwise be harmful to the host.

  17. A Diverse Community of Metal(loid) Oxide Respiring Bacteria Is Associated with Tube Worms in the Vicinity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Black Smoker Field

    PubMed Central

    Maltman, Chris; Walter, Graham; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Epibiotic bacteria associated with tube worms living in the vicinity of deep sea hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean were investigated for the ability to respire anaerobically on tellurite, tellurate, selenite, selenate, metavanadate and orthovanadate as terminal electron acceptors. Out of 107 isolates tested, 106 were capable of respiration on one or more of these oxides, indicating that metal(loid) oxide based respiration is not only much more prevalent in nature than is generally believed, but also is an important mode of energy generation in the habitat. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed the bacterial community to be rich and highly diverse, containing many potentially new species. Furthermore, it appears that the worms not only possess a close symbiotic relationship with chemolithotrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, but also with the metal(loid) oxide transformers. Possibly they protect the worms through reduction of the toxic compounds that would otherwise be harmful to the host. PMID:26914590

  18. Quinolone activity against anaerobes.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, P C

    1999-01-01

    The first generation of fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin are inactive against most anaerobic bacteria. However, some broad-spectrum quinolones, which have recently become clinically available or are under active development, have significant antianaerobic activity. This review summarises the in vitro activity of currently available, as well as experimental, quinolones against clinically significant anaerobic bacteria. Quinolones with low activity against anaerobes include ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, fleroxacin, pefloxacin, enoxacin and lomefloxacin. Compounds with intermediate antianaerobic activity include sparfloxacin and grepafloxacin. Trovafloxacin, gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin yield low MICs against most groups of anaerobes. Quinolones with the greatest in vitro activity against anaerobes include clinafloxacin and sitafloxacin (DU-6859a).

  19. REGULATORY MECHANISMS OF CELLULAR RESPIRATION

    PubMed Central

    Barron, E. S. Guzman; Nelson, Leonard; Ardao, Maria Isabel

    1948-01-01

    Oxidizing agents of sulfhydryl groups such as iodosobenzoate, alkylating agents such as iodoacetamide, and mercaptide-forming agents such as cadmium chloride, mercuric chloride, p-chloromercuribenzoate, sodium arsenite, and p-carboxyphenylarsine oxide, added in small concentrations to a suspension of sea urchin sperm produced an increase in respiration. When the concentration was increased there was an inhibition. These effects are explained by postulating the presence in the cells of two kinds of sulfhydryl groups: soluble sulfhydryl groups, which regulate cellular respiration, and fixed sulfhydryl groups, present in the protein moiety of enzymes. Small concentrations of sulfhydryl reagents combine only with the first, thus producing an increase in respiration; when the concentration is increased, the fixed sulfhydryl groups are also attacked and inhibition of respiration is the consequence. Other inhibitors of cell respiration, such as cyanide and urethanes, which do not combine with —SH groups, did not stimulate respiration in small concentration. PMID:18891144

  20. C4-Dicarboxylate Utilization in Aerobic and Anaerobic Growth.

    PubMed

    Unden, Gottfried; Strecker, Alexander; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Kim, Ok Bin

    2016-06-01

    C4-dicarboxylates and the C4-dicarboxylic amino acid l-aspartate support aerobic and anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli and related bacteria. In aerobic growth, succinate, fumarate, D- and L-malate, L-aspartate, and L-tartrate are metabolized by the citric acid cycle and associated reactions. Because of the interruption of the citric acid cycle under anaerobic conditions, anaerobic metabolism of C4-dicarboxylates depends on fumarate reduction to succinate (fumarate respiration). In some related bacteria (e.g., Klebsiella), utilization of C4-dicarboxylates, such as tartrate, is independent of fumarate respiration and uses a Na+-dependent membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Uptake of the C4-dicarboxylates into the bacteria (and anaerobic export of succinate) is achieved under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by different sets of secondary transporters. Expression of the genes for C4-dicarboxylate metabolism is induced in the presence of external C4-dicarboxylates by the membrane-bound DcuS-DcuR two-component system. Noncommon C4-dicarboxylates like l-tartrate or D-malate are perceived by cytoplasmic one-component sensors/transcriptional regulators. This article describes the pathways of aerobic and anaerobic C4-dicarboxylate metabolism and their regulation. The citric acid cycle, fumarate respiration, and fumarate reductase are covered in other articles and discussed here only in the context of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism. Recent aspects of C4-dicarboxylate metabolism like transport, sensing, and regulation will be treated in more detail. This article is an updated version of an article published in 2004 in EcoSal Plus. The update includes new literature, but, in particular, the sections on the metabolism of noncommon C4-dicarboxylates and their regulation, on the DcuS-DcuR regulatory system, and on succinate production by engineered E. coli are largely revised or new.

  1. Identification, distribution, and toxigenicity of obligate anaerobes in polluted waters.

    PubMed Central

    Daily, O P; Joseph, S W; Gillmore, J D; Colwell, R R; Seidler, R J

    1981-01-01

    A seasonal occurrence of obligately anaerobic bacteria, predominantly of the genera Bacteroides and Clostridium, in a polluted water site has been observed. The number of anaerobes varied from 1.8 X 10(3) cells/ml in the warmer months to 10 cells/ml in winter. Several isolates were toxigenic, indicating a potential human health hazard. PMID:7235706

  2. Cytochrome c Biogenesis Genes Involved in Arsenate Respiration by Shewanella trabarsenatis ANA-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, D. K.

    2002-12-01

    Arsenate can be used as a terminal electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration by diverse bacteria. The detection of these bacteria in numerous contaminated environments suggests that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Arsenate-respiring bacteria have been implicated in the mobilization of arsenic from arsenic-contaminated sediments. However, the enzymatic mechanisms supporting arsenate respiration are largely unknown. Here, we describe c-type cytochromes that are involved in arsenate respiration by the bacterium Shewanella trabarsenatis strain ANA-3, a facultative anaerobe that is able to use a variety of electron acceptors for growth. We performed transposon mutagenesis to study the electron transport pathway in ANA-3 during arsenate respiration. 10 arsenate-respiration deficient mutants were found after screening up to 7,000 mutants, and 4 were shown to have unique transposon insertions through Southern Blot analysis. The physiological properties of these mutants were determined, including characterization of their growth on different electron acceptors. The genes flanking the transposon insertions were sequenced for each mutant, and several were found to encode c-type cytochrome biogenesis genes. UV/VIS spectra and SDS/PAGE were used to confirm the absence of c-type cytochromes in the mutants. Based on these findings, we proposed a model for respiratory electron transport to arsenate.

  3. Quinone-reactive proteins devoid of haem b form widespread membrane-bound electron transport modules in bacterial respiration.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Kern, Melanie

    2008-10-01

    Many quinone-reactive enzyme complexes that are part of membrane-integral eukaryotic or prokaryotic respiratory electron transport chains contain one or more haem b molecules embedded in the membrane. In recent years, various novel proteins have emerged that are devoid of haem b but are thought to fulfil a similar function in bacterial anaerobic respiratory systems. These proteins are encoded by genes organized in various genomic arrangements and are thought to form widespread membrane-bound quinone-reactive electron transport modules that exchange electrons with redox partner proteins located at the outer side of the cytoplasmic membrane. Prototypic representatives are the multihaem c-type cytochromes NapC, NrfH and TorC (NapC/NrfH family), the putative iron-sulfur protein NapH and representatives of the NrfD/PsrC family. Members of these protein families vary in the number of their predicted transmembrane segments and, consequently, diverse quinone-binding sites are expected. Only a few of these enzymes have been isolated and characterized biochemically and high-resolution structures are limited. This mini-review briefly summarizes predicted and experimentally demonstrated properties of the proteins in question and discusses their role in electron transport and bioenergetics of anaerobic respiration.

  4. Respiration Capacity of the Fermenting Bacterium Lactococcus lactis and Its Positive Effects on Growth and Survival†

    PubMed Central

    Duwat, Patrick; Sourice, Sophie; Cesselin, Bénédicte; Lamberet, Gilles; Vido, Karin; Gaudu, Philippe; Le Loir, Yves; Violet, Florent; Loubière, Pascal; Gruss, Alexandra

    2001-01-01

    Oxygen is a major determinant of both survival and mortality of aerobic organisms. For the facultative anaerobe Lactococcus lactis, oxygen has negative effects on both growth and survival. We show here that oxygen can be beneficial to L. lactis if heme is present during aerated growth. The growth period is extended and long-term survival is markedly improved compared to results obtained under the usual fermentation conditions. We considered that improved growth and survival could be due to the capacity of L. lactis to undergo respiration. To test this idea, we confirmed that the metabolic behavior of lactococci in the presence of oxygen and hemin is consistent with respiration and is most pronounced late in growth. We then used a genetic approach to show the following. (i) The cydA gene, encoding cytochrome d oxidase, is required for respiration and plays a direct role in oxygen utilization. cydA expression is induced late in growth under respiration conditions. (ii) The hemZ gene, encoding ferrochelatase, which converts protoporphyrin IX to heme, is needed for respiration if the precursor, rather than the final heme product, is present in the medium. Surprisingly, survival improved by respiration is observed in a superoxide dismutase-deficient strain, a result which emphasizes the physiological differences between fermenting and respiring lactococci. These studies confirm respiratory metabolism in L. lactis and suggest that this organism may be better adapted to respiration than to traditional fermentative metabolism. PMID:11443085

  5. Isolation and in vitro phosphorylation of sensory transduction components controlling anaerobic induction of light harvesting and reaction center gene expression in Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Kouadio, J L; Mosley, C S; Bauer, C E

    1995-01-17

    Anaerobic induction of light harvesting and reaction center gene expression involves two transacting factors termed RegA and RegB. Sequence and mutational analysis has indicated that RegA and RegB constitute cognate components of a prokaryotic sensory transduction cascade with RegB comprising a membrane-spanning sensor kinase and RegA a cytosolic response regulator. In this study we have purified RegA, as well as a truncated portion of RegB (RegB') and undertaken an in vitro analysis of autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer activities. Incubation of RegB' with [gamma-32P]ATP and MgCl2 resulted in phosphorylation of RegB' (RegB' approximately P) over a 20-min incubation period. Incubation of RegB' approximately P with RegA resulted in rapid transfer of the phosphate from RegB' to RegA. In analogy to other characterized prokaryotic sensory transduction components, mutational and chemical stability studies also in