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Sample records for anal canal cancer

  1. Surveillance of Anal Canal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is most frequently a locoregional disease that is amenable to curative therapy in a majority of fit patients. Complete response rates after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) are good, with up to 75% of patients with no evidence of relapse on surveillance. Relapse is most frequently locoregional and is often amendable to salvage surgery with curative intent. Effective surveillance attempts to improve outcomes by identifying recurrent or persistent disease early, managing both acute and late toxicities, and offering reassurance to patients. This article explores the rationale and evidence for surveillance programs after definitive CRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Anal cancer Overview Anal cancer is an uncommon type of cancer that occurs in the anal canal. The anal canal is a short tube at the end ... your rectum through which stool leaves your body. Anal cancer can cause signs and symptoms such as ...

  3. Cancer of the anal canal and local control.

    PubMed

    Valentini, V; Mantello, G; Luzi, S; Macchia, G; Manfrida, S; Smaniotto, D

    1998-01-01

    Concomitant radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. It can afford a high local control rate though the same impact has not been observed on survival. A few reports have concerned the impact of local control on distant metastases and survival. From 1988 to 1998 at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 30 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal were treated for cure. Treatment consisted of two cycles of radiotherapy (23.4 Gy) with a 4-5 week split in each cycle. 5FU (100 mg/sqm/24 h) was administered in continuous infusion for the first 4 days of therapy; mitomycin C (10 mg/sqm bolus) was administered on day 1, 4-6 weeks after the end of cycle 2 of concomitant radiochemotherapy, patients received a boost of interstitial brachytherapy. Local control on T of all patients was 84% at 5 years. Six patients showed locoregional recurrence: 3 recurrences on T and 4 disease progressions in locoregional lymph nodes. 3 of 6 patients underwent salvage surgery. The initial extent of the disease, the patient's age and brachytherapy boost did not have a statistically significant influence on local control. Two of the 30 patients showed liver metastases, and at their appearance, one patient was free of local disease while the other showed locoregional progression after Miles' operation for salvage. The metastasis-free interval was not significantly influenced by local control, although at 5 years, 96% of patients with local control of T were free of metastases vs 75% of those with recurrence on T (p = 0.22). Overall actuarial survival at 5 years was 75%. The behavior of survival in our experience seemed to be significantly influenced by local control: in the group with local control, 5-year survival was 85% vs 40% of patients with local recurrence (p = 0.01).

  4. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - anus; Squamous cell carcinoma - anal; HPV - anal cancer ... Anal cancer can start anywhere in the anus. Where it starts determines the kind of cancer it is. Squamous cell carcinoma. This is the most common type of anal cancer. It ...

  5. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  6. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2345 Phone Search Search Category Cancer A-Z Anal Cancer If you have anal cancer or are close to someone who does, ... cope. Here you can find out all about anal cancer, including risk factors, symptoms, how it is ...

  7. Metachronous Anal Canal and Prostate Cancers with Simultaneous Definitive Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Edward F.; Jacimore, Laura L.; Nelson, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Anal canal cancer is rare, accounting for only 1.3% of all gastrointestinal tract malignancies. Prostate cancer incidence is much higher and accounts for 27.6% of all malignancies in men. Treatment guidelines for anal cancer involve radiotherapy to the primary site and draining lymphatics while treatment for prostate cancer can also include pelvic radiotherapy. The literature is silent on the optimum course of action when these two malignancies are found synchronously or metachronously. Herein, we report a case of a patient diagnosed with intermediate risk prostate cancer who, prior to definitive therapy for this first malignancy, was also diagnosed with anal canal cancer. We conclude that a simultaneous approach with radiation therapy and chemotherapy with subsequent boost to the prostate is recommended. Screening for synchronous prostate cancer in male anal canal cancer patients is probably indicated and may preclude suboptimal treatment for a second occult primary. PMID:22606449

  8. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Anal Cancer Anal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Anal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Anal Cancer Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Screening ...

  9. A phase II clinical study to assess the feasibility of self and partner anal examinations to detect anal canal abnormalities including anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Nyitray, Alan G; Hicks, Joseph T; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Baraniuk, Sarah; White, Margaret; Millas, Stefanos; Onwuka, Nkechi; Zhang, Xiaotao; Brown, Eric L; Ross, Michael W; Chiao, Elizabeth Y

    2017-08-23

    Anal cancer is a common cancer among men who have sex with men (MSM); however, there is no standard screening protocol for anal cancer. We conducted a phase II clinical trial to assess the feasibility of teaching MSM to recognise palpable masses in the anal canal which is a common sign of anal cancer in men. A clinician skilled in performing digital anorectal examinations (DARE) used a pelvic manikin to train 200 MSM, aged 27-78 years, how to do a self-anal examination (SAE) for singles or a partner anal examination (PAE) for couples. The clinician then performed a DARE without immediately disclosing results, after which the man or couple performed an SAE or PAE, respectively. Percentage agreement with the clinician DARE in addition to sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for the SAE, PAE and overall. Men had a median age of 52 years, 42.5% were African American and 60.5% were HIV positive. DARE detected abnormalities in 12 men while the men's SAE/PAEs detected 9 of these. A total of 93.0% of men classified the health of their anal canal correctly (95% CI 89.5 to 96.5). Overall percentage agreement, sensitivity and specificity were 93.0%, 75.0% and 94.2%, respectively, while PPV and NPV were 45.0% and 98.3%, respectively. The six men who detected the abnormality had nodules/masses ≥3 mm in size. More than half of men (60.5%) reported never checking their anus for an abnormality; however, after performing an SAE/PAE, 93.0% said they would repeat it in the future. These results suggest that tumours of ≥3 mm may be detectable by self or partner palpation among MSM and encourage further investigation given literature suggesting a high cure rate for anal cancer tumours ≤10 mm. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. The anal canal as a risk organ in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyunsoo; Baek, Jong Geun; Jo, Sunmi

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients with cervical cancer undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. However, patients with hemorrhoids may be troubled with low radiation dose. We tried to analyze the dose-volume statistics of the anal canal in patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. The records of 31 patients with cervical cancer who received definite or postoperative radiotherapy at one institution were reviewed. Acute anal symptoms, such as anal pain and bleeding, were evaluated from radiotherapy start to 1 month after radiotherapy completion. Various clinical and dosimetric factors were analyzed to characterize relations with acute anal complications. The anal verge was located an average of 1.2 cm (range -0.6~3.9) below the lower border of the ischial tuberosity and an average of 2.7 cm (range -0.6~5.7) behind the sacral promontory level. The presence of hemorrhoids before radiotherapy was found to be significantly associated with acute radiation-induced anal symptoms (p = 0.001), and the mean induction dose for anal symptoms was 36.9 Gy. No patient without hemorrhoids developed an anal symptom during radiotherapy. Dosimetric analyses of V30 and V40 showed marginal correlations with anal symptoms (p = 0.07). The present study suggests a relation between acute anal symptoms following radiotherapy and acute hemorrhoid aggravation. Furthermore, the location of the anal verge was found to be variable, and consequently doses administered to the anal canal also varied substantially. Our results caution careful radiation treatment planning for whole pelvic radiotherapy, and that proper clinical management be afforded patients with hemorrhoids during radiotherapy.

  11. Clinical and treatment factors associated with vaginal stenosis after definitive chemoradiation for anal canal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirabeau-Beale, Kristina; Hong, Theodore S; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Crowley, Elizabeth M; Cusack, James C; Drapek, Lorraine C; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Markowski, Meghan; Napolitano, Brian; Nyamwanda, Jacqueline; Ryan, David P; Wolfgang, John; Kachnic, Lisa A; Wo, Jennifer Y

    2015-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the incidence of vaginal stenosis (VS) and identify clinical and treatment factors that predict for VS in female patients with anal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation. The cohort included 95 consecutive women receiving definitive chemoradiation between 2003 and 2012. All but 1 received intensity modulated radiation therapy; median primary tumor dose 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4-60). A modified National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4 was used to score VS based on the medical record description of dyspareunia, pain with dilator use, vaginal dryness, or difficult pelvic examination. Ordered logistic regression was performed to assess VS predictors. Median age was 60.4 years (range, 19-97). With median follow-up of 2.5 years, 70 women (74%) had adequate information to assess VS. Of these, VS grade distribution was 21.4% grade 0, 14.3% grade 1, 27.1% grade 2, and 37.1% grade 3. By multivariable ordered logistic regression, younger age (P = .02), higher tumor dose (P = .06), and earlier treatment year (P = .04) were associated with higher grade of VS. VS is a common late complication in women treated definitively with chemoradiation for anal canal cancer. Younger age, higher tumor dose, and earlier year of treatment were associated with a higher grade of stenosis. Prospective investigation into patient reported outcomes is warranted, including sexual function and VS prevention strategies to better understand its effect on long-term survivorship. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nivolumab After Combined Modality Therapy in Treating Patients With High Risk Stage II-IIIB Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Margin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage III Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer AJCC v6 and v7

  13. Pathology of Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paulo M; Coudry, Renata; Moniz, Camila Motta Venchiarutti

    2017-01-01

    Anal canal cancer is rather an uncommon disease but its incidence is increasing. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most frequent primary anal neoplasm and can encompass a variety of morphologies. HPV infection has a key role in precancerous lesions and cancer development by the production of E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Anal squamous precancerous lesions are now classified according to the same criteria and terminology as their cervical counterparts. The p16 expression by immunohistochemistry is a surrogate marker for human papilloma virus (HPV). Many other tumor types can arise in the anal canal, including adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors, malignant melanomas, lymphomas and various types of mesenchymal tumors. For differential diagnosis, immunostaining markers such as CK5/6 and p63 can be used to distinguish SCC and CK7 for adenocarcinoma. Other classical panels can also be applied as in other locations. Currently, there are no biomarkers able to predict prognosis or response to treatment in clinical practice.

  14. Dose planning objectives in anal canal cancer IMRT: the TROG ANROTAT experience

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Elizabeth; Cray, Alison; Haworth, Annette; Chander, Sarat; Lin, Robert; Subramanian, Brindha; Ng, Michael

    2015-06-15

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is ideal for anal canal cancer (ACC), delivering high doses to irregular tumour volumes whilst minimising dose to surrounding normal tissues. Establishing achievable dose objectives is a challenge. The purpose of this paper was to utilise data collected in the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Treatments and Technologies (ANROTAT) project to evaluate the feasibility of ACC IMRT dose planning objectives employed in the Australian situation. Ten Australian centres were randomly allocated three data sets from 15 non-identifiable computed tomography data sets representing a range of disease stages and gender. Each data set was planned by two different centres, producing 30 plans. All tumour and organ at risk (OAR) contours, prescription and dose constraint details were provided. Dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for each plan were analysed to evaluate the feasibility of dose planning objectives provided. All dose planning objectives for the bone marrow (BM) and femoral heads were achieved. Median planned doses exceeded one or more objectives for bowel, external genitalia and bladder. This reached statistical significance for bowel V30 (P = 0.04), V45 (P < 0.001), V50 (P < 0.001), external genitalia V20 (P < 0.001) and bladder V35 (P < 0.001), V40 (P = 0.01). Gender was found to be the only significant factor in the likelihood of achieving the bowel V50 (P = 0.03) and BM V30 constraints (P = 0.04). The dose planning objectives used in the ANROTAT project provide a good starting point for ACC IMRT planning. To facilitate clinical implementation, it is important to prioritise OAR objectives and recognise factors that affect the achievability of these objectives.

  15. Relationship Among Anal Sphincter Injury, Patulous Anal Canal, and Anal Pressures in Patients with Anorectal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, David; Harvey, Doris M.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The anal sphincters and puborectalis are routinely imaged with an endoanal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil, which does not assess co-aptation of the anal canal at rest. Using a MRI torso coil, we identified a patulous anal canal in some patients with anorectal disorders. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between anal sphincter and puborectalis injury, a patulous anal canal, and anal pressures. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 119 patients who underwent MRI and manometry analysis of anal anatomy and pressures, respectively, from February 2011 through March 2013 at the Mayo Clinic. Anal pressures were determined by high-resolution manometry, anal sphincter and puborectalis injury was determined by endoanal MRI, and anal canal integrity was determined by torso MRI. Associations between manometric and anatomical parameters were evaluated with univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Fecal incontinence (55 patients, 46%) and constipation (36 patients. 30%) were the main indications for testing; 49 patients (41%) had a patulous anal canal, which was associated with injury to more than 1 muscle (all P≤.001) and internal sphincter (P<.01), but not puborectalis (P=.09) or external sphincter (P=.06) injury. Internal (P<.01) and external sphincter injury (P=.02) and a patulous canal (P<.001), but not puborectalis injury, predicted anal resting pressure. A patulous anal canal was the only significant predictor (P<.01) of the anal squeeze pressure increment. Conclusions Patients with anorectal disorders commonly have a patulous anal canal, associated with more severe anal injury, anal resting pressure, and squeeze pressure increment. It is therefore important to identify patulous anal canal because it appears to be a marker of not only anal sphincter injury but disturbances beyond sphincter injury, such as damage to the anal cushions or anal denervation. PMID:25869638

  16. Relationship Among Anal Sphincter Injury, Patulous Anal Canal, and Anal Pressures in Patients With Anorectal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Prichard, David; Harvey, Doris M; Fletcher, Joel G; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Bharucha, Adil E

    2015-10-01

    The anal sphincters and puborectalis are imaged routinely with an endoanal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil, which does not assess co-aptation of the anal canal at rest. By using a MRI torso coil, we identified a patulous anal canal in some patients with anorectal disorders. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between anal sphincter and puborectalis injury, a patulous anal canal, and anal pressures. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 119 patients who underwent MRI and manometry analysis of anal anatomy and pressures, respectively, from February 2011 through March 2013 at the Mayo Clinic. Anal pressures were determined by high-resolution manometry, anal sphincter and puborectalis injury was determined by endoanal MRI, and anal canal integrity was determined by torso MRI. Associations between manometric and anatomic parameters were evaluated with univariate and multivariate analyses. Fecal incontinence (55 patients; 46%) and constipation (36 patients; 30%) were the main indications for testing; 49 patients (41%) had a patulous anal canal, which was associated with injury to more than 1 muscle (all P ≤ .001), and internal sphincter (P < .01), but not puborectalis (P = .09) or external sphincter (P = .06), injury. Internal (P < .01) and external sphincter injury (P = .02) and a patulous canal (P < .001), but not puborectalis injury, predicted anal resting pressure. A patulous anal canal was the only significant predictor (P < .01) of the anal squeeze pressure increment. Patients with anorectal disorders commonly have a patulous anal canal, which is associated with more severe anal injury and independently predicted anal resting pressure and squeeze pressure increment. It therefore is important to identify a patulous anal canal because it appears to be a marker of not only anal sphincter injury but disturbances beyond sphincter injury, such as damage to the anal cushions or anal denervation. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  17. MITHRA – multiparametric MR/CT image adapted brachytherapy (MR/CT-IABT) in anal canal cancer: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Manfrida, Stefania; Barbaro, Brunella; Colangione, Maria Maddalena; Masiello, Valeria; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Placidi, Elisa; Autorino, Rosa; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Chiesa, Silvia; Mantini, Giovanna; Kovács, György; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to test a novel multiparametric imaging guided procedure for high-dose-rate brachytherapy in anal canal cancer, in order to evaluate the feasibility and safety. Material and methods For this analysis, we considered all consecutive patients who underwent magnetic resonance/computed tomography image adapted brachytherapy (MR/CT-IABT) treated from February 2012 to July 2014. To conduct this project, we formed a working group that established the procedure and identified the indicators and benchmarks to evaluate the feasibility and safety. We considered the procedure acceptable if 90% of the indicators were consistent with the benchmarks. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast and diffusion weighted imaging were performed with an MRI-compatible dummy applicator in the anus to define the position of the clinical target volume disease and biological information. A pre-implantation treatment planning was created in order to get information on the optimal position of the needles. Afterwards, the patient underwent a simulation CT and the definite post-implantation treatment planning was created. Results We treated 11 patients (4 men and 7 women) with MR/CT-IABT and we performed a total of 13 procedures. The analysis of indicators for procedure evaluation showed that all indicators were in agreement with the benchmark. The dosimetric analysis resulted in a median of V200, V150, V100, V90, V85, respectively of 24.6%, 53.4%, 93.5%, 97.6%, and 98.7%. The median coverage index (CI) was 0.94, the median dose homogeneity index (DHI) was 0.43, the median dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR) resulted 0.56, the median overdose volume index (ODI) was 0.27. We observed no episodes of common severe acute toxicities. Conclusions Brachytherapy is a possible option in anal cancer radiotherapy to perform the boost to complete external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance can also have biological advantages compared to the US. Our results suggest that

  18. Conformal Therapy Improves the Therapeutic Index of Patients with Anal Canal Cancer Treated with Combined Chemotherapy and External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vuong, Te . E-mail: te.vuong@muhc.mcgill.ca; Kopek, Neil; Ducruet, Thierry; Portelance, Lorraine; Faria, Sergio; Bahoric, Boris; Devic, Slobodan

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with anal canal cancer, in terms of local control (LC), freedom from relapse (FFR), and overall survival (OS) rates, and to estimate long-term toxicity data. Methods and Materials: Sixty historical patients, treated with conventional radiation techniques (C-RT), were used as controls, and 62 consecutive patients were treated with 3D-CRT. Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 54 Gy in 30 fractions delivered continuously, compared with 45-58.9 Gy (median dose, 54 Gy) in a split course in patients treated with C-RT. Chemotherapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil with either mitomycin-C or cis-platinum given concurrently with radiation. Survival curves were performed using the Kaplan-Meier model, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis of risk factors. Results: No differences in stage and age distribution were observed between the two groups. Patients treated with 3D-CRT and C-RT had an actuarial 5-year LC rate of 85.1% and 61.1%, respectively (p = 0.0056); the FFR rate was 70.2% and 46.1% (p = 0.0166), and the OS rate was 80.7% and 53.9% (p = 0.0171). In multivariate analysis, factors of significance for LC were nodal (N) status (p < 0.001); for OS, 3D-CRT (p = 0.038), N status (p 0.011), and T status (p = 0.012); and for FFR, 3D-CRT (p = 0.024) and N status (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The use of 3D-CRT allows patients with anal canal cancer to complete radiation and chemotherapy without interruption for toxicity, with significant improvements in LC, FFR, and OS.

  19. Radiation therapy of anal canal cancer: from conformal therapy to volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Angelo; Cozzi, Luca; Iftode, Cristina; Ascolese, Annamaria; Campisi, Maria Concetta; Clerici, Elena; Comito, Tiziana; De Rose, Fiorenza; Fogliata, Antonella; Franzese, Ciro; Mancosu, Pietro; Navarria, Piera; Tomatis, Stefano; Villa, Elisa; Scorsetti, Marta

    2014-11-18

    To appraise the role of volumetric modulated arc (RapidArc, RA) in the treatment of anal canal carcinoma (ACC). A retrospective analysis has been conducted on 36 patients treated with RA since 2009 comparing outcome against a group of 28 patients treated with conformal therapy (CRT). RA treatments were prescribed with SIB technique with 59.4 Gy to the primary tumor and nodes and 49.5 Gy to the elective nodes. CRT was sequentially delivered with 45 Gy to the pelvic target and a boost of 14.4 Gy to the primary tumor. Median age of patients was 65 yrs for RA (59 yrs for CRT); 90% had Stage II-III (93% in the CRT group). No statistically significant differences were observed concerning survival or control. 5 yrs disease specific survival was 85.7% and 81.2%, loco-regional control was of 78.1% and 82.1% for RA and CRT respectively. RA treatments lead to lower incidence of higher grade of toxicity events (all retrospectively retrieved from charts as worse events). Grade 2-3 toxicity, compared to CRT, reduced from 89% to 68% for GI, from 39% to 33% for GU and from 82% to 75% for the skin. Late toxicity was as follows: 5/36 (14%) and 3/36 (8%) patients had G1 or G2 GI toxicity in the RA group (1/28 (4%) and 4/28 (14%) in the CRT group). GU late toxicity was observed only in 4/28 (14%) patients of the CRT group: 3/28 (11%) had G2 and 1/28 (4%) had G1. RA treatments of ACC patients proved to be equally effective than CRT but it was associated to a reduction of toxicity.

  20. Neoplasms of Anal Canal and Perianal Skin

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Daniel; Beddy, David; Dozois, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Tumors of the anus and perianal skin are rare. Their presentation can vary and often mimics common benign anal pathology, thereby delaying diagnosis and appropriate and timely treatment. The anatomy of this region is complex because it represents the progressive transition from the digestive system to the skin with many different co-existing types of cells and tissues. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal is the most frequent tumor found in the anal and perianal region. Less-frequent lesions include Bowen's and Paget's disease, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and adenocarcinoma. This article aims to review the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options for neoplasms of the anal canal and perianal skin. PMID:22379406

  1. Impact of facility volume on outcomes in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal: Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed

    Amini, Arya; Jones, Bernard L; Ghosh, Debashis; Schefter, Tracey E; Goodman, Karyn A

    2017-01-01

    Given the rarity of anal cancer and the technical aspects involved in radiation (RT) planning, the authors conducted a population-based analysis evaluating the impact of radiation oncology facility volume on overall survival (OS) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for patients with SCC of the anal canal who underwent RT. All patients were coded as having received their entire course of RT at the NCDB reporting facility. Facility volume was categorized into tertiles (low, intermediate, and high) and was based on the number of times a facility's unique identification code appeared. In total, 13,550 patients were identified. Patients who received treatment at higher volume radiation oncology facilities had longer OS based on multivariate analysis (MVA) (hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-0.90; P < .001) and propensity score matching analysis (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.69-0.91; P < .001). For patients who received treatment at low-volume, intermediate-volume, and high-volume centers, the 5-year OS rate was 70%, 72.2%, and 75.4%, respectively (P < .001). Compared with low/intermediate-volume radiation oncology centers, high-volume centers were more likely to treat patients with concurrent chemotherapy (odds ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.07-1.51; P = .006) and less likely to have treatment delays leading to an RT duration of >45 days (odds ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.69-0.80; P < .001). Treatment at higher volume radiation oncology centers appears to be associated with improved OS in patients with SCC of the anal canal. These results likely reflect the relation between physician experience and delivery of high-quality RT, which perhaps is best evident in rare tumors such as anal SCC. Cancer 2017;123:228-236. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  2. Human papillomavirus genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic factors for patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Skovrider-Ruminski, Wojciech; Høgdall, Estrid; Geertsen, Poul Flemming; Havsteen, Hanne

    2014-06-10

    Carcinomas of the anal canal are strongly associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Expression of p16 is used as a surrogate marker of HPV infection. In a retrospective study, we evaluated HPV genotyping and p16 expression as prognostic markers of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in patients diagnosed with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal. HPV genotyping polymerase chain reaction (high-risk subtypes 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58) and immunohistochemical expression of p16 were analyzed by using paraffin-embedded tumor biopsies from 143 anal carcinomas. The patients were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. HPV16 was detected in 81.0% of the tumors, followed by HPV33 (5.1%), HPV18 (2.2%), and HPV58 (0.7%). p16 positivity was found in 92.9% of the tumors. In univariable survival analysis, HPV positivity was significantly correlated with improved OS (74% v 52%; P=.036) and DSS (84% v 52%; P=.002), and p16 positivity was significantly correlated with improved OS (76% v 30%; P<.001) and DSS (85% v 30%; P<.001). In multivariable COX analysis that included HPV status, p16 status, sex, T stage, N stage, and treatment, p16 positivity remained an independent prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.61; P=.016) and DSS (HR, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.53; P=.011). p16 positivity is an independent prognostic factor for OS and DSS in patients with AJCC stages I to III carcinoma of the anal canal. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  3. Premalignant Lesions of the Anal Canal and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Juan Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anus (SCCA) is a rare tumor. However, its incidence has been increasing in men and women over the past 25 years worldwide. Risk factors associated with this cancer are those behaviors that predispose individuals to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and immunosuppression. Anal cancer is generally preceded by high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), which is most prevalent in human immunodeficiency virus-positive men who have sex with men. High-risk patients may benefit from screening. The most common presentation is rectal bleeding, which is present in nearly 50% of patients. Twenty percent of patients have no symptoms at the time of presentation. Clinical staging of anal cancer requires a digital rectal exam and a positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Endorectal/endoanal ultrasound appears to add more-specific staging information when compared with digital rectal examination alone. Treatment of anal cancer prior to the 1970s involved an abdominoperineal resection. However, the current standard of care for localized anal cancer is concurrent chemoradiation therapy, primarily because of its sphincter-saving and colostomy-sparing potential. Studies have addressed alternative chemoradiation regimens to improve the standard protocol of fluorouracil, misogynic, and radiation, but no alternative regimen has proven superior. Surgery is reserved for those patients with residual disease or recurrence. PMID:22942800

  4. Prospective Evaluation of Acute Toxicity and Quality of Life After IMRT and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Anal Canal and Perianal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Kathy; Cummings, Bernard J.; Lindsay, Patricia; Skliarenko, Julia; Craig, Tim; Le, Lisa W.; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca; Dinniwell, Robert; Bayley, Andrew J.; Dawson, Laura A.; Ringash, Jolie; Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Moore, Malcolm J.; Chen, Eric X.; Easson, Alexandra M.; Kassam, Zahra; Cho, Charles; Kim, John

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate toxicity, quality of life (QOL), and clinical outcomes in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for anal and perianal cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2008 to November 2010, patients with anal or perianal cancer treated with IMRT were eligible. Radiation dose was 27 Gy in 15 fractions to 36 Gy in 20 fractions for elective targets and 45 Gy in 25 fractions to 63 Gy in 35 fractions for gross targets using standardized, institutional guidelines, with no planned treatment breaks. The chemotherapy regimen was 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Toxicity was graded with the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. QOL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and CR29 questionnaires. Correlations between dosimetric parameters and both physician-graded toxicities and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated by polyserial correlation. Results: Fifty-eight patients were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 34 months; the median age was 56 years; 52% of patients were female; and 19% were human immunodeficiency virus—positive. Stage I, II, III, and IV disease was found in 9%, 57%, 26%, and 9% of patients, respectively. Twenty-six patients (45%) required a treatment break because of acute toxicity, mainly dermatitis (23/26). Acute grade 3 + toxicities included skin 46%, hematologic 38%, gastrointestinal 9%, and genitourinary 0. The 2-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), colostomy-free survival (CFS), and cumulative locoregional failure (LRF) rates were 90%, 77%, 84%, and 16%, respectively. The global QOL/health status, skin, defecation, and pain scores were significantly worse at the end of treatment than at baseline, but they returned to baseline 3 months after treatment. Social functioning and appetite scores were

  5. Prospective evaluation of acute toxicity and quality of life after IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy for anal canal and perianal cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Kathy; Cummings, Bernard J; Lindsay, Patricia; Skliarenko, Julia; Craig, Tim; Le, Lisa W; Brierley, James; Wong, Rebecca; Dinniwell, Robert; Bayley, Andrew J; Dawson, Laura A; Ringash, Jolie; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Moore, Malcolm J; Chen, Eric X; Easson, Alexandra M; Kassam, Zahra; Cho, Charles; Kim, John

    2014-11-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate toxicity, quality of life (QOL), and clinical outcomes in patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for anal and perianal cancer. From June 2008 to November 2010, patients with anal or perianal cancer treated with IMRT were eligible. Radiation dose was 27 Gy in 15 fractions to 36 Gy in 20 fractions for elective targets and 45 Gy in 25 fractions to 63 Gy in 35 fractions for gross targets using standardized, institutional guidelines, with no planned treatment breaks. The chemotherapy regimen was 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. Toxicity was graded with the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. QOL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and CR29 questionnaires. Correlations between dosimetric parameters and both physician-graded toxicities and patient-reported outcomes were evaluated by polyserial correlation. Fifty-eight patients were enrolled. The median follow-up time was 34 months; the median age was 56 years; 52% of patients were female; and 19% were human immunodeficiency virus-positive. Stage I, II, III, and IV disease was found in 9%, 57%, 26%, and 9% of patients, respectively. Twenty-six patients (45%) required a treatment break because of acute toxicity, mainly dermatitis (23/26). Acute grade 3 + toxicities included skin 46%, hematologic 38%, gastrointestinal 9%, and genitourinary 0. The 2-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), colostomy-free survival (CFS), and cumulative locoregional failure (LRF) rates were 90%, 77%, 84%, and 16%, respectively. The global QOL/health status, skin, defecation, and pain scores were significantly worse at the end of treatment than at baseline, but they returned to baseline 3 months after treatment. Social functioning and appetite scores were significantly better at 12 months than at baseline. Multiple

  6. Urethral dose sparing in squamous cell carcinoma of anal canal using proton therapy matching electrons with prior brachytherapy for prostate cancer: A case study.

    PubMed

    Apinorasethkul, Ontida; Lenards, Nishele; Hunzeker, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to communicate a technique on treating the re-irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of anal canal with proton fields matched with electron fields to spare prostatic urethra. A 76-year old male presented with a secondary radiation-induced malignancy as a result of prostate brachytherapy seeds irradiation 10 years prior. A rectal examination revealed a bulky tumor at the top of the anal canal involving the left superior-most aspect of the anal canal extending superiorly into the rectum. The inferior extent was palpable approximately 3cm from the anal verge and the superior extent of the mass measured greater than 5cm in the superior-inferior dimension. Chemoradiation was suggested since the patient was opposed to abdominoperineal resection (APR) and colostomy. The use of proton therapy matching with electron fields in the re-irradiation setting could help reduce the complications. A 2 lateral proton beams were designed to treat the bulky tumor volume with 2 electron beams treating the nodal volumes. This complication of treatment fields helped spare the prostatic urethra and reduced the risk of urinary obstruction in the future. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteomic signatures reveal a dualistic and clinically relevant classification of anal canal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Herfs, Michael; Longuespée, Rémi; Quick, Charles M; Roncarati, Patrick; Suarez-Carmona, Meggy; Hubert, Pascale; Lebeau, Alizée; Bruyere, Diane; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Baiwir, Dominique; Lai, Keith; Dunn, Andrew; Obregon, Fabiola; Yang, Eric J; Pauw, Edwin De; Crum, Christopher P; Delvenne, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Aetiologically linked to HPV infection, malignancies of the anal canal have substantially increased in incidence over the last 20 years. Although most anal squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) respond well to chemoradiotherapy, about 30% of patients experience a poor outcome, for undetermined reasons. Despite cumulative efforts for discovering independent predictors of overall survival, both nodal status and tumour size are still the only reliable factors predicting patient outcome. Recent efforts have revealed that the biology of HPV-related lesions in the cervix is strongly linked to the originally infected cell population. To address the hypothesis that topography also influences both gene expression profile and behaviour of anal (pre)neoplastic lesions, we correlated both proteomic signatures and clinicopathological features of tumours arising from two distinct portions of the anal canal: the lower part (squamous zone) and the more proximal anal transitional zone. Although microdissected cancer cells appeared indistinguishable by morphology (squamous phenotype), unsupervised clustering analysis of the whole proteome significantly highlighted the heterogeneity that exists within anal canal tumours. More importantly, two region-specific subtypes of SCC were revealed. The expression profile (sensitivity/specificity) of several selected biomarkers (keratin filaments) further confirmed the subclassification of anal (pre)cancers based on their cellular origin. Less commonly detected compared to their counterparts located in the squamous mucosa, SCCs originating in the transitional zone more frequently displayed a poor or basaloid differentiation, and were significantly correlated with reduced disease-free and overall survivals. Taken together, we present direct evidence that anal canal SCC comprises two distinct entities with different cells of origin, proteomic signatures, and survival rates. This study forms the basis for a dualistic classification of anal carcinoma

  8. [Surgical treatment for cicatrix strictures of anal canal].

    PubMed

    Pomazkin, V I; Mansurov, Iu V

    2011-01-01

    Classification of anal canal strictures with gradation of intensity, extent and localization is proposed. In 12 patients with compensated strictures combination of stenosis and anal fissure served as an indication for operation. These patients underwent fissure excision with dosed sphincterotomy. Anoplasty with displacement of island skin flaps to anal canal defects was carried out to 29 patients with sub-or decompensated strictures after dissection of scarry stricture. Good direct results were achieved in 38 patients. Compensated re-stenosis treated conservatively was observed in 3 patients after anoplasty. It is drawn a conclusion about necessity of differential approach to choice of treatment mode for anal scarry strictures. Anoplasty according to proposed method is considered to be optimal for marked strictures.

  9. Anal Canal Carcinoma in a Child With Disorders of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Horikawa, Reiko; Masaki, Hidekazu; Yoshioka, Takako; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kanamori, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal in children is rare. To date, the etiology and outcome of this condition have been not fully understood. Here, we report an 11-year-old child with anal canal cancer who had concomitant disorders of sex development. Radiotherapy followed by salvage surgery achieved disease-free survival of 3 years. Since overexpression of cell cycle regulatory protein p16 was immunohistochemically evident in tumor tissue, human papillomavirus infection was considered as a causative factor in the carcinogenesis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. HIV– positive anal cancer: an update for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Dandapani, Savita V; Eaton, Michael; Pagnini, Paul G

    2010-01-01

    Anal cancer used to be a rare cancer traditionally associated with elderly women. There are approximately 5260 cases per year in the U.S. (1). The onslaught of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) virus has led to a change in anal cancer demographics. Anal cancer is on the rise in the U.S and the number of anal cases documented has quadrupled in the past 20 yrs correlating with the rise of the HIV epidemic. The incidence of anal cancer is 40 to 80 fold higher in the HIV positive (HIV+) population when compared to the general population (2). With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV+ patients are living longer as less are progressing to AIDS. As a consequence non AIDS defining cancers such as anal cancer are on the rise. Factors implicated in the etiology of anal cancer in HIV+ patients include (Human papillomavirus) HPV virus status, sexual habits, and a history of smoking. HPV 16 and receptive anal intercourse (RAI) increase the risk of anal cancer by 33% over the general population. In the general population, the rate of anal cancer is approximately 0.9 cases per 100,000. In patients with a history of RAI, the rate approaches 35 cases per 100,000 which is equivalent to the prevalence of cervical cancer (3). Smokers are eight times more likely to develop anal cancer. There has been much discussion about tailoring treatment decisions in HIV+ patients with anal cancer. This review focuses on squamous cell carcinomas of the anal canal which comprise 80 to 90% of all anal cancers diagnosed and highlight key issues in the management of HIV+ anal cancer patients including recent clinical trials. PMID:22811803

  11. Anal cancer – a review

    PubMed Central

    Salati, Sajad Ahmad; Al Kadi, Azzam

    2012-01-01

    Anal cancer accounts for only 1.5% of gastrointestinal malignancies but this disease has shown a steady increase in incidence particularly in HIV positive males. The understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of anal cancer has changed radically over last thirty years. Risk factors have been identified and organ preservation by chemoradiotherapy has become a standard. This article aims to review the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options for anal cancer in the light of current literature. PMID:23580899

  12. Carcinoma of the anal canal: small steps in treatment advances.

    PubMed

    Eng, Cathy

    2011-09-01

    For locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal, efforts to discover effective treatments that would protect sphincter preservation led to the development of combined chemoradiotherapy, which, when administered appropriately, is curative. While the standard of combined modality chemoradiotherapy has minimally changed over the past 30 years, various chemotherapeutic and biologic agents, as well as novel methods for delivering radiation, have enhanced the treatment of anal carcinoma and are continuously being explored. This review examines the risk factors associated with anal carcinoma, and subsequently discusses the current standard of care from diagnosis through surveillance, paying attention to the pivotal trials that have shaped modern treatment paradigms.

  13. Chronic anal fissure: morphometric analysis of the anal canal at 3.0 Tesla MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Erden, Ayşe; Peker, Elif; Gençtürk, Zeynep Bıyıklı

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTıVE: To compare the morphometric data relating to the muscular structures of the anal canal, in patients with chronic anal fissure and in control group, examined at a 3.0 Tesla MR system. Forty-seven consecutive patients with chronic anal fissure and randomly selected 40 patients who had no claims for perianal disease during their life time were included in the study. T2-weighted sagittal, high-resolution (HR) T2-weighted, and contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted oblique axial and oblique coronal images were retrospectively analyzed by two observers in consensus. Thickness of sphincteric muscles, anal canal length, anorectal angle, thickness of anococcygeal ligament, depth of Minor triangle, width between subcutaneous sphincters, vascularity of posterior commissure, visibility of posterosuperior projection of external sphincter, and angle between the distal anal canal and posterosuperior projection of external sphincter (H angle) in patients and in controls were compared and analyzed using t test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Spearman correlation. The patients with chronic anal fissure had longer anal canal (51.50 mm ± 0.91 vs. 44.11 mm ± 0.71; p = 0.000), thicker internal anal sphincter muscle at mid-anal level (4.18 ± 0.15 vs. 3.39 ± 0.07; p = 0.007), and wider space between subcutaneous external sphincters (11.39 ± 0.50 vs. 6.89 ± 0.22; p = 0.000). In patients, there was a positive correlation between H angle and external sphincter thickness at proximal (r = 0.347; p = 0.021), middle (r = 0427; p = 0.000), and distal (r = 0.518; p = 0.000)) levels of the anal canal. CONCLUSıON: 3.0 Tesla MR imaging provides detailed information about the morphometric changes in the anal sphincter muscles in patients with chronic anal fissure.

  14. SU-E-T-621: Planning Methodologies for Cancer of the Anal Canal: Comparing IMRT, Rapid Arc, and Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    McGlade, J; Kassaee, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate planning methods for anal canal cancer and compare the results of 9-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (Varian, RapidArc), and Proton Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Methods: We generated plans with IMRT, RapidArc (RA) and PBS for twenty patients for both initial phase including nodes and cone down phase of treatment using Eclipe (Varian). We evaluated the advantage of each technique for each phase. RA plans used 2 to 4 arcs and various collimator orientations. PBS used two posterior oblique fields. We evaluated the plans comparing dose volume histogram (DVH), locations of hot spots, and PTV dose conformity. Results: Due to complex shape of target, for RA plans, multiple arcs (>2) are required to achieve optimal PTV conformity. When the PTV exceeds 15 cm in the superior-inferior direction, limitations of deliverability start to dominate. The PTV should be divided into a superior and an inferior structure. The optimization is performed with fixed jaws for each structure and collimator set to 90 degrees for the inferior PTV. Proton PBS plans show little advantage in small bowel sparing when treating the nodes. However, PBS plan reduces volumetric dose to the bladder at the cost of higher doses to the perineal skin. IMRT plans provide good target conformity, but they generate hot spots outside of the target volume. Conclusion: When using one planning technique for entire course of treatment, Multiple arc (>2) RA plans are better as compared to IMRT and PBS plans. When combining techniques, RA for the initial phase in combination with PBS for the cone down phase results in the most optimal plans.

  15. Screening for Anal Cancer in Women

    PubMed Central

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Darragh, Teresa M.; Berry-Lawhorn, J. Michael; Roberts, Jennifer Margaret; Khan, Michelle J.; Boardman, Lori A.; Chiao, Elizabeth; Einstein, Mark H.; Goldstone, Stephen E.; Jay, Naomi; Likes, Wendy M.; Stier, Elizabeth A.; Welton, Mark Lane; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of anal cancer is higher in women than men in the general population and has been increasing for several decades. Similar to cervical cancer, most anal cancers are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) and it is believed that anal cancers are preceded by anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Our goal was to summarize the literature on anal cancer, HSIL and HPV infection in women, and provide screening recommendations in women. Methods A group of experts convened by the ASCCP and the International Anal Neoplasia Society reviewed the literature on anal HPV infection, anal SIL and anal cancer in women. Results Anal HPV infection is common in women but is relatively transient in most. The risk of anal HSIL and cancer varies considerably by risk group, with HIV-infected women and those with a history of lower genital tract neoplasia (LGTN) at highest risk compared with the general population. Conclusions While there are no data yet to demonstrate that identification and treatment of anal HSIL leads to reduced risk of anal cancer, women in groups at the highest risk should be queried for anal cancer symptoms and have digital anorectal examinations to detect anal cancers. HIV-infected women and women with LGTN, may be considered for screening with anal cytology with triage to treatment if HSIL is diagnosed. Healthy women with no known risk factors or anal cancer symptoms do not need to be routinely screened for anal cancer or anal HSIL. PMID:26103446

  16. Anal Canal Duplication in an 11-Year-Old-Child

    PubMed Central

    Van Biervliet, S.; Maris, E.; Vande Velde, S.; Vande Putte, D.; Meerschaut, V.; Herregods, N.; De Bruyne, R.; Van Winckel, M.; Van Renterghem, K.

    2013-01-01

    Anal canal duplication (ACD) is the least frequent digestive duplication. Symptoms are often absent but tend to increase with age. Recognition is, however, important as almost half of the patients with ACD have concomitant malformations. We present the clinical history of an eleven-year-old girl with ACD followed by a review of symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis based on all the reported cases in English literature. PMID:24151565

  17. Sentinel lymph node procedure in patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal: early experience.

    PubMed

    Damin, Daniel C; Rosito, Mario A; Gus, Pedro; Spiro, Bernardo L; Amaral, Beatriz B; Meurer, Luise; Cartel, Andre; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2003-08-01

    This study was conducted to assess the feasibility of the sentinel lymph node procedure in patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal. Between February 2001 and November 2002, 14 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal and no clinical evidence of inguinal involvement were prospectively enrolled in the study. The sentinel lymph node procedure consisted of a combination of preoperative lymphoscintigraphy with technetium 99m dextran 500 injected around the tumor and intraoperative detection of the sentinel node with a gamma probe. Patent blue V dye was also injected at the periphery of the tumor to facilitate direct identification of the blue-stained lymph node. After removal, the sentinel node was studied by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry for pancytokeratins (antigen A1 and A3). Detection and removal of sentinel lymph nodes was possible in all patients. There was no correlation between tumor size and pattern of lymphatic drainage to the groin. Tumors located in the midline of the anal canal gave rise to bilateral sentinel nodes in eight of nine cases. In total, 23 sentinel lymph nodes were removed. One patient (7.1 percent) had a node identified as positive for metastatic carcinoma on immunohistochemical staining. Surgical complications were minimal. The standardized technique was safe and highly effective in sampling inguinal sentinel lymph nodes in carcinoma of the anal canal. It also proved to be useful as an instrument to detect micrometastatic deposits in clinically normal nodes. Our early results suggest the sentinel lymph node procedure may have a role in guiding a more selective approach for patients with anal cancer. Additional studies in a larger patient population to determine the sensitivity and specificity of this method are warranted.

  18. Management of persistent anal canal carcinoma after combined-modality therapy: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anal canal carcinoma is a rare gastro-intestinal cancer. Radiochemotherapy is the recommended primary treatment for patients with non-metastatic carcinoma; surgery is generally reserved for persistent or recurrent disease. Follow-up and surveillance after primary treatment is paramount to classify patients in those with complete remission, persistent or progressive disease. Locally persistent disease represents a clinically significant problem and its management remains subject of some controversy. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise recommendations for the primary treatment of anal canal carcinoma, to focus on the optimal time to consider residual disease as genuine persistence to proceed with salvage treatment, and to discern how this analysis might inform future clinical trials in management in this class of patients. PMID:24472223

  19. Pharmacotherapy of Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jane E; Eng, Cathy

    2017-08-02

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA), among other malignancies, is associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV) and its incidence continues to rise. Anal SCCA will likely remain an existing healthcare concern given compliance issues with the HPV vaccination seen in the US. Localized disease is predominantly treated with standard of care (SOC) definitive chemoradiation that has remained unchanged for decades. Clinical and molecular prognostic factors have emerged to characterize patients unresponsive to SOC, revealing the need for an alternate approach. Metastatic disease is an extremely small subset and understudied population due to its rarity. Recent prospective trials and mutational analysis have opened treatment options for this subset in need. Our review details the pharmacotherapeutic treatment in localized and metastatic anal SCCA chronologically, while also describing future outlooks.

  20. Squamous-cell Carcinoma of the Anus and Anal Canal: An Analysis of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, W. B.

    1941-01-01

    The analysis is of 55 cases admitted into St. Mark's Hospital from 1922 to 1940. The incidence was 3.35% of all cases of cancer of the rectum, anal canal and anus admitted during this period. Sex distribution—27 males and 28 females. The average age (61.7 years) is higher than that of columnar-cell carcinoma of the rectum (57.4 years). Histology.—The cases have been graded into three grades of malignancy—low grade, medium grade, and high grade. Low grade squamous carcinoma is twice as frequent in men as in women, and generally originates at the anal margin. Medium grade squamous carcinoma is equally distributed between men and women; it may arise at the anus or in the anal canal. High grade squamous carcinoma is much more common in the female sex and is almost entirely limited to the anal canal. Quadrant affected—about one-third of the anal margin growths and one-half of the anal canal growths were situated anteriorly. Differential diagnosis from simple papilloma, simple ulcer, chronic inflammation, tuberculous ulcer, tuberculide, primary chancre, amœbic ulcer, basal-cell carcinoma, columnar-cell carcinoma. Biopsy and grading essential before treatment is decided upon. The results of treatment in the three grades of malignancy are described. The best results were obtained in the early low-grade cases treated by interstitial radium needling. In the medium and high grades only three five-year survivals can be reported and these followed excision of the rectum. The management of the inguinal glands is discussed and the importance of a very close post-operative supervision emphasized. Squamous carcinoma of the anal canal may cause lymphatic metastases in the superior hæmorrhoidal glands; there have been four such cases in this series. Diathermy perineal excision is indicated in these cases. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 6aFig. 6bFig. 7Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:19992316

  1. HDR brachytherapy for anal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Gyoergy

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of treating anal cancer is to preserve the anal sphincter function while giving high doses to the tumor and sparing the organ at risk. For that reason there has been a shift from radical surgical treatment with colostomy to conservative treatment. Radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy has an important role in the treatment of anal cancer patients. New techniques as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have shown reduced acute toxicity and high rates of local control in combination with chemotherapy compared to conventional 3-D radiotherapy. Not only external beam radio-chemotherapy treatment (EBRT) is an established method for primary treatment of anal cancer, brachytherapy (BT) is also an approved method. BT is well known for boost irradiation in combination with EBRT (+/– chemotherapy). Because of technical developments like modern image based 3D treatment planning and the possibility of intensity modulation in brachytherapy (IMBT), BT today has even more therapeutic potential than it had in the era of linear sources. The combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and BT allows the clinician to deliver higher doses to the tumor and to reduce dose to the normal issue. Improvements in local control and reductions in toxicity therefore become possible. Various BT techniques and their results are discussed in this work. PMID:24982770

  2. Hidrosadenoma of the anal canal: a case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vainer, B; Bille Brahe, N E; Horn, T

    2003-02-01

    Hidrosadenoma of the anal canal is an extremely rare tumour. Only nine cases with similar histologic structure have been described in the literature, most representing tumours resected from the anal or rectal mucosa. We present a case of anal hidrosadenoma with immunohistochemical staining features identifying it as a true sweat gland tumour.

  3. Anal Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer that remains after treatment with external-beam radiation therapy. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ... cancer remains or comes back after treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. ... options. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ...

  4. Stages of Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer that remains after treatment with external-beam radiation therapy. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ... cancer remains or comes back after treatment with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. ... options. Patients who have had treatment that saves the sphincter ...

  5. Early Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal Resected by Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tamaru, Yuzuru; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Ninomiya, Yuki; Asayama, Naoki; Shigita, Kenjiro; Nishiyama, Soki; Hayashi, Nana; Arihiro, Koji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    The standard treatment approach for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal includes abdominoperineal resection and chemoradiotherapy. However, there are currently very few reports of early SCC of the anal canal resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). We report 2 rare cases of SCC of the anal canal resected by ESD. In case 1, a 66-year-old woman underwent a colonoscopy due to blood in her stool, and an elevated lesion, 15 mm in size, was identified from the rectum to the dentate line of the anal canal on internal hemorrhoids. The lesion was diagnosed as an early SCC of the anal canal, and ESD was successfully performed. The histopathological diagnosis was SCC in situ. In case 2, a 71-year-old woman underwent a colonoscopy due to constipation, and an elevated lesion, 25 mm in size, was identified from the dentate line to the anal canal. The lesion was diagnosed as early-stage SCC of the anal canal, and ESD was successfully performed. The histopathological diagnosis was SCC in situ. No complications or recurrence after ESD occurred in either case. PMID:26034474

  6. Anal canal duplication and triplication: a rare entity with different presentations.

    PubMed

    Palazon, P; Julia, V; Saura, L; de Haro, I; Bejarano, M; Rovira, C; Tarrado, X

    2017-05-01

    Anal canal duplication (ACD) is the rarest of gastrointestinal duplications. Few cases have been reported. Most cases present as an opening in the midline, posterior to the normal anus. The aim of our revision is to contribute with eight new cases, some of them with unusual presentations: five presented as the typical form, one with a perianal nodule, and two presented as two separate orifices (anal canal triplication). Complete excision was performed in all patients with no complications. ACD is the most distal and the least frequent digestive duplication. Its treatment should be surgical excision, to avoid complications such as abscess, fistulization, or malignization. Anal canal triplication has never been described before.

  7. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection of the anal canal in women: A prospective analysis of high-risk populations

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Bernd P.; Hofmann, Jörg; Stoellnberger, Susanne; Bergauer, Florian; Blankenstein, Thomas; Alba-Alejandre, Irene; Stein, Angela; Stuckart, Claudia; Weizsäcker, Katharina; Mylonas, Ioannis; Mahner, Sven; Gingelmaier, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with the development of cervical and anal cancer. Worldwide, the incidence of anal cancer has increased markedly. The present study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection of the uterine cervix and anal canal in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- and non-HIV-infected risk populations. Cervical and anal HPV swabs and cytology samples were collected from 287 patients at the University Hospital of Munich, Germany between 2011 and 2013. Patients were divided into HIV-negative controls (G1) and two risk groups, including HIV-negative patients with cytological abnormalities of the cervix (G2) and HIV-infected patients (G3). Data, including clinical parameters, were analysed. The risk groups had significantly more positive results for HPV in the anus (71.03 and 83.15% for G2 and G3, respectively), as compared with G1. The predominant HPV genotypes found in the anus were high-risk HPV genotypes, which were significantly correlated with concomittant cervical HPV findings. In the risk groups, a significant association between the cytological findings and HPV detection in the cervix was found, while the results of the anus revealed no significance. The results of the present study suggested that the prevalence of HPV infection in the anal canal of risk populations is high. Furthermore, patients with abnormal cervical cytology results and HIV-infected women, irrespective of their individual cervical findings, may have a risk of concomittant anal high-risk HPV infection. Based on the predominant HPV genotypes found in the study, HPV vaccination could reduce the incidence of anal cancer. Nevertheless, high-risk patients should be intensively screened for anal squamous intraepithelial abnormalities to avoid invasive cancer stages. PMID:28454426

  8. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection of the anal canal in women: A prospective analysis of high-risk populations.

    PubMed

    Kost, Bernd P; Hofmann, Jörg; Stoellnberger, Susanne; Bergauer, Florian; Blankenstein, Thomas; Alba-Alejandre, Irene; Stein, Angela; Stuckart, Claudia; Weizsäcker, Katharina; Mylonas, Ioannis; Mahner, Sven; Gingelmaier, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with the development of cervical and anal cancer. Worldwide, the incidence of anal cancer has increased markedly. The present study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection of the uterine cervix and anal canal in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- and non-HIV-infected risk populations. Cervical and anal HPV swabs and cytology samples were collected from 287 patients at the University Hospital of Munich, Germany between 2011 and 2013. Patients were divided into HIV-negative controls (G1) and two risk groups, including HIV-negative patients with cytological abnormalities of the cervix (G2) and HIV-infected patients (G3). Data, including clinical parameters, were analysed. The risk groups had significantly more positive results for HPV in the anus (71.03 and 83.15% for G2 and G3, respectively), as compared with G1. The predominant HPV genotypes found in the anus were high-risk HPV genotypes, which were significantly correlated with concomittant cervical HPV findings. In the risk groups, a significant association between the cytological findings and HPV detection in the cervix was found, while the results of the anus revealed no significance. The results of the present study suggested that the prevalence of HPV infection in the anal canal of risk populations is high. Furthermore, patients with abnormal cervical cytology results and HIV-infected women, irrespective of their individual cervical findings, may have a risk of concomittant anal high-risk HPV infection. Based on the predominant HPV genotypes found in the study, HPV vaccination could reduce the incidence of anal cancer. Nevertheless, high-risk patients should be intensively screened for anal squamous intraepithelial abnormalities to avoid invasive cancer stages.

  9. [Sensitivity of the anal canal: study techniques and results in normal subjects].

    PubMed

    Solana Bueno, A; Roig Vila, J V; Villoslada Prieto, C; Segarra Gomar, D; Ramirez Muñoz, D; Hinojosa del Val, J; Lledó Matoses, S

    1995-04-01

    To describe a technique for the study of the anal canal sensitivity to electric and thermal stimulation, and to investigate it prospectively in normal subjects. Mucosal electrosensitivity and thermal sensation of the anal canal is correlated with motor parameters: perineometry, manometry and electrophysiology. 41 control subjects (20M & 21F) with normal anorectal anatomophysiology. In the middle anal canal minimum electrosensibility thresholds were present, and they were similar to the thermal profile. A significant impairment in electrosensitivity was observed as a function of age, but no differences between the sexes were found. Lower thresholds were obtained than cold temperatures (p < 0.001). Both tests of sensitivity correlated with pudendal motor parameters. The maximal thermal difference in the anal canal was 0.28 degree C, while the minimal detectable temperature change was 0.46 +/- 0.1 degrees C. The sensitivity of the anal canal is greatest in the zone of the anal valves and better in response to hot than cold stimulus. As the minimum detectable temperature change has been greater than the difference of temperature between the low and high anal canal, we suggest that discrimination is not possible on the basis of thermal differences.

  10. What's New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Anal Cancer About Anal Cancer What’s New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment? Important research ... cancer cells is expected to help scientists develop new drugs to fight this disease. Early detection Ongoing ...

  11. Rare Case of Anal Canal Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma Associated with Perianal and Vulvar Pagetoid Spread

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Rae; Cho, Hyun Yee; Baek, Jeong-Heum; Jeong, Juhyeon; Ha, Seung Yeon; Seok, Jae Yeon; Park, Sung Won; Sym, Sun Jin; Lee, Kyu Chan; Chung, Dong Hae

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman was referred to surgery for incidentally found colonic polyps during a health examination. Physical examination revealed widespread eczematous skin lesion without pruritus in the perianal and vulvar area. Abdominopelvic computed tomography showed an approximately 4-cm-sized, soft tissue lesion in the right perianal area. Inguinal lymph node dissection and Mils’ operation extended to perianal and perivulvar skin was performed. Histologically, the anal canal lesion was composed of mucin-containing signet ring cells, which were similar to those found in Pagetoid skin lesions. It was diagnosed as an anal canal signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) with perianal and vulvar Pagetoid spread and bilateral inguinal lymph node metastasis. Anal canal SRCC is rare, and the current case is the third reported case in the English literature. Seven additional cases were retrieved from the world literature. Here, we describe this rare case of anal canal SRCC with perianal Pagetoid spread and provide a literature review. PMID:26447133

  12. Rare Case of Anal Canal Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma Associated with Perianal and Vulvar Pagetoid Spread.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Rae; Cho, Hyun Yee; Baek, Jeong-Heum; Jeong, Juhyeon; Ha, Seung Yeon; Seok, Jae Yeon; Park, Sung Won; Sym, Sun Jin; Lee, Kyu Chan; Chung, Dong Hae

    2016-05-01

    A 61-year-old woman was referred to surgery for incidentally found colonic polyps during a health examination. Physical examination revealed widespread eczematous skin lesion without pruritus in the perianal and vulvar area. Abdominopelvic computed tomography showed an approximately 4-cm-sized, soft tissue lesion in the right perianal area. Inguinal lymph node dissection and Mils' operation extended to perianal and perivulvar skin was performed. Histologically, the anal canal lesion was composed of mucin-containing signet ring cells, which were similar to those found in Pagetoid skin lesions. It was diagnosed as an anal canal signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) with perianal and vulvar Pagetoid spread and bilateral inguinal lymph node metastasis. Anal canal SRCC is rare, and the current case is the third reported case in the English literature. Seven additional cases were retrieved from the world literature. Here, we describe this rare case of anal canal SRCC with perianal Pagetoid spread and provide a literature review.

  13. Level of highest mean resting pressure segment in the anal canal. A quantitative assessment of anal sphincter function.

    PubMed

    Goes, R N; Simons, A J; Beart, R W

    1996-03-01

    Even with the development of new technologies, the mechanism of fecal continence is still not completely understood. This study evaluates the relative position of the highest mean resting pressure (HMRP) in the anal canal and its correlation with function in incontinent patients and in controls. Sixteen incontinent patients (mean age, 47.1 +/- 13.9 (range, 18-63) years; 12 female) and 16 controls (mean age, 35.4 +/- 8.7 (range, 24-58) years; 12 female) were studied using a water-perfused eight-port radial catheter computer-assisted vectromanometry. Position of the HMRP was analyzed in relation to the anal verge (D1) and to the proximal functional border of the anal canal (D2). Controls had HMRP located more distally in the anal canal, because D2 was significantly higher than D1 (mean, 3.45 +/- 0.75 vs. 1.81 +/- 0.63 cm; p + 0.001). For incontinent patients, D1 and D2 were similar (mean, 1.86 +/- 0.75 vs. 2.08 +/- 1.11 cm; not significant). Comparison of the relative position of the HMRP between patients and controls showed a more proximal location for incontinent patients than controls (mean, 49.1 +/- 12.1 percent vs. 35.4 +/- 10.2 percent; p = 0.002). Position of the HMRP is significantly more proximal for incontinent patients than for controls, and measurement of the distance from the anal verge to the HMRP in relation to the full length of the anal canal may represent another way to quantitatively assess anal sphincter function.

  14. Morphology of the epithelium of the lower rectum and the anal canal in the adult human.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Noguchi, Tsuyoshi; Nagai, Kaoruko; Akashi, Yuichi; Kawahara, Katsunobu; Shimada, Tatsuo

    2012-06-01

    The anal canal is an important body part clinically. However, there is no agreement about the epithelium of the anal canal, the anal transitional zone (ATZ) epithelium in particular. The aim of this study is to clarify the structure of the epithelium of the human lower rectum and anal canal. Intact rectum and anus obtained from patients who underwent surgery for rectal carcinoma were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy (LM and SEM). By LM, three types of epithelium were observed in the anal canal: simple columnar epithelium, stratified squamous epithelium, and stratified columnar epithelium. The lower rectum was composed of simple columnar epithelium. SEM findings showed stratified squamous epithelium that consisted of squamous cells with microridges, changing to simple columnar epithelium consisting of columnar cells with short microvilli at the anorectal line. LM and SEM observations in a one-to-one ratio revealed that the area of stratified columnar epithelium based on LM corresponded to the anal crypt and sinus. In conclusion, the epithelium of the human anal canal was fundamentally composed of simple columnar epithelium and stratified squamous epithelium. We found no evidence of the ATZ.

  15. Prophylactic HPV vaccination and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Chigurupati, Nagasudha L; Fung, Leslie

    2016-06-02

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. High risk populations include HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV-negative MSM, HIV-positive women and heterosexual men and women with a history of cervical cancer. HPV has been detected in over 90% of anal cancers. HPV16 is the most common genotype detected in about 70% of anal cancers. The quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine has been demonstrated to prevent vaccine associated persistent anal HPV infections as well as anal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (AIN2+) in young MSM not previously infected. A retrospective analysis also suggests that qHPV vaccination of older MSM treated for AIN2+ may significantly decrease the risk of recurrence of the AIN2+. The HPV types detected in anal cancer are included in the 9-valent vaccine. Thus, the 9-valent HPV vaccine, when administered to boys and girls prior to the onset of sexual activity, should effectively prevent anal cancer.

  16. Mitomycin-C- or Cisplatin-Based Chemoradiotherapy for Anal Canal Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Olivatto, Luis O.; Cabral, Vania; Rosa, Arthur; Bezerra, Marcos; Santarem, Erick; Fassizoli, Ana; Castro, Leonaldson; Simoes, Jose Humberto; Small, Isabele A.; Ferreira, Carlos Gil

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy of concurrent radiotherapy with mitomycin-C (MMC)-based or cisplatin (CP)-based combinations in a cohort of patients with locally advanced anal canal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 2000, 179 patients with locally advanced anal canal carcinoma were treated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancer with two cycles of chemotherapy during Weeks 1 and 5 of radiotherapy. 5-Fluorouracil (750 mg/m{sup 2} 120-hour infusion or 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} 96-hour infusion) plus CP (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on the first day of each cycle or MMC (10-15 mg/m{sup 2}) on the first day of Cycle 1 was administered concurrent with radiotherapy (total dose, 55-59.4 Gy). Of the 179 patients, 60% were included from a randomized trial initiated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancer in 1991 that compared concurrent chemoradiotherapy with MMC vs. CP. Results: The median follow-up for the whole chemoradiotherapy group was 83 months. The median patient age was 58 years, 57% had Stage T3-T4 tumors, and 35% had N-positive disease. The 5-year cumulative colostomy rate was not significantly different between the CP group (22%) and MMC group (29%; p = .28). The actuarial 10-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate for the CP group was 54% and 49% and for the MMC group was 52% and 53%, respectively (p = .32 and p = .92, respectively). On multivariate analysis, male gender (p = .042) and advanced Stage T3-T4 disease (p <.0001) were statistically significant for worse disease-free survival. Stage T3-T4 (p = .039) and N+ (p = .039) disease remained independently significant for overall survival. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up has confirmed the good results of chemoradiotherapy with CP plus 5-fluorouracil, which seem to provide results equivalent to those with MMC plus 5-fluorouracil.

  17. Beneficial use of magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging for diagnosing a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Morisaki, Tomohito; Isomoto, Hajime; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Takeshita, Hiroaki; Sawai, Terumitsu; Abe, Kuniko; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The patient was a 74-year-old woman. She visited a dermatology clinic with a complaint of discomfort in the anal region. Erosion was observed in the anal region, and biopsies were performed. She was diagnosed with Bowen's disease and was referred to the dermatology department of our hospital for treatment. At our department, an endoscopic examination was performed for assessing the extent of Bowen's disease in the rectum. A retroflexed view of the anal canal revealed a slightly raised lesion with a faded color and an irregular surface. Narrow-band imaging (NBI) revealed a whitish lesion with a relatively clear margin and brown dots on the inside. Magnifying endoscopy with NBI revealed abnormal microvessels with dilatation, tortuosity, caliber change and various shapes, which were quite similar to the intrapapillary capillary loop patterns of superficial esophageal cancer. A complete transanal resection of the anal mucosa was performed thereafter. The patient was diagnosed with a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma on the basis of a pathological examination. An early diagnosis is critical for successful treatment of anal canal cancer. In this regard, magnifying endoscopy with NBI may be useful for determining the presence and extent of anal canal cancer. © 2011 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2011 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  18. Perianal and Vulvar Extramammary Paget Disease: A Report of Six Cases and Mapping Biopsy of the Anal Canal.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuzo; Kazama, Sinsuke; Yamada, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Takuya; Murono, Koji; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Masui, Yuri; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Kadono, Takafumi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of perianal and vulvar extramammary Paget disease (EMPD), rare intraepithelial malignancies, is often challenging because of its potential to spread into the anal canal. However, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal resection margin within the anal canal. Between 2004 and 2014, six patients (three with perianal EMPD and three with vulvar EMPD) in which the spread of Paget cells into the anal canal was highly suspected were referred to our department. To evaluate the disease extent within the anal canal, preoperative mapping biopsy of the anal canal was performed in five out of six patients. Two patients were positive for Paget cells within the anal canal (one at the dentate line and the other at 0.5 cm above the dentate line), whereas in three patients, Paget cell were present only in the skin of the anal verge. Using 1 cm margin within the anal canal from the positive biopsy sites, we performed anal-preserving wide local excision (WLE), and negative resection margins within the anal canal were confirmed in all five patients. The remaining one patient with perianal EMPD did not undergo mapping biopsy of the anal canal because preoperative colonoscopy revealed that the Paget cells had spread into the lower rectum. Therefore, WLE with abdominoperineal resection was performed. During the median follow-up period of 37.3 months, no local recurrence was observed in all patients. Our small case series suggest the usefulness of mapping biopsy of the anal canal for the treatment of perianal and vulvar EMPD.

  19. Perianal and Vulvar Extramammary Paget Disease: A Report of Six Cases and Mapping Biopsy of the Anal Canal

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Sinsuke; Yamada, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Takuya; Murono, Koji; Yasuda, Koji; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Masui, Yuri; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Kadono, Takafumi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of perianal and vulvar extramammary Paget disease (EMPD), rare intraepithelial malignancies, is often challenging because of its potential to spread into the anal canal. However, there is still no consensus regarding the optimal resection margin within the anal canal. Between 2004 and 2014, six patients (three with perianal EMPD and three with vulvar EMPD) in which the spread of Paget cells into the anal canal was highly suspected were referred to our department. To evaluate the disease extent within the anal canal, preoperative mapping biopsy of the anal canal was performed in five out of six patients. Two patients were positive for Paget cells within the anal canal (one at the dentate line and the other at 0.5 cm above the dentate line), whereas in three patients, Paget cell were present only in the skin of the anal verge. Using 1 cm margin within the anal canal from the positive biopsy sites, we performed anal-preserving wide local excision (WLE), and negative resection margins within the anal canal were confirmed in all five patients. The remaining one patient with perianal EMPD did not undergo mapping biopsy of the anal canal because preoperative colonoscopy revealed that the Paget cells had spread into the lower rectum. Therefore, WLE with abdominoperineal resection was performed. During the median follow-up period of 37.3 months, no local recurrence was observed in all patients. Our small case series suggest the usefulness of mapping biopsy of the anal canal for the treatment of perianal and vulvar EMPD. PMID:27746643

  20. Extrapulmonary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Joshua M.; Brown, Karen; Lo, Shelly; Nagda, Suneel; Yong, Sherri

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma affecting the anal canal is a rare and poorly understood entity which can, in its early stages, masquerade as benign anorectal disease such as hemorrhoids. Methods. We report a case of this rare malignancy which initially presented with hematochezia and anal pain. We also review the literature with regard to previously described cases and management strategies including the role of surgery. Results. Despite aggressive multidisciplinary treatment consisting of chemotherapy and radiation, the disease progressed rapidly with dissemination occurring only three months after completion of treatment. Because of the aggressive nature of this tumor, the treatment options for this almost universally fatal malignancy are often palliative in nature. Conclusion. Chemoradiotherapy is likely the most reasonable approach to extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the anal canal given its aggressiveness. PMID:22454644

  1. Combined radical radiation therapy and chemotherapy for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, B.J.; Rider, W.D.; Harwood, A.R.; Keane, T.J.; Thomas, G.M.; Erlichman, C.; Fine, S.

    1982-03-01

    Radical radiation therapy (5000 rads in 20 fractions in 4 weeks) combined with iv mitomycin (10 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1000 mg/m2/24 hours for 4 days) was used to treat 13 patients with locally advanced but operable squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. All patients achieved local control and retained anal continence, and none developed metastases. The patients were followed from 4 to 34 months (median, 12). Severe acute gastrointestinal toxic effects were seen in three patients; the same patients had significant thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. Treatment with this combined program may allow conservative management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal and should be considered as an alternative to abdominoperineal resection.

  2. Diversity of human papillomavirus in the anal canal of men: The HIM study

    PubMed Central

    Sichero, Laura; Nyitray, Alan G.; Nunes, Emily Montosa; Nepal, Bal; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Sobrinho, João S.; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.; Villa, Luisa L.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with development of anogenital lesions in men. There are no reports describing the distribution of non-alpha HPV types in the anal canal of a sexually diverse men group. The HIM (HPV in Men) Study is a multicenter study of the natural history of HPV infection in Brazil, Mexico and USA. At baseline, 12% of anal canal specimens PCR HPV-positive were not typed by the Roche Linear Array and were considered unclassified. Our goal was characterizing HPVs among these unclassified specimens at baseline and assess associations with participant socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics. Unclassified HPVs were typed by sequencing amplified PGMY09/11 products or cloning of PGMY/GP+ nested amplicons followed by sequencing. Further analysis was conducted using FAP primers. Of men with unclassified HPV at the anal canal, most (89.1%) were men who have sex with women (MSW). Readable sequences were produced for 62.8% of unclassified specimens, of which 75.2% were characterized HPV types. A total of 18, 26, and 3 different α-, β- and γ-HPV types were detected, respectively. Compared to older men (45-70 years), α-HPVs were more commonly detected among young men (18-30 years) whereas β-HPVs were more frequent among mid-adult men (31-44 years). β-HPVs were more common among heterosexual men (85.0%) than non-heterosexual men. β2-HPV types composed all β-HPVs detected among non-heterosexual men. The high prevalence of β-HPV in the anal canal of men who do not report receptive anal sex is suggestive of other forms of transmission that do not involve penile-anal intercourse. PMID:25698660

  3. Angiogenesis inhibitors and symptomatic anal ulcers in metastatic colorectal cancer patients (*).

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Francesca; Lonardi, Sara; Salmaso, Beatrice; Lacognata, Carmelo; Battaglin, Francesca; Cavallin, Francesco; Saadeh, Luca; Murgioni, Sabina; Caruso, Antonino; Aliberti, Camillo; Zagonel, Vittorina; Castoro, Carlo; Scarpa, Marco

    2017-07-15

    Angiogenesis inhibitors are a standard first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. Anal canal pain is a common adverse event, but its cause has never been described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors and symptomatic anal ulcer development. This retrospective cohort study included all 601 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer patients undergoing first line treatment from January 2010 to June 2016 at the Veneto Institute of Oncology. Details about patient characteristics, treatment and proctology reports were retrieved and compared. Vascularization of the anal canal was evaluated with contrast MRI. Fifty out of 601 patients reported perianal complaints during treatment and underwent proctologic evaluation. Among those, 16 were found to have an anal ulcer. Symptomatic anal ulcers occurred only in patients receiving bevacizumab (4.2% vs. 0% with other regimens, p = .009). The peak incidence was 4-8 weeks after treatment start. Vascularization of anal canal was significantly lower in patients treated with bevacizumab (p = .03). Hypertension and hemorrhoids were associated with a lower risk of anal ulcer occurrence (p = .009 and p = .036). Pain intensity was severe. All attempts at symptomatic treatment only led to transient benefit. The absence of symptomatic ulcers was protective against earlier permanent discontinuation of treatment (HR = .22, 95%CI: 0.04-0.62). The development of symptomatic anal ulcers in patients receiving angiogenesis inhibitor is a common adverse event which can compromise the continuation of cancer therapy. We recommend an early proctologic evaluation in case of anal symptoms with the aim to prevent and timely manage such complication.

  4. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal.

    PubMed

    Morris, Van; Rao, Xiayu; Pickering, Curtis; Foo, Wai Chin; Rashid, Asif; Eterovic, Karina; Kim, Taebeom; Chen, Ken; Wang, Jing; Shaw, Kenna; Eng, Cathy

    2017-08-07

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA) is a rare gastrointestinal malignancy with an increasing annual incidence globally. The majority of cases are linked to prior infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). For patients with metastatic SCCA, no consensus standard treatment exists. Identification of relevant targeted agents as novel therapeutic approaches for metastatic SCCA has been limited by a lack of comprehensive molecular profiling. We performed whole-exome sequencing on tumor-normal pairs from 24 patients with metastatic SCCA. Tumor tissue from 17 additional patients was analyzed using a 263-gene panel as a validation cohort. Gene expression profiling was performed on available frozen tissue to assess for differential expression patterns. Based on these findings, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of SCCA were generated to test targeted therapies against PI3K and EGFR. Despite a low mutation burden, mutations in PIK3CA, MLL2, and MLL3 were among the most commonly mutated genes. An association between TP53 mutations and HPV-negative SCCA tumors was observed. Gene expression analysis suggested distinct tumor subpopulations harboring PIK3CA mutations and for which HPV had integrated into the host genome. In vivo studies demonstrated improvement with anti-EGFR treatment. Gene mutation frequencies, tumor mutation burden, and gene expression patterns for metastatic SCCA appear similar to other HPV-associated malignancies.Implications: This first comprehensive genomic characterization for patients with metastatic SCCA provides further rationale for the integration of SCCA into the development of novel targeted therapies across HPV-related cancers. Mol Cancer Res; 1-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  6. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    PubMed Central

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. Results The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. Conclusion The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques. PMID:26229623

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Tools, Specimens, and Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog ... the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest ...

  8. How Is Anal Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiology) Tests . Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ... 2014 Last Revised: January 20, 2016 American Cancer Society medical information is copyrighted material. For reprint requests, ...

  9. Anal-canal duplication in a 6-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, K; Umeda, T; Murahashi, O; Sugitoh, T

    2002-03-01

    A 6-year-old girl with an anal deformity had been complaining of pruritus around the anus. A small pit at 6 o'clock was diagnosed as an anal duplication. Fistulography showed a 0.5-cm-depth fistula without communication to the rectum. A 1.5-cm diameter presacral mass was shown on computed tomography. There was no sacral anomaly. At fistulectomy, the fistula contained mucous, yellow-white fluid. The base was enlarged, probably because of inflammation, but was resected without any invasion of the rectum. Histology showed squamous epithelium on the surface of the fistula and columnar epithelium and goblet cells in the base, which confirmed the diagnosis of an anal-canal duplication.

  10. Radiation therapy for epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal, clinical and treatment factors associated with outcome.

    PubMed

    Myerson, R J; Kong, F; Birnbaum, E H; Fleshman, J W; Kodner, I J; Picus, J; Ratkin, G A; Read, T E; Walz, B J

    2001-10-01

    In recent years, treatment with combined chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for epidermoid carcinoma of the anus. However, optimal radiotherapy techniques and doses are not well established. During the period 1975-1997, 106 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal underwent radiation therapy. Treatment policies evolved from radiation therapy alone or with surgery, to combined chemotherapy and radiation followed by surgery, to combined chemotherapy and radiation. Overall 74% of patients were NED (no evidence of disease) at last follow-up. The most important clinical correlate with ultimate freedom from disease (includes the contribution of salvage surgery) was extent of disease. The 5-year ultimate freedom from disease was 87+/-5% for T1/T2N0, 78+/-10% for T3N0 (15% salvaged by surgery), and 43+/-10% for either T4N0 or any N+ lesions (P<0.001, Tarone-Ware). There was no difference between planned vs. expectant surgery (5-year ultimate NED: 67+/-11% planned surgery vs. 73+/-5% expectant surgery). The most important correlate with late toxicity was a history of major pelvic surgery (surgical vs. non-surgical group: P=0.013, Fisher's exact test, two-tailed summation). Thirty-three additional malignancies have been seen in 26 patients. The most common additional malignancies were gynecologic (nine cases), head and neck (six cases), and lung cancer (five cases). For T1/T2N0 disease, moderate doses of radiation combined with chemotherapy provided adequate treatment. T4N0 and N+ lesions are the most appropriate candidates for investigational protocols evaluating dose intensification. T3N0 tumors may also be appropriate for investigation; however, dose intensification may ultimately prove counterproductive if the cure rate is not improved and salvage surgery is rendered more difficult. The volume of irradiated small bowel should be minimized for patients who have a past history of major pelvic surgery or who (because of locally advanced

  11. Increased yield pressure in the anal canal during sacral nerve stimulation: a pilot study with the functional lumen imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Haas, S; Liao, D; Gregersen, H; Lundby, L; Laurberg, S; Krogh, K

    2017-02-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is a well-established treatment for fecal incontinence but its mode of action remains obscure. Anal sphincter function is usually evaluated with manometry but resistance to distension may be a more appropriate parameter than luminal pressure. The functional lumen imaging probe allows detailed description of distension properties of the anal canal. Our objective in this study was to characterize the impact of SNS on distension properties of the anal canal in patients with idiopathic fecal incontinence. We studied 10 women (median age 64 [44-79] years) with idiopathic fecal incontinence at baseline and during SNS. The luminal geometry of the anal canal was examined with the FLIP at rest and during squeeze and the distensibility of the anal canal was investigated during filling of the bag. All patients were successfully treated with SNS and the mean Wexner Incontinence Score was reduced from 14.9 ± 4 to 7.1 ± 4.8 (P<.001). The pressure required to open the narrowest point of the anal canal during distension (yield pressure) increased from 14.5 ± 12.2 mmHg at baseline to 20.5 ± 13.3 mmHg during SNS (P<.01). The pressure-strain elastic modulus increased non-significantly from 2.2 ± 0.5 to 2.9 ± 1.6 kPa, indicating increased stiffness of the anal canal. The yield pressure and the resistance to distension increased in response to SNS for idiopathic fecal incontinence. This will inevitably increase the resistance to flow through the anal canal, which may contribute to the benefits of sacral nerve stimulation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Does Sacral Nerve Stimulation Improve Continence Through Enhanced Sensitivity of the Anal Canal? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Haas, S; Brock, C; Krogh, K; Gram, M; Lundby, L; Drewes, A M; Laurberg, S

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the effects of sacral nerve stimulation against fecal incontinence involve neuromodulation at spinal or supraspinal levels. This study aims to investigate the afferent sensory pathways from the anorectum before and during sacral nerve stimulation. This is an explorative study. Fifteen women with idiopathic fecal incontinence (mean age, 58 ± 12.2 years) were selected. Cortical evoked potentials were recorded during repeated rapid balloon distension of the rectum and the anal canal both before and during temporary sacral nerve stimulation. Stimuli applied were individualized according to the subjective urge to defecate. The main outcomes measured were 1) stimulus intensity, 2) latencies and amplitudes of cortical evoked potentials, and 3) spectral content in predefined frequency bands of cortical evoked potentials. The median Wexner fecal incontinence score improved from 15.5 ± 3.6 before to 6.7 ± 5 during sacral nerve stimulation (p < 0.001). Sacral nerve stimulation did not affect the threshold for urge to defecate during rectal distension (p = 0.64) but reduced the threshold from stimulation of the anal canal by 50% (p = 0.03). No statistically significant differences were found in latencies, amplitudes, or spectral analysis. This is a pilot study of limited size. In patients with idiopathic fecal incontinence, sacral nerve stimulation reduced the threshold for urge to defecate elicited from the anal canal, whereas supraspinal responses remained unaltered. This may suggest that sacral nerve stimulation, at least in part, acts via somatic afferent fibers enhancing anal sensation.

  13. Survival from anal cancer among Hispanics-Puerto Rico, 2000-2007.

    PubMed

    Colon-Lopez, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Torres-Cintrón, Mariela; Perez, Naydi; Mercado-Acosta, Juan José; Guiot, Humberto M; Suarez, Erick

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing, particularly among HIV and men who have sex with men (MSM) groups. The vast majority of cases are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection. Epidemiological studies have also documented low survival, which might be linked to lack of appropriate screening, access, and utilization of pertinent health care services. Our objective was to assess the relative survival (1 and 3 years) of anal cancer in Puerto Rico for men and women during the period from 2000-2007. All histological types of cancer of anus, anal canal, and anorectum (ICD-O-3 codes C210-C218), except for sarcomas, were included. Relative survival was estimated with the use of life tables from the population of Puerto Rico. In addition, the excess survival was compared by age at diagnosis, histology, and stage (defined as local, regional, or distant), using the Poisson regression model. The overall 3-year relative survival in Puerto Rico was the same (53 %) for men and women. Our findings establish baseline survival data for anal cancer in Hispanics from Puerto Rico. Since now, the national guidelines for anal cancer screening and treatment are on their way to be determined; baseline information about survival will allow monitoring the efficacy that standardized screening programs may eventually have in increasing anal cancer survival in this population.

  14. Anal Cancer: An Examination of Radiotherapy Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Lim, Faye

    2011-04-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9811, ACCORD-03, and ACT II Phase III trials in anal cancer showed no benefit for cisplatin-based induction and maintenance chemotherapy, or radiation dose-escalation >59 Gy. This review examines the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation (CRT) in anal cancer, and discusses potential alternative radiotherapy strategies. The evidence for the review was compiled from randomized and nonrandomized trials of radiation therapy and CRT. A total of 103 retrospective/observational studies, 4 Phase I/II studies, 16 Phase II prospective studies, 2 randomized Phase II studies, and 6 Phase III trials of radiotherapy or chemoradiation were identified. There are no meta-analyses based on individual patient data. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach for all stages of anal cancer is inappropriate. Early T1 tumors are probably currently overtreated, whereas T3/T4 lesions might merit escalation of treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy or the integration of biological therapy may play a role in future.

  15. The Prognostic Value of HPV Status and p16 Expression in Patients with Carcinoma of the Anal Canal

    PubMed Central

    Roldán Urgoiti, Gloria B.; Gustafson, Karla; Klimowicz, Alexander C.; Petrillo, Stephanie K.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Doll, Corinne M.

    2014-01-01

    Background In anal cancer studies, the detection frequency of high-risk HPV (human papillomavirus) is variable, depending on the method used. There are limited data reporting results of different HPV detection techniques in the same clinical series, and very few correlating results with clinical outcome. Objectives To evaluate tumor expression of p16/HPV16 using three different methods, and to determine their association with clinical outcome in patients with anal canal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Design This retrospective study included patients with anal canal SCC treated with definitive radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy at a single institution between 1992 and 2005. Formalin-fixed paraffin–embedded tumor samples from 53 of the 89 (60%) patient pre-treatment biopsies were adequate for tissue microarray construction. HPV status was determined using: p16 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitative IHC (AQUA), HPV genotype analysis by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and HPV linear array sub-typing. Expression status was correlated with clinical outcome. Results 80% (28/35) of patient tumors had high p16 expression using conventional IHC. HPV16 CISH was positive in 81% (34/42) of tumors, and 78% (28/36) of tumors were HPV subtype 16. HPV16 CISH correlated with p16 evaluated by conventional IHC (correlation coefficient 0.46; p = 0.01) and by p16 AQUA score (correlation coefficient 0.49; p = 0.001). A subset of cases (15%) had very high p16 quantitative IHC scores (>244) and were associated with a higher incidence of local or distant recurrence (p = 0.04). Conclusions The vast majority (80%) of anal canal SCC in our series were positive for HPV16/p16, regardless of the testing method used. The exploratory analysis of automated quantitative IHC scoring was the only technique to define a subset of patients with a worse prognosis by p16 expression status on univariate analysis. Further exploration of the molecular

  16. Anal anatomy and normal histology.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Priti

    2012-12-01

    The focus of this article is the anatomy and histology of the anal canal, and its clinical relevance to anal cancers. The article also highlights the recent histological and anatomical changes to the traditional terminology of the anal canal. The terminology has been adopted by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, separating the anal region into the anal canal, the perianal region and the skin. This paper describes the gross anatomy of the anal canal, along with its associated blood supply, venous and lymphatic drainage, and nerve supply. The new terminology referred to in this article may assist clinicians and health care providers to identify lesions more precisely through naked eye observation and without the need for instrumentation. Knowledge of the regional anatomy of the anus will also assist in management decisions.

  17. Biomarkers in anal cancer: from biological understanding to stratified treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher M; Goh, Vicky; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Gilbert, Duncan C

    2017-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the anus and anal canal represent a model of a cancer and perhaps the first where level 1 evidence supported primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in treating locoregional disease with curative intent. The majority of tumours are associated with infection with oncogenic subtypes of human papilloma virus and this plays a significant role in their sensitivity to treatment. However, not all tumours are cured with CRT and there remain opportunities to improve outcomes in terms of oncological control and also reducing late toxicities. Understanding the biology of ASCC promises to allow a more personalised approach to treatment, with the development and validation of a range of biomarkers and associated techniques that are the focus of this review. PMID:27923035

  18. Biomarkers in anal cancer: from biological understanding to stratified treatment.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher M; Goh, Vicky; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Gilbert, Duncan C

    2017-01-17

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the anus and anal canal represent a model of a cancer and perhaps the first where level 1 evidence supported primary chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in treating locoregional disease with curative intent. The majority of tumours are associated with infection with oncogenic subtypes of human papilloma virus and this plays a significant role in their sensitivity to treatment. However, not all tumours are cured with CRT and there remain opportunities to improve outcomes in terms of oncological control and also reducing late toxicities. Understanding the biology of ASCC promises to allow a more personalised approach to treatment, with the development and validation of a range of biomarkers and associated techniques that are the focus of this review.

  19. [Squamous carcinoma of the anal canal and its variations. Personal experience and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Messinetti, S; Marzullo, A; Giacomelli, L; Manno, A; Pavone, M G; Fabrizio, G; Finizio, R; Porcelli, C; Granai, A V

    1994-01-01

    Six cases of anal canal squamous carcinoma are presented. The authors precise the present view about pathological, epidemiological, clinical and therapeutical aspects of these lesions. They stress, also, the primary role of embryology and anatomy in the oncogenesis of such tumours; the importance to single out specific population at risk, absolutely different from the typical one for rectal adenocarcinoma and the role of chemoradiation therapy as treatment of choice of these neoplasms. Particular importance is given to modern histologic and histogenetic classification of these tumours, stressing the difficulties to distinguish the various histologic types.

  20. Anal fissures associated with targeted therapies in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Squires, Jennifer

    2009-12-01

    Although ovarian cancer remains a leading cause of gynecologic cancer death, targeted therapies are improving patient outcomes. Anal fissures are a side effect of targeted therapies that can disrupt or stop treatment regimens. Diagnosis and management of anal fissures by advanced practice nurses are crucial for maintaining the quality of life of patients with ovarian cancer.

  1. DOES ENDOSCOPIC ULTRASOUND IMPROVE DETECTION OF LOCALLY RECURRENT ANAL SQUAMOUS CELL CANCER?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Carrie Y.; Weiser, Martin R.; Paty, Philip B.; Guillem, Jose G.; Nash, Garrett M.; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Patil, Sujata; Temple, Larissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Evaluating patients for recurrent anal cancer after primary treatment can be difficult due to distorted anatomy and scarring. Many institutions incorporate endoscopic ultrasound to improve detection, but the effectiveness is unknown. Objective To compare the effectiveness of digital rectal exam and endoscopic ultrasound during routine follow-up of anal cancer patients in detecting locally recurrent disease. Design Retrospective, single-institution review Settings Oncologic tertiary referral center Patients 175 patients with nonmetastatic anal squamous cell cancer without persistent disease after primary chemoradiotherapy who had at least one post-treatment ultrasound and examination by a colorectal surgeon. Main Outcome Measures First modality to detect local recurrence, concordance, crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value. Results 855 endoscopic ultrasounds and 873 digital rectal exams were performed during 35 months median follow-up. Overall, ultrasound detected 7 (0.8%) mesorectal and 32 (3.7%) anal canal abnormalities; digital exam detected 69 (7.9%) anal canal abnormalities. Locally recurrent disease was found on biopsy in 8 patients, all detected first or only with digital exam. Four patients did not have an ultrasound at the time of diagnosis of recurrence. The concordance of ultrasound and digital exam in detecting recurrent disease was fair at 0.37 (SE 0.08, 95% CI 0.21-0.54) and there was no difference in crude cancer detection rate, sensitivity, specificity, and negative or positive predictive values. Limitations The heterogeneity of follow-up timing and exams is not standardized in this study but is reflective of general practice. Conclusions Endoscopic ultrasound did not provide any advantage over digital rectal examination in identifying locally recurrent anal cancer, and should not be recommended for routine surveillance. PMID:25585077

  2. Rectogesic (glyceryl trinitrate 0.2%) ointment relieves symptoms of haemorrhoids associated with high resting anal canal pressures.

    PubMed

    Tjandra, J J; Tan, J J Y; Lim, J F; Murray-Green, C; Kennedy, M L; Lubowski, D Z

    2007-06-01

    Some haemorrhoids are associated with high resting anal canal pressures. The aim of this study was to assess if Rectogesic, a topical glyceryl trinitrate 0.2% ointment was effective in relieving symptoms of early grade haemorrhoids associated with high resting anal canal pressures. This was a prospective, two-centre, open label study of 58 patients with persistent haemorrhoidal symptoms. Patients with first or second degree haemorrhoids and a maximum resting anal canal pressure > 70 mmHg were included. Rectogesic was applied three times a day for 14 days. Anorectal manometry was performed 30 min after the first application of Rectogesic. A 28-day diary was completed during 14 days of therapy and for 14 days after cessation of treatment. This recorded the incidence of rectal bleeding, and visual analogue scales for anal pain, throbbing, pruritus, irritation and difficulty in bowel movement. Maximum resting anal canal pressures were reduced after application of Rectogesic (115.0 +/- 40.4 mmHg vs 94.7 +/- 34.1 mmHg, P < 0.001). In the study period and at 14 days after cessation of Rectogesic, there was significant reduction in rectal bleeding (P = 0.0002), and significant improvement of anal pain (P = 0.0024), throbbing (P = 0.0355), pruritus (P = 0.0043), irritation (P = 0.0000) and difficulty in bowel movement (P = 0.001). The main adverse event was headache in 43.1% of patients. Rectogesic is a safe and feasible treatment for patients with early grade haemorrhoids associated with high resting anal canal pressures.

  3. Summary of emerging targets in anal cancer: the case for an immunotherapy based-approach

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Van

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA) remains a less common gastrointestinal malignancy despite a continued increase in the annual incidence in the United States and globally. The vast majority of all cases are attributed to persistent infection and integration into host cell DNA by human papillomavirus (HPV). For patients with metastatic anal cancer, there is currently no accepted consensus standard of care. Given the viral etiology associated with the oncogenesis of this tumor, great interest exists for the development of immunotherapy as a novel approach to improving clinical outcomes for patients afflicted with this disease. This review highlights various immunotherapies under investigation in the treatment of advanced human malignancies and discusses their potential as future treatments for metastatic anal cancer. PMID:27747086

  4. A qualitative investigation among men who have sex with men on the acceptability of performing a self- or partner anal exam to screen for anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Butame, Seyram A; Lawler, Sylvia; Hicks, Joseph T; Wilkerson, J Michael; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Baraniuk, Sarah; Ross, Michael W; Chiao, Elizabeth Yu; Nyitray, Alan G

    2017-08-04

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary cause of anal cancer, a disease that disproportionately affects men who have sex with men (MSM); however, there is no uniform screening protocol to detect anal cancer. This qualitative study explores whether a self-anal exam (SAE) or partner anal exam (PAE), that includes self-palpation or palpation of a partner's anal canal, is an acceptable and self-efficacious screening test, which will cue appropriate follow-up care in MSM. Twenty-four MSM living in Houston took part in four focus group sessions eliciting their responses to a study teaching them to perform an SAE or PAE (SAE/PAE). Participants were asked about the acceptability and feasibility of executing an SAE/PAE routinely. Thematic analysis of session transcripts was used to identify common patterns in participant responses. Overall, participants expressed self-efficacy for performing an SAE/PAE and voiced a preference for being taught the procedure by a clinician. Participants agreed that they would consult with a clinician if they ever discovered an abnormality while performing an SAE/PAE. A lack of knowledge about anal cancer among MSM may present a barrier to adopting SAE/PAE. In discussing their experience of the exams, some participants suggested that it could become a routine practice for them. Our findings suggest that SAE and PAE, as a screen for anal cancer, are acceptable and feasible to MSM. Future research should explore attitudes and beliefs of MSM, with the aim of improving anal cancer education and understanding of pathologic findings.

  5. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  6. Effect of age, gender, and parity on anal canal pressures. Contribution of impaired anal sphincter function to fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    McHugh, S M; Diamant, N E

    1987-07-01

    The contribution of the resting anal canal pressure (RAP) and the maximal squeeze pressure (MSP) to the problem of fecal incontinence was assessed by comparing 143 incontinent patients to a control population of 157 healthy subjects. These parameters were determined using a multilumen continuously perfused catheter and a mechanized rapid pull-through technique. In 10 male volunteers both RAP and MSP were determined using catheters that varied from 3 mm to 18 mm in diameter. In the control population, the RAP was significantly lower in females 40 years of age and over as compared to males. MSP values were significantly lower in females at virtually all ages. In women, parity did not correlate with RAP (coefficient = -0.099, P greater than 0.05) and MSP (coefficient = -0.123, P greater than 0.05) and any decrease in pressures was related to aging. Aging in women was associated with a consistent reduction in RAP (coefficient = -0.614, P less than 0.00005) and MSP (coefficient = -0.372, P = 0.0006). In males, there was a similar but less impressive age-related reduction for the RAP (coefficient = -0.333, P = 0.006) but not for the MSP (coefficient = -0.196, P greater than 0.05). Nine percent of the volunteer population were essentially unable to increase the RAP with maximal squeeze efforts. A linear increase in anal pressures was recorded as catheter diameter increased from 3 to 12 mm. Normative data for the RAP and MSP (mean +/- 2 SD) were constructed for each sex on a decade basis and showed a wide range of pressures for each age grouping. In the group with fecal incontinence (FI) 39% of females and 44% of males fell within the "normal" range for both the RAP and MSP. For all patients with FI, 41% and 17% had impairment of one or both parameters, respectively. It is concluded that: aging affects the RAP in both sexes but to a greater degree in women. The MSP is related to aging in women only; child bearing has no effect upon these parameters; clinical problems of

  7. Does an erroneous diagnosis of squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal and anal margin at first physician visit influence prognosis?

    PubMed

    Jensen, S L; Hagen, K; Shokouh-Amiri, M H; Nielsen, O V

    1987-05-01

    Patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the anal canal (n = 125) and its margin (n = 76) were divided into five groups: those with an erroneous diagnosis and a correct diagnosis made at first physician visit; those with a history of less than six months, between six and 18 months, and more than 18 months. Patients with canal tumors had an erroneous diagnosis made more frequently than patients with margin tumors. In both groups patients with an erroneous diagnosis had longer histories than patients with a correct diagnosis. Among patients with erroneously diagnosed canal tumor, pain, the feeling of a lump, anal discharge, and pruritus ani occurred less frequently than among correctly diagnosed patients. The prognosis was worse among patients with erroneously diagnosed canal tumors compared with correctly diagnosed patients. Such a difference could not be found among patients with margin tumors. There was a gradual worsening of the prognosis among patients with increasing length of history and canal tumors, in contrast to patients with margin tumors, in whom only a history of more than 18 months was associated with a worse prognosis.

  8. Basal internal anal sphincter tone, inhibitory neurotransmission, and other factors contributing to the maintenance of high pressures in the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Rattan, S; Singh, J

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of the basal tone in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for rectoanal continence. Effective evacuation requires a fully functional rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR)-mediated relaxation of the IAS via inhibitory neurotransmission (INT). Systematic studies examining the nature of the INT in different species have identified nitric oxide (NO) as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter. However, other mediators such as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), ATP, and carbon monoxide (CO) may also play species-specific role under certain experimental conditions. Measurements of the intraluminal pressures in the IAS along with the force of the isolated IAS tissues are the mainstay in the basic studies for the molecular mechanisms underlying the basal tone and in the nature of the INT. The identification of NO as the inhibitory neurotransmitter has led to major advances in the diagnosis and treatment of a number of rectoanal motility disorders associated with the IAS dysfunction. Besides the IAS, the high pressures in the anal canal are affected by the external anal sphincter (EAS) function, and its malfunction may also lead to rectoanal incontinence. Different approaches including biofeedback have been attempted to improve the EAS function, with variable outcomes. There is a dire need for the innovative ways to improve the week high pressures zone in the anal canal. This viewpoint focuses on two studies that extend the above concept of multiplicity of inhibitory neurotransmitters (Neurogastroenterol Motil 2011 23 e11–25), and that high pressures in the anal canal can be improved by the EAS plication (Neurogastroenterol Motil 2011 23 70–5). © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Dosimetric comparison of IMRT rectal and anal canal plans generated using an anterior dose avoidance structure.

    PubMed

    Leicher, Brian; Day, Ellen; Colonias, Athanasios; Gayou, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    To describe a dosimetric method using an anterior dose avoidance structure (ADAS) during the treatment planning process for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with anal canal and rectal carcinomas. A total of 20 patients were planned on the Elekta/CMS XiO treatment planning system, version 4.5.1 (Maryland Heights MO) with a superposition algorithm. For each patient, 2 plans were created: one employing an ADAS (ADAS plan) and the other replanned without an ADAS (non-ADAS plan). The ADAS was defined to occupy the volume between the inguinal nodes and primary target providing a single organ at risk that is completely outside of the target volume. Each plan used the same beam parameters and was analyzed by comparing target coverage, overall plan dose conformity using a conformity number (CN) equation, bowel dose-volume histograms, and the number of segments, daily treatment duration, and global maximum dose. The ADAS and non-ADAS plans were equivalent in target coverage, mean global maximum dose, and sparing of small bowel in low-dose regions (5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy). The mean difference between the CN value for the non-ADAS plans and ADAS plans was 0.04 ± 0.03 (p < 0.001). The mean difference in the number of segments was 15.7 ± 12.7 (p < 0.001) in favor of ADAS plans. The ADAS plan delivery time was shorter by 2.0 ± 1.5 minutes (p < 0.001) than the non-ADAS one. The ADAS has proven to be a powerful tool when planning rectal and anal canal IMRT cases with critical structures partially contained inside the target volume.

  10. Dosimetric comparison of IMRT rectal and anal canal plans generated using an anterior dose avoidance structure

    SciTech Connect

    Leicher, Brian; Day, Ellen; Colonias, Athanasios; Gayou, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    To describe a dosimetric method using an anterior dose avoidance structure (ADAS) during the treatment planning process for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with anal canal and rectal carcinomas. A total of 20 patients were planned on the Elekta/CMS XiO treatment planning system, version 4.5.1 (Maryland Heights MO) with a superposition algorithm. For each patient, 2 plans were created: one employing an ADAS (ADAS plan) and the other replanned without an ADAS (non-ADAS plan). The ADAS was defined to occupy the volume between the inguinal nodes and primary target providing a single organ at risk that is completely outside of the target volume. Each plan used the same beam parameters and was analyzed by comparing target coverage, overall plan dose conformity using a conformity number (CN) equation, bowel dose-volume histograms, and the number of segments, daily treatment duration, and global maximum dose. The ADAS and non-ADAS plans were equivalent in target coverage, mean global maximum dose, and sparing of small bowel in low-dose regions (5, 10, 15, and 20 Gy). The mean difference between the CN value for the non-ADAS plans and ADAS plans was 0.04 ± 0.03 (p < 0.001). The mean difference in the number of segments was 15.7 ± 12.7 (p < 0.001) in favor of ADAS plans. The ADAS plan delivery time was shorter by 2.0 ± 1.5 minutes (p < 0.001) than the non-ADAS one. The ADAS has proven to be a powerful tool when planning rectal and anal canal IMRT cases with critical structures partially contained inside the target volume.

  11. Extramammary Paget’s Disease of Anal Canal Associated With Rectal Adenoma Without Invasive Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chumbalkar, Vaibhav; Jennings, Timothy A.; Ainechi, Sanaz; Lee, Edward C.; Lee, Hwajeong

    2016-01-01

    Extramammary Paget’s disease (EMPD) is a rare disease which is found in apocrine-rich locations such as anogenital region, axilla and rarely in other sites. Perianal EMPD is often reported as the involvement of perianal skin, but involvement of anal mucosa is very rare. Based on pathogenesis and association with either synchronous or metachronous malignancy, EMPD can be divided into primary and secondary types. Treatment approach for these two types of Paget’s disease and their prognosis is different, thus it is important to make the distinction. Secondary type of Paget’s disease is almost always described in association with invasive malignancy. While secondary Paget’s disease arising in association with ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast is common, secondary EMPD associated with precursor lesion of the rectum without invasion is exceedingly rare. We report a very rare case of secondary Paget’s disease of the anal canal in association with rectal tubular adenoma (precursor lesion) without malignancy. PMID:28058078

  12. Cancer incidence in the Love Canal area

    SciTech Connect

    Janerich, D.T.; Burnett, W.S.; Feck, G.; Hoff, M.; Nasca, P.; Polednak, A.P.; Greenwald, P.; Vianna, N.

    1981-06-01

    Data from the New York Cancer Registry show no evidence for higher cancer rates associated with residence near the Love Canal toxic waste burial site in comparison with the entire state outside of New York City. Rates of liver cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia, which were selected for special attention, were not consistently elevated. Among the other cancers studied, a higher rate was noted only for respiratory cancer, but it was not consistent across age groups and appeared to be related to a high rate for the entire city of Niagara Falls. There was no evidence that the lung cancer rate was associated with the toxic wastes buried at the dump site.

  13. Cancer incidence in the Love Canal area.

    PubMed

    Janerich, D T; Burnett, W S; Feck, G; Hoff, M; Nasca, P; Polednak, A P; Greenwald, P; Vianna, N

    1981-06-19

    Data from the New York Cancer Registry show no evidence for higher cancer rates associated with residence near the Love Canal toxic waste burial site in comparison with the entire state outside of New York City. Rates of liver cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia, which were selected for special attention, were not consistently elevated. Among the other cancers studied, a higher rate was noted only for respiratory cancer, but it was not consistent across age groups and appeared to be related to a high rate for the entire city of Niagara Falls. There was no evidence that the lung cancer rate was associated with the toxic wastes buried at the dump site.

  14. Effects of ovarian failure on submucosal collagen and blood vessels of the anal canal in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Elbanna, Hosam Ghazy; Abbas, Amr Medhat; Zalata, Khaled; Farid, Mohamed; Ghanum, Wageh; Youssef, Mohamed; Thabet, Waleed Mohamed; El Awady, Saleh; El-Sattar, Mohamed H Abd

    2010-04-01

    Estrogen and progesterone receptors are expressed in the anal canal. Fecal control deteriorates after menopause. This phenomenon is related to decreased circulating levels of estrogen and progesterone due to ovarian failure at menopause. To study the effects of estrogen and progesterone on inflammatory cells, submucosal collagen fibers, and vascular plexus of the anal canal of postmenopausal women. Experiments were performed on samples of anorectal tissue obtained from 40 women, 19 menstruating (group I), and 21 postmenopausal women (group II). Investigations included immunohistochemistry of estrogen and progesterone receptors and CD34. In negative estrogen receptors (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR), inflammatory cells, submucosal blood vessels, collagen type I were nonsignificantly changed in postmenopausal women relative to menstruating women (P > 0.05) whereas, in positive ER and PR, inflammatory cells and collagen I were significantly increased and submucosal blood vessels were significantly decreased in postmenopausal women relative to menstruating women (P < 0.05). Estrogen and progesterone, in menstruating women, produce beneficial effects by decreasing incidence of inflammation and increasing anal canal submucosal blood vessels number and collagen types I, thus both hormones have a positive effect on anal compliance and pressure.

  15. Gradient of pressure and time between proximal anal canal and high-pressure zone during internal anal sphincter relaxation. Its role in the fecal continence mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goes, R N; Simons, A J; Masri, L; Beart, R W

    1995-10-01

    The normal response to rectal distention is a relaxation of the proximal anal canal (PAC). We hypothesized that this mechanism would require a gradient of pressure and time to preserve continence. Sixteen volunteers (10 male), mean age, 41.5 (range, 24-60) years, were studied using an eight port axial catheter with a compliant balloon at its tip. Relaxation was induced by a small volume of rectal distention (15-30 ml of air) and was recorded until recovery of resting anal pressure (RAP). Duration of relaxation was measured until recovery of RAP. Amplitude of relaxation was determined between RAP before rectal distention (RAP-BR) and pressure at the point of maximum relaxation (RAP-PMR). Gradient of pressure was determined by comparing RAP-PMR in the high-pressure zone (HPZ) and PAC. Contraction in the distal anal canal was interpreted as external anal sphincter contraction (EASC) and was compared with RAP-PMR in the HPZ. Relaxation was significantly greater in PAC than in HPZ (50 vs. 36 percent; P = 0.001). RAP-PMR was significantly higher in HPZ than in PAC (30.7 vs. 12.6 mmHg; P = 0.001). EASC was observed in six patients and did not show significant difference with RAP-PMR in HPZ (39.7 vs. 36.3 mmHg; not significant). Relaxation began at the same time in all levels but lasted significantly longer in PAC compared with HPZ (13.5 vs. 9.4 sec; P = 0.003). Anal relaxation induced by small volume rectal distention involves a gradient in the pressure and time of relaxation between PAC and the HPZ.

  16. The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Current Perspective and Future Role in Prevention and Treatment of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Anal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Mudresh R.; Lewis, James S.; Lockhart, A. Craig

    2016-01-01

    The incidences of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal cancer and its precursor lesion, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, are rising in the U.S. and globally. Five-year survival rates with current modalities of treatment for anal cancer are generally favorable for localized and regional disease. For metastatic disease, the relative survival rate is poor. Major contributing factors for the increase in anal cancer incidence include increasing receptive anal intercourse (hetero- and homosexual), increasing HPV infections, and longer life expectancy of treated people who are seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus. Because treatment outcomes with systemic therapy in patients with advanced disease are so poor, prevention may be the best approach for reducing disease burden. The association of a major causative agent with anal cancer provides an excellent opportunity for prevention and treatment. The advent of the HPV vaccine for anal cancer prevention and treatment is a significant milestone and has the potential to greatly impact these cancers. The data regarding potential use of the HPV vaccine in anal cancer prevention and treatment are reviewed. Implications for Practice: The incidences of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal cancer and its precursor lesion, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, are on the rise in the U.S. and globally. Based on recent studies, the HPV vaccine is approved for prevention of the infection and development of HPV-related anal cancer. In addition, several small studies have shown that the vaccine may be useful as adjuvant therapy for anal cancer. There is a need for public health strategies aimed at education of both patients and practitioners to improve the use of the vaccine for prevention of HPV-related anal cancer. The development of a therapeutic vaccine is a work in progress. PMID:26961923

  17. The Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Current Perspective and Future Role in Prevention and Treatment of Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Felix A; Mehta, Mudresh R; Lewis, James S; Lockhart, A Craig

    2016-04-01

    The incidences of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal cancer and its precursor lesion, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, are rising in the U.S. and globally. Five-year survival rates with current modalities of treatment for anal cancer are generally favorable for localized and regional disease. For metastatic disease, the relative survival rate is poor. Major contributing factors for the increase in anal cancer incidence include increasing receptive anal intercourse (hetero- and homosexual), increasing HPV infections, and longer life expectancy of treated people who are seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus. Because treatment outcomes with systemic therapy in patients with advanced disease are so poor, prevention may be the best approach for reducing disease burden. The association of a major causative agent with anal cancer provides an excellent opportunity for prevention and treatment. The advent of the HPV vaccine for anal cancer prevention and treatment is a significant milestone and has the potential to greatly impact these cancers. The data regarding potential use of the HPV vaccine in anal cancer prevention and treatment are reviewed. The incidences of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal cancer and its precursor lesion, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, are on the rise in the U.S. and globally. Based on recent studies, the HPV vaccine is approved for prevention of the infection and development of HPV-related anal cancer. In addition, several small studies have shown that the vaccine may be useful as adjuvant therapy for anal cancer. There is a need for public health strategies aimed at education of both patients and practitioners to improve the use of the vaccine for prevention of HPV-related anal cancer. The development of a therapeutic vaccine is a work in progress. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. [Adenocarcinoma of anal canal. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pollastri, E; Brosutti, O; Montenovo, A; Bergero, A; Moroni, J

    1994-01-01

    Carcinomas of the anal channel includes only 2 to 6 per cent of all colorectal tumors. They are squamous cell carcinomas, cloacogenic carcinoma and unusually, adenocarcinomas. A 41 year old man in which an adenocarcinoma of the anal channel developed within a chronic perianal fistula, is presented. A review of the literature about adenocarcinoma or the anus is made, and then the incidence, probable etiologies, biologic behavior, clinical features, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment are enunciated. This rare tumor is associated with chronic inflammatory disease of the anal channel because of its etiology (fistula-in-ano, condyloma acuminata), because of cellular changes that are perpetuated by local immunologic blockade. We conclude that any chronic inflammatory disease must be treated early and adequately to avoid metaplastic and frank neoplastic changes. A deep and early biopsy of any benign lesion must be made if it does not respond to treatment, and a histopathologic exam of any tissue resected in orificial surgery must be performed. We suggest to use the classification of histological typing used by the W.H.O. and the staging of cancer by the U.I.C.C. and A.J.C.C. (1987).

  19. ACR Appropriateness Criteria®-Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Theodore S; Pretz, Jennifer L; Herman, Joseph M; Abdel-Wahab, May; Azad, Nilofer; Blackstock, A William; Das, Prajnan; Goodman, Karyn A; Jabbour, Salma K; Jones, William E; Konski, Andre A; Koong, Albert C; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel; Small, William; Thomas, Charles R; Zook, Jennifer; Suh, W Warren

    2014-01-01

    The management of anal cancer is driven by randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials. However, trials may present conflicting conclusions. Furthermore, different clinical situations may not be addressed in certain trials because of eligibility inclusion criteria. Although prospective studies point to the use of definitive 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C-based chemoradiation as a standard, some areas remain that are not well defined. In particular, management of very early stage disease, radiation dose, and the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy remain unaddressed by phase III studies. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Appropriateness Criteria® are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  20. Dosimetric planning study for the prevention of anal complications after post-operative whole pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Baek, J G; Kim, E C; Kim, S K; Jang, H

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced anal toxicity can be induced by low radiation doses in patients with haemorrhoids. The object of this study was to determine the dosimetric benefits of different whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) techniques in terms of dose delivered to the anal canal in post-operative patients with cervical cancer. The planning CT images of 10 patients with cervical cancer undergoing postoperative radiotherapy were used for comparison of three different plans. All patients had been treated using the conventional box technique WPRT (CV-WPRT), and we tried low-margin-modified WPRT (LM-WPRT), three-dimensional conformal techniques WPRT (CF-WPRT) and intensity-modulated WPRT (IM-WPRT) planning for dosimetric comparison of the anal canal, retrospectively. Mean anal canal doses of the IM-WPRT were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those of CV-WPRT, LM-WPRT and CF-WPRT, and V10, V20, V30 and V40 to the anal canal were also significantly lower for IM-WPRT (p < 0.05). The proportion of planning target volumes (PTVs) that received ≥98% of the prescribed dose for all plans was >99%, and the proportion that received ≥108% of the prescribed dose for IM-WPRT was <2%. Volumes of bladders and rectums that received ≥30 or ≥40 Gy were significantly lower for IM-WPRT than for three of the four-field WPRT plans (p = 0.000). IM-WPRT can significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to the anal canal and does not compromise PTV coverage. In patients with haemorrhoids, IM-WPRT may be of value for the prevention of anal complications. Although tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients undergoing post-operative WPRT, patients with haemorrhoids may suffer complications at low radiation doses. The present study shows IM-WPRT can be meaningful in these patients.

  1. Squamous anal cancer: patient characteristics and HPV type distribution.

    PubMed

    Ouhoummane, N; Steben, M; Coutlée, F; Vuong, Te; Forest, P; Rodier, C; Louchini, R; Duarte, E; Brassard, P

    2013-12-01

    Infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is strongly associated with anal cancer. However, detailed studies on HPV type distribution by gender and age are limited. Retrospective study of 606 invasive anal cancers diagnosed between 1990 and 2005 in two large urban areas of the province of Québec, Canada. Cases were identified from hospitalization registry. Patient characteristics were collected from medical files. Archived anal squamous cancer specimens were available from 96 patients and were tested for HPV DNA and typing. Variant analysis was performed on 16 consecutive and 24 non-consecutive HPV16-positive samples to assess potential contamination during amplification. Among the 606 patients with anal cancers, 366 (60%) were women. Median age at diagnosis was 63 years. HPV was detected in 88/96 (92%) of cases. HPV16 was the most frequent type detected in 90% of HPV-positive specimens. Other types including 6, 11, 18, 33, 52, 53, 56, 58, 62 and 82 were also found. HPV 97 was not detected. HPV prevalence was associated with female gender and younger age. No contamination occurred during amplification as shown by the subset of 41 HPV16-positive samples, as 37, 2 and 1 isolates were from the European, African and Asian lineages, respectively. The most frequent variants were G1 (n=22) and the prototype (n=12). Women with anal cancer are at higher risk for anal HPV infection, and HPV infection, especially HPV16, is strongly associated with squamous anal cancer. Therefore, HPV vaccine could potentially prevent the occurrence of anal cancer in both men and women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Clinical to target volume margins determination in radiotherapy for anal cancers].

    PubMed

    Libois, V; Mahé, M-A; Rio, E; Maingon, P

    2016-10-01

    There are very few data on the expansion from the clinical target volume (CTV) to the planning target volume (PTV) in the anal cancer treatment. This article aims to collect the different elements needed for the construction of a PTV from scientific data based on a literature analysis. We reviewed the articles published in the medical literature from the last 20years. They concerned setup errors and internal organ mobility of the different volumes of patients treated by conformational radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (anal canal, meso-rectum, common, intern and extern, inguinal and pre-sacral lymph nodes). CTV to PTV margins admitted in the guidelines and atlas of consensus groups (SFRO, RTOG, AGITG) are from 0.7 to 1cm in all directions, based on expert's opinions but not on scientific data. There are no specific studies on the canal anal mobility. Most of the data are from other pelvis cancers (gynecologic, rectum and prostate). Setup errors can be reduced by daily imaging. Patient repositioning and immobilization modalities are mostly local habits rather than scientific consensus. A three-dimensional 1cm margin is generally admitted. Margins reduction must be careful and has to be assessed.

  3. [A Case of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal with a Perianal Abscess].

    PubMed

    Adikrisna, Rama; Udagawa, Masaru; Sugita, Yuusuke; Ishii, Takeshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yabata, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    A 72-year-old female patient was referred to our department because she felt pain at the anus with pus discharge. Physical examination revealed a tumor on the left side of the anus, and a subcutaneous induration near the tumor. Abdominal CT scan revealed an irregularly shaped tumor with abscess formation. There were no enlarged lymph nodes or distant metastasis. Anal canal carcinoma (cStage Ⅱ) with a complication of perianal abscess was suspected, so we performed surgical incision and drainage. A biopsy of the tumor led to the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. However, because surgical drainage alone was not effective for treatment of the abscess, colostomy of the sigmoid colon was carried out 14 days after admission. After chemoradiation therapy (5-FU 800 mg/m2/day on days 1-4 and 29-32, mitomycin C [MMC] 10 mg/m2 on days 1 and 29, and radiation with a total dose 54 Gy), the tumor disappeared completely, considered to be a complete response. Twenty months after chemoradiation, there were no signs of recurrence.

  4. Anatomically Realistic Three-Dimensional Meshes of the Pelvic Floor & Anal Canal for Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Noakes, Kimberley F.; Bissett, Ian P.; Pullan, Andrew J.; Cheng, Leo K.

    2014-01-01

    Three anatomically realistic meshes, suitable for finite element analysis, of the pelvic floor and anal canal regions have been developed to provide a framework with which to examine the mechanics, via finite element analysis of normal function within the pelvic floor. Two cadaver-based meshes were produced using the Visible Human Project (male and female) cryosection data sets, and a third mesh was produced based on MR image data from a live subject. The Visible Man (VM) mesh included 10 different pelvic structures while the Visible Woman and MRI meshes contained 14 and 13 structures respectively. Each image set was digitized and then finite element meshes were created using an iterative fitting procedure with smoothing constraints calculated from ‘L’-curves. These weights produced accurate geometric meshes of each pelvic structure with average Root Mean Square (RMS) fitting errors of less than 1.15 mm. The Visible Human cadaveric data provided high resolution images, however, the cadaveric meshes lacked the normal dynamic form of living tissue and suffered from artifacts related to postmortem changes. The lower resolution MRI mesh was able to accurately portray structure of the living subject and paves the way for dynamic, functional modeling. PMID:18317929

  5. Interstitial curietherapy in the conservative treatment of anal and rectal cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Papillon, J.; Montbarbon, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Chassard, J.L.; Ardiet, J.M. )

    1989-12-01

    Conservative treatment has become a valid alternative to radical surgery in most cases of cancer of the anal canal and in selected cases of cancer of the low rectum. In this strategy interstitial curietherapy has an appreciable role to play. The results of a series of 369 patients followed more than 3 years indicate that implantation of Iridium-192 is effective not as sole treatment but as a booster dose 2 months after a course of external beam or intracavitary irradiation. The dose delivered did not exceed 20 to 30 Gy and the implantations were always performed in one plane using either a plastic template or a steel fork. Three groups of cases must be considered: (a) among 221 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal, the rate of death related to treatment failures was 20% and among the patients cured more than 90% retained normal sphincter function. (b) In 90 patients with T1-T2 invasive adenocarcinoma of the rectum, Iridium-192 was carried out after four applications of contact X ray therapy. The rate of control was 84%. (c) In 62 elderly, poor risk patients with T2-T3 tumor of the low rectum initially suitable for an abdomino-perineal resection, a tentative extension of the field of conservation was made using a split-course protocol combining a short course of external beam irradiation at a dose of 30-35 Gy in 10 fractions over 12 days and an Iridium-192 implant. The rate of death due to treatment failures was 14.5% and among the patients controlled 97% had a normal anal function. These results show that implantations of Iridium-192 may contribute to the control of anal and rectal cancers and may spare many patients a permanent colostomy, but the treatment requires great care in patient selection, treatment protocol, technical details, and follow-up. This treatment policy must be conceived as a team work of radiation oncologists and surgeons.

  6. Cancer Incidence among Former Love Canal Residents

    PubMed Central

    Gensburg, Lenore J.; Pantea, Cristian; Kielb, Christine; Fitzgerald, Edward; Stark, Alice; Kim, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Background The Love Canal was a rectangular 16-acre, 10-ft-deep chemical waste landfill situated in a residential neighborhood in Niagara Falls, New York. This seriously contaminated site came to public attention in 1978. Only one prior study examined cancer incidence in former residents of the Love Canal neighborhood (LC). Objective In this study we aimed to describe cancer incidence in former LC residents from 1979 to 1996 and to investigate whether it differs from that of New York State (NYS) and Niagara County (NC). Methods From 1978 to 1982, we interviewed 6,181 former residents, and 5,052 were eligible to be included in this study. In 1996, we identified 304 cancer diagnoses in this cohort using the NYS Cancer Registry. We compared LC cancer incidence with that of NYS and NC using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), and we compared risks within the LC group by potential exposure to the landfill using survival analysis. Results SIRs were elevated for cancers of the bladder [SIRNYS = 1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.91–2.16] and kidney (SIRNYS = 1.48; 95% CI, 0.76–2.58). Although CIs included 1.00, other studies have linked these cancers to chemicals similar to those found at Love Canal. We also found higher rates of bladder cancer among residents exposed as children, based on two cases. Conclusions In explaining these excess risks, the role of exposure to the landfill is unclear given such limitations as a relatively small and incomplete study cohort, imprecise exposure measurements, and the exclusion of cancers diagnosed before 1979. Given the relatively young age of the cohort, further surveillance is warranted. PMID:19672407

  7. Inguinal sentinel lymph node biopsy for staging anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Péley, G; Farkas, E; Sinkovics, I; Kovács, T; Keresztes, S; Orosz, Z; Köves, I

    2002-01-01

    The optimal treatment of clinically negative inguinal lymph nodes in patients with primary anal cancer has not yet been clearly defined. The presence of metastases in the inguinal lymph nodes is an adverse prognostic factor for anal cancer. In the present study the feasibility of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for staging anal cancer was investigated. From September 1999 to March 2002, 8 patients with biopsy proven primary anal cancer underwent lymphoscintigraphy and dual-agent guided inguinal SLNB for nodal staging before starting multimodality treatment. Inguinal SLNB was successful in all 8 patients (13 groins). A total of 20 hot and blue SLNs (mean 1,5 (1-2) per groins) were removed. In 2 patients (25%) the SLN was positive for metastasis. Lymphoscintigraphy followed by dual-agent guided inguinal SLNB is technically feasible for staging patients with primary anal cancer. The detection of metastases in the removed sentinel lymph node(s) may alter the treatment and thus may improve the locoregional control and overall survival of these patients.

  8. Development of new drug strategies in infrequent digestive tumors: esophageal, biliary tract, and anal cancers.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Jaume; Ramos, Francisco Javier; Macarulla, Teresa; Elez, Elena; Ruiz-Echarri, Manuel; Perez-Garcia, Jose; Tabernero, Josep

    2009-07-01

    In the last years, interesting advances have been reported in the treatment of infrequent digestive tumors. The increasing development of new targeted therapies in human cancer has also impacted in these rare gastrointestinal malignancies providing a wide range of possibilities in the design of future clinical trials. The inhibition of angiogenesis and the blockage of the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway have provided the most interesting activity in recently reported studies for esophageal and biliary tract carcinomas. Additionally, several targeted therapies have been developed to target the main kinase proteins of the most important pathways of these malignancies. The results of the biggest phase III trial in locally advanced anal carcinoma have been recently published. Finally, the inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor has also showed promising activity in anal carcinomas. Recent advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis have led to meaningful changes in the management of gastrointestinal cancers. Although the major advances in targeted therapy have been introduced in the treatment of colorectal cancer, new interesting approaches have been reported in less frequent gastrointestinal tumors such as esophageal, biliary tract, and anal canal carcinoma opening a new hope in the treatment of these rare tumors in the molecular targeted therapy era.

  9. Why a special issue on anal cancer and what is in it?

    PubMed

    Fairley, Christopher K; Brotherton, Julia M L; Hillman, Richard; Grulich, Andrew E

    2012-12-01

    This editorial describes the contents of this special issue of Sexual Health devoted to anal cancer. The aim of the issue is to provide readers with information to assist them in making decisions about what to do about detecting anal cancer early in men who have sex with men with HIV. Should they be advocating screening? It discusses the epidemiology of HPV infection, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and anal cancer in MSM, heterosexual men and women; anal cancer screening and treatment of anal cancer. And most importantly, what should be done about vaccinating boys with the HPV vaccine.

  10. HIV infection connected to rising anal cancer rates in men in the U.S.

    Cancer.gov

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contributes substantially to the epidemic of anal cancer in men, but not women in the United States, according to new research from NCI. Chart shows overall incidence rates of anal cancers in general population

  11. Prevalence of cutaneous beta and gamma human papillomaviruses in the anal canal of men who have sex with women.

    PubMed

    Smelov, Vitaly; Hanisch, Rachel; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Sokolova, Olga; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-06-01

    Data regarding anal cutaneous HPV detection among HIV-positive and HIV-negative persons largely relies on studies among men who have sex with men in limited geographical settings. Understanding the distribution, determinants, and potential human health effects of anal cutaneous HPV types among men who have sex with women (MSW) is important. Anal canal swab samples from 415 Russian MSW (384 HIV-negative and 31 HIV-positive) were tested for 43 β-HPVs and 29 γ-HPVs, using a multiplex PCR combined with Luminex technology. β-HPV was detected in 24.4% and γ-HPV in 15.9% of anal samples of all Russian MSW. In total, 34 β-HPV and 19 γ-HPV types were detected, with the most commonly detected β-HPV types being 110, 22 and 124 and the most common γ-HPV types being 95, 132 and 50. For both genera, being HIV-positive at the time of testing was a significant determinant of detection (74.2% for β-HPVs and 48.4% for γ-HPVs compared to 20.1% and 12.5% in HIV-negative MSW, respectively). A wide spectrum and moderate prevalence of anal β-HPV and γ-HPV types was found in our MSW study sample, suggesting that routes other than penile-anal intercourse may be important in cutaneous HPV transmission. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Damaged anal canal as a cause of fecal incontinence after surgical repair for Hirschsprung disease - a preventable and under-reported complication.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Andrea; Frischer, Jason; Knod, Jennifer Leslie; Dickie, Belinda; Levitt, Marc A; Holder, Monica; Jackson, Lyndsey; Peña, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Fecal incontinence after the surgical repair of Hirschsprung disease is a potentially preventable complication that carries a negative impact on patient's quality of life. Patients that were previously operated for Hirschsprung disease and presented to our bowel management clinic with the complaint of fecal incontinence were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent a rectal examination under anesthesia looking for anatomic explanations for their incontinence. One hundred three patients were identified. 54 patients had a damaged anal canal. 22 patients also had a patulous anus. The operative reports mentioned the pectinate line in 32 patients, in 12 it was not mentioned, and in 10 patients the operative report was not available. All patients with a damaged anal canal suffered from true fecal incontinence; 45 of them are on daily enemas (41 are clean and 4 are still having "accidents"), 7 are not doing bowel management due to noncompliance and 2 patients have a permanent ileostomy. 49 patients did not have a damaged anal canal, 25 of those responded to changes in diet and medication and are having voluntary bowel movements. Fecal incontinence may occur after an operation for Hirschsprung disease. When the anal canal is damaged, incontinence is always present, severe, and probably permanent. The preservation of the anal canal may avoid this complication. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Randomized Clinical Trials in Localized Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clayton A; Kachnic, Lisa A

    2017-10-01

    Management of anal carcinoma began as abdominoperineal resection and has evolved to combined chemotherapy and radiation. Early randomized trials demonstrated superior clinical outcomes of combined modality therapy over radiotherapy alone. Subsequent trials investigated alterations in the standard backbone of radiotherapy concurrent with 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C with intent to maintain clinical outcomes while reducing treatment-related morbidity. The addition of intensity-modulated radiotherapy to radiation planning and delivery has subsequently reduced acute toxicity and detrimental treatment breaks. Ongoing and future trials are aimed at reducing therapy in favorable patient populations to decrease morbidity while intensifying treatment in patients with negative prognostic factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. HPV in genital cancers (at the exception of cervical cancer) and anal cancers.

    PubMed

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bruni, Laia; Alemany, Laia

    2014-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been firmly established as a central and necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer and it has been etiologically linked to other anogenital (vulva, vagina, anus and penis) and head and neck cancers, particularly oropharyngeal. Although being rare, the incidence of some of these cancers in some countries has increased in the last decades. HPV-related anogenital tumors share many risk factors with cervical cancer. The HPV aetiological contribution differs in each anatomical location reflecting differences in the natural history and viral tissue tropism. The highest prevalence of HPV DNA in cancers other than cervix has been described for anal, followed by vagina, penile and vulvar cancers. HPV16 has been described as the most common type detected in all cancer sites with different contributions being the highest in anal carcinoma (around 80% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers) and the lowest in vaginal cancers with a contribution similar to that found in cervical cancers (around 60%). Current HPV vaccines have already demonstrated their efficacy in preventing anogenital pre-neoplastic lesions caused by vaccine HPV types. HPV-based prevention tools like HPV vaccination and to a lesser extend screening (e.g. for anal cancer) can be useful measures for reducing the burden of these anogenital cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Reproducibility and genital sparing with a vaginal dilator used for female anal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Briere, Tina Marie; Crane, Christopher H; Beddar, Sam; Bhosale, Priya; Mok, Henry; Delclos, Marc E; Krishnan, Sunil; Das, Prajnan

    2012-08-01

    Acute vulvitis, acute urethritis, and permanent sexual dysfunction are common among patients treated with chemoradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Avoidance of the genitalia may reduce sexual dysfunction. A vaginal dilator may help delineate and displace the vulva and lower vagina away from the primary tumor. The goal of this study was to evaluate the positional reproducibility and vaginal sparing with the use of a vaginal dilator. Ten female patients treated with IMRT for anal cancer were included in this study. A silicone vaginal dilator measuring 29 mm in diameter and 114 mm in length was inserted into the vagina before simulation and each treatment. The reproducibility of dilator placement was investigated with antero-posterior and lateral images acquired daily. Weekly cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging was used to confirm coverage of the GTV, which was typically posterior and inferior to the dilator apex. Finally, a planning study was performed to compare the vaginal doses for these 10 patients to a comparable group of 10 female patients who were treated for anal cancer with IMRT without vaginal dilators. The absolute values of the location of the dilator apex were 7.0 ± 7.8mm in the supero-inferior direction, 7.5 ± 5.5 mm in the antero-posterior, and 3.8 ± 3.1mm in the lateral direction. Coverage of the GTV and CTV was confirmed from CBCT images. The mean dose to the vagina was lower by 5.5 Gy, on average, for the vaginal dilator patients, compared to patients treated without vaginal dilators. The vaginal dilator tended to be inserted more inferiorly during treatment than during simulation. For these ten patients, this did not compromise tumor coverage. Combined with IMRT treatment planning, use of a vaginal dilator could allow for maximum sparing of female genitalia for patients undergoing radiation therapy for anal cancer. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Do We Know What Causes Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign up for Email Policies Our Volunteers More ACS Sites Bookstore Shop Cancer Atlas Press Room Cancer Statistics Center Volunteer Learning Center Follow Us Twitter Facebook ...

  17. Enterobius vermicularis worm granuloma mimicking like a pseudo tumor in the anal canal: An unusual clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bharathi, K; Anuradha, S; Chandrasekar, VC Ajay; Thirunarayanan, R

    2012-01-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is one of the most common intestinal nematode worldwide. Enterobius rarely causes a symptomatic disease. We report here an unusual case of a 60-year old man who came with a polypoidal growth in the anal canal increasing in size for past 20 years. He had pain and intense itching over the mass. The differential diagnosis of squamous papilloma, fibroma and foreign body granuloma were considered. The mass lesion was excised surgically and sent to the pathology laboratory. The mass turned out to be an “E. vermicularis worm granuloma” by histopathologic examination. Thus, timely reporting and surgical resection of such lesion is necessary to prevent further complications. This case is reported here for the unusual presentation of pinworm as a pseudoneoplasm in the anal canal. Incidence of these cases reflected the poor personal hygiene and improper disposal of human excreta in the rural areas. We insist that health education is the only way to control the spread of helminthic infections that causes a heavy disease burden to our country. PMID:23767020

  18. Enterobius vermicularis worm granuloma mimicking like a pseudo tumor in the anal canal: An unusual clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Bharathi, K; Anuradha, S; Chandrasekar, Vc Ajay; Thirunarayanan, R

    2012-07-01

    Enterobius vermicularis is one of the most common intestinal nematode worldwide. Enterobius rarely causes a symptomatic disease. We report here an unusual case of a 60-year old man who came with a polypoidal growth in the anal canal increasing in size for past 20 years. He had pain and intense itching over the mass. The differential diagnosis of squamous papilloma, fibroma and foreign body granuloma were considered. The mass lesion was excised surgically and sent to the pathology laboratory. The mass turned out to be an "E. vermicularis worm granuloma" by histopathologic examination. Thus, timely reporting and surgical resection of such lesion is necessary to prevent further complications. This case is reported here for the unusual presentation of pinworm as a pseudoneoplasm in the anal canal. Incidence of these cases reflected the poor personal hygiene and improper disposal of human excreta in the rural areas. We insist that health education is the only way to control the spread of helminthic infections that causes a heavy disease burden to our country.

  19. Condyloma Acuminatum, Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia, and Anal Cancer in the Setting of HIV: Do We Really Understand the Risk?

    PubMed

    Fazendin, Edward A; Crean, Alexander J; Fazendin, Jessica M; Kucejko, Robert J; Gill, Harkenwar S; Poggio, Juan L; Stein, David E

    2017-10-01

    The gold standard for surveillance of patients with anal lesions is unclear. The aim of this study was to stratify patients for risk of progression of disease and to determine appropriate intervals for surveillance of patients with anal disease. This was a retrospective chart review for patients treated for anal lesions between 2007 and 2014. Only patients with ≥1 year of follow-up from index evaluation, pathology, documented physical examination, and anoscopy findings were included for analysis. The study was conducted at an urban university hospital. HIV-positive patients with anal lesions treated with excision and fulguration were included. Recurrence of anal lesions, progression of disease, and progression to cancer were measured. Ninety-one patients met inclusion criteria. The mean age was 41.6 years, and mean follow-up was 38.6 months (range, 11.0-106.0 mo). On initial pathology, 8 patients (8.8%) had a diagnosis of condyloma acuminatum without dysplasia, 20 patients (22%) had anal intraepithelial neoplasia I, 32 (35.2%) had anal intraepithelial neoplasia II, and 31 (34.1%) had anal intraepithelial neoplasia III. Sixty-nine patients (75.8%) had repeat procedures. Seven (87.5%) of 8 patients with condyloma and 6 (30%) of 20 patients with anal intraepithelial neoplasia I progressed to high-grade lesions. Five (15.6%) of 32 patients progressed from anal intraepithelial neoplasia II to III, and 2 patients with anal intraepithelial neoplasia III (6.5%) developed squamous cell carcinoma (2.3% for the entire cohort). This was a single institution study. High-resolution anoscopy was not used. All of the HIV-positive patients with condyloma or anal intraepithelial neoplasia, regardless of the presence of dysplasia, should be surveyed at equivalent 3-month time intervals, because their risk of progression of disease is high. Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A389.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal Before and After Chemoradiation: Can MRI Predict for Eventual Clinical Outcome?

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, Vicky; Gollub, Frank K.; Liaw, Jonathan; Wellsted, David; Przybytniak, Izabela; Padhani, Anwar R.; Glynne-Jones, Rob

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To describe the MRI appearances of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal before and after chemoradiation and to assess whether MRI features predict for clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients (15 male, 20 female; mean age 60.8 years) with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the anal canal underwent MRI before and 6-8 weeks after definitive chemoradiation. Images were reviewed retrospectively by two radiologists in consensus blinded to clinical outcome: tumor size, signal intensity, extent, and TNM stage were recorded. Following treatment, patients were defined as responders by T and N downstaging and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Final clinical outcome was determined by imaging and case note review: patients were divided into (1) disease-free and (2) with relapse and compared using appropriate univariate methods to identify imaging predictors; statistical significance was at 5%. Results: The majority of tumors were {<=}T2 (23/35; 65.7%) and N0 (21/35; 60%), mean size 3.75cm, and hyperintense (++ to +++, 24/35 patients; 68%). Following chemoradiation, there was a size reduction in all cases (mean 73.3%) and a reduction in signal intensity in 26/35 patients (74.2%). The majority of patients were classified as responders (26/35 (74.2%) patients by T and N downstaging; and 30/35 (85.7%) patients by RECIST). At a median follow-up of 33.5 months, 25 patients (71.4%) remained disease-free; 10 patients (28.6%) had locoregional or metastatic disease. Univariate analysis showed that no individual MRI features were predictive of eventual outcome. Conclusion: Early assessment of response by MRI at 6-8 weeks is unhelpful in predicting future clinical outcome.

  1. Multimodal therapy is feasible in elderly anal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dale, Jon Espen; Sebjørnsen, Sigrun; Leh, Sabine; Rösler, Cornelia; Aaserud, Stein; Møller, Bjørn; Fluge, Øystein; Erichsen, Christian; Nadipour, Saied; Kørner, Hartwig; Pfeffer, Frank; Dahl, Olav

    2017-01-01

    Many patients are diagnosed with an anal cancer in high ages. We here present the outcome after oncological therapy for patients above 80 years compared with younger patients. A series of 213 consecutive patients was diagnosed and treated at a single institution from 1984 to 2009. The patients received similar radiation doses but with different techniques, thus progressively sparing more normal tissues. The majority of patients also had simultaneous [5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin C] or induction chemotherapy (cisplatin and 5FU). The patients were stratified by age above or below 80 years. Despite that the goal was to offer standard chemoradiation treatment to all, the octo- and nonagenarians could not always be given chemotherapy. In our series 35 of 213 anal cancer patients were above 80 years. After initial therapy similar complete response was observed, 80% above and 87% below 80 years. Local recurrence rate was also similar in both groups, 21% versus 26% (p = .187). Cancer-specific survival and relative survival were significantly lower in patients above 80 years, 60% and 50% versus 83% and 80%, (p = .015 and p = .027), respectively. Patients older than 80 years develop anal cancer, but more often marginal tumors. Even in the oldest age group half of the patients can tolerate standard treatment by a combination of radiation and chemotherapy, and obtain a relative survival of 50% after five years. Fragile patients not considered candidates for chemoradiation may be offered radiation or resection to control local disease.

  2. Anal Cancer: What Happens After Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

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  3. Dosimetric planning study for the prevention of anal complications after post-operative whole pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Baek, J G; Kim, E C; Kim, S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Radiation-induced anal toxicity can be induced by low radiation doses in patients with haemorrhoids. The object of this study was to determine the dosimetric benefits of different whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) techniques in terms of dose delivered to the anal canal in post-operative patients with cervical cancer. Methods: The planning CT images of 10 patients with cervical cancer undergoing postoperative radiotherapy were used for comparison of three different plans. All patients had been treated using the conventional box technique WPRT (CV-WPRT), and we tried low-margin-modified WPRT (LM-WPRT), three-dimensional conformal techniques WPRT (CF-WPRT) and intensity-modulated WPRT (IM-WPRT) planning for dosimetric comparison of the anal canal, retrospectively. Results: Mean anal canal doses of the IM-WPRT were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those of CV-WPRT, LM-WPRT and CF-WPRT, and V10, V20, V30 and V40 to the anal canal were also significantly lower for IM-WPRT (p < 0.05). The proportion of planning target volumes (PTVs) that received ≥98% of the prescribed dose for all plans was >99%, and the proportion that received ≥108% of the prescribed dose for IM-WPRT was <2%. Volumes of bladders and rectums that received ≥30 or ≥40 Gy were significantly lower for IM-WPRT than for three of the four-field WPRT plans (p = 0.000). Conclusion: IM-WPRT can significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to the anal canal and does not compromise PTV coverage. In patients with haemorrhoids, IM-WPRT may be of value for the prevention of anal complications. Advances in knowledge: Although tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients undergoing post-operative WPRT, patients with haemorrhoids may suffer complications at low radiation doses. The present study shows IM-WPRT can be meaningful in these patients. PMID:26395671

  4. Metabolic tumor volume predicts disease progression and survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Bazan, Jose G; Koong, Albert C; Kapp, Daniel S; Quon, Andrew; Graves, Edward E; Loo, Billy W; Chang, Daniel T

    2013-01-01

    PET imaging has become a useful diagnostic tool in patients with anal cancer. We evaluated the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) in patients with anal cancer treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Patients with anal cancer who underwent PET imaging for pretreatment staging or radiation therapy planning from 2003 to 2011 were included. PET parameters included MTV and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). Total MTV (MTV-T) was defined as the sum of the volumes above a standardized uptake value 50% of the SUVmax within the primary tumor and involved nodes. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used to test for associations between metabolic or clinical endpoints and overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and event-free survival (EFS). Thirty-nine patients were included. Median follow-up for the cohort was 22 mo. Overall, 6 patients died and 9 patients had disease progression. The 2-y OS, PFS, and EFS for the entire cohort were 88%, 74%, and 69%, respectively. Higher MTV-T was associated with worse OS (P = 0.04), PFS (P = 0.004), and EFS (P = 0.002) on univariate analysis. Patients with an MTV greater than 26 cm(3) had worse PFS than did those with an MTV of 26 cm(3) or less (33% vs. 82%, P = 0.003). SUVmax was not prognostic for any outcome. Higher T classification (T3/T4 vs. T1/T2) was associated with worse PFS and EFS. When adjusting for T classification, MTV-T remained a significant predictor for PFS (P = 0.01) and EFS (P = 0.02). MTV-T yields prognostic information on PFS and EFS beyond that of established prognostic factors in patients with anal cancer.

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal: a review of the aetiology, presentation, staging, prognosis and methods available for treatment.

    PubMed

    Szmulowicz, Ursula M; Wu, James S

    2012-12-01

    Anal cancer is an uncommon malignancy, with the majority of cases comprised of squamous cell carcinomas. The increasing incidence of this disease reflects a rise in the transmission of the human papillomavirus, the causative organism of most tumours. Abdominoperineal resection (APR), once the primary mode of treatment, has been supplanted by sphincter-saving combination chemoradiation as the first-line therapy. However, surgeons continue to play a role in the multidisciplinary management of patients with anal cancer for diagnosis and post-treatment surveillance. Sentinel node biopsy may identify patients with clinically and radiographically negative inguinal lymph nodes who will benefit from groin irradiation. In very select cases, the controversial means of local excision has been employed as primary treatment, often in conjunction with radiation and chemotherapy. The management of persistent or recurrent anal cancers following primary chemoradiation remains a concern, for which only salvage APR currently offers the possibility of a cure. The introduction of human papillomavirus vaccines presents the exciting potential for the eradication of the disease.

  6. Prevalence and predictors of unsatisfactory anal cytology tests in a cohort of gay and bisexual men in Sydney, Australia: baseline findings from the Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer (SPANC).

    PubMed

    Templeton, David J; Roberts, Jennifer M; Poynten, I Mary; Law, Carmella; Hillman, Richard J; Farnsworth, Annabelle; Fairley, Christopher K; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Grulich, Andrew E; Jin, Fengyi

    2017-05-01

    Anal cytology has been suggested as a screening test for the anal cancer precursor high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). We aimed to assess the prevalence and predictors of initial unsatisfactory anal cytology tests ('unsats'). The Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer is a natural history study of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) and precancerous lesions among gay and bisexual men (GBM) of at least 35 years in Sydney, Australia. At each study visit, an anal swab is collected for cytological testing. Unsats are defined as slides with fewer than 2000 nucleated squamous cells and no abnormal cells. Among 617 GBM enrolled, the median age was 49 (range: 35-79) years and 220 (35.7%) were HIV positive. Initial unsats occurred in 61 (9.9%, 95% confidence interval: 7.6-12.5%), and 29 (4.7%, 95% confidence interval: 3.2-6.7%) remained unsatisfactory on repeat cytology. Initial unsats were associated with fewer lifetime anal-receptive partners with a condom (P=0.007); fewer recent anal-receptive sexual partners without a condom (P=0.005); never having had anal chlamydia (P=0.023) or gonorrhea (P=0.003); HIV-negative status (P=0.002); fewer total (P=0.002), low-risk (P=0.005), and high-risk (P=0.015) HPV types detected; lack of anal HPV18 detection (P=0.001); never having anally douched (P<0.001); and douching with soapy water (P=0.009) among those who douched. Unsats were less common among those with histologic HSIL (P=0.008) and nonsignificantly less common among those with fewer anal canal octants affected by HSIL (P=0.080), but were more common among those who felt more nervous (P=0.020) during the examination. Our findings suggest that unsats are more common among GBM with less receptive anal sexual experience. Avoiding douching with soapy water and strategies to aid patient relaxation during sampling may reduce the unsat rate.

  7. Anal cancer: French Intergroup Clinical Practice Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up (SNFGE, FFCD, GERCOR, UNICANCER, SFCD, SFED, SFRO, SNFCP).

    PubMed

    Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Vendrely, Veronique; Abramowitz, Laurent; Borg, Christophe; Francois, Eric; Goere, Diane; Huguet, Florence; Peiffert, Didier; Siproudhis, Laurent; Ducreux, Michel; Bouché, Olivier

    2017-08-01

    This document is a summary of the French Intergroup guidelines regarding the management of anal carcinomas, published in November 2016. It is a collaborative work produced under the auspices of the majority of the French medical societies involved in the management of anal cancer. It is based on the previous guidelines published in 2010. Recommendations are graded in three categories, according to the amount of evidence found in the literature. Non-metastatic anal carcinomas can be divided into two risk groups, according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or endorectal-ultrasonograpy. Localized small cancers (T1N0) are mainly treated by exclusive radiation therapy in the case of cancers of the anal canal, or by surgery in the case of cancers of the anal margin. The recommended treatment of locally advanced tumours (T2-T4, N0-N2) is definitive concomitant radio-chemotherapy. Salvage surgery should be reserved for patients with poor response, tumour progression or local relapse after radio-chemotherapy, or in cases of persistent vaginal fistula or total anal incontinence after the cessation of radio-chemotherapy. In the case of metastatic tumours, current therapeutic recommendations are based on less robust evidence; with chemotherapy playing a major role. These recommendations are permanently being reviewed, and each individual case must be discussed inside a multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Surgical excision alone for stage T1 anal verge cancers in people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Alfa-Wali, M; Dalla Pria, A; Nelson, M; Tekkis, P; Bower, M

    2016-06-01

    Anal cancer accounts for a small percentage of colorectal malignancies. Early stage (T1N0M0) cancers of the anal verge have been treated with local surgical excision alone in individuals without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The risk of anal cancer is higher in people living with HIV (PLWH). We present results of the outcomes of T1 anal verge cancers treated by local excision only in a series of PLWH. Demographic and clinicopathological data was prospectively collected from all HIV positive individuals with anal cancer, treated between 1986 and 2015. The date from anal cancer diagnosis until the date of the last follow up were collected. Fifteen patients had T1N0M0 cancer of the anal verge from a total of 92 patients with HIV-associated anal cancer. The mean age was 49 years (range 36-57). The average age of HIV diagnosis was 35 years (range 19-48) and four patients had a diagnosis of AIDS prior to the diagnosis of anal cancer. All patients were surgically managed with complete local excision of the tumour. There were no complications or need for any adjuvant therapy. No patients have relapsed and at a median follow up of 4 years (range 3-15), the overall survival was 100%. Surgical resection for early stage anal verge cancers is an effective strategy in PLWH. Increasing awareness of anal cancer and anoscopy surveillance in PLWH will hopefully continue to identify anal cancers at an early stage that are amenable to minimally invasive surgical management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nerves in the intersphincteric space of the human anal canal with special reference to their continuation to the enteric nerve plexus of the rectum.

    PubMed

    Hieda, Keisuke; Cho, Kwang Ho; Arakawa, Takashi; Fujimiya, Mineko; Murakami, Gen; Matsubara, Akio

    2013-10-01

    In the intersphincteric space of the anal canal, nerves are thought to "change" from autonomic to somatic at the level of the squamous-columnar epithelial junction of the anal canal. To compare the nerve configuration in the intersphincteric space with the configuration in adjacent areas of the human rectum, we immunohistochemically assessed tissue samples from 12 donated cadavers, using antibodies to S100, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Antibody to S100 revealed a clear difference in intramuscular nerve distribution patterns between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the most inferior part of the rectum, with the former having a plexus-like configuration, while the latter contained short, longitudinally running nerves. Most of the intramural ganglion cells in the anal canal were restricted to above the epithelial junction, but some were located just below that level. Near or at the level of the epithelial junction, the nerves along the rectal adventitia and Auerbach's nerve plexus joined to form intersphincteric nerves, with all these nerves containing both nNOS-positive parasympathetic and TH-positive sympathetic nerve fibers. Thus, it was histologically difficult to distinguish somatic intersphincteric nerves from the autonomic Auerbach's plexus. In the intersphincteric space, the autonomic nerve elements with intrapelvic courses seemed to "borrow" a nerve pathway in the peripheral branches of the pudendal nerve. Injury to the intersphincteric nerve during surgery may result in loss of innervation in the major part of the internal anal sphincter. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Anal Canal Adenocarcinoma in a Patient with Longstanding Crohn’s Disease Arising From Rectal Mucosa that Migrated From a Previously Treated Rectovaginal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Maejima, Taku; Kono, Toru; Orii, Fumika; Maemoto, Atsuo; Furukawa, Shigeru; Liming, Wang; Kasai, Shoji; Fukahori, Susumu; Mukai, Nobutaka; Yoshikawa, Daitaro; Karasaki, Hidenori; Saito, Hiroya; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 50 Final Diagnosis: Anal canal adenocarcinoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: CT • MRI • biopsy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: This study reports the pathogenesis of anal canal adenocarcinoma in a patient with longstanding Crohn’s disease (CD). Case Report: A 50-year-old woman with a 33-year history of CD presented with perianal pain of several months’ duration. She had been treated surgically for a rectovaginal fistula 26 years earlier and had been treated with infliximab (IFX) for the previous 4 years. A biopsy under anesthesia revealed an anal canal adenocarcinoma, which was removed by abdominoperineal resection. Pathological examination showed that a large part of the tumor consisted of mucinous adenocarcinoma at the same location as the rectovaginal fistula had been removed 26 years earlier. There was no evidence of recurrent rectovaginal fistula, but thick fibers surrounded the tumor, likely representing part of the previous rectovaginal fistula. Immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against cytokeratins (CK20 and CK7) revealed that the adenocarcinoma arose from the rectal mucosa, not the anal glands. Conclusions: Mucinous adenocarcinoma can arise in patients with CD, even in the absence of longstanding perianal disease, and may be associated with adenomatous transformation of the epithelial lining in a former fistula tract. PMID:27373845

  11. Risk of Anal Cancer in People Living with HIV: Addressing Anal Health in the HIV Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Walker, Crystal Martin; Likes, Wendy; Bernard, Marye; Kedia, Satish; Tolley, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Anal health and anal cancer are rarely addressed in HIV primary care. We sought to understand factors that impeded or promoted addressing anal health in HIV primary care from providers' perspectives. In this exploratory study, HIV primary care providers from the Mid-South region of the United States participated in brief individual interviews. We analyzed transcribed data to identify barriers and facilitators to addressing anal health. Our study sample included five physicians and four nurse practitioners. The data revealed a number of barriers such as perception of patient embarrassment, provider embarrassment, external issues such as time constraints, demand of other priorities, lack of anal complaints, lack of resources, and gender discordance. Facilitators included awareness, advantageous circumstances, and the patient-provider relationship. Anal health education should be prioritized for HIV primary care providers. Preventive health visits should be considered to mitigate time constraints, demands for other priorities, and unequal gender opportunities. Copyright © 2016 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Anal cytology].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Béla; Sápi, Zoltán; Bánhegyi, Dénes; Marschalkó, Márta; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2015-01-04

    The incidence of anal cancer has increased in recent decades, particularly among human immunodeficiency virus infected men who have sex with men. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia is a potential precursor lesion of anal cancer. Anal cytology is the primary screening test for anal intraeptithelial neoplasia. The authors aimed to analyze the results of anal cytology of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection at the National Centre of STD, Department of Dermatology, Dermatooncology and Venereology, Semmelweis University. 155 anal cytological examinations were performed in 140 patients between November 1, 2012 and August 31, 2014. 44% of patients were found to have anal dysplasia, and only 1.6% of patients had high-grade lesions. This rate is lower as compared to published studies including larger number of patients. The study underlines the necessity of screening for anal lesions in the population at-risk.

  13. Invited commentary: Biological and clinical insights from epidemiologic research into HIV, HPV, and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A; Madeleine, Margaret M

    2013-09-15

    Anal cancer is common among people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This cancer is caused by human papillomavirus, and immunosuppression likely contributes to its development. In this issue of the Journal, Bertisch et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;178(6):877-884) present the results of a case-control study of anal cancer among HIV-infected people in Switzerland. They demonstrate that anal cancer risk is increased in association with a low CD4+ cell count (a clinical measurement of immune status). In particular, HIV-induced immunosuppression was most severe among cases approximately 6-7 years prior to the diagnosis of anal cancer. A plausible biological interpretation is that immunosuppression is important at an early stage of the development of anal cancer, but that the neoplastic process becomes irreversible over time with persistent human papillomavirus infection and genetic damage. With current efforts to provide earlier combination antiretroviral therapy to HIV-infected people, anal cancer incidence may start to decline. Bertisch et al. also demonstrate a strong association between serum antibodies against the human papillomavirus type 16 protein E6 and anal cancer risk, highlighting the role of this viral oncoprotein in carcinogenesis. Additional biomarkers could help refine clinical approaches to anal cancer screening and prevention for the HIV-infected population.

  14. Invited Commentary: Biological and Clinical Insights From Epidemiologic Research Into HIV, HPV, and Anal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Eric A.; Madeleine, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Anal cancer is common among people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This cancer is caused by human papillomavirus, and immunosuppression likely contributes to its development. In this issue of the Journal, Bertisch et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;178(6):877–884) present the results of a case-control study of anal cancer among HIV-infected people in Switzerland. They demonstrate that anal cancer risk is increased in association with a low CD4+ cell count (a clinical measurement of immune status). In particular, HIV-induced immunosuppression was most severe among cases approximately 6–7 years prior to the diagnosis of anal cancer. A plausible biological interpretation is that immunosuppression is important at an early stage of the development of anal cancer, but that the neoplastic process becomes irreversible over time with persistent human papillomavirus infection and genetic damage. With current efforts to provide earlier combination antiretroviral therapy to HIV-infected people, anal cancer incidence may start to decline. Bertisch et al. also demonstrate a strong association between serum antibodies against the human papillomavirus type 16 protein E6 and anal cancer risk, highlighting the role of this viral oncoprotein in carcinogenesis. Additional biomarkers could help refine clinical approaches to anal cancer screening and prevention for the HIV-infected population. PMID:23900552

  15. Impact of the HIV Epidemic on the Incidence Rates of Anal Cancer in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The risk of anal cancer is substantially increased in HIV-infected individuals. Thus, the HIV epidemic may have influenced the increasing anal cancer trends in the United States. We estimated the impact of the HIV epidemic on trends in anal cancer incidence in the United States during 1980–2005. Methods Data on anal cancer cases with and without AIDS were obtained from the HIV/AIDS Cancer Match Study. The number of HIV-infected anal cancer cases without AIDS was estimated from the number of anal cancers occurring before diagnosis of AIDS. The proportion of anal cancer cases with HIV infection in the general population was calculated. We estimated temporal trends in the incidence rates of anal cancer in the general population overall and after exclusion of HIV-infected cancer cases by calculating annual percent changes and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a Joinpoint log-linear model. All incidence rates were standardized to the 2000 US population by age, sex, and race. Results During 1980–2005, of the 20 533 estimated anal cancer cases, 1665 (8.1%) were HIV-infected. During 2001–2005, the proportion of anal cancer cases with HIV infection was the highest—1.2% (95% CI = 0.93 to 1.4%) among females and 28.4% (95% CI = 26.6 to 29.4%) among males. During 1980–2005, HIV infection did not have an impact on the trends in anal cancer among females (incidence rates increased by 3.3% [95% CI = 3.0 to 3.7%] annually overall, and by 3.3% [95% CI = 2.9 to 3.6%] annually without HIV-infected anal cancer cases) but had a strong impact on the trends in anal cancer among males (incidence rates increased by 3.4% [95% CI = 2.9 to 3.9%] annually overall, and by 1.7% [95% CI = 1.2 to 2.3%] annually without HIV infection). Conclusion During 1980–2005, the increasing anal cancer incidence rates in the United States were strongly influenced by the HIV epidemic in males but were independent of HIV infection in females. PMID:23042932

  16. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Staging and Treatment of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sveistrup, Joen; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Henriksen, Birthe Merete; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: This study was intended to determine the role of PET/CT in the staging of anal cancer as a supplement to three-dimensional transanal ultrasound (TAUS) and inguinal ultrasound (US). The impact of the PET/CT on the initial stage and treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US was assessed. Methods and Materials: Ninety-five (95) patients referred to our clinic between July 1, 2005, and December 31, 2009, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had biopsy-proven primary squamous cell cancer of the anal canal. There were 65 females (68%) and 30 males (32%), and the median age was 58 years (range, 35-88 years). Six (6%) of the patients were HIV positive. All patients were staged with TAUS/US and PET/CT. Results: Twenty-eight (28) patients were diagnosed with suspicious perirectal node metastases. TAUS visualized 24 of these, whereas PET/CT detected 15. Suspicious inguinal nodes were visualized on either US or PET/CT in 41 patients. Seventeen (17) of these had confirmed malignant disease on biopsy, and 15 had confirmed benign disease. All 17 patients (100%) with malignant inguinal nodes were diagnosed by PET/CT, whereas US identified 16 (94%). Ten patients were diagnosed with suspicious inguinal nodes on PET/CT that had not been seen on US. One of these was malignant, three were benign, and six were not biopsied. PET/CT diagnosed eight metastatic sites, whereas TAUS/US diagnosed three. PET/CT discovered three of the five synchronous cancers seen in this study. PET/CT upstaged the disease in 14% of the cases and changed the treatment plan proposed by TAUS/US in 17%. Conclusion: PET/CT has great potential influence on the staging and treatment of anal cancer. TAUS is important in the staging of the primary tumor and N1-stage, whereas PET/CT seems necessary for the N2/3-stage, the M-stage and synchronous cancers.

  17. Anal metastasis of rectal cancer-adenocarcinoma of squamous cells: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shun; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Nakaji, Yu; Nakanishi, Ryota; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Oda, Yoshinao; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-12-01

    Anal metastasis of colorectal cancer is very rare and is usually associated with a history of anal disease, including anal fistula, fissure, hemorrhoidectomy, and anastomotic injury. We report a case of rectal cancer with a synchronous anal metastasis consisting of adenocarcinoma of squamous cells without a history of anal disease. A 60-year-old woman had a chief complaint of melena. She had a 1.5-cm anal tumor on the perianal skin, and a Bollman type 2 rectal tumor on the Ra portion was found on colonoscopy. Biopsy of both tumors revealed a similar histology of well- to moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. There was no sign of metastases in lymph nodes or other organs. For the purpose of diagnosis and treatment, transperineal local resection of the anal tumor was performed, and it was histologically identified as adenocarcinoma of squamous cells with no invasion to muscles, lymph ducts, or microvessels. The pathological margin was free. Then, to achieve radical cure, laparoscopic low anterior resection (LAR) with D3 lymphadenectomy was performed. The histological diagnosis of the anal tumor was adenocarcinoma of squamous cells without invasion to muscles, lymph ducts, or vessels. The surgical margin was completely free. Immunohistochemical analysis of both tumors revealed similar staining patterns, and the final diagnosis was rectal cancer with metastasis to the anal skin. The patient received no postoperative therapy, and no recurrences have been observed 12 months after surgery. We expect that our sphincter-preserving surgical strategy provided a good prognosis for the synchronous rectal cancer and anal metastasis. This is a rare report of a case with an anal metastasis of colorectal cancer on perianal squamous cells without a history of anal disease that was resected while preserving anal function.

  18. Anal HPV detection in men who have sex with men living with HIV who report no recent anal sexual behaviours: baseline analysis of the Anal Cancer Examination (ACE) study.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jason J; Chen, Marcus; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Cornall, Alyssa; Garland, Suzanne M; Jin, Fengyi; Tee, B K; Eu, Beng; Fairley, Christopher K

    2016-08-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV are at high risk of infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV), the cause of anal cancer. We assess whether anal HPV DNA detection is related to recent anal sexual activity, what types of anal sexual activity or the persistence of HPV genotypes. We analysed anal swabs taken at the baseline of a 2-year prospective anal cancer screening study of MSM living with HIV from four HIV clinics in Melbourne, Australia. Anal HPV detection was stratified by age and anal sexual behaviours. 281 anal swabs were included in the analysis. The majority (80%, 95% CI 75 to 84) of men were positive for any HPV; 59% (95% CI 53 to 65) were positive for high-risk HPV (hr-HPV) genotypes; and 31% (95% CI 26 to 36) men were positive for HPV 16 and/or 18 with no significant differences according to age groups (p>0.261). In men who reported no receptive anal sexual activity in the last six months (22%), hr-HPV was found in 53% (95% CI 41 to 65) for no anal sexual activity versus. 60% (95% CI 54 to 67) for anal sexual activity (p=0.320). HPV 16 and/or 18 was found in 26% (95% CI 16 to 38) for no anal sexual activity versus. 32% (95% CI 27 to 39) for anal sexual activity (p=0.320). Anal HPV in MSM living with HIV is detected in the majority of men throughout all age groups. Anal HPV detection remains high even in men reporting no anal sexual activity in the preceding six months. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Treating High-grade Lesions to Prevent Anal Cancer in HIV-infected People

    Cancer.gov

    This study, called the ANCHOR trial, will investigate whether screening and prevention methods similar to those used to prevent cervical cancer can help prevent anal cancer in HIV-infected men and women.

  20. Canals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkleman, Michael

    1974-01-01

    In the mid-1800's, the canal system in the U.S. was thriving. But, by the end of that century, roads and railways had replaced these commercial thoroughfares. Renewed interest in the abandoned canals is now resulting in renovation and ecological site development in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. (MA)

  1. Canals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkleman, Michael

    1974-01-01

    In the mid-1800's, the canal system in the U.S. was thriving. But, by the end of that century, roads and railways had replaced these commercial thoroughfares. Renewed interest in the abandoned canals is now resulting in renovation and ecological site development in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. (MA)

  2. Leukocytosis and neutrophilia predicts outcome in anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Schernberg, Antoine; Escande, Alexandre; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Ducreux, Michel; Nguyen, France; Goere, Diane; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Leukocytosis and neutrophilia could be the tip of the iceberg in the inflammatory tumor microenvironment. We aimed to validate their prognostic significance in a cohort of patients treated with definitive chemoradiation for anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Clinical records from all consecutive patients treated in a single institution between 2006 and 2016 with curative-intent radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Leukocytosis and neutrophilia, defined as leukocyte or neutrophil count over 10,000 and 7500/mm(3), respectively, were studied in terms of overall survival (OS), progression (PFS), locoregional (LFS) and distant (DFS)-free survival. We identified 103 non-metastatic HIV-negative patients, with concurrent chemotherapy use in 78%. Twelve and 8% displayed baseline leukocytosis and neutrophilia, respectively. Estimated 3-year OS and PFS were 88% and 67%, respectively. In univariate analysis, both leukocytosis and neutrophilia were strongly associated with inferior OS, PFS, LFS and DFS (p<0.01). In multivariate analysis, leukocytosis and neutrophilia remained strongly associated with patient outcome (p<0.01), independently from tumor T and N-stage. Anemia was an independent predictor of worse OS and PFS, while chemoradiation overall treatment time below 50days improved PFS. Leukocytosis and neutrophilia are strong prognostic factors for OS, PFS, LFS and DFS in anal cancer treated with chemoradiation. These biomarkers could help identify patients with higher risk of tumor relapse that require treatment intensification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radio-chemotherapy in anal cancer: Institutional experience at a large radiation oncology center in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Moisés; Ovalle, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Aim In this article the aim is to provide a concise narrative review and inform the institutional experience at a referral center in Chile with the use of radio-chemotherapy in anal cancer. Background Cancer of the anus and anal canal is mainly a loco-regional disease. For years the standard of care has been concomitant radio-chemotherapy, which permits organ preservation and better local control than alternative surgical procedures. Materials and methods A retrospective analysis of 44 patients treated between 2002 and 2010 was performed. Local recurrence, distant recurrence and overall survival were analyzed with the Kaplan–Meier method. Relevant groups where compared with the log-rank test and univariate analysis were done with the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Median follow-up of the cohort was 56 months, with a minimum follow-up of at least 24 months. There was a significant difference between clinical stages in disease free survival (log-rank trend p < 0.001), and a significant difference in overall survival (OS) when comparing clinical stages that were grouped in stage I–IIIa and IIIB (log-rank p = 0.001). On univariate analysis, age older than 60, having received full treatment and dose above 45 Gy were all significantly related to OS (p < 0.05). An overall survival of 45% and disease free survival of 45% at 5 years were found in our series. Conclusions Our findings show that results at the Instituto de Radiomedicina in Chile are comparable to published literature. Dismal results in stage IIIb cases indicate much work remains in therapies to achieve loco-regional control in locally advanced cases. PMID:25061522

  4. Alpha, beta and gamma Human Papillomaviruses in the anal canal of HIV-infected and uninfected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Donà, Maria Gabriella; Gheit, Tarik; Latini, Alessandra; Benevolo, Maria; Torres, Montserrat; Smelov, Vitaly; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Giglio, Amalia; Cristaudo, Antonio; Zaccarelli, Mauro; Tommasino, Massimo; Giuliani, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    Anal infection by cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) has been rarely investigated. We aimed to assess the prevalence, genotype diversity, and determinants of mucosal (alpha) and cutaneous (beta and gamma) anal HPV infection in men who have sex with men (MSM). Anal samples were collected with a Dacron swab. Alpha HPVs were detected using the Linear Array HPV genotyping test, while beta and gamma HPVs using a PCR combined with Luminex technology. A total of 609 MSM (437 HIV-uninfected and 172 HIV-infected, most of which were undergoing cART) were enrolled. Alpha, beta, and gamma HPVs were detected in 78.0%, 27.6% and 29.3% of the participants. Only alpha HPV prevalence was significantly higher among HIV-infected compared to uninfected MSM (93.0% vs. 72.1%, p < 0.0001). Beta2 and gamma10 represented the most frequent cutaneous HPV species, with no significant differences between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. The most common alpha, beta, and gamma genotypes were HPV16, HPV111, HPV121, respectively. Alpha HPV infection was significantly associated with lifetime number of partners, receptive anal sex, and HIV status. Beta and/or gamma HPV infection showed no significant association with HIV status, socio-demographic or sexual behavioral factors. A wide spectrum of mucosal and cutaneous HPV types is present in the anal canal. Only mucosal HPV prevalence increased significantly in cases of concomitant HIV infection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. An integrative review of guidelines for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jessica S; Holstad, Marcia M; Thomas, Tami; Bruner, Deborah Watkins

    2014-07-01

    HIV-infected individuals are 28 times more likely than the general population to be diagnosed with anal cancer. An integrative review of recommendations and guidelines for anal cancer screening was performed to provide a succinct guide to inform healthcare clinicians. The review excluded studies that were of non-HIV populations, redundant articles or publications, non-English manuscripts, or nonclinical trials. The review found no formal national or international guidelines exist for routine screening of anal cancer for HIV-infected individuals. To date, no randomized control trial provides strong evidence supporting efficaciousness and effectiveness of an anal cancer screening program. The screening recommendations from seven international-, national-, and state-based reports were reviewed and synthesized in this review. These guidelines suggest anal cancer screening, albeit unproven, may be beneficial at decreasing the incidence of anal cancer. This review highlights the paucity of screening-related research and is an area of need to provide clear direction and to define standard of care for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

  6. Replacing 5-fluorouracil by capecitabine in localised squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Karla T; Pereira, Allan AL; Araujo, Raphael L; Oliveira, Suilane Coelho Ribeiro; Hoff, Paulo M; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Background The standard treatment for localised squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCAC) is chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin. Because 5-FU and capecitabine have offered similar efficacy in many phase-III trials of solid tumours, studies have tested capecitabine in this setting of SCCAC. However, these studies are small and have reported variable results. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed. Methods Medline, Scopus and Embase were searched for studies that evaluated the efficacy outcomes of capecitabine used as a substitute of 5-FU in the CRT of localised SCCAC. The primary endpoint was complete response rate (CRR) at 6 months. Metaprop analysis of reported CRR-based on pooled estimates of proportions with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated on the base of the Freeman-Tukey double arcsine transformation. Results We retrieved 300 studies, of which six met our eligibility criteria. The capecitabine dose ranged from 500 mg/m2 to 825 mg/m2 BID for 5 days per week during radiation. With a total of 218 patients, the median follow-up was 21.5 months (14–23). The pooled analysis of three trials (N = 132 patients) reported a CRR at 6 months of 88% (83%–94%), considering all clinical stages. The pooled analysis of overall CRR (N = 218 patients), evaluated at different intervals, showed an overall CRR of 91% (87%–95%). Rates of locoregional relapse varied from 3.2% to 21%. The majority of patients completed the planned radiotherapy dose (93.5%–100%) and any chemotherapy interruption was reported in up to 55.8% of patients. Conclusions Capecitabine is an acceptable and more convenient alternative to infusional 5-FU in the CRT for localised SCCAC, offering similar clinical CRR to those reported by phase-III trials. PMID:28105070

  7. A case of metastatic carcinoma of anal fistula caused by implantation from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rina; Ichikawa, Ryosuke; Ito, Singo; Mizukoshi, Kosuke; Ishiyama, Shun; Sgimoto, Kiichi; Kojima, Yutaka; Goto, Michitoshi; Tomiki, Yuichi; Yao, Takashi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    This case involved an 80-year-old man who was seen for melena. Further testing revealed a tubular adenocarcinoma 50 mm in size in the rectum. In addition, an anal fistula was noted behind the anus along with induration. A biopsy of tissue from the external (secondary) opening of the fistula also revealed adenocarcinoma. Nodules suspected of being metastases were noted in both lung fields. The patient was diagnosed with rectal cancer, a cancer arising from an anal fistula, and a metastatic pulmonary tumor, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy was begun. A laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection was performed 34 days after 6 cycles of mFOLFOX-6 therapy. Based on pathology, the rectal cancer was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, and this adenocarcinoma had lymph node metastasis (yp T3N2aM1b). There was no communication between the rectal lesion and the anal fistula, and a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma resembling the rectal lesion was noted in the anal fistula. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that both the rectal lesion and anal fistula were cytokeratin 7 (CK7) (-) and cytokeratin 20 (CK20) (+), and the patient's condition was diagnosed as implantation of rectal cancer in an anal fistula.In instances where an anal fistula develops in colon cancer, cancer implantation in that fistula must also be taken into account, and further testing should be performed prior to surgery.

  8. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of anal cancer: Toxicity and clinical outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Farrey, Karl J.; Rash, Carla C.; Heimann, Ruth; Chmura, Steven J. . E-mail: schmura@radonc.uchicago.edu

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To assess survival, local control, and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated with nine-field IMRT plans. Thirteen received concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C, whereas 1 patient received 5-fluorouracil alone. Seven patients were planned with three-dimensional anteroposterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) fields for dosimetric comparison to IMRT. Results: Compared with AP/PA, IMRT reduced the mean and threshold doses to small bowel, bladder, and genitalia. Treatment was well tolerated, with no Grade {>=}3 acute nonhematologic toxicity. There were no treatment breaks attributable to gastrointestinal or skin toxicity. Of patients who received mitomycin C, 38% experienced Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. IMRT did not afford bone marrow sparing, possibly resulting from the clinical decision to prescribe 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in most patients, vs. the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-recommended 30.6 Gy whole pelvic dose. Three of 17 patients, who did not achieve a complete response, proceeded to an abdominoperineal resection and colostomy. At a median follow-up of 20.3 months, there were no other local failures. Two-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and colostomy-free survival are: 91%, 65%, and 82% respectively. Conclusions: In this hypothesis-generating analysis, the acute toxicity and clinical outcome with IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer is encouraging. Compared with historical controls, local control is not compromised despite efforts to increase conformality and reduce normal structure dose.

  9. Anal Canal Adenocarcinoma in a Patient with Longstanding Crohn's Disease Arising From Rectal Mucosa that Migrated From a Previously Treated Rectovaginal Fistula.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Taku; Kono, Toru; Orii, Fumika; Maemoto, Atsuo; Furukawa, Shigeru; Liming, Wang; Kasai, Shoji; Fukahori, Susumu; Mukai, Nobutaka; Yoshikawa, Daitaro; Karasaki, Hidenori; Saito, Hiroya; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2016-07-04

    BACKGROUND This study reports the pathogenesis of anal canal adenocarcinoma in a patient with longstanding Crohn's disease (CD). CASE REPORT A 50-year-old woman with a 33-year history of CD presented with perianal pain of several months' duration. She had been treated surgically for a rectovaginal fistula 26 years earlier and had been treated with infliximab (IFX) for the previous 4 years. A biopsy under anesthesia revealed an anal canal adenocarcinoma, which was removed by abdominoperineal resection. Pathological examination showed that a large part of the tumor consisted of mucinous adenocarcinoma at the same location as the rectovaginal fistula had been removed 26 years earlier. There was no evidence of recurrent rectovaginal fistula, but thick fibers surrounded the tumor, likely representing part of the previous rectovaginal fistula. Immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against cytokeratins (CK20 and CK7) revealed that the adenocarcinoma arose from the rectal mucosa, not the anal glands. CONCLUSIONS Mucinous adenocarcinoma can arise in patients with CD, even in the absence of longstanding perianal disease, and may be associated with adenomatous transformation of the epithelial lining in a former fistula tract.

  10. Anal Cancer Incidence in the United States, 1977–2011: Distinct Patterns by Histology and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, Meredith S.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Coghill, Anna E.; Darragh, Teresa M.; Devesa, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC) are generally combined in cancer surveillance, their etiologies likely differ. Here, we describe demographic characteristics and trends in incidence rates (IRs) of anal cancer by histology (SCC, ADC) and behavior (invasive, in situ) in the United States. Methods With data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, we estimated age-adjusted anal cancer IRs across behavior/histology by demographic and tumor characteristics for 2000–2011. Trends in IRs and annual percent changes during 1977–2011 were also estimated and compared to rectal cancer. Results Women had higher rates of SCC (rate ratio [RR]=1.45; 95%CI 1.40–1.50) and lower rates of ADC (RR=0.68; 95%CI 0.62–0.74) and squamous carcinoma in situ (CIS) (RR=0.36; 95%CI 0.34–0.38) than men. Blacks had lower rates of SCC (RR=0.82; 95%CI 0.77–0.87) and CIS (RR=0.90; 95%CI 0.83–0.98) than non-Hispanic whites, but higher rates of ADC (RR=1.48; 95%CI 1.29–1.70). Anal cancer IRs were higher in men and blacks aged <40 years. During 1992–2011, SCC IRs increased 2.9%/year, ADC IRs declined non-significantly, and CIS IRs rose 14.2%/year. SCC and ADC IR patterns and trends were similar across anal and rectal cancers. Conclusions Rates of anal SCC and CIS have increased strongly over time, in contrast to rates of anal ADC, similar to trends observed for rectal SCC and ADC. Impact Anal SCC and ADC likely have different etiologies, but may have similar etiologies to rectal SCC and ADC, respectively. Strong increases in CIS IRs over time may reflect anal cancer screening patterns. PMID:26224796

  11. Dose-Painted Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Report of Acute Toxicity and Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kachnic, Lisa A.; Tsai, Henry K.; Coen, John J.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Hartshorn, Kevan; Kwak, Eunice L.; Willins, John D.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chemoradiation for anal cancer yields effective tumor control, but is associated with significant acute toxicity. We report our multi-institutional experience using dose-painted IMRT (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: Between August 2005 and May 2009, 43 patients were treated with DP-IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy for biopsy-proven, squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal at two academic medical centers. DP-IMRT was prescribed as follows: T2N0: 42 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fraction (fx) to elective nodal planning target volume (PTV) and 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to anal tumor PTV; T3-4N0-3: 45 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fx to elective nodal PTV, and 54 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to the anal tumor and metastatic nodal PTV >3 cm with 50.4 Gy, 1.68 Gy/fx to nodal PTVs {<=}3 cm in size. Acute and late toxicity was reported by the treating physician. Actuarial analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 58 years; 67% female; 16% Stage I, 37% II; 42% III; 5% IV. Fourteen patients were immunocompromised: 21% HIV-positive and 12% on chronic immunosuppression. Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 0.6-43.5 months). Sixty percent completed chemoradiation without treatment interruption; median duration of treatment interruption was 2 days (range, 2-24 days). Acute Grade 3+ toxicity included: hematologic 51%, dermatologic 10%, gastrointestinal 7%, and genitourinary 7%. Two-year local control, overall survival, colostomy-free survival, and metastasis-free survival were 95%, 94%, 90%, and 92%, respectively. Conclusions: Dose-painted IMRT appears effective and well-tolerated as part of a chemoradiation therapy regimen for the treatment of anal canal cancer.

  12. Recognizing and treating anal cancer: training medical students and physicians in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Ana P; Guiot, Humberto M; Díaz-Miranda, Olga L; Román, Leticia; Palefsky, Joel; Colón-López, Vivian

    2013-12-01

    This training activity aimed at increasing the knowledge of anal cancer screening, diagnostic and treatment options in medical students and physicians, to determine the interest of these individuals in receiving training in the diagnosis and treatment of anal cancer, and to explore any previous training and/or experience with both anal cancer and clinical trials that these individuals might have. An educational activity (1.5 contact hours) was attended by a group of medical students, residents and several faculty members, all from the Medical Sciences Campus of the University of Puerto Rico (n = 50). A demographic survey and a 6-item pre- and post-test on anal cancer were given to assess knowledge change. Thirty-four participants (68%) answered the survey. Mean age was 29.6 +/- 6.6 years; 78.8% had not received training in anal cancer screening, 93.9% reported being interested in receiving anal cancer training, and 75.8% expressed an interest in leading or conducting a clinical trial. A significant increase in the test scores was observed after the educational activity (pre-test: 3.4 +/- 1.2; post-test: 4.7 +/- 0.71). Three of the items showed an increase in knowledge by the time the post-test was taken. The first of these items assessed the participants' knowledge regarding the existence of any guidelines for the screening/treatment of patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal disease. The second of these items attempted to determine whether the participants recognized that anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) 2 is considered to be a high-grade neoplasia. The last of the 3 items was aimed at ascertaining whether or not the participants were aware that warty growths in the anus are not necessarily a manifestation of high-grade AIN. This educational activity increased the participants' knowledge of anal cancer and revealed, as well, that most of the participants were interested in future training and in collaborating in a clinical trial. Training

  13. Addressing Risk and Reluctance at the Nexus of HIV and Anal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ka‘opua, Lana Sue I.; Cassel, Kevin; Shiramizu, Bruce; Stotzer, Rebecca L.; Robles, Andrew; Kapua, Cathy; Orton, Malulani; Milne, Cris; Sesepasara, Maddalynn

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancer disproportionately burdens persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) regardless of natal sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, and ethnic identity. Culturally competent communications are recommended to address health disparities, with sociocultural relevance ensured through constituent dialogic processes. Results are presented from six provider focus groups conducted to inform the promotion/education component of a Hawai‘i-based project on anal cancer screening tools. Krueger’s focus group methodology guided discussion queries. Verbatim transcripts of digitally recorded discussions were analyzed using grounded theory and PEN-3 procedures. Adherence to an audit trail ensured analytic rigor. Grounded theory analysis detected the overall theme of risk and reluctance to anal cancer screening, characterized by anal cancer not being “on the radar” of PLHIV, conflicting attributions of the anus and anal sex, fear of sex-shaming/-blaming, and other interrelated conceptual categories. PEN-3 analysis revealed strategies for destigmatizing anal cancer, through “real talk” (proactive, candid, nonjudgmental discussion) nested in a framework of sexual health and overall well-being, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, transgender persons, and other marginalized groups. Application of strategies for health practice are specific to the Hawai‘i context, yet may offer considerations for developing strengths-based, culturally relevant screening promotion/education with diverse PLHIV in other locales. PMID:26630979

  14. Addressing Risk and Reluctance at the Nexus of HIV and Anal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I; Cassel, Kevin; Shiramizu, Bruce; Stotzer, Rebecca L; Robles, Andrew; Kapua, Cathy; Orton, Malulani; Milne, Cris; Sesepasara, Maddalynn

    2016-01-01

    Anal cancer disproportionately burdens persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) regardless of natal sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, and ethnic identity. Culturally competent communications are recommended to address health disparities, with sociocultural relevance ensured through constituent dialogic processes. Results are presented from six provider focus groups conducted to inform the promotion/education component of a Hawai'i-based project on anal cancer screening tools. Krueger's focus group methodology guided discussion queries. Verbatim transcripts of digitally recorded discussions were analyzed using grounded theory and PEN-3 procedures. Adherence to an audit trail ensured analytic rigor. Grounded theory analysis detected the overall theme of risk and reluctance to anal cancer screening, characterized by anal cancer not being "on the radar" of PLHIV, conflicting attributions of the anus and anal sex, fear of sex-shaming/-blaming, and other interrelated conceptual categories. PEN-3 analysis revealed strategies for destigmatizing anal cancer, through "real talk" (proactive, candid, nonjudgmental discussion) nested in a framework of sexual health and overall well-being, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, transgender persons, and other marginalized groups. Application of strategies for health practice are specific to the Hawai'i context, yet may offer considerations for developing strengths-based, culturally relevant screening promotion/education with diverse PLHIV in other locales.

  15. IMRT treatment of anal cancer with a scrotal shield

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, Rodney C.; Wu, Q. Jackie; McMahon, Ryan; Czito, Brian; Willett, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The risk of sterility in males undergoing radiotherapy in the pelvic region indicates the use of a shielding device, which offers protection to the testes for patients wishing to maintain fertility. The use of such devices in the realm of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the pelvic region can pose many obstacles during simulation, treatment planning, and delivery of radiotherapy. This work focuses on the development and execution of an IMRT plan for the treatment of anal cancer using a scrotal shielding device on a clinical patient. An IMRT plan was developed using Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), using a wide array of gantry angles as well as fixed jaw and fluence editing techniques. When possible, the entire target volume was encompassed by the treatment field. When the beam was incident on the scrotal shield, the jaw was fixed to avoid the device and the collimator rotation optimized to irradiate as much of the target as possible. This technique maximizes genital sparing and allows minimal irradiation of the gonads. When this fixed-jaw technique was found to compromise adequate coverage of the target, manual fluence editing techniques were used to avoid the shielding device. Special procedures for simulation, imaging, and treatment verification were also developed. In vivo dosimetry was used to verify and ensure acceptable dose to the gonads. The combination of these techniques resulted in a highly conformal plan that spares organs and risk and avoids the genitals as well as entrance of primary radiation onto the shielding device.

  16. Impact of screening and antiretroviral therapy on anal cancer incidence in HIV-positive MSM.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Nello; Bertisch, Barbara; Kouyos, Roger D; Calmy, Alexandra; Bucher, Heiner C; Cavassini, Matthias; Estill, Janne; Keiser, Olivia; Egger, Matthias

    2017-08-24

    The incidence of anal cancer is high in HIV-positive MSM. We modeled the impact of screening strategies and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) coverage on anal cancer incidence in Switzerland. Individual-based, dynamic simulation model parameterized with Swiss HIV Cohort Study and literature data. We assumed all men to be human papillomavirus infected. CD4 cell count trajectories were the main predictors of anal cancer. From 2016 we modeled cART coverage either as below 100% (corresponding to 2010-2015) or as 100%, and the following four screening strategies: no screening, yearly anal cytology (Papanicolaou smears), yearly anoscopy and targeted anoscopy 5 years after CD4 count dropped below 200 cells/μl. Median nadir CD4 cell count of 6411 MSM increased from 229 cells/μl during 1980-1989 to 394 cells/μl during 2010-2015; cART coverage increased from 0 to 83.4%. Modeled anal cancer incidence peaked at 81.7/100 000 in 2009, plateaued 2010-2015 and will decrease to 58.7 by 2030 with stable cART coverage, and to 52.0 with 100% cART coverage. With yearly cytology, incidence declined to 38.2/100 000 by 2030, with yearly anoscopy to 32.8 and with CD4 cell count guided anoscopy to 51.3. The numbers needed to screen over 15 years to prevent one anal cancer case were 384 for yearly cytology, 313 for yearly anoscopy and 242 for CD4 cell count-dependent screening. Yearly screening of HIV-positive MSM may reduce anal cancer incidence substantially, with a number needed to screen that is comparable with other screening interventions to prevent cancer.

  17. Damage to anal sphincter/levator ani muscles caused by operative procedure in anal sphincter-preserving operation for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Atsushi; Koda, Keiji; Kosugi, Chihiro; Yamazaki, Masato; Yasuda, Hideki

    2011-04-01

    Details of postoperative damage to anal sphincter tonus following sphincter-preserving operation for rectal cancer remain unclear. Postoperative anal tonus was measured using 3-dimensional (3D) vector manometry in 56 patients. Anal length with pressure from any direction was defined as total length (TL). Length with circular pressure (LCP), which is only measurable using 3D manometry, was also evaluated. In operations associated with low anastomosis, both TL and LCP at rest were significantly shortened when compared with control (high interior resection [HAR]). In particular, degraded LCP at rest was obvious. Anal lengths in squeezing state were preserved except in cases with intersphincteric resection (ISR). Postoperative incontinence score inversely correlated with functional anal length at rest. Although the sphincter muscles are mechanically preserved, function of the internal sphincter and subsequent defecatory function can be degraded in cases with operative procedures including surgical maneuvers at the pelvic floor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anal cancer and its precursors in HIV-positive patients: perspectives and management.

    PubMed

    Berry, J Michael; Palefsky, Joel M; Welton, Mark Lane

    2004-04-01

    Anal cancer is an increasing problem among HIV-infected persons. Although patients are living longer and with better quality of life because of treatment with HAART, they remain at risk for invasive anal cancer and its precursor, anal HSIL. Given the substantial numbers of patients with anal HSIL, further studies need to be done to determine the efficacy and optimal mode of treatment of HSIL, to define the optimal method for screening patients at risk, to define the best way to follow up patients with documented HSIL to ensure early detection, to define prognostic factors for progression to invasive cancer, and to determine the progression rate of HSIL to invasive cancer. Although patients with good functional status and immunologic function seem to do relatively well with standard CMT for anal cancer, there are less fortunate patients who experience substantial morbidity from therapy and have a poorer outcome. It is difficult to draw definitive conclusions about the therapy of HIV-positive patients with anal cancer based on the available literature because of the retrospective nature of the analyses, the small number of patients, and the heterogeneity of the patients reported with regard to tumor size, pretreatment immunologic status, and the variety of treatments received by patients in some series. Identifying patients who develop invasive anal cancer as early as possible will improve results to some degree, but prospective, controlled, multi-institutional trials evaluating the treatment of anal cancer in HIV-infected persons are required to accurately define ways to improve outcome with less morbidity. The results of ongoing therapeutic HPV vaccine trials are eagerly awaited. Improvement may come by the following, determining ways to more accurately stage patients, such as endoanal ultrasound, sentinel lymph node sampling, or positron emission tomography scans; defining the role of cisplatin and whether it is indeed less toxic and equally or more effective

  19. HPV and anal cancer in HIV-infected individuals: a review.

    PubMed

    Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Mooij, Sofie H; Richel, Oliver; de Vries, Henry J C; Prins, Jan M

    2014-09-01

    HIV infection is one of the strongest risk factors for anal squamous cell cancer (ASCC). Most ASCC are caused by HPV, and most HPV-associated ASCC are caused by HPV-16. Anal HPV infections are very common in men who have sex with men (MSM), and nearly universal among HIV-infected MSM. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor for ASCC, is present in about 30 % of HIV+ MSM, but neither the progression rate to ASCC nor the regression rate are known. The incidence rate of ASCC among HIV-infected people has risen in the first decade after cART became available, but appears to be plateauing recently. Anal cytology has poor sensitivity and specificity. High resolution anoscopy (HRA) is advocated by some as a screening tool in high-risk groups, but is cumbersome and time-consuming and it is unknown whether HRA followed by treatment of HGAIN prevents ASCC. More research is needed on progression and regression rates of HGAIN, on effective therapy of HGAIN, and on biomarkers that predict HGAIN or anal cancer. HPV vaccination and earlier start of cART may prevent most anal cancers in the long run.

  20. Human Papillomavirus Positivity in the Anal Canal in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Men Who Have Anal Sex with Men in Guangzhou, China: Implication for Anal Exams and Early Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xuqi; Ke, Wujian; Yang, Ligang; Huang, Shujie; Qin, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Background. The epidemiology of HPV in men who have sex with men (MSM) in Guangzhou, China, had not been reported previously. Methods. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected MSM were recruited from a Guangzhou-based MSM clinic in 2013. Sociodemographic characteristics and sexual behaviors were collected. An anal cytological sample was taken for HPV testing. Results. We recruited 79 HIV-infected and 85 HIV-uninfected MSM. The median age was 26 years in both groups. The positivities of anal HPV of any type (81.0% versus 48.2%), any high risk type (50.6% versus 27.1%), any low risk type (55.7% versus 31.8%), and any 9-valent vaccine type (74.7% versus 36.5%) were all significantly higher among HIV-infected compared to that among HIV-negative MSM (p for all < 0.05). The great majority of HPV-infected MSM were infected with 9-valent vaccine types (59 out of 64 HIV-infected and 31 out of 41 HIV-uninfected). Anal bacterial infections were associated with higher anal HPV positivity and greater number of anal HPV types. Conclusion. Sexually active MSM in Guangzhou, especially those infected with HIV, had high and multiple HPV detections. The majority of these cases were potentially preventable by HPV vaccine. Regular anal exams and early HPV vaccination are warranted in this population. PMID:28133605

  1. Human Papillomavirus Positivity in the Anal Canal in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Men Who Have Anal Sex with Men in Guangzhou, China: Implication for Anal Exams and Early Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuqi; Ke, Wujian; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Huang, Shujie; Qin, Xiaolin; Yang, Bin; Zou, Huachun

    2017-01-01

    Background. The epidemiology of HPV in men who have sex with men (MSM) in Guangzhou, China, had not been reported previously. Methods. HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected MSM were recruited from a Guangzhou-based MSM clinic in 2013. Sociodemographic characteristics and sexual behaviors were collected. An anal cytological sample was taken for HPV testing. Results. We recruited 79 HIV-infected and 85 HIV-uninfected MSM. The median age was 26 years in both groups. The positivities of anal HPV of any type (81.0% versus 48.2%), any high risk type (50.6% versus 27.1%), any low risk type (55.7% versus 31.8%), and any 9-valent vaccine type (74.7% versus 36.5%) were all significantly higher among HIV-infected compared to that among HIV-negative MSM (p for all < 0.05). The great majority of HPV-infected MSM were infected with 9-valent vaccine types (59 out of 64 HIV-infected and 31 out of 41 HIV-uninfected). Anal bacterial infections were associated with higher anal HPV positivity and greater number of anal HPV types. Conclusion. Sexually active MSM in Guangzhou, especially those infected with HIV, had high and multiple HPV detections. The majority of these cases were potentially preventable by HPV vaccine. Regular anal exams and early HPV vaccination are warranted in this population.

  2. Exploring the Perceptions of Anal Cancer Screening and Behaviors Among Gay and Bisexual Men Infected With HIV

    PubMed Central

    Koskan, Alexis M.; LeBlanc, Natalie; Rosa-Cunha, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of anal cancer is on the rise among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Given the increasing availability of screening, this study explored anal cancer screening awareness and behaviors among MSM infected with HIV. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 58 MSM infected with HIV. Results Other than 2 participants treated for anal cancer and 3 treated for precancerous anal lesions, the majority of participants had never heard of anal cancer. Men reported lack of awareness and recommendations from their health care professionals as the greatest barriers to screening. Upon learning about their risk for anal cancer and the availability of screening, the men were eager to discuss screening with their physicians. Participants provided numerous recommendations for future interventions, including training health care professionals to promote screening, disseminating information pertaining to anal cancer through social networks, and creating media campaigns to raise awareness about the need to screen for this type of cancer. Conclusions Future intervention work should focus on ensuring that health care professionals, particularly among HIV/primary care specialists, promote screening for anal dysplasia. It is critical that intervention methods use a community-based approach to raise awareness about the need to screen for anal cancer, especially among MSM infected with HIV. PMID:27009457

  3. Determinants of macroscopic anal cancer and precancerous lesions in 1206 HIV-infected screened patients.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, L; Benabderrahmane, D; Walker, F; Yazdapanah, Y; Yéni, P; Rioux, C; Bouscarat, F; Lafferre, E; Mentré, F; Duval, X

    2016-10-01

    Anal screening is recommended in HIV-positive patients, especially men who have sex with men (MSM), due to an increased incidence of anal cancer. The optimal screening methods are not generally agreed. Screening for anal lesions by anorectal examination, including anoscopy, was offered to HIV-positive outpatients in a tertiary care university hospital regardless of gender or sexual orientation. Among the 1206 screened patients (701 MSM, 247 heterosexual men, 258 women), 311 (26%) had histologically proven lesions related to human papilloma virus (HPV) (34% MSM, 14% heterosexual men, 14% women); 123 (10%) had low-grade dysplasia and 70 (6%) high-grade dysplasia. Seven anal cancers were also diagnosed. Determinants of any lesion were age < 45 years [OR = 1.56 (95% CI, 1.16-2.11)], a CD4 count of < 200/mm(3) [OR = 2.54 (1.71-3.78)], receptive anal intercourse [OR =3.03 (2.06-4.47)], sub-Saharan African origin [OR = 0.53 (0.33-0.85)], and history of HPV-related lesion [OR = 1.84 (1.35-2.51)]. These determinants were similar for all different grades of dysplasia. In patient subgroup analysis, receptive anal intercourse, the CD4 cell count and a history of HPV lesions were determinants of HPV-positivity in all patients, whereas age was only a determinant in men. Anoscopy is an alternative method for anal screening in an HIV-positive population. This screening has to be compared with other tools in populations at high risk of anal cancer. Colorectal Disease © 2016 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. [A case report of metastatic anal fistula cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Murata, Akihiro; Takatsuka, Satoshi; Shinkawa, Hiroji; Kaizaki, Ryoji; Hori, Takaaki; Ikehara, Teruyuki

    2014-11-01

    A 69-year-old man with perianal pain was diagnosed with an anal fistula and a rectal tumor by magnetic resonance imaging and pulmonary tuberculosis by computed tomography. A colonoscopy confirmed the presence of a circular mass in the rectum 6 cm from the anal verge. Histological examination revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Initially, seton drainage was used to improve the perianal pain. After 2 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy, the patient underwent low anterior resection for the rectal cancer. Six months after surgery, a perianal tumor was detected at the postoperative site of the anal fistula. Biopsy of the tumor revealed adenocarcinoma. Because the histological appearance of the second tumor was identical to the rectal cancer, it was diagnosed as a metastatic anal fistula cancer. The tumor shrunk after 3 courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX) plus bevacizumab and there was no evidence of distant metastasis. Local resection of the anal fistula cancer was performed. Six months postoperatively, the patient is doing well and shows no sign of recurrence.

  5. Systematic Review of Racial Disparities in Human Papillomavirus–Associated Anal Dysplasia and Anal Cancer Among Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Tim; Bertozzi-Villa, Clara

    2015-01-01

    We systematically reviewed the literature on anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, dysplasia, and cancer among Black and White men who have sex with men (MSM) to determine if a racial disparity exists. We searched 4 databases for articles up to March 2014. Studies involving Black MSM are nearly absent from the literature. Of 25 eligible studies, 2 stratified by race and sexual behavior. Both reported an elevated rate of abnormal anal outcomes among Black MSM. White MSM had a 1.3 times lower prevalence of group-2 HPV (P < .01) and nearly 13% lower prevalence of anal dysplasia than did Black MSM. We were unable to determine factors driving the absence of Black MSM in this research and whether disparities in clinical care exist. Elevated rates of abnormal anal cytology among Black MSM in 2 studies indicate a need for future research in this population. PMID:25713941

  6. Immune Microenvironments of Anal Cancer Precursors Differ by HIV-serostatus, Affecting Ablation Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxin; Gaisa, Michael M; Wang, Xiaofei; Swartz, Talia H; Arens, Yotam; Dresser, Karen A; Sigel, Carlie; Sigel, Keith

    2017-09-02

    Anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) are the precursors to anal cancer and frequently persist or recur following electrocautery ablation (EA). Impaired mucosal immunity may facilitate anal carcinogenesis. We characterized the immune microenvironment of anal HSIL in correlation with HIV-serostatus and ablation outcomes. Using immunohistochemistry, mucosa-infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were quantified in HSIL and benign mucosa from 70 HIV+ and 45 HIV- patients. Clinicopathological parameters were compared. Anal HSIL harbored more T lymphocytes than benign mucosa regardless of HIV status (p≤0.03). Total T lymphocyte count and CD8+ subset were significantly higher in HIV+ HSIL vs. HIV- HSIL (median cell count 71 vs. 47; 47 vs. 22/HPF, p<0.001) whereas the CD4+ subset was comparable between groups (median 24 vs. 25, p=0.4). Post EA, HSIL persisted in 41% of HIV+ and 19% of HIV- patients (p=0.04). Unadjusted analysis showed trends towards EA failures associated with HIV seropositivity (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 2.0; 95% CI 0.8-4.9) and increased CD8+ cells (IRR 2.3; 95% CI 0.9-5.3). HIV is associated with alterations of the immune microenvironment of anal HSIL manifested by increased local lymphocytic infiltrates, predominately CD8+. HIV seropositivity and excess CD8+ cells may be associated with ablation resistance.

  7. What drives the number of high-risk human papillomavirus types in the anal canal in HIV-positive men who have sex with men?

    PubMed

    del Amo, Julia; González, Cristina; Geskus, Ronald B; Torres, Montse; Del Romero, Jorge; Viciana, Pompeyo; Masiá, Mar; Blanco, Jose R; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; Ortiz, Marta

    2013-04-15

    We estimated the effect of sexual behavior, age, and immunodeficiency on the number of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) types in the anal canal among human immunodeficiency virus-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Anal samples were genotyped with the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test, and risk factors were investigated with Poisson regression. Of 586 MSM, 69% were Spanish, and 25.6% were Latin American; the median age was 34.9 years (interquartile range [IQR], 30.1-40.8). The median number of recent sex partners was 6 (IQR, 2-24 sex partners), and the median CD4(+) T-cell count was 531.5 cells/mm(3) (IQR, 403-701 cells/mm(3)). The prevalence of any and multiple HR-HPV infections was 83.4% and 60.5%, respectively. The most common types were HPV-16 (42%), HPV-51 (24%), HPV-39 (23.7%), and HPV-59 (23.5%). Age had a statistically significant, nonlinear association with the number of types, with the highest number detected around 35 years of age (P < .001). The number of recent sex partners had a statistically significant, fairly linear association on the log scale (P = .033). The high prevalence of HR-HPV types is associated with recent sexual behavior and age.

  8. Tumor Response and Survival Predicted by Post-Therapy FDG-PET/CT in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Myerson, Robert J.; Fleshman, James W.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDG uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer.

  9. Identification of a Novel Human Papillomavirus, Type HPV199, Isolated from a Nasopharynx and Anal Canal, and Complete Genomic Characterization of Papillomavirus Species Gamma-12

    PubMed Central

    Oštrbenk, Anja; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Hošnjak, Lea; Li, Jingjing; Deng, Qiuju; Šterbenc, Anja; Poljak, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The novel human papillomavirus type 199 (HPV199) was initially identified in a nasopharyngeal swab sample obtained from a 25 year-old immunocompetent male. The complete genome of HPV199 is 7,184 bp in length with a GC content of 36.5%. Comparative genomic characterization of HPV199 and its closest relatives showed the classical genomic organization of Gammapapillomaviruses (Gamma-PVs). HPV199 has seven major open reading frames (ORFs), encoding five early (E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7) and two late (L1 and L2) proteins, while lacking the E5 ORF. The long control region (LCR) of 513 bp is located between the L1 and E6 ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis additionally confirmed that HPV-199 clusters into the Gamma-PV genus, species Gamma-12, additionally containing HPV127, HV132, HPV148, HPV165, and three putative HPV types: KC5, CG2 and CG3. HPV199 is most closely related to HPV127 (nucleotide identity 77%). The complete viral genome sequence of additional HPV199 isolate was determined from anal canal swab sample. Two HPV199 complete viral sequences exhibit 99.4% nucleotide identity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first member of Gamma-PV with complete nucleotide sequences determined from two independent clinical samples. To evaluate the tissue tropism of the novel HPV type, 916 clinical samples were tested using HPV199 type-specific real-time PCR: HPV199 was detected in 2/76 tissue samples of histologically confirmed common warts, 2/108 samples of eyebrow hair follicles, 2/137 anal canal swabs obtained from individuals with clinically evident anal pathology, 4/184 nasopharyngeal swabs and 3/411 cervical swabs obtained from women with normal cervical cytology. Although HPV199 was found in 1.4% of cutaneous and mucosal samples only, it exhibits dual tissue tropism. According to the results of our study and literature data, dual tropism of all Gamma-12 members is highly possible. PMID:26375679

  10. [Sacral resection in surgical treatment of locally advanced primary and recurrent rectal and anal cancer: short-term outcomes].

    PubMed

    Tsarkov, P V; Efetov, S K; Sidorova, L V; Tulina, I A

    2017-01-01

    To assess safety of rectum removal with distal sacral resection. The short-term results of surgical treatment of primary and recurrent locally advanced rectal and anal cancer with sacral fixation have been analyzed. 32 patients underwent combined operations with sacral resection at the level of S2-S5. In 12 patients only one point of tumor fixation (F1) was revealed, 10 patients had two points of fixation (F2), three patients had three fixation points (F3) and in 7 cases the tumor was fixed to four points (F4) of fixation to different pelvic structures. Mean intraoperative blood loss and surgery time was 551±81 ml and 320±20 min in cases of sacral fixation only that was significantly lower compared with F2 cases - 1278±551 ml and 433±45 min, F3 cases - 2200±600 ml and 620±88 min, F4 cases - 2157±512.5 ml and 519±52,3 min, respectively (р<0.05). Complications requiring surgical intervention occurred in 9% patients (n=3). Among 23 patients with intact bladder and ureters urinary disorders occurred in 42% (n=10). Resection margin was negative along posterior surface of the specimen in all cases. Advanced surgery with distal sacral resection is advisable for radical removal of locally advanced and recurrent rectal and anal canal cancer fixed to the sacrum with negative resection margin. These operations are feasible in specialized centers and should be performed by specially trained oncological or colorectal surgeon.

  11. Sociodemographic Predictors of Anal Cancer Screening and Follow-up in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jessica S; Holstad, Marcia M; Watkins Bruner, Deborah

    2017-07-14

    Anal cancer in the United States is generally rare; however, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are 28 times more likely to be given a diagnosis of anal cancer than the general population. The aim of this study was to examine the rates and sociodemographic predictors of anal cancer screening and follow-up anoscopy in a sample of HIV-infected individuals. Data for this study (n = 200) were derived from a retrospective chart review of randomly selected HIV-infected individuals. Data analyses included Pearson's correlation coefficient statistic to examine bivariate associations and logistic regression modeling for prediction of anal Papanicolaou test screening and follow-up anoscopy. Screening rates and follow-up after an abnormal anal Pap test were low. Women were less likely to be screened for anal cancer (odds ratio [OR], 0.244; P = .007). Men who have sex with men were almost 4 times more likely to be screened for anal cancer (OR, 3.7; P = .02). Men who have sex with men were 6 times more likely to have follow-up after an abnormal anal Pap test compared with heterosexual men or women of any sexual orientation (OR, 6.88; P = .002). High-risk groups for anal cancer should be targeted for preventative measures as part of a cancer prevention plan to decrease the personal and clinical burden associated with anal cancer. Cancer prevention is a multistep process that requires screening and follow-up efforts, where healthcare providers play a vital role in these efforts. Findings from this study can inform strategies to improve screening and follow-up rates in HIV-infected individuals.

  12. HPV and Anal Cancer Knowledge among HIV-Infected and Non-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    PubMed

    Fenkl, Eric A; Jones, Sandra Gracia; Schochet, Elie; Johnson, Paulette

    2015-12-11

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the current status of what men who have sex with men (MSM) know about anal cancer in terms of self-care behaviors/practices, human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge, risk awareness, anal cancer screening history, the need to be screened, and how demographic or behavioral practices were associated with knowledge and awareness. A convenience sampling method was employed. Participants were recruited in 2014-2015 in venues such as Pride Center events as well as in bars, restaurants, and cafes that cater to a gay clientele. Participants' knowledge of HPV and anal cancer were examined using the Anal Cancer Knowledge Questionnaire (ACKQ). The 65-item survey consisted of demographic variables, questions related to anal health behaviors, practices, and perceptions, HPV and anal cancer knowledge, and HPV and anal cancer risk awareness. The sample consisted of 163 men. The mean age of the participants was 49.6 years. The majorities were white (62.6%), followed by Hispanic (26.4%) and Black (8.0%). Study participants were, to a great extent, uninformed and largely unaware of the link between HPV and anal cancer and the risk that HPV and anal cancer presented to MSM. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that HPV knowledge, P < .001, and risk awareness, P < .001, differed by HIV status. In spite of efforts in recent years to raise HPV and anal cancer awareness, those groups most at risk appear to remain uncertain of risk, screening, and measures to protect themselves from the adverse implications of HPV infection.

  13. Methylation of HPV and a tumor suppressor gene reveals anal cancer and precursor lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lorincz, Attila T.; Nathan, Mayura; Reuter, Caroline; Warman, Rhian; Thaha, Mohamed A.; Sheaff, Michael; Vasiljevic, Natasa; Ahmad, Amar; Cuzick, Jack; Sasieni, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We studied DNA methylation patterns of human papillomavirus (HPV) and tumor suppressor gene EPB41L3 in 148 anal and perianal biopsies to determine whether high levels of methylation would be associated with anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). The most prevalent HPV type was HPV16, detected in 54% of the 30 benign biopsies, 33% of the 43 low-grade AIN (lgAIN), 82% of the 59 high grade AIN (hgAIN) and 4 of the 5 anal cancers. A methylation score was developed (0.561*HPV16me+0.439*EPB41L3) which had increasing values with severity of disease: the mean was 8.1% in benign, 13.2% in lgAIN, 22.3% in hgAIN and 49.3% in cancers (p < 0.0001). The methylation score as a triage classifier at a cut-off of 8.8 gave a sensitivity of 90.6% (95% CI: 82.8, 96.9), specificity of 50.7% (95% CI: 39.7, 61.6) and area under the curve of 0.82 (95% CI: 0.75–0.89) for separating hgAIN and cancer from benign and lgAIN biopsies. We conclude that methylation of HPV16 and EPB41L3 show highly significant association with increasing severity of AIN and cancer and may be useful as biomarkers in anal disease. PMID:28881579

  14. Salvage abdominoperineal resection and perineal wound healing in local recurrent or persistent anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferenschild, Floris T J; Vermaas, Maarten; Hofer, Stefan O; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M M; de Wilt, Johannes H W

    2005-11-01

    The primary treatment for anal cancer is chemoradiation (CRT). Failures after CRT are potentially curable with an abdominoperineal resection (APR). A major problem of surgery in the anal area is poor healing of the perineal wound. Between 1985 and 2000, 129 patients treated for anal cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 24 patients with local failure, 18 patients were treated with an APR. The aim of this study was to review the results and long-term outcome after salvage APR, with special emphasis on perineal wound healing. Mean age at diagnosis was 59 (range: 41-83) years. After a median of 16 months, only 2 patients developed a local recurrence. The 5-year overall survival was 30%. In 11 patients the perineal wound was closed primarily, in 3 patients the perineal wound was left open, and in 4 patients a vertical rectus abdominus musculocutaneous (VRAM) flap was used. Perineal wound breakdown occurred in 5 of the 14 patients (36%) not treated with primary muscle reconstruction. In all patients treated with a VRAM flap the perineal wound healed primarily. In the present study salvage APR in recurrent or persistent anal cancer results in good local control and 5-year overall survival of 30%. When performing an APR a VRAM flap reconstruction should be considered to prevent disabling perineal wound complications.

  15. Screening for Anal Cancer in HIV Positive Patients: Should We Make It A Standard-of-care?

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Zhou, Haiyang

    2017-09-27

    Anal cancer is biological similar to cervical cancer, and is preceded by anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). Screening for AIN and treatments to reduce the risk of anal cancer are not established as guidelines of care for HIV-infected patients. It is mainly because screening and treating of AIN is not yet proven to reduce the incidence of anal cancer. The present study preliminarily demonstrated that a successful screening program in preventing squamous cell anal cancer in HIV positive patients. The authors achieved their purpose of controlling the evolution of all abnormalities identified during the anal cancer screening, preventing AIN to progress towards anal cancer, and reversing any form of AIN by surgery, ablation or medical therapy. Randomized controlled multi-center trials with a large sample size should be carried out to validate the study results. It is wise for the physicians to actively screen and treat AIN in HIV-infected patients whenever possible unless the results of randomized controlled study demonstrate that doing so is inappropriate.

  16. Technical aspects of radiation therapy for anal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Eli D.; Ahmed, Inaya; Yue, Ning J.

    2014-01-01

    Historically treated with surgery, current practice recommends anal carcinoma to be treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation. This review will examine the anatomy, modes of disease spread and recurrence, and evaluate the existing evidence for treatment options for these tumors. An in-depth examination of specific radiation therapy (RT) techniques—such as conventional 3D-conformal RT and intensity-modulated RT—will be discussed along with modern dose constraints. RT field arrangement, patient setup, and recommended gross and clinical target volume (CTV) contours will be considered. Areas in need of further investigation, such as the role in treatment for positron emission tomography (PET) will be explored. PMID:24982768

  17. Role of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Management of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena; Ricardi, Umberto; Milanesi, Enrica; Cassoni, Paola; Baccega, Massimo; Filippini, Claudia; Racca, Patrizia; Lesca, Adriana; Munoz, Fernando H.; Fora, Gianluca; Skanjeti, Andrea; Cravero, Francesca; Morino, Mario

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pre- and post-treatment staging of anal cancer are often inaccurate. The role of positron emission tomograpy-computed tomography (PET-CT) in anal cancer is yet to be defined. The aim of the study was to compare PET-CT with CT scan, sentinel node biopsy results of inguinal lymph nodes, and anal biopsy results in staging and in follow-up of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three consecutive patients diagnosed with anal cancer underwent PET-CT. Results were compared with computed tomography (CT), performed in 40 patients, and with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) (41 patients) at pretreatment workup. Early follow-up consisted of a digital rectal examination, an anoscopy, a PET-CT scan, and anal biopsies performed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment. Data sets were then compared. Results: At pretreatment assessment, anal cancer was identified by PET-CT in 47 patients (88.7%) and by CT in 30 patients (75%). The detection rates rose to 97.9% with PET-CT and to 82.9% with CT (P=.042) when the 5 patients who had undergone surgery prior to this assessment and whose margins were positive at histological examination were censored. Perirectal and/or pelvic nodes were considered metastatic by PET-CT in 14 of 53 patients (26.4%) and by CT in 7 of 40 patients (17.5%). SNB was superior to both PET-CT and CT in detecting inguinal lymph nodes. PET-CT upstaged 37.5% of patients and downstaged 25% of patients. Radiation fields were changed in 12.6% of patients. PET-CT at 3 months was more accurate than PET-CT at 1 month in evaluating outcomes after chemoradiation therapy treatment: sensitivity was 100% vs 66.6%, and specificity was 97.4% vs 92.5%, respectively. Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Conclusions: In this series, PET-CT detected the primary tumor more often than CT. Staging of perirectal/pelvic or inguinal lymph nodes was better with PET-CT. SNB was more accurate in staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  18. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  19. On the etiology of anal squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Morten

    2002-08-01

    -negative. A combined molecular biological and histological analysis showed that anal SCs with likely origin in the anal canal are 7.5 times more likely to be HPV-positive than anal SCs with likely origin in the perianal skin. Additionally, cancer of the anal canal are more likely than those of the perianal skin to be characterized histologically by small or medium-sized tumor cells, basaloid features, and little or no keratinization. Epidemiological studies from the past two decades have contributed imprtantly to our current understanding of anal SC and its causes. Most cases of this neoplasm can now be considered as a consequence of sexually or otherwise acquired infection in the anal mucosa with types of HPV already known to be involved in cancers of the uterine cervix. Expectedly, the upward trend in the incidence of anal SC seen over the past half century will continue in many years to come. However, there is currently widespread, yet cautious, optimism regarding the prospects for a prophylactic HPV vaccine. It this optimism is justified, the future may bring drastic reductions in the incidence of HPV-associated morbidities, including SC.

  20. Systematic review: anal and rectal changes after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Krol, Robin; Smeenk, Robert Jan; van Lin, Emile N J T; Yeoh, Eric E K; Hopman, Wim P M

    2014-03-01

    Pelvic radiotherapy may lead to changes of anorectal function resulting in incontinence-related complaints. The aim of this study was to systematically review objective findings of late anorectal physiology and mucosal appearance after irradiation for prostate cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane library were searched. Original articles in which anal function, rectal function, or rectal mucosa were examined ≥3 months after EBRT for prostate cancer were included. Twenty-one studies were included with low to moderate quality. Anal resting pressures significantly decreased in 6 of the 9 studies including 277 patients. Changes of squeeze pressure and rectoanal inhibitory reflex were less uniform. Rectal distensibility was significantly impaired after EBRT in 7 of 9 studies (277 patients). In 4 of 9 studies on anal and in 5 of 9 on rectal function, disturbances were associated with urgency, frequent bowel movements or fecal incontinence. Mucosal changes as assessed by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score revealed telangiectasias in 73 %, congestion in 33 %, and ulceration in 4 % of patients in 8 studies including 346 patients, but no strictures or necrosis. Three studies reported mucosal improvement during follow-up. Telangiectasias, particularly multiple, were associated with rectal bleeding. Not all bowel complaints (30 %) were related to radiotherapy. Low to moderate quality evidence indicates that EBRT reduces anal resting pressure, decreases rectal distensibility, and frequently induces telangiectasias of rectal mucosa. Objective changes may be associated with fecal incontinence, urgency, frequent bowel movements, and rectal bleeding, but these symptoms are not always related to radiation damage.

  1. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence in Invasive Anal Cancers in the United States prior to Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Steinau, M; Unger, ER; Hernandez, BY; Goodman, MT; Copeland, G; Hopenhayn, C; Cozen, W; Saber, MS; Huang, Y; Peters, ES; Lynch, CF; Wilkinson, EJ; Rajeevan, MS; Lyu, C; Saraiya, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Conduct a representative survey of Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and its genotype distribution in invasive anal cancer specimens in the U.S. Methods Population-based archival anal cancer specimens were identified from Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana and Michigan cancer registries and SEER tissue repositories in Hawaii, Iowa and Los Angeles. Sections from one representative block per case were used for DNA extraction. All extracts were assayed first by Linear Array and re-tested with INNO-LiPA if inadequate or HPV negative. Results Among 146 unique invasive anal cancer cases, 93 (63.7%) were from women and 53 (36.3%) from men. HPV (any type) was detected in 133 (91.1%) cases and 129 (88.4%) contained at least one high risk type, most (80.1%) as a single genotype. HPV16 had the highest prevalence (113 cases, 77.4%); HPV6, 11, 18 and 33 were also found multiple times. Among HPV16 positive cases, 37% were identified as prototype variant Ep and 63% were non-prototypes: 33% Em, 12% E-G131G, 5% Af1, 4% AA/NA-1, 3% E-C109G, 3% E-G131T, 2% As and 1% Af2. No significant differences in the distributions of HPV (any), high-risk types, or HPV16/18 were seen between gender, race or age group. Conclusions The establishment of pre-vaccine HPV prevalence in the U.S. is critical to the surveillance of vaccine efficacy. Almost 80% of anal cancers were positive for the vaccine types HPV16 or HPV18 and in 70% these were the only types detected suggesting that a high proportion might be preventable by current vaccines. PMID:23609590

  2. Adenocarcinoma arising from an anal gland—Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Konishi, Fumio; Yoshida, Takayoshi; Yoshinaga, Yasuo; Izumo, Toshiyuki; Lefor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Adenocarcinoma arising from an anal gland is extremely rare. Most anal canal cancers are squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma is infrequently diagnosed. Diagnostic criteria and the standard treatment for adenocarcinoma of the anal canal have not been clearly defined, in part because of the rarity of this lesion. PRESENTATION OF CASE An 84-year-old man who presented with a piece of tissue prolapsing from the anus. An incisional biopsy showed adenocarcinoma, and an abdomino-perineal resection was then performed. Cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 19 (CK19) stained positive in the specimen, suggesting that the tumor developed from an anal gland. The patient was discharged after surgery without any complications. DISCUSSION Exact diagnostic criteria for adenocarcinoma of the anal canal have not been previously described. In the present case, CK7 and CK19 were stained, and the tumor showed positivity for both of these markers, which is compatible with the staining patterns of anal gland origin cancer. Radical resection is recommended rather than local resection, because of the tumor's high recurrence rate. Some authors recommend combined modality treatment with preoperative or postoperative chemoradiotherapy because of the high rate of distant recurrence. CONCLUSION The preoperative diagnosis of adenocarcinoma arising from an anal gland is not easily established. However, it may be possible to suspect an anal glandular adenocarcinoma based on a meticulous physical examination, appropriate diagnostic studies and pathological findings on biopsy. PMID:24705191

  3. Localized volume effects for late rectal and anal toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V. . E-mail: j.lebesque@nki.nl; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Slot, Annerie; Dielwart, Michel F.H.; Koper, Peter C.M.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters derived from anorectal, rectal, and anal wall dose distributions that correlate with different late gastrointestinal (GI) complications after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 641 patients from a randomized trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. Toxicity was scored with adapted Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria and five specific complications. The variables derived from dose-volume histogram of anorectal, rectal, and anal wall were as follows: % receiving {>=}5-70 Gy (V5-V70), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}). The anus was defined as the most caudal 3 cm of the anorectum. Statistics were done with multivariate Cox regression models. Median follow-up was 44 months. Results: Anal dosimetric variables were associated with RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}2 (V5-V40, D{sub mean}) and incontinence (V5-V70, D{sub mean}). Bleeding correlated most strongly with anorectal V55-V65, and stool frequency with anorectal V40 and D{sub mean}. Use of steroids was weakly related to anal variables. No volume effect was seen for RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}3 and pain/cramps/tenesmus. Conclusion: Different volume effects were found for various late GI complications. Therefore, to evaluate the risk of late GI toxicity, not only intermediate and high doses to the anorectal wall volume should be taken into account, but also the dose to the anal wall.

  4. Synchronized functional anal sphincter assessment: maximizing the potential of anal vector manometry and 3-D anal endosonography.

    PubMed

    Schizas, A M P; Ahmad, A N; Emmanuel, A V; Williams, A B

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the association between structure and function is vital before considering surgery involving anal sphincter division. By correlating three-dimensional anal endosonography (AES) and three-dimensional anal canal vector volume manometry (VVM), this study details a method to produce measurements of both sphincter length and pressure leading to identification of the functionally important areas of the anal canal. The aim of this study was to provide combined detailed information on anal canal anatomy and physiology. Twelve males and 12 nulliparous females with no bowel symptoms underwent VVM (using a water-perfused, eight-channel radially arranged catheter) and AES. The synchronization of AES and VVM identified that the majority of rest and squeeze anal pressure is present in the portion of the anal canal covered by both anal sphincters. Nearly, 20% of overall resting anal pressure is produced distal to the caudal termination of the internal anal sphincter. Puborectalis accounts for a significantly greater percentage volume of pressure in females both at rest and when squeezing, though the total volume of pressure is not significantly greater. The majority of resting and squeezing pressure and the least asymmetry, in both sexes, is in the portion of the anal canal covered by external anal sphincter. In females, the external anal sphincter is shorter and a proportionately longer puborectalis accounts for a greater percentage of pressure. Sphincter targeted fistula surgery in females must be performed with special caution. A protective role for puborectalis following obstetric anal sphincter injury is suggested. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Risk of Anal Cancer in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Justice, Amy C.; Engels, Eric; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J.; Brooks, John T.; Napravnik, Sonia; Hessol, Nancy A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Klein, Marina B.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Saag, Michael S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Press, Natasha; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although few have evaluated rates separately for men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women. There are also conflicting data regarding calendar trends. Methods. In a study involving 13 cohorts from North America with follow-up between 1996 and 2007, we compared anal cancer incidence rates among 34 189 HIV-infected (55% MSM, 19% other men, 26% women) and 114 260 HIV-uninfected individuals (90% men). Results. Among men, the unadjusted anal cancer incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 131 for HIV-infected MSM, 46 for other HIV-infected men, and 2 for HIV-uninfected men, corresponding to demographically adjusted rate ratios (RRs) of 80.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.7–151.1) for HIV-infected MSM and 26.7 (95% CI, 11.5–61.7) for other HIV-infected men compared with HIV-uninfected men. HIV-infected women had an anal cancer rate of 30/100 000 person-years, and no cases were observed for HIV-uninfected women. In a multivariable Poisson regression model, among HIV-infected individuals, the risk was higher for MSM compared with other men (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8–6.0), but no difference was observed comparing women with other men (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2). In comparison with the period 2000–2003, HIV-infected individuals had an adjusted RR of 0.5 (95% CI, .3–.9) in 1996–1999 and 0.9 (95% CI, .6–1.2) in 2004–2007. Conclusions. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, suggesting a need for universal prevention efforts. Rates increased after the early antiretroviral therapy era and then plateaued. PMID:22291097

  6. Epigenomic Characterization of Locally Advanced Anal Cancer: An RTOG 98-11 Specimen Study

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M; Eschrich, Steven; Winter, Kathryn; Riggs, Bridget; Berglund, Anders; Ajidahun, Abidemi; Simko, Jeff; Moughan, Jennifer; Ajani, Jaffer; Magliocco, Anthony; Elahi, Abul; Hoffe, Sarah; Shibata, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-11 clinical trial demonstrated the superiority of standard 5FU/mitomycin-C over 5FU/cisplatin in combination with radiation in the treatment of anal squamous cell cancer. Tumor size (>5cm) and lymph node metastases are associated with disease progression. There may be key molecular differences (e.g. DNA methylation changes) in tumors at high-risk for progression. Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine if there are differences in DNA methylation at individual CpG sites and within genes among locally advanced anal cancers, with large tumor size and/or nodal involvement, compared to those that are less advanced. Design Case-case study among 121 patients defined as high-risk (tumor size>5cm and/or nodal involvement; n=59) or low-risk (≤5cm, node negative; n=62) within the mitomycin-C arm of RTOG98-11 trial. DNA methylation was measured using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 Array. Settings Tertiary care cancer center in collaboration with a national clinical trials cooperative group. Patients The patients consisted of 74 women and 47 men with a median age of 54 years (minmax 25-79). Main Outcome Measures DNA methylation differences at individual CpG sites and within genes between low and high-risk patients were compared using Mann-Whitney test (p-value<0.001). Results A total of 16 CpG loci were differentially methylated (14 increased and 2 decreased) in high vs. low-risk cases. Genes harboring differentially methylated CpG sites included known tumor suppressor genes and novel targets. Limitations This study only included patients in mitomycin-C arm with tumor tissue; however, this sample was representative of the trial. Conclusions This is the first study to apply genome-wide methylation analysis to anal cancer. Biologically relevant differences in methylated targets were found to discriminate locally advanced from early anal cancer. Epigenetic events likely play a significant role in the

  7. Genital invasion or perigenital spread may pose a risk of marginal misses for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Julia; Lohr, Frank; Buergy, Daniel; Büsing, Karen; Trunk, Marcus J; Wenz, Frederik; Mai, Sabine

    2016-04-04

    While intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in anal cancer is feasible and improves high-dose conformality, the current RTOG/AGITG contouring atlas and planning guidelines lack specific instructions on how to proceed with external genitalia. Meanwhile, the RTOG-Protocol 0529 explicitly recommends genital sparing on the basis of specific genital dose constraints. Recent pattern-of-relapse studies based on conventional techniques suggest that marginal miss might be a potential consequence of genital sparing. Our goal is to outline the potential scope and increase the awareness for this clinical issue. We present and discuss four patients with perigenital spread in anal cancer in both early and advanced stages (three at time of first diagnosis and one in form of relapse). Genital/perigenital spread was observed once as direct genital infiltration and thrice in form of perigenital lymphatic spread. We review the available data regarding the potential consequences of genital sparing in anal cancer. Pattern-of-relapse studies in anal cancer after conventional radiotherapy and the current use of IMRT in anal cancer are equivocal but suggest that genital sparing may occasionally result in marginal miss. An obvious hypothesis suggested by our report is that perigenital lymphovascular invasion might be associated with manifest inguinal N+ disease. Local failure has low salvage rates in recent anal cancer treatment series. Perigenital spread may pose a risk of marginal misses in IMRT in anal cancer. To prevent marginal misses, meticulous pattern-of-relapse analyses of controlled IMRT-series are warranted. Until their publication, genital sparing should be applied with caution, PET/CT should be used when possible and meeting genital dose constraints should not be prioritized over CTV coverage, especially (but not only) in stage T3/4 and N+ disease.

  8. Late effects and quality of life after chemo-radiation for the treatment of anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Gillian; Haigh, Rachel; McLean, Catriona; Phillips, Hamish

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the late effects and quality of life of patients following chemo-radiation treatment for anal cancer. All surviving anal cancer patients treated within NHS Lothian between 1990 and 2007 were invited to participate. Data were collected using the EORTC QLQ-C30, the EORTC QLQ-CR38 and the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre Bowel Function Instrument (MSKCC). Overall response rate was 46% (n = 42); mean age 54.7 years and with a median time interval of 63.8 months between treatment and completion of the questionnaires. Thirty-five percent of the participants were 'rarely' or 'never' able to wait 15 min to get to the toilet; 50% were 'rarely' or 'never' able to control the passage of gas; 35% limited the types of solid foods they eat; 22% had leakage of stool during the day; 39% required to use a protective pad and 29% altered their daily activities because of bowel function 'always' or 'most of the time'. Seventeen percent of patients reported financial difficulties ('quite a bit' and 'very much'). Both men and women reported high symptomology for sexual problems with a median score of 83.3 (50.0. 100.0). This study has shown that in a sub-set of patients treated with chemo-radiation for anal cancer, persistent treatment related issues are reported at a medium time interval of 5.3 years. Further work is now required to understand the impact of symptoms on day-to-day life and the challenges that people face in managing these inter-related and complex problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal: Patterns and Predictors of Failure and Implications for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jean L.; Patil, Sujata M.; Temple, Larissa K.F.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Saltz, Leonard B.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) is increasingly used in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCAC). Prevention of locoregional failure (LRF) using IMRT requires appropriate clinical target volume (CTV) definition. To better define the CTV for IMRT, we evaluated patterns and predictors of LRF in SCCAC patients given conventional radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of 180 SCCAC patients treated with conventional radiation with or without chemotherapy at our institution between January 1990 and March 2007. All patients received radiation; the median primary tumor dose was 45 Gy. A total of 173 patients also received mitomycin-based chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 40 months. Actuarial 3-year colostomy-free survival was 89% and overall survival (OS) 88%. Actuarial 3-year LRF was 23%. A total of 45 patients had LRF, with 35 (78%) occurring locally in the primary site (25 local only, 10 local and regional); however, 20 (44%) had regional components of failure within the pelvis or inguinal nodes (10 regional only, 10 local and regional). Cumulative sites of LRF (patients may have one or more site of failure) were as follows: primary, 35; inguinal, 8; external perianal, 5; common iliac, 4; presacral, 3; distal rectum, 2; external iliac, 2; and internal iliac, 2. All patients with common iliac failure had cT3 or N+ disease. Conclusions: The observed patterns of failure support inclusion of the inguinal and all pelvic nodal groups in the CTV for IMRT. In patients with advanced tumor or nodal stage, common iliac nodes should also be included in the CTV.

  10. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Jose G.; Luxton, Gary; Mok, Edward C.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters that correlate with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 33 patients receiving CRT. Pelvic bone (PBM) was contoured for each patient and divided into subsites: ilium, lower pelvis (LP), and lumbosacral spine (LSS). The volume of each region receiving at least 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 Gy was calculated. Endpoints included grade {>=}3 HT (HT3+) and hematologic event (HE), defined as any grade {>=}2 HT with a modification in chemotherapy dose. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was evaluated with the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. Logistic regression was used to test associations between HT and dosimetric/clinical parameters. Results: Nine patients experienced HT3+ and 15 patients experienced HE. Constrained optimization of the LKB model for HT3+ yielded the parameters m = 0.175, n = 1, and TD{sub 50} = 32 Gy. With this model, mean PBM doses of 25 Gy, 27.5 Gy, and 31 Gy result in a 10%, 20%, and 40% risk of HT3+, respectively. Compared with patients with mean PBM dose of <30 Gy, patients with mean PBM dose {>=}30 Gy had a 14-fold increase in the odds of developing HT3+ (p = 0.005). Several low-dose radiation parameters (i.e., PBM-V10) were associated with the development of HT3+ and HE. No association was found with the ilium, LP, or clinical factors. Conclusions: LKB modeling confirms the expectation that PBM acts like a parallel organ, implying that the mean dose to the organ is a useful predictor for toxicity. Low-dose radiation to the PBM was also associated with clinically significant HT. Keeping the mean PBM dose <22.5 Gy and <25 Gy is associated with a 5% and 10% risk of HT, respectively.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of screening for anal cancer using regular digital ano-rectal examinations in men who have sex with men living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jason J; Fairley, Christopher K; Carroll, Susan; Walker, Sandra; Chen, Marcus; Read, Tim; Grulich, Andrew; Bradshaw, Catriona; Kaldor, John; Clarke, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anal cancer in men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV is an important issue but there are no consistent guidelines for how to screen for this cancer. In settings where screening with anal cytology is unavailable, regular anal examinations have been proposed in some guidelines but their cost-effectiveness is unknown. Methods Our objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of regular anal examinations to screen for anal cancer in HIV-positive MSM living in Australia using a probabilistic Markov model. Data sources were based on the medical literature and a clinical trial of HIV-positive MSM receiving an annual anal examination in Australia. The main outcome measures for calculating effectiveness were undiscounted and discounted (at 3%) lifetime costs, life years gained, quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Base-case analysis estimated the average cost of screening for and management of anal cancer ranged from $195 for no screening to $1,915 for lifetime annual screening of men aged ≥ 50. Screening of men aged ≥ 50 generated ICERs of $29,760 per QALY gained (for screening every four years), $32,222 (every three years) and $45,484 (every two years). Uncertainty for ICERs was mostly influenced by the cost (financially and decrease in quality of life) from a false-positive result, progression rate of anal cancer, specificity of the anal examination, the probability of detection outside a screening program and the discount rate. Conclusions Screening for anal cancer by incorporating regular anal examinations into routine HIV care for MSM aged ≥ 50 is most likely to be cost-effective by conventional standards. Given that anal pap smears are not widely available yet in many clinical settings, regular anal exams for MSM living with HIV to detect anal cancer earlier should be implemented. PMID:26942721

  12. Clinical characteristics of women diagnosed with carcinoma who tested positive for cervical and anal high-risk human papillomavirus DNA and E6 RNA.

    PubMed

    Veo, Carlos A R; Saad, Sarhan S; Fregnani, José Humberto T G; Scapulatempo-Neto, Cristovam; Tsunoda, Audrey Tieko; Resende, Júlio César Possati; Lorenzi, Adriana Tarlá; Mafra, Allini; Cinti, Claudia; Cotrim, Ismael Dale; Rosa, Luciana Albina Reis; de Oliveira, Cristina Mendes; Martins, Toni Ricardo; Centrone, Cristiane; Levi, José Eduardo; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar

    2015-07-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) is an essential cause of cervical carcinoma and is also strongly related to anal cancer development. The hrHPV E6 oncoprotein plays a major role in carcinogenesis. We aimed to evaluate the frequency of hrHPV DNA and E6 oncoprotein in the anuses of women with cervical carcinoma. We analyzed 117 women with cervical cancer and 103 controls for hrHPV and the E6 oncogene. Positive test results for a cervical carcinoma included 66.7 % with hrHPV-16 and 7.7 % with hrHPV-18. One case tested positive for both HPV variants (0.9 %). The samples from the anal canal were positive for HPV-16 in 59.8 % of the cases. Simultaneous presence of HPV in the cervix and anal canal was found in 53.8 % of the cases. Regarding expression of E6 RNA, positivity for HPV-16 in the anal canal was found in 21.2 % of the cases, positivity for HPV-16 in the cervix was found in 75.0 %, and positivity for HPV-18 in the cervix was found in 1.9 %. E6 expression in both the cervix and anal canal was found in 19.2 % of the cases. In the controls, 1 % tested positive for HPV-16 and 0 % for HPV-18. Anal samples from the controls showed a hrHPV frequency of 4.9 % (only HPV16). The presence of hrHPV in the anal canal of women with cervical cancer was detected at a high frequency. We also detected E6 RNA expression in the anal canal of women with cervical cancer, suggesting that these women are at risk for anal hrHPV infection.

  13. Screening for Squamous Cell Anal Cancer in HIV Positive Patients: A Five-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Santorelli, Chiara; Leo, Cosimo Alex; Hodgkinson, Jonathan D; Baldelli, Franco; Cantarella, Francesco; Cavazzoni, Emanuel

    2017-06-23

    Potential screening modalities for early diagnosis of squamous cell anal cancer (SCC) in HIV patients include digital anorectal examination (DARE), anal Papanicolaou testing (Pap test), human papilloma virus (HPV) co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the results of a five-year screening program for SCC in HIV patients. We conducted a retrospective study on 204 HIV patients who underwent a screening program for SCC from October 2010 to January 2015. All patients were screened by DARE, anal Pap test, including HPV test and cytology, and high-resolution video-proctoscopy (HR-VPS) with and without acetic acid 3%. Depending on macroscopic appearance and biopsies, patients underwent observation or treatment. Median follow-up was 36 months. Cytologic abnormalities (Cyt+) for high-risk HPV genotypes were recorded in 34% of patients. HR-VPS was positive in 59 patients (29%), of whom 13 patients (22%) were positive for warts; the rest have typical features of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN). Sixteen (8%) patients had AIN (AIN I-III) and underwent wide local excision, ablation, or imiquimod. Absence of progression was recorded. Fourteen patients (7%) had SCC: eight (57%) with no evidence of recurrence, two (14%) had recurrence, and four (29%) died from metastatic disease. Our data demonstrated a successful screening program in preventing SCC in HIV patients. We demonstrate the advantages of progression towards SCC. Moreover, we used a new screening tool, the HR-VPS, a low-cost and manageable instrument to collect patients' long-term data.

  14. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia: Progression to invasive cancer is not a certainty.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Mathilde; Brochard, Charlène; Lion, Annie; Henno, Sébastien; Mallet, Anne Laure; Bodere, Anaïs; Bouguen, Guillaume; Lièvre, Astrid; Siproudhis, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    The incidences of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HSIL) and superficially invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SISCCA) related to human papillomavirus (HPV) have increased. These lesions can progress to invasive anal cancer. The aim of the study was to assess the clinical outcome with a special focus on the healing rate. Forty-six consecutive patients (M/F: 35/11; HIV+: 30) with histologically proven HSIL lesions (N=41) or SISCCA (N=5) were enrolled in a follow-up survey. Of the 46 patients, 40 were treated by excision (n=9), electrocoagulation (n=13), topical treatment (n=2) or combined strategies (n=16). After a mean follow-up of 35 (27-43) months, only one patient progressed to an invasive cancer. Regression and healing were observed in 14 (30%) and 15 (33%) patients. The cumulative probabilities of healing were 14%, 49% and 74% after 1, 3 and 5 years. None of the current smokers healed. Heterosexual patients, sexual abstinence, patients older than 44 years old, non-smokers, patients without any past history of condyloma and those with less than 2 high-risk HPVs at baseline were more likely to heal. Progression to invasive cancer is a rare event. Large, prospective cohort studies are needed to plan coherent strategies for both follow-up and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of anal cancer screening in women with cervical neoplasia in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, I; Gaudet, M; Peacock, S J; Aquino-Parsons, C

    2016-06-27

    Precursors to anal squamous cell carcinoma may be detectable through screening; however, the literature suggests that population-level testing is not cost-effective. Given that high-grade cervical neoplasia (CIN) is associated with an increased risk of developing anal cancer, and in light of changing guidelines for the follow-up and management of cervical neoplasia, it is worthwhile to examine the costs and effectiveness of an anal cancer screening program delivered to women with previously-detected CIN. A model of anal cancer screening and treatment was constructed, to estimate the cost-effectiveness of a population of CIN II/III+ women who were screened using anal cytology vs. one that received no anal cancer screening. Costs were based on Canadian estimates, and survival was based on estimates taken from the scientific literature. Effectiveness was measured in terms of life years gained (LYG) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The model was run for 50 cycles, with each cycle representing one year. Incremental cost (screened vs. unscreened) was $82.17 per woman in the model. Incremental effectiveness was 0.004 LYG, and was equivalent to zero in terms of QALY. An ICER of $20,561/LYG was calculated, while no meaningful incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) could be calculated for quality-adjusted survival. Our analysis suggests that anal cancer screening is cost-effective in terms of overall survival in women with a previous diagnosis of CIN II or CIN III as part of regular follow-up, but may not contribute meaningfully-different quality-adjusted survival due to the adverse effects of screening-related interventions.

  16. One compared with two cycles of mitomycin C in chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer: analysis of outcomes and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, R.; McConnell, Y.; Roxin, G.; Banerjee, R.; Urgoiti, G.B. Roldán; MacLean, A.R.; Buie, W.D.; Mulder, K.E.; Vickers, M.M.; Joseph, K.J.; Doll, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Concurrent chemoradiation with fluorouracil (5fu) and mitomycin C (mmc) is standard treatment for anal canal carcinoma (acc). The current protocol in Alberta is administration of 5fu and mmc during weeks 1 and 5 of radiation. However, administration of the second bolus of mmc has been based largely on centre preference. Given limited published data on outcomes with different mmc regimens, our objective was to compare the efficacy and toxicity of 1 compared with 2 cycles of mmc in acc treatment. Methods Our retrospective study evaluated 169 acc patients treated with radical chemoradiotherapy between 2000 and 2010 at two tertiary cancer centres. All patients were treated with 2 cycles of 5fu and with 1 cycle (mmc1) or 2 cycles (mmc2) of mmc. Acute toxicities, disease-free (dfs) and overall survival (os) were analyzed. Results Baseline demographics, performance status, and stage were similar in the groups of patients who received mmc1 (52%) and mmc2 (48%). Before treatment, median hematologic parameters were comparable, except for white blood cell count, which was higher in the mmc2 group, but within normal range. The 5-year os and dfs were similar (75.1% and 54.2% for mmc1 vs. 70.7% and 44.2% for mmc2, p = 0.98 and p = 0.63 respectively). On multivariate analysis, mmc2 was the factor most strongly associated with specific acute toxicities: grade 3+ leukopenia (hazard ratio: 4.82; p < 0.01), grade 3+ skin toxicity (hazard ratio: 4.76; p < 0.001), and hospitalizations secondary to febrile neutropenia (hazard ratio: 9.91; p = 0.001). Conclusions In definitive chemoradiotherapy for acc, 1 cycle of mmc appears to offer outcomes similar to those achieved with 2 cycles, with significantly less acute toxicity. PMID:24940105

  17. Influence of human papillomavirus and p16(INK4a) on treatment outcome of patients with anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koerber, Stefan Alexander; Schoneweg, Clara; Slynko, Alla; Krug, David; Haefner, Matthias F; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Juergen; Sterzing, Florian; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Prigge, Elena-Sophie; Reuschenbach, Miriam

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate HPV-DNA and p16(INK4a) (p16) expression as prognostic markers for outcome in patients with anal cancer. From January 2000 to December 2011 a cohort of 105 anal cancer patients was treated with definitive chemoradiation at our institution. Tumor biopsies from 90 patients were analyzed for HPV-DNA by polymerase chain reaction and for p16 expression by immunohistochemistry. Median follow-up was 48.6months (range 2.8-169.1months). HPV-DNA or p16-expression was found in 75 anal cancers each (83.3%), concordance was detectable in 70 tumors (77.8%). Significantly improved overall survival (OS) [77.1% vs. 51.4%, p=0.005], progression-free survival (PFS) [64.0% vs. 35.0%, p<0.001] and improved local control [81.0% vs. 55.9%, p=0.023] was found for concomitant HPV- and p16-positive anal carcinomas (cHPPAC) in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed better OS [p=0.015] and PFS [p=0.002] for cHPPAC. The combination of HPV-DNA and p16 can be used as an independent prognostic parameter in anal cancer patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Initial Results from the Royal College of Radiologists' UK National Audit of Anal Cancer Radiotherapy 2015.

    PubMed

    Muirhead, R; Drinkwater, K; O'Cathail, S M; Adams, R; Glynne-Jones, R; Harrison, M; Hawkins, M A; Sebag-Montefiore, D; Gilbert, D C

    2017-03-01

    UK guidance was recently developed for the treatment of anal cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We audited the current use of radiotherapy in UK cancer centres for the treatment of anal cancer against such guidance. We describe the acute toxicity of IMRT in comparison with patient population in the audit treated with two-phase conformal radiotherapy and the previous published data from two-phase conformal radiotherapy, in the UK ACT2 trial. A Royal College of Radiologists' prospective national audit of patients treated with radiotherapy in UK cancer centres was carried out over a 6 month period between February and July 2015. Two hundred and forty-two cases were received from 40/56 cancer centres (71%). In total, 231 (95%) underwent full dose radiotherapy with prophylactic nodal irradiation. Of these, 180 (78%) received IMRT or equivalent, 52 (22%) two-phase conformal (ACT2) technique. The number of interruptions in radiotherapy treatment in the ACT2 trial was 15%. Interruptions were noted in 7% (95% confidence interval 0-14%) of courses receiving two-phase conformal and 4% (95% confidence interval 1-7%) of those receiving IMRT. The percentage of patients completing the planned radiotherapy dose, irrelevant of gaps, was 90% (95% confidence interval 82-98%) and 96% (95% confidence interval 93-99%), in two-phase conformal and IMRT respectively. The toxicity reported in the ACT2 trial, in patients receiving two-phase conformal in the audit and in patients receiving IMRT in the audit was: any toxic effect 71%, 54%, 48%, non-haematological 62%, 49%, 40% and haematological 26%, 13%, 18%, respectively. IMRT implementation for anal cancer is well underway in the UK with most patients receiving IMRT delivery, although its usage is not yet universal. This audit confirms that IMRT results in reduced acute toxicity and minimised treatment interruptions in comparison with previous two-phase conformal techniques. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of

  19. Quality of life of elderly Chinese rectal cancer patients after preventative anal surgery: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Li, Ka; Li, Ji-Ping; Huang, Ming-Jun; Zhang, Run; Hu, Yan-Jie

    2013-09-01

    To assess the QOL in rectal cancer patients after preventative anal operation and to discuss the influence of age on perceived quality of life. A prospective study of 342 patients with rectal cancer from May 2011 to January 2012 in the gastrointestinal surgery department was randomly selected and divided into the elderly group and the young group, and the differences in their QOL assessed by the questionnaire QLQ-C30, after preventative anal surgery (7 days) were compared. A total of 207 patients met the study criteria and were divided into the elderly group (≥60 years, 107 cases) and the young group (<60 years, 100 cases). The incidences of complication with pneumonia (p=0.030), wound infection (p=0.024) and ileus (p=0.036) were higher in the elderly group. In the QLQ-C30 assessment, the physical function in the elderly group was worse (p=0.004). Additionally, the fatigue of symptom, sleep disturbance and poor appetite (p<0.001), and global quality of life (p=0.002) were worse in the elderly group too. However, the role and emotional function were better in the elderly group (p<0.001). The QOL in elderly patients is generally worse than young patients, and a targeted approach should be used.

  20. HPV-negative squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal is unresponsive to standard treatment and frequently carries disruptive mutations in TP53

    PubMed Central

    Meulendijks, D; Tomasoa, N B; Dewit, L; Smits, P H M; Bakker, R; van Velthuysen, M-L F; Rosenberg, E H; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M; Cats, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), p16 expression, and TP53 mutations are known prognostic factors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, but their role in squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCAC) is less well established. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of tumour HPV status, p16 and p53 expression, and mutations in TP53 in patients with SCCAC receiving (chemo)radiotherapy. Methods: Human papillomavirus DNA was determined using an INNO-LiPA-based assay in tumour tissue of 107 patients with locally advanced SCCAC. Patients were treated with radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy consisting of a fluoropyrimidine and mitomycin C. Expression of p16 and p53 was determined using immunohistochemistry. Exons 2–11 of TP53 in tumour tissue were sequenced. Results: DNA of high-risk HPV types was detected in 93 out of 107 tumours (87%), all of which overexpressed p16 (HPV+/p16+). Of 14 HPV-negative (HPV−) tumours (13%), 10 (9%) were p16-negative (HPV−/p16−) and 4 (4%) overexpressed p16 (HPV−/p16+). Patients with HPV−/p16− disease had inferior 3-year locoregional control (LRC) (15%) compared with patients with HPV+/p16+ tumours (82%, P<0.001) and HPV−/p16+ tumours (75%, P=0.078). Similarly, 3-year overall survival (OS) was 35% (HPV−/p16−) vs 87% (HPV+/p16+, P<0.001) and 75% (HPV−/p16+, P=0.219). Disruptive mutations in TP53 were found in 80% of HPV−/p16− tumours vs 6% of HPV+/p16+ tumours (P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, HPV−/p16− status was an independent predictor of inferior LRC and OS. Conclusions: HPV− tumours are frequently TP53 mutated. HPV−/p16− status is a strong predictor for reduced LRC and OS, and alternative treatment strategies for patients with HPV−/p16− disease need to be explored. PMID:25871546

  1. Cancer of the external auditory canal and temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Kuhel, W I; Hume, C R; Selesnick, S H

    1996-10-01

    Malignant tumors involving the structures of the temporal bone represent formidable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for clinicians involved in the treatment of otologic disease. This article offers a perspective on the current understanding of the biology of malignancies involving the external auditory canal, middle ear space, and temporal bone, and reviews the often confusing and contradictory literature on this topic.

  2. Radiochemotherapy in Anal Cancer: cCR, clinical outcomes and quality of life using two different treatment schedules

    PubMed Central

    Di Santo, Sara; Trignani, Marianna; Neri, Matteo; Milano, Angelo; Innocenti, Paolo; Taraborrelli, Maria; Augurio, Antonietta; Vinciguerra, Annamaria; Di Tommaso, Monica; Ursini, Lucia Anna; Di Pilla, Angelo; Di Nicola, Marta; Genovesi, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Aim Main endpoint was a response rate to therapy; secondary endpoints were disease-free survival, overall survival, acute and late toxicities, specially in terms of anorectal and urinary continence. Background Radiochemotherapy for anal cancer achieves a good clinical response, locoregional control, anal function preservation. However, oncologic outcomes can differ using radiotherapy plus fluorouracil and mytomicin vs. cisplatin and fluorouracil. Methods Between 2000 and 2012, 27 anal cancer patients receiving radiotherapy combined with two different radiochemotherapy schedules, fluorouracil and mytomicin (group A) and cisplatin plus fluorouracil (group B). The Kaplan–Meier method was also used to estimate local control, overall survival and disease free survival. Statistical significance between curves was evaluated using the Log-rank test. Results Complete pathological response was found in 85.2% of patients, with higher rates of response in the group A (100% vs. 63.6%, p = 0.039). No significantly difference was found between the two groups for the other endpoints. Low rates of both acute and late toxicities were recorded. Conclusion Radiotherapy plus fluorouracil and mytomicin provide a better complete pathological response than radiotherapy plus cisplatin and fluorouracil and a greater rate of anal sphincter function preservation. Globally, radiochemotherapy of the anal cancer provides excellent clinical outcomes with a good profile of acute and late toxicity, without difference between the two groups studied. PMID:25859401

  3. HPV16 E6 seropositivity among cancer-free men with oral, anal or genital HPV16 infection.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; Waterboer, Tim; Campbell, Christine M Pierce; Ingles, Donna J; Kuhs, Krystle A Lang; Nyitray, Alan G; Hildesheim, Allan; Pawlita, Michael; Kreimer, Aimée R; Giuliano, Anna R

    2016-12-01

    Antibodies against the Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 oncoprotein appear years prior to clinical diagnosis of anal and oropharyngeal cancer, but whether they develop around the time of HPV infection is unclear. Serum samples from 173 cancer-free men from the Human Papillomavirus Infection in Men (HIM) Study were tested for HPV antibodies and DNA. HPV16 E6 seropositivity was low among men with oral HPV16-infection (1/28; 3.6%, 95%CI=0.0%-18.4%), anal HPV16-infection (1/61; 1.6%, 95%CI=0.0%-8.8%), and 24-month persistent genital HPV16-infection (1/84; 1.2%, 0.0-6.5%). This suggests E6 seroconversion may not occur around the time of oral, anal, or genital HPV16 acquisition.

  4. Age-Specific Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) among Men Who Have Sex with Women and Men Who Have Sex with Men: The HPV in Men (HIM) Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho da Silva, Roberto J.; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Lu, Beibei; Smith, Danélle; Abrahamsen, Martha; Papenfuss, Mary; Villa, Luisa L.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2011-01-01

    Background. An increasing incidence of anal cancer among men suggests a need to better understand anal canal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among human immunodeficiency virus–negative men. Methods. Genotyping for HPV was conducted on cells from the anal canal among men who have sex with women (MSW) and men who have sex with men (MSM), aged 18–70 years, from Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. Factors associated with anal HPV infection were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Results. The prevalence of any HPV type and oncogenic HPV types did not differ by city. Anal canal HPV prevalence was 12.2% among 1305 MSW and 47.2% among 176 MSM. Among MSW, reporting a lifetime number of ≥10 female sex partners, a primary sexual relationship <1 year in duration, and a prior hepatitis B diagnosis were independently associated with detection of any anal HPV in multivariable analysis. Among MSM, a younger age, reporting ≥2 male anal sex partners in the past 3 months, and never using a condom for anal sex in the past 6 months were independently associated with detection of any anal HPV in multivariable analysis. Conclusions. Number of sex partners was associated with anal HPV infection in both MSW and MSM. Anal HPV infection in men may be mediated by age, duration of sexual relationship, and condom use. PMID:21148496

  5. [Guidelines for delineation of pelvic lymph nodes in anal cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Vendrely, V; Galland-Girodet, S; Orré, M; Maire, J-P

    2013-10-01

    Squamous cell anal cancer is a rare malignancy, its incidence increases due to higher exposure of the young adults to risk factors. The current management is based on chemoradiotherapy, which is highly effective and achieves locoregional control but causes important morbidity. Improvement of radiation technique such as intensity modulated radiation therapy has led to reduce acute toxicities, but also requires an accurate delineation of the target volumes in order not to underestimate potential and pathological sites resulting in an increase of the locoregional failures. PET scanner has an important place in the pretreatment work-up for staging and targeting the delineation of the volumes, allowing to select patients with localized disease, avoid geographic miss and appropriately boost nodal disease. The study of recurrences sites has not yet provided a real mapping of the recurrences depending on the treatment volumes. Different radiation oncologist cooperative groups have published guidelines and tools for delineation, in order to provide homogeneity but also customize the management of anal carcinoma.

  6. Defecation into clothing without forewarning and mean radiation dose to bowel and anal-sphincter among gynecological cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Lind, Helena; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Steineck, Gunnar; Waldenström, Ann-Charlotte; Nyberg, Tommy; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Al-Abany, Massoud; Åvall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the relationship between mean radiation dose to the bowels and the anal-sphincter and occurrence of 'defecation into clothing without forewarning', a specific and serious fecal incontinence symptom after gynecological radiotherapy. Additional potential risk factors associated with the symptom are explored. Data were collected for 519 eligible gynecological cancer survivors, treated with pelvic radiotherapy, with a median follow-up of 5.8 years, using a study-specific questionnaire and medical records. Correlations between defecation into clothing without forewarning and mean dose to organs at risk; the anal-sphincter region, the rectum, the sigmoid and the small intestines were investigated, also taking other risk factors into account. Twelve percent reported having had the symptom at least once in the preceding six months. Mean doses >50 Gy to the anal-sphincter region, the rectum, the sigmoid and the small intestines were related to the occurrence of the symptom. Significantly associated risk factors were deliveries with high birth weight, heart failure and lactose and/or gluten intolerance. After adjusting for these factors, mean doses >50 Gy to the anal-sphincter region, the sigmoid and the small intestines remained related to the occurrence of the symptom. Mean doses to the bowels and anal-sphincter region are related to the risk of defecation into clothing without forewarning in long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic radiotherapy. Further radiobiological modeling may distinguish which organ(s) contribute most to development of the symptom.

  7. Brain metastasis in basaloid undifferentiated anal carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HERNANDO-CUBERO, JORGE; ALONSO-ORDUÑA, VICENTE; HERNANDEZ-GARCIA, ALBA; DE MIGUEL, ANA CEBOLLERO; ALVAREZ-GARCIA, NATALIA; ANTON-TORRES, ANTONIO

    2014-01-01

    Anal cancer is a rare tumor that accounts for 2% of all colorectal neoplasms. The brain is a rarely affected organ. The aim of the present study was to the review the only four cases of anal cancer brain metastases previously published in the literature. In addition, the current study presents the case of a 69-year-old male diagnosed with basaloid undifferentiated carcinoma of the anal canal (stage IV with liver, lung and bone metastasis). Despite the patient’s good response to chemotherapy and the achievement of a partial response that was maintained for 14 months, brain metastases developed. Although radiotherapy was administered, the patient succumbed to the condition 12 weeks after the diagnosis of brain metastasis. PMID:24944707

  8. Mean Absorbed Dose to the Anal-Sphincter Region and Fecal Leakage among Irradiated Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Alsadius, David; Hedelin, Maria; Lundstedt, Dan; Pettersson, Niclas; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To supplement previous findings that the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation to the anal sphincter or lower rectum affects the occurrence of fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors. We also wanted to determine whether anatomically defining the anal-sphincter region as the organ at risk could increase the degree of evidence underlying clinical guidelines for restriction doses to eliminate this excess risk. Methods and Materials: We identified 985 men irradiated for prostate cancer between 1993 and 2006. In 2008, we assessed long-term gastrointestinal symptoms among these men using a study-specific questionnaire. We restrict the analysis to the 414 men who had been treated with external beam radiation therapy only (no brachytherapy) to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions to the prostate or postoperative prostatic region. On reconstructed original radiation therapy dose plans, we delineated the anal-sphincter region as an organ at risk. Results: We found that the prevalence of long-term fecal leakage at least once per month was strongly correlated with the mean dose to the anal-sphincter region. Examining different dose intervals, we found a large increase at 40 Gy; {>=}40 Gy compared with <40 Gy gave a prevalence ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.6-8.6). Conclusions: This long-term study shows that mean absorbed dose to the anal-sphincter region is associated with the occurrence of long-term fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors; delineating the anal-sphincter region separately from the rectum and applying a restriction of a mean dose <40 Gy will, according to our data, reduce the risk considerably.

  9. Twenty-Five-Year Experience With Radical Chemoradiation for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, Jonathan M.; Link, Emma; Leong, Trevor; Heriot, Alexander; Vazquez, Melisa; Chander, Sarat; Chu, Julie; Foo, Marcus; Lee, Mark T.; Lynch, Craig A.; Mackay, John; Michael, Michael; Tran, Phillip; Ngan, Samuel Y.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors, patterns of failure, and late toxicity in patients treated with chemoradiation (CRT) for anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anus treated by CRT with curative intent between February 1983 and March 2008 were identified through the institutional database. Chart review and telephone follow-up were undertaken to collect demographic data and outcome. Results: Two hundred eighty-four patients (34% male; median age 62 years) were identified. The stages at diagnosis were 23% Stage I, 48% Stage II, 10% Stage IIIA, and 18% Stage IIIB. The median radiotherapy dose to the primary site was 54 Gy. A complete clinical response to CRT was achieved in 89% of patients. With a median follow-up time of 5.3 years, the 5-year rates of locoregional control, distant control, colostomy-free survival, and overall survival were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78-88), 92% (95% CI, 89-96), 73% (95% CI, 68-79), and 82% (95% CI, 77-87), respectively. Higher T stage and male sex predicted for locoregional failure, and higher N stage predicted for distant metastases. Locoregional failure occurred most commonly at the primary site. Omission of elective inguinal irradiation resulted in inguinal failure rates of 1.9% and 12.5% in T1N0 and T2N0 patients, respectively. Pelvic nodal failures were very uncommon. Late vaginal and bone toxicity was observed in addition to gastrointestinal toxicity. Conclusions: CRT is a highly effective approach in anal cancer. However, subgroups of patients fare relatively poorly, and novel approaches are needed. Elective inguinal irradiation can be safely omitted only in patients with Stage I disease. Vaginal toxicity and insufficiency fractures of the hip and pelvis are important late effects that require prospective evaluation.

  10. Outcomes of abdominoperineal resection for management of anal cancer in HIV-positive patients: a national case review.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Ira L; Alturki, Hasan; Canner, Joseph K; Schneider, Eric B; Efron, Jonathan E; Wick, Elizabeth C; Gearhart, Susan L; Safar, Bashar; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-08-05

    The incidence of anal cancer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals is increasing, and how co-infection affects outcomes is not fully understood. This study sought to describe the current outcome disparities between anal cancer patients with and without HIV undergoing abdominoperineal resection (APR). A retrospective review of all US patients diagnosed with anal squamous cell carcinoma, undergoing an APR, was performed. Cases were identified using a weighted derivative of the Healthcare Utilization Project's National Inpatient Sample (2000-2011). Patients greater than 60 years old were excluded after finding a skewed population distribution between those with and without HIV infection. Multivariable logistic regression and generalized linear modeling analysis examined factors associated with postoperative outcomes and cost. Perioperative complications, in-hospital mortality, length of hospital stay, and hospital costs were compared for those undergoing APR with and without HIV infection. A total of 1725 patients diagnosed with anal squamous cell cancer undergoing APR were identified, of whom 308 (17.9 %) were HIV-positive. HIV-positive patients were younger than HIV-negative patients undergoing APR for anal cancer (median age 47 years old versus 51 years old, p < 0.001) and were more likely to be male (95.1 versus 30.6 %, p < 0.001). Postoperative hemorrhage was more frequent in the HIV-positive group (5.1 versus 1.5 %, p = 0.05). Mortality was low in both groups (0 % in HIV-positive versus 1.49 % in HIV-negative, p = 0.355), and length of stay (LOS) (10+ days; 75th percentile of patient data) was similar (36.9 % with HIV versus 29.8 % without HIV, p = 0.262). Greater hospitalization costs were associated with patients who experienced a complication. However, there was no difference in hospitalization costs seen between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients (p = 0.66). HIV status is not associated with worse

  11. Human papillomavirus genotyping, human papillomavirus mRNA expression, and p16/Ki-67 cytology to detect anal cancer precursors in HIV-infected MSM.

    PubMed

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Tokugawa, Diane; Schwartz, Lauren; Lorey, Thomas S; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Lamere, Brandon; Gage, Julia C; Fetterman, Barbara; Darragh, Teresa M; Castle, Philip E

    2012-11-13

    Anal cancer incidence is high in HIV-infected MSM. Screening for anal intraepithelial lesions and cancers is performed at specialized clinics and relies on high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) and anal cytology. Both approaches have limited reproducibility and sensitivity for detecting anal cancer precursors. We evaluated biomarkers for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease in a population of HIV-infected MSM. A cross-sectional screening study with passive follow-up included 363 MSM followed at a HIV/AIDS clinic. All men had anal cytology samples taken and were evaluated using HRA and anal biopsies. Using a composite endpoint of biopsy results and cytology, we compared the performance of HPV16/18 genotyping, HPVE6/E7 mRNA expression, and p16/Ki-67 cytology to detect high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AINs). For all biomarkers analyzed, there was a significant trend of increasing percentage of men testing positive with increasing severity of disease (P < 0.001). HPV DNA testing had the highest sensitivity for anal intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 and anal intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (AIN3), followed by p16/Ki-67, HPVE6/E7 mRNA testing, and HPV16/18 genotyping. The highest Youden's index was observed for HPVE6/E7 mRNA testing, followed by HPV16/18 genotyping, p16/Ki-67 cytology, and HPV DNA testing. Increasing the threshold for positivity of p16/Ki-67 to five or more positive cells led to significantly higher specificity, but unchanged sensitivity for detecting AIN3. Molecular features of anal disease categories are similar to those of corresponding cervical lesions. Biomarkers evaluated for cervical cancer screening may be used for primary anal cancer screening or to decide who should require immediate treatment vs. expectant management.

  12. The sexual health of female rectal and anal cancer survivors: results of a pilot randomized psycho-educational intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, Tammy; Nelson, Christian; Philip, Errol; Temple, Larissa; Schover, Leslie; Baser, Raymond E.; Starr, Tatiana D.; Cannon, Kathleen; Jennings, Sabrina; Jandorf, Lina; Carter, Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual dysfunction is a frequently reported consequence of rectal/anal cancer treatment for female patients. Purpose The purpose of this study was to conduct a small randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a telephone-based, four-session Cancer Survivorship Intervention-Sexual Health (CSI-SH). Methods Participants (N = 70) were stratified by chemotherapy, stoma, and menopause statuses before randomization to CSI-SH or assessment only (AO). Participants were assessed at baseline, 4 months (follow-up 1), and 8 months (follow-up 2). Results The intervention had medium effect sizes from baseline to follow-up 1, which decreased by follow-up 2. Effect sizes were larger among the 41 sexually active women. Unadjusted means at the follow-ups were not significantly different between the treatment arms. Adjusting for baseline scores, demographics, and medical variables, the intervention arm had significantly better emotional functioning at follow-ups 1 and 2 and less cancer-specific stress at follow-up 1 compared to the AO arm. Conclusion The data supported the hypothesized effects on improved sexual and psychological functioning and quality of life in CSI-SH female rectal/anal cancer survivors compared to the AO condition. Condensed Abstract This pilot study (N = 70) of CSI-SH supported the impact of this intervention on sexual and psychological functioning and quality of life on rectal and anal cancer survivors compared with an AO condition. However, intervention effects were stronger at follow-up 1 as compared to follow-up 2 and were stronger for sexually active women. Implications for Cancer Survivors Women may benefit from a brief, four-session, sexual health intervention after treatment from rectal and anal cancer. PMID:26667358

  13. [Comparison of oncology outcomes and anal function among laparoscopic partial, subtotal and total intersphincteric resection for low rectal cancers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Quanlong; Zhao, Yujuan; Zhuo, Guangzuan; Yin, Shuhui; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Ke; Ding, Jianhua

    2017-08-25

    To compare the oncology outcomes and anal function among laparoscopic partial, subtotal and total intersphincteric resection(ISR) for low rectal cancers. From June 2011 to February 2016, a total of 79 consecutive patients with low rectal cancers underwent laparoscopic ISR with hand-sewn coloanal anastomosis at our department. According to the distal tumor margin, partial ISR (internal sphincter resection at the dentate line) was used to treat tumors with distance <1 cm from the anal sphincter (n=28), subtotal ISR was adopted for the tumors locating between the dentate line and intersphincteric groove (n=34), and total ISR (resection at the dentate line) was applied in the treatment of intra-anal tumors (n=17). Anal function was evaluated by a standardized gastrointestinal questionnaire, Wexner incontinence score and Kirwan's classification. Metaphase oncological results and postoperative anal function were compared among three groups, and. Other than the distance of tumor low margin to dentate line (P=0.000) and serum CEA level (P=0.040), no significant differences were noted in baseline data among 3 groups (all P>0.05). The median follow up was 21(8-61) months. The 3-year disease-free survival rates in laparoscopic partial, subtotal and total ISR groups were 91.1%, 88.9%, 88.2% (P=0.901) and the 3-year local relapse-free survival rates were 91.1%, 72.9%, 80.2%(P=0.658), whose all differences were not significant. Thirty-eight patients who did not receive neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and underwent ileostomy closure for at least 24 months completed the evaluation of anal function, including 14 cases in partial group, 15 cases in subtotal group and 9 cases in total group. Of 38 patients, 73.7%(28/38) was classified as good function (Wexner incontinence score ≤10) and no patient adopted a colostomy because of severe fecal incontinence(Kirwan classification=grade 5). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in Wexner incontinence score and Kirwan

  14. Predictors and Patterns of Recurrence After Definitive Chemoradiation for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan . E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org; Bhatia, Sumita; Eng, Cathy; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Bhosale, Priya; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate patterns of locoregional failure, and predictors of recurrence and survival in patients treated with chemoradiation for anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and August 2004, 167 patients with nonmetastatic squamous cell anal carcinoma were treated with definitive chemoradiation. The median dose of radiotherapy was 5500 cGy. Concurrent chemotherapy was given with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in 117 patients, 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C in 24 patients, and other regimens in 26 patients. Results: The estimated 3-year rates of locoregional control, distant control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 81%, 88%, 67%, and 84%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that higher T stage and N stage independently predicted for a higher rate of locoregional failure; higher N stage and basaloid subtype independently predicted for a higher rate of distant metastasis; and higher N stage and positive human immunodeficiency virus status independently predicted for a lower rate of overall survival. Among the patients who had locoregional failure, 18 (75%) had failure involving the anus or rectum, 5 (21%) had other pelvic recurrences, and 1 (4%) had inguinal recurrence. The 5 pelvic recurrences all occurred in patients with the superior border of the radiotherapy field at the bottom of the sacroiliac joint. Conclusions: Trials of more aggressive and innovative locoregional and systemic therapies are warranted in high-risk patients, based on their T and N stages. The majority of locoregional failures involve the anus and rectum, whereas inguinal recurrences occur rarely. Placing the superior border of the radiotherapy field at L5/S1 could potentially reduce pelvic recurrences.

  15. Anal Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Zaghiyan, Karen N.; Fleshner, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Anal fissure is one of the most common anorectal problems. Anal fissure is largely associated with high anal sphincter pressures and most treatment options are based on reducing anal pressures. Conservative management, using increased fiber and warm baths, results in healing of approximately half of all anal fissures. In fissures that fail conservative care, various pharmacologic and surgical options offer satisfactory cure rates. Lateral internal sphincterotomy remains the gold standard for definitive management of anal fissure. This review outlines the key points in the presentation, pathophysiology, and management of anal fissure. PMID:22379402

  16. Fetal growth of the anal sinus and sphincters, especially in relation to anal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Takashi; Hwang, Si Eun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Wilting, Joerg; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Hwang, Hong Pil; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The anal sinuses, small furrows above the pectinate line, sometimes form perianal abscesses in adults. We examined the pattern of fetal growth of the anal sinus and sphincters using 22 mid-term (8-18 weeks) and 6 late-stage (30-38 weeks) fetuses. In mid-term fetuses, the external and internal sphincters gradually increased in thickness, depending on specimen size (from 0.2 to 1.5 mm), whereas the anteroposterior diameter of the anal canal at the epithelial junction was relatively stable (0.5-1.0 mm) irrespective of specimen size. Anal canal diameter increased less than twofold between mid-term and late-stage fetuses, from 0.5-1.0 to almost 2 mm, whereas sphincter thickness increased over tenfold, from 0.2-1.5 to almost 3.5 mm. The anal sinus often showed balloon-like enlargement when the sphincter muscle bundles were tightly packed in mid-term, but not in late-stage fetuses. Large concentric mechanical stress from the sphincters in late-stage fetuses apparently prevented the anal sinus from expanding in a balloon-like manner. Conversely, to avoid anal stenosis, the growing sinuses maintained a luminal space of the anal canal in response to stress from rapidly growing sphincters. The inferiorly extending sinus usually provided temporal double canals separated by a thick column. In the presence of double lumens, anal canal duplication is likely to develop without any abnormalities of the anal epithelium and sphincters.

  17. Isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria from external ear canal of cancer patients at Shafa Cancer Hospital-Ahwaz.

    PubMed

    Kalantar, E; Mosaei, M; Ekrami, A; Pedram, M

    2006-01-01

    A bacteriological study of external ear canal was performed in 52 hospitalized cancer patients and 42 non hospitalized cancer patients at Shafa hospital, Ahwaz. Study was under taken to find out the normal flora changes in the external ear canals and to observe the prevalence of external otitis among these cancer patients. The control group consisted of 40 non-cancer patients. We observed the following bacteria among hospitalized cancer patients. Staphylococcus Coagulase negative (51.9%), Staphylococcus aureus (15.7%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (11.9%). Similarly, among non hospitalized cancer patients, Staphylococcus Coagulase negative (45.2%), S. aureus (9.5%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (4.7%). Incidence of Staphylococcus Coagulase negative and Streptococci pneumoniae is higher in control group than that in cancer patients. We have concluded that cancer patients probably suffer from external otitis more frequently because of enhanced colonization by S. aureus (P < 0.05). The antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms to various antibiotics was determined by disk diffusion method using Muller Hinton agar. In hospitalized cancer patients Staphylococcus Coagulase negative was 25% and 85% resistant to Vancomycin and Penicillin G and in non hospitalized cancer patients, Staphylococcus Coagulase negative were 45% and 80% resistant to Vancomycin and Penicillin G. S. aureus of both the groups (hospitalized & non hospitalized) were resistant to Penicillin G. Similarly, both the groups were 55% and 50% resistance to Vancomycin.

  18. Body image and sexual function in women after treatment for anal and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Catherine; Philip, Errol J; Baser, Raymond E; Carter, Jeanne; Schuler, Tammy A; Jandorf, Lina; DuHamel, Katherine; Nelson, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Treatment for anal and rectal cancer (ARCa) often results in side effects that directly impact sexual functioning; however, ARCa survivors are an understudied group, and factors contributing to the sexual sequelae are not well understood. Body image problems are distressing and may further exacerbate sexual difficulties, particularly for women. This preliminary study sought to (1) describe body image problems, including sociodemographic and disease/treatment correlates, and (2) examine relations between body image and sexual function. For the baseline assessment of a larger study, 70 women completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire and Colorectal Cancer-specific Module, including the Body Image subscale, and Female Sexual Function Index. Pearson's correlation and multiple regression evaluated correlates of body image. Among sexually active women (n = 41), hierarchical regression examined relations between body image and sexual function domains. Women were on average 55 years old (standard deviation = 11.6), non-Hispanic White (79%), married (57%), and employed (47%). The majority (86%) reported at least one body image problem. Younger age, lower global health status, and greater severity of symptoms related to poorer body image (p's < 0.05). Poor body image was inversely related to all aspects of sexual function (β range 0.50-0.70, p's < 0.05), except pain. The strongest association was with Female Sexual Function Index Sexual/Relationship Satisfaction. These preliminary findings suggest the importance of assessing body image as a potentially modifiable target to address sexual difficulties in this understudied group. Further longitudinal research is needed to inform the development and implementation of effective interventions to improve the sexual health and well-being of female ARCa survivors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. An anal cancer screening program for MSM in Italy: Prevalence of multiple HPV types and vaccine-targeted infections.

    PubMed

    Garbuglia, Anna Rosa; Gentile, Marco; Del Nonno, Franca; Lorenzini, Patrizia; Lapa, Daniele; Lupi, Federico; Pinnetti, Carmela; Baiocchini, Andrea; Libertone, Raffaella; Cicalini, Stefania; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ammassari, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    Elevated HPV infection rates have been described in HIV-positive males, placing these subjects at high risk of anal neoplasia. Bivalent, quadrivalent, and nonavalent vaccines to prevent HPV infection have been developed, and recently proposed for gender-neutral immunization programs. In order to estimate the benefit that could be obtained by vaccination of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), we aimed at describing the frequency of multiple and vaccine-targeted HPV infections in MSM enrolled in an anal cancer screening program. The anal cancer screening program was conducted between July 2009 and October 2012. Mucosal anal samples were tested for HPV DNA using MY09/MY11 PCR primers and, if positive, genotyped using the CLART2HPV Clinical Array (35HPV types). A total of 220 MSM were screened and 88.6% were positive for HPV DNA: in 86.5% at least one high-risk (HR) type was found and in 13% only low-risk (LR) HPV were found. Multiple infections accounted for 84.5% of HPV DNA-positive cases and overall 160 different HPV genotype combinations were recognized (only three combinations were detected in more than one patient each). Based on strain coverage, at least one vaccine-targeted HPV type was found in 38.9%, 64%, and 78.4% of cases when considering bivalent, quadrivalent and nonavalent vaccines, respectively. At least one HR vaccine-targeted strain was found in 39% of MSM for bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines, and in 64% of cases for nonavalent prevention. Anal HPV infections in unvaccinated mostly HIV-infected MSM are highly prevalent. The majority of this population has multiple infections with an extremely heterogeneous number of genotype combinations. The nonavalent vaccine could theoretically have prevented a minimum of one HR HPV type in two thirds of subjects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional morphology of anal sphincter complex unveiled by high definition anal manometery and three dimensional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Raizada, V; Bhargava, V; Karsten, A; Mittal, R K

    2011-11-01

    Anal sphincter complex consists of anatomically overlapping internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS) and puborectalis muscle (PRM). We determined the functional morphology of anal sphincter muscles using high definition anal manometery (HDAM), three dimensional (3D)-ultrasound (US) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We studied 15 nulliparous women. High definition anal manometery probe equipped with 256 pressure transducers was used to measure the anal canal pressures at rest and squeeze. Lengths of IAS, PRM, and EAS were determined from the 3D-US images and superimposed on the HDAM plots. Movements of anorectal angle with squeeze were determined from the dynamic MR images. High definition anal manometery plots reveal that anal canal pressures are highly asymmetric in the axial and circumferential direction. Anal canal length determined by the 3D-US images is slightly smaller than that measured by HDAM. The EAS (1.9 ± 0.5 cm long) and PRM (1.7 ± 0.4 cm long) surround distal and proximal parts of the anal canal, respectively. With voluntary contraction, anal canal pressures increase in the proximal (PRM) and distal (EAS zone) parts of anal canal. Posterior peak pressure in the anal canal moves cranially in relation to the anterior peak pressure, with squeeze. Similar to the movement of peak posterior pressure, MR images show cranial movement of anorectal angle with squeeze. Our study proves that the PRM is responsible for the closure of the cranial part of anal canal. HDAM, in addition to measuring constrictor function can also record the elevator function of levator ani/pelvic floor muscles. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Prevalence of patient-reported gastrointestinal symptoms and agreement with clinician toxicity assessments in radiation therapy for anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tom, Ashlyn; Bennett, Antonia V; Rothenstein, Diana; Law, Ethel; Goodman, Karyn A

    2017-09-07

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms pose a significant burden to patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for anal cancer; however, the impact of symptoms from the patient perspective has not been quantified. This retrospective study examined and compared patient and clinician reports of acute GI toxicity during CRT. Patients treated with definitive RT using intensity-modulated radiation therapy for anal cancer between 9/09 and 11/12 were reviewed. Median RT dose was 56 Gy (range 45-56), and 76 patients (97%) received concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. During RT, patients completed the 7-item Bowel Problem Scale (BPS) weekly. Clinicians assessed toxicity separately using CTCAE v. 3.0. Scores of BPS ≥ 3 and CTCAE ≥ 1 were considered to be clinically meaningful. Agreement of the two assessments was evaluated by Cohen's kappa coefficient. Seventy-eight patients completed at least one BPS and had a corresponding clinician assessment. Patients reporting scores of ≥3 was highest at week 5 (n = 68) for diarrhea (44.1%), proctitis (57.4%), and mucus (48.4%), while urgency (47.6%), tenesmus (31.7%), and cramping (27%) were highest at week 4 (n = 63). Baseline bleeding scores (26.7%; score ≥3) improved during treatment (13.4% at week 5). "Poor" agreement was observed between patient- and clinician-reported proctitis (Cohen's k = 0.11; n = 58); however, there was "good" agreement for diarrhea (Cohen's k = 0.68; n = 58). Acute GI toxicity during definitive CRT for anal cancer was most significant during weeks 4-5, while rectal bleeding improved during treatment. Discrepancies in patient- and clinician-reported symptoms demonstrate the potential for patient-reported outcomes to be useful tools for anal cancer clinical assessments.

  2. Elective Inguinal Node Irradiation in Early-Stage T2N0 Anal Cancer: Prognostic Impact on Locoregional Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zilli, Thomas; Betz, Michael; Bieri, Sabine; Ris, Frederic; Roche, Bruno; Roth, Arnaud D.; Allal, Abdelkarim S.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of elective inguinal node radiation therapy (INRT) on locoregional control (LRC) in patients with early-stage T2N0 anal cancer treated conservatively with primary RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1976 and 2008, 116 patients with T2 node-negative anal cancer were treated curatively with RT alone (n=48) or by combined chemoradiation therapy (CRT) (n=68) incorporating mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil. Sixty-four percent of the patients (n=74) received elective INRT. Results: Over a median follow-up of 69 months (range, 4-243 months), 97 (84%) and 95 patients (82%) were locally and locoregionally controlled, respectively. Rates for 5-year actuarial local control, LRC, cancer-specific, and overall survival for the entire population were 81.7% ± 3.8%, 79.2% ± 4.1%, 91.1% ± 3.0%, and 72.1% ± 4.5%, respectively. The overall 5-year inguinal relapse-free survival was 92.3% ± 2.9%. Isolated inguinal recurrence occurred in 2 patients (4.7%) treated without INRT, whereas no groin relapse was observed in those treated with INRT. The 5-year LRC rates for patients treated with and without INRT and with RT alone versus combined CRT were 80.1% ± 5.0% versus 77.8% ± 7.0% (P=.967) and 71.0% ± 7.2% versus 85.4% ± 4.5% (P=.147), respectively. A trend toward a higher rate of grade ≥3 acute toxicity was observed in patients treated with INRT (53% vs 31%, P=.076). Conclusions: In cases of node-negative T2 anal cancer, the inguinal relapse rate remains relatively low with or without INRT. The role of INRT in the treatment of early-stage anal carcinoma needs to be investigated in future prospective trials.

  3. Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) Contouring Atlas and Planning Guidelines for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Michael; Leong, Trevor; Chander, Sarat; Chu, Julie; Kneebone, Andrew; Carroll, Susan; Wiltshire, Kirsty; Ngan, Samuel; Kachnic, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To develop a high-resolution target volume atlas with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning guidelines for the conformal treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: A draft contouring atlas and planning guidelines for anal cancer IMRT were prepared at the Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) annual meeting in September 2010. An expert panel of radiation oncologists contoured an anal cancer case to generate discussion on recommendations regarding target definition for gross disease, elective nodal volumes, and organs at risk (OARs). Clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) margins, dose fractionation, and other IMRT-specific issues were also addressed. A steering committee produced the final consensus guidelines. Results: Detailed contouring and planning guidelines and a high-resolution atlas are provided. Gross tumor and elective target volumes are described and pictorially depicted. All elective regions should be routinely contoured for all disease stages, with the possible exception of the inguinal and high pelvic nodes for select, early-stage T1N0. A 20-mm CTV margin for the primary, 10- to 20-mm CTV margin for involved nodes and a 7-mm CTV margin for the elective pelvic nodal groups are recommended, while respecting anatomical boundaries. A 5- to 10-mm PTV margin is suggested. When using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions to gross disease and 45 Gy to elective nodes with chemotherapy is appropriate. Guidelines are provided for OAR delineation. Conclusion: These consensus planning guidelines and high-resolution atlas complement the existing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) elective nodal ano-rectal atlas and provide additional anatomic, clinical, and technical instructions to guide radiation oncologists in the planning and delivery of IMRT for anal cancer.

  4. Successful closure of anal cancer-related fistulas with upfront intra-arterial chemotherapy: a report of 8 cases.

    PubMed

    Kridel, Robert; Cochet, Stéphane; Roche, Bruno; Bressoud, Albéric; Gervaz, Pascal; Betz, Michael; Roth, Arnaud D

    2011-05-01

    Fistulas arising from the perforation of anal cancer into adjacent organs are a debilitating complication in the course of the disease. We studied intra-arterial chemotherapy as a strategy to close such fistulas before the initiation of standard chemoradiation. This study was based on a retrospective chart review. The investigation was conducted at Geneva University Hospital. Eight patients with anal cancer-related fistulas were included in the study. Patients were treated at our institution from 2002 to 2009 with upfront chemotherapy consisting of 1 to 4 cycles of intra-arterial cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, and mitomycin C, and intravenous bleomycin. Intra-arterial chemotherapy was followed by standard chemoradiation. Fistula closure was assessed by an expert proctologist. Complete closure of fistulas was documented in 7 of 8 patients. Toxicity was manageable and consisted mainly of thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and febrile neutropenia as well as fatigue. This is a retrospective, uncontrolled review of only 8 patients and thus a meaningful comparison with standard chemoradiation is not feasible. Upfront intra-arterial chemotherapy is a promising strategy to close anal cancer-related fistulas before initiating chemoradiation, potentially obviating the need for hazardous reconstructive surgery after radiotherapy.

  5. Topographic Anatomy of the Anal Sphincter Complex and Levator Ani Muscle as It Relates to Intersphincteric Resection for Very Low Rectal Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Yuichiro; Ito, Masaaki; Watanabe, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Kojima, Motohiro; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Akita, Keiichi; Saito, Norio

    2016-05-01

    Intersphincteric resection has become a widely used treatment for patients with rectal cancer. However, the detailed anatomy of the anal canal related to this procedure has remained unclear. The purpose of this study was to clarify the detailed anatomy of the anal canal. This is a descriptive study. Histologic evaluations of paraffin-embedded tissue specimens were conducted at a tertiary referral hospital. Tissue specimens were obtained from cadavers of 5 adults and from 13 patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer. Sagittal sections from 9 circumferential portions of the cadaveric anal canal (histologic staining) and 3 circumferential portions from patients were studied (immunohistochemistry for smooth and skeletal muscle fibers). Longitudinal fibers between the internal and external anal sphincters consisted primarily of smooth muscle fibers that continued from the longitudinal muscle of the rectum. The levator ani muscle attached directly to the lateral surface of the longitudinal smooth muscle of the rectum. The length of the attachment was longer in the anterolateral portion and shorter in the posterior portion of the anal canal. In the lateral and posterior portions, the levator ani muscle partially overlapped the external anal sphincter; however, there was less overlap in the anterolateral portion. In the posterior portion, thick smooth muscle was present on the surface of the levator ani muscle and it continued to the longitudinal muscle of the rectum. We observed only limited portions in some surgical specimens because of obstruction by tumors. The levator ani muscle attaches directly to the longitudinal muscle of the rectum. The spatial relationship between the smooth and skeletal muscles differed in different portions of the anal canal. For intersphincteric resection, dissection must be performed between the longitudinal muscle of the rectum and the levator ani muscle/external anal sphincter, and the appropriate surgical lines

  6. The importance of HIV status and gender when designing prevention strategies for anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Míguez, María José; Burbano-Levy, Ximena; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Malow, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Our objective is to review and summarize relevant aspects of the literature regarding human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, and to compare how the trajectory of HPV may differ in persons who are and who are not co-infected with HIV. This comparison is particularly important because the literature on HPV has been largely based on individuals who are not co-infected with HIV. Also, HPV findings may differ in HIV-uninfected individuals versus HIV-infected individuals. In addition, many reviews ignore gender differences, although in HIV-uninfected individuals, anal cancers are up to 4 times more prevalent in women than men. Clinical decision making may be problematic if such critical factors as HIV status and gender are neglected. Therefore, we will review existing information on how HIV status and gender may affect the manifestation of HPV, particularly focusing on epidemiology, screening, and treatment issues. Copyright © 2011 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA characterization in squamous cell anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Vittoria; Zanellato, Elena; Franzetti-Pellanda, Alessandra; Molinari, Francesca; Movilia, Alessandra; Paganotti, Alessia; Deantonio, Letizia; De Dosso, Sara; Assi, Agnese; Crippa, Stefano; Boldorini, Renzo; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Saletti, Piercarlo; Frattini, Milo

    2014-04-01

    Combined chemoradiation therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of squamous cell anal cancer (SCAC). However, even if the response rate is very high, many patients eventually relapse or experience a reccurrence, thus requiring an invasive surgical procedure that has severe side effects. Most SCAC tumors overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); therefore, it is reasonable to consider anti-EGFR drugs as a new treatment option, as demonstrated by anecdotal reports. Promising results obtained in other solid tumors, both squamous and non-squamous, have revealed that an increase in the EGFR gene copy number may predict the efficacy of anti-EGFR therapies, while the presence of mutations in downstream members of the EGFR pathway may confer resistance. These markers have been only sporadically considered in SCAC. We investigated the status of the EGFR gene using FISH and examined KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA hot-spots mutations using sequencing analysis in a cohort of 84 patients affected by SCAC. Twenty-eight patients (34%) showed an increase in EGFR gene copy number due to amplification (4%) or to polysomy (30%). KRAS and PIK3CA gene mutations were found in 4 (5%) and 13 patients (16%), respectively. No mutations were found in the BRAF gene. The characterization of the EGFR pathway may help in identifying different subgroups of SCAC that have specific molecular features, which may have implications in what targeted therapies are used to treat each patient.

  8. Anal Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Assessment and Safety Committee Initiatives Past Presidents Healthcare Economics Committee Search ... ANAL WARTS Anal warts (condyloma acuminata) are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted ...

  9. Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision of low rectal cancer with preservation of anal sphincter: A report of 82 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zong-Guang; Wang, Zhao; Yu, Yong-Yang; Shu, Ye; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Li; Lei, Wen-Zhang; Wang, Tian-Cai

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (LTME) of low rectal cancer with preservation of anal sphincter. METHODS: From June 2001 to June 2003, 82 patients with low rectal cancer underwent laparoscopic total mesorectal excision with preservation of anal sphincter. The lowest edge of tumors was below peritoneal reflection and 1.5-7 cm from the dentate line (1.5-5 cm in 48 cases, 5-7 cm in 34 cases). RESULTS: LTME with anal sphincter preservation was performed on 82 randomized patients with low rectal cancer, and 100% sphincter preservation rate was achieved. There were 30 patients with laparoscopic low anterior resection (LLAR) at the level of the anastomosis below peritoneal reflection and 2 cm above from the dentate line; 27 patients with laparoscopic ultralow anterior resection (LULAR) at the level of anastomoses 2 cm below from the dentate line; and 25 patients with laparoscopic coloanal anastomoses (LCAA) at the level of the anastomoses at or below the dentate line. No defunctioning ileostomy was created in any case. The mean operating time was 120 min (ranged from 110-220 min), and the mean operative blood loss was 20 mL (ranged from 5-120 mL). Bowel function was restored and diet was resumed on day 1 or 2 after operation. The mean hospital stay was 8 d (ranged from 5-14). Postoperative analgesics were used in 45 patients. After surgery, 2 patients had urinary retention, one had anastomotic leakage, and another 2 patients had local recurrence one year later. No interoperative complication was observed. CONCLUSION: LTME with preservation of anal sphincter is a feasible, safe and minimally invasive technique with less postoperative pain and rapid recovery, and importantly, it has preserved the function of the sphincter. PMID:12854145

  10. RTOG 0529: A Phase 2 Evaluation of Dose-Painted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin-C for the Reduction of Acute Morbidity in Carcinoma of the Anal Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Kachnic, Lisa A.; Winter, Kathryn; Myerson, Robert J.; Goodyear, Michael D.; Willins, John; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Haddock, Michael G.; Rotman, Marvin; Parikh, Parag J.; Safran, Howard; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A multi-institutional phase 2 trial assessed the utility of dose-painted intensity modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) in reducing grade 2+ combined acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary adverse events (AEs) of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) chemoradiation for anal cancer by at least 15% compared with the conventional radiation/5FU/MMC arm from RTOG 9811. Methods and Materials: T2-4N0-3M0 anal cancer patients received 5FU and MMC on days 1 and 29 of DP-IMRT, prescribed per stage: T2N0, 42 Gy elective nodal and 50.4 Gy anal tumor planning target volumes (PTVs) in 28 fractions; T3-4N0-3, 45 Gy elective nodal, 50.4 Gy ≤3 cm or 54 Gy >3 cm metastatic nodal and 54 Gy anal tumor PTVs in 30 fractions. The primary endpoint is described above. Planned secondary endpoints assessed all AEs and the investigator’s ability to perform DP-IMRT. Results: Of 63 accrued patients, 52 were evaluable. Tumor stage included 54% II, 25% IIIA, and 21% IIIB. In primary endpoint analysis, 77% experienced grade 2+ gastrointestinal/genitourinary acute AEs (9811 77%). There was, however, a significant reduction in acute grade 2+ hematologic, 73% (9811 85%, P=.032), grade 3+ gastrointestinal, 21% (9811 36%, P=.0082), and grade 3+ dermatologic AEs 23% (9811 49%, P<.0001) with DP-IMRT. On initial pretreatment review, 81% required DP-IMRT replanning, and final review revealed only 3 cases with normal tissue major deviations. Conclusions: Although the primary endpoint was not met, DP-IMRT was associated with significant sparing of acute grade 2+ hematologic and grade 3+ dermatologic and gastrointestinal toxicity. Although DP-IMRT proved feasible, the high pretreatment planning revision rate emphasizes the importance of real-time radiation quality assurance for IMRT trials.

  11. Baseline findings from the Anal Cancer Examination (ACE) study: screening using digital ano-rectal examination in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jason J; Grulich, Andrew; Walker, Sandra; Hoy, Jennifer; Read, Tim; Bradshaw, Catriona; Garland, Suzanne M; Hillman, Richard; Templeton, David; Hocking, Jane; Eu, Beng; Tee, B K; Fairley, Christopher K

    2016-06-01

    Cytological screening for anal cancer precursors is not always possible. We investigated digital ano-rectal examination (DARE) as a means of early anal cancer detection in HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). We recruited 327 HIV-positive MSM aged 35 and over from clinics with HIV physicians in Melbourne, Australia, to receive an annual DARE. We analyzed baseline data from patient questionnaires regarding general, anal and sexual health, adverse effects from the anal examination, cancer worry, and quality of life. The majority of men (82%, 95% CI:78-87) felt relaxed during the DARE, 1% (95% CI:0-3) complained of pain, and 1% (95% CI:0-4) reported bleeding after the examination. Nearly all men (99%, 95% CI:96-100) were willing to continue with an annual DARE. Quality of life was unaffected with utility scores of 0.76 before examination vs. 0.77 two weeks after examination, (p = 0.41). An anal abnormality was detected in 86 men (27%, 95% CI:22-31), with one anal cancer identified. The specialist referral rate following DARE was 5% (95% CI:3-8). Recruitment rates were significantly associated with the clinic setting (sexual health centre 78%, general practice 13%, hospital 14%, p = 0.002) and specialty (sexual health physician 67%, general practitioner 20%, infectious disease physician 14%, p = 0.031). Annual DARE to detect anal cancer in HIV-positive MSM was acceptable for patients, with minimal side effects. Strategies to increase HIV physician's patient recruitment would be needed if DARE were to be implemented in anal cancer screening. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. First Case of the Cervical Lymph Node as the Only Site of Metastasis from Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Jaiswal, Sunny; Saif, Muhammad W

    2017-05-30

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma was a previously uncommon malignancy that has steadily increased in incidence with the increased prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Anal squamous cell carcinoma is typically characterized by local and regional involvement and distant metastases are far less common. Here, we report a case of a 36-year-old female initially diagnosed with anal squamous cell carcinoma manifesting as an anal mass along with an enlarged inguinal lymph node. After receiving chemoradiation therapy, she remained disease-free until recently, when she presented with an isolated left infraclavicular lymph node found on physical examination followed by a biopsy that was consistent with recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma. The positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) uptake of her original left inguinal lymph node was decreased, suggesting improved regional disease, and no other metastases were found. Our case represents a rare occurrence of metastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma to an isolated distal lymph node and reminds physicians not to forget a unusual site of metastasis and prevent any delay in treatment.

  13. Surgical treatment of anal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Vanella, Serafino; Cadeddu, Federica; Marniga, Gaia; Mazzeo, Pasquale; Brandara, Francesco; Maria, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Anal stenosis is a rare but serious complication of anorectal surgery, most commonly seen after hemorrhoidectomy. Anal stenosis represents a technical challenge in terms of surgical management. A Medline search of studies relevant to the management of anal stenosis was undertaken. The etiology, pathophysiology and classification of anal stenosis were reviewed. An overview of surgical and non-surgical therapeutic options was developed. Ninety percent of anal stenosis is caused by overzealous hemorrhoidectomy. Treatment, both medical and surgical, should be modulated based on stenosis severity. Mild stenosis can be managed conservatively with stool softeners or fiber supplements. Sphincterotomy may be quite adequate for a patient with a mild degree of narrowing. For more severe stenosis, a formal anoplasty should be performed to treat the loss of anal canal tissue. Anal stenosis may be anatomic or functional. Anal stricture is most often a preventable complication. Many techniques have been used for the treatment of anal stenosis with variable healing rates. It is extremely difficult to interpret the results of the various anaplastic procedures described in the literature as prospective trials have not been performed. However, almost any approach will at least improve patient symptoms. PMID:19399922

  14. Prognostic Relevance of HPV Infection and p16 Overexpression in Squamous Cell Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mai, Sabine; Welzel, Grit; Ottstadt, Martine; Lohr, Frank; Severa, Sebastin; Prigge, Elena-Sophie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Trunk, Marcus J; Wenz, Frederik; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Reuschenbach, Miriam

    2015-11-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and p16 status have both been reported as prognostic factors in anal cancer, but the prognostic relevance of combined detection and particularly HPV-/p16+ and HPV+/p16- signatures is unknown. We evaluated combined HPV DNA and p16 status as a prognostic factor of treatment response in anal cancer. 106 patients treated with radiochemotherapy (RCT+5-FU/MMC) with available paraffin-embedded tumor tissue specimens were evaluated regarding local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. In addition to HPV DNA/p16 status, the influence of age, gender, previous surgery, initial recurrence, T stage, N status, and tumor localization was analyzed. 63 patients were HPV+/p16+, 9 were HPV+/p16-, 11 were HPV-/p16+, and 23 were HPV-/p16-. In univariate analysis, LC was significantly better in patients with T1/2 stage, female gender, and HPV/p16 status. HPV+/p16+ was associated with significantly better LC (88.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 78.89-97.31) compared with HPV-/p16+ (63.6%; 95% CI: 35.18-92.02; P=.021) and especially HPV-/p16- (55.8%; 95% CI: 33.46-78.14; P=.002) but not with HPV+/p16- (77.8%; 95% CI: 50.56-105.04; P=.270). OS was influenced by T stage and LC. HPV+/p16+ patients showed a trend toward better OS compared with HPV-/p16- patients (HPV+/p16+: 81.1%; 95% CI: 70.12-92.08 vs HPV-/p16-: 68.8%; 95%CI: 47.44-90.16; P=.138). On multivariate analysis, T3/4 stage and HPV/p16 status (HPV-/p16+, HPV-/p16- vs HPV+/p16+) predicted poorer LC (T3/4: 50.3% vs T1/2: 86.6%, hazard ratio [HR] 0.22; 95% CI: 0.09-0.53; P<.001; HPV+/p16+ vs HPV-/p16+: HR 4.73; 95% CI: 1.33-16.82; P=.016, and HPV+/p16+ vs HPV-/p16-: HR 6.40; 95% CI: 2.23-18.35; P<.001), whereas local relapse dramatically influenced OS. Our data suggest that HPV/p16 signature determines prognosis. HPV+/p16+ patients had the best prognosis, and HPV-/p16+ and HPV-/p16- patients showed the worst outcome and therefore require therapy optimization, particularly given that LC is

  15. Body Image and Sexual Function in Women after Treatment for Anal and Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Catherine; Philip, Errol J.; Baser, Raymond E.; Carter, Jeanne; Schuler, Tammy A.; Jandorf, Lina; DuHamel, Katherine; Nelson, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Treatment for anal and rectal cancer (ARCa) often results in side effects that directly impact sexual functioning; however, ARCa survivors are an understudied group and factors contributing to the sexual sequelae are not well understood. Body image problems are distressing and may further exacerbate sexual difficulties, particularly for women. This preliminary study sought to (1) describe body image problems, including sociodemographic and disease/treatment correlates; and (2) examine relations between body image and sexual function. Methods For the baseline assessment of a larger study, 70 women completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and CR38, including the Body Image subscale, and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression evaluated correlates of body image. Among sexually active women (n=41), hierarchical regression examined relations between body image and sexual function domains. Results Women were an average 55 years old (SD=11.6), Non-Hispanic White (79%), married (57%), and employed (47%). The majority (86%) reported at least one body image problem. Younger age, lower global health status, and greater severity of symptoms related to poorer body image (p’s<.05). Poor body image was inversely related to all aspects of sexual function (β range .50 to .70, p’s<.05), except pain. The strongest association was with FSFI Sexual/Relationship Satisfaction. Conclusion These preliminary findings suggest the importance of assessing body image as a potentially modifiable target to address sexual difficulties in this understudied group. Further longitudinal research is needed to inform the development and implementation of effective interventions to improve the sexual health and well-being of female ARCa survivors. PMID:25974874

  16. Impact of screening and ART on anal cancer incidence in HIV-positive men who have sex with men: mathematical modeling study.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Nello; Bertisch, Barbara; Kouyos, Roger D; Calmy, Alexandra; Bucher, Heiner C; Cavassini, Matthias; Estill, Janne; Keiser, Olivia; Egger, Matthias

    2017-05-16

    The incidence of anal cancer is high in HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). We modeled the impact of screening strategies and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) coverage on anal cancer incidence in Switzerland. Individual-based, dynamic simulation model parameterized with Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) and literature data. We assumed all men to be HPV infected. CD4 cell count trajectories were the main predictors of anal cancer. From 2016 we modeled cART coverage either as below 100% (corresponding to 2010-2015) or as 100%, and the following four screening strategies: (i) no screening, (ii) yearly anal cytology (Pap smears), (iii) yearly anoscopy and (iv) targeted anoscopy five years after CD4 count dropped below 200 cells/μl. Median nadir CD4 cell count of 6,411 MSM increased from 229 cells/μl during 1980-89 to 394 cells/μl during 2010-15; cART coverage increased from 0% to 83.4%. Modeled anal cancer incidence peaked at 81.7/100,000 in 2009, plateaued 2010-2015 and decreased to 58.7 by 2030 with stable cART coverage, and to 52.0 with 100% cART coverage. With yearly cytology, incidence declined to 38.2/100,000 by 2030, with yearly anoscopy to 32.8 and with CD4 count guided anoscopy to 51.3. The numbers needed to screen over 15 years to prevent one anal cancer case (NNS) were 384 for yearly cytology, 313 for yearly anoscopy and 242 for CD4 count dependent screening. Yearly screening of HIV-positive MSM may reduce anal cancer incidence substantially, with a NNS that is comparable to other screening interventions to prevent cancer.

  17. Experience and psychological impact of anal cancer screening in gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Russo, S; Mccaffery, K; Ellard, J; Poynten, M; Prestage, G; Templeton, D J; Hillman, R; Law, C; Grulich, A E

    2017-06-20

    Human papillomavirus-related anal cancer rates are increasing and are particularly high in gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBM/MSM), especially HIV-positive individuals. Although screening programs for high-risk populations have been advocated, concerns about possible adverse psychological consequences exist. This study aimed to investigate GBM/MSM's experience, understanding and emotional response to screening techniques for anal cancer to determine how best to minimise psychological distress in future programs. In-depth qualitative face-to-face interviews were conducted with 21 GBM/MSM participating in the "Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer" in Sydney, Australia, between June 2013 and June 2014. Nonrandom, purposive sampling was used to ensure heterogeneity with respect to HIV status and screening test results. Framework analysis method was used to organise the data and identify emerging themes. Knowledge about anal cancer, human papillomavirus and the link between them was limited. Abnormal screening results affected participants' sense of well-being and were associated with anxiety and concern about developing anal cancer. HIV-negative men receiving abnormal results showed higher levels of distress compared to their HIV-positive counterparts. Consultations with general practitioners about abnormal results had an important role in increasing participants' understanding and in moderating their anxiety. Anal cancer screening should be accompanied by health education around anal cancer, its aetiology and the meaning of associated test results. Simple and effective communication strategies should be encouraged. Collaboration with general practitioners could assist the process of education and reporting test results. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The impact of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography on the staging, management and outcome of anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Winton, E de; Heriot, A G; Ng, M; Hicks, R J; Hogg, A; Milner, A; Leong, T; Fay, M; MacKay, J; Drummond, E; Ngan, S Y

    2009-03-10

    Accurate inguinal and pelvic nodal staging in anal cancer is important for the prognosis and planning of radiation fields. There is evidence for the role of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and management of cancer, with early reports of an increasing role in outcome prognostication in a number of tumours. We aimed to determine the effect of FDG-PET on the nodal staging, radiotherapy planning and prognostication of patients with primary anal cancer. Sixty-one consecutive patients with anal cancer who were referred to a tertiary centre between August 1997 and November 2005 were staged with conventional imaging (CIm) (including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound and chest X-ray) and by FDG-PET. The stage determined by CIm and the proposed management plan were prospectively recorded and changes in stage and management as a result of FDG-PET assessed. Patients were treated with a uniform radiotherapy technique and dose. The accuracy of changes and prognostication of FDG-PET were validated by subsequent clinical follow-up. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate survival for the whole cohort and by FDG-PET and CIm stage. The tumour-stage group was changed in 23% (14 out of 61) as a result of FDG-PET (15% up-staged, 8% down-staged). Fourteen percent of T1 patients (3 out of 22), 42% of T2 patients (10 out of 24) and 40% of T3-4 patients (6 out of 15) assessed using CIm, had a change in their nodal or metastatic stage following FDG-PET. Sensitivity for nodal regional disease by FDG-PET and CIm was 89% and 62%, respectively. The staging FDG-PET scan altered management intent in 3% (2 out of 61) and radiotherapy fields in 13% (8 out of 61). The estimated 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for the cohort were 77.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 55.3-90.4%) and 72.2% (95% CI: 51.5-86.4%), respectively. The estimated 5-year PFS for FDG-PET and CIm

  19. The impact of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography on the staging, management and outcome of anal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Winton, E de; Heriot, A G; Ng, M; Hicks, R J; Hogg, A; Milner, A; Leong, T; Fay, M; MacKay, J; Drummond, E; Ngan, S Y

    2009-01-01

    Accurate inguinal and pelvic nodal staging in anal cancer is important for the prognosis and planning of radiation fields. There is evidence for the role of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the staging and management of cancer, with early reports of an increasing role in outcome prognostication in a number of tumours. We aimed to determine the effect of FDG-PET on the nodal staging, radiotherapy planning and prognostication of patients with primary anal cancer. Sixty-one consecutive patients with anal cancer who were referred to a tertiary centre between August 1997 and November 2005 were staged with conventional imaging (CIm) (including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound and chest X-ray) and by FDG-PET. The stage determined by CIm and the proposed management plan were prospectively recorded and changes in stage and management as a result of FDG-PET assessed. Patients were treated with a uniform radiotherapy technique and dose. The accuracy of changes and prognostication of FDG-PET were validated by subsequent clinical follow-up. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis was used to estimate survival for the whole cohort and by FDG-PET and CIm stage. The tumour-stage group was changed in 23% (14 out of 61) as a result of FDG-PET (15% up-staged, 8% down-staged). Fourteen percent of T1 patients (3 out of 22), 42% of T2 patients (10 out of 24) and 40% of T3–4 patients (6 out of 15) assessed using CIm, had a change in their nodal or metastatic stage following FDG-PET. Sensitivity for nodal regional disease by FDG-PET and CIm was 89% and 62%, respectively. The staging FDG-PET scan altered management intent in 3% (2 out of 61) and radiotherapy fields in 13% (8 out of 61). The estimated 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for the cohort were 77.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 55.3–90.4%) and 72.2% (95% CI: 51.5–86.4%), respectively. The estimated 5-year PFS for FDG-PET and

  20. Anal dysplasia screening: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    -term immunosuppression. In Ontario, there are about 25,000 people living with HIV infection; more than 6,000 of these are women. About 28% of the newly diagnosed HIV infections are in women, a doubling since 1999. It has also been estimated that 1 of 3 people living with HIV do no know it. HEALTH TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTION: Anal Pap test screening involves the blind insertion of a swab into the anal canal and fixing cells either on a slide or in fluid for cytological examination. Anal cytology classified by the standardized Bethesda System is the same classification used for cervical cytology. It has 4 categories: normal, atypical squamous cells of uncertain significance, or squamous intraepithelial lesions which are further classified into low- or high-grade lesions. Abnormal cytological findings are subjected to further evaluations by high-resolution anoscopy, a technique similar to cervical colposcopy, and biopsy. Several HPV deoxyribonucleic acid detection technologies such as the Hybrid 11 Capture and the polymerase chain reaction are available to detect and differentiate HPV viral strains. Unlike cervical cancer, there are no universally accepted guidelines or standards of care for anal dysplasia. Moreover, there are no formal screening programs provincially, nationally, or internationally. The New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute has recently recommended (March 2007) annual anal pap testing in high-risk groups. In Ontario, reimbursement exists only for Pap tests for cervical cancer screening. That is, there is no reimbursement for anal Pap testing in men or women, and HPV screening tests for cervical or anal cancer are also not reimbursed. The scientific evidence base was evaluated through a systematic literature review. Assessments of current practices were obtained through consultations with various agencies and individuals including the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care AIDS Bureau; Public Health Infectious Diseases Branch, Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

  1. Rectal bleeding and prolapse… not always benign diseases rather anal cancer. The importance of a correct decision making since primary care

    PubMed Central

    COCORULLO, G.; TUTINO, R.; FALCO, N.; FONTANA, T.; SALAMONE, G.; LICARI, L.; GULOTTA, G.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal bleeding is very common in general population with a prevalence of 10–20 %. Primary care physicians have to stratify patients basing on urgency and on the colo-rectal cancer risk and to conduct a decision making for the correct management. We report a case of a 61-years-old woman, complaining rectal bleeding and an anal mass attended to their family doctor who does a visit but without a digital rectal examination and diagnosed a hemorrhoidal prolapse suggesting medical therapy. For the persistence of symptoms she comes to our service from emergency attention. Inspection and digital rectal examination revealed an anal mass. CT scan was performed showing a large anal mass involving half anal circumference. Histologic samples showed an epithelial proliferation compatible with a squamous carcinoma. Oncological consult was requested and a chemo-radiotherapy treatment was proposed. This case report highlights the difficulty when physicians assess patients with anorectal complaints in differentiating anal cancer from benign disease, presumably because symptoms are similar. Primary care physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion of cancer in high-risk population. Sensitization of these colleagues is required since digital rectal examination is of inestimable value to verify the presence of a rectal or an anal mass. PMID:27734798

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Anal Cancer With Para-aortic Nodal Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Das, Prajnan; Eng, Cathy; Reish, Andrew G.; Beddar, A. Sam; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the rates of toxicity, locoregional control, distant control, and survival in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodal involvement, treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2007, 6 patients with squamous cell anal cancer and para-aortic nodal involvement were treated with IMRT and concurrent infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. The primary tumor was treated with a median dose of 57.5 Gy (range, 54-60 Gy), involved para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes were treated with a median dose of 55 Gy (range, 50.5-55 Gy), and noninvolved nodal regions were treated with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 43.5-45 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 25 months, none of the patients had a recurrence at the primary tumor, pelvic/inguinal nodes, or para-aortic nodes, whereas 2 patients developed distant metastases to the liver. Four of the 6 patients are alive. The 3-year actuarial locoregional control, distant control, and overall survival rates were 100%, 56%, and 63%, respectively. Four of the 6 patients developed Grade 3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity during chemoradiation. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy could potentially serve as definitive therapy in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodal involvement. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be indicated in these patients, as demonstrated by the distant failure rates. These patients need to be followed carefully because of the potential for treatment-related toxicities.

  3. Anal Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Jennifer Sam; Shashidharan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Anal fissure (fissure-in-ano) is a very common anorectal condition. The exact etiology of this condition is debated; however, there is a clear association with elevated internal anal sphincter pressures. Though hard bowel movements are implicated in fissure etiology, they are not universally present in patients with anal fissures. Half of all patients with fissures heal with nonoperative management such as high fiber diet, sitz baths, and pharmacological agents. When nonoperative management fails, surgical treatment with lateral internal sphincterotomy has a high success rate. In this chapter, we will review the symptoms, pathophysiology, and management of anal fissures. PMID:26929749

  4. Anal Fissure.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Jennifer Sam; Shashidharan, M

    2016-03-01

    Anal fissure (fissure-in-ano) is a very common anorectal condition. The exact etiology of this condition is debated; however, there is a clear association with elevated internal anal sphincter pressures. Though hard bowel movements are implicated in fissure etiology, they are not universally present in patients with anal fissures. Half of all patients with fissures heal with nonoperative management such as high fiber diet, sitz baths, and pharmacological agents. When nonoperative management fails, surgical treatment with lateral internal sphincterotomy has a high success rate. In this chapter, we will review the symptoms, pathophysiology, and management of anal fissures.

  5. “Topographic and Manometric characterization of the Recto-Anal Inhibitory Reflex (RAIR)”

    PubMed Central

    Cheeney, G; Nguyen, M; Valestin, J; Rao, SSC

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION (RAIR) Recto-anal inhibitory reflex is an integral part of normal defecation. The physiological characteristics of RAIR along anal length and anterior-posterior axis are unknown. AIM To perform topographic and vector-graphic evaluation of RAIR along anal canal using high definition manometry (HDM), and examine the role of various muscle components. METHODS Anorectal topography was assessed in 10 healthy volunteers using HDM probe with 256 sensors. RAIR data were analyzed every mm along the length of anal canal for topographic, baseline, residual, and plateau pressures during 5 mean volumes of balloon inflation (15cc, 40cc, 71cc, 101cc, 177cc), and in 3D by dividing anal canal into 4×2.1 mm grids. RESULTS Relaxation pressure progressively increases along anal canal with increasing balloon volume up to 71 cc and thereafter plateaus. In 3-D, RAIR is maximally seen at the middle and upper portions of anal canal (levels 1.2-3.2 cm) and posteriorly. Peak residual pressure was seen at proximal anal canal. CONCLUSION RAIR is characterized by differential anal relaxation along Anterior-Posterior axis, longitudinally along the length of anal canal, and it depends on the rectal distention volume. It is maximally seen at internal anal sphincter pressure zone. Multidimensional analyses indicate that external anal sphincter provides bulk of anal residual pressure. Our findings emphasize importance of sensor location and orientation; as anterior and more distal location may miss RAIR. PMID:22235880

  6. Neuromyogenic properties of the internal anal sphincter: therapeutic rationale for anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, R; Vaizey, C J; Boulos, P B; Hoyle, C H

    2000-06-01

    Lateral sphincterotomy diminishes internal anal sphincter hypertonia and thereby reduces anal canal pressure. This improves anal mucosal blood flow and promotes the healing of anal fissures. However, sphincterotomy can be associated with long term disturbances of sphincter function. The optimal treatment for an anal fissure is to induce a temporary reduction of anal canal resting pressure to allow healing of the fissure without permanently disrupting normal sphincter function. Broader understanding of the intrinsic mechanisms controlling smooth muscle contraction has allowed pharmacological manipulation of anal sphincter tone. We performed an initial Medline literature search to identify all articles concerning "internal anal sphincter" and "anal fissures". This review is based on these articles and on additional publications obtained by manual cross referencing. Internal anal smooth muscle relaxation can be inhibited by stimulation of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic enteric neurones, parasympathetic muscarinic receptors, or sympathetic beta adrenoceptors, and by inhibition of calcium entry into the cell. Sphincter contraction depends on an increase in cytoplasmic calcium and is enhanced by sympathetic adrenergic stimulation. Currently, the most commonly used pharmacological agent in the treatment of anal fissures is topical glyceryl trinitrate, a nitric oxide donor. Alternative agents that exhibit a similar effect via membrane Ca2+ channels, muscarinic receptors, and alpha or beta adrenoceptors are also likely to have a therapeutic potential in treating anal fissures.

  7. Psychological correlates of sexual dysfunction in female rectal and anal cancer survivors: analysis of baseline intervention data.

    PubMed

    Philip, Errol J; Nelson, Christian; Temple, Larissa; Carter, Jeanne; Schover, Leslie; Jennings, Sabrina; Jandorf, Lina; Starr, Tatiana; Baser, Ray; DuHamel, Katherine

    2013-10-01

    Sexual dysfunction represents a complex and multifactorial construct that can affect both men and women and has been noted to often deteriorate significantly after treatment for rectal and anal cancer. Despite this, it remains an understudied, underreported, and undertreated issue in the field of cancer survivorship. This study examined the characteristics of women enrolled in an intervention trial to treat sexual dysfunction, and explored the relationship between sexual functioning and psychological well-being. There were 70 female posttreatment anal or rectal cancer survivors assessed as part of the current study. Participants were enrolled in a randomized intervention trial to treat sexual dysfunction and completed outcome measures prior to randomization. The main outcome measures are quality of life (QOL) (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire [EORTC-QLQ-C30] and Colorectal Cancer-Specific Module [QLQ-CR38]), sexual functioning (Female Sexual Functioning Index), and psychological well-being (Brief Symptom Inventory Depression/Anxiety, Impact of Events Scale-Revised, CR-38 Body Image). Women enrolled in the study intervention were on average 55 years old, predominantly Caucasian (79%), married (57%), and a median of 4 years postprimary treatment. For those reporting sexual activity at baseline (N=41), sexual dysfunction was associated with a range of specific measures of psychological well-being, all in the hypothesized direction. The Sexual/Relationship Satisfaction subscale was associated with all measures of psychological well-being (r=-0.45 to -0.70, all P<0.01). Body image, anxiety, and cancer-specific posttraumatic distress were notable in their association with subscales of sexual functioning, while a global QOL measure was largely unrelated. For sexually active female rectal and anal cancer survivors enrolled in a sexual health intervention, sexual dysfunction was significantly and consistently

  8. Preliminary results of a screening program for anal cancer and its precursors for HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Vigo-Spain.

    PubMed

    Iribarren Díaz, Mauricio; Ocampo Hermida, Antonio; González-Carreró Fojón, Joaquín; Longueira Suárez, Rebeca; Rivera Gallego, Alberto; Casal Núñez, Enrique; Ocampo Álvarez, Antón; Cachay, Edward R

    2017-04-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have the highest risk of developing anal cancer (AC). The objective of this study was to describe our screening implementation program in this population, and report the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) anal infection, and cytological and histological findings in a Spanish medium-size community (Vigo, Spain). Prospective cohort analysis of 240 HIV-infected MSM. Cellular anal sample and high risk HPV (HR-HPV)-tests were performed to study cytological changes and HPV genotyping. High resolution anoscopy (HRA) was performed in 209 patients. Results were analyzed with respect to epidemiological, clinical and analytical factors. Of 209 patients selected for HRA, the prevalence of HR-HPV anal infection, cytological and histological alterations was 85.6%, 47.5%, and 39.8%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for ≥ ASCUS (atypia of squamous cells of undetermined significance) cytology in relation to histological alterations were 61% and 85%, (OR: 8.7; IC 95%: 4.4-17.2), respectively. Observed concordance between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) cytology and HSIL anal intraepithelial neoplasia types 2 and 3 (AIN-2/3) histology was 64% (OR: 11.4; IC 95%: 3.6-36.7). One patient with HSIL cytology presented a prevalent anal squamous carcinoma. HRA was feasible with similar results to relevant groups. There was a high prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection, and cytological and histological alterations.

  9. Uptake and Predictors of Anal Cancer Screening in Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Rajan, Shirani D.; Bhatia, Rohini; Cranston, Ross D.; Plankey, Michael W.; Silvestre, Anthony; Ostrow, David G.; Wiley, Dorothy; Shah, Nisha; Brewer, Noel T.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated attitudes about and acceptance of anal Papanicolaou (Pap) screening among men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods. Free anal Pap screening (cytology) was offered to 1742 MSM in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, who reported history of, attitudes about, and experience with screening. We explored predictors of declining screening with multivariate logistic regression. Results. A history of anal Pap screening was uncommon among non–HIV-infected MSM, but more common among HIV-infected MSM (10% vs 39%; P < .001). Most participants expressed moderate or strong interest in screening (86%), no anxiety about screening (66%), and a strong belief in the utility of screening (65%). Acceptance of screening during this study was high (85%) across all 4 US sites. Among those screened, most reported it was “not a big deal” or “not as bad as expected,” and 3% reported that it was “scary.” Declining to have screening was associated with Black race, anxiety about screening, and low interest, but not age or HIV status. Conclusions. This study demonstrated high acceptance of anal Pap screening among both HIV-infected and non–HIV-infected MSM across 4 US sites. PMID:23865658

  10. Defensive anality and anal narcissism.

    PubMed

    Shengold, L

    1985-01-01

    This paper aims at demonstrating a currently beleaguered assumption: the central importance, the continuing vitality, and the appropriate complexity of Freud's theory of the drives and of his idea of the primacy of the body ego. It is not enough to consider man a thinking machine or a social being; his animal nature must be given a central place in psychology. The paper postulates that 'anal or sphincter defensiveness' is one of the precursors of the repression barrier. Anality has been comparatively neglected in recent psychoanalytic literature, and so has its explorer, Karl Abraham. The paper's thesis is that there is a special defensive importance to anal erogeneity and libido, and to those aspects of ego and superego that are functionally operative (as the 'sadistic-anal organization' (Freud, 1917)) during the so-called 'sadistic-anal' developmental phase. Any of the psychic danger situations can evoke regression to manifestations of 'anal narcissim'--an attempt to master overwhelming feeling by a kind of emotional sphincter action, narrowing down the world to the controllable and the predictable. The basic assumption here is Fliess's idea that the attainment of anal sphincter control functions--with, as-it-were, 'psychic resonance'--as a means to master primal (murderous, cannibalistic) affect. For optimal psychic development, a proper balance must be attained between anal control of, and anal expression of, instinctual derivatives--especially of affect laden with aggression.

  11. Anal fissure

    MedlinePlus

    ... bath 2 to 3 times a day. The water should cover only the hips and buttocks. If the anal fissures do not go away with home care methods, treatment may involve: Botox injections into the muscle in the anus (anal sphincter) ...

  12. Mandibular Canal Widening and Bell's Palsy: Sequelae of Perineural Invasion in Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Gopinath Thilak Parepady; Sherigar, Vishwanath; Shetty, Sameep S; Satya, Shree; Gohil, Sourabh M

    2016-01-01

    Perineural invasion is an underrecognized route of metastatic spread along the nerve bundles within the nerve sheath into the surrounding tissues. It hinders the ability to establish local control as tumour cells can traverse along nerve tracts well beyond the extent of any local invasion rendering them inoperable and unresectable. Perineural invasion is a marker of poor prognosis. Oral submucous fibrosis with oral cancer constitutes a clinicopathologically distinct disease. Our case highlights an enigmatic presentation of oral submucous fibrosis and its coexistence with oral cancer presenting with unusual neurological disturbance of the inferior alveolar nerve and facial nerve and diffuse widening of the mandibular canal. The objective of this case report is to enumerate the significance of perineural invasion in determining the course of the disease and necessitate the need for future studies that can shed light on molecular mediators and pathogenesis of perineural spread.

  13. Mandibular Canal Widening and Bell's Palsy: Sequelae of Perineural Invasion in Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Gopinath Thilak Parepady; Sherigar, Vishwanath; Satya, Shree; Gohil, Sourabh M.

    2016-01-01

    Perineural invasion is an underrecognized route of metastatic spread along the nerve bundles within the nerve sheath into the surrounding tissues. It hinders the ability to establish local control as tumour cells can traverse along nerve tracts well beyond the extent of any local invasion rendering them inoperable and unresectable. Perineural invasion is a marker of poor prognosis. Oral submucous fibrosis with oral cancer constitutes a clinicopathologically distinct disease. Our case highlights an enigmatic presentation of oral submucous fibrosis and its coexistence with oral cancer presenting with unusual neurological disturbance of the inferior alveolar nerve and facial nerve and diffuse widening of the mandibular canal. The objective of this case report is to enumerate the significance of perineural invasion in determining the course of the disease and necessitate the need for future studies that can shed light on molecular mediators and pathogenesis of perineural spread. PMID:28025626

  14. Cryptoglandular anal fistula.

    PubMed

    de Parades, V; Zeitoun, J-D; Atienza, P

    2010-08-01

    Fistula arising from the glands of the anal crypts is the most common form of anoperineal sepsis. It is characterized by a primary internal orifice in the anal canal, a fistulous tract, and an abscess and/or secondary perineal orifice with purulent discharge. Antibiotics are not curative. The treatment of an abscess is urgent and consists, whenever possible, of incision and drainage under local anesthesia. Definitive treatment of the fistulous tract can await a second stage. The primary aim is to control infection without sacrificing anal continence. Fistulotomy is the basis for all treatments but the specific technique depends on the height of the fistula in relation to the sphincteric mechanism. Overall results of fistulotomy are excellent but there is some risk of anal incontinence. This explains the growing interest in sphincter sparing techniques such as the mucosal advancement flap, the injection of fibrin glue, and the plug procedure. However, results of these procedures are not yet good enough and leave much room for improvement.

  15. Fibroepithelial polyp in an anal fistulous track: a sign of chronic pathology

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Iordanis N; Danias, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    Hypertrophied anal papillae and fibroepithelial polyps are benign acquired polypoid lesions of the anal canal. The development and protrusion of a fibroepithelial polyp in an anal fistulous track is described. This is a rare physical sign of chronic anal pathology. PMID:22242043

  16. Anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Schlichtemeier, Steven; Engel, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    An anal fissure is a common, mostly benign, condition that can be acute or chronic. The diagnosis is usually made on history and physical examination, but further investigations are sometimes necessary. Primary fissures are usually benign and located in the posterior or anterior position. Secondary fissures are lateral or multiple and often indicate a more serious underlying pathology. The management of primary anal fissures is generally non-operative and includes increased dietary fibre, sitz baths, topical ointments and botulinum toxin injections. If these treatments are ineffective the patient will need a surgical referral. Secondary anal fissures require further investigation. Multidisciplinary management is preferable and is essential in the case of malignancy.

  17. A comparison between 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin and capecitabine/mitomycin in combination with radiation for anal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Dante D.; Schellenberg, Devin; Lim, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are no randomized phase III trials comparing 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin (FM) versus capecitabine/mitomycin (CM) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced anal cancer. We aim to evaluate the outcomes of patients treated with FM and CM at our institution. Methods Patients with stage I–III anal cancer who initiated curative-intent RT (50–54 Gy) with either CM or FM between 1998 and 2013 at the BC Cancer Agency were reviewed. Cox proportional models were used to analyze the impact of regimen on disease-free survival (DFS) and anal cancer-specific survival (ACSS). Results A total of 300 patients were included. Baseline characteristics were well-distributed between the groups. A total of 194 patients (64.6%) received FM and 106 (35.3%) CM. The 2-year DFS was 79.7% for CM [95% confidence intervals (95% CI), 71.1–88.3%] and 78.8% for FM (95% CI, 73–84.6%); 2-year ACSS was 88.7% for CM (95% CI, 81.8–95.5%) and 87.5% for FM (95% CI, 82.8–92.2%). On multivariate analysis, only HIV status, clinical T size (≤5 vs. >5 cm), and N status (negative vs. positive) remained as significant prognostic factors for both DFS and ACSS. Chemotherapy regimen (CM vs. FM) had no impact on either DFS [P=0.995; hazard ratios (HR) =0.99; 95% CI, 0.57–1.74] or ACSS (P=0.847; HR =0.93; 95% CI, 0.46–1.86). Conclusions In our population-based study, CM and FM concomitant with RT achieved similar DFS and ACSS. Substitution of capecitabine for infusional 5-FU may therefore be a reasonable option for patients and physicians who prefer to avoid the inconvenience and potential complications of a central infusional device. PMID:27563458

  18. Anal Itching

    MedlinePlus

    ... irritants. Avoid bubble baths, genital deodorants, perfumed soaps, moist wipes, witch hazel products and other items that might irritate the anal area. Cut back on or avoid coffee, cola, alcohol, citrus fruits, chocolate, spicy foods, tomatoes ...

  19. Comparison of anal cancer outcomes in public and private hospital patients treated at a single radiation oncology center

    PubMed Central

    Bitterman, Danielle S.; Grew, David; Gu, Ping; Cohen, Richard F.; Sanfilippo, Nicholas J.; Leichman, Cynthia G.; Leichman, Lawrence P.; Moore, Harvey G.; Gold, Heather T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare clinical and treatment characteristics and outcomes in locally advanced anal cancer, a potentially curable disease, in patients referred from a public or private hospital. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 112 anal cancer patients from a public and a private hospital who received definitive chemoradiotherapy at the same cancer center between 2004 and 2013. Tumor stage, radiotherapy delay, radiotherapy duration, and unplanned treatment breaks ≥10 days were compared using t-test and χ2 test. Overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS), and colostomy free survival (CFS) were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard models for OS and DFS were developed. Results The follow-up was 14.9 months (range, 0.7-94.8 months). Public hospital patients presented with significantly higher clinical T stage (P<0.05) and clinical stage group (P<0.05), had significantly longer radiotherapy delays (P<0.05) and radiotherapy duration (P<0.05), and had more frequent radiation therapy (RT) breaks ≥10 days (P<0.05). Three-year OS showed a marked trend in favor of private hospital patients for 3-year OS (72.8% vs. 48.9%; P=0.171), 3-year DFS (66.3% vs. 42.7%, P=0.352), and 3-year CFS (86.4% vs. 68.9%, P=0.299). Referral hospital was not predictive of OS or DFS on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Public hospital patients presented at later stage and experienced more delays in initiating and completing radiotherapy, which may contribute to the trend in poorer DFS and OS. These findings emphasize the need for identifying clinical and treatment factors that contribute to decreased survival in low socioeconomic status (SES) populations. PMID:26487947

  20. Setup Variations in Radiotherapy of Anal Cancer: Advantages of Target Volume Reduction Using Image-Guided Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yijen; Suh, Steve; Nelson, Rebecca A.; Liu An; Pezner, Richard D.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To define setup variations in the radiation treatment (RT) of anal cancer and to report the advantages of image-guided RT (IGRT) in terms of reduction of target volume and treatment-related side effects. Methods and Materials: Twelve consecutive patients with anal cancer treated by combined chemoradiation by use of helical tomotherapy from March 2007 to November 2008 were selected. With patients immobilized and positioned in place, megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans were performed before each treatment and were automatically registered to planning CT scans. Patients were shifted per the registration data and treated. A total of 365 MVCT scans were analyzed. The primary site received a median dose of 55 Gy. To evaluate the potential dosimetric advantage(s) of IGRT, cases were replanned according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0529, with and without adding recommended setup variations from the current study. Results: Significant setup variations were observed throughout the course of RT. The standard deviations for systematic setup correction in the anterior-posterior (AP), lateral, and superior-inferior (SI) directions and roll rotation were 1.1, 3.6, and 3.2 mm, and 0.3 Degree-Sign , respectively. The average random setup variations were 3.8, 5.5, and 2.9 mm, and 0.5 Degree-Sign , respectively. Without daily IGRT, margins of 4.9, 11.1, and 8.5 mm in the AP, lateral, and SI directions would have been needed to ensure that the planning target volume (PTV) received {>=}95% of the prescribed dose. Conversely, daily IGRT required no extra margins on PTV and resulted in a significant reduction of V15 and V45 of intestine and V10 of pelvic bone marrow. Favorable toxicities were observed, except for acute hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Daily MVCT scans before each treatment can effectively detect setup variations and thereby reduce PTV margins in the treatment of anal cancer. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IGRT provided favorable

  1. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for Peutz-Jeghers syndrome with synchronous rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min-Er; Niu, Bei-Zhan; Ji, Wu-Yang; Wu, Bin

    2016-06-14

    We report on a patient diagnosed with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) with synchronous rectal cancer who was treated with laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). PJS is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple hamartomatous polyps in the gastrointestinal tract, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and increased risks of gastrointestinal and nongastrointestinal cancer. This report presents a patient with a 20-year history of intermittent bloody stool, mucocutaneous pigmentation and a family history of PJS, which together led to a diagnosis of PJS. Moreover, colonoscopy and biopsy revealed the presence of multiple serried giant pedunculated polyps and rectal adenocarcinoma. Currently, few options exist for the therapeutic management of PJS with synchronous rectal cancer. For this case, we adopted an unconventional surgical strategy and ultimately performed laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA. This procedure is widely considered to be the first-line treatment option for patients with ulcerative colitis or familial adenomatous polyposis. However, there are no previous reports of treating PJS patients with laparoscopic IPAA. Since the operation, the patient has experienced no further episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding and has demonstrated satisfactory bowel control. Laparoscopic restorative proctocolectomy with IPAA may be a safe and effective treatment for patients with PJS with synchronous rectal cancer.

  2. Exposing the gaps in awareness, knowledge and estimation of risk for anal cancer in men who have sex with men living with HIV: a cross-sectional survey in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jason J; Chen, Marcus; Grulich, Andrew; Walker, Sandra; Temple-Smith, Meredith; Bradshaw, Catriona; Garland, Suzanne M; Hillman, Richard; Templeton, David; Hocking, Jane; Eu, Beng; Tee, BK; Fairley, Christopher K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of anal cancer is significantly higher in men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV when compared to the general population. We aimed to assess their awareness, knowledge and perceived level of personal risk for anal cancer to help inform educational strategies targeting this group. Methods A cross-sectional study of 327 HIV positive MSM in Melbourne, Australia, attending clinical settings (a sexual health centre, tertiary hospital HIV outpatients and high HIV caseload general practices) completed a written questionnaire in 2013/14. Poor knowledge was defined as those who had never heard of anal cancer, or scored 5 or less out of 10 in knowledge questions amongst those who reported ever hearing about anal cancer. Underestimation of risk was defined as considering themselves as having the same or lower risk for anal cancer compared to the general population. Results Of 72% (95% confidence interval (CI): 67–77) who had heard of anal cancer, 47% (95% CI: 41–53) could not identify any risk factors for anal cancer. Of total men surveyed, 51% (95% CI: 46–57) underestimated their risk for anal cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that men who underestimated their risk were older (OR 1.04 (per year increase in age), 95% CI: 1.01–1.07), had poor anal cancer knowledge (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.21–3.51), and more likely to have ever had an anal examination (OR 2.41, 95% CI: 1.18–4.93). They were less likely to consult a physician if they had an anal abnormality (OR 0.54, 95% CI: 0.31–0.96), to have had receptive anal sex (OR 0.12, 95% CI: 0.02–0.59) or speak English at home (OR 0.28, 95% CI: 0.09–0.90). Conclusions This survey of MSM living with HIV demonstrated limited awareness, knowledge level and estimation of risk for anal cancer. Further educational and public health initiatives are urgently needed to improve knowledge and understanding of anal cancer risk in MSM living with HIV. PMID:25828269

  3. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Son, Christina H; Law, Ethel; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P; Yang, T Jonathan; Riedel, Elyn; Wu, Abraham J; Deasy, Joseph O; Goodman, Karyn A

    2015-07-01

    Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤-1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = -1) was <35 Gy and the mean vaginal dose was <43 Gy, severe VS was reduced (P=.02). A 1-year analysis suggests increasingly negative D values with increasing mean dose. However, patients with compliance <40% were more likely to have toxicity. Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Beg, Muhammad S.; Das, Prajnan; Meyer, Jeffrey

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for anal cancer and determine disease, patient, and treatment parameters that influence the result. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision model was designed with the various disease states for the base case of a 65-year-old patient with anal cancer treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Health states accounting for rates of local failure, colostomy failure, treatment breaks, patient prognosis, acute and late toxicities, and the utility of toxicities were informed by existing literature and analyzed with deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Results: In the base case, mean costs and quality-adjusted life expectancy in years (QALY) for IMRT and 3D-CRT were $32,291 (4.81) and $28,444 (4.78), respectively, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $128,233/QALY for IMRT compared with 3D-CRT. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis found that IMRT was cost-effective in 22%, 47%, and 65% of iterations at willingness-to-pay thresholds of $50,000, $100,000, and $150,000 per QALY, respectively. Conclusions: In our base model, IMRT was a cost-ineffective strategy despite the reduced acute treatment toxicities and their associated costs of management. The model outcome was sensitive to variations in local and colostomy failure rates, as well as patient-reported utilities relating to acute toxicities.

  5. Prognostic Factors Derived From A Prospective Database Dictate Clinical Biology Of Anal Cancer: The Intergroup Trial (RTOG 98-11)

    PubMed Central

    Ajani, Jaffer A.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Pedersen, John; Benson, Al B.; Thomas, Charles R.; Mayer, Robert J.; Haddock, Michael G.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Only 4 prospective randomized phase III trials have been reported for anal cancer. Prognostic factor analysis for anal cancer from prospective database has been published from only one study (n=110). To confirm and uncover new prognostic factors, we analyzed the prospective database of intergroup RTOG 98-11. Methods Univariate and multivariate analyses of the baseline characteristics for 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were carried out. Various combinations of tumor diameter and clinically positive nodes (N+) were analyzed to identify subgroups. Results 644 were assessable and analyzed. Tumor diameter >5 cm was associated with poorer 5-year DFS (p=0.0003) and poorer 5-year OS (p=0.0031) and N+ was associated with poorer 5-year DFS (p=<0.0001) and poorer 5-year OS (p=<0.0001) in the multivariate analysis. In stratified analyses, N+ had more adverse influence on DFS and OS than did tumor diameter. Patients with >5cm tumor and N+ had the worst DFS (only 30% at 3 years compared to 74% for the best group; <5 cm primary and N0) and OS (only 48% at 4 years compared to 81% for the best group; <5 cm primary and N0). Men had worst DFS (p=0.02) and OS (p=0.016). These factors maintained their influence in each treatment arm Conclusions This prospective prognostic factor analysis establishes tumor diameter as an independent prognosticator of poorer 5-year DFS and OS and confirms N+ and male gender as poor prognostic factors. This analysis also uncovers novel subgroups (derived from combining prognostic factors) with incremental worsening of DFS and OS. PMID:20564111

  6. High-Dose Split-Course Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: Outcome Analysis Regarding the Boost Strategy (CORS-03 Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Ortholan, Cecile; Resbeut, Michel; Teissier, Eric; Ronchin, Philippe; Cowen, Didier; Zaccariotto, Audrey; Benezery, Karen; Francois, Eric; Salem, Naji; Ellis, Steve; Azria, David; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the clinical outcome in anal cancer patients treated with split-course radiation therapy and boosted through external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: From January 2000 to December 2004, a selected group (162 patients) with invasive nonmetastatic anal squamous cell carcinoma was studied. Tumor staging reported was T1 = 31 patients (19%), T2 = 77 patients (48%), T3 = 42 patients (26%), and T4= 12 patients (7%). Lymph node status was N0-1 (86%) and N2-3 (14%). Patients underwent a first course of EBRT: mean dose 45.1 Gy (range, 39.5-50) followed by a boost: mean dose 17.9 Gy (range, 8-25) using EBRT (76 patients, 47%) or BCT (86 patients, 53%). All characteristics of patients and tumors were well balanced between the BCT and EBRT groups. Results: The mean overall treatment time (OTT) was 82 days (range, 45-143) and 67 days (range, 37-128) for the EBRT and BCT groups, respectively (p < 0.001). The median follow-up was 62 months (range, 2-108). The 5-year cumulative rate of local recurrence (CRLR) was 21%. In the univariate analysis, the prognostic factors for CRLR were as follows: T stage (T1-2 = 15% vs. T3-4 = 36%, p = 0.03), boost technique (BCT = 12% vs. EBRT = 33%, p = 0.002) and OTT (OTT <80 days = 14%, OTT {>=}80 days = 34%, p = 0.005). In the multivariate analysis, BCT boost was the unique prognostic factor (hazard ratio = 0.62 (0.41-0.92). In the subgroup of patients with OTT <80 days, the 5-year CRLR was significantly increased with the BCT boost (BC = 9% vs. EBRT = 28%, p = 0.03). In the case of OTT {>=}80 days, the 5-year CRLR was not affected by the boost technique (BCT = 29% vs. EBRT = 38%, p = 0.21). Conclusion: In anal cancer, when OTT is <80 days, BCT boost is superior to EBRT boost for CRLR. These results suggest investigating the benefit of BCT boost in prospective trials.

  7. Acceptability of HPV vaccines and perceptions related to genital warts and penile/anal cancers among men who have sex with men in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixin; Mo, Phoenix K H; Lau, Joseph T F; Lau, Mason; Lai, Coco H Y

    2013-09-23

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of contracting HIV and developing genital warts and penile/anal cancers. HPV vaccines are efficacious in preventing such HPV-related diseases among males and WHO recommends its use to young MSM. In a cross-sectional survey, 542 MSM were interviewed. After being briefed about the vaccines' efficacies and the market price, the prevalence of acceptability of HPV vaccination was 29.2%. Adjusted by significant background variables, perceived high/very high chances of contracting genital warts [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.04, 95%CI=1.11-3.72] and penile/anal cancers (AOR=1.89, 95%CI=1.09-3.29) among local MSM, perceived moderately high mortality rate of penile/anal cancers (AOR=1.78, 95%CI=1.13-2.81), fear toward penile/anal cancers (moderate: AOR=1.75, 95%CI=1.07-2.86; high/very high: AOR=1.82, 95%CI=1.13-2.92) and disagreement with the statement "MSM in general are not willing to take HPV vaccines" (AOR=1.82, 95%CI=1.24-2.68) were associated with the conditional acceptability. Acceptability of this new measure is reasonably high and there are rooms for improvement. Implementation trials to promote HPV vaccination by changing cognitions such as HPV-related risk perceptions, norms and perceptions toward anal/penile cancer are greatly warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Low energy manual anal stretch: an approach in the treatment of chronic anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Gaj, Fabio; Biviano, Ivano; Candeloro, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Anal fissure is a tear in the epitelial lining of the anal canal. This is a very common anorectal disorder, but the choice of treatment is unclear. Sphincterotomy is effective but it is affected by a high risk of fecal incontinence. Manual anal stretch is aN efficacious, economic and safe maneuver. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the safety and effectiveness of anal stretch in resolving chronic anal fissures. Twenty-five patients with a clinical diagnosis of chronic anal fissure were submitted to anal stretch. All patients were submitted to anal stretch, after clinical evaluation. All patients were studied at basal time, and at 7 days, 3, 6 and 12 months after the treatment. At 3 months and 6 months after the anal stretch, 88% and 94% of patients showed a resolution of anal fissures and only 12% have relapsed at 12 months, without complications, such as faecal incontinence. The anal stretch appears to induce better resolution of chronic anal fissure with a very low risk of fecal incontinence.

  9. Anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    Schlichtemeier, Steven; Engel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY An anal fissure is a common, mostly benign, condition that can be acute or chronic. The diagnosis is usually made on history and physical examination, but further investigations are sometimes necessary. Primary fissures are usually benign and located in the posterior or anterior position. Secondary fissures are lateral or multiple and often indicate a more serious underlying pathology. The management of primary anal fissures is generally non-operative and includes increased dietary fibre, sitz baths, topical ointments and botulinum toxin injections. If these treatments are ineffective the patient will need a surgical referral. Secondary anal fissures require further investigation. Multidisciplinary management is preferable and is essential in the case of malignancy. PMID:27041801

  10. Transvaginal early fistula debridement and repair plus continuous vacuum aspiration via anal tube for rectovaginal fistula following rectal cancer surgery: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guo-De; Cao, Yong-Kuan; Wang, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Guo-Hu; Wang, Pei-Hong; Gong, Jia-Qing

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and superiority of transvaginal early fistula debridement and repair plus continuous vacuum aspiration via anal tube for rectovaginal fistula following rectal cancer surgery. The clinical data of four cases of rectovaginal fistula following rectal cancer surgery were retrospectively analyzed in our center. After adequate preoperative preparation, the patients underwent transvaginal fistula debridement and repair plus continuous vacuum aspiration via anal tube under continuous epidural anesthesia. After surgery and before discharge, anti-infection and nutritional support was administered for 2 d, and fluid diet and anal tube vacuum aspiration continued for 7 d. All the four cases healed. Three of them healed after one operation, and the other patient had obvious shrinkage of the fistular orifice after the first operation and underwent the same operation for a second time before complete healing. The duration of postoperative follow-up was 2, 7, 8 and 9 months respectively. No recurrence or abnormal sex life was reported. Early transvaginal fistula debridement and repair plus continuous vacuum aspiration via anal tube are feasible for rectovaginal fistula following rectal cancer surgery. This operation has many advantages, such as minimal invasiveness, short durations of operation, short treatment cycles, and easy acceptance by the patient. In addition, it does not necessitate colostomy for feces shunt and a secondary colostomy and reduction.

  11. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging and 3D endoanal ultrasound in detection, staging and assessment post treatment, in anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Reginelli, Alfonso; Granata, Vincenza; Fusco, Roberta; Granata, Francesco; Rega, Daniela; Roberto, Luca; Pellino, Gianluca; Rotondo, Antonio; Selvaggi, Francesco; Izzo, Francesco; Petrillo, Antonella; Grassi, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    We compared Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and 3D Endoanal Ultrasound (EAUS) imaging performance to confirm anal carcinoma and to monitor treatment response.58 patients with anal cancer were retrospectively enrolled. All patients underwent clinical examination, anoscopic examination; EAUS and contrast-enhanced MRI study before and after treatment. Four radiologists evaluated the presence of lesions, using a 4-point confidence scale, features of the lesion and nodes on EAUS images, T1-weighted (T1-W), T2-weighted (T2-W) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) signal intensity (SI), the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map for nodes and lesion, as well as enhancement pattern during dynamic MRI were assessed.All lesions were detected by EAUS while MRI detected 93.1% of anal cancer. MRI showed a good correlation with EAUS, anoscopy and clinical examination. The residual tissue not showed significant difference in EAUS assessment and T2-W SI in pre and post treatment. We found significant difference in dynamic study, in SI of DWI, in ADC map and values among responder's patients in pre and post treatment. The neoplastic nodes were hypoecoic on EAUS, with hyperintense signal on T2-W sequences and hypointense signal on T1-W. The neoplastic nodes showed SI on DWI sequences and ADC value similar to anal cancer. We found significant difference in nodes status in pre and post therapy on DWI data.3D EAUS and MRI are accurate techniques in anal cancer staging, although EAUS is more accurate than MRI for T1 stage. MRI allows correct detection of neoplastic nodes and can properly stratify patients into responders or non responders.

  12. EXTRA-A Multicenter Phase II Study of Chemoradiation Using a 5 Day per Week Oral Regimen of Capecitabine and Intravenous Mitomycin C in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob Meadows, Helen; Wan, Susan; Gollins, Simon; Leslie, Martin; Levine, Ed; McDonald, Alec C.; Myint, Sun; Samuel, Les; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) + mitomycin C (MMC)-based chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with epidermoid anal carcinoma. Clinical trials in other cancers have confirmed 5-FU can successfully be replaced by the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine. This phase II trial aimed to determine the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of capecitabine, MMC and radiotherapy (RT) in anal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy comprised the schedule of the UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT) II trial (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy). With MMC (12 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1 and capecitabine on each RT treatment day in two divided doses (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d). The endpoints were complete response at 4 weeks, local control at 6 months and toxicity. Results: Thirty-one patients entered the trial. The median age was 61 years (range 45-86) with 14 males and 17 females. Compliance with chemotherapy with no dose interruptions or delays was 68%, and with RT was 81%. Eighteen (58%) patients completed both modalities of treatment as planned. Dose-limiting Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea was seen in 1 of 31 patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3 neutropenia. There were no treatment-related deaths. Four weeks following completion of chemoradiation, 24 patients (77%) had a complete clinical response, and 4 (16%) a partial response. With a median follow-up of 14 months, three locoregional relapses occurred. Conclusions: Capecitabine with MMC and RT in with patients anal carcinoma is well tolerated, with minimal toxicity and acceptable compliance. We recommend testing this schedule in future national Phase III studies in anal cancer.

  13. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Anal Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Infection Among HIV-Infected Women in France in the Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Era.

    PubMed

    Heard, Isabelle; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Potard, Valérie; Etienney, Isabelle; Crenn-Hebert, Catherine; Moore, Catherine; Touraine, Philippe; Cubie, Heather; Costagliola, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the type-specific prevalence of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and risk factors for anal high-risk (HR) HPV infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women. A cross-sectional study of anal and cervical HPV infection was nested within a gynecological cohort of HIV-infected women. Specimens were tested for type-specific DNA using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. The study population consisted of 311 women with a median age of 45.3 years, of whom 42.8% originated from sub-Saharan Africa and 96.8% were receiving combination antiretroviral therapy. The median CD4(+)cell count was 612/μL, and the HIV load was <50 copies/mL in 84.1%. HR-HPV types were detected in the anal canal in 148 women (47.6%) and in the cervix in 82 (26.4%). HPV-16 was the most prevalent type in both the anal canal (13.2% of women) and the cervix (5.1%). In multivariable analysis, factors associated with prevalent anal HR-HPV infection were CD4(+)count <350/μL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.5), concurrent cervical lesions (2.6; 1.0-4.3), and cervical HR-HPV infection (1.8; 1.0-3.2). The high prevalence of HR-HPV types, including HPV-16, in the anal canal of HIV-positive women is concerning. Anal cancer screening should be considered for HIV-positive women as part of their routine care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The value of a transformation zone component in anal cytology to detect HSIL.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer M; Jin, Fengyi; Thurloe, Julia K; Ekman, Deborah; Adams, Marjorie K; McDonald, Ross L; Biro, Clare; Poynten, I Mary; Grulich, Andrew E; Farnsworth, Annabelle

    2016-08-01

    In a cytology-based screening program intended to prevent anal cancer, the anal transformation zone (TZ) should be adequately sampled because it is the site most susceptible to the development of the cancer precursor, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). An adequate TZ component is defined as comprising at least 10 rectal columnar or squamous metaplastic cells. In the current study, the authors examined whether the presence of a TZ component in anal cytology correlated with the detection of histological HSIL. In a natural history study of anal human papillomavirus infection in homosexual men, all participants underwent liquid-based cytology and high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) with or without biopsy at each visit. True-negative cytology (negative cytology with non-HSIL biopsy or negative HRA), false-negative cytology (negative cytology with HSIL biopsy), and true-positive cytology (abnormal cytology with HSIL biopsy) were compared with regard to the presence or absence of a TZ component. Of 617 participants, baseline results included 155 true-positive results, 191 true-negative results, and 31 false-negative results. The absence of an adequate TZ component was found to be significantly higher for false-negative (32.3%) than for either true-positive (11.0%; P = .0034) or true-negative (13.1%; P = .0089) results. Significantly more false-negative cases lacked a TZ component compared with either true-positive or true-negative cases. TZ cells may be an important indicator of sample quality for anal cytology because, unlike cervical sampling, the anal canal is not visualized during cytology sampling. Cancer Cytopathol 2016;124:596-601. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. Anal self-massage in the treatment of acute anal fissure: a randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gaj, Fabio; Biviano, Ivano; Candeloro, Laura; Andreuccetti, Jacopo

    2017-01-01

    An anal fissure (AF) is a tear in the epithelial lining of the anal canal. This is a very common condition, but the choice of treatment is unclear. The use of anal dilators is effective, economic, and safe. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of two conservative treatments, the use of anal dilators or a finger for anal dilatation, in reducing anal pressure and resolving anal fissures. Fifty patients with a clinical diagnosis of AF were randomly assigned to one of the treatments, self-massage of the anal sphincter (group A, 25 patients) or passive dilatation using dilators (group B, 25 patients). All patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of treatment, and after 12 weeks and 6 months. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale. After the treatment, 60% of patients treated with dilators and 80% of patients treated with anal self-massage using a finger showed disappearance of their anal fissures. A comparison between signs and symptoms reported by the patients in the two groups showed a statistically significant reduction in anal pain (group A, P=0.0001; group B, P=0.0001) and bleeding after defecation (group A, P=0.001, group B, P=0.001). At 6 months after treatment, a significantly greater reduction in anal pain was observed in Group A compared to Group B (P=0.02). The use of anal self-massage with a finger appears to induce a better resolution of acute anal fissure than do anal dilators, and in a shorter time.

  16. Anal self-massage in the treatment of acute anal fissure: a randomized prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gaj, Fabio; Biviano, Ivano; Candeloro, Laura; Andreuccetti, Jacopo

    2017-01-01

    Background An anal fissure (AF) is a tear in the epithelial lining of the anal canal. This is a very common condition, but the choice of treatment is unclear. The use of anal dilators is effective, economic, and safe. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of two conservative treatments, the use of anal dilators or a finger for anal dilatation, in reducing anal pressure and resolving anal fissures. Methods Fifty patients with a clinical diagnosis of AF were randomly assigned to one of the treatments, self-massage of the anal sphincter (group A, 25 patients) or passive dilatation using dilators (group B, 25 patients). All patients were evaluated at baseline, at the end of treatment, and after 12 weeks and 6 months. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale. Results After the treatment, 60% of patients treated with dilators and 80% of patients treated with anal self-massage using a finger showed disappearance of their anal fissures. A comparison between signs and symptoms reported by the patients in the two groups showed a statistically significant reduction in anal pain (group A, P=0.0001; group B, P=0.0001) and bleeding after defecation (group A, P=0.001, group B, P=0.001). At 6 months after treatment, a significantly greater reduction in anal pain was observed in Group A compared to Group B (P=0.02). Conclusion The use of anal self-massage with a finger appears to induce a better resolution of acute anal fissure than do anal dilators, and in a shorter time. PMID:28655981

  17. Pap smear in the prevention of HPV-related anal cancer: preliminary results of the study in a male population at risk.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Luigi; Tiradritti, Luana; Lorenzoni, Elisa; Zuccati, Giuliano; Matucci, Marzia; Butera, Daniela; Foxi, Prassede; Confortini, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and anal cytology, considering a population of HIV-positive and negative men who have sex with men (MSM), at high risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STD), in order to ascertain which of the methods examined is the best screening strategy for the prevention of anal cancer. In the period 06/2013-07/2014 at the "MTS Centre" of the University of Florence, 87 male patients, homo/bi-sexual, of which 46 HIV-negative and 41 HIV-positive, were recruited for anal Pap smear and HPV testing. All patients with an "abnormal" cytological result underwent anoscopy with possible biopsy. HPV testing was positive in 73 patients (83.6%). Cytology was negative in 50 patients (57.5%), inconclusive in 14 patients (16.1%), abnormal in 23 patients (26.4%): 14 ASC-US (19.2%), 4 ASC-H (5.5%), 5 L-SIL (6.8%), 0 H-SIL. Anoscopy with biopsy led to diagnosis of AIN I in 10 cases, of which 6 ASC-US+ and 4L-SIL+, AIN II in only 1 case, LS-IL+. Anal HPV testing, when used in primary screening, lead to a high number of "false positives", given the too high prevalence of HPV infection in MSM, the highest risk population targeted for screening. So we propose a screening program with anal cytology which has a high sensitivity for detection of AIN while is a poor predictor of the severity of these lesions; therefore, all patients with abnormal anal Pap smear should undergo anoscopy with biopsy.

  18. Internal anal sphincter: Clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lalit; Emmanuel, Anton

    2017-08-01

    To summarise current knowledge of Internal anal sphincter. The internal anal sphincter (IAS) is the involuntary ring of smooth muscle in the anal canal and is the major contributor to the resting pressure in the anus. Structural injury or functional weakness of the muscle results in passive incontinence of faeces and flatus. With advent of new assessment and treatment modalities IAS has become an important topic for surgeons. This review was undertaken to summarise our current knowledge of internal anal sphincter and highlight the areas that need further research. The PubMed database was used to identify relevant studies relating to internal anal sphincter. The available evidence has been summarised and advantages and limitations highlighted for the different diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Our understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of IAS has increased greatly in the last three decades. Additionally, there has been a rise in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques specifically targeting the IAS. Although these are promising, future research is required before these can be incorporated into the management algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Christina H.; Law, Ethel; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P.; Yang, T. Jonathan; Riedel, Elyn; Wu, Abraham J.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤−1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. Results: The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = −1) was <35 Gy and the mean vaginal dose was <43 Gy, severe VS was reduced (P=.02). A 1-year analysis suggests increasingly negative D values with increasing mean dose. However, patients with compliance <40% were more likely to have toxicity. Conclusions: Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed.

  20. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Malignancies: A Preliminary Toxicity and Disease Outcomes Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pepek, Joseph M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicities associated with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. This study reports the results of using IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Records of patients with anal malignancies treated with IMRT at Duke University were reviewed. Acute toxicity was graded using the NCI CTCAEv3.0 scale. Overall survival (OS), metastasis-free survival (MFS), local-regional control (LRC) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Forty-seven patients with anal malignancy (89% canal, 11% perianal skin) were treated with IMRT between August 2006 and September 2008. Median follow-up was 14 months (19 months for SCC patients). Median radiation dose was 54 Gy. Eight patients (18%) required treatment breaks lasting a median of 5 days (range, 2-7 days). Toxicity rates were as follows: Grade 4: leukopenia (7%), thrombocytopenia (2%); Grade 3: leukopenia (18%), diarrhea (9%), and anemia (4%); Grade 2: skin (93%), diarrhea (24%), and leukopenia (24%). The 2-year actuarial overall OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 85%, 78%, 90% and 82%, respectively. For SCC patients, the 2-year OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 100%, 100%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. Conclusions: IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer results in significant reductions in normal tissue dose and acute toxicities versus historic controls treated without IMRT, leading to reduced rates of toxicity-related treatment interruption. Early disease-related outcomes seem encouraging. IMRT is emerging as a standard therapy for anal cancer.

  1. Contrast-Enhanced [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Staging and Radiotherapy Planning in Patients With Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bannas, Peter; Weber, Christoph; Adam, Gerhard; Frenzel, Thorsten; Derlin, Thorsten; Mester, Janos; Klutmann, Susanne

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: The practice of surgical staging and treatment of anal cancer has been replaced by noninvasive staging and combined modality therapy. For appropriate patient management, accurate lymph node staging is crucial. The present study evaluated the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced [{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG)-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for staging and radiotherapy planning of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 22 consecutive patients (median age, 61 years old) with anal cancer underwent complete staging evaluation including physical examination, biopsy of the primary tumor, and contrast-enhanced (ce)-PET/CT. Patients were positioned as they would be for their subsequent radiotherapy. PET and CT images were evaluated independently for detectability and localization of the primary tumor, pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes, and distant metastasis. The stage, determined by CT or PET alone, and the proposed therapy planning were compared with the stage and management determined by ce-PET/CT. Data from ce-PET/CT were used for radiotherapy planning. Results: ce-PET/CT revealed locoregional lymph node metastasis in 11 of 22 patients (50%). After simultaneous reading of PET and CT data sets by experienced observers, 3 patients (14%) were found to have sites of disease not seen on CT that were identified on PET. Two patients had sites of disease not seen on PET that were identified on CT. In summary, 2 patients were upstaged, and 4 patients were downstaged due to ce-PET/CT. However, radiotherapy fields were changed due to the results from ce-PET/CT in 23% of cases compared to CT or PET results alone. Conclusions: ce-PET/CT is superior to PET or CT alone for staging of anal cancer, with significant impact on therapy planning.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Study of HPV Vaccination as a Primary Prevention Strategy for Anal Cancer in HIV-Positive Men in Chile.

    PubMed

    Vargas Parada, Constanza; Lennert Veerman, J

    2016-12-01

    Most anal cancers are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The incidence is increasing, especially in high-risk individuals such as HIV-positive men. Evidence shows that the new quadrivalent HPV vaccine reduces the rates of anal intraepithelial neoplasia among men who have sex with men. To determine whether vaccinating against HPV-related anal cancer is cost-effective in HIV-positive men in Chile. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted by constructing a cohort multistate life-table-based Markov model in MS Excel in which the prevention of HPV infection was expected to influence the incidence of anal cancer in HIV-positive men. The comparator was the current practice of no systematic HPV prevention. Estimates of the efficacy of the vaccine were obtained from a substudy of a larger randomized controlled trial, incidence rates from the Chilean Population Cancer Registries, mortality rates from the National Institute of Statistics, and disease costs from a cost-effectiveness report. A public health care sector perspective was applied. The outcome was measured in averted disability-adjusted life-years. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated considering a lifetime horizon for costs and health outcomes. The estimated incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was US $138,269/ disability-adjusted life-year (95% confidence interval $95,936-$221,862). Assuming a threshold of 3 times the gross domestic product per capita, the intervention was not cost-effective. The outcome was sensitive to the vaccine price and vaccine efficacy. HPV vaccination in HIV-positive men from a Chilean public health care sector perspective is not cost-effective. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association Between Bone Marrow Dosimetric Parameters and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Anal Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mell, Loren K. Schomas, David A.; Salama, Joseph K.; Devisetty, Kiran; Aydogan, Bulent; Miller, Robert C.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Kindler, Hedy L.; Roeske, John C.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the volume of pelvic bone marrow (PBM) receiving 10 and 20 Gy or more (PBM-V{sub 10} and PBM-V{sub 20}) is associated with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 48 consecutive anal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The median radiation dose to gross tumor and regional lymph nodes was 50.4 and 45 Gy, respectively. Pelvic bone marrow was defined as the region extending from the iliac crests to the ischial tuberosities, including the os coxae, lumbosacral spine, and proximal femora. Endpoints included the white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), hemoglobin, and platelet count nadirs. Regression models with multiple independent predictors were used to test associations between dosimetric parameters and HT. Results: Twenty patients (42%) had Stage T3-4 disease; 15 patients (31%) were node positive. Overall, 27 (56%), 24 (50%), 4 (8%), and 13 (27%) experienced acute Grade 3-4 leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia, respectively. On multiple regression analysis, increased PBM-V{sub 5}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} were significantly associated with decreased WBC and ANC nadirs, as were female gender, decreased body mass index, and increased lumbosacral bone marrow V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} (p < 0.05 for each association). Lymph node positivity was significantly associated with a decreased WBC nadir on multiple regression analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This analysis supports the hypothesis that increased low-dose radiation to PBM is associated with acute HT during chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer. Techniques to limit bone marrow irradiation may reduce HT in anal cancer patients.

  4. Functional Morphology of Anal Sphincter Complex Unveiled by High Definition Manometery & 3-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Varuna; Bhargava, Valmik; Karsten, Anna; Mittal, Ravinder K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Anal sphincter complex consists of anatomically overlapping internal anal sphincter (IAS), external anal sphincter (EAS) & puborectalis muscle (PRM). We determined the functional morphology of anal sphincter muscles using high definition manometery (HDAM), 3D-ultrasound (US) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Patients We studied 15 nulliparous women. Interventions HDAM probe equipped with 256 pressure transducers was used to measure the anal canal pressures at rest and squeeze. Lengths of IAS, PRM and EAS were determined from the 3D-US images and superimposed on the HDAM plots. Movements of anorectal angle with squeeze were determined from the dynamic MR images. Results HDAM plots reveal that anal canal pressures are highly asymmetric in the axial and circumferential direction. Anal canal length determined by the 3D-US images is slightly smaller than measured by HDAM. The EAS (1.9 ± 0.5 cm long) and PRM (1.7 ± 0.4 cm long) surround distal and proximal parts of the anal canal respectively. With voluntary contraction, anal canal pressures increase in the proximal (PRM) and distal (EAS zone) parts of anal canal. Posterior peak pressure in the anal canal moves cranially in relationship to the anterior peak pressure, with squeeze. Similar to the movement of peak posterior pressure, MR images show cranial movement of anorectal angle with squeeze. Conclusion Our study proves that the PRM is responsible for the closure of the cranial part of anal canal. HDAM, in addition to measuring constrictor function can also record the elevator function of levator ani/pelvic floor muscles. PMID:21951657

  5. Proctocolectomy for colorectal cancer--is the ileal pouch anal anastomosis a safe alternative to permanent ileostomy?

    PubMed

    Snelgrove, Ryan; Brown, Carl J; O'Connor, Brenda I; Huang, Harden; Victor, J Charles; Gryfe, Robert; MacRae, Helen; Cohen, Zane; McLeod, Robin S

    2014-12-01

    Ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the procedure of choice in patients requiring surgery for ulcerative colitis (UC) and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). There are few data on reconstruction with the IPAA in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). This study assessed the outcomes of the IPAA compared to proctocolectomy and permanent ileostomy (PI) on these patients. Between 1983 and 2013, over 2800 patients with CRC have been treated at the Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH). Demographic, surgical, pathological, and outcome data for all patients have been maintained in a database-73 patients were treated for CRC with proctocolectomy: 39 patients with IPAA and 34 patients with PI. Clinical features, pathologic findings, and survival outcomes were compared between these groups. Each group was similar with respect to gender, stage, and histologic grade. Patients undergoing IPAA were significantly younger. The diagnosis leading to proctocolectomy was more commonly UC or FAP in patients treated with IPAA (39/39 vs. 23/34, p = 0.001). Rectal cancer subgroups were similar in age, sex, TNM stage, T-stage, height of tumor, and histologic grade. There was no significant difference in overall or disease free survival between groups for colon or rectal primaries. Analysis using the Cochran-Armitage trend test suggests that utilization of IPAA has increased over time (p = 0.002). The IPAA is a viable and safe option to select for patients who would otherwise require PI. Increased experience and improved outcomes following IPAA has led to its more liberal use in selected patients.

  6. Colposcopy and High Resolution Anoscopy in Screening For Anal Dysplasia in Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Vulvar Dysplasia or Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-08

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 1; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Vaginal Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  7. Epidemiology of anal HPV infection in high-risk men attending a sexually transmitted infection clinic in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana Patricia; Del Toro-Mejías, Lizbeth; Clatts, Michael Craig; Palefsky, Joel M

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in Puerto Rico have reported an increasing incidence of anal cancer in Puerto Rican men. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, genotype distribution and risk factors associated with anal HPV infection among men attending an STI clinic in Puerto Rico. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 205 men 18 years and older. A comprehensive survey was administered that included a demographic and a behavioral assessment. Separate logistic regression models were performed to determine factors associated with any, high-risk (HR), and multiple anal HPV infection. The mean age of the study sample was 38.0±13.5 years. The most common HR types were 58, 51 and 31. Overall, HR anal HPV infection was found in 53.5% of the participants. Multiple HPV types in the anal canal were found in 47.6% of the sample. A third (29.8%) of participants reported being men who had sex with men (MSM). MSM had a significantly higher prevalence of any, HR and multiple HPV infection (p-value<0.05). Separate multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that being MSM was associated with any (OR = 4.5; [95%CI: 1.9-10.7]), HR (OR = 3.4; [95%CI: 1.1-10.3) and multiple anal HPV infection (OR = 3.6; [95%CI: 1.5-9.1). HIV was marginally associated with multiple anal HPV infection in multivariate analysis (OR = 3.3; 95%CI = 1.0-11.0). Anal HPV is common among sexually active men attending this STI clinic, with higher likelihood of anal HPV infection among MSM.

  8. Epidemiology of Anal HPV Infection in High-Risk Men Attending a Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana Patricia; Del Toro-Mejías, Lizbeth; Clatts, Michael Craig; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies in Puerto Rico have reported an increasing incidence of anal cancer in Puerto Rican men. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, genotype distribution and risk factors associated with anal HPV infection among men attending an STI clinic in Puerto Rico. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among 205 men 18 years and older. A comprehensive survey was administered that included a demographic and a behavioral assessment. Separate logistic regression models were performed to determine factors associated with any, high-risk (HR), and multiple anal HPV infection. Results The mean age of the study sample was 38.0±13.5 years. The most common HR types were 58, 51 and 31. Overall, HR anal HPV infection was found in 53.5% of the participants. Multiple HPV types in the anal canal were found in 47.6% of the sample. A third (29.8%) of participants reported being men who had sex with men (MSM). MSM had a significantly higher prevalence of any, HR and multiple HPV infection (p-value<0.05). Separate multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that being MSM was associated with any (OR = 4.5; [95%CI: 1.9–10.7]), HR (OR = 3.4; [95%CI: 1.1–10.3) and multiple anal HPV infection (OR = 3.6; [95%CI: 1.5–9.1). HIV was marginally associated with multiple anal HPV infection in multivariate analysis (OR = 3.3; 95%CI = 1.0–11.0). Conclusions Anal HPV is common among sexually active men attending this STI clinic, with higher likelihood of anal HPV infection among MSM. PMID:24400071

  9. Combined preoperative neoadjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy for anal and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.E.; Muff, N.S.; Shetabi, H.

    1986-05-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy combining 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin C, and moderate-dose radiotherapy was given preoperatively to 29 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum, 3 patients with squamous cell cancer, and 1 patient with basaloid carcinoma of the anus. Significant downstaging, and even eradication, of these lesions was realized in a high percentage of cases. Population-based data for the period of 1979 to 1984 which encompasses the time of our study indicate the survival of those treated by the neoadjuvant therapy was superior to that of patients treated by surgery alone or by surgery followed by radiotherapy. In general, patients with the poorest clinical presentation had been referred for this therapy.

  10. Acute anal toxicity after whole pelvic radiotherapy in patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids: identification of dosimetric and patient factors.

    PubMed

    Jang, H; Baek, J G; Yoo, S-J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids are known to be less tolerant of radiation doses lower than known tolerance doses. In the present study, the authors sought to identify the risk factors of acute haemorrhoid aggravation after whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT). The records of 33 patients with cervical, rectal or prostate cancer with asymptomatic haemorrhoids, which were confirmed by colonoscopy before the start of radiotherapy (RT), were reviewed. Acute anal symptoms, such as anal pain and bleeding, were observed up to 1 month after RT completion. Dosimetric and patient factors were analysed, and subgroup analyses were performed. The median induction dose for acute anal symptoms was 34.1 Gy (range, 28.8-50.4 Gy). Post-operative treatment intent showed more acute anal toxicity of patient factors (p = 0.04). In subgroup analysis, post-operative treatment intent and concurrent chemoradiotherapy were found to be related to acute anal symptoms (p < 0.01). Of the dosimetric factors, V10 tended to be related to acute anal symptoms (p = 0.08). This study indicates that asymptomatic haemorrhoid may deteriorate after low-dose radiation and that patient factors, such as treatment intent and concurrent chemotherapy, probably influence anal toxicity. In patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids, WPRT requires careful dosimetry and clinical attention. The tolerance of anal canal tends to be ignored in patients with pelvic cancer who are undergoing WPRT. However, patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids may be troubled by low radiation doses, and further studies are required.

  11. Clinical and functional results of laparoscopic intersphincteric resection for ultralow rectal cancer: is there a distinction between the three types of hand-sewn colo-anal anastomosis?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Ke; Liu, Quanlong; Yin, Shuhui; Zhuo, Guangzuan; Zhao, Yujuan; Zhu, Jun; Ding, Jianhua

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the clinical and functional outcomes of three types of hand-sewn colo-anal anastomosis (CAA) after laparoscopic intersphincteric resection (Lap-ISR) for patients with ultralow rectal cancer. A total of 79 consecutive patients treated by Lap-ISR for low-lying rectal cancer in an academic medical center from June 2011 to February 2016. According to the distal tumor margin and individualized anal length, the patients underwent three types of hand-sewn CAA including partial-ISR, subtotal-ISR, and total-ISR. Of the 79 patients, 35.4% required partial-ISR, 43% adopted subtotal-ISR, and 21.5% underwent total-ISR. R0 resection was achieved in 78 patients (98.7%). In addition to distal resection margin, there were no significant differences in clinicopathological parameters and postoperative complications between the three groups. The type of hand-sewn CAA did not influence the 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) or local relapse-free survival (LFS). At 24-months follow-up, in spite of higher incontinence scores in total-ISR group, there were not statistically significant differences in functional outcomes including Wexner score or Kirwan grade between the groups. Nevertheless, patients with chronic anastomotic stricture showed worse anal function than those without the complication. The type of hand-sewn CAA after Lap-ISR may not influence oncological and functional outcomes, but chronic stricture deteriorates continence status.

  12. Mitomycin and Fluorouracil With Concurrent Radiation (FUMIR) Regimen for Anal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    White, Brittany N.; Waddell, J. Aubrey; Solimando, Dominic A.

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of cancer chemotherapy requires pharmacists be familiar with the complicated regimens and highly toxic agents used. This column reviews various issues related to preparation, dispensing, and administration of antineoplastic therapy, and the agents, both commercially available and investigational, used to treat malignant diseases. Questions or suggestions for topics should be addressed to Dominic A. Solimando, Jr, President, Oncology Pharmacy Services, Inc, 4201 Wilson Blvd #110-545, Arlington, VA 22203, e-mail: OncRxSvc@aol.com; or J. Aubrey Waddell, Professor, University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy; Oncology Pharmacist, Pharmacy Department, Blount Memorial Hospital, 907 E. Lamar Alexander Parkway, Maryville, TN 37804, e-mail: waddfour@charter.net. PMID:24421505

  13. Evaluation of Planned Treatment Breaks During Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: Update of RTOG 92-08

    SciTech Connect

    Konski, Andre Garcia, Miguel; John, Madhu; Krieg, Richard; Pinover, Wayne; Myerson, Robert; Willett, Christopher

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 92-08 began as a single arm, Phase II trial for patients with anal cancer consisting of radiation (RT) + 5-flourouracil + mitomycin-C with a mandatory 2-week break and was amended after completion to evaluate the same treatment regimen without a treatment break. Long-term efficacy and late toxicity reporting are the specific aims of this study. Methods and Materials: Survivals were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Overall survival (OS) was compared with RTOG 87-04 with the log-rank test. Time to local failure, regional failure, locoregional failure (LRF), distant metastases, second primary, and colostomy failure were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. LRF was compared with RTOG 87-04 using the Gray's test. Results: Forty-seven patients entered in the mandatory treatment break cohort. The study was reopened in 1995 to the no mandatory treatment break cohort completing accrual with 20 patients in 1996. Of 67 total patients, 1 patient in the mandatory treatment break portion of the study did not receive any protocol treatment and is excluded from analyses. After adjusting for tumor size, neither cohort showed a statistically significant difference in OS or LRF compared with the RTOG 87-04 mitomycin-C arm. No patient in either cohort experienced a Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Conclusions: No statistically significant differences were seen in OS or LRF when compared to the mitomycin-C arm of RTOG 87-04, but the sample sizes for the mandatory break cohort and the no mandatory break cohort are small. Late toxicity was low and similar for the treatment cohorts.

  14. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-23

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  15. Anal Neoplasia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Classification Proposal, Epidemiology, Carcinogenesis, and Risk Management Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Andrew; Fléjou, Jean-Francois; Siproudhis, Laurent; Abramowitz, Laurent; Svrcek, Magali; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2017-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] may develop, similarly to individuals from general population, rare cases of human papilloma virus [HPV]-related anal canal squamous cell carcinoma [SCC] and intra-epithelial precursor lesions, as well as very rare cases of anal canal adenocarcinoma. Patients with chronic perianal Crohn's disease [CD] are at substantial risk of developing SCC or adenocarcinoma from the fistula-lining epithelium, as well as SCC or adenocarcinoma arising from chronic anorectal ulcerations or strictures. Based on this lesion stratification, we provide in this review tailored incidence estimates and we propose an IBD-specific classification of all types of anal neoplasia that may occur in patients with IBD. After reviewing putative carcinogenesis of all types of neoplasia, we conclude that HPV vaccination could reduce the incidence of HPV-related lesions, although an anal screening programme related to these lesions is not mandatory on the sole basis of IBD. By contrast, we point out that all patients with chronic perianal CD should be explored in depth, including biopsies under anaesthesia and fistula curettage when necessary, in case of any change in anal symptoms ─in particular new, increasing, unexplained pain. Finally, we conclude that there is an urgent need for elaborating and evaluating surveillance algorithms in patients with chronic perianal CD, in order to avoid cancers with late diagnosis and poor prognosis. Copyright © 2017 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Anal and perianal squamous carcinomas and high-grade intraepithelial lesions exclusively associated with "low-risk" HPV genotypes 6 and 11.

    PubMed

    Cornall, Alyssa M; Roberts, Jennifer M; Garland, Suzanne M; Hillman, Richard J; Grulich, Andrew E; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2013-11-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinomas are predominantly associated with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), particularly HPV 16, similar to cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancers. Although the presence of "low-risk" HPVs, in particular genotypes 6 and 11, have occasionally been reported in various HPV-related anogenital cancers, the overall distribution of these genotypes in the anal canal and perianal tissue may differ to that in the cervix. In addition, although the majority of anal and perianal cancers are associated with HPV, some are not; hence, confirmation of direct association of the virus within a lesion is important. Using laser capture microdissection, anal and perianal invasive carcinomas and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) in biopsies previously associated with HPV 6 or 11 alone were isolated from tissue sections and HPV genotype tested. Of seven cases tested, four invasive carcinomas were positive for HPV 6 only, one invasive carcinoma was negative for HPV and two HSILs were positive for HPV 11 only. All samples were confirmed as HPV 16/18 negative using two different DNA targets (E6 and L1). From these results, we confirm that HPV 6 and 11 can occasionally be associated with high-grade lesion and anal cancer.

  17. Perceptions of HPV, genital warts, and penile/anal cancer and high-risk sexual behaviors among men who have sex with men in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lau, Joseph T F; Wang, Zixin; Lau, Mason; Lai, Coco H Y

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of HIV and HPV is high among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. It is unclear whether cognitive and affective responses related to HPV and HPV-related diseases are negatively associated with HIV-related risk behaviors among MSM. This cross-sectional study interviewed 449 adult Chinese MSM in Hong Kong. The prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) and having had anal sex with more than one man in the last 6 months (multiple male sex partnerships) was 39.0 and 71.3 %, respectively. After adjusting for four significant background variables (education level, cohabitation with a man, exposure to HIV prevention materials, and HIV voluntary counseling and testing), variables negatively associated with UAI and/or multiple male sex partnerships included (1) correct HPV-related knowledge (AOR = 0.48-0.66), (2) perceived susceptibility (AOR = 0.32-0.55) and perceived severity (AOR = 0.12-0.60) related to HPV and HPV-related diseases, and (3) fear towards contracting genital warts and penile/anal cancer (AOR = 0.40-0.55). Perceived high chance of contracting HPV was positively associated with multiple partnerships (AOR = 4.74). It is possible to reduce HIV-related risk behaviors by increasing levels of knowledge, cognitions, and fear related to HPV and related diseases. It is important to integrate prevention of HIV with prevention of sexually transmitted infections. Such interventions are warranted.

  18. Anal Fissures

    MedlinePlus

    ... the world’s most common cancers. It is the deadliest cancer in the United States.…September 2017September 2017familydoctor.org editorial staff AboutAdvertise with UsCopyright & PermissionsPrivacy PolicyContact FamilyDoctor.org is powered by © 2017 American Academy of Family Physicians

  19. Malignant transformation in an anal condyloma acuminatum.

    PubMed

    Ejeckam, G C; Idikio, H A; Nayak, V; Gardiner, J P

    1983-03-01

    A 61-year-old man had malignant transformation of an anal condyloma acuminatum, demonstrated by light and electron microscopic studies. Intranuclear virus-like particles were seen in the benign condylomatous koilocytotic cells but these were absent in the malignant cells. Multinucleation, syncytial giant cells and nuclear atypia in a condyloma acuminatum are considered features of in-situ carcinomatous change. Anal condyloma acuminatum requires wide excision and thorough examination of anorectal canal in order to exclude hidden disease, which will predispose to recurrence. Homosexuality is considered a predisposing factor. The authors stress the importance of histopathologic examination of all anorectal warts to exclude malignant change.

  20. Hot or cold in anal pain? A study of the changes in internal anal sphincter pressure profiles.

    PubMed

    Dodi, G; Bogoni, F; Infantino, A; Pianon, P; Mortellaro, L M; Lise, M

    1986-04-01

    In 26 volunteers without anorectal complaints, and in 31 patients with anorectal problems such as hemorrhoidal disease, anal fissure, and proctalgia fugax, baseline resting anal canal pressures were recorded manometrically for 5 minutes at room temperature (23 degrees C). In 16 volunteers (Group A) and 21 patients (Group B) anorectal manometry was then performed while the anus was immersed in water at varying temperatures (5 degrees C, 23 degrees C, and 40 degrees C). In ten volunteers (Group A') and ten patients (Group B') resting pressures were recorded for an additional 30 minutes following immersion for 5 minutes at 40 degrees C. In all subjects (at least P less than 0.01), resting anal canal pressures diminished significantly from baseline after immersion at 40 degrees C, but remained unchanged in all subjects after immersion at 5 degrees C and 23 degrees C. In Group A', anal canal pressures remained significantly reduced for 15 minutes (P less than 0.02). In Group B', significant reduction in resting pressure lasted 30 minutes (P less than 0.02). Wet heat applied to the anal sphincter apparatus significantly and reproducibly decreased resting anal canal pressures over time, and therefore was likely to benefit patients after anorectal operations and those with anorectal pain.

  1. Chemoradiotherapy for anal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Houlihan, Orla A; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-08-01

    Anal cancer is a relatively rare cancer, making up approximately 0.4% of all new diagnoses of cancer.(1) The incidence of anal cancer, however, has increased in recent years.(2) The aim of this paper is to review current treatment of anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the most common type of anal cancer. This review article focuses on recent and ongoing trials studying the outcomes of various chemoradiotherapy (CRT) regimens in the treatment of anal SCC. PubMed was initially searched for relevant trials. This search was then supplemented by hand searches of reference lists and abstracts of relevant conferences. CRT with mitomycin C (MMC) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been proven to have effective results in the treatment of anal SCC. Salvage surgery has a role in some patients in the treatment of persistent or recurrent disease beyond 26 weeks. The addition of induction or maintenance chemotherapy to CRT has not been shown to have any benefit. Primary CRT with MMC and 5-FU is the current standard treatment for anal SCC. There is currently no role for induction or maintenance chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevalence of Anal HPV and Anal Dysplasia in HIV-Infected Women From Johannesburg, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Goeieman, Bridgette J; Firnhaber, Cynthia S; Jong, Eefje; Michelow, Pam; Kegorilwe, Patricia; Swarts, Avril; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Allan, Bruce; Smith, Jennifer S; Wilkin, Timothy J

    2017-07-01

    Anal cancer is a relatively common cancer among HIV-infected populations. There are limited data on the prevalence of anal high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection and anal dysplasia in HIV-infected women from resource-constrained settings. A cross-sectional study of HIV-infected women aged 25-65 years recruited from an HIV clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. Cervical and anal swabs were taken for conventional cytology and HR-HPV testing. Women with abnormal anal cytology and 20% of women with negative cytology were seen for high-resolution anoscopy with biopsy of visible lesions. Two hundred women were enrolled. Anal HR-HPV was found in 43%. The anal cytology results were negative in 51 (26%); 97 (49%) had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL), 32 (16%) had atypical squamous cells of unknown significance, and 19 (9.5%) had high-grade SIL or atypical squamous cells suggestive of high-grade SIL. On high-resolution anoscopy, 71 (36%) had atypia or low-grade SIL on anal histology and 17 (8.5%) had high-grade SIL. Overall, 31 (17.5%) had high-grade SIL present on anal cytology or histology. Abnormal cervical cytology was found in 70% and cervical HR-HPV in 41%. We found a significant burden of anal HR-HPV infection, abnormal anal cytology, and high-grade SIL in our cohort. This is the first study of the prevalence of anal dysplasia in HIV-infected women from sub-Saharan Africa. Additional studies are needed to define the epidemiology of these conditions, as well as the incidence of anal cancer, in this population.

  3. Relationship between anal symptoms and anal findings

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Hans Georg; Gebbensleben, Ole; Hilger, York; Rohde, Henning

    2009-01-01

    Background: The frequencies and types of anal symptoms were compared with the frequencies and types of benign anal diseases (BAD). Methods: Patients transferred from GPs, physicians or gynaecologists for anal and/or abdominal complaints/signs were enrolled and asked to complete a questionnaire about their symptoms. Proctologic assessment was performed in the knee-chest position. Definitions of BAD were tested in a two year pilot study. Findings were entered into a PC immediately after the assessment of each individual. Results: Eight hundred seven individuals, 539 (66.8%) with and 268 without BAD were analysed. Almost one third (31.2%) of patients with BAD had more than one BAD. Concomitant anal findings such as skin tags were more frequently seen in patients with than without BAD (<0.01). After haemorrhoids (401 patients), pruritus ani (317 patients) was the second most frequently found BAD. The distribution of stages in 317 pruritus ani patients was: mild (91), moderate (178), severe (29), and chronic (19). Anal symptoms in patients with BAD included: bleeding (58.6%), itch (53.7%), pain (33.7%), burning (32.9%), and soreness (26.6%). Anal lesions could be predicted according to patients' answers in the questionnaire: haemorrhoids by anal bleeding (p=0.032), weeping (p=0.017), and non-existence of anal pain (p=0.005); anal fissures by anal pain (p=0.001) and anal bleeding (p=0.006); pruritus ani by anal pain (p=0.001), itching (p=0.001), and soreness (p=0.006). Conclusions: The knee-chest position may allow for the accumulation of more detailed information about BAD than the left lateral Sims' position, thus enabling physicians to make more reliable anal diagnoses and provide better differentiated therapies. PMID:19277253

  4. SU-E-J-270: Repeated 18F-FDG PET/CTs Based Feature Analysis for the Predication of Anal Cancer Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Chuong, M; Choi, W; Lu, W; Latifi, K; Saeed, N; Hoffe, S; Shridhar, R; Moros, E; Tan, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify PET/CT based imaging predictors of anal cancer recurrence and evaluate baseline vs. mid-treatment vs. post-treatment PET/CT scans in the tumor recurrence prediction. Methods: FDG-PET/CT scans were obtained at baseline, during chemoradiotherapy (CRT, midtreatment), and after CRT (post-treatment) in 17 patients of anal cancer. Four patients had tumor recurrence. For each patient, the mid-treatment and post-treatment scans were respectively aligned to the baseline scan by a rigid registration followed by a deformable registration. PET/CT image features were computed within the manually delineated tumor volume of each scan to characterize the intensity histogram, spatial patterns (texture), and shape of the tumors, as well as the changes of these features resulting from CRT. A total of 335 image features were extracted. An Exact Logistic Regression model was employed to analyze these PET/CT image features in order to identify potential predictors for tumor recurrence. Results: Eleven potential predictors of cancer recurrence were identified with p < 0.10, including five shape features, five statistical texture features, and one CT intensity histogram feature. Six features were indentified from posttreatment scans, 3 from mid-treatment scans, and 2 from baseline scans. These features indicated that there were differences in shape, intensity, and spatial pattern between tumors with and without recurrence. Recurrent tumors tended to have more compact shape (higher roundness and lower elongation) and larger intensity difference between baseline and follow-up scans, compared to non-recurrent tumors. Conclusion: PET/CT based anal cancer recurrence predictors were identified. The post-CRT PET/CT is the most important scan for the prediction of cancer recurrence. The baseline and mid-CRT PET/CT also showed value in the prediction and would be more useful for the predication of tumor recurrence in early stage of CRT. This work was supported in part by the

  5. Comparison of Positron Emission Tomography Scanning and Sentinel Node Biopsy in the Detection of Inguinal Node Metastases in Patients With Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena; Castellano, Isabella; Cassoni, Paola; Ricardi, Umberto; Munoz, Fernando; Racca, Patrizia; Contu, Viviana; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Morino, Mario; Mussa, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Background: Inguinal lymph node metastases in patients with anal cancer are an independent prognostic factor for local failure and overall mortality. Inguinal lymph node status can be adequately assessed with sentinel node biopsy, and the radiotherapy strategy can subsequently be changed. We compared this technique vs. dedicated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) to determine which was the better tool for staging inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: In our department, 27 patients (9 men and 18 women) underwent both inguinal sentinel node biopsy and PET-CT. PET-CT was performed before treatment and then at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Results: PET-CT scans detected no inguinal metastases in 20 of 27 patients and metastases in the remaining 7. Histologic analysis of the sentinel lymph node detected metastases in only three patients (four PET-CT false positives). HIV status was not found to influence the results. None of the patients negative at sentinel node biopsy developed metastases during the follow-up period. PET-CT had a sensitivity of 100%, with a negative predictive value of 100%. Owing to the high number of false positives, PET-CT specificity was 83%, and positive predictive value was 43%. Conclusions: In this series of patients with anal cancer, inguinal sentinel node biopsy was superior to PET-CT for staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  6. Gay and Bisexual Men's Willingness to Receive Anal Papanicolaou Testing

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alison C.; Reiter, Paul L.; Smith, Jennifer S.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the willingness of gay and bisexual men, who have high rates of anal cancer that might be prevented through regular screening, to receive anal Papanicolaou tests. Methods. We surveyed a national sample of men aged 18 to 59 years who self-identified as gay (n = 236) or bisexual (n = 70). Results. Most respondents were willing to accept free screening (83%), but fewer would pay for the test (31%; McNemar's χ2 = 158.02; P < .001). Willingness to pay for screening was higher among men who reported greater worry about getting anal cancer (OR [odds ratio] = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06, 2.72), higher perceived likelihood of anal cancer (OR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.18, 2.99), and higher income (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.18, 3.98), in adjusted analyses. Only 33% (17 of 51) of HIV-positive respondents, who have the highest risk for anal cancer, had received anal Papanicolaou tests. Conclusions. Anal cancer screening was highly acceptable to gay and bisexual men, although cost was a major barrier. Efforts to reduce anal cancer disparities should target beliefs about anal cancer and barriers to anal Papanicolaou testing in this population. PMID:20395576

  7. Treatment of anal fistula and abscess.

    PubMed

    Pigot, F

    2015-04-01

    The glands of Hermann and Desfosses, located in the thickness of the anal canal, drain into the canal at the dentate line. Infection of these anal glands is responsible for the formation of abscesses and/or fistulas. When this presents as an abscess, emergency drainage of the infected cavity is required. At the stage of fistula, treatment has two sometimes conflicting objectives: effective drainage and preservation of continence. These two opposing constraints explain the existence of two therapeutic concepts. On one hand the laying-open of the fistulous tract (fistulotomy) in one or several operative sessions remains the treatment of choice because of its high cure rates. On the other hand surgical closure with tract ligation or obturation with biological components preserves sphincter function but suffers from a higher failure rate. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Bilateral internal acoustic canal mass.

    PubMed

    Nazim, Korkut; Mehmet, Yilmaz; Tuna, Edizer Deniz; Marlen, Mamanov Asanbekovich

    2013-01-01

    We reported a case of bilateral internal acoustic canal mass. A 42-year-old man patient was previously treated for colon cancer. After surgery during chemotherapy signs as severe vertigo and bilateral sudden hearing loss occurred. Temporal bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had bilateral internal acoustic canal masses.

  9. [Usefulness of subarachnoid phenol-glycerin block therapy for enabling cancer patients with refractory anal pain to proceed to home-based care].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shunsuke; Inoue, Daisuke; Sakuyama, Toshikazu; Tanifuji, Yasumasa; Moriya, Kunio; Kawakubo, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, the number of cancer patients and their families desiring palliative home-based care in Japan has increased. Subarachnoid phenol-glycerin block therapy is offered to relieve refractory anal pain in cancer patients, and to reduce the side effects of systemic administration of opioids, such as drowsiness. The effects of phenol-glycerin, which is a medicine used for neurodegenerative diseases, lasted for 1 week to 3 months. Eight patients with this manipulation showed a significant improvement in their pain level, calculated by the numerical rating scale(NRS). Five of these patients could proceed to homebased care. It is important to establish common guidelines for the management of phenol-glycerin. The participation of pharmacists in the palliative care team will contribute to further growth of home-based care.

  10. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia: A review of diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Joseph R; Siekas, Lacey L; Kaz, Andrew M

    2017-01-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a premalignant lesion of the anal mucosa that is a precursor to anal cancer. Although anal cancer is relatively uncommon, rates of this malignancy are steadily rising in the United States, and among certain high risk populations the incidence of anal cancer may exceed that of colon cancer. Risk factors for AIN and anal cancer consist of clinical factors and behaviors that are associated with the acquisition and persistence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The strongest HPV-associated risk factors are HIV infection, receptive anal intercourse, and high risk sexual behavior. A history of HPV-mediated genital cancer, which suggests infection with an oncogenic HPV strain, is another risk factor for AIN/anal cancer. Because progression of AIN to anal cancer is known to occur in some individuals over several years, screening for AIN and early anal cancer, as well as treatment of advanced AIN lesions, is reasonable in certain high-risk populations. Although randomized controlled trials evaluating screening and treatment outcomes are lacking, experts support routine screening for AIN in high risk populations. Screening is performed using anal cytological exams, similar to those performed in cervical cancer screening programs, along with direct tissue evaluation and biopsy via high resolution anoscopy. AIN can be treated using topical therapies such as imiquimod, 5-flurouracil, and trichloroacetic acid, as well as ablative therapies such as electrocautery and laser therapy. Reductions in AIN and anal cancer rates have been shown in studies where high-risk populations were vaccinated against the oncogenic strains of HPV. Currently, the CDC recommends both high-risk and average-risk populations be vaccinated against HPV infection using the quadrivalent or nonavalent vaccines. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with AIN and the role of HPV vaccination, particularly in high risk populations. PMID:28255426

  11. Anal intraepithelial neoplasia: A review of diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Joseph R; Siekas, Lacey L; Kaz, Andrew M

    2017-02-15

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is a premalignant lesion of the anal mucosa that is a precursor to anal cancer. Although anal cancer is relatively uncommon, rates of this malignancy are steadily rising in the United States, and among certain high risk populations the incidence of anal cancer may exceed that of colon cancer. Risk factors for AIN and anal cancer consist of clinical factors and behaviors that are associated with the acquisition and persistence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. The strongest HPV-associated risk factors are HIV infection, receptive anal intercourse, and high risk sexual behavior. A history of HPV-mediated genital cancer, which suggests infection with an oncogenic HPV strain, is another risk factor for AIN/anal cancer. Because progression of AIN to anal cancer is known to occur in some individuals over several years, screening for AIN and early anal cancer, as well as treatment of advanced AIN lesions, is reasonable in certain high-risk populations. Although randomized controlled trials evaluating screening and treatment outcomes are lacking, experts support routine screening for AIN in high risk populations. Screening is performed using anal cytological exams, similar to those performed in cervical cancer screening programs, along with direct tissue evaluation and biopsy via high resolution anoscopy. AIN can be treated using topical therapies such as imiquimod, 5-flurouracil, and trichloroacetic acid, as well as ablative therapies such as electrocautery and laser therapy. Reductions in AIN and anal cancer rates have been shown in studies where high-risk populations were vaccinated against the oncogenic strains of HPV. Currently, the CDC recommends both high-risk and average-risk populations be vaccinated against HPV infection using the quadrivalent or nonavalent vaccines. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with AIN and the role of HPV vaccination, particularly in high risk populations.

  12. Prevalence of anal human papillomavirus infection and anal HPV-related disorders in women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Sebring, Meagan C; Mendez, Audrey E; Ba, Fatimata S; Trimble, Debra D; Chiao, Elizabeth Y

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the findings of publications addressing the epidemiology of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and anal cancer in women. We conducted a systematic review among publications published from Jan. 1, 1997, to Sept. 30, 2013, to limit to publications from the combined antiretroviral therapy era. Three searches were performed of the National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the following search terms: women and anal HPV, women anal intraepithelial neoplasia, and women and anal cancer. Publications were included in the review if they addressed any of the following outcomes: (1) prevalence, incidence, or clearance of anal HPV infection, (2) prevalence of anal cytological or histological neoplastic abnormalities, or (3) incidence or risk of anal cancer. Thirty-seven publications addressing anal HPV infection and anal cytology remained after applying selection criteria, and 23 anal cancer publications met the selection criteria. Among HIV-positive women, the prevalence of high-risk (HR)-HPV in the anus was 16-85%. Among HIV-negative women, the prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection ranged from 4% to 86%. The prevalence of anal HR-HPV in HIV-negative women with HPV-related pathology of the vulva, vagina, and cervix compared with women with no known HPV-related pathology, varied from 23% to 86% and from 5% to 22%, respectively. Histological anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or greater) was found in 3-26% of the women living with HIV, 0-9% among women with lower genital tract pathology, and 0-3% for women who are HIV negative without known lower genital tract pathology. The incidence of anal cancer among HIV-infected women ranged from 3.9 to 30 per 100,000. Among women with a history of cervical cancer or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3, the incidence rates of anal cancer ranged from 0.8 to 63.8 per 100,000 person-years, and in

  13. Anal fissure - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100154.htm Anal fissure - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... rectum through which passes stool during defecation. The anal sphincter is a critical mechanism for control of ...

  14. Prevalence of anal human papillomavirus infection and anal HPV-related disorders in women: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stier, Elizabeth A.; Sebring, Meagan C.; Mendez, Audrey E.; Ba, Fatimata S.; Trimble, Debra D.; Chiao, Elizabeth Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to systematically review the findings of publications addressing the epidemiology of anal HPV infection, anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer in women. Data Sources We conducted a systematic review among publications published from January 1, 1997 to September 30, 2013 in order to limit to publications from the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) era. Three searches were performed of the National Library of Medicine PubMed database using the following search terms: “women and anal HPV”, “women anal intraepithelial neoplasia”, and “women and anal cancer.” Study Eligibility Criteria Publications were included in the review if they addressed any of the following outcomes: (1) prevalence, incidence, or clearance of anal HPV infection, (2) prevalence of anal cytological or histological neoplastic abnormalities, or (3) incidence or risk of anal cancer. Thirty-seven publications addressing anal HPV infection and anal cytology remained after applying selection criteria, and 23 anal cancer publications met the selection criteria. Results Among HIV-positive women, prevalence of HR-HPV in the anus was 16-85%. Among HIV-negative women, prevalence of anal HR-HPV infection ranged from 4 - 86%. The prevalence of anal HR- HPV in HIV-negative women with HPV-related pathology of the vulva, vagina and cervix compared with women with no known HPV-related pathology, varied from 23-86%, and 5-22%, respectively. Histologic anal HSIL (AIN 2+) was found in 3-26% of the women living with HIV, 0-9% among women with lower genital tract pathology, and 0-3% for women who are HIV-negative without known lower genital tract pathology. The incidence of anal cancer among HIV-infected women ranged from 3.9-30 per 100,000. Among women with a history of cervical cancer or CIN 3, the IR of anal cancer ranged from 0.8-63.8/100,000 person-years, and in the general population, the IRs ranged from 0.55-2.4/100,000 person-years. Conclusions This

  15. 'Mind the Gap'-The Impact of Variations in the Duration of the Treatment Gap and Overall Treatment Time in the First UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT I)

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Adams, Richard; McDonald, Alec; Gollins, Simon; James, Roger; Northover, John M.A.; Meadows, Helen M.; Jitlal, Mark

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The United Kingdom Coordinating Committee on Cancer Research anal cancer trial demonstrated the benefit of combined modality treatment (CMT) using radiotherapy (RT), infusional 5-fluorouracil, and mitomycin C over RT alone. The present study retrospectively examines the impact of the recommended 6-week treatment gap and local RT boost on long-term outcome. Methods and Materials: A total of 577 patients were randomly assigned RT alone or CMT. After a 6-week gap responders received a boost using either additional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (15 Gy) or iridium-192 implant (25 Gy). The effect of boost, the gap between initial treatment (RT alone or CMT) and boost (Tgap), and overall treatment time (OTT) were examined for their impact on outcome. Results: Among the 490 good responders, 436 (89%) patients received a boost after initial treatment. For boosted patients, the risk of anal cancer death decreased by 38% (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.62, 99% CI 0.35-1.12; p = 0.04), but there was no evidence this was mediated via a reduction in locoregional failure (LRF) (HR: 0.90, 99% CI 0.48-1.68; p = 0.66). The difference in Tgap was only 1.4 days longer for EBRT boost, compared with implant (p = 0.51). OTT was longer by 6.1 days for EBRT (p = 0.006). Tgap and OTT were not associated with LRF. Radionecrosis was reported in 8% of boosted, compared with 0% in unboosted patients (p = 0.03). Conclusions: These results question the benefit of a radiotherapy boost after a 6-week gap. The higher doses of a boost may contribute more to an increased risk of late morbidity, rather than local control.

  16. Adjuvant HPV vaccination for anal cancer prevention in HIV-positive men who have sex with men: The time is now.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Ashish A; Cantor, Scott B; Fenwick, Elisabeth; Chiao, Elizabeth Y; Nyitray, Alan G; Stier, Elizabeth A; Goldstone, Stephen E; Wilkin, Timothy; Chhatwal, Jagpreet

    2017-09-12

    Outcomes of treating high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), a precursor to anal cancer, remain uncertain. Emerging evidence shows that post HSIL treatment adjuvant quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccination improves the effectiveness of treatment. However, no recommendations exist regarding the use of qHPV vaccine as an adjuvant form of therapy. Our objective was to determine whether post-treatment adjuvant vaccination should be adopted in HIV-infected MSM (individuals at highest risk for anal cancer) on the basis of cost-effectiveness determined using existing evidence or whether future research is needed. We developed a Markov (state-transition) cohort model to assess the cost-effectiveness of post-treatment adjuvant HPV vaccination of 27years or older HIV-infected MSM. We first estimated cost-effectiveness and then performed value-of-information (VOI) analysis to determine whether future research is required by estimating the expected value of perfect information (EVPI). We also estimated expected value of partial perfect information (EVPPI) to determine what new evidences should have highest priority. With the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $71,937/QALY, "treatment plus vaccination" was the most cost-effective HSIL management strategy using the willingness-to-pay threshold of 100,000/QALY. We found that population-level EVPI for conducting future clinical research evaluating HSIL management approaches was US$12 million (range $6-$20 million). The EVPPI associated with adjuvant qHPV vaccination efficacy estimated in terms of hazards of decreasing HSIL recurrence was $0 implying that additional data from a future study evaluating efficacy of adjuvant qHPV vaccination will not change our policy conclusion that "treatment plus vaccination" was cost-effective. Both the ICER and EVPI were sensitive to HSIL treatment compliance. Post-treatment adjuvant qHPV vaccination in HIV-infected MSM aged 27 or above is likely to be cost

  17. Impact of hypothyroidism on primary anal malignant melanoma: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Siddharth; Verma, Satyajeet; Kala, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Primary melanoma of the anal canal is rare and highly malignant condition, which is 1% of all invasive tumors in this site. This condition is often mistaken for benign conditions as either hemorrhoids or rectal polyp. Thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulation causes high proliferation of malignant melanoma. The association of hypothyroidism with primary malignant melanoma of anal canal is very rare. We are reporting such a very rare case.

  18. Cost considerations in the treatment of anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Bianco, Giuseppe; Silvestrini, Nicola; Maria, Giorgio

    2014-08-01

    Anal fissure is a split in the lining of the distal anal canal. Lateral internal sphincterotomy remains the gold standard for treatment of anal fissure. Although technique is simple and effective, a drawback of this surgical procedure is its potential to cause minor but some times permanent alteration in rectal continence. Conservative approaches (such as topical application of ointment or botulinum toxin injections) have been proposed in order to treat this condition without any risk of permanent injury of the internal anal sphincter. These treatments are effective in a large number of patients. Furthermore, with the ready availability of medical therapies to induce healing of anal fissure, the risk of a first-line surgical approach is difficult to justify. The conservative treatments have a lower cost than surgery. Moreover, evaluation of the actual costs of each therapeutic option is important especially in times of economic crisis and downsizing of health spending.

  19. Anal Health Care Basics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason; Mclemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy.The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate.Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area.Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases.In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists.

  20. Anal Health Care Basics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason; McLemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy. The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate. Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area. Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases. In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists. PMID:27723447

  1. Optical spectroscopy diagnosis for serum of normal and digestive canal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Jin, Huiqiang; Wang, Yuepeng

    2003-07-01

    To investigate the spectral specialities of digestive cancer serum for diagnosis, fluorescence and Raman spectra of normal, digestive cancer (both before and after operation), such as stomach cancer, esophagus cancer and atrophic gastritis sera were measured in the visible region in this study. Results demonstrate several points. First, all spectra except esophagus cancer were characterized by three sharp peaks (A, B and C), but we cannot differentiate them from each other at once. The intensity of each peak was different in different spectrum. Second, after samples were radiated by laser, fluorescence weakend along with red shift of its band center, and spectral changes of normal and stomach cancer (after operation) cases were different from other samples. It was also observed that spectral changes of atrophic gastritis were very similar with stomach cancer (such as the red shift of fluorescence peak is more than 12 nm) after radiated by laser, however, there are still some distinctions that can be used to differentiate them from each other. At last, a notable difference is that the relative intensity of peak C excited by 488.0 nm is higher than excited by 514.5 nm in spectrum of stomach cancer, whereas lower in other cases.

  2. Rectal atresia and anal stenosis: the difference in the operative technique for these two distinct congenital anorectal malformations.

    PubMed

    Lane, V A; Wood, R J; Reck, C; Skerritt, C; Levitt, M A

    2016-04-01

    Rectal atresia and anal stenosis are rare forms of anorectal malformations. The aim of the definitive surgical repair in such cases is to preserve the anal canal, the dentate line, and the sphincter complex. We present a case of rectal atresia and anal stenosis to demonstrate the differences in the operative repair. The techniques described leave the anterior wall of the very distal anal canal untouched in both rectal stenosis and anal atresia; however, the dissection of the rectum differs. The atretic rectum in rectal atresia is mobilized and sutured to the anal canal circumferentially. In anal stenosis, the posterior rectum is mobilized in the form of rectal advancement, and the posterior 180° is anastomosed directly to the skin (as in a standard PSARP) with preservation of the anal canal as the anterior 180° of the final anoplasty. These patients have an excellent prognosis for bowel control and fecal continence, and therefore, complete mobilization and resection of the anal canal must be avoided.

  3. Outcomes of Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Mitomycin C for Anal Cancer in Immunocompetent Versus Immunodeficient Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Yuji; Kinsella, Michael T.; Reynolds, Harry L.; Chipman, Gregory; Remick, Scot C.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Information is limited as to how we should treat invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients with chronic immunosuppression, since the majority of clinical studies to date have excluded such patients. The objective of this study is to compare treatment outcomes in immunocompetent (IC) versus immunodeficient (ID) patients with invasive anal SCC treated similarly with combined modality therapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and March 2007, a total of 36 consecutive IC and ID patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with infusional 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. The IC and ID groups consisted of 19 and 17 patients, respectively, with 14 human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) and 3 post-solid organ transplant ID patients. There were no significant differences in tumor size, T stage, N stage, chemotherapy doses, or radiation doses between the two groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 3.1 years, no differences were found in overall survival, disease-specific survival, and colostomy-free survival. Three-year overall survival was 83.6% (95% CI = 68.2-100) and 91.7% (95% CI = 77.3-100) in the IC and ID groups, respectively. In addition, there were no differences in acute and late toxicity profiles between the two groups. In the human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients, Cox modeling showed no difference in overall survival by pretreatment CD4 counts (hazard ratio = 0.994, 95% CI = 0.98-1.01). No correlation was found between CD4 counts and the degree of acute toxicities. Conclusion: Our data suggest that standard combined modality therapy with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil plus mitomycin C is as safe and effective for ID patients as for IC patients.

  4. Risk factors for anal HPV infection and anal precancer in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lauren M; Castle, Philip E; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Fetterman, Barbara; Tokugawa, Diane; Lorey, Thomas S; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Luhn, Patricia; Gage, Julia C; Darragh, Teresa M; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a large proportion of anal cancers. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) are at increased risk of HPV infection and anal cancer compared with HIV-negative men. We evaluated risk factors for HPV infection and anal precancer in a population of HIV-infected MSM. Our study included 305 MSM at an HIV/AIDS clinic in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Health Maintenance Organization. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations of risk factors comparing men without anal HPV infection; men with anal HPV infection, but no precancer; and men with anal precancer. Low CD4 count (<350 cells/mm(3)) and previous chlamydia infection were associated with an increased risk of carcinogenic HPV infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-10.40 and OR, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.16-15.51, respectively). History of smoking (OR, 2.71 95% CI, 1.43-5.14), duration, recency, and dose of smoking increased the risk of anal precancer among carcinogenic HPV-positive men but had no association with HPV infection. We found distinct risk factors for anal HPV infection and anal precancer. Risk factors for HPV infection and anal precancer are similar to established risk factors for cervical cancer progression.

  5. Oxaliplatin Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-24

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Liver Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  6. Early-stage Node-negative (T1-T2N0) Anal Cancer Treated with Simultaneous Integrated Boost Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Arcadipane, Francesca; Ragona, Riccardo; Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Cassoni, Paola; Rondi, Nadia; Morino, Mario; Racca, Patrizia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    To report clinical outcomes of a consecutive series of patients with early-stage (T1-T1N0) anal cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach similarly to the RTOG 05-29 trial. A cohort of 43 patients underwent SIB-IMRT employing a schedule consisting of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions to the gross tumor volume and 42 Gy/28 fractions to the elective nodal volumes for cT1N0 cases, and 54 Gy/30 fractions and 45 Gy/30 fractions to the same volumes for cT2N0 cases. Chemotherapy was administered concurrently following Nigro's regimen. The primary endpoint was colostomy-free survival (CFS). Secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC), disease-free (DFS), cancer-specific (CSS) and overall (OS) survival. Median follow-up was 39.7 months. The actuarial 3-year CFS was 79.4% [95% confidence interval (CI)=61.4-89.7%]. Actuarial 3-year OS and CSS were 90.8% (95% CI=74.1-96.9%) and 93.8% (95% CI=77.3-98.4%), while DFS was 75.5% (95% CI=56.4-87.1%). Actuarial 3-year LRC was 86.1% (95% CI=69.6-94%). On multivariate analysis, tumor size >3 cm showed a trend towards significance in predicting CFS [hazard ratio (HR)=8.6, 95% CI=84.7-88.1%; p=0.069]. Maximum detected adverse events included: skin (G3): 18%; gastrointestinal tract (G2): 67%; genitourinary tract (G3): 3%; genitalia (G2): 30%; anemia (G2): 7%; leukopenia (G3): 26%, leukopenia (G4):7%; neutropenia (G3): 15%; neutropenia (G4): 12%; thrombocytopenia (G3): 9%. Our clinical results support the use of SIB-IMRT in the combined modality treatment of patients with anal cancer. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Current management of anal fistulas in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Piotr; Banasiewicz, Tomasz; Matysiak, Konrad; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Anal fistulas occurring in Crohn's disease (CD) comprise a risk factor of severe course of inflammation. They are frequently intractable due to various factors such as penetration of the anal canal or rectal wall, impaired wound healing, and immunosuppression, among others. Anal fistulas typical to CD develop from fissures or ulcers of the anal canal or rectum. Accurate identification of the type of fistula, such as low and simple or high and complex, is crucial for prognosis as well as for the choice of treatment. If fistulotomy remains the gold standard in the surgical treatment of the former, it is contraindicated in high and complex fistulas due to possible risk of damage to the anal sphincter with subsequent faecal incontinence. Therefore, the latter require a conservative and palliative approach, such as an incision and drainage of abscesses accompanying fistulas or prolonged non-cutting seton placement. Currently, conservative, sphincter-preserving, and definitive procedures such as mucosal advancement or dermal island flaps, the use of plugs or glue, video assisted anal fistula treatment, ligation of the intersphincteric track, and vacuum assisted closure are gaining a great deal of interest. Attempting to close the internal opening without injuring the sphincter is a major advantage of those methods. However, both the palliative and the definitive procedures require adjuvant therapy with medical measures. PMID:26557938

  8. Ascending and descending reflex motor activity of recto-anal region-cholinergic and nitrergic implications in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Radomirov, Radomir; Ivancheva, Christina; Brading, Alison F; Itzev, Dimitar; Rakovska, Angelina; Negrev, Negrin

    2009-04-29

    The implications of cholinergic and nitrergic transmissions in ascending and descending reflex motor pathways of recto-anal region in rat model were evaluated using: (i) electrical stimulation; (ii) triple organ bath; and (iii) morphological techniques. Electrical stimulation to anal canal induced simultaneous ascending contractile responses of longitudinal and circular muscles of proximal rectum, local contraction of anal canal or contraction followed by relaxation of internal anal sphincter when external sphincter was dissected off. The stimulation of proximal rectum elicited local contractions of both rectal layers and descending contractions of internal sphincter or anal canal. Tetrodotoxin (0.1 microM) prevented the electrically elicited events. The ascending excitatory responses and the local and ascending contractions of longitudinal muscle were more pronounced than those of circular muscle suggesting dominant role of ascending reflex pathways and of longitudinal muscle in rectal motor activity. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-containing fibres and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase-positive neurons were observed in myenteric ganglia of rectum and anal canal. NG-nitro-l-arginine (0.5mM) increased the contractile ascending and descending responses. During atropine (0.3 microM) treatment the ascending and descending contractions were suppressed but not abolished and a relaxation revealed in ascending response of circular muscle and in descending responses of internal anal sphincter and anal canal. The relaxation was decreased by NG-nitro-l-arginine and increased by l-arginine (0.5mM). The results suggest that cholinergic excitatory ascending and descending pathways and nitric oxide-dependent inhibitory ascending neurotransmission(s) to rectal circular muscle and inhibitory descending to internal anal sphincter and anal canal are involved in reflex circuitry controlling motor activity of recto-anal region.

  9. [Outcome of treatment of anal squamous cell carcinoma and its precursor in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Nadal, Sidney Roberto; Horta, Sergio Henrique Couto; Calore, Edenilson Eduardo; Manzione, Carmen Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Incidence of anal squamous cell carcinoma is increasing mainly among HIV-positive patients. Treatment consists of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, sometimes followed by tumor resection. The objective was to evaluate the follow-up of such patients to verify recurrences and evolution from HAIN to cancer. This is a report of cases treated at the "Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas", Sao Paulo, Brazil. We attended 45 HIV-positive patients between July 1996 and June 2006. Most were male (97.7%), with ages ranging from 23 to 55 years (mean: 38.5 years). Thirty patients had high grade anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (HAIN), treated with local resection, and 15 with anal canal invasive squamous cell carcinoma were first submitted to chemo radiation, while biopsies were obtained during follow-up. Patients with HAIN had recurrences in 16.7% of cases and remained cancer free for up to five years. Chemoradiation was not possible in five patients with invasive carcinoma (40%) because three had advanced AIDS and two refused treatment. Eight (88.8%) out of nine patients had complete response to chemoradiation and remained cancer free for a period from three to six years. Chemoradiation failed in the ninth patient: abdominal perineal resection was performed, and there was no recurrence over a five-year period. We concluded that HAIN can recur after local resection in HIV-positive patients but does not evolve to invasive carcinoma. Invasive cancer can be treated in the same way as in HIV seronegative persons, when clinical conditions permit.

  10. Anal abscess and fistula.

    PubMed

    Sneider, Erica B; Maykel, Justin A

    2013-12-01

    Benign anorectal diseases, such as anal abscesses and fistula, are commonly seen by primary care physicians, gastroenterologists, emergency physicians, general surgeons, and colorectal surgeons. It is important to have a thorough understanding of the complexity of these 2 disease processes so as to provide appropriate and timely treatment. We review the pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment options for both anal abscesses and fistulas.

  11. Irradiation of FDG-PET-Defined Active Bone Marrow Subregions and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Anal Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Brent S; Jee, Kyung-Wook; Niemierko, Andrzej; Murphy, Janet E; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Allen, Jill N; Lee, Leslie K; Wang, Yingbing; Drapek, Lorraine C; Hong, Theodore S; Wo, Jennifer Y

    2016-03-15

    Irradiation of pelvic bone marrow (BM) has been correlated with hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients undergoing chemoradiation for anal cancer. We hypothesized that irradiation of hematologically active bone marrow (ABM) subregions defined by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a principal cause of radiation-associated HT. The cohort included 45 patients with nonmetastatic anal cancer who underwent FDG-PET imaging prior to definitive chemoradiation with mitomycin-C and 5-fluorouracil. Total bone marrow (TBM) was defined as the external contour of the pelvic bones from the top of lumbar 5 (L5) to the bottom of the ischial tuberosity. Standardized uptake values (SUV) for all voxels within the TBM were quantified and normalized by comparison to normal liver SUV. Subvolumes of the TBM that exhibited the highest and lowest 50% of the SUVs were designated ABM50 and IBM50, respectively. The primary endpoint was the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir during or within 2 weeks of completion of treatment. Multivariate linear modeling was used to analyze the correlation between the equivalent uniform doses (EUD) with an a value of 0.5, 1 (equivalent to mean dose), 3, 7, and 12 to the BM structures and the ANC. Mean ± SD ANC nadir was 0.77 × 10(9)/L (±0.66 × 10(9)/L). Grades 3 and 4 ANC toxicity occurred in 26.7% and 44.4% of patients, respectively. The EUD a parameter of 0.5 was optimal for all BM models indicating high radiation sensitivity. EUD of TBM and ABM50 and IBM50 were all significantly associated with ANC nadir. However, model performance for ABM50 was not superior to that of the TBM and IBM50 models. Irradiation of pelvic BM was associated with HT. However, FDG-PET-defined ABM models failed to improve model performance compared to the TBM model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pruritus ani: is anal sphincter dysfunction important in aetiology?

    PubMed

    Eyers, A A; Thomson, J P

    1979-12-15

    Forty-three patients whose principal symptom was pruritus ani were studied. Twenty-eight had anal disease, while in 15 no such disease could be shown. Maximum resting pressures and transient and sustained pressures of the anal canal in response to rectal distension were measured by manometry. Although the maximum resting pressure in the patients with no disease was about the same as that in the group with disease, the pressures recorded in response to rectal distension were significantly lower. These results show that the anal sphincter relaxes in response to rectal distension more readily in patients with no anal disease. Hence soiling may occur, which may be a factor in the genesis of pruritus ani.

  13. Pruritus ani: is anal sphincter dysfunction important in aetiology?

    PubMed Central

    Eyers, A A; Thomson, J P

    1979-01-01

    Forty-three patients whose principal symptom was pruritus ani were studied. Twenty-eight had anal disease, while in 15 no such disease could be shown. Maximum resting pressures and transient and sustained pressures of the anal canal in response to rectal distension were measured by manometry. Although the maximum resting pressure in the patients with no disease was about the same as that in the group with disease, the pressures recorded in response to rectal distension were significantly lower. These results show that the anal sphincter relaxes in response to rectal distension more readily in patients with no anal disease. Hence soiling may occur, which may be a factor in the genesis of pruritus ani. PMID:534862

  14. Anal melanoma with neuroendocrine differentiation: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ilardi, Gennaro; Caroppo, Danila; Varricchio, Silvia; Vita, Giulia; Di Lorenzo, Pierpaolo; Insabato, Luigi; De Rosa, Gaetano; Mascolo, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Melanoma of the anal cavity is an uncommon malignant tumor with an aggressive clinical behavior. The presence of nonmelanocytic cell or tissue components, designated as divergent differentiation, is an unusual but well-documented phenomenon in melanoma. We experienced a rare case of amelanotic melanoma with neuroendocrine differentiation of the anal canal, occurring in a 68-year old woman. This tumor was characterized by a clear-cut radial growth phase and an invasive component composed of a diffuse small cells population positive for neuroendocrine markers with a focal but convincing co-expression of S100 protein. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case of neuroendocrine differentiation in a primary melanoma of the anal cavity. Although anal melanoma with neuroendocrine differentiation is exceptional, clinical practitioners should be aware of its possibility at this site. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Investigation of body image as a mediator of the effects of bowel and GI symptoms on psychological distress in female survivors of rectal and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Catherine; Rodriguez, Vivian M; Carter, Jeanne; Temple, Larissa; Nelson, Christian; DuHamel, Katherine

    2016-04-01

    Treatment for rectal and anal cancer (RACa) can result in persistent bowel and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Body image problems may develop over time and exacerbate symptom-related distress. RACa survivors are an understudied group, however, and factors contributing to post-treatment well-being are not well understood. This study examined whether poorer body image explained the relation between symptom severity and psychological distress. Participants (N = 70) completed the baseline assessment of a sexual health intervention study. Bootstrap methods tested body image as a mediator between bowel and GI symptom severity and two indicators of psychological distress (depressive and anxiety symptoms), controlling for relevant covariates. Measures included the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-CR38) Diarrhea, GI Symptoms, and Body Image subscales and Brief Symptom Index Depression and Anxiety subscales. Women averaged 55 years old (SD = 11.6), White (79 %), and were 4 years post-treatment. Greater Depression was related to poorer Body Image (r = -.61) and worse Diarrhea (r = .35) and GI Symptoms (r = .48). Greater Anxiety was related to poorer Body Image (r = -.42) and worse GI Symptoms (r = .45), but not Diarrhea (r = .20). Body Image mediated the effects of bowel and GI symptoms on Depression, but not on Anxiety. Long-term bowel and GI dysfunction are distressing and affect how women perceive and relate to their bodies, exacerbating survivorship difficulties. Interventions to improve adjustment post-treatment should address treatment side effects, but also target body image problems to alleviate depressive symptoms. Reducing anxiety may require other strategies. Body image may be a key modifiable factor to improve well-being in this understudied population. Longitudinal research is needed to confirm findings.

  16. Anal study in immunocompetent women with human papillomavirus related lower genital tract pathology.

    PubMed

    Donaire, Concepción; Reillo, Marcos; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan C; López-Fernández, José A

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of anal dysplasia in immunocompetent women with cervical intraepithelial dysplasia. We did a prospective cohort study, in which we enrolled 166 women with gynecological pathology related to human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. All patients underwent an anal cytology and HPV detection. Statistical analysis with a 95% confidence interval was used for prevalence calculations. A Χ2 test and Fisher's exact one were used to determine differences between groups of qualitative variables. Differences between normally distributed and non-normally distributed groups in quantitative variables were accounted for using Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney's U test, respectively. Out of the 166 patients studied, high risk HPV in the anal canal was detected in 107 (64.46%) cases. The most prevalent genotype observed was non 16/18 high risk HPV, present in 54 (50.47%) patients. There was no a significant association with smoking, use of condom, anal intercourse, or anal benign pathology. However, a significant correlation between the presence of high risk HPV in the anal canal and the antecedent of condylomas was observed (p=0.047) (CI95%: 1.00%-12.58%). Women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 1 had a significantly increased presence of high risk HPV in the anal canal (p=0.044). Out of the 166 women, 6 (3.61%) had abnormal anal cytology results, and were referred to high-resolution anoscopy. Anal biopsy was performed in these six cases. In 2 patients the biopsy reported low-grade Anal Intraepithelial Neoplasia: 1.20% (0.15%-4.28%). Women with cervical intraepithelial dysplasia have 1.20% prevalence of anal intraepithelial neoplasia, so that it does not seem necessary to screen this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of anal motor characteristics of the sensorimotor response (SMR) using 3-D anorectal pressure topography

    PubMed Central

    Cheeney, Gregory; Remes-Troche, Jose M.; Attaluri, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Desire to defecate is associated with a unique anal contractile response, the sensorimotor response (SMR). However, the precise muscle(s) involved is not known. We aimed to examine the role of external and internal anal sphincter and the puborectalis muscle in the genesis of SMR. Anorectal 3-D pressure topography was performed in 10 healthy subjects during graded rectal balloon distention using a novel high-definition manometry system consisting of a probe with 256 pressure sensors arranged circumferentially. The anal pressure changes before, during, and after the onset of SMR were measured at every millimeter along the length of anal canal and in 3-D by dividing the anal canal into 4 × 2.1-mm grids. Pressures were assessed in the longitudinal and anterior-posterior axis. Anal ultrasound was performed to assess puborectalis morphology. 3-D topography demonstrated that rectal distention produced an SMR coinciding with desire to defecate and predominantly induced by contraction of puborectalis. Anal ultrasound showed that the puborectalis was located at mean distance of 3.5 cm from anal verge, which corresponded with peak pressure difference between the anterior and posterior vectors observed at 3.4 cm with 3-D topography (r = 0.77). The highest absolute and percentage increases in pressure during SMR were seen in the superior-posterior portion of anal canal, reaffirming the role of puborectalis. The SMR anal pressure profile showed a peak pressure at 1.6 cm from anal verge in the anterior and posterior vectors and distinct increase in pressure only posteriorly at 3.2 cm corresponding to puborectalis. We concluded that SMR is primarily induced by the activation and contraction of the puborectalis muscle in response to a sensation of a desire to defecate. PMID:21109594

  18. The Effect of the UK Coordinating Centre for Cancer Research Anal Cancer Trial (ACT1) on Population-based Treatment and Survival for Squamous Cell Cancer of the Anus.

    PubMed

    Downing, A; Morris, E J A; Aravani, A; Finan, P J; Lawton, S; Thomas, J D; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2015-12-01

    Between 1987 and 1994, three randomised phase III trials showed that chemoradiotherapy with mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil was superior to radiotherapy alone (ACT1, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer) or radiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 87-04, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 1289) for squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. We explored the population-based changes in England before, during and after the UK-based ACT1 trial. Information was extracted from the National Cancer Data Repository on patients diagnosed with squamous cell anal cancer in England between 1981 and 2010 (n = 11 743). Robust treatment information was available for the Yorkshire region (n = 1065). Changes in treatment patterns and 3 year survival were investigated in 7 year cohorts before, during and after the ACT1 trial. In Yorkshire, the proportion of patients receiving surgery alone fell from 61.6% before, 29.8% during and 12.5% after ACT1; the proportion of patients receiving primary chemoradiotherapy rose from 6.5% before, 17.7% during and 58.8% after ACT1 and continued to rise to 70.3% in the subsequent period. Three year survival improved during the study period from 59.5% (95% confidence interval 56.6-62.2) before ACT1 to 73.6% (95% confidence interval 71.9-75.2) after the trial. Survival in Yorkshire was comparable with that in England. The treatment for squamous cell carcinoma of the anus changed dramatically during the study period. The predominant use of surgery before ACT1, a transition phase during the trial and a dramatic increase in the use of chemoradiotherapy after ACT1 provide strong evidence of the effect of the trial on population-based practice. Survival continued to increase during this period. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Physiology of ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Goes, R; Beart, R W

    1995-09-01

    Increasing experience with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) associated with increasing knowledge about anorectal physiology has lead to a large number of publications. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current understanding of fecal continence as revealed by the evolution of the ileoanal procedure. Review of the literature covering the most important physiologic parameters involved in fecal continence was undertaken. Rectoanal inhibitory reflex is probably absent after IPAA but is preserved when distal anorectal mucosa is spared. Anal resting pressure decreases but is less affected when the internal anal sphincter is less traumatized. Squeeze pressure is not importantly affected, and the importance of reservoir function as a determinant of stool frequency is emphasized. IPAA does not affect the coordination between pouch and anal canal motility in the majority of cases. Normal continence is preserved, even during the night, by preserving a gradient of pressure between the pouch and anal canal. Physiologic concepts are well established, but controversies about the continence mechanism related to IPAA remain. The IPAA procedure has allowed discrimination of details about the function of multiple structures involved in fecal continence.

  20. Preservation of anal function after total excision of the anal mucosa for Bowen's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, V H; Madden, J J; Franklin, J D; Burnett, L S; Jones, H W; Lynch, J B

    1984-01-01

    Six women with Bowen's disease of the anogenital area were treated by total excision of the anal mucosa, perianal skin and, in some cases, partial vulvectomy. Two patients had foci of microinvasive squamous carcinoma. Adequate tumor margins were determined by frozen sections. The resulting mucosal and cutaneous defects were grafted with medium split-thickness skin grafts applied to the anal canal and sutured circumferentially to the rectal mucosa. Grafts were held in place by a finger cot inserted in the anal canal and stuffed with cotton balls. Patients were constipated five or six days with codeine. The skin grafts healed per primam. One additional patient was similarly treated for a chronic herpetic ulceration of the anus and healed. Contrary to dire predictions, all patients were able to distinguish between gaseous and solid rectal contents and sphincter function was preserved. In one patient, Bowen's disease has recurred in the grafted perianal skin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6372711

  1. Anal Disorders - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anal Disorders URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/analdisorders.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  2. The performance of anal cytology as a screening test for anal HSILs in homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fengyi; Grulich, Andrew E; Poynten, I Mary; Hillman, Richard J; Templeton, David J; Law, Carmella L H; Farnsworth, Annabelle; Garland, Suzanne M; Fairley, Christopher K; Roberts, Jennifer M

    2016-06-01

    Studies regarding the performance of anal cytology in which both the screening test (cytology) and the diagnostic test (high-resolution anoscopy [HRA]) are performed in all members of a screening population are rare. The authors evaluated the performance of liquid-based anal cytology in a cohort of homosexual men in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer (SPANC) is a 3-year prospective study of the natural history of anal human papillomavirus infection in homosexual men aged ≥35 years. At baseline, all participants underwent a liquid-based anal cytology test and HRA at the same clinical visit. Biopsies were obtained for histological assessment if lesions suspicious for human papillomavirus infection were visible during HRA. Using any cytological abnormality as the threshold, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated against histologically diagnosed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs). Among 617 men recruited, the median age was 49 years (range, 35-79 years) and 35.7% were positive for the human immunodeficiency virus. Overall, the sensitivity of cytology was 83.2%, the specificity was 52.6%, the positive predictive value was 45.8%, and the negative predictive value was 86.7%. Specificity improved with increasing age (P for trend =.041). Sensitivity was significantly higher in men with >1 anal octant of biopsy-confirmed HSIL (92.9% vs 77.7%; P = .010), and in those who had ≥10 metaplastic cells present on their cytology slides (87.5% vs 70.2%; P = .007). Anal cytology was found to have a higher specificity in older men while maintaining sensitivity. Sensitivity was higher among those with more extensive HSILs and men with metaplastic cells present on cytology. Cancer Cytopathol 2016;124:415-24. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Dose to specific subregions of pelvic bone marrow defined with FDG-PET as a predictor of hematologic nadirs during concomitant chemoradiation in anal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Arcadipane, Francesca; Ragona, Riccardo; Lesca, Adriana; Gallio, Elena; Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Cassoni, Paola; Arena, Vincenzo; Bustreo, Sara; Faletti, Riccardo; Rondi, Nadia; Morino, Mario; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that irradiated volume of specific subregions of pelvic active bone marrow as detected by (18)FDG-PET may be a predictor of decreased blood cells nadirs in anal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation, we analyzed 44 patients submitted to IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Several bony structures were defined: pelvic and lumbar-sacral (LSBM), lower pelvis (LPBM) and iliac (IBM) bone marrow. Active BM was characterized employing (18)FDG-PET and characterized in all subregions as the volume having standard uptake values (SUVs) higher than SUVmean. All other regions were defined as inactive BM. On dose-volume histograms, dosimetric parameters were taken. Endpoints included white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), hemoglobin (Hb) and platelet (Plt) nadirs. Generalized linear modeling was used to find correlations between dosimetric variables and blood cells nadirs. WBC nadir was significantly correlated with LSBM mean dose (β = -1.852; 95 % CI -3.205/-0.500; p = 0.009), V10 (β = -2.153; 95 % CI -4.263/-0.721; p = 0.002), V20 (β = -2.081; 95 % CI -4.880/-0.112; p = 0.003), V30 (β = -1.971; 95 % CI -4.748/-0.090; p = 0.023) and IBM V10 (β = -0.073; 95 % CI -0.106/-0.023; p = 0.016). ANC nadir found to be significantly associated with LSBM V10 (β = -1.878; 95 % CI -4.799/-0.643; p = 0.025), V20 (β = -1.765; 95 % CI -4.050/-0.613; p = 0.030) and IBM V10 (β = -0.039; 95 % CI -0.066/-0.010; p = 0.027). Borderline significance was found for correlation between Plt nadir and LSBM V30 (β = -0.056; 95 % CI -2.748/-0.187; p = 0.060), V40 (β = -0.059; 95 % CI -3.112/-0.150; p = 0.060) and IBM V30 (β = -0.028; 95 % CI -0.074/-0.023; p = 0.056). No inactive BM subsites were found to be correlated with any blood cell nadir. (18)FDG-PET is able to define active bone marrow within pelvic osseous structures. LSBM is the strongest predictor of decreased blood cells

  4. Investigation of Body Image as a Mediator of the Effects of Bowel and GI Symptoms on Psychological Distress in Female Survivors of Rectal and Anal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Catherine; Rodriguez, Vivian M.; Carter, Jeanne; Temple, Larissa; Nelson, Christian; DuHamel, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Treatment for rectal and anal cancer (RACa) can result in persistent bowel and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Body image problems may develop over time and exacerbate symptom-related distress. RACa survivors are an understudied group, however, and factors contributing to post-treatment well-being are not well understood. This study examined whether poorer body image explained the relation between symptom severity and psychological distress. Methods Participants (N=70) completed the baseline assessment of a sexual health intervention study. Bootstrap methods tested body image as a mediator between bowel and GI symptom severity and two indicators of psychological distress (depressive and anxiety symptoms), controlling for relevant covariates. Measures included the EORTC-QLQ-CR38 Diarrhea, GI Symptoms, and Body Image subscales and Brief Symptom Index Depression and Anxiety subscales. Results Women averaged 55 years old (SD=11.6), White (79%), and 4-years post-treatment. Greater Depression related to poorer body image (r=−.61) and worse diarrhea (r=.35) and GI symptoms (r=.48). Greater Anxiety related to poorer body image (r=−.42) and worse GI symptoms (r=.45), but not diarrhea (r=.20). Body image mediated the effects of bowel and GI symptoms on Depression, but not on Anxiety. Conclusions Long-term bowel and GI dysfunction are distressing and affect how women perceive and relate to their bodies, exacerbating survivorship difficulties. Interventions to improve adjustment post-treatment should address treatment side effects, but also target body image problems to alleviate depressive symptoms. Reducing anxiety may require other strategies. Body image may be a key modifiable factor to improve well-being in this understudied population. Longitudinal research is needed to confirm findings. PMID:26446699

  5. 68. CANAL PLAN 5 EAST. CANAL BED IS VISIBLE WHILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. CANAL PLAN 5 EAST. CANAL BED IS VISIBLE WHILE FOOT OF CANAL IS UNDERGOING MAINTAINANCE. NOTE HOW LARGE AMOUNTS OF DIRT ARE HAULED FROM PLACE TO PLACE USING A CANAL BOAT AND CRADLE. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  6. 3. ELEVATION. FROM SOUTH WITH CANAL PRISM. Canal Road ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ELEVATION. FROM SOUTH WITH CANAL PRISM. - Canal Road Bridge, Canal Road spanning Delaware Canal Diversion, Locks 22 & 23 in Delaware Canal State Park in Williams Township, Raubsville, Northampton County, PA

  7. Proctology - diseases of the anal region.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Proctology is a medical subspecialty that encompasses diseases of the perianal region, anal canal, and rectum. Dermatologists play a pivotal role in this realm, as inflammatory perianal disorders, infectious and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as perianal tumors and their precursor lesions fall within the core competency of dermatology. In a concise manner, the present article highlights all relevant disease groups in the field of proctology. With a particular focus on aspects pertinent to dermatologists, this includes inflammatory disorders, "classic" proctologic diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, malignancies of the anal region, as well as pathogen-induced diseases. Despite the wide variety of disorders, there are only five key symptoms prompting patients to consult a proctologist, including anal pruritus and burning, discharge, bleeding, pain, and foreign body sensation. A simple algorithm, which incorporates these symptoms as well as key clinical features, may assist in quickly establishing the correct diagnosis in everyday clinical practice. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Alvarado, I; Quirós, B; Salmeron, J; Shin, HR; Pirog, E; Guimerà, N; Hernández, GA; Felix, A; Clavero, O; Lloveras, B; Kasamatsu, E; Goodman, MT; Hernandez, BY; Laco, J; Tinoco, L; Geraets, DT; Lynch, CF; Mandys, V; Poljak, M; Jach, R; Verge, J; Clavel, C; Ndiaye, C; Klaustermeier, J; Cubilla, A; Castellsagué, X; Bravo, IG; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Muñoz, N; Bosch, FX; Sanjosé, S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the human papillomaviruses (HPV) types in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in cancer dataset. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95%CI:85.1–91.0%) and in 95.4% of AIN 2/3 (95%CI:84.2–99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers. In view of HPV DNA results and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. PMID:24817381

  9. [Colo-anal anastomosis. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Morlino, A; Tramutola, G; Rossi, M T; Scutari, F

    2009-03-01

    The aim of study is to report the results of our experience about ultra-low rectum carcinomas treated with anterior resection and colo-anal anastomosis. The surgery still represents the treatment of choice for the cancer of the rectum. The problems concern the conservation of the sphincter functions (anal and urethral), and sexual function and the reduction of the locoregional recurrences. From 2005 to 2007, 33 patients underwent surgery for low and ultralow rectal carcinoma (30 treated with neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy, and 3 only with surgery). In 16 of these we have performed a colo-anal anastomosis, in 11 an ultralow colorectal anastomosis and in 7 a Miles resection. We report our updated results.

  10. Controversy at Love Canal.

    PubMed

    Paigen, B

    1982-06-01

    A cancer researcher reviews the events surrounding the toxic waste contamination at Love Canal with emphasis on the political nature of the controversy about its health impact. Antagonism between the community and the New York State Department of Health was fueled by several factors: the state's awareness that it gained from delay in investigation, disagreement on health problems to be studied, control over the information gathering process, silencing of opposition opinion, and the violation of norms of scientific behavior. The author calls for the establishment of standards of ethical behavior for scientists in such situations, standards for conflict resolution, and means of appeal for those injured.

  11. Obstetric sphincter tears and anal incontinence: an observational follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Zetterström, Jan; López, Annika; Holmström, Bo; Nilsson, Bengt Y; Tisell, Ake; Anzén, Bo; Mellgren, Anders

    2003-10-01

    Persistent defects after primary sphincter repair and occult sphincter tears are common after vaginal deliveries. Anal incontinence may be associated with these morphological defects. Forty-six primiparous women were evaluated with ultrasonography, manometry and electrophysiology. Twenty-four women had undergone primary repair of obstetric sphincter tears (sphincter group), 16 women had no clinical sphincter tear but developed anal incontinence postpartum (symptom group), and six were delivered by elective cesarean section (cesarean group). In the sphincter group, 50% had anal incontinence at follow-up. At ultrasonography, 70% had injuries anteriorly in the midanal canal. At manometry, 4% had decreased resting pressure and 50% decreased squeeze pressure. At electrophysiology, 19% had pathologic pudendal latency and 25% pathologic fiber density. In the symptom group, 44% had injuries anteriorly in the midanal canal at ultrasonography. At manometry, all women had normal resting pressure and 19% had a decreased squeeze pressure. At electrophysiology, 46% had pathologic pudendal latency and 29% pathologic fiber density. In the cesarean group, 33% had mild anal incontinence at follow-up. Ultrasonography and manometry were normal in all women. At electrophysiology, 33% had pathologic pudendal latency and 17% pathologic fiber density. Anal sphincter injuries at childbirth are often inadequately diagnosed and primary repair frequently results in persisting defects in the anal sphincter. Anatomic injuries to the anal sphincter play an important role in the development of anal incontinence after delivery, but a significant proportion of symptomatic women also demonstrate neurologic impairment at electrophysiologic testing.

  12. Transperineal sonographic anal sphincter complex evaluation in chronic anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Bedair, Elsaid M; El Hennawy, Hany M; Moustafa, Ahmed Abdu; Meki, Gad Youssef; Bosat, Bosat Elwany

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the role of transperineal sonography in assessment of pathologic changes to the anal sphincter complex in patients with chronic anal fissures. We conducted a prospective case-control study of 100 consecutive patients of any age and both sexes with chronic anal fissures who presented to a colorectal clinic between January 2012 and August 2013 (group A) and 50 healthy volunteers (group B). The most common patterns of radiologic changes to anal sphincters associated with chronic anal fissures were circumferential thickening of the anal sphincter complex in 5 patients (5%), circumferential thickening of the internal anal sphincter in 3 patients (3%), preferential thickening of the internal anal sphincter at the 6-o'clock position in 80 patients (80%) and the 12-o'clock position in 7 patients (7%), preferential thickening of the internal and external anal sphincters in 3 patients (3%), and thinning of the internal anal sphincter in 2 patients (2%). Chronic anal fissures cause differential thickening of both internal and external anal sphincters, with a trend toward increased thickness in relation to the site of the fissure. Routine preoperative transperineal sonography for patients with chronic anal fissures is recommended, and it is mandatory in high-risk patients. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  13. Heterosexual anal sexuality and anal sex behaviors: a review.

    PubMed

    McBride, Kimberly R; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2010-03-01

    Little research addresses the role of anal sexuality and anal sexual behaviors as a widely practiced but relatively less frequent element of a heterosexual sexual repertoire. However, the importance of anal sex in sexual health is increasingly well-defined by epidemiological and clinical studies. This article reviews existing data on a range of heterosexual anal sex practices and provides conceptual and methodological recommendations for new research.

  14. Anal Neuroendocrine Tumor Masquerading as External Hemorrhoids: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad; Dirweesh, Ahmed; Alvarez, Chikezie; Conaway, Herbert; Moser, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors in gastrointestinal (GI) tract are a rare source of GI malignancy with an estimated incidence of 2.5 - 5 per 100,000 people per year and the prevalence of 35 per 100,000. In the GI tract, they are located in decreasing order of frequency in appendix, ileum, rectum, stomach, and colon. Those found in the anal region represent just 1% of all malignancies of the anal canal. Their clinical presentation can be widely varying, sometimes being found incidentally with metastatic disease and an unknown primary source. We report a case of a 60-year-old male who presented with a 2-week history of intermittent bright red blood per rectum and anal pain. He was found to have a lesion in the perianal area which was subsequently diagnosed has a poorly differentiated large cell type neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) with hepatic metastasis. PMID:28270879

  15. Internal sphincterotomy versus topical nitroglycerin ointment for chronic anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Muhammad I; Pervaiz, Arif; Figueiredo, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Anal fissure is a common benign condition. An anorectal problem is defined as a split in the anal canal mucosa that extends from the dentate line to the anal verge. Chronic anal fissure is defined by a history of symptoms present for more than 2 months' duration and with a triad of external skin tags, namely, a hypertrophied anal papilla, an ulcer with rolled edges, and a base exposing the internal sphincter. Because complications such as incontinence are associated with surgical treatment, chemical sphincterotomy is currently favored. The objective of this study is to compare the difference in outcome between open partial lateral anal sphincterotomy and application of topical 0.2% nitroglycerin ointment for the treatment of chronic anal fissure. This was a quasi-experimental study carried out between January 16, 2007 and January 15, 2008 in the Surgical Department of Jinnah Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. Sixty consecutive cases with a clinical diagnosis of chronic anal fissure were recruited in the study. All recruited patients met the study inclusion criteria and were randomly assigned to one of the two groups. Group A was managed conservatively using topical 0.2% nitroglycerin ointment, whereas Group B underwent open partial lateral anal sphincterotomy. Both groups were followed up at 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 6 weeks after the treatment. All the patients complained of pain. A total of 43 (71.7%) patients had pain with constipation, whereas 31 (51.7%) patients had bleeding per rectum. Upon clinically examining the anal area, tenderness was elicited in all 60 (100%) patients. Group A included 30 (11 females and 19 males) cases treated with topical 0.2% nitroglycerin ointment and Group B included 30 (11 females and 19 males) cases who underwent open partial lateral anal sphincterotomy. In Group A, only 15 patients with fissures were successfully treated (50%). By contrast, 28 (93%) patients with fissures in Group B were successfully treated, and only two (7

  16. Anal itching -- self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000689.htm Anal itching - self-care To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anal itching occurs when the skin around your anus ...

  17. [Acute anal pain].

    PubMed

    Pittet, O; Demartines, N; Hahnloser, D

    2014-03-05

    Anal pain is a common reason for consultation, whose etiology is varied and should not be limited to the hemorrhoidal disease. The purpose of this article is to conduct a review of the literature on anorectal pathologies most frequently encountered and make recommendations regarding their management.

  18. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  19. Ultrasound anal sphincter defects and 3D anal pressure defects.

    PubMed

    Mion, F; Garros, A; Damon, H; Roman, S

    2017-04-13

    We read with interest the paper by Rezaie et al. on the use of 3D high definition anorectal manometry (3DARM) to detect anal sphincter defects in patients with faecal incontinence [1]. In their series of 39 patients, they described a new metrics to define anal pressure defect (defect of at least 18° of the 25 mmHg isobaric contour on anal resting pressures), and then compared the results of pressure defects determined by 3DARM and 3D anal ultrasound results. They found a rather good negative predictive value of manometry to eliminate the presence of ultrasound anal sphincter defects (92%), and suggested the possibility to use 3DARM to rule out anal sphincter defects and avoid the need of anal ultrasound in selected patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Collection of Biospecimen & Clinical Information in Patients w/ Gastrointestinal Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-24

    Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Gynecologic Cancers; Gynecologic Cancers Cervical Cancer; Gastric (Stomach) Cancer; Gastro-Esophageal(GE) Junction Cancer; Gastrointenstinal Stromal Tumor (GIST); Colon/Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Colon Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Anal Cancer; Anal Cancer; Hepatobiliary Cancers; Hepatobiliary Cancers Liver; Pancreatic Cancer

  1. Distribution of human papillomavirus genotypes in anal cytological and histological specimens from HIV-infected men who have sex with men and men who have sex with women.

    PubMed

    Darwich, Laila; Videla, Sebastian; Cañadas, Mari-Paz; Piñol, Marta; García-Cuyàs, Francesc; Vela, Sandra; Molina-López, Rafael A; Coll, Josep; Sirera, Guillem; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2013-09-01

    Anal cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Moreover, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an additional risk factor for anal cancer. Therefore, when designing preventive protocols for HIV-infected men, it is important to detect high-risk (HR) oncogenic HPV genotypes present in their anal canals. However, most studies have focused only on men who have sex with men (MSM). To estimate the prevalence of HPV and describe its genotype distribution using anal cytology and histology specimens from HIV-infected populations of MSM and men who have sex with women (MSW). Crosssectional study of the CARH·MEN cohort. Single-center prospective cohort of HIV-infected men attending the Outpatient HIV Clinic of Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol (Spain), where they undergo annual screening for HPV infection of the anus, penis and mouth. Four hundred eighty-three HIV-infected men (341 MSM, 142 MSW) with no current or previous history of anal condylomata. HPV genotypes detected (multiplex-PCR), cytology results (Papanicolaou test) and histology results (biopsy-based). Cytological abnormalities were detected in 40% of MSM (129/321; 95%CI, 35-46) and 20% of MSW (26/131; 95%CI, 13-28) (OR=2.7; 95%CI, 1.7-4.4). All high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) were positive for HR-HPV in both groups. High-resolution anoscopy was performed in 146 patients (120 MSM, 26 MSW) with abnormal cytological diagnoses. Lesions were visualized in 80 MSM (67%) and 14 MSW (54%) (OR=1.7 [95%CI, 0.7-4.0]). Histological diagnosis was anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN)-1 in 51 MSM (64%) and 6 MSW (43%), AIN-2 in 9 MSM (11%) and 3 MSW (21%), AIN-3 in 7 MSM (9%) and 1 MSW (7%), and normal in 13 MSM (16%) and 4 MSW (29%). HPV16 was the most prevalent HR genotype. Study limitations include its crosssectional design. Anal cancer screening should be offered to all HIV-infected men, regardless of their sexual orientation.

  2. Association between smoking and size of anal warts in HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Luu, H N; Amirian, E S; Beasley, R P; Piller, L; Chan, W; Scheurer, M E

    2012-11-01

    While the association between smoking and human papillomavirus infection, cervical cancer, and anal cancer has been well studied, evidence on the association between cigarette smoking and anal warts is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate if cigarette smoking status influences the size of anal warts over time in HIV-infected women in a sample of 976 HIV-infected women from the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). A linear mixed model was used to determine the effect of smoking on anal wart size. Even though women who were currently smokers had larger anal warts at baseline and slower growth rate of anal wart size after each visit than women who were not current smokers, there was no association between size of anal wart and current smoking status over time. Further studies on the role of smoking and interaction between smoking and other risk factors, however, should be explored.

  3. Association Between Smoking and Size of Anal Warts in HIV-infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Luu, HN; Amirian, ES; Beasley, RP; Piller, L; Chan, W; Scheurer, ME

    2015-01-01

    While the association between smoking and HPV infection, cervical cancer, and anal cancer has been well studied, evidence on the association between cigarette smoking and anal warts is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate if cigarette smoking status influences the size of anal warts over time in HIV-infected women in a sample of 976 HIV-infected women from the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). A linear mixed model was used to determine the effect of smoking on anal wart size. Even though women who were currently smokers had larger anal warts at baseline and slower growth rate of anal wart size after each visit than women who were not current smokers, there was no association between size of anal wart and current smoking status over time. Further studies on the role of smoking and interaction between smoking and other risk factors, however, should be explored. PMID:23155099

  4. Prospective cohort study of phenotypic variation based on an anal sphincter function in adults with fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Brochard, C; Bouguen, G; Bodère, A; Ropert, A; Mallet, A-L; Morcet, J; Bretagne, J-F; Siproudhis, L

    2016-10-01

    One-third of patients with fecal incontinence (FI) do not have any anal dysfunction. The aim was to characterize patients with FI with normal anal function compared with patients with anal weakness. The general characteristics and data of anal manometry, endosonography, and defecography of patients who were evaluated for FI at a single institution from 2005 to 2015 were prospectively assessed. Fecal incontinence was defined by the Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score (CCIS) >4. Anal weakness was defined by one or more of the three following parameters: <25 mmHg at the upper part of the anal canal, <26 mmHg at the lower part of the anal canal, and <60 mmHg for the mean squeeze pressure. A total of 439 patients with FI were included (152 with normal anal function/287 with anal weakness). Severe constipation (Kess score ≥21) was predominant in patients with normal anal function (44/151 vs 50/284, respectively; p = 0.0054). Fecal incontinence with normal anal function was significantly associated with lower age (>63 years; odds ratio [OR] = 0.29), higher weight (>65 kg; OR = 1.69), fecal urgency (OR = 1.58), less severe FI score (CCIS score >10; OR = 0.52), higher abdominal pressure (>36 mmHg; OR = 2.15), and paradoxical puborectal contraction (OR = 2.07) in a multivariate analysis model. Fecal incontinence with normal anal function is a specific phenotype that involves distal constipation and may be an early stage of FI with anal weakness. Physicians should adapt their management to focus on the treatment of constipation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Cryptoglandular anal fistulas].

    PubMed

    de Parades, Vincent; Zeitoun, Jean-David; Bauer, Pierre; Atienza, Patrick

    2008-10-31

    Cryptoglandular anal fistulae are the most frequently occurring form of perianal sepsis. Characteristically they have an endoanal primary opening, a fistula track and an abscess and/or an external purulent opening. Antibiotic therapy is not of use in initial management except in special cases. Treatment of an abscess, if present, is required urgently and when possible, consists of its incision under local anaesthesia. Treating the fistula track occurs afterwards and aims to dry up the purulent discharge and avoid recurrence of the abscess by means of surgical fistulotomy. These techniques are very effective in terms of eradication of the problem but there is sometimes a risk of anal incontinence. This explains the increasing interest in sphincter preserving techniques using the advancement of a covering flap of rectal mucosa and the injection of fibrin glue.

  6. 27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL BRIDGE IN DISTANCE; LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  7. 2. CANAL BOAT ENTERING THE DELAWARE CANAL FROM OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CANAL BOAT ENTERING THE DELAWARE CANAL FROM OF THE LEHIGH RIVER. BOATS COULD BE FERRIED ACROSS THE DELAWARE RIVER TO THE MORRIS CANAL BY A CABLE SUPPORTED TROLLEY. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  8. The changes in resting anal pressure after performing full-thickness rectal advancement flaps.

    PubMed

    Balciscueta, Zutoia; Uribe, Natalia; Mínguez, Miguel; García-Granero, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    Advancement flap is an accepted approach for treating complex fistula-in-ano.The purpose was to evaluate the changes in resting pressure along the anal canal after performing a full-thickness flap. Manometric review of patients who have undergone a full-thickness rectal advancement flap procedure for complex anal fistulas of cryptoglandular origin. Recurrence and continence were evaluated. Resting Anal Pressure was assessed along the anal canal by two measures: maximum resting pressure(MRP) and inferior resting pressure(IRP) at 0.5 cm from the anal verge. 119 patients were evaluated. Overall recurrence rate was5.9%. Anal continence was maintained intact in 76.5%. Manometric study showed a significant decrease in postoperative MRP(90.6 ± 31.9 to 45.2 ± 20 mmHg; p < 0.001), while IRP values did not differ significantly(28.2 ± 18.3 to 23.2 ± 13.5 mmHg; p = 0.1). Performing a full-thickness rectal flap causes a decrease of the MRP in the middle third of the anal canal, due to the inclusion of the internal sphincter in flap. It seems crucial to preserve the distal internal sphincter intact as it helps both to maintain the resting pressure in the lower third and avoid deformities of the anal margin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anal involvement in pemphigus vularis.

    PubMed

    Khezri, Somayeh; Mahmoudi, Hamid-Reza; Masoom, Seyedeh Nina; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Balighi, Kamran; Hosseini, S Hamed; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucosa. Anal mucosa may be involved in PV, but the frequency and clinical profile are not fully ascertained. Objective. The aim was to investigate the involvement of the anal area in newly diagnosed PV patients. Patients and Methods. A total of 168 consecutive newly diagnosed PV patients were enrolled. Anal symptoms and signs, involvement of other body sites, and severity of disease were recorded. Results. A total of 47 out of 168 patients (27.9%) had involvement of the anal area. Anal involvement was significantly associated with PV lesions in ophthalmic (P = 0.03), nasal (P = 0.02), and genital mucosa (P < 0.001) but not the oral cavity (P = 0.24). There was a significant association between number of involved mucosal sites and anal involvement (P < 0.001). Anal involvement was associated with oral severity (P = 0.02). Constipation was the most frequent symptom (73.8%) followed by pain on defecation (50%). Seventeen patients (36%) were symptom-free. Erosion was the most frequent sign (91.5%). Conclusion. Anal involvement in PV seems to be more frequent than previously assumed. Routine anal examination is recommended even in asymptomatic patients as anal involvement appears to correlate with the severity of PV.

  10. EUROGIN 2014 Roadmap: Differences in HPV infection natural history, transmission, and HPV-related cancer incidence by gender and anatomic site of infection

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Anna R.; Nyitray, Alan G.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Pierce Campbell, Christine M.; Goodman, Marc T.; Sudenga, Staci L.; Monsonego, Joseph; Franceschi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause cancer at multiple anatomic sites in men and women, including cervical, oropharyngeal, anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancers in women and oropharyngeal, anal, and penile cancers in men. In this EUROGIN 2014 roadmap, differences in HPV-related cancer and infection burden by gender and anatomic site are reviewed. The proportion of cancers attributable to HPV varies by anatomic site, with nearly 100% of cervical, 88% of anal, and less than 50% of lower genital tract and oropharyngeal cancers attributable to HPV, depending on world region and prevalence of tobacco use. Often mirroring cancer incidence rates, HPV prevalence and infection natural history varies by gender and anatomic site of infection. Oral HPV infection is rare and significantly differs by gender; yet HPV-related cancer incidence at this site is several-fold higher than at either the anal canal or penile epithelium. HPV seroprevalence is significantly higher among women compared to men, likely explaining the differences in age-specific HPV prevalence and incidence patterns observed by gender. Correspondingly, among heterosexual partners, HPV transmission appears higher from women to men. More research is needed to characterize HPV natural history at each anatomic site where HPV causes cancer in men and women, information that is critical to inform the basic science of HPV natural history and the development of future infection and cancer prevention efforts. PMID:25043222

  11. Atrioventricular Canal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... birth (congenital). The condition is often associated with Down syndrome. Atrioventricular canal defect allows extra blood to flow ... baby's heart is developing. Some factors, such as Down syndrome, might increase the risk of atrioventricular canal defect. ...

  12. SU-E-J-254: Evaluating the Role of Mid-Treatment and Post-Treatment FDG-PET/CT in Predicting Progression-Free Survival and Distant Metastasis of Anal Cancer Patients Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Wang, J; Chuong, M; D’Souza, W; Choi, W; Lu, W; Latifi, K; Hoffe, S; Moros, E; Saeed, Nadia; Tan, S; Shridhar, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of mid-treatment and post-treatment FDG-PET/CT in predicting progression-free survival (PFS) and distant metastasis (DM) of anal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 17 anal cancer patients treated with CRT were retrospectively studied. The median prescription dose was 56 Gy (range, 50–62.5 Gy). All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before and after CRT. 16 of the 17 patients had an additional FDG-PET/CT image at 3–5 weeks into the treatment (denoted as mid-treatment FDG-PET/CT). 750 features were extracted from these three sets of scans, which included both traditional PET/CT measures (SUVmax, SUVpeak, tumor diameters, etc.) and spatialtemporal PET/CT features (comprehensively quantify a tumor’s FDG uptake intensity and distribution, spatial variation (texture), geometric property and their temporal changes relative to baseline). 26 clinical parameters (age, gender, TNM stage, histology, GTV dose, etc.) were also analyzed. Advanced analytics including methods to select an optimal set of predictors and a model selection engine, which identifies the most accurate machine learning algorithm for predictive analysis was developed. Results: Comparing baseline + mid-treatment PET/CT set to baseline + posttreatment PET/CT set, 14 predictors were selected from each feature group. Same three clinical parameters (tumor size, T stage and whether 5-FU was held during any cycle of chemotherapy) and two traditional measures (pre- CRT SUVmin and SUVmedian) were selected by both predictor groups. Different mix of spatial-temporal PET/CT features was selected. Using the 14 predictors and Naive Bayes, mid-treatment PET/CT set achieved 87.5% accuracy (2 PFS patients misclassified, all local recurrence and DM patients correctly classified). Post-treatment PET/CT set achieved 94.0% accuracy (all PFS and DM patients correctly predicted, 1 local recurrence patient misclassified) with logistic regression, neural network or

  13. Integrated Cancer Repository for Cancer Research

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-05

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma; Breastcancer; Leukemia; Melanoma; Sarcoma; Unknown Primary Tumor; Multiple Myeloma; Ovarian Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Vaginal Cancer

  14. Dysregulation of Autophagy Contributes to Anal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carchman, Evie H.; Matkowskyj, Kristina A.; Meske, Louise; Lambert, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process that removes and recycles unnecessary/dysfunctional cellular components, contributing to cellular health and survival. Autophagy is a highly regulated cellular process that responds to several intracellular signals, many of which are deregulated by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection through the expression of HPV-encoded oncoproteins. This adaptive inhibitory response helps prevent viral clearance. A strong correlation remains between HPV infection and the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anus, particularly in HIV positive and other immunosuppressed patients. We hypothesize that autophagy is inhibited by HPV–encoded oncoproteins thereby promoting anal carcinogenesis (Fig 1). Materials and Methods HPV16 transgenic mice (K14E6/E7) and non-transgenic mice (FVB/N), both of which do not spontaneously develop anal tumors, were treated topically with the chemical carcinogen, 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), to induce anal cancer. The anuses at different time points of treatment (5, 10, 15 and 20 weeks) were analyzed using immunofluorescence (IF) for two key autophagy marker proteins (LC3β and p62) in addition to histological grading. The anuses from the K14E6/E7 mice were also analyzed for visual evidence of autophagic activity by electron microscopy (EM). To see if there was a correlation to humans, archival anal specimens were assessed histologically for grade of dysplasia and then analyzed for LC3β and p62 protein content. To more directly examine the effect of autophagic inhibition on anal carcinogenesis, nontransgenic mice that do not develop anal cancer with DMBA treatment were treated with a known pharmacologic inhibitor of autophagy, chloroquine, and examined for tumor development and analyzed by IF for autophagic proteins. Results Histologically, we observed the progression of normal anoderm to invasive SCC with DMBA treatment in K14E6/E7 mice but not in nontransgenic

  15. Long-Term Follow-Up of a Phase II Trial of High-Dose Radiation With Concurrent 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin in Patients With Anal Cancer (ECOG E4292)

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Catalano, Paul J.; Martenson, James A.; Mondschein, Joshua K.; Wagner, Henry; Mansour, Edward G.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Benson, Al Bowen

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Although chemoradiation using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) is the standard of care in the treatment of anal cancer, many patients are unable to tolerate MMC. This Phase II clinical trial was performed to determine whether cisplatin could replace MMC in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with localized anal cancer were enrolled. One patient registered but never received any assigned therapy and was excluded from all analyses. Between February 1, 1993, and July 21, 1993, 19 patients were accrued to Cohort 1. Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and pelvic nodes, followed by a boost to the primary and involved nodes to 59.4 Gy. A planned 2-week treatment break was used after 36 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 5-FU 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/day on Days 1 to 4 and cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1. A second course of 5-FU and cisplatin was given after 36 Gy, when the patient resumed radiation therapy. Between April 4, 1996, and September 23, 1996, an additional 13 patients (Cohort 2) were accrued to the study and received the same treatment except without the planned treatment break. Results: Complete response was seen in 78% (90% CI, 63-89) of patients and was higher in patients who did not get a planned treatment break (92% vs. 68%). The overall Grade 4 toxicity rate was 31%. One treatment-related death (Grade 5) occurred in a patient who developed sepsis. The 5-year overall survival was 69%. Conclusions: Radiation therapy, cisplatin, and 5-FU resulted in an overall objective response (complete response + partial response) of 97%. Although the 5-year progression-free survival was only 55%, the overall 5-year survival was 69%. Given the excellent salvage provided by surgery, this study affirms that cisplatin-based regimens may be an alternative for patients who cannot tolerate the severe hematologic toxicities associated with mitomycin-based chemoradiation regimens.

  16. Significance of Co-expression of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Ki67 on Clinical Outcome in Patients With Anal Cancer Treated With Chemoradiotherapy: An Analysis of NRG Oncology RTOG 9811.

    PubMed

    Doll, Corinne M; Moughan, Jennifer; Klimowicz, Alexander; Ho, Clement K; Kornaga, Elizabeth N; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Ajani, Jaffer A; Crane, Christopher H; Kachnic, Lisa A; Okawara, Gordon S; Berk, Lawrence B; Roof, Kevin S; Becker, Mark J; Grisell, David L; Ellis, Robert J; Sperduto, Paul W; Marsa, Gerald W; Guha, Chandan; Magliocco, Anthony M

    2017-03-01

    To measure co-expression of EGFR and Ki67 proteins in pretreatment tumor biopsies of anal cancer patients enrolled on NRG Oncology RTOG 9811, a phase III trial comparing 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin-C/radiation therapy (Arm A) versus 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin/radiation therapy (Arm B), and to correlate expression with clinical outcome. EGFR and Ki67 co-expression was measured after constructing a tissue microarray using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and automated quantitative image analysis. The Ki67 score within EGFR high versus low areas (Ki67ratio in EGFRhigh:low) in each tumor core was analyzed at the median, quartiles, and as a continuous variable. Associations between the tumor markers and clinical endpoints (overall and disease-free survival, locoregional and colostomy failure, and distant metastases) were explored. A total of 282 pretreatment tumors were analyzed from NRG Oncology RTOG 9811. Of evaluated specimens, 183 (65%, n=89, Arm A; n=94, Arm B) were eligible and analyzable. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics or outcomes between analyzable and unanalyzable patient cases. Median follow-up was 6.0 years. On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for gender, patients with Ki67ratio in EGFRhigh:low ≥median had worse overall survival (hazard ratio 2.41, 95% confidence interval 1.38-4.19, P=.0019). After adjusting for N stage and largest tumor dimension, patients with Ki67ratio in EGFRhigh:low ≥ median had a higher risk of a disease-free failure (hazard ratio 1.85, 95% confidence interval 1.18-2.92, P=.0078). Technical validation with an independent anal cancer patient cohort was performed and shows a very similar biomarker score distribution. High Ki67ratio in EGFRhigh:low is associated with worse clinical outcome in this subset of patients with anal cancer treated with chemoradiation on NRG Oncology RTOG 9811. Evaluation within a clinical trial will be required to determine whether patients with these tumor

  17. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  18. Hypertrophied anal papillae and fibrous anal polyps, should they be removed during anal fissure surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pravin J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Hypertrophied anal papillae and fibrous anal polyps are not given due importance in the proctology practice. They are mostly ignored being considered as normal structures. The present study was aimed to demonstrate that hypertrophied anal papillae and fibrous anal polyps could cause symptoms to the patients and that they should be removed in treatment of patients with chronic fissure in anus. METHODS: Two groups of patients were studied. A hundred patients were studied in group A in which the associated fibrous polyp or papillae were removed by radio frequency surgical device after a lateral subcutaneous sphincterotomy for relieving the sphincter spasm. Another group of a hundred patients who also had papillae or fibrous polyps, were treated by lateral sphincterotomy alone. They were followed up for one year. RESULTS: Eighty-nine percent patients from group A expressed their satisfaction with the treatment in comparison to only 64% from group B who underwent sphincterotomy alone with the papillae or anal polyps left untreated. Group A patients showed a marked reduction with regard to pain and irritation during defecation (P = 0.0011), pricking or foreign body sensation in the anus (P = 0.0006) and pruritus or wetness around the anal verge (P = 0.0008). CONCLUSION: Hypertrophied anal papillae and fibrous anal polyps should be removed during treatment of chronic anal fissure. This would add to effectiveness and completeness of the procedure. PMID:15285031

  19. Hypertrophied anal papillae and fibrous anal polyps, should they be removed during anal fissure surgery?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pravin-J

    2004-08-15

    Hypertrophied anal papillae and fibrous anal polyps are not given due importance in the proctology practice. They are mostly ignored being considered as normal structures. The present study was aimed to demonstrate that hypertrophied anal papillae and fibrous anal polyps could cause symptoms to the patients and that they should be removed in treatment of patients with chronic fissure in anus. Two groups of patients were studied. A hundred patients were studied in group A in which the associated fibrous polyp or papillae were removed by radio frequency surgical device after a lateral subcutaneous sphincterotomy for relieving the sphincter spasm. Another group of a hundred patients who also had papillae or fibrous polyps, were treated by lateral sphincterotomy alone. They were followed up for one year. Eighty-nine percent patients from group A expressed their satisfaction with the treatment in comparison to only 64% from group B who underwent sphincterotomy alone with the papillae or anal polyps left untreated. Group A patients showed a marked reduction with regard to pain and irritation during defecation (P = 0.0011), pricking or foreign body sensation in the anus (P = 0.0006) and pruritus or wetness around the anal verge (P = 0.0008). Hypertrophied anal papillae and fibrous anal polyps should be removed during treatment of chronic anal fissure. This would add to effectiveness and completeness of the procedure.

  20. Management of Complex Anal Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Bubbers, Emily J.; Cologne, Kyle G.

    2016-01-01

    Complex anal fistulas require careful evaluation. Prior to any attempts at definitive repair, the anatomy must be well defined and the sepsis resolved. Several muscle-sparing approaches to anal fistula are appropriate, and are often catered to the patient based on their presentation and previous repairs. Emerging technologies show promise for fistula repair, but lack long-term data. PMID:26929751

  1. Total proctocolectomy and ileal - anal pouch

    MedlinePlus

    Restorative proctocolectomy; Ileal-anal resection; Ileal-anal pouch; J-pouch; S-pouch; Pelvic pouch; Ileal-anal pouch; Ileal ... RD, Mahmoud N, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau J. Colon and rectum. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, ...

  2. [Perianal fistula and anal fissure].

    PubMed

    Heitland, W

    2012-12-01

    CRYPTOGLANDULAR ANAL FISTULA: Perianal abscesses are caused by cryptoglandular infections. Not every abscess will end in a fistula. The formation of a fistula is determined by the anatomy of the anal sphincter and perianal fistulas will not heal on their own. The therapy of a fistula is oriented between a more aggressive approach (operation) and a conservative treatment with fibrin glue or a plug. Definitive healing and the development of incontinence are the most important key points. ANAL FISSURES: Acute anal fissures should be treated conservatively by topical ointments, consisting of nitrates, calcium channel blockers and if all else fails by botulinum toxin. Treatment of chronic fissures will start conservatively but operative options are necessary in many cases. Operation of first choice is fissurectomy, including excision of fibrotic margins, curettage of the base and excision of the sentinel pile and anal polyps. Lateral internal sphincterotomy is associated with a certain degree of incontinence and needs critical long-term observation.

  3. Current concepts in anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Ayantunde, Abraham A; Debrah, Samuel A

    2006-12-01

    Anal fissure is a common and distressing problem the true incidence of which is probably higher than recorded. There is a progressive understanding of the etiopathogenesis of this entity and the changing trend in its management approach. This is a systematic review of available published literature looking at current management options in anal fissures. A MEDLINE-based search of the relevant literature from 1970 to 2004 was performed on the current concepts in etiopathogenesis and management of anal fissure. The current opinion is a drift toward conservative measures as the first- and second-line approaches rather than surgery for treatment of anal fissure. Simple and readily available measures with less complication, good patient compliance, and satisfaction requiring no hospitalization should first be considered. Most anal fissures heal with medical therapy, but their limitations include side effects, poor compliance, and recurrence of the fissure. A cautious surgical approach is required to treat those who do not respond to medical therapy.

  4. Prevalence, clearance, and incidence of human papillomavirus type-specific infection at the anal and penile site of HIV-infected men.

    PubMed

    Darwich, Laila; Cañadas, Mari-Paz; Videla, Sebastian; Coll, Josep; Molina-López, Rafael A; Sirera, Guillem; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2013-08-01

    We studied the type-specific infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) at the anal canal and penile site in a cohort of HIV-infected men. Prevalence, clearance, and incidence of specific HPV types in the anal canal and penis were determined in 733 HIV-infected men from the Spanish CAn Ruti HIV+ Men ([CARH•MEN]) cohort (538 men who have sex with men [MSM] and 195 heterosexual men). In both groups, the most prevalent high-risk type was HPV-16 (anal canal [31.6% MSM; 6.8% heterosexual] and penis [4.8% MSM; 6.8% heterosexual]). The most prevalent low-risk type was HPV-6 (anal canal [23.2% MSM; 12.8% heterosexual], penis [8.1% MSM; 8.9% heterosexual]). Anal prevalence was significantly higher in MSM, as was incidence, except for HPV-16, which was similar between male groups (5.9 new cases per 1000 person-months [95% confidence interval, 4.3-7.9] in MSM; 4.4 [95% confidence interval, 2.5-7.2] in heterosexual men; P > 0.05). The anal clearance rate of the different HPV types and retention time of infection were similar in both groups, as well as the HPV infection of the penis. HIV-infected MSM had a high prevalence of HPV infection at the anal canal; however, heterosexual HIV-infected men were also at risk for acquiring and sustaining persistent high-risk HPV types at the anal and penile site and are at risk for developing dysplasia in the future. All HIV-infected men should be recommended for routinely anal HPV screening.

  5. Cetuximab Plus Chemoradiotherapy in Immunocompetent Patients With Anal Carcinoma: A Phase II Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group Trial (E3205).

    PubMed

    Garg, Madhur K; Zhao, Fengmin; Sparano, Joseph A; Palefsky, Joel; Whittington, Richard; Mitchell, Edith P; Mulcahy, Mary F; Armstrong, Karin I; Nabbout, Nassim H; Kalnicki, Shalom; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Onitilo, Adedayo A; Moriarty, Daniel J; Fitzgerald, Thomas J; Benson, Al B

    2017-03-01

    Purpose Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCAC) is characterized by high locoregional failure (LRF) rates after sphincter-preserving definitive chemoradiation (CRT) and is typically associated with anogenital human papilloma virus infection. Because cetuximab enhances the effect of radiation therapy in human papilloma virus-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, we hypothesized that adding cetuximab to CRT would reduce LRF in SCCAC. Methods Sixty-one patients with stage I to III SCCAC received CRT including cisplatin, fluorouracil, and radiation therapy to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes (45 to 54 Gy) plus eight once-weekly doses of concurrent cetuximab. The study was designed to detect at least a 50% reduction in 3-year LRF rate (one-sided α, 0.10; power 90%), assuming a 35% LRF rate from historical data. Results Poor risk features included stage III disease in 64% and male sex in 20%. The 3-year LRF rate was 23% (95% CI, 13% to 36%; one-sided P = .03) by binomial proportional estimate using the prespecified end point and 21% (95% CI, 7% to 26%) by Kaplan-Meier estimate in a post hoc analysis using methods consistent with historical data. Three-year rates were 68% (95% CI, 55% to 79%) for progression-free survival and 83% (95% CI, 71% to 91%) for overall survival. Grade 4 toxicity occurred in 32%, and 5% had treatment-associated deaths. Conclusion Although the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation for SCCAC was associated with lower LRF rates than historical data with CRT alone, toxicity was substantial, and LRF still occurs in approximately 20%, indicating the continued need for more effective and less toxic therapies.

  6. Root canal irrigants.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-10-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were 'root canal irrigants' and 'endodontic irrigants.' The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance.

  7. Root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ‘root canal irrigants’ and ‘endodontic irrigants.’ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:21217955

  8. [Surgical treatment of anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiandong; Zhang, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Anal fistula is a common disease. It is also quite difficult to be solved without recurrence or damage to the anal sphincter. Several techniques have been described for the management of anal fistula, but there is no final conclusion of their application in the treatment. This article summarizes the history of anal fistula management, the current techniques available, and describes new technologies. Internet online searches were performed from the CNKI and Wanfang databases to identify articles about anal fistula management including seton, fistulotomy, fistulectomy, LIFT operation, biomaterial treatment and new technology application. Every fistula surgery technique has its own place, so it is reasonable to give comprehensive individualized treatment to different patients, which may lead to reduced recurrence and avoidance of damage to the anal sphincter. New technologies provide promising alternatives to traditional methods of management. Surgeons still need to focus on the invention and improvement of the minimally invasive techniques. Besides, a new therapeutic idea is worth to explore that the focus of surgical treatment should be transferred to prevention of the formation of anal fistula after perianal abscess.

  9. Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal full) - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Bitter Root Irrigation Canal, Heading at Rock Creek Diversion Dam, West of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  10. 14. Junction of the Tempe Canal and Western Canal, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Junction of the Tempe Canal and Western Canal, looking north. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. Anterior anal fissures are associated with occult sphincter injury and abnormal sphincter function.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, J T; Urie, A; Molloy, R G

    2008-03-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic anal fissure (CAF) remains incompletely understood but most are associated with a high resting anal pressure and reduced perfusion at the fissure site. To date, no major distinction has been made between anterior and posterior anal fissures and their aetiology and treatment. We compared anterior and posterior fissures in patients who have failed to respond to medical treatment with respect to their underlying aetiology, anal canal pressures and sphincter muscle integrity. Seventy consecutive patients (54 female:16 male) with a symptomatic CAF and 39 normal controls (19 female:20 male) without evidence of significant ano-rectal pathology were prospectively assessed by manometry and anal endosonography. Anterior anal fissures were identified in a younger age group [33 years (IQR 26-37) vs 41 years (IQR 36-52)] and predominantly in women. Anterior fissure patients were significantly more likely to have underlying external anal sphincter defects compared with posterior fissures [OR 10.9 (95% CI 3.4-35.4)]. Maximum resting pressure was not significantly elevated for anterior fissures compared with controls (P = 0.316) but was significantly elevated in posterior fissures (P = 0.005). The maximum squeeze pressure was significantly lower in the anterior fissure group [167 cmH2O (IQR 126-196) vs 205 cmH2O (IQR 174-262), P = 0.004]. A history of obstetric trauma was significantly associated with anterior fissure location [OR 13.9 (95% CI 3.4-55.7)]. Anterior anal fissures are associated with occult external anal sphincter injury and impaired external anal sphincter function compared with posterior fissures. These findings have implications for treatment, especially if a definitive procedure, such as lateral internal sphincterotomy, is considered.

  12. [Differential diagnosis of anal eczema].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, A; Ruzicka, T; Hermans, C

    2015-06-01

    Dermatologic disorders often show involvement of the (peri)anal skin. However, diagnosis of (peri)anal dermatoses is often difficult even for experienced dermatologists due to delayed clinical presentation or prior treatment with over-the-counter medications. The distinct anatomical conditions of the (peri)anal region results in atypical clinical presentation of common dermatoses. Typical symptoms include pruritus, burning, bleeding and pain. Careful history of symptoms, stool, hygiene, sexual practice as well as thorough inspection of the entire body and proctological examination are crucial to make the correct diagnosis. In case of atypical presentation or uncertainty a biopsy needs to be obtained to ensure correct diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Patient Symptomatology in Anal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Wick, Elizabeth C; Leeds, Ira L; Efron, Jonathan E; Gearhart, Susan L; Safar, Bashar; Fang, Sandy H

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution anoscopy (HRA) is becoming increasingly advocated as a method of screening for anal dysplasia in high-risk patients. To describe, through HRA findings, the association between patient symptomatology and anal dysplasia among patients at high risk for anal dysplasia. Univariable and multivariable analyses were conducted of data from a prospectively maintained HRA database on all patients undergoing HRA with biopsy from November 1, 2011, to March 13, 2014, at a tertiary care HRA clinic. Data included demographics, medical history and comorbidities, HIV status and related measures (CD4 cell counts, HIV viral load, and use of highly active antiretroviral therapy), sexual orientation (when available), patient symptoms at initial presentation, physical examination findings, anal Papanicolaou (Pap) smear findings. High-resolution anoscopy diagnosis of high- vs low-grade dysplasia or no dysplasia. One hundred sixty-one HRA biopsy specimens (mean [SEM], 1.77 [0.11] biopsy specimens per patient) were obtained from 91 patients (mean [SEM] age, 45.7 [1.2] years; 61 men [67%]; 47 black patients [52%]; and 70 human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients [77%]). Twenty-seven patients (30%) had high-grade dysplasia, 26 had low-grade dysplasia (29%), and 38 had no dysplasia (42%). The majority of patients (63 [69%]) were asymptomatic (anal pain, 11 [12%]; bleeding, 14 [15%]; and pruritus, 10 [11%]). Forty-one patients (45%) presented with anal pain (odds ratio, 5.25; 95% CI, 1.44-21.82; P = .02), and patients with either high- or low-grade dysplasia were more likely to present with anal lesions on physical examination compared with patients without dysplasia (odds ratio, 4.34; 95% CI, 1.78-11.20; P = .002). Multivariable analysis suggested that anal pain was independently associated with high-grade dysplasia (odds ratio, 6.42; 95% CI, 1.18-43.3; P = .03). Anal dysplasia is a silent disease that is frequently asymptomatic. However, patients with anal

  14. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  15. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. This narrowing is called “stenosis.” As the lumbar spinal canal narrows, the nerves that go through it are squeezed. This squeezing ... chest). It’s thought that these positions “open” the lumbar canal and take the pressure off the nerves that go to the legs. In severe cases, ...

  16. Modern management of anal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Limura, Elsa; Giordano, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Ideal surgical treatment for anal fistula should aim to eradicate sepsis and promote healing of the tract, whilst preserving the sphincters and the mechanism of continence. For the simple and most distal fistulae, conventional surgical options such as laying open of the fistula tract seem to be relatively safe and therefore, well accepted in clinical practise. However, for the more complex fistulae where a significant proportion of the anal sphincter is involved, great concern remains about damaging the sphincter and subsequent poor functional outcome, which is quite inevitable following conventional surgical treatment. For this reason, over the last two decades, many sphincter-preserving procedures for the treatment of anal fistula have been introduced with the common goal of minimising the injury to the anal sphincters and preserving optimal function. Among them, the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure appears to be safe and effective and may be routinely considered for complex anal fistula. Another technique, the anal fistula plug, derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa, is safe but modestly effective in long-term follow-up, with success rates varying from 24%-88%. The failure rate may be due to its extrusion from the fistula tract. To obviate that, a new designed plug (GORE BioA®) was introduced, but long term data regarding its efficacy are scant. Fibrin glue showed poor and variable healing rate (14%-74%). FiLaC and video-assisted anal fistula treatment procedures, respectively using laser and electrode energy, are expensive and yet to be thoroughly assessed in clinical practise. Recently, a therapy using autologous adipose-derived stem cells has been described. Their properties of regenerating tissues and suppressing inflammatory response must be better investigated on anal fistulae, and studies remain in progress. The aim of this present article is to review the pertinent literature, describing the advantages and limitations of

  17. Modern management of anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Limura, Elsa; Giordano, Pasquale

    2015-01-07

    Ideal surgical treatment for anal fistula should aim to eradicate sepsis and promote healing of the tract, whilst preserving the sphincters and the mechanism of continence. For the simple and most distal fistulae, conventional surgical options such as laying open of the fistula tract seem to be relatively safe and therefore, well accepted in clinical practise. However, for the more complex fistulae where a significant proportion of the anal sphincter is involved, great concern remains about damaging the sphincter and subsequent poor functional outcome, which is quite inevitable following conventional surgical treatment. For this reason, over the last two decades, many sphincter-preserving procedures for the treatment of anal fistula have been introduced with the common goal of minimising the injury to the anal sphincters and preserving optimal function. Among them, the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure appears to be safe and effective and may be routinely considered for complex anal fistula. Another technique, the anal fistula plug, derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa, is safe but modestly effective in long-term follow-up, with success rates varying from 24%-88%. The failure rate may be due to its extrusion from the fistula tract. To obviate that, a new designed plug (GORE BioA®) was introduced, but long term data regarding its efficacy are scant. Fibrin glue showed poor and variable healing rate (14%-74%). FiLaC and video-assisted anal fistula treatment procedures, respectively using laser and electrode energy, are expensive and yet to be thoroughly assessed in clinical practise. Recently, a therapy using autologous adipose-derived stem cells has been described. Their properties of regenerating tissues and suppressing inflammatory response must be better investigated on anal fistulae, and studies remain in progress. The aim of this present article is to review the pertinent literature, describing the advantages and limitations of

  18. Comparison of controlled-intermittent anal dilatation and lateral internal sphincterotomy in the treatment of chronic anal fissures: a prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Tayfun; Gonullu, Dogan; Oncu, Mahmut; Koksoy, Ferda Nihat; Ozkan, Sibel Gurdal; Aycan, Omer

    2009-06-01

    The results of controlled-intermittent anal dilatation (CIAD) or lateral internal sphincterotomy (LIS) in the treatment of chronic anal fissures are presented. Forty patients who were randomized to two groups underwent CIAD or a LIS. The pre- and post-operative mean anal canal resting pressures (MACRPs) and symptoms were recorded and the results were compared. Two months post-operatively, 18 patients in the CIAD group and 17 patients in the LIS group had healed completely, and had no anal incontinence or other complications. The post-operative improvement in pain, bleeding, and constipation did not differ significantly between the two groups. In the CIAD and LIS groups, the pre-operative MACRPs were 89.7+/-16.5 and 87.6+/-12.3 mmHg, respectively; 2 months post-operatively, the MACRPs had significantly decreased to 76.9+/-13.7 and 78.1+/-11.3 mmHg in the CIAD and LIS groups, respectively. No statistical difference existed in the pre- or post-treatment MACRPs between the groups. CIAD applied with a standardized technique reduced anal canal resting pressure and provided symptomatic healing that was equivalent to a LIS. Since there were no findings of incontinence, or situations which resulted in sphincter damage, we conclude that CIAD is suitable for patients with chronic anal fissures because it is less invasive than LIS, with equivalent efficacy and safety. In addition, the CIAD method may be an alternative procedure in older and multiparous women who has a higher risk of incontinence.

  19. Prevalence of and risk factors for anal human papillomavirus infection among young healthy women in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Castro, Felipe A; Quint, Wim; Gonzalez, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A; Herrero, Rolando; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Schiffman, Mark; Struijk, Linda; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; DelVecchio, Corey; Lowy, Douglas R; Porras, Carolina; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R

    2012-10-01

    Anal cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), yet little is known about anal HPV infection among healthy young women. A total of 2017 sexually active women in the control arm of an HPV-16/18 vaccine trial had a single anal specimen collected by a clinician at the 4-year study visit. Samples were tested for HPV by SPF(10) PCR/DEIA/LiPA(25), version 1. A total of 4% of women had HPV-16, 22% had oncogenic HPV, and 31% had any HPV detected in an anal specimen. The prevalence of anal HPV was higher among women who reported anal intercourse, compared with those who did not (43.4% vs 28.4%; P< .001). Among women who reported anal intercourse, cervical HPV (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.4-8.2]), number of sex partners (aOR, 2.2 [95% CI, 1.1-4.6] for ≥ 4 partners), and number of anal intercourse partners (aOR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.1-3.3] for ≥ 2 partners) were independent risk factors for anal HPV detection. Among women who reported no anal intercourse, cervical HPV (aOR, 4.7 [95% CI, 3.7-5.9]), number of sex partners (aOR, 2.4 [95% CI, 1.7-3.4] for ≥ 4 partners), and report of anal fissures (aOR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.8]) were associated with an increased odds of anal HPV detection. Anal HPV is common among young women, even those who report no anal sex, and was associated with cervical HPV infection. Anal fissures in women who report never having had anal intercourse may facilitate HPV exposure. NCT00128661.

  20. Prolonged-Release Oxycodone/Naloxone Improves Anal Sphincter Relaxation Compared to Oxycodone Plus Macrogol 3350.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Brock, Christina; Grønlund, Debbie; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2017-10-06

    Opioid analgesics inhibit anal sphincter function and contribute to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD). However, it is unknown whether the inhibition can be reduced by opioid antagonism with prolonged-release (PR) naloxone and how this compares to laxative treatment. To compare the effects of combined PR oxycodone/naloxone or PR oxycodone plus macrogol 3350 on anal sphincter function and gastrointestinal symptoms. A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was conducted in 20 healthy men. Participants were treated for 5 days with combined PR oxycodone/naloxone or PR oxycodone plus macrogol 3350. Resting anal pressure, anal canal distensibility, and relaxation of the internal sphincter to rectal distension were evaluated before treatment (baseline) and on day 5. The Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptom (PAC-SYM) questionnaire, stool frequency, and stool consistency were assessed daily. Both PR oxycodone/naloxone and PR oxycodone plus macrogol treatment decreased sphincter relaxation compared to baseline (- 27.5%; P < 0.001 and - 14.7%; P = 0.01). However, sphincter relaxation was increased after PR naloxone/oxycodone treatment compared to macrogol (difference = + 17.6%; P < 0.001). Resting anal pressure and anal canal distensibility did not differ between treatments. PAC-SYM abdominal symptoms score was lower during PR naloxone compared to macrogol (0.2 vs. 3.2; P = 0.002). The number of bowel movements was lower during PR naloxone versus macrogol (4.2 vs. 5.4; P = 0.035). Relaxation of the internal anal sphincter was significantly better after PR oxycodone/naloxone treatment compared to PR oxycodone plus macrogol 3350. These findings highlight that OIBD may require specific therapy against the complex, pan-intestinal effects of opioids.

  1. Anal fissures and anal scars in anal abuse--are they significant?

    PubMed

    Pierce, Agnes M

    2004-05-01

    The notes of 214 children who, over a period of 7 years, had been referred after an allegation or a suspicion of any form of child abuse, were examined retrospectively to establish the pattern of injury found, especially with regard to anal fissures or scars. These were all children who had had their genitalia examined at the time of their referral. In 81 children (Group A) who had no history or evidence of sexual abuse, two fissures were found, both with medical explanations for their presence. In 83 (Group B) who alleged sexual abuse but denied anal abuse, nine (11%) had fissures or scars, and in four of the nine there was a history of significant constipation at some time. In 50 children (Group C) who had a strong history of anal abuse, 41 (84%) had fissures or scars. The diagnosis in 13 of these cases was considered definite because there was a confession or guilty plea from the abuser; in the remainder, the diagnosis was "not proven" despite a strong history or gross anal signs and regardless of the verdict in court proceedings. The significance of the findings was discussed with a view to clarifying the relative importance of anal fissures in children with a strong history of anal abuse.

  2. Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Prevalences and Factors Associated with Abnormal Anal Cytology in HIV-Infected Women in an Urban Cohort from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Paula M.; Lake, Jordan E.; Levi, José Eduardo; Coutinho, José Ricardo; de Andrade, Angela; Heinke, Thais; Derrico, Mônica; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Friedman, Ruth K.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Identifying factors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, associated with abnormal anal cytology in HIV-infected women have implications for anal squamous cell cancer (SCC) prevention in HIV-infected women. Anal and cervical samples were collected for cytology, and tested for high-(HR-HPV) and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) genotypes in a cross-sectional analysis of the IPEC Women's HIV Cohort (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Multivariate log-binomial regression models estimated prevalence ratios for factors associated with abnormal anal cytology [≥atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, (ASC-US)]. Characteristics of the 863 participants included: median age 42 years, 57% non-white, 79% current CD4+ T-cell count >350 cells/mm3, 53% HIV-1 viral load <50 copies/mL, median ART duration 5.8 years. Fifty-one percent of anal specimens contained ≥1 HR-HPV genotype; 31% had abnormal anal cytology [14% ASC-US, 11% low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion, (LSIL); 2% atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade SIL (ASC-H); 4% high-grade SIL/cancer (HSIL+)]. In multivariate analysis, cervical LSIL+, nadir CD4+ T-cell count ≤50 cells/mm3, HIV-1 viral load ≥50 copies/mL, and anal HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 33, 45, 52, 56, and 58 were associated with ≥anal ASC-US (p<0.05). Abnormal anal cytology and HR-HPV prevalences were high. HIV-infected women with cervical LSIL+, low nadir CD4+ counts, or detectable HIV-1 viral loads should be a particular focus for enhanced anal SCC screening efforts. PMID:25361401

  3. Bush Canal Floodgate Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -0 9 -9 Bush Canal Floodgate Study Tate O. McAlpin, Rutherford C. Berger, and Amena M. Henville July 2009 C oa st...al a n d H yd ra u lic s La b or at or y Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-09-9 July 2009 Bush Canal ...LA 70118-3651 Under Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request (MIPR) W42HEM60734548, “H&H Modeling of Bush Canal /Morganza to the Gulf” ERDC/CHL

  4. Similar mechanisms of traumatic rectal injuries in patients who had anal sex with animals to those who were butt-fisted by human sexual partner.

    PubMed

    Sendler, Damian Jacob

    2017-10-01

    Sexual pleasure comes in various forms of physical play, for many it involves stimulation of the vagina, while the anus for others; some enjoy both. A recent report by Cappelletti et al.(1) shows a meta-analysis of cases describing anal trauma due to sexual fisting in human partners. This clinical article reports four cases of males diagnosed with zoophilia, and who received anal sex from animals, resulting in injuries. Surgical and psychiatric evaluations are summarized. Unusual etiology of sexual activity with animals caused peri-anal trauma in men who engaged in anal sex with dogs and farm animals. Injuries to patients who receive anal sex from animals are mechanistically similar to fisting-induced rectal damage. Among zoophiles, the mode of harm occurs through blood-engorged, interlocked penis that causes tissue lacerations upon retraction from an anus. In people experimenting with fisting, repetitive stretching within anal canal and of external sphincter causes the internal injuries. The mode of physical stimulation explains the extent of injuries in fisters vs. zoophiles: in fisting, the pressure applied by hand is controllable proximally around and within anal sphincter, while penetration by the animal penis is unpredictable and occurs within the proximal anal canal. Forensically, the findings presented in this article describe a significant mechanism of injury in fisters versus passive zoophiles. These descriptions may aid in clinically differentiating pleasurable and pathological rectal stimulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. VIDEO-ASSISTED ANAL FISTULA TREATMENT: TECHNICAL CONSIDERATIONS AND PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF THE FIRST BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    MENDES, Carlos Ramon Silveira; FERREIRA, Luciano Santana de Miranda; SAPUCAIA, Ricardo Aguiar; LIMA, Meyline Andrade; ARAUJO, Sergio Eduardo Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Backgroung Anorectal fistula represents an epithelized communication path of infectious origin between the rectum or anal canal and the perianal region. The association of endoscopic surgery with the minimally invasive approach led to the development of the video-assisted anal fistula treatment. Aim To describe the technique and initial experience with the technique video-assisted for anal fistula treatment. Technique A Karl Storz video equipment was used. Main steps included the visualization of the fistula tract using the fistuloscope, the correct localization of the internal fistula opening under direct vision, endoscopic treatment of the fistula and closure of the internal opening which can be accomplished through firing a stapler, cutaneous-mucosal flap, or direct closure using suture. Results The mean distance between the anal verge and the external anal orifice was 5.5 cm. Mean operative time was 31.75 min. In all cases, the internal fistula opening could be identified after complete fistuloscopy. In all cases, internal fistula opening was closed using full-thickness suture. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. After a 5-month follow-up, recurrence was observed in one (12.5%) patient. Conclusion Video-assisted anal fistula treatment is feasible, reproducible, and safe. It enables direct visualization of the fistula tract, internal opening and secondary paths. PMID:24676305

  6. Video-assisted anal fistula treatment: technical considerations and preliminary results of the first Brazilian experience.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Carlos Ramon Silveira; Ferreira, Luciano Santana de Miranda; Sapucaia, Ricardo Aguiar; Lima, Meyline Andrade; Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Anorectal fistula represents an epithelized communication path of infectious origin between the rectum or anal canal and the perianal region. The association of endoscopic surgery with the minimally invasive approach led to the development of the video-assisted anal fistula treatment. To describe the technique and initial experience with the technique video-assisted for anal fistula treatment. A Karl Storz video equipment was used. Main steps included the visualization of the fistula tract using the fistuloscope, the correct localization of the internal fistula opening under direct vision, endoscopic treatment of the fistula and closure of the internal opening which can be accomplished through firing a stapler, cutaneous-mucosal flap, or direct closure using suture. The mean distance between the anal verge and the external anal orifice was 5.5 cm. Mean operative time was 31.75 min. In all cases, the internal fistula opening could be identified after complete fistuloscopy. In all cases, internal fistula opening was closed using full-thickness suture. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. After a 5-month follow-up, recurrence was observed in one (12.5%) patient. Video-assisted anal fistula treatment is feasible, reproducible, and safe. It enables direct visualization of the fistula tract, internal opening and secondary paths.

  7. Natural history of anal vs oral HPV infection in HIV-infected men and women.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Xiao, Wiehong; Gillison, Maura L

    2013-07-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are at greater risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal than oropharyngeal cancers. The prevalence of anal vs oral HPV infections is higher in this population, but whether this is explained by higher incidence or persistence is unknown. Oral rinse and anal swab samples were collected semiannually from 404 HIV-infected adults in Baltimore, Maryland. Samples were tested for 37 HPV types using PGMY09/11 primers and reverse line-blot hybridization. Risk factors for HPV persistence were explored using adjusted Wei-Lin-Weissfeld models. The prevalence (84% vs 28%), incidence (145 vs 31 per 1000 person-months), and 12-month persistence (54% vs 29%) were higher for anal vs oral HPV infections, respectively (each P < .001). Heterosexual men had lower incidence of anal HPV than men who have sex with men and women, but a higher incidence of oral HPV infection (test of interaction P < 0.001). In adjusted analyses, risk factors for HPV persistence included prevalent vs incident (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 4.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.5-4.8) and anal vs oral HPV infections (aHR = 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.9). The higher incidence and persistence of anal vs oral HPV infections likely contributes to the higher burden of anal as compared to oral HPV-associated cancers in HIV-infected individuals.

  8. Videoscopic Versus Open Inguinal Lymphadenectomy for Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-04

    Melanoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Carcinoma; Urethral Carcinoma; Extramammary Paget's Disease; Scrotal Carcinoma; Anal Cancer; Vulvar Cancer; Skin Cancer; Lymphadenopathy

  9. The EVVA Cohort Study: Anal and Cervical Type-Specific Human Papillomavirus Prevalence, Persistence, and Cytologic Findings in Women Living With HIV.

    PubMed

    de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Kaufman, Elaina; de Castro, Christina; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Burchell, Ann N; Klein, Marina; Charest, Louise; Auger, Manon; Rodrigues-Coutlée, Sophie; Coutlée, François

    2017-08-15

    The risk of anal cancer due to high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is higher in women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than in the general population. We present findings of cervical and anal HPV and cytologic tests at baseline in the EVVA cohort study and HPV persistence data 6 months after baseline. Semiannual visits included questionnaires, chart reviews, cervical/anal cytologic and cervical/anal HPV testing for 2 years. Genotyping for 36 HPV genotypes was performed using the Roche Linear Array HPV genotyping test. A total of 151 women living with HIV were recruited. At baseline, 75% had anal HPV, 51% had anal HR-HPV, 50% had cervical HPV, and 29% had cervical HR-HPV. Anal HPV-16 and HPV-51 were more frequent in women born in Canada (31% and 29%, respectively, compared with ≤16% for other women). Most anal HR-HPV types detected at 6 months (57%-93%) were persistent from baseline. Findings of anal cytologic tests were abnormal for 37% of women. Anal HPV is highly prevalent in women living with HIV, and type distribution varies by place of birth. High-resolution anoscopy was indicated in more than one third of results. As anal cancer is potentially preventable, these important findings need to be considered when selecting the best approach for anal cancer screening programs.

  10. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  11. Anal fistula. Past and present.

    PubMed

    Zubaidi, Ahmad M

    2014-09-01

    Anal fistula is a common benign condition that typically describes a miscommunication between the anorectum and the perianal skin, which may present de novo, or develop after acute anorectal abscess. Athough anal fistulae are benign, the condition can still negatively influence a patient's quality of life by causing minor pain, social hygienic embarrassment, and in severe cases, frank sepsis. Despite its long history and prevalence, anal fistula management remains one of the most challenging and controversial topics in colorectal surgery today. The end goals of treatment include draining the local infection, eradicating the fistulous tract, and minimizing recurrence and incontinence rates. The goal of this review is to ensure surgeons and physicians are aware of the different imaging and treatment choices available, and to report expected outcomes of the various surgical modalities so they may select the most suitable treatment. 

  12. Anal sphincter structure and function in homosexual males engaging in anoreceptive intercourse.

    PubMed

    Chun, A B; Rose, S; Mitrani, C; Silvestre, A J; Wald, A

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate the structure and function of the internal (IAS) and external (EAS) anal sphincters in anoreceptive homosexual men and to determine whether anoreceptive intercourse (ARI) is associated with a higher risk of incontinence in this population. We studied 14 anoreceptive homosexual males and 10 age-matched non-anoreceptive heterosexual males in a controlled, prospective cohort study. Subjects underwent evaluation of resting and maximum squeeze anal canal pressures (maximum squeeze pressure obtained over resting pressure) by station pull-through technique, using a manometric perfusion catheter followed by endoanal ultrasonography to evaluate the structure of the IAS and EAS. Manometry also was performed in age-matched male controls. All subjects completed a questionnaire that assessed sexual practices and bowel habits, including fecal incontinence. Resting pressures were significantly lower in subjects engaging in ARI (70.7 +/- 3.2 mm Hg vs. 91.4 +/- 5.2 mm Hg; mean +/- SEM, p < 0.003), whereas there was no significant difference in the mean maximum squeeze pressures, compared with controls (177.1 +/- 14.1 mm Hg vs. 151.8 +/- 19.6 mm Hg; mean +/- SEM, p = 0.32). No disruptions of the IAS or EAS were identified in either the anoreceptive or control group. Anoreceptive men tended to have thinner anal sphincters than controls, but the difference was not statistically significant. Furthermore, there were no complaints of fecal incontinence by the study subjects. Passive ARI is associated with decreased resting anal canal pressures, but total pressures are normal. There were no IAS or EAS defects, as well as no fecal incontinence, in our subjects. Better relaxation of the ARI subjects during anal canal manometry may explain the lower resting pressures.

  13. Panama Canal capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bronzini, M.S.

    1995-04-27

    Predicting the transit capacities of the various Panama Canal alternatives required analyzing data on present Canal operations, adapting and extending an existing computer simulation model, performing simulation runs for each of the alternatives, and using the simulation model outputs to develop capacity estimates. These activities are summarized in this paper. A more complete account may be found in the project final report (TAMS 1993). Some of the material in this paper also appeared in a previously published paper (Rosselli, Bronzini, and Weekly 1994).

  14. ASTER Suez Canal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-06

    One of the most important waterways in the world, the Suez Canal runs north to south across the Isthmus of Suez in northeastern Egypt. This image of the canal covers an area 36 kilometers (22 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It shows the northern part of the canal, with the Mediterranean Sea just visible in the upper right corner. The Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez, an arm of the Red Sea. The artificial canal provides an important shortcut for ships operating between both European and American ports and ports located in southern Asia, eastern Africa, and Oceania. With a length of about 195 kilometers (121 miles) and a minimum channel width of 60 meters (197 feet), the Suez Canal is able to accommodate ships as large as 150,000 tons fully loaded. Because no locks interrupt traffic on this sea level waterway, the transit time only averages about 15 hours. ASTER acquired this scene on May 19, 2000. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02661

  15. How Many Cancers Are Linked with HPV Each Year?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Year Rates by Race and Ethnicity HPV-Associated Anal Cancer HPV-Associated Cervical Cancer HPV-Associated Oropharyngeal ... in the CDC genotyping study, the percentage of anal cancer caused by HPV was used because recent ...

  16. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, 18) recombinant vaccine (gardasil(®)): a review of its use in the prevention of premalignant anogenital lesions, cervical and anal cancers, and genital warts.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Paul L

    2014-07-01

    Quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) [types 6, 11, 16, 18] recombinant vaccine (Gardasil(®); Silgard(®)) is composed of virus-like particles formed by self-assembly of recombinant L1 capsid protein from each of HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18. It is indicated for use from the age of 9 years as a two- or three-dose vaccination course over 6 months for the prevention of premalignant anogenital lesions, cervical and anal cancers, and genital warts caused by the vaccine HPV types. In placebo-controlled trials, quadrivalent HPV vaccine provided high-level protection against infection or disease caused by the vaccine HPV types over 2-4 years in females aged 15-45 years who were negative for the vaccine HPV types, and provided a degree of cross-protection against certain non-vaccine HPV types. The vaccine also provided high-level protection against persistent infection, anogenital precancerous lesions and genital warts caused by the vaccine HPV types over 3 years in susceptible males aged 16-26 years. Protection has been demonstrated for up to 8 years. In subjects who were negative for the vaccine HPV types, high seroconversion rates and high levels of anti-HPV antibodies were observed in females of all age ranges from 9 to 45 years and in males aged 9-26 years. The vaccine was generally well tolerated and was usually predicted to be cost effective in girls and young women. Therefore, quadrivalent HPV vaccine offers an effective means to substantially reduce the burden of HPV-related anogenital disease in females and males, particularly cervical cancer and genital warts.

  17. Vaccine-preventable anal human papillomavirus in Australian gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Poynten, I Mary; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Jin, Fengyi; Templeton, David J; Machalek, Dorothy A; Cornall, Alyssa; Phillips, Samuel; Fairley, Christopher K; Garland, Suzanne M; Law, Carmella; Carr, Andrew; Hillman, Richard J; Grulich, Andrew E

    2017-06-01

    HPV causes ~90% of anal cancer and HPV16 is the type most commonly associated with anal cancer. Gay and bisexual men (GBM) are at greatly increased risk. We investigated patterns of vaccine-preventable anal HPV in older GBM. The Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer (SPANC) is an ongoing, prospective cohort study of HIV-positive and HIV-negative Australian GBM. Participants completed questionnaires and underwent an anal swab for HPV genotyping using Roche Linear Array. We analysed baseline data from SPANC by HPV type, mean number of types, stratified by age and HIV status. Anal HPV results from 606 (98.2%) of 617 participants (median age 49 years, 35.7% HIV-positive) showed 525 (86.7%) had ≥1 HPV type and 178 (29.4%) had HPV16. Over one third of participants (214, 35.3%) had no nonavalent vaccine-preventable types detected. Two (0.3%) participants had all quadrivalent types and none had all nonavalent vaccine types. HIV-positive participants (p<0.001) and younger participants (p=0.059) were more likely to have more vaccine-preventable HPV types detected. Anal HPV was highly prevalent in this largely community-based GBM cohort. Vaccine-preventable HPV16 was detected in approximately one third of participants. These findings suggest that the potential efficacy of HPV vaccination of older GBM should be explored. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 'Frozen finger' in anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Chintamani; Tandon, Megha; Khandelwal, Rohan

    2009-10-01

    Acute anal fissures are usually managed by various invasive and non-invasive modalities ranging from simple lifestyle changes to chemical and surgical sphincterotomies. Frozen finger, prepared using a water-filled ordinary rubber glove, was successfully used in one hundred patients, thus providing a cost-effective and simple solution to the problem.

  19. Effect of semicircular canal dehiscence on contralateral canal bone thickness.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Tello, Borja; Cisneros, Ana; Crovetto, Rafael; Martinez, Claudio; Rodriguez, Olívia; Lecumberri, Iñigo; Crovetto, Miguel Ángel; Whyte, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if the existence of dehiscence in the superior or posterior semicircular canal was associated with the thinning of the bone roof in the rest of the vertical canals (superior or posterior). The thickness of the superior and posterior semicircular canals contralateral to a dehiscence was studied using computerized tomography and compared statistically. When a superior semicircular canal had a dehiscence, the contralateral canal showed a significant mean decrease in its thickness of 0.5mm (SD: 0.3 mm). This was not the case if the dehiscence was in the posterior semicircular canal, where the thickness of 2.1 mm remained unchanged (SD: 1.2 mm; P=.49). When a posterior semicircular canal showed dehiscence, no significant thinning was shown in the superior semicircular (1 mm; SD: 0.4) or in the posterior contralateral (1.3 mm; SD: 0.3) canals. The existence of a dehiscence in the superior semicircular canal is associated with bone thinning in the canal on the opposite side, but not with the posterior semicircular canal. In contrast, if the dehiscence is in the posterior semicircular canal, contralateral and superior canal thickness is not modified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. The Semicircular Canal Microphonic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbitt, R. D.; Boyle, R.; Highstein, S. M.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Present experiments were designed to quantify the alternating current (AC) component of the semicircular canal microphonic for angular motion stimulation as a function of stimulus frequency and amplitude. The oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau, was used as the experimental model. Calibrated mechanical indentation of the horizontal canal duct was used as a stimulus to generate hair-cell and afferent responses reproducing those present during head rotation. Sensitivity to polarization of the endolymph DC voltage re: perilymph was also investigated. Modulation of endolymph voltage was recorded using conventional glass electrodes and lock-in amplification over the frequency range 0.2-80 Hz. Access to the endolymph for inserting voltage recording and current passing electrodes was obtained by sectioning the anterior canal at its apex and isolating the cut ends in air. For sinusoidal stimulation below approx.10 Hz, the horizontal semicircular canal AC microphonic was nearly independent of stimulus frequency and equal to approximately 4 microV per micron indent (equivalent to approx. 1 microV per deg/s). A saturating nonlinearity decreasing the microphonic gain was present for stimuli exceeding approx.3 micron indent (approx. 12 deg/s angular velocity). The phase was not sensitive to the saturating nonlinearity. The microphonic exhibited a resonance near 30Hz consistent with basolateral current hair cell resonance observed previously in voltage-clamp records from semicircular canal hair cells. The magnitude and phase of the microphonic exhibited sensitivity to endolymphatic polarization consistent with electro-chemical reversal of hair cell transduction currents.

  1. The Semicircular Canal Microphonic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbitt, R. D.; Boyle, R.; Highstein, S. M.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Present experiments were designed to quantify the alternating current (AC) component of the semicircular canal microphonic for angular motion stimulation as a function of stimulus frequency and amplitude. The oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau, was used as the experimental model. Calibrated mechanical indentation of the horizontal canal duct was used as a stimulus to generate hair-cell and afferent responses reproducing those present during head rotation. Sensitivity to polarization of the endolymph DC voltage re: perilymph was also investigated. Modulation of endolymph voltage was recorded using conventional glass electrodes and lock-in amplification over the frequency range 0.2-80 Hz. Access to the endolymph for inserting voltage recording and current passing electrodes was obtained by sectioning the anterior canal at its apex and isolating the cut ends in air. For sinusoidal stimulation below approx.10 Hz, the horizontal semicircular canal AC microphonic was nearly independent of stimulus frequency and equal to approximately 4 microV per micron indent (equivalent to approx. 1 microV per deg/s). A saturating nonlinearity decreasing the microphonic gain was present for stimuli exceeding approx.3 micron indent (approx. 12 deg/s angular velocity). The phase was not sensitive to the saturating nonlinearity. The microphonic exhibited a resonance near 30Hz consistent with basolateral current hair cell resonance observed previously in voltage-clamp records from semicircular canal hair cells. The magnitude and phase of the microphonic exhibited sensitivity to endolymphatic polarization consistent with electro-chemical reversal of hair cell transduction currents.

  2. Natural History of Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection in Heterosexual Women and Risks Associated With Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Ma, Yifei; Farhat, Sepideh; Jay, Julie; Hanson, Evelyn; Benningfield, Susanna; Jonte, Janet; Godwin-Medina, Cheryl; Wilson, Robert; Shiboski, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is more common in women than in men, yet little is known about the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) in women. The objective was to examine the natural history of anal HPV in heterosexual women. Methods. Young women participating in an HPV cohort study were seen at 4-month intervals for cervical and anal HPV testing. Time to clearance was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier approach; risks for persistence were assessed using Cox regression models. Results. Seventy-five women (mean age, 23.5 ± 4.1 years) who tested positive for anal HPV were followed for a mean of 84.5 ± 44.9 months. By 3 years, 82.5% of anal non-16 high-risk (HR) HPV, 82.6% of low-risk (LR) HPV, and 76.2% of HPV-16 infections had cleared. By 3 years, only 36.4% of women had become negative for all HPV types. In the multivariable model, concurrent cervical HPV-16 (P < .001), weekly alcohol use (P = .015), anal touching during sex (P = .045), recent anal sex (P = .04), and no condom use during anal sex (P = .04) were associated with HPV-16 persistence. Greater number of new sex partners (P = .024) and condom use during vaginal sex (P = .003) were associated with clearance. Similar associations were found for clearance in all HR-HPV infections. Only concomitant cervical HPV was associated with non-16 HR-HPV persistence. Conclusions. The majority of anal HPV infections cleared within 3 years. HPV-16 infections were slower to clear than other HR-HPV infections, consistent with its role in anal cancer. Specific sexual behaviors were associated with persistence, suggesting that education and behavioral interventions may decrease persistence. PMID:24368624

  3. 55. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, looking southwest. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  4. 54. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, looking southwest. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  5. Irinotecan, Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Liver Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  6. Squamous intraepithelial lesions of the anal squamocolumnar junction: Histopathological classification and HPV genotyping.

    PubMed

    Clavero, Omar; McCloskey, Jenny; Molina, Vicente Marco; Quirós, Beatriz; Bravo, Ignacio G; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Pimenoff, Ville N

    2017-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related anal cancer lesions are often found adjacent to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ). We have assessed the histopathology and associated HPV genotypes in anal SCJ lesions in surgically excised anal warts in HIV-negative and -positive patients. Histopathology identified 47 squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) adjacent to the SCJ amongst a total of 145 cases of clinically diagnosed anal condylomata. The anal SCJ lesions were further analyzed with p16, CK7 and p63 immunohistochemistry and HPV genotyping. Sixteen (16/47) of the excised anal wart lesions contained HSIL; Three were HSIL and exclusively associated with oncogenic HPVs. A further thirteen (13/47) were mixed lesions. Of these eight were HSILs with LSIL and six were HSILs with papillary immature metaplasia (PIM); Ten of the mixed lesions were associated with one or more oncogenic HPVs, while three cases were exclusively associated with HPV6. Clinically diagnosed anal warts cannot be assumed to be limited to low-grade lesions as anal warts of the SCJ often show heterogeneous lesions, with coexistence of LSIL, PIM, and HSIL. Lesions showing PIM, however, may mimic HSIL, because they are hypercellular, but lack the nuclear atypia and conspicuous mitotic activity of HSIL; and are p16 negative. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anal sphincter trauma and anal incontinence in urogynecological patients.

    PubMed

    Guzmán Rojas, R A; Kamisan Atan, I; Shek, K L; Dietz, H P

    2015-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of evidence of residual obstetric anal sphincter injury, to evaluate its association with anal incontinence (AI) and to establish minimal diagnostic criteria for significant (residual) external anal sphincter (EAS) trauma. This was a retrospective analysis of ultrasound volume datasets of 501 patients attending a tertiary urogynecological unit. All patients underwent a standardized interview including determination of St Mark's score for those presenting with AI. Tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) was used to evaluate the EAS and the internal anal sphincter (IAS). Among a total of 501 women, significant EAS and IAS defects were found in 88 and 59, respectively, and AI was reported by 69 (14%). Optimal prediction of AI was achieved using a model that included four abnormal slices of the EAS on TUI. IAS defects were found to be less likely to be associated with AI. In a multivariable model controlling for age and IAS trauma, the presence of at least four abnormal slices gave an 18-fold (95% CI, 9-36; P < 0.0001) increase in the likelihood of AI, compared with those with fewer than four abnormal slices. Using receiver-operating characteristics curve statistics, this model yielded an area under the curve of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.80-0.92). Both AI and significant EAS trauma are common in patients attending urogynecological units, and are strongly associated with each other. Abnormalities of the IAS seem to be less important in predicting AI. Our data support the practice of using, as a minimal criterion, defects present in four of the six slices on TUI for the diagnosis of significant EAS trauma. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Puborectal sling interposition combined with seton drainage for pouch-vaginal fistula after rectal cancer surgery with colonic J pouch-anal reconstruction: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Aya; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Okigami, Masato; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    The management of postoperative rectovaginal fistula (RVF) after rectal cancer surgery is difficult and requires reconstruction of the anastomotic site and fistula. Though various surgical procedures have been reported for the repair of RVFs, the results of surgical repair are often unsatisfactory, and failure of the initial repair leads to difficulty in the later operations. Furthermore, it has been reported that cases associated with local infection result in low success rates. We report a case of an 80-year-old woman with a recurrent colonic J pouch-vaginal fistula after anoabdominal rectal resection with partial internal sphincteric resection, who achieved a good outcome following a repair using a puborectal sling interposition combined with seton drainage. It may be a useful option for RVF management in repair of such pouch-vaginal fistula after coloanal anastomosis with intersphincteric resection.

  9. [Predictive factors of 2-month postpartum anal incontinence among patients with an obstetrical anal sphincter injury].

    PubMed

    Ménard, S; Poupon, C; Bourguignon, J; Théau, A; Goffinet, F; Le Ray, C

    2016-10-01

    To determine prevalence of short-term postpartum anal incontinence after obstetrical anal sphincter injury and prognostic factors. Retrospective study including every patient with an obstetrical anal sphincter injury between January 2006 and December 2012 in one tertiary maternity unit. Patients were interviewed and examined at 2-month postpartum. Anal incontinence was defined by the presence of at least one of the following symptoms: flatus incontinence, faecal incontinence and faecal urgency. Among 17,110 patients who delivered vaginally during period study, 134 (0.8%) presented an anal sphincter injury. Postpartum obstetrical data were available for 110 of them. Among those patients, 50 women (45.5%) had at least one symptom of anal incontinence at 2-month postpartum and 8 (7.3%) had faecal incontinence. Only maternal age and second stage duration were significantly associated with anal incontinence after obstetrical anal sphincter injury. The degree of sphincter damage at delivery (IIIa, b, c, IV) was not associated with the risk of anal incontinence at 2-month postpartum. Maternal age and second stage duration were the only risk factor for anal incontinence after obstetrical anal sphincter injury in this study. High prevalence of anal incontinence at 2-month postpartum of obstetrical anal sphincter injury is observed no matter what is the degree of anal sphincter damage. Our results highlight the importance to diagnose all obstetrical anal sphincter injuries whatever the degree of damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrical stimulation of anal sphincter or pudendal nerve improves anal sphincter pressure.

    PubMed

    Damaser, Margot S; Salcedo, Levilester; Wang, Guangjian; Zaszczurynski, Paul; Cruz, Michelle A; Butler, Robert S; Jiang, Hai-Hong; Zutshi, Massarat

    2012-12-01

    Stimulation of the pudendal nerve or the anal sphincter could provide therapeutic options for fecal incontinence with little involvement of other organs. The goal of this project was to assess the effects of pudendal nerve and anal sphincter stimulation on bladder and anal pressures. Ten virgin female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocated to control (n = 2), perianal stimulation (n = 4), and pudendal nerve stimulation (n = 4) groups. A monopolar electrode was hooked to the pudendal nerve or placed on the anal sphincter. Aballoon catheter was inserted into the anus to measure anal pressure, and a catheter was inserted into the bladder via the urethra to measure bladder pressure. Bladder and anal pressures were measured with different electrical stimulation parameters and different timing of electrical stimulation relative to spontaneous anal sphincter contractions. Increasing stimulation current had the most dramatic effect on both anal and bladder pressures. An immediate increase in anal pressure was observed when stimulating either the anal sphincter or the pudendal nerve at stimulation values of 1 mA or 2 mA. No increase in anal pressure was observed for lower current values. Bladder pressure increased at high current during anal sphincter stimulation, but not as much as during pudendal nerve stimulation. Increased bladder pressure during anal sphincter stimulation was due to contraction of the abdominal muscles. Electrical stimulation caused an increase in anal pressures with bladder involvement only at high current. These initial results suggest that electrical stimulation can increase anal sphincter pressure, enhancing continence control.

  11. 56. View of lined canal looking east toward unlined canal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. View of lined canal looking east toward unlined canal, from road bridge crossing lined canal. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  12. Synchronous mucinous adenocarcinoma of the recto sigmoid revealed by and seeding an anal fistula. (A case report and review of the literature).

    PubMed

    Spiridakis, Konstadinos G; Sfakianakis, Elefterios E; Flamourakis, Manthos E; Intzepogazoglou, Dimitra S; Tsagataki, Eleni S; Ximeris, Nikolaos E; Rachmanis, Efstathios K; Gionis, Ioannis G; Kostakis, Giorgos E; Christodoulakis, Manousos S

    2017-01-01

    There are few cases of synchronous rectal adenocarcinoma revealed by an anal fistula. The diagnosis of synchronous mucinous adenocarcinoma of the recto sigmoid and anal canal remains difficult. The chronic anal fistula can be mistaken as the common manifestation of a benign perianal abscess or fistula. We present a rare case of a Greek Caucasian 79year old male patient with anal fistula and a recurrent perianal abscess who subsequently was found to have developed synchronous rectosigmoid and perianal mucinous adenocarcinoma on biopsy. The histological exam revealed mucinous adenocarcinoma in two sites, representing two tumors, cells were immunopositive for cytokeratin 20 and negative in cytokeratin 7. The patient underwent "laparoscopic extralevator abdominoperineal excision " with both lesions being resected. There is no recurrence after four years of follow up. This case highlights the importance of high suspicion, further investigation and the need of biopsy in all anal fistulae. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Love canal questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a 3-month monitoring study of the Love Canal area near Niagara Falls, N.Y., after the federal government pronounced that a potential health risk existed due to chemical waste dumps. In 1982 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) decided that the area was habitable, subject to implementation of effective safeguards against leakage from the canal and to cleaning up of the contaminants. Now, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) has announced that, with the information available, it is not possible to demonstrate with certainty that unsafe levels do not exist within the so-called “emergency declaration area” (EDA).

  14. SU-D-9A-02: Relative Effects of Threshold Choice and Spatial Resolution Modeling On SUV and Volume Quantification in F18-FDG PET Imaging of Anal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, F; Bowsher, J; Palta, M; Czito, B; Willett, C; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET imaging with F18-FDG is utilized for treatment planning, treatment assessment, and prognosis. A region of interest (ROI) encompassing the tumor may be determined on the PET image, often by a threshold T on the PET standard uptake values (SUVs). Several studies have shown prognostic value for relevant ROI properties including maximum SUV value (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total glycolytic activity (TGA). The choice of threshold T may affect mean SUV value (SUVmean), MTV, and TGA. Recently spatial resolution modeling (SRM) has been introduced on many PET systems. SRM may also affect these ROI properties. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relative influence of SRM and threshold choice T on SUVmean, MTV, TGA, and SUVmax. Methods: For 9 anal cancer patients, 18F-FDG PET scans were performed prior to treatment. PET images were reconstructed by 2 iterations of Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (OSEM), with and without SRM. ROI contours were generated by 5 different SUV threshold values T: 2.5, 3.0, 30%, 40%, and 50% of SUVmax. Paired-samples t tests were used to compare SUVmean, MTV, and TGA (a) for SRM on versus off and (b) between each pair of threshold values T. SUVmax was also compared for SRM on versus off. Results: For almost all (57/60) comparisons of 2 different threshold values, SUVmean, MTV, and TGA showed statistically significant variation. For comparison of SRM on versus off, there were no statistically significant changes in SUVmax and TGA, but there were statistically significant changes in MTV for T=2.5 and T=3.0 and in SUVmean for all T. Conclusion: The near-universal statistical significance of threshold choice T suggests that, regarding harmonization across sites, threshold choice may be a greater concern than choice of SRM. However, broader study is warranted, e.g. other iterations of OSEM should be considered.

  15. Anal human papillomavirus infection: prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of related lesions.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, Maria; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Ravenda, Paola Simona; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is mostly asymptomatic, but may also have many diverse clinical signs encompassing benign ano-genital lesions, and carcinomas. Recently, interest has also particularly focused on anal cancer since, over the last decades, its incidence has been greatly increasing in developed countries, both in women and men and is drastically higher in specific risk groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-1 infected individuals. Approximately 88% of anal cancer cases worldwide are associated with HPV infection. This review summarizes our current understanding of anal HPV infection, discussing its epidemiology and risk factors in various populations, and the state of the art in the detection of anal HPV infection and its related lesions through both cytology and histology. Finally, we discuss the clinical management and therapy for these lesions.

  16. Successful hepatectomy for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal—a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Tercia Tarciane; Belotto, Marcos; Peixoto, Renata D’Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Despite rare, metastatic anal carcinoma confers a poor prognosis. Systemic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for advanced disease while the role of biologics and/or surgical resection of metastatic disease are anecdotal. Compared to isolated liver colorectal or neuroendocrine cancer liver metastases, there is far less experience with resection or nonsurgical local ablative procedures for patients with metastatic anal carcinoma to the liver. We report the case of a 67-year-old woman with metastatic anal carcinoma to the liver who was successfully treated with liver resection and remains free of relapse more than one year later. PMID:28078133

  17. Endoanal MRI of the anal sphincter complex: correlation with cross-sectional anatomy and histology.

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, S M; Stoker, J; Zwamborn, A W; Den Hollander, J C; Kuiper, J W; Entius, C A; Laméris, J S

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate the in vivo endoanal MRI findings of the anal sphincter with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Fourteen patients with rectal tumours were examined with a rigid endoanal MR coil before undergoing abdominoperineal resection. In addition, 12 cadavers were used to obtain cross-sectional anatomical sections. The images were correlated with the histology and anatomy of the resected rectal specimens as well as with the cross-sectional anatomical sections of the 12 cadavers. The findings in 8 patients, 11 rectal preparations, and 10 cadavers, could be compared. In these cases, there was an excellent correlation between endoanal MRI and the cross-sectional cadaver anatomy and histology. With endoanal MRI, all muscle layers of the anal canal wall, comprising the internal anal sphincter, longitudinal muscle, the external anal sphincter and the puborectalis muscle were clearly visible. The levator ani muscle and ligamentous attachments were also well demonstrated. The perianal anatomical spaces, containing multiple septae, were clearly visible. In conclusion, endoanal MRI is excellent for visualising the anal sphincter complex and the findings show a good correlation with the cross-sectional anatomy and histology. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8982844

  18. Chronic anal fissures: Open lateral internal sphincterotomy result; a case series study.

    PubMed

    Salih, Abdulwahid M

    2017-03-01

    Anal fissure are defined as a tear in the skin of the anal canal distal to dentate line. Although still there are controversies about the exact management, lateral sphincterotomy is promising. The aim of this series is to present the outcome of lateral sphincterotomy for internal anal sphincter in term of patient satisfaction and complication. A prospective single cohort study, 190 patients, who were undergone lateral sphincterotomy for internal anal sphincter from 2010 to 2014, were analyzed. The operation was performed as a day case procedure. The median duration of follow up was 5 years (ranging from 3 to 6). The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social sciences (SPSS) version 22. Descriptive statistic was used to describe findings. Forty three males (22.6%) and 147 females (77.4%) with a mean ± SD of age of 31.19 ± 7.78 years. Constipation was reported in 152 (80%) patients, bleeding in 131 (68.6%) cases, and pain in 142 (74.7%) patients. The median duration of the disease was 20 months (ranging from 1 to 30 months). Post-operatively, patient satisfaction was high (98.4%) with only 3 cases (1.6%) of recurrence. Conclusion: lateral sphincterotomy for internal anal sphincter, along, is the procedure of choice for management of CAF because it is effective and it can cure the disease in nearly all patients with good patient satisfaction.

  19. The male ScreenING Study: prevalence of HPV-related genital and anal lesions in an urban cohort of HIV-positive men in Germany.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, W; Wieland, U; Skaletz-Rorowski, A; Brockmeyer, N H; Swoboda, J; Kreuter, A; Michalik, C; Potthoff, A

    2016-06-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) induce condylomata, anogenital cancers and their precursor lesions as anal or penile intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN/PIN). HIV-positive individuals have an increased risk for the development of anogenital HPV-induced lesions. Estimation of the prevalence of HPV-related anogenital benign and malignant lesions in HIV-infected men attending a screening programme. Four hundred HIV-positive men [98% men who have sex with men (MSM)] were enrolled in this prospective study from 2008 to 2011. All patients received an inspection of the anogenital region, digital rectal examination, high-resolution anoscopy (HRA), anal cytology, anal/penile histology if required, and HPV-typing of anal and penile swabs. At baseline, 75% (n = 302) of the men had abnormal anal cytological/histological results. 41% presented with low-grade (n = 164), 24% with high-grade anal dysplasia (n = 95) and two men with invasive anal cancer. 2.3% had PIN (n = 9) and one patient had penile cancer at baseline. Throughout the study period, 75% had anal dysplasia (low-grade n = 177, high-grade n = 125), 3.3% (n = 13) had PIN and two further patients developed anal cancer. Within the study period, 52.8% (n = 211) had condylomata (49% anal, 15% penile, 11% anal plus penile condylomata). At baseline, 88.5% of anal and 39.3% of penile swabs were HPV-DNA positive, and 77.8% of anal and 26.5% of penile swabs carried high-risk HPV-types. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV-type. HIV-positive MSM have a high risk for HPV-induced condylomata, (pre)malignant anogenital lesions and anogenital cancers. Screening for HPV-induced dysplasia is crucial to avoid progression to invasive carcinomas. Additionally, HPV-vaccination recommendations should be extended to high-risk populations. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  20. The presence of bovine papillomavirus type 4 DNA is not required for the progression to, or the maintenance of, the malignant state in cancers of the alimentary canal in cattle.

    PubMed

    Campo, M S; Moar, M H; Sartirana, M L; Kennedy, I M; Jarrett, W F

    1985-07-01

    In the Western Highlands of Scotland there is a very high incidence of alimentary cancers in cattle. The carcinomas of the upper alimentary canal are found in association with virus-induced benign papillomas, and transformation of papillomas to carcinomas has been observed. Strong circumstantial evidence suggests that the progression to malignancy is due to the interplay between the virus, bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV-4), and carcinogen(s) present in bracken fern, which infests the marginal upland grazing grounds. The carcinomas are often accompanied by adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the lower bowels. To elucidate the role of the virus in the transformation process, we have analysed several malignancies of the alimentary canal, and have detected the viral genome in only one case of transforming papilloma of the oesophagus and one case of carcinoma of the tongue. We conclude that, although required for the induction of papillomas, the presence of the BPV-4 DNA is not necessary for the progression to, or the maintenance of, the transformed state.

  1. Efficacy of nitroglycerine ointment in the treatment of pediatric anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Joda, Ali E; Al-Mayoof, Ali F

    2017-04-08

    Anal fissure is the most common anal disease in children. In the past few decades, the understanding of its pathophysiology has led to a progressive reduction in invasive procedures in favor of conservative treatment based on stool softeners and the relaxation of the anal sphincter. This randomized controlled study assessed the safety and efficacy of nitroglycerine (NTG) ointment in the treatment of pediatric anal fissure, which had not yet been proved. An unequal randomized controlled study included 105 pediatric patients with anal fissure who had presented to the private and outpatient clinics of the Central Teaching Hospital of Pediatrics during the period from February 2015 to May 2016. The control group consisted of 70 patients. Both groups were treated with classical conservative therapy of sitz bath, stool softener, and local anesthetic. In the second group, chemical sphincterotomy with 0.2% NTG ointment was used in 35 patients, and was applied at the anal canal twice daily for 8weeks. The primary outcomes of symptomatic improvement and healed fissure, as well as side effects, were analyzed. The average age of patients was 2years (range, 4months to 5years). Patients in the NTG group had 77% symptomatic relief and 60% healed fissure compared to the control group, which had 54% and 32.8% respectively. All were statistically significant. No serious adverse effects were noticed during the treatment period. The use of 0.2% NTG ointment is an effective therapy for anal fissure in children in terms of good healing rate and rapid symptom relief, but it has the drawback of a long treatment period, making patient compliance more difficult, in addition to the problems of tolerance and recurrence. Prospective randomized controlled study (treatment study). Type 2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche human papillomavirus (HPV) linear array for HPV genotyping in anal swab samples.

    PubMed

    Low, Huey Chi; Silver, Michelle I; Brown, Brandon J; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M; Gravitt, Patti E; Woo, Yin Ling

    2015-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors.