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Sample records for anal sphincter muscle

  1. Sphincter Contractility After Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Autograft into the Cryoinjured Anal Sphincters of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Haet Nim; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Jun-Seok; Lee, Hye Seung

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to determine whether the injection of muscle-derived stem cells into the anal sphincter can improve functional properties in a fecal incontinence rat model. Methods Cryoinjured rats were utilized as a fecal incontinence model. The gastrocnemius muscles of normal three-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the purification of the muscle-derived stem cells. The experimental group was divided into three subgroups: normal control; cryoinjured; and muscle-derived stem cells (3 × 106 cells) injection group of cryoinjured rats. All groups were subsequently employed in contractility experiments using muscle strips from the anal sphincter, one week after preparation. Results Contractility in the cryoinjured group was significantly lower than in the control after treatment with acetylcholine and KCl. In the muscle-derived stem cells injection group, contraction amplitude was higher than in the cryoinjured group but not significantly (20.5 ± 21.3 vs. 17.3 ± 3.4 g per gram tissue, with acetylcholine (10−4 mol/l); 31 ± 14.2 vs. 18.4 ± 7.9 g per gram tissue, with KCl (10−4 mol/l)). PKH-26-labeled transplanted cells were detected in all of the grafted sphincters. Differentiated muscle masses stained positively for alpha smooth muscle actin and myosin heavy chain at the muscle-derived stem cells injection sites. Conclusions This is the first study reporting that autologous muscle-derived stem cell grafts may be a tool for improving anal sphincter function. PMID:18536965

  2. Relationship Among Anal Sphincter Injury, Patulous Anal Canal, and Anal Pressures in Patients with Anorectal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, David; Harvey, Doris M.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The anal sphincters and puborectalis are routinely imaged with an endoanal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil, which does not assess co-aptation of the anal canal at rest. Using a MRI torso coil, we identified a patulous anal canal in some patients with anorectal disorders. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between anal sphincter and puborectalis injury, a patulous anal canal, and anal pressures. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 119 patients who underwent MRI and manometry analysis of anal anatomy and pressures, respectively, from February 2011 through March 2013 at the Mayo Clinic. Anal pressures were determined by high-resolution manometry, anal sphincter and puborectalis injury was determined by endoanal MRI, and anal canal integrity was determined by torso MRI. Associations between manometric and anatomical parameters were evaluated with univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Fecal incontinence (55 patients, 46%) and constipation (36 patients. 30%) were the main indications for testing; 49 patients (41%) had a patulous anal canal, which was associated with injury to more than 1 muscle (all P≤.001) and internal sphincter (P<.01), but not puborectalis (P=.09) or external sphincter (P=.06) injury. Internal (P<.01) and external sphincter injury (P=.02) and a patulous canal (P<.001), but not puborectalis injury, predicted anal resting pressure. A patulous anal canal was the only significant predictor (P<.01) of the anal squeeze pressure increment. Conclusions Patients with anorectal disorders commonly have a patulous anal canal, associated with more severe anal injury, anal resting pressure, and squeeze pressure increment. It is therefore important to identify patulous anal canal because it appears to be a marker of not only anal sphincter injury but disturbances beyond sphincter injury, such as damage to the anal cushions or anal denervation. PMID:25869638

  3. Bimodal effect of oxidative stress in internal anal sphincter smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Rattan, Satish

    2015-09-01

    Changes in oxidative stress may affect basal tone and relaxation of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle in aging. We examined this issue by investigating the effects of the oxidative stress inducer 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY-83583) in basal as well as U-46619-stimulated tone, and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxation in rat IAS. LY-83583, which works via generation of reactive oxygen species in living cells, produced a bimodal effect in IAS tone: lower concentrations (0.1 nM to 10 μM) produced a concentration-dependent increase, while higher concentrations (50-100 μM) produced a decrease in IAS tone. An increase in IAS tone by lower concentrations was associated with an increase in RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) activity. This was evident by the increase in RhoA/ROCK in the particulate fractions, in ROCK activity, and in the levels of phosphorylated (p) (Thr696)-myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 and p(Thr18/Ser19)-20-kDa myosin light chain. Conversely, higher concentrations of LY-83583 produced inhibitory effects on RhoA/ROCK. Interestingly, both the excitatory and inhibitory effects of LY-83583 in the IAS were reversed by superoxide dismutase. The excitatory effects of LY-83583 were found to resemble those with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibition by l-NNA, since it produced a significant increase in the IAS tone and attenuated NANC relaxation. These effects of LY-83583 and l-NNA were reversible by l-arginine. This suggests the role of nNOS inhibition and RhoA/ROCK activation in the increase in IAS tone by LY-83583. These data have important implications in the pathophysiology and therapeutic targeting of rectoanal disorders, especially associated with IAS dysfunction. PMID:26138467

  4. Bimodal effect of oxidative stress in internal anal sphincter smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Rattan, Satish

    2015-09-01

    Changes in oxidative stress may affect basal tone and relaxation of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle in aging. We examined this issue by investigating the effects of the oxidative stress inducer 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY-83583) in basal as well as U-46619-stimulated tone, and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxation in rat IAS. LY-83583, which works via generation of reactive oxygen species in living cells, produced a bimodal effect in IAS tone: lower concentrations (0.1 nM to 10 μM) produced a concentration-dependent increase, while higher concentrations (50-100 μM) produced a decrease in IAS tone. An increase in IAS tone by lower concentrations was associated with an increase in RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) activity. This was evident by the increase in RhoA/ROCK in the particulate fractions, in ROCK activity, and in the levels of phosphorylated (p) (Thr696)-myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 and p(Thr18/Ser19)-20-kDa myosin light chain. Conversely, higher concentrations of LY-83583 produced inhibitory effects on RhoA/ROCK. Interestingly, both the excitatory and inhibitory effects of LY-83583 in the IAS were reversed by superoxide dismutase. The excitatory effects of LY-83583 were found to resemble those with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibition by l-NNA, since it produced a significant increase in the IAS tone and attenuated NANC relaxation. These effects of LY-83583 and l-NNA were reversible by l-arginine. This suggests the role of nNOS inhibition and RhoA/ROCK activation in the increase in IAS tone by LY-83583. These data have important implications in the pathophysiology and therapeutic targeting of rectoanal disorders, especially associated with IAS dysfunction.

  5. Bimodal effect of oxidative stress in internal anal sphincter smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit

    2015-01-01

    Changes in oxidative stress may affect basal tone and relaxation of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle in aging. We examined this issue by investigating the effects of the oxidative stress inducer 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione (LY-83583) in basal as well as U-46619-stimulated tone, and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxation in rat IAS. LY-83583, which works via generation of reactive oxygen species in living cells, produced a bimodal effect in IAS tone: lower concentrations (0.1 nM to 10 μM) produced a concentration-dependent increase, while higher concentrations (50–100 μM) produced a decrease in IAS tone. An increase in IAS tone by lower concentrations was associated with an increase in RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) activity. This was evident by the increase in RhoA/ROCK in the particulate fractions, in ROCK activity, and in the levels of phosphorylated (p) Thr696-myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 and pThr18/Ser19-20-kDa myosin light chain. Conversely, higher concentrations of LY-83583 produced inhibitory effects on RhoA/ROCK. Interestingly, both the excitatory and inhibitory effects of LY-83583 in the IAS were reversed by superoxide dismutase. The excitatory effects of LY-83583 were found to resemble those with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibition by l-NNA, since it produced a significant increase in the IAS tone and attenuated NANC relaxation. These effects of LY-83583 and l-NNA were reversible by l-arginine. This suggests the role of nNOS inhibition and RhoA/ROCK activation in the increase in IAS tone by LY-83583. These data have important implications in the pathophysiology and therapeutic targeting of rectoanal disorders, especially associated with IAS dysfunction. PMID:26138467

  6. Galectin-1-induced skeletal muscle cell differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells seeded on an acellular dermal matrix improves injured anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhao; Liu, Xiangui; Ren, Xianghai; Zhang, Qiulei; Zhang, Tingtao; Qian, Qun; Liu, Weicheng; Jiang, Congqing

    2016-05-01

    According to recent studies, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) transplanted via local or tail vein injection can improve healing after anal sphincter injury (ASI) in animal models. However, the transplanted MSCs do not generate skeletal muscle that completely resembles the natural anal sphincter structure. In the present study, we investigated whether bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs could be induced by Galectin-1 (Gal-1) to differentiate into skeletal muscle and whether the recellularization of an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) with skeletal muscle-differentiated MSCs represents a promising approach to restore ASI in a rat model. BM-MSCs subjected to adenovirus-mediated transfection with Gal-1-GFP (Ad-GFP-Gal-1) displayed increased Gal-1 and desmin expression and differentiated into skeletal muscle cells. MSCs transfected with Ad-GFP-Gal-1 (MSC-Gal-1) were seeded onto an ADM (ADM-MSC-Gal-1) via co-culture, and fusion was observed using a confocal laser scanning microscope. ADM-MSC-Gal-1, ADM-MSC, ADM-MSC-Ad, ADM, or a saline control was applied to a rat ASI model, and injury healing was evaluated via histological examination 6 weeks following treatment. ADM-MSC-Gal-1 treatment promoted significant healing after ASI and improved external anal sphincter contraction curves compared with the other treatments and also led to substantial skeletal muscle regeneration and neovascularization. Our results indicate that repair using ADMs and differentiated MSCs may improve muscle regeneration and restore ASI. PMID:27355329

  7. Development of a three-dimensional physiological model of the internal anal sphincter bioengineered in vitro from isolated smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Louise; Baar, Keith; Dennis, Robert G; Bitar, Khalil N

    2005-08-01

    Fecal incontinence affects people of all ages and social backgrounds and can have devastating psychological and economic consequences. This disorder is largely attributed to decreased mechanical efficiency of the internal anal sphincter (IAS), yet little is known about the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the malfunction of sphincteric smooth muscle at the cellular level. The object of this study was to develop a three-dimensional (3-D) physiological model of the IAS bioengineered in vitro from isolated smooth muscle cells. Smooth muscle cells isolated from the IAS of rabbits were seeded in culture on top of a loose fibrin gel, where they migrated and self-assembled in circumferential alignment. As the cells proliferated, the fibrin gel contracted around a 5-mm-diameter SYLGARD mold, resulting in a 3-D cylindrical ring of sphincteric tissue. We found that 1) the bioengineered IAS rings generated a spontaneous basal tone, 2) stimulation with 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP) caused a sustained decrease in the basal tone (relaxation) that was calcium-independent, 3) upon stimulation with ACh, bioengineered IAS rings showed a calcium- and concentration-dependent peak contraction at 30 s that was sustained for 4 min, 4) addition of 8-Br-cAMP induced rapid relaxation of ACh-induced contraction and force generation of IAS rings, and 5) bioengineered sphincter rings show striking functional differences when compared with bioengineered rings made from isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. This is the first report of a 3-D in vitro model of a gastrointestinal smooth muscle IAS. Bioengineered IAS rings demonstrate physiological functionality and may be used in the elucidation of the mechanisms causing sphincter malfunction.

  8. Nervous control of the internal anal sphincter of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, M; Gonella, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent nerve stimulation on the activity of longitudinal and circular coats of th anal sphincteric area have been studied on acute animals using extracellular electrical recordings. In addition, the effect of intramural sympathetic nerves stimulation has been investigated on anal sphincteric circular muscle, with the sucrose gap technique. 2. Hypogastric nerve stimulation elicited in anal sphincteric circular muscle slow time course depolarization responses (latency 200-400 msec) which were abolished by alpha-adrenergic blockers (dihydroergotamine, phentolamine). 3. Stimulation of the parasympathetic outflow to the internal anal sphincter (second ventral sacral root: VS2) inhibited spontaneous electrical activity of the circular muscle. Pharmacological arguments lead to the conclusion that the inhibition induced by VS2 stimulation is mediated through intramural non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (purinergic) inhibitory neurones. 4. Rectal distension caused an inhibition of the anal sphincteric circular muscle activity which persisted in the presence of atropine, phentolamine and propranolol, indicating that this inhibition was produced by non-adrenergic non-cholinergic intramural neurones. 5. VS2 stimulation produced only an activation of the longitudinal muscle of the sphincteric area, which was abolished by hexamethonium and atropine; in contrast, hypogastric nerve stimulation gave rise to an inhibition which was blocked by propranolol. These results indicate that the longitudinal muscle receives (1) an excitatory innervation from preganglionic parasympathetic nerves connected with intramural cholinergic neurones, and (2) an inhibitory sympathetic innervation from noradrenergic axons running in the hypogastric nerves. No inhibitory no-adrenergic non-cholinergic innervation was observed in the longitudinal muscle in response to VS2 stimulation. 6. The results obtained from simultaneous stimulation of VS2 and

  9. Increased anal basal pressure in chronic anal fissures may be caused by overreaction of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex.

    PubMed

    van Meegdenburg, Maxime M; Trzpis, Monika; Heineman, Erik; Broens, Paul M A

    2016-09-01

    Chronic anal fissure is a painful disorder caused by linear ulcers in the distal anal mucosa. Even though it counts as one of the most common benign anorectal disorders, its precise etiology and pathophysiology remains unclear. Current thinking is that anal fissures are caused by anal trauma and pain, which leads to internal anal sphincter hypertonia. Increased anal basal pressure leads to diminished anodermal blood flow and local ischemia, which delays healing and leads to chronic anal fissure. The current treatment of choice for chronic anal fissure is either lateral internal sphincterotomy or botulinum toxin injections. In contrast to current thinking, we hypothesize that the external, rather than the internal, anal sphincter is responsible for increased anal basal pressure in patients suffering from chronic anal fissure. We think that damage to the anal mucosa leads to hypersensitivity of the contact receptors of the anal-external sphincter continence reflex, resulting in overreaction of the reflex. Overreaction causes spasm of the external anal sphincter. This in turn leads to increased anal basal pressure, diminished anodermal blood flow, and ischemia. Ischemia, finally, prevents the anal fissure from healing. Our hypothesis is supported by two findings. The first concerned a chronic anal fissure patient with increased anal basal pressure (170mmHg) who had undergone lateral sphincterotomy. Directly after the operation, while the submucosal anesthetic was still active, basal anal pressure decreased to 80mmHg. Seven hours after the operation, when the anesthetic had completely worn off, basal anal pressure increased again to 125mmHg, even though the internal anal sphincter could no longer be responsible for the increase. Second, in contrast to previous studies, recent studies demonstrated that botulinum toxin influences external anal sphincter activity and, because it is a striated muscle relaxant, it seems reasonable to presume that it affects the striated

  10. Anal sphincter injuries during hemorrhoidectomy: a multi center study.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Rezvan; Mahjoubi, Bahar; Kadivar, Maryam; Azizi, Rasoul; Zahedi-Shoolami, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhoidectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with third or fourth-degree hemorrhoids. Although the majority of surgeons believe that surgical hemorrhoidectomy is the most effective approach with excellent results in the management of hemorrhoid disease, but hemorrhoidectomy is not a simple procedure. One of the complications of this surgery is an injury to anal sphincters that can lead to incontinency in some patients. In this study, we aimed to reveal the percentage of external and internal anal sphincter injuries in surgical hemorrhoidectomy. We prospectively enrolled 128 patients from April 2006 to February 2007. They underwent hemorrhoidectomy in three general hospitals in Tehran. All patients were in grade III or IV and underwent open hemorrhoidectomy (Milligan-Morgan). After surgery, all resected material was histopathologically examined by two expert pathologists and the results confirmed by other one if there is any discrepancy. From all specimens which sent to the pathology department 15.8% (21 Pts.) had muscle fibers that Smooth muscle fibers were seen in 80.5% (17 Pts.) of them and striated muscle fibers were found in 19.5% (4 Pts.). Although hemorrhoidectomy is a safe and effective method for treatment of hemorrhoid, but the inadvertent removal of smooth and striated muscle during open hemorrhoidectomy had raised concerns about its effects on postoperative anorectal function.

  11. Segmental and descending control of the external urethral and anal sphincters in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Mackel, R

    1979-01-01

    1. The present work concerns the contribution of the somatic central nervous system to two viscero-somatic reflexes, micturition and defecation. Descending and segmental actions and properties of the motoneurones innervating the striated external urethral and external anal sphincters were studied with intracellular recording in male cats, under chloralose anaesthesia. 2. Motoneurones innervating the external urethral and external anal sphincters were intermingled and most strongly concentrated in the lateral part of the ventral horn in the S2 segment of the spinal cord. 3. Stimulation of the S1 to S3 ipsilateral dorsal roots or of the homonymous pudendal nerve branches showed that less than half of the sphincter motoneurons receive monosynaptic excitatory connexions from low threshold afferents. 4. The after-hyperpolarization recorded in the external urethral and external anal sphincter motoneurones was relatively short lasting, not long lasting as would have been expected for motoneurones innervating slow-twitch, tonic type muscles. 5. There was no evidence for recurrent inhibition in pudendal motoneurones innervating the external urethral and external anal sphincters. 6. Descending excitation and inhibition to the sphincter motoneurones originated in the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis of the medullary reticular formation. The descending reticulospinal actions are comparable to those observed in hind limb motoneurones. 7. It is suggested that the segmental reflex connexions play a role in controlling bladder and rectal continence. The descending actions studied also modulate the segmental reflex actions and may provide voluntary control of the sphincter muscles. PMID:512936

  12. A rare case of leiomyoma of the internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Sturiale, Alessandro; Fabiani, Bernardina; Naldini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leiomyoma is a benign tumour which derives from the smooth muscle fibres and it may occurs in every site in which this type of muscle is present. Among all benign soft tissue tumours it represents almost 3.8% and its pathogenesis remains still unknown. Presentation of case The present case is about a 62 year old woman referred to our centre complaining anal and perineal pain which increase after defecation in association with the appearance of a nodule in the perianal region fixed to the anal sphincter. A 360° tridimensional transanal ultrasound was performed and it showed an anterior nodular thickening of the internal anal sphincter. After an inconclusive preoperative biopsy and a counselling with the patient, the surgeons decided to proceed with the surgical excision. The immunohistochemical examination confirmed the preoperative suspicion of leiomyoma. At 1 year follow-up the patient had not tumour-related symptoms or fecal incontinence and any signs of local recurrence at ultrasound imaging were demonstrated. Discussion Leiomyomas are relatively insensitive to chemotherapy whereby surgery is the treatment of choice and it should be adequate to the site and dimension of the lesion achieving a complete resection with free margins. A further close follow-up is needed too. Conclusion Nowadays there is not a gold standard technique to treat such kind of lesions and the decision of the best surgical approach should depend on the dimension and site. In fact, surgery aims to the oncological outcome trying also to minimize the possible post-operative functional complications. PMID:27078867

  13. Ultrasound imaging of the anal sphincter complex: a review.

    PubMed

    Abdool, Z; Sultan, A H; Thakar, R

    2012-07-01

    Endoanal ultrasound is now regarded as the gold standard for evaluating anal sphincter pathology in the investigation of anal incontinence. The advent of three-dimensional ultrasound has further improved our understanding of the two-dimensional technique. Endoanal ultrasound requires specialised equipment and its relative invasiveness has prompted clinicians to explore alternative imaging techniques. Transvaginal and transperineal ultrasound have been recently evaluated as alternative imaging modalities. However, the need for technique standardisation, validation and reporting is of paramount importance. We conducted a MEDLINE search (1950 to February 2010) and critically reviewed studies using the three imaging techniques in evaluating anal sphincter integrity.

  14. Challenges faced in the clinical application of artificial anal sphincters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-hui; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Shuang; Luo, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Fecal incontinence is an unresolved problem, which has a serious effect on patients, both physically and psychologically. For patients with severe symptoms, treatment with an artificial anal sphincter could be a potential option to restore continence. Currently, the Acticon Neosphincter is the only device certified by the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, the clinical safety and efficacy of the Acticon Neosphincter are evaluated and discussed. Furthermore, some other key studies on artificial anal sphincters are presented and summarized. In particular, this paper highlights that the crucial problem in this technology is to maintain long-term biomechanical compatibility between implants and surrounding tissues. Compatibility is affected by changes in both the morphology and mechanical properties of the tissues surrounding the implants. A new approach for enhancing the long-term biomechanical compatibility of implantable artificial sphincters is proposed based on the use of smart materials. PMID:26365115

  15. Challenges faced in the clinical application of artificial anal sphincters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-hui; Zhou, Ying; Zhao, Shuang; Luo, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Fecal incontinence is an unresolved problem, which has a serious effect on patients, both physically and psychologically. For patients with severe symptoms, treatment with an artificial anal sphincter could be a potential option to restore continence. Currently, the Acticon Neosphincter is the only device certified by the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, the clinical safety and efficacy of the Acticon Neosphincter are evaluated and discussed. Furthermore, some other key studies on artificial anal sphincters are presented and summarized. In particular, this paper highlights that the crucial problem in this technology is to maintain long-term biomechanical compatibility between implants and surrounding tissues. Compatibility is affected by changes in both the morphology and mechanical properties of the tissues surrounding the implants. A new approach for enhancing the long-term biomechanical compatibility of implantable artificial sphincters is proposed based on the use of smart materials.

  16. Characteristics of the internal anal sphincter and the rectum of the vervet monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, V

    1979-01-01

    1. The physiology of the internal anal sphincter of the vervet monkey was investigated. 2. Strips of sphincter in vitro contracted to noradrenaline and adrenaline; adrenoceptors were mainly alpha-excitatory. Strips of rectal circular muscle relaxed to noradrenaline and contained both inhibitory alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors. 3. All strips contracted to acetylcholine. After hyoscine or atropine, high doses of acetylcholine relaxed all strips by stimulating intramural inhibitory neurones as relaxations were blocked by tetrodotoxin and hexamethonium. Nicotine and DMPP gave relaxations with similar characteristics. 4. It was concluded that relaxations to acetylcholine, nicotine and DMPP were not adrenergic as relaxations still occurred in strips from sympathetically denervated or reserpinized animals. The block of these relaxations by propranolol and guanethidine was considered to be unrelated to their actions as adrenergic blocking drugs. 5. All strips relaxed to field electrical stimulation (1--5 Hz) through stimulation of intramural inhibitory neurones as tetrodotoxin blocked these relaxations. Adrenergic blocking drugs, prior reserpinization or prior section of the hypogastric nerves did not block these responses. The relaxations were not therefore adrenergic. 6. 5-Hydroxytryptamine relaxed all strips but was not the transmitter in relaxations to acetylcholine, DMPP or nicotine, nor to field electrical stimulation, as desensitization of strips of 5-HT did not alter these responses. 7. The circular smooth muscle of the internal anal sphincter had a dense terminal adrenergic innervation which rapidly decreased orad. 8. In vivo, hypogastric nerve stimulation relaxed the rectum but contracted the sphincter. Sacral nerve root stimulation caused an after-contraction in both rectum and sphincter. In vivo, a close arterial injection of adrenaline or noradrenaline inhibited the spontaneous contraction waves of the rectum, but contracted the sphincter. Both these responses

  17. Survey of anal sphincter dysfunction using anal manometry in patients with fecal incontinence: a possible guide to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; DiMarino, Anthony J.; Moleski, Stephanie; Rattan, Satish; Cohen, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the surge of new medical and surgical approaches to treat fecal incontinence, the types of sphincter abnormalities in patients with incontinence have not been well characterized. We aimed to categorize anal sphincter dysfunction using anorectal manometry in patients with fecal incontinence as a potential guide for improved treatment. Methods A retrospective review of 162 consecutive patients with fecal incontinence referred for anorectal manometry was performed. Resting anal pressure and maximal squeeze pressure were considered as measures of internal anal sphincter and external anal sphincter function respectively. Results Mean age of the patients was 63 years (13-89); females (81.5%) and males (18.5%). 74% of the patients had sphincter dysfunction on anorectal manometry. Internal anal sphincter dysfunction was present in 62% patients vs. external anal sphincter dysfunction present in 44% patients. 80% females had abnormal manometry vs. 44% in males (P<0.0001). Internal anal sphincter dysfunction was present in 68% females vs. 37% in males (P=0.0026). Conclusions Overall, abnormal anorectal manometry studies revealed that internal anal sphincter dysfunction is the most common finding, alone or in combination with external anal sphincter dysfunction. We suggest that anorectal manometry may be important to delineate anal sphincter function prior to using newer therapeutic mechanical devices. Future studies using pharmacological agents to increase internal anal sphincter tone may be of clinical importance. Finally, the classification of fecal incontinence based on the type of sphincter dysfunction may be an improved guide in the selection of newer agents in treating fecal incontinence. PMID:26423466

  18. The gonyautoxin 2/3 epimers reduces anal tone when injected in the anal sphincter of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Rogelio; Lagos, Néstor; Lattes, Karinna; Azolas, Carlos García Rodrigo; Bocic, Gunther; Cuneo, Aldo; Chiong, Hector; Jensen, Cristian; Henríquez, Ana I; Fernández, Cristian

    2004-01-01

    The primary clinical symptom of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning is acute paralytic illness produced by paralyzing toxins. Paralytic shellfish poison is formed by a mixture of phycotoxins and their toxicity is due to its reversible binding to a receptor site on the voltage-gated sodium channel on excitable cells, thus blocking neuronal transmission. We studied the effect of the gonyautoxin 2/3 epimers by local infiltration in the anal internal sphincter of healthy voluntary adults in order to reduce anal tone. The toxin was injected after prior clinical evaluation, anoscopy and anorectal manometry. Post injection clinical examination, electromyography and anorectal manometry were performed. Resting and voluntary contraction pressures were measured and the anorectal inhibitory and anocortical reflexes were tested by manometry. Blood and urine samples were obtained from each participant, and hemogram, basic metabolic panel, and urinalysis were done both before and one week after the injection. This study shows, for the first time, that gonyautoxin 2/3 reduces the anal tone by relaxing the anal sphincters in 100 % of the participants. Manometric recordings showed a significant decrease in anal maximal voluntary contraction pressure after the toxin injection, dropping to 55.2+/-6.2 % and 47.0+/-6.8% (Mean Value+/-Std.Dev.) of the baseline values at 2 minutes and at 24 hours respectively after the injection. Post-injection electromyography showed that activity of the muscle was abolished. We conclude that local administration of gonyautoxin 2/3 to the anal sphincter produces immediate relaxation and a statistically significant decrease in the anal tone (p <0.001). PMID:15515965

  19. Purse-string morphology of external anal sphincter revealed by novel imaging techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Valmik; Sheean, Geoff; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Sinha, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    The external anal sphincter (EAS) may be injured in 25–35% of women during the first and subsequent vaginal childbirths and is likely the most common cause of anal incontinence. Since its first description almost 300 years ago, the EAS was believed to be a circular or a “donut-shaped” structure. Using three-dimensional transperineal ultrasound imaging, MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and muscle fiber tracking, we delineated various components of the EAS and their muscle fiber directions. These novel imaging techniques suggest “purse-string” morphology, with “EAS muscles” crossing contralaterally in the perineal body to the contralateral transverse perineal (TP) and bulbospongiosus (BS) muscles, thus attaching the EAS to the pubic rami. Spin-tag MRI demonstrated purse-string action of the EAS muscle. Electromyography of TP/BS and EAS muscles revealed their simultaneous contraction and relaxation. Lidocaine injection into the TP/BS muscle significantly reduced anal canal pressure. These studies support purse-string morphology of the EAS to constrict/close the anal canal opening. Our findings have implications for the effect of episiotomy on anal closure function and the currently used surgical technique (overlapping sphincteroplasty) for EAS reconstructive surgery to treat anal incontinence. PMID:24458022

  20. Obstetrical Anal Sphincter Injuries (OASIS): Prevention, Recognition, and Repair.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Marie-Andrée; Pierce, Marianne; Alter, Jens-Erik W; Chou, Queena; Diamond, Phaedra; Epp, Annette; Geoffrion, Roxana; Harvey, Marie-Andrée; Larochelle, Annick; Maslow, Kenny; Neustaedter, Grace; Pascali, Dante; Pierce, Marianne; Schulz, Jane; Wilkie, David; Sultan, Abdul; Thakar, Ranee

    2015-12-01

    Objectif : Analyser les données probantes traitant des lésions obstétricales du sphincter anal (LOSA) en ce qui concerne leur diagnostic, les techniques visant leur réparation et les résultats de l’intervention. Formuler des recommandations permettant d’éclairer les conseils offerts aux patientes ayant connu des LOSA en ce qui a trait à la voie d’accouchement à privilégier dans le cadre des grossesses subséquentes. Options : Les fournisseurs de soins obstétricaux qui comptent des patientes ayant connu des LOSA disposent de l’option de réparer le sphincter anal en faisant appel à la méthode de suture « bout à bout » (end-to-end) ou à la méthode « en paletot » (overlapping). Ils pourraient également être appelés à conseiller des femmes ayant déjà connu des LOSA en ce qui a trait à la voie d’accouchement à privilégier pour les grossesses subséquentes. Issues : Le critère d’évaluation était la continence anale à la suite d’une réparation primaire de LOSA et à la suite d’un accouchement subséquent. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans Medline, EMBASE et The Cochrane Library en mai 2011 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. anal canal, obstetrics, obstetric labour complication, pregnancy complication, treatment outcome, surgery, quality of life) et de mots clés (p. ex. obstetrical anal sphincter injur*, anus sphincter, anus injury, delivery, obstetrical care, surgery, suturing method, overlap, end-to-end, feces incontinence) appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs. Aucune restriction n’a été imposée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en septembre 2014. La littérature grise (non

  1. [Preservation of the anal sphincter in low rectal lesions].

    PubMed

    Arthur, K E; Guerra, M

    1997-01-01

    We have discussed the surgical options to save the anorectal sphincter in lesions within the lower 2/3 of the rectum. We presented four clinical cases: two villous adenomas, one adenocarcinoma and one benign tumor, probably of embryonic origin. We discussed the surgical options in order to avoid a permanent colostomy. There is not a single surgical procedure that we can count on to preserve the anal sphincter, either in benign or malignant lesions. The surgeons treating this pathology should consider all options and be able to select the most adequate, the less complicated and yet be able to preserve continence. The surgeons should remember that in treating malignant lesions "a curative resection is worth a colostomy". PMID:9805095

  2. 3D Topography of the Young Adult Anal Sphincter Complex Reconstructed from Undeformed Serial Anatomical Sections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F.; Hagoort, Jaco; Shan, Jin-Lu; Tan, Li-Wen; Fang, Bin-Ji; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pelvic-floor anatomy is usually studied by artifact-prone dissection or imaging, which requires prior anatomical knowledge. We used the serial-section approach to settle contentious issues and an interactive 3D-pdf to make the results widely accessible. Method 3D reconstructions of undeformed thin serial anatomical sections of 4 females and 2 males (21–35y) of the Chinese Visible Human database. Findings Based on tendinous septa and muscle-fiber orientation as segmentation guides, the anal-sphincter complex (ASC) comprised the subcutaneous external anal sphincter (EAS) and the U-shaped puborectal muscle, a part of the levator ani muscle (LAM). The anococcygeal ligament fixed the EAS to the coccygeal bone. The puborectal-muscle loops, which define the levator hiatus, passed around the anorectal junction and inserted anteriorly on the perineal body and pubic bone. The LAM had a common anterior attachment to the pubic bone, but separated posteriorly into puborectal and “pubovisceral” muscles. This pubovisceral muscle was bilayered: its internal layer attached to the conjoint longitudinal muscle of the rectum and the rectococcygeal fascia, while its outer, patchy layer reinforced the inner layer. ASC contraction makes the ano-rectal bend more acute and lifts the pelvic floor. Extensions of the rectal longitudinal smooth muscle to the coccygeal bone (rectococcygeal muscle), perineal body (rectoperineal muscle), and endopelvic fascia (conjoint longitudinal and pubovisceral muscles) formed a “diaphragm” at the inferior boundary of the mesorectum that suspended the anorectal junction. Its contraction should straighten the anorectal bend. Conclusion The serial-section approach settled contentious topographic issues of the pelvic floor. We propose that the ASC is involved in continence and the rectal diaphragm in defecation. PMID:26305117

  3. Biomimetic artificial sphincter muscles: status and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Vanessa; Fattorini, Elisa; Karapetkova, Maria; Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Weiss, Florian; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is the involuntary loss of bowel content and affects more than 12% of the adult population, including 45% of retirement home residents. Severe fecal incontinence is often treated by implanting an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, have long-term reoperation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. These statistics show that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter and that the development of an adaptive, biologically inspired implant is required. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are being developed as artificial muscles for a biomimetic sphincter, due to their suitable response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. However, at present the operation voltage of DEAs is too high for artificial muscles implanted in the human body. To reduce the operating voltage to tens of volts, we are using microfabrication to reduce the thickness of the elastomer layer to the nanometer level. Two microfabrication methods are being investigated: molecular beam deposition and electrospray deposition. This communication covers the current status and a perspective on the way forward, including the long-term prospects of constructing a smart sphincter from low-voltage sensors and actuators based on nanometer-thin dielectric elastomer films. As DEA can also provide sensory feedback, a biomimetic sphincter can be designed in accordance with the geometrical and mechanical parameters of its natural counterpart. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence du ring daily activities.

  4. Management of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in subsequent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Evans, C; Archer, R; Forrest, A; Barrington, J

    2014-08-01

    Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) are common and may greatly affect a patient's quality of life. There is very little information regarding optimum management in future pregnancies. Based upon anecdotal experience, this study describes the recommendations of a cohort of consultant obstetricians in the UK, in this clinical situation. There is limited adherence to the available national guidelines due to the absence of available equipment and expertise to perform endo-anal ultrasound and manometry. Elective episiotomy is still recommended by a small number of obstetricians but the majority of patients are routinely followed-up. Caesarean section is only advised for asymptomatic patients with a previous stage 4 tear, and for any symptomatic patient with a previous stage 3 or 4 tear, irrespective of subgrade. A request for elective caesarean section is likely to be granted, irrespective of OASIS grade. The use of postpartum endo-anal ultrasound would help identify those women in whom a further vaginal delivery is unlikely to exacerbate any symptoms of faecal incontinence. PMID:24800795

  5. The magnetic anal sphincter: a new device in the management of severe fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Mantoo, Surendra; Meurette, Guillaume; Podevin, Juliette; Lehur, Paul-Antoine

    2012-09-01

    The authors aim to report the concept and technique of implantation and the first results of the clinical use of the magnetic anal sphincter (MAS) in the management of fecal incontinence (FI). The MAS device is designed to augment the native anal sphincter. The implant is a series of titanium beads with magnetic cores linked together with independent titanium wires. To defecate, the force generated by straining separates the beads to open up the anal canal. The technique of implantation is simple with no requirement of adjustments. The MAS has a role in the management of severe FI. The device has acceptable and comparable adverse effects to other therapies. FI and Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life scores are significantly improved in the short term. The MAS offers a simple and less invasive option of anal reinforcement. It is one step further in the quest for an ideal artificial anal sphincter device. PMID:23116075

  6. Membrane properties of external urethral and external anal sphincter motoneurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, M

    1991-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from external urethral sphincter (EUS) and external anal sphincter (EAS) motoneurones in the cat spinal cord under pentobarbitone anaesthesia. EUS and EAS motoneurones were located in segments S1 and S2 in the lateral part of the ventral horn corresponding to column Y of Romanes in the cat or group X of Onuf in man. 2. The axonal conduction velocity of sphincter motoneurones, calculated from the latency of the antidromic action potential and the conduction distance, ranged from 16 to 80 ms-1, much slower than that of hindlimb motoneurones. The duration of the spike after-hyperpolarization (AHP) was in a similar range to that of hindlimb motoneurones. The antidromic latency, the duration of the action potential and the duration of the AHP were positively correlated with one another. 3. The input resistance ranged from 2.6 to 9.0 M omega and was positively correlated with the latency of the antidromic spike. The plots of input resistance versus conduction velocity in sphincter motoneurones were distributed around the extrapolated regression line determined for hindlimb motoneurones, indicating that there is a common correlation amongst conduction velocity, input resistance, and size of motoneurones regardless of the muscle type innervated by a motoneurone. 4. The regression line relating AHP duration and input resistance in sphincter motoneurones was quite different from that in hindlimb motoneurones in its slope, indicating that the AHP duration does not depend solely on the size of the motoneurone. 5. The voltage responses to injection of steps of hyperpolarizing current developed a time-dependent depolarizing 'sag' at higher current levels. The delay in onset and the time constant of decay of this depolarizing sag depended upon the peak amplitude of the hyperpolarizing response. The slope resistance in the I-V curve decreased in the hyperpolarizing direction in all neurones examined, indicating the existence of anomalous

  7. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Keaney, John F; Fogarty, Kevin E; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca(2+)]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca(2+)]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  8. Automatic localisation of innervation zones: a simulation study of the external anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Mesin, Luca; Gazzoni, Marco; Merletti, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    Traumas of the innervation zone (IZ) of the external anal sphincter (EAS), e.g. during delivery, can promote the development of faecal incontinence. Recently developed probes allow high-resolution detection of EMG signals from the EAS. The analysis of pelvic floor muscles by surface EMG (in particular, the estimation of the location of the IZ) has potential applications in the diagnosis and investigation of the mechanisms of incontinence. An automatic method (based on matched filter approach) for the estimation of the IZ distribution of EAS from surface EMG is discussed and tested using an analytical model of generation of EMG signals from sphincter muscles. Simulations are performed varying length of the fibres, thickness of the mucosa, position of the motor units, and force level. Different distributions of IZs are simulated. The performance of the proposed method in the estimation of the IZ distribution is affected by surface MUAP amplitude (as the estimation made by visual inspection), by mucosa thickness (performance decreases when fibre length is higher) and by different MU distributions. However, in general the method is able to identify the position of two IZ locations and can measure asymmetry of the IZ distribution. This strengthens the potential applications of high density surface EMG in the prevention and investigation of incontinence.

  9. The molecular basis of the genesis of basal tone in internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Wang, Pei; Liu, Dong-Hai; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chen; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Tao, Tao; Sun, Jie; Peng, Ya-Jing; Lu, Ping; Zheng, Kaizhi; Craige, Siobhan M.; Lifshitz, Lawrence M.; Keaney Jr, John F.; Fogarty, Kevin E.; ZhuGe, Ronghua; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle sphincters exhibit basal tone and control passage of contents through organs such as the gastrointestinal tract; loss of this tone leads to disorders such as faecal incontinence. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this tone remain unknown. Here, we show that deletion of myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK) in the smooth muscle cells from internal anal sphincter (IAS-SMCs) abolishes basal tone, impairing defecation. Pharmacological regulation of ryanodine receptors (RyRs), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) or TMEM16A Ca2+-activated Cl− channels significantly changes global cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the tone. TMEM16A deletion in IAS-SMCs abolishes the effects of modulators for TMEM16A or VDCCs on a RyR-mediated rise in global [Ca2+]i and impairs the tone and defecation. Hence, MLCK activation in IAS-SMCs caused by a global rise in [Ca2+]i via a RyR-TMEM16A-VDCC signalling module sets the basal tone. Targeting this module may lead to new treatments for diseases like faecal incontinence. PMID:27101932

  10. Peri-anal implantation of bioengineered human internal anal sphincter constructs intrinsically innervated with human neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Shreya; Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Gilmont, Robert R.; Somara, Sita; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Bitar, Khalil N.

    2014-01-01

    Background The internal anal sphincter (IAS) is a major contributing factor to anal canal pressure and is required for maintenance of rectoanal continence. IAS damage or weakening results in fecal incontinence. We have demonstrated that bioengineered intrinsically innervated human IAS tissue replacements possess key aspects of IAS physiology, like generation of spontaneous basal tone and contraction/relaxation in response to neurotransmitters. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of implantation of bioengineered IAS constructs in the peri-anal region of athymic rodents. Methods Human IAS tissue constructs were bioengineered from isolated human IAS circular smooth muscle cells and human enteric neuronal progenitor cells. Upon maturation of the bioengineered constructs in culture, they were implanted surgically into the perianal region of athymic rats. Growth factor was delivered to the implanted constructs through a microosmotic pump. Implanted constructs were retrieved from the animals 4 weeks post-implantation. Results Animals tolerated the implantation well, and there were no early postoperative complications. Normal stooling was observed during the implantation period. Upon harvest, implanted constructs were adherent to the perirectal rat tissue, and appeared healthy and pink. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed neovascularization. Implanted smooth muscle cells maintained contractile phenotype. Bioengineered constructs responded to neuronally evoked relaxation in response to electrical field stimulation and vasoactive intestinal peptide, indicating the preservation of neuronal networks. Conclusions Our results indicate that bioengineered innervated IAS constructs can be used to augment IAS function in an animal model. This is a regenerative medicine based therapy for fecal incontinence that would directly address the dysfunction of the IAS muscle. PMID:24582493

  11. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs. PMID:26314281

  12. Thermal control of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters for complete implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Okuyama, Takeshi; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kamiyama, Takamichi; Nishi, Kotaro; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents an approach for the thermal control of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys. An artificial anal sphincter has been proposed by the authors to resolve problems of severe fecal incontinence in patients. The basic design of the artificial sphincter consists of two all-round shape memory alloy plates as the main functional parts, and heaters that are attached to the SMA plates for generating the thermal cycles required for the phase transformation accompanied shape changes of the plates. The SMA artificial sphincter could be fitted around intestines, performing an occlusion function at body temperature and a release function upon heating. Thermal compatibility of such prostheses is most important and is critical for practical use. Since a temperature rise of approximately 20 °C from body temperature is needed to activate a complete transformation of SMA plates, an earlier model of ours allowed only a short period of heating, resulting in incomplete evacuation. In this work, a thermal control approach using a temperature-responsive reed switch has been incorporated into the device to prevent the SMA plates from overheating. Then, with thermal insulation the artificial anal sphincter is expected to allow a long enough opening period for fecal continence; without any thermal impact to the surrounding tissues that would be in contact with the artificial sphincter. Thermal control was confirmed in both in vitro and in vivo experiments, suggesting the effectiveness of the present approach. The modified SMA artificial anal sphincter has been implanted into animal models for chronic experiments of up to 4 weeks, and has exhibited good performance by maintaining occlusion and release functions. At autopsy, no anomaly due to thermal impact was found on the surfaces of intestines that had been in contact with the artificial anal sphincter.

  13. Mode of Vaginal Delivery: A Modifiable Intrapartum Risk Factor for Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simó González, Marta; Porta Roda, Oriol; Perelló Capó, Josep; Gich Saladich, Ignasi; Calaf Alsina, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the comparative risks of this anal sphincter injury in relation to the type of intervention in vaginal delivery. We performed an observational, retrospective study of all vaginal deliveries attended at a tertiary university hospital between January 2006 and December 2009. We analyzed the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injury for each mode of vaginal delivery: spontaneous delivery, vacuum, Thierry spatulas, and forceps. We determined the proportional incidence between methods taking spontaneous delivery as the reference. Ninety-seven of 4526 (2.14%) women included in the study presented obstetric anal sphincter injury. Instrumental deliveries showed a significantly higher risk of anal sphincter injury (2.7 to 4.9%) than spontaneous deliveries (1.1%). The highest incidence was for Thierry spatulas (OR 4.804), followed by forceps (OR 4.089) and vacuum extraction (OR 2.509). The type of intervention in a vaginal delivery is a modifiable intrapartum risk factor for obstetric anal sphincter injury. Tearing can occur in any type of delivery but proportions vary significantly. All healthcare professionals attending childbirth should be aware of the risk for each type of intervention and consider these together with the obstetric factors in each case. PMID:25722727

  14. Complete anal sphincter complex disruption from intercourse: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, S.O.; Samuels, L.; Bambury, I.; Cherian, C.J.; Christie, L.; Kulkarni, S.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Anal sphincter injuries are uncommon injuries outside of obstetric practice – but they may cause disastrous complications. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of complete anal sphincter disruption from anal intercourse in a 25 year old woman. Clinical management is presented and technical details of the repair are discussed. She had an uneventful post-operative course and good continence after 154 days of follow up. DISCUSSION This is one of a handful of reported cases of anal sphincter disruption secondary to anal intercourse. The established risk factors in this case included receptive anal intercourse coupled with alcohol use. We review the pertinent surgical principles that should be observed when repairing these injuries, including anatomically correct repair and appropriate suture choice. There is little evidence to support simultaneous faecal diversion for primary repair of acute perineal lacerations. CONCLUSION Acute post-coital sphincter injuries should be treated operatively on an emergent basis, without diversion because they are low energy injuries with minimal tissue loss and excellent blood supply. Although repair of each injury should be individualized, the majority of these injuries do not require concomitant protective colostomy creation. PMID:22940697

  15. Preoperative Therapy for Lower Rectal Cancer and Modifications in Distance From Anal Sphincter

    SciTech Connect

    Gavioli, Margherita Losi, Lorena; Luppi, Gabriele; Iacchetta, Francesco; Zironi, Sandra; Bertolini, Federica; Falchi, Anna Maria; Bertoni, Filippo; Natalini, Gianni

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and magnitude of changes in lower rectal cancer resulting from preoperative therapy and its impact on sphincter-saving surgery. Preoperative therapy can increase the rate of preserving surgery by shrinking the tumor and enhancing its distance from the anal sphincter. However, reliable data concerning these modifications are not yet available in published reports. Methods and Materials: A total of 98 cases of locally advanced cancer of the lower rectum (90 Stage uT3-T4N0-N+ and 8 uT2N+M0) that had undergone preoperative therapy were studied by endorectal ultrasonography. The maximal size of the tumor and its distance from the anal sphincter were measured in millimeters before and after preoperative therapy. Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after therapy, and the histopathologic margins were compared with the endorectal ultrasound data. Results: Of the 90 cases, 82.5% showed tumor downsizing, varying from one-third to two-thirds or more of the original tumor mass. The distance between the tumor and the anal sphincter increased in 60.2% of cases. The median increase was 0.73 cm (range, 0.2-2.5). Downsizing was not always associated with an increase in distance. Preserving surgery was performed in 60.6% of cases. It was possible in nearly 30% of patients in whom the cancer had reached the anal sphincter before the preoperative therapy. The distal margin was tumor free in these cases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that in very low rectal cancer, preoperative therapy causes tumor downsizing in >80% of cases and in more than one-half enhances the distance between the tumor and anal sphincter. These modifications affect the primary surgical options, facilitating or making sphincter-saving surgery possible.

  16. Adynamic and dynamic muscle transposition techniques for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Barišić, Goran; Krivokapić, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Gracilis muscle transposition is well established in general surgery and has been the main muscle transposition technique for anal incontinence. Dynamization, through a schedule of continuous electrical stimulation, converts the fatigue-prone muscle fibres to a tonic fatigue-resistant morphology with acceptable results in those cases where there is limited sphincter muscle mass. The differences between gluteoplasty and graciloplasty, as well as the techniques and complications of both procedures, are outlined in this review. Overall, these techniques are rarely carried out in specialized units with experience, as there is a high revision and explantation rate. PMID:24759348

  17. Changes in anal sphincter tone at induction of anaesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, M. J.; Tomlinson, P. A.; Ubhi, C. S.; Wright, J.; Hardcastle, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in anal pressure have been monitored during the induction of anaesthesia. Falls in pressure accompany loss of consciousness following bolus doses of commonly used intravenous and inhalational anaesthetic agents. Subsequent rises in pressure towards pre-anaesthetic levels are usually associated with the time taken to correct responses and initial recovery. Premedication, including anticholinergic drugs in conventional dosage, does not affect anal pressure. PMID:3408160

  18. Experience with a new prosthetic anal sphincter in three coloproctological centres

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fecal incontinence is a common and severely disabling disorder. For patients with severe fecal incontinence, surgery may prove to be the only adequate treatment option. Methods This study reports on 43 patients that were treated with a prosthetic sphincter system between 2005 and 2009 in three coloproctological centres. Main Outcome Measures: complications, anal pressures before and after surgery, fecal continence score. Results The new artificial sphincter system significantly improves continence but leads to some complications in clinical practice. After implantation of the device, continence improved significantly (Keller & Jostarndt continence score 2.6 to 14.3 (P < 0.01)). With the band activated, resting pressure improved significantly as compared to baseline (10.7 mmHg vs. 66.1 mm Hg, P < 0.01). The same holds for anal sphincter squeeze pressure (32.2 mmHg versus 85.9 mm Hg, P < 0.01). Complications occurred in 21 patients (48.8%): 10 surgical and 13 technical. Two patients were affected by both technical and surgical problems. The median time of the occurrence was 3 months postop. In five patients difficulties arose within the first postoperative month leading to explantation of the device in three patients. 90% of complications occurred in the first year. Conclusions The soft anal band of AMI (AAS), a new artificial anal sphincter, improves severe anal incontinence, but it must be regarded as a last treatment option to avoid a stoma. PMID:24502440

  19. Is a new high-resolution probe better than the standard probe for 3D anal sphincter and levator ani imaging?

    PubMed

    Rostaminia, Ghazaleh; White, Dena; Quiroz, Lieschen; Shobeiri, S Abbas

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of a new three-dimensional (3D) endoluminal ultrasound probe in assessing the levator ani muscle and anal sphincter complex. A total of 85 patients who had undergone concurrent 3D endovaginal (EVUS) and 3D endoanal (EAUS) ultrasound with both the standard BK 2052 probe and the new high-definition BK 8838 probes were included. For EVUS volumes, the levator ani deficiency (LAD) scores were calculated for each probe. For the EAUS volumes, any defects in the external anal sphincter (EAS) and the internal anal sphincter (IAS) visualized with each probe were recorded. The 3D volumes were evaluated in a blinded fashion. Appropriate statistics were utilized to assess absolute agreements between each pair of imaging modalities. The mean age of the patient population was 59 years (SD ± 10.76), the mean body mass index (BMI) was 28.36 (SD ± 5.99), and the median parity was 2 (range 1, 7). In all, 93% of the patients were Caucasian, 31% had stage 0 or 1 prolapse, while 59% had stage 2 prolapse. The mean total LAD score obtained on EVUS with the standard and the new probes were 11.49 (SD ± 4.94) and 11.53 (SD ± 5.01), respectively, p = 0.3778. Among the 53 patients who had EAUS with both probes, exact agreement for visualization of EAS and IAS for the standard and the new probes was 83% and 98%, respectively. Both transducers can be used for endovaginal imaging of the levator ani muscles interchangeably. Both transducers can be used for endoanal imaging of anal sphincter complex interchangeably.

  20. Functional and molecular characterization of beta-adrenoceptors in the internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Sandeep; Kazerounian, Shiva; Banwait, Kuldip; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A; Rattan, Satish

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to characterize different beta-adrenoceptors (beta-ARs) and determine their role in the spontaneously tonic smooth muscle of the internal anal sphincter (IAS). The beta-AR subtypes in the opossum IAS were investigated by functional in vitro, radioligand binding, Western blot, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies. ZD 7114 [(S)-4-[2-hydroxy-3-phenoxypropylaminoethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl)phenoxyacetamide], a selective beta(3)-AR agonist, caused a potent and concentration-dependent relaxation of the IAS smooth muscle that was antagonized by the beta(3)-AR antagonist SR 59230A [1-(2-ethylphenoxy)-3-[[(1S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthalenyl]amino]-(2S)-2-propanol hydrochloride]. Conversely, the IAS smooth muscle relaxation caused by beta(1)- and beta(2)-AR agonists (xamoterol and procaterol, respectively) was selectively antagonized by their respective antagonists CGP 20712 [(+/-)-2-hydroxy-5-[2-[[2-hydroxy-3-[4-[1-methyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-imidazol-2-yl]phenoxy]propyl]amino]ethoxy]-benzamide methanesulfonate salt] and ICI 118551. Saturation binding of [(125)I]iodocyanopindolol to beta-AR subtypes revealed the presence of a high-affinity site (K(d1) = 96.4 +/- 8.7 pM; B(max1) = 12.5 +/- 0.6 fmol/mg protein) and a low-affinity site (K(d2) = 1.96 +/- 1.7 nM; B(max2) = 58.7 +/- 4.3 fmol/mg protein). Competition binding with selective beta-AR antagonists revealed that the high-affinity site correspond to beta(1)/beta(2)-AR and the low affinity site to beta(3)-AR. Receptor binding data suggest the predominant presence of beta(3)-AR over beta(1)/beta(2)-AR. Western blot studies identified beta(1)-, beta(2)-, and beta(3)-AR subtypes. The presence of beta(1)-, beta(2)-, and beta(3)-ARs was further demonstrated by mRNA analysis using RT-PCR. The studies demonstrate a comprehensive functional and molecular characterization of beta(1)-, beta(2)-, and beta(3)-ARs in IAS smooth muscle. These studies may have

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 upregulation modulates tone and fibroelastic properties of internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay; Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Rattan, Satish

    2014-09-15

    A compromise in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) tone and fibroelastic properties (FEP) plays an important role in rectoanal incontinence. Herein, we examined the effects of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 upregulation on these IAS characteristics in young rats. We determined the effect of HO-1 upregulator hemin on HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions and on basal IAS tone and its FEP before and after HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX. For FEP, we determined the kinetics of the IAS smooth muscle responses, by the velocities of relaxation, and recovery of the IAS tone following 0 Ca(2+) and electrical field stimulation. To characterize the underlying signal transduction for these changes, we determined the effects of hemin on RhoA-associated kinase (RhoA)/Rho kinase (ROCK) II, myosin-binding subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase 1, fibronectin, and elastin expression levels. Hemin increased HO-1 mRNA and protein similar to the increases in the basal tone, and in the FEP of the IAS. Underlying mechanisms in the IAS characteristics are associated with increases in the genetic and translational expressions of RhoA/ROCKII, and elastin. Fibronectin expression levels on the other hand were found to be decreased following HO-1 upregulation. The results of our study show that the hemin/HO-1 system regulates the tone and FEP of IAS. The hemin/HO-1 system thus provides a potential target for the development of new interventions aimed at treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders, specifically the age-related IAS dysfunction.

  2. [Radiological diagnosis of constipation and anal incontinence caused by changes in the pelvic floor and anal sphincter. Our experience with 38 patients with constipation with or without incontinence].

    PubMed

    Parrella, R E; Brizi, M G; Giannasio, T; Natale, L; Posi, G; Vulpio, C

    1987-11-01

    Rectal constipation, anal incontinence and constipation combined with incontinence, are often caused by organic or simply functional changes in the pelvic floor and sphincteric apparatus. Therefore morphological as well as manometric and electromyographic studies of these anatomical parts are required. This is possible by combining two techniques: Intestinal Transit Time (ITT) and Defecatory Proctogram with Balloon (DPB). Personal experience of 38 patients with constipation with or without incontinence is reported. The results lead to the following conclusions: 1) ITT is a simple and non-invasive radiological technique that provides us with objective evidence of an impairment, i.e. constipation, whose symptoms are often only subjective; especially it allows us to identify rectal constipation, that can be caused by impairment of the anal sphincteric apparatus. 2) Using an uroprophylactic with a collar that adapts to the size of the anal duct, DPB always permits visualisation of the duct with good representation of the recto-anal angle, whose changes may be the expression of organic or only functional impairments of the anal sphincteric apparatus. Increasing use of the two radiological techniques is therefore recommended in the diagnosis of alterations of the pelvic floor or anal sphincter.

  3. Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Akca, Nezih; Ozdemir, Bulent; Kanat, Ayhan; Batcik, Osman Ersagun; Yazar, Ugur; Zorba, Orhan Unal

    2014-01-01

    Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD) in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW) Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was counteracted by a trend

  4. Mean Absorbed Dose to the Anal-Sphincter Region and Fecal Leakage among Irradiated Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Alsadius, David; Hedelin, Maria; Lundstedt, Dan; Pettersson, Niclas; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To supplement previous findings that the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation to the anal sphincter or lower rectum affects the occurrence of fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors. We also wanted to determine whether anatomically defining the anal-sphincter region as the organ at risk could increase the degree of evidence underlying clinical guidelines for restriction doses to eliminate this excess risk. Methods and Materials: We identified 985 men irradiated for prostate cancer between 1993 and 2006. In 2008, we assessed long-term gastrointestinal symptoms among these men using a study-specific questionnaire. We restrict the analysis to the 414 men who had been treated with external beam radiation therapy only (no brachytherapy) to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions to the prostate or postoperative prostatic region. On reconstructed original radiation therapy dose plans, we delineated the anal-sphincter region as an organ at risk. Results: We found that the prevalence of long-term fecal leakage at least once per month was strongly correlated with the mean dose to the anal-sphincter region. Examining different dose intervals, we found a large increase at 40 Gy; {>=}40 Gy compared with <40 Gy gave a prevalence ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.6-8.6). Conclusions: This long-term study shows that mean absorbed dose to the anal-sphincter region is associated with the occurrence of long-term fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors; delineating the anal-sphincter region separately from the rectum and applying a restriction of a mean dose <40 Gy will, according to our data, reduce the risk considerably.

  5. Investigation of the distribution and function of α-adrenoceptors in the sheep isolated internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Rayment, SJ; Eames, T; Simpson, JAD; Dashwood, MR; Henry, Y; Gruss, H; Acheson, AG; Scholefield, JH; Wilson, VG

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We have investigated the distribution of α-adrenoceptors in sheep internal anal sphincter (IAS), as a model for the human tissue, and evaluated various imidazoline derivatives for potential treatment of faecal incontinence. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Saturation and competition binding with 3H-prazosin and 3H-RX821002 were used to confirm the presence and density of α-adrenoceptors in sheep IAS, and the affinity of imidazoline compounds at these receptors. A combination of in vitro receptor autoradiography and immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the regional distribution of binding sites. Contractile activity of imidazoline-based compounds on sheep IAS was assessed by isometric tension recording. KEY RESULTS Saturation binding confirmed the presence of both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors, and subsequent characterization with sub-type-selective agents, identified them as α1A- and α2D-adrenoceptor sub-types. Autoradiographic studies with 3H-prazosin showed a positive association of α1-adrenoceptors with immunohistochemically identified smooth muscle fibres. Anti-α1-adrenoceptor immunohistochemistry revealed similar distributions of the receptor in sheep and human IAS. The imidazoline compounds caused concentration-dependent contractions of the anal sphincter, but the maximum responses were less than those elicited by l-erythro-methoxamine, a standard non-imidazoline α1-adrenoceptor agonist. Prazosin (selective α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) significantly reduced the magnitude of contraction to l-erythro-methoxamine at the highest concentration used. Both prazosin and RX811059 (a selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) reduced the potency (pEC50) of clonidine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study shows that both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors are expressed in the sheep IAS, and contribute (perhaps synergistically) to contractions elicited by various imidazoline derivatives. These agents may prove useful in the treatment of faecal incontinence

  6. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 mediate relaxation of guinea pig internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Che

    2014-02-10

    Activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 stimulates contraction of the rat but relaxation of the guinea pig colon. The aim of the present study was to investigate PAR effects on internal anal sphincter (IAS) motility. We measured relaxation of isolated muscle strips from the guinea pig IAS caused by PAR agonists using isometric transducers. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to determine the existence of PAR. In the IAS, thrombin and PAR1 peptide agonists TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2 evoked moderate to marked relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, trypsin and PAR2 peptide agonists 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2, SLIGRL-NH2 and SLIGKV-NH2 produced relaxation. In contrast, both PAR1 and PAR2 inactive control peptides did not elicit relaxation. Furthermore, the selective PAR1 antagonist vorapaxar and PAR2 antagonist GB 83 specifically inhibited thrombin and trypsin-induced relaxations, respectively. RT-PCR revealed the presence of PAR1 and PAR2 in the IAS. This indicates that PAR1 and PAR2 mediate the IAS relaxation. The relaxant responses of TFLLR-NH2 and trypsin were attenuated by N(omega)-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), indicating involvement of NO. These responses were not affected by tetrodotoxin, implying that the PAR effects are not neurally mediated. On the other hand, PAR4 agonists GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2 did not cause relaxation or contraction, suggesting that PAR4 is not involved in the sphincter motility. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both PAR1 and PAR2 mediate relaxation of the guinea pig IAS through the NO pathway. PAR1 and PAR2 may regulate IAS tone and might be potential therapeutic targets for anal motility disorders. PMID:24631471

  7. Assessment and in vitro experiment of artificial anal sphincter system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Liu, Jinding; Jiang, Enyu; Wang, Hua

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel artificial anal sphincter (AAS) system based on rebuilding the rectal sensation function is proposed to treat human fecal incontinence. The executive mechanism of the traditional AAS system was redesigned and integrated for a simpler structure and better durability. The novel executive mechanism uses a sandwich structure to simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter. To rebuild the lost rectal sensation function caused by fecal incontinence, we propose a novel method for rebuilding the rectal sensation function based on an Optimal Wavelet Packet Basis (OWPB) using the Davies-Bouldin (DB) index and a support vector machine (SVM). OWPB using a DB index is used for feature vector extraction, while a SVM is adopted for pattern recognition.Furthermore, an in vitro experiment with the AAS system based on rectal sensation function rebuilding was carried out. Experimental results indicate that the novel executive mechanism can simulate the basic function of the natural human anal sphincter, and the proposed method is quite effective for rebuilding rectal sensation in patients. PMID:24619902

  8. Nature of extracellular signal that triggers RhoA/ROCK activation for the basal internal anal sphincter tone in humans

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Phillips, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular signal that triggers activation of rho-associated kinase (RhoA/ROCK), the major molecular determinant of basal internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone, is not known. Using human IAS tissues, we identified the presence of the biosynthetic machineries for angiotensin II (ANG II), thromboxane A2 (TXA2), and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α). These end products of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) (ANG II) and arachidonic acid (TXA2 and PGF2α) pathways and their effects in human IAS vs. rectal smooth muscle (RSM) were studied. A multipronged approach utilizing immunocytochemistry, Western blot analyses, and force measurements was implemented. Additionally, in a systematic analysis of the effects of respective inhibitors along different steps of biosynthesis and those of antagonists, their end products were evaluated either individually or in combination. To further describe the molecular mechanism for the IAS tone via these pathways, we monitored RhoA/ROCK activation and its signal transduction cascade. Data showed characteristically higher expression of biosynthetic machineries of RAS and AA pathways in the IAS compared with the RSM. Additionally, specific inhibition of the arachidonic acid (AA) pathway caused ∼80% decrease in the IAS tone, whereas that of RAS lead to ∼20% decrease. Signal transduction studies revealed that the end products of both AA and RAS pathways cause increase in the IAS tone via activation of RhoA/ROCK. Both AA and RAS (via the release of their end products TXA2, PGF2α, and ANG II, respectively), provide extracellular signals which activate RhoA/ROCK for the maintenance of the basal tone in human IAS. PMID:25882611

  9. Nature of extracellular signal that triggers RhoA/ROCK activation for the basal internal anal sphincter tone in humans.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish; Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Phillips, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    The extracellular signal that triggers activation of rho-associated kinase (RhoA/ROCK), the major molecular determinant of basal internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone, is not known. Using human IAS tissues, we identified the presence of the biosynthetic machineries for angiotensin II (ANG II), thromboxane A2 (TXA2), and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α). These end products of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) (ANG II) and arachidonic acid (TXA2 and PGF2α) pathways and their effects in human IAS vs. rectal smooth muscle (RSM) were studied. A multipronged approach utilizing immunocytochemistry, Western blot analyses, and force measurements was implemented. Additionally, in a systematic analysis of the effects of respective inhibitors along different steps of biosynthesis and those of antagonists, their end products were evaluated either individually or in combination. To further describe the molecular mechanism for the IAS tone via these pathways, we monitored RhoA/ROCK activation and its signal transduction cascade. Data showed characteristically higher expression of biosynthetic machineries of RAS and AA pathways in the IAS compared with the RSM. Additionally, specific inhibition of the arachidonic acid (AA) pathway caused ~80% decrease in the IAS tone, whereas that of RAS lead to ~20% decrease. Signal transduction studies revealed that the end products of both AA and RAS pathways cause increase in the IAS tone via activation of RhoA/ROCK. Both AA and RAS (via the release of their end products TXA2, PGF2α, and ANG II, respectively), provide extracellular signals which activate RhoA/ROCK for the maintenance of the basal tone in human IAS.

  10. Surgeons’ assessment of internal anal sphincter nerve supply during TaTME - inbetween expectations and reality

    PubMed Central

    Kneist, Werner; Hanke, Laura; Kauff, Daniel W.; Lang, Hauke

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intraoperative identification of nerve fibers heading from the inferior rectal plexus (IRP) to the internal anal sphincter (IAS) is challenging. The transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) is said to better preserve pelvic autonomic nerves. The aim of this study was to investigate the nerve identification rates during TaTME by transanal visual and electrophysiological assessment. Material and methods: A total of 52 patients underwent TaTME for malignant conditions. The IRP with its posterior branches to the IAS and the pelvic splanchnic nerves (PSN) were visually assessed in 20 patients (v-TaTME). Electrophysiological nerve identification was performed in 32 patients using electric stimulation under processed electromyography of IAS (e-TaTME). Results: The indication profile for TaTME was comparable between the v-TaTME and the e-TaTME group. The identification of IRP was more meaningful under electrophysiological assessment than under visual assessment for the left pelvic side (81% vs. 45%, p = 0.008) as well as the right pelvic side (78% vs. 45%, p = 0.016). The identification rates for PSN did not significantly differ between both groups, respectively (81% vs. 75%, p = 0.420 and 84% vs. 70%, p = 0.187). Conclusions: The transanal approach facilitated visual identification of IAS nerve supply. In combination with electrophysiological nerve assessment the identification rate almost doubled. For further insights functional data are needed. PMID:27333465

  11. Development of an implantable artificial anal sphincter by the use of the shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Amae, S; Wada, M; Luo, Y; Nakamura, H; Yoshida, S; Kamiyama, T; Yambe, T; Takagi, T; Nitta, S; Ohi, R

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we developed and assessed an artificial anal sphincter driven by an shape memory alloy actuator (AS-SMA). The performance characteristics of the device were analyzed with a measurement system. Assessment showed that the AS-SMA could generate a pressure of 55 mm Hg at an atmospheric temperature of 36 degrees C, and displacement of the SMA actuator was 7.5 mm when the temperature of the SMA plate was 55 degrees C. To evaluate opening and closing, we studied a piglet colostomy model, in which the AS-SMA was implanted around the colostomy in the extraperitoneal space. Flow control tests using living porcine intestine revealed that the AS-SMA could maintain fecal continence against an intestinal pressure of 75 mm Hg. The high pressure zone corresponding to the location of the device was demonstrated in a manometric examination. For 6 days after surgery, we activated the AS-SMA twice a day and observed the bowel movements. The animal experiment indicated that the AS-SMA is able to control the bowel movements of patients with fecal incontinence if several problems, such as burning of tissue around the device and compression injury of the intestine, are resolved.

  12. Optimal Design of Litz Wire Coils With Sandwich Structure Wirelessly Powering an Artificial Anal Sphincter System.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Yan, Sheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Xiaoyang

    2015-07-01

    Transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) is widely used to energize implantable biomedical devices. As a key part of the TETS, a pair of applicable coils with low losses, high unloaded Q factor, and strong coupling is required to realize an efficient TETS. This article presents an optimal design methodology of planar litz wire coils sandwiched between two ferrite substrates wirelessly powering a novel mechanical artificial anal sphincter system for treating severe fecal incontinence, with focus on the main parameters of the coils such as the wire diameter, number of turns, geometry, and the properties of the ferrite substrate. The theoretical basis of optimal power transfer efficiency in an inductive link was analyzed. A set of analytical expressions are outlined to calculate the winding resistance of a litz wire coil on ferrite substrate, taking into account eddy-current losses, including conduction losses and induction losses. Expressions that describe the geometrical dimension dependence of self- and mutual inductance are derived. The influence of ferrite substrate relative permeability and dimensions is also considered. We have used this foundation to devise an applicable coil design method that starts with a set of realistic constraints and ends with the optimal coil pair geometries. All theoretical predictions are verified with measurements using different types of fabricated coils. The results indicate that the analysis is useful for optimizing the geometry design of windings and the ferrite substrate in a sandwich structure as part of which, in addition to providing design insight, allows speeding up the system efficiency-optimizing design process.

  13. Nitrergic neuromuscular transmission in the mouse internal anal sphincter is accomplished by multiple pathways and postjunctional effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Sotherton, A. G.; Peri, L. E.; Sanders, K. M.; Ward, S. M.; Keef, K. D.

    2014-01-01

    The effector cells and second messengers participating in nitrergic neuromuscular transmission (NMT) were investigated in the mouse internal anal sphincter (IAS). Protein expression of guanylate cyclase (GCα, GCβ) and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI) were examined in cryostat sections with dual-labeling immunohistochemical techniques in PDGFRα+ cells, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and smooth muscle cells (SMC). Gene expression levels were determined with quantitative PCR of dispersed cells from Pdgfrαegfp/+, KitcopGFP/+, and smMHCCre-egfp mice sorted with FACS. The relative gene and protein expression levels of GCα and GCβ were PDGFRα+ cells > ICC ≫ SMC. In contrast, cGKI gene expression sequence was SMC = ICC > PDGFRα+ cells whereas cGKI protein expression sequence was neurons > SMC ≫ ICC = PDGFRα+ cells. The functional role of cGKI was investigated in cGKI−/− mice. Relaxation with 8-bromo (8-Br)-cGMP was greatly reduced in cGKI−/− mice whereas responses to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were partially reduced and forskolin responses were unchanged. A nitrergic relaxation occurred with nerve stimulation (NS, 5 Hz, 60 s) in cGKI+/+ and cGKI−/− mice although there was a small reduction in the cGKI−/− mouse. Nω-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA) abolished responses during the first 20–30 s of NS in both animals. The GC inhibitor ODQ greatly reduced or abolished SNP and nitrergic NS responses in both animals. These data confirm an essential role for GC in NO-induced relaxation in the IAS. However, the expression of GC and cGKI by all three cell types suggests that each may participate in coordinating muscular responses to NO. The persistence of nitrergic NMT in the cGKI−/− mouse suggests the presence of a significant GC-dependent, cGKI-independent pathway. PMID:25301187

  14. RhoA/ROCK pathway is the major molecular determinant of basal tone in intact human internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-04-01

    The knowledge of molecular control mechanisms underlying the basal tone in the intact human internal anal sphincter (IAS) is critical for the pathophysiology and rational therapy for a number of debilitating rectoanal motility disorders. We determined the role of RhoA/ROCK and PKC pathways by comparing the effects of ROCK- and PKC-selective inhibitors Y 27632 and Gö 6850 (10(-8) to 10(-4) M), respectively, on the basal tone in the IAS vs. the rectal smooth muscle (RSM). Western blot studies were performed to determine the levels of RhoA/ROCK II, PKC-α, MYPT1, CPI-17, and MLC(20) in the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms, in the IAS vs. RSM. Confocal microscopic studies validated the membrane distribution of ROCK II. Finally, to confirm a direct relationship, we examined the enzymatic activities and changes in the basal IAS tone and p-MYPT1, p-CPI-17, and p-MLC(20), before and after Y 27632 and Gö 6850. Data show higher levels of RhoA/ROCK II and related downstream signal transduction proteins in the IAS vs. RSM. In addition, data show a significant correlation between the active RhoA/ROCK levels, ROCK enzymatic activity, downstream proteins, and basal IAS tone, before and after ROCK inhibitor. From these data we conclude 1) RhoA/ROCK and downstream signaling are constitutively active in the IAS, and this pathway (in contrast with PKC) is the critical determinant of the basal tone in intact human IAS; and 2) RhoA and ROCK are potential therapeutic targets for a number of rectoanal motility disorders for which currently there is no satisfactory treatment.

  15. Does the Finnish intervention prevent obstetric anal sphincter injuries? A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Mette Østergaard; Madsen, Mia Lund; Skriver-Møller, Anne-Cathrine; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A rise in obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) has been observed and a preventive approach, originating in Finland, has been introduced in several European hospitals. The aim of this paper was to systematically evaluate the evidence behind the ‘Finnish intervention’. Design A systematic review of the literature conducted according to the Preferred Reporting for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Outcome measures The primary outcome was OASIS. Secondary outcomes were (perinatal): Apgar scores, pH and standard base excess in the umbilical cord, and (maternal): episiotomy, intact perineum, first and second-degree perineal lacerations, duration of second stage, birth position and women's perceptions/birth experiences. Methods Multiple databases (Cochrane, Embase, Pubmed and SveMed) were systematically searched for studies published up to December 2014. Both randomised controlled trials and observational studies were eligible for inclusion. Studies were excluded if a full-text article was not available. Studies were evaluated by use of international reporting guidelines (eg, STROBE). Results Overall, 1042 articles were screened and 65 retrieved for full-text evaluation. Seven studies, all observational and with a level of evidence at 2c or lower, were included and consistently reported a significant reduction in OASIS. All evaluated episiotomy and found a significant increase. Three studies evaluated perinatal outcomes and reported conflicting results. No study reported on other perineal outcomes, duration of the second stage, birth positions or women's perceptions. Conclusions A reduction in OASIS has been contributed to the Finnish intervention in seven observational studies, all with a low level of evidence. Knowledge about the potential perinatal and maternal side effects and women's perceptions of the intervention is extremely limited and the biological mechanisms underlying the Finnish intervention are not well documented

  16. Optimal Design of Litz Wire Coils With Sandwich Structure Wirelessly Powering an Artificial Anal Sphincter System.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Yan, Sheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Xiaoyang

    2015-07-01

    Transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) is widely used to energize implantable biomedical devices. As a key part of the TETS, a pair of applicable coils with low losses, high unloaded Q factor, and strong coupling is required to realize an efficient TETS. This article presents an optimal design methodology of planar litz wire coils sandwiched between two ferrite substrates wirelessly powering a novel mechanical artificial anal sphincter system for treating severe fecal incontinence, with focus on the main parameters of the coils such as the wire diameter, number of turns, geometry, and the properties of the ferrite substrate. The theoretical basis of optimal power transfer efficiency in an inductive link was analyzed. A set of analytical expressions are outlined to calculate the winding resistance of a litz wire coil on ferrite substrate, taking into account eddy-current losses, including conduction losses and induction losses. Expressions that describe the geometrical dimension dependence of self- and mutual inductance are derived. The influence of ferrite substrate relative permeability and dimensions is also considered. We have used this foundation to devise an applicable coil design method that starts with a set of realistic constraints and ends with the optimal coil pair geometries. All theoretical predictions are verified with measurements using different types of fabricated coils. The results indicate that the analysis is useful for optimizing the geometry design of windings and the ferrite substrate in a sandwich structure as part of which, in addition to providing design insight, allows speeding up the system efficiency-optimizing design process. PMID:25808086

  17. Assessing the association of oxytocin augmentation with obstetric anal sphincter injury in nulliparous women: a population-based, case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Rygh, Astrid B; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil; Körner, Hartwig; Eggebø, Torbjørn M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association of oxytocin augmentation with obstetric anal sphincter injury among nulliparous women. Design Population-based, case–control study. Setting Primary and secondary teaching hospital serving a Norwegian region. Population 15 476 nulliparous women with spontaneous start of labour, single cephalic presentation and gestation ≥37 weeks delivering vaginally between 1999 and 2012. Methods Based on the presence or absence of oxytocin augmentation, episiotomy, operative vaginal delivery and birth weight (<4000 vs ≥4000 g), we modelled in logistic regression the best fit for prediction of anal sphincter injury. Within the modified model of main exposures, we tested for possible confounding, and interactions between maternal age, ethnicity, occiput posterior position and epidural analgaesia. Main outcome measure Obstetric anal sphincter injury. Results Oxytocin augmentation was associated with a higher OR of obstetric anal sphincter injuries in women giving spontaneous birth to infants weighing <4000 g (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.5 to 2.2). Episiotomy was not associated with sphincter injuries in spontaneous births, but with a lower OR in operative vaginal deliveries. Spontaneous delivery of infants weighing ≥4000 g was associated with a threefold higher OR, and epidural analgaesia was associated with a 30% lower OR in comparison to no epidural analgaesia. Conclusions Oxytocin augmentation was associated with a higher OR of obstetric anal sphincter injuries during spontaneous deliveries of normal-size infants. We observed a considerable effect modification between the most important factors predicting anal sphincter injuries in the active second stage of labour. PMID:25059967

  18. Episiotomy characteristics and risks for obstetric anal sphincter injuries: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Stedenfeldt, M; Pirhonen, J; Blix, E; Wilsgaard, T; Vonen, B; Øian, P

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between the geometrical properties of episiotomy and obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) because episiotomies angled at 40–60° are associated with fewer OASIS than episiotomies with more acute angles. Design Case–control study. Setting University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø and Nordland Hospital, Bodø, Norway. Sample Seventy-four women who had one vaginal birth and episiotomy. Cases (n = 37) have sustained OASIS at birth, while controls (n = 37) had not. The groups were matched for instrumental delivery. Methods Two groups of women with history of only one vaginal birth were compared. Episiotomy scar was identified and photographed and relevant measures were taken. Data were analysed using conditional logistic analysis. Main outcome measures Mean episiotomy angle, length, depth, incision point. Results The risk of sustaining OASIS decreased by 70% (odds ratio [OR] 0.30; 95% CI 0.14–0.66) for each 5.5-mm increase in episiotomy depth, decreased by 56% (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.23–0.86) for each 4.5-mm increase in the distance from the midline to the incision point of the episiotomy, and decreased by 75% (OR 0.25; 95% CI 0.10–0.61) for each 5.5-mm increase in episiotomy length. Lastly, there was no difference in mean angle between groups but there was a “U-shaped” association between angle and OASIS (OR 2.09; 95% CI 1.02–4.28) with an increased risk (OR 9.00; 95% CI 1.1–71.0) of OASIS when the angle was either smaller than 15°or >60°. Conclusion The present study showed that scarred episiotomies with depth > 16 mm, length > 17 mm, incision point > 9 mm lateral of midpoint and angle range 30–60° are significantly associated with less risk of OASIS. Shrinkage of tissue must be considered. PMID:22390647

  19. Predicting the activation states of the muscles governing upper esophageal sphincter relaxation and opening.

    PubMed

    Omari, Taher I; Jones, Corinne A; Hammer, Michael J; Cock, Charles; Dinning, Philip; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Costa, Marcello; McCulloch, Timothy M

    2016-03-15

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation and deactivation of neural inputs to these muscles, including the intrinsic cricopharyngeus (CP) and extrinsic submental (SM) muscles, results in their mechanical activation or deactivation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure, and ultimately reduces or promotes flow of content. By measuring the changes in diameter, using intraluminal impedance, and the concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure, it is possible to determine when the muscles are passively or actively relaxing or contracting. From these "mechanical states" of the muscle, the neural inputs driving the specific motor behaviors of the UES can be inferred. In this study we compared predictions of UES mechanical states directly with the activity measured by electromyography (EMG). In eight subjects, pharyngeal pressure and impedance were recorded in parallel with CP- and SM-EMG activity. UES pressure and impedance swallow profiles correlated with the CP-EMG and SM-EMG recordings, respectively. Eight UES muscle states were determined by using the gradient of pressure and impedance with respect to time. Guided by the level and gradient change of EMG activity, mechanical states successfully predicted the activity of the CP muscle and SM muscle independently. Mechanical state predictions revealed patterns consistent with the known neural inputs activating the different muscles during swallowing. Derivation of "activation state" maps may allow better physiological and pathophysiological interpretations of UES function.

  20. Smoking during Pregnancy Is Associated with a Decreased Incidence of Obstetric Anal Sphincter Injuries in Nulliparous Women

    PubMed Central

    Räisänen, Sari; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Gissler, Mika; Heinonen, Seppo

    2012-01-01

    Background Smoking is a modifiable lifestyle factor that has been shown to be associated with adverse perinatal outcomes and to have adverse health and dose-dependent connective tissue effects. The objective of this study was to examine whether smoking during pregnancy was associated with the incidence of obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) among six birthweight groups in singleton vaginal deliveries, considering nulliparous and multiparous women separately between 1997 and 2007 in Finland. Methodology A retrospective population-based register study. Populations included women with spontaneous singleton vaginal deliveries, consisting of all 213,059 nulliparous and all 288,391 multiparous women. Incidence of OASIS (n = 2,787) between smoking status groups was adjusted using logistic regression analyses. Principal Findings Of the nulliparous women, 13.1% were smokers, 3.6% had given up smoking during the first trimester of their pregnancy and 81.1% were non-smokers. Among these groups 0.7%, 0.9% and 1.1%, respectively suffered OASIS (p≤0.001). Nulliparous women who smoked had a 28% (95% CI 16–38%, p≤0.001) lower risk of OASIS compared to non-smokers, when adjusting for background variables. In multiparous women, the overall frequencies of OASIS were much lower (0.0–0.2%). A similar inverse relationship between OASIS rates and smoking was significant in pooled univariate analysis of multiparous women, but multivariate analysis revealed statistically insignificant results between non-smokers and smokers. Conclusions Nulliparous women who were smokers had a 28% lower incidence of OASIS. However, smoking during pregnancy cannot be recommended since it has shown to be associated with other adverse pregnancy outcomes and adverse health effects. The observed association warrants clinical repetition studies and, if confirmed, also in vitro studies focusing on connective tissue properties at a molecular and cellular level. PMID:22815899

  1. Straddle injury with anal sphincter and rectal rupture in a young girl Case report.

    PubMed

    Pietroletti, Renato; Delreno, Federica; D'Orsi, Amalia; Caoci, Stefano; Carlei, Francesco

    2015-07-29

    Negli incidenti stradali o sportivi è possibile l’eventualità di lesioni traumatiche indicate come “straddle injury”, “trauma a cavalcioni”, per caduta o urto del perineo su un corpo solido a gambe divaricate. Per lo più si tratta di traumi chiusi di lieve-moderata entità, esitanti in ematomi ecchimosi o abrasioni. Il caso descritto riguarda una quattordicenne vittima in un incidente stradale di un trauma chiuso “a cavalcioni”. Alla presentazione lamentava dolore e sanguinamento perineale e all’esame obiettivo una ferita lacero contusa in sede perianale anteriore. La TC non risultava diagnostica. L’esame in anestesia documentava la rottura completa dello sfintere esterno a livello della commissura anale anteriore, in continuità con una rottura a tutto spessore del retto per un’estensione prossimale di circa 15 cm. Dopo lavaggio e sutura delle lesioni, la laparoscopia verificava assenza di lesioni nella pelvi e nella cavità addominale, e consentiva il confezionamento di una colostomia su bacchetta mediante allargamento dell’accesso laparoscopico. Decorso post-operatorio regolare e dimissione in VIII giornata. A sei mesi chiusura della colostomia previa verifica di normalità dei parametri di fisiologia anorettale. Al follow up recente assenti incontinenza o soiling. I traumi chiusi “a cavalcioni” coinvolgono per lo più il settore uro genitale, ma il coinvolgimento anorettale si riscontra in quelli di maggiore gravità e/o con meccanismo penetrante. Il caso descritto aveva comportato un’importante lesione anorettale pur trattandosi di un trauma chiuso perineale, verosimilmente per la dinamica dell’incidente e lo stato di sovrappeso. Essenziale è l’esame in anestesia generale, di valore superiore alla diagnostica per immagini, che è utile per escludere lesioni viscerali o ossee. L’approccio laparoscopico è utile anche per l’eventuale confezionamento di una colostomia di protezione.

  2. Synthesis of Facial Image with Expression Based on Muscular Contraction Parameters Using Linear Muscle and Sphincter Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Seonju; Ozawa, Shinji

    We aim to synthesize individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. We have proposed a method of calculating the muscular contraction parameters from arbitrary face image without using learning for each individual. As a result, we could generate not only individual facial expression, but also the facial expressions of various persons. In this paper, we propose the muscle-based facial model; the facial muscles define both the linear and the novel sphincter. Additionally, we propose a method of synthesizing individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. First, the individual facial model with expression is generated by fitting using the arbitrary face image. Next, the muscular contraction parameters are calculated that correspond to the expression displacement of the input face image. Finally, the facial expression is synthesized by the vertex displacements of a neutral facial model based on calculated muscular contraction parameters. Experimental results reveal that the novel sphincter muscle can synthesize facial expressions of the facial image, which corresponds to the actual face image with arbitrary and mouth or eyes expression.

  3. Towards a Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: Application of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Regeneration of the Sphincter Muscle.

    PubMed

    Aicher, Wilhelm K; Hart, Melanie L; Stallkamp, Jan; Klünder, Mario; Ederer, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver; Vaegler, Martin; Amend, Bastian; Sievert, Karl D; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a significant social, medical, and economic problem. It is caused, at least in part, by degeneration of the sphincter muscle controlling the tightness of the urinary bladder. This muscular degeneration is characterized by a loss of muscle cells and a surplus of a fibrous connective tissue. In Western countries approximately 15% of all females and 10% of males are affected. The incidence is significantly higher among senior citizens, and more than 25% of the elderly suffer from incontinence. When other therapies, such as physical exercise, pharmacological intervention, or electrophysiological stimulation of the sphincter fail to improve the patient's conditions, a cell-based therapy may improve the function of the sphincter muscle. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge on stem cells suitable for therapy of urinary incontinence: mesenchymal stromal cells, urine-derived stem cells, and muscle-derived satellite cells. In addition, we report on ways to improve techniques for surgical navigation, injection of cells in the sphincter muscle, sensors for evaluation of post-treatment therapeutic outcome, and perspectives derived from recent pre-clinical studies. PMID:26237258

  4. Towards a Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: Application of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Regeneration of the Sphincter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.; Stallkamp, Jan; Klünder, Mario; Ederer, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver; Vaegler, Martin; Amend, Bastian; Sievert, Karl D.; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2014-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a significant social, medical, and economic problem. It is caused, at least in part, by degeneration of the sphincter muscle controlling the tightness of the urinary bladder. This muscular degeneration is characterized by a loss of muscle cells and a surplus of a fibrous connective tissue. In Western countries approximately 15% of all females and 10% of males are affected. The incidence is significantly higher among senior citizens, and more than 25% of the elderly suffer from incontinence. When other therapies, such as physical exercise, pharmacological intervention, or electrophysiological stimulation of the sphincter fail to improve the patient’s conditions, a cell-based therapy may improve the function of the sphincter muscle. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge on stem cells suitable for therapy of urinary incontinence: mesenchymal stromal cells, urine-derived stem cells, and muscle-derived satellite cells. In addition, we report on ways to improve techniques for surgical navigation, injection of cells in the sphincter muscle, sensors for evaluation of post-treatment therapeutic outcome, and perspectives derived from recent pre-clinical studies. PMID:26237258

  5. Inhibitory action of acetylcholine on the smooth muscle from the lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Velkova, V; Papasova, M; Boev, K; Bonev, A

    1979-01-01

    The effect of acetylcholine (Ach) on smooth-muscle strips isolated along the transversal axis of cat lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is studied. Ach in low concentrations (10(-11)--10(-9) g/ml) causes contraction of the muscle strips. Increase of the concentration to 10(-8) g/ml leads to biphasic effect: contraction with relaxation. Inhibitory response predominates at Ach 10(-6) and 10(-5) g/ml. Atropine (10(-6) M) eliminates the excitatory phase but it has no effect on the second relaxation phase. Propranolol (10(-6), 2 X 10(-6) M) as well as phentolamine turn the inhibitory response to Ach into contraction. Noradrenaline leads to LES contraction while isoprenaline induces relaxation. In smooth-muscle LES strips from cats pretreated with reserpine (1 mg/kg for 3 days), Ach in the concentrations used (10(-5), 10(-6) g/ml) leads to contraction. The changes observed are membrane-dependent -- the contraction is accompanied by depolarization, relaxation by hyperpolarization. The inhibitory effect of Ach on LES smooth muscle is discussed in the light of the hypothesis of Burn and Rand (1960) about the release of noradrenaline under the effect of Ach.

  6. Inhibitory effect of beta3-adrenoceptor agonist in lower esophageal sphincter smooth muscle: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Sarma, D N K; Banwait, Kuldip; Basak, Ashim; DiMarino, Anthony J; Rattan, Satish

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effects of (R,R)-5-[2-[2-3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl] - amino]propyl] - 1,3 - benzodioxole - 2, 2 - dicarboxylate (CL 316243) (a typical beta3-agonist) on the spontaneously tonic smooth muscle of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Studies were carried out in smooth muscle strips and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of opossum LES. Isometric tension was recorded in the basal state and after CL 316243, and before and after beta3-antagonist (S)-N-[4-[2-[[3-[-(acetamidomethyl)phenoxy]-2-hydroxypropyl]amino]ethyl]phenyl]benzenesulfonamide (L 748337) and nonselective antagonist propranolol. In some experiments, the effects of nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) nerve activation by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also examined. The effects of CL 316243 were compared with those of nonselective beta-agonist isoproterenol. CL 316243 caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the LES smooth muscle. The relaxant action of CL 316243 was determined to be directly at the smooth muscle because it remained unmodified by the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin and other neurohumoral antagonists, and also was observed in the SMCs. L 748337 selectively antagonized the relaxant effect of CL 316243 and, conversely, had no significant effect on the inhibitory actions of isoproterenol. CL 316243 (1 x 10(-8) M) caused an augmentation of NANC relaxation in the LES. Another beta3-agonist, (S)-4-[hydroxy-3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl)-phenoxyacetamide (ZD 7114), also caused concentration-dependent full relaxation of the LES that was selectively antagonized by beta3-anatagonist 3-(2-ethylphenoxy)-1-[(1S)1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphth-1-ylaminol]-(2S)-2-propanol oxalate (SR 59230A). These studies defined the effects of characteristic inhibitory beta3-adrenoceptors in the spontaneously tonic LES smooth muscle and suggested a potential therapeutic role in the esophageal motility disorders characterized by hypertensive LES. PMID:12490574

  7. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K.; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (<1), whereas the reverse was the case during TLESR (>2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR. PMID:26045610

  8. The effect of M & B 22948 on carbachol-induced inositol trisphosphate accumulation and contraction in iris sphincter smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, R A; Abdel-Latif, A A

    1991-04-25

    The effect of a cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, M & B 22948, on carbachol-induced phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate (PIP2) breakdown and phosphatidic acid labeling, 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate (IP3) accumulation and muscle contraction was studied in bovine iris sphincter smooth muscle. Addition of carbachol (10 microM) to 32P-labeled tissue resulted in increased labeling of phosphatidic acid and hydrolysis of PIP2. In myo[3H]inositol labeled tissue, carbachol caused rapid accumulation of IP3 which reached its maximum at about 2 min. Under identical experimental conditions, carbachol initiated a rapid increase in muscle contraction (phasic component) which was followed by a slightly lower contractile response (tonic component) that lasted for several minutes. Pretreatment of the iris sphincter with M & B 22948 did not alter carbachol-stimulated PIP2 breakdown and phosphatidic acid labeling, IP3 accumulation, or phasic component of the contractile response. However, the tonic component of the contractile response was increasingly attenuated by increasing concentrations of the drug. In conclusion, the data presented demonstrate a close correlation between carbachol-induced IP3 accumulation and muscle contraction, and that M & B 22948 does not inhibit carbachol-induced responses in the iris sphincter.

  9. Potentiation of acetylcholine action by huperzine-A and physostigmine on some vertebrate effectors, including human iris sphincter muscle.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Buerki, Robin A; Patil, Popat N

    2003-04-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to compare the acetylcholine potentiating action of huperzine-A with acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine on the frog rectus abdominus muscle, rat phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation, guinea pig ileum and human iris sphincter muscle. In vitro on the frog rectus abdominus muscle, microM of each alkaloid, incubated for 10 min, shifted the acetylcholine concentration response curve to the left. At EC(50) level, physostigmine potentiated acetylcholine response by 4-fold. The potentiation by huperzine-A was 40-fold. The acetylcholine maximum effect, relative to the control, increased to approximately 130% by each alkaloid. Neurally mediated twitch contraction of the rat diaphragm, a skeletal muscle at 1 microM was also potentiated more by huperzine-A than that by physostigmine. Neuromuscular block by (+)-tubocurarine was reversed more easily by huperzine-A than that by physostigmine. On guinea pig ileum, a 30 nM concentration of each alkaloid incubated for 5 min potentiated acetylcholine (10 nM) by 42%, and 33% for huperzine-A and physostigmine respectively. The difference in potentiation between the alkaloids was not significant. At 300 nM of each alkaloid, intrinsic indirect contractions were observed on the ileum, where the rate of contraction by huperzine-A was faster than that by physostigmine. On the iris sphincter, huperzine-A and physostigmine produced a concentration-dependent effect. Maximum effect after each alkaloid was achieved at 30 microM. Potentiation of acetylcholine response by 0.3 microM huperzine-A after a 10-min incubation was greater than that achieved by physostigmine at an equivalent concentration on the contralateral iris sphincter. In summary, huperzine-A exhibits greater acetylcholine potentiating activity on vertebrate muscles than that produced by physostigmine. The results are discussed in relation to the potential therapeutic value of huperzine-A.

  10. Anal fissure - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100154.htm Anal fissure - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... rectum through which passes stool during defecation. The anal sphincter is a critical mechanism for control of ...

  11. Ascending and descending reflex motor activity of recto-anal region-cholinergic and nitrergic implications in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Radomirov, Radomir; Ivancheva, Christina; Brading, Alison F; Itzev, Dimitar; Rakovska, Angelina; Negrev, Negrin

    2009-04-29

    The implications of cholinergic and nitrergic transmissions in ascending and descending reflex motor pathways of recto-anal region in rat model were evaluated using: (i) electrical stimulation; (ii) triple organ bath; and (iii) morphological techniques. Electrical stimulation to anal canal induced simultaneous ascending contractile responses of longitudinal and circular muscles of proximal rectum, local contraction of anal canal or contraction followed by relaxation of internal anal sphincter when external sphincter was dissected off. The stimulation of proximal rectum elicited local contractions of both rectal layers and descending contractions of internal sphincter or anal canal. Tetrodotoxin (0.1 microM) prevented the electrically elicited events. The ascending excitatory responses and the local and ascending contractions of longitudinal muscle were more pronounced than those of circular muscle suggesting dominant role of ascending reflex pathways and of longitudinal muscle in rectal motor activity. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-containing fibres and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase-positive neurons were observed in myenteric ganglia of rectum and anal canal. NG-nitro-l-arginine (0.5mM) increased the contractile ascending and descending responses. During atropine (0.3 microM) treatment the ascending and descending contractions were suppressed but not abolished and a relaxation revealed in ascending response of circular muscle and in descending responses of internal anal sphincter and anal canal. The relaxation was decreased by NG-nitro-l-arginine and increased by l-arginine (0.5mM). The results suggest that cholinergic excitatory ascending and descending pathways and nitric oxide-dependent inhibitory ascending neurotransmission(s) to rectal circular muscle and inhibitory descending to internal anal sphincter and anal canal are involved in reflex circuitry controlling motor activity of recto-anal region.

  12. Reflection of the State of Hunger in Impulse Activity of Nose Wing Muscles and Upper Esophageal Sphincter during Search behavior in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Dvoenko, E E; Zenina, O Yu

    2016-07-01

    Reflection of the state of hunger in impulse activity of nose wing muscles and upper esophageal sphincter muscles was studied in chronic experiments on rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the absence of locomotion and during search behavior. In the absence of apparent behavioral activity, including sniffing, alai nasi muscles of hungry rabbits constantly generated bursts of action potentials synchronous with breathing, while upper esophageal sphincter muscles exhibited regular aperiodic low-amplitude impulse activity of tonic type. Latent form of food motivation was reflected in the structure of temporal organization of impulse activity of alai nasi muscles in the form of bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and in temporal structure of impulse activity of upper esophageal sphincter muscles in the form of monomodal distribution. The latent form of food motivation was manifested in the structure of temporal organization of periods of the action potentials burst-like rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, in the form of monomodal distribution, characterized by a high degree of dispersion of respiratory cycle periods. In the absence of physical activity hungry animals sporadically exhibited sniffing activity, manifested in the change from the burst-like impulse activity of alai nasi muscles to the single-burst activity type with bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and monomodal distribution of the burst-like action potentials rhythm periods, the maximum of which was shifted towards lower values, which was the cause of increased respiratory rate. At the same time, the monomodal temporal structure of impulse activity of the upper esophageal sphincter muscles was not changed. With increasing food motivation in the process of search behavior temporal structure of periods of the burst-like action potentials rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, became similar to that observed during sniffing, not accompanied by animal's locomotion, which is

  13. Reflection of the State of Hunger in Impulse Activity of Nose Wing Muscles and Upper Esophageal Sphincter during Search behavior in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Dvoenko, E E; Zenina, O Yu

    2016-07-01

    Reflection of the state of hunger in impulse activity of nose wing muscles and upper esophageal sphincter muscles was studied in chronic experiments on rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the absence of locomotion and during search behavior. In the absence of apparent behavioral activity, including sniffing, alai nasi muscles of hungry rabbits constantly generated bursts of action potentials synchronous with breathing, while upper esophageal sphincter muscles exhibited regular aperiodic low-amplitude impulse activity of tonic type. Latent form of food motivation was reflected in the structure of temporal organization of impulse activity of alai nasi muscles in the form of bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and in temporal structure of impulse activity of upper esophageal sphincter muscles in the form of monomodal distribution. The latent form of food motivation was manifested in the structure of temporal organization of periods of the action potentials burst-like rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, in the form of monomodal distribution, characterized by a high degree of dispersion of respiratory cycle periods. In the absence of physical activity hungry animals sporadically exhibited sniffing activity, manifested in the change from the burst-like impulse activity of alai nasi muscles to the single-burst activity type with bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and monomodal distribution of the burst-like action potentials rhythm periods, the maximum of which was shifted towards lower values, which was the cause of increased respiratory rate. At the same time, the monomodal temporal structure of impulse activity of the upper esophageal sphincter muscles was not changed. With increasing food motivation in the process of search behavior temporal structure of periods of the burst-like action potentials rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, became similar to that observed during sniffing, not accompanied by animal's locomotion, which is

  14. Defensive anality and anal narcissism.

    PubMed

    Shengold, L

    1985-01-01

    This paper aims at demonstrating a currently beleaguered assumption: the central importance, the continuing vitality, and the appropriate complexity of Freud's theory of the drives and of his idea of the primacy of the body ego. It is not enough to consider man a thinking machine or a social being; his animal nature must be given a central place in psychology. The paper postulates that 'anal or sphincter defensiveness' is one of the precursors of the repression barrier. Anality has been comparatively neglected in recent psychoanalytic literature, and so has its explorer, Karl Abraham. The paper's thesis is that there is a special defensive importance to anal erogeneity and libido, and to those aspects of ego and superego that are functionally operative (as the 'sadistic-anal organization' (Freud, 1917)) during the so-called 'sadistic-anal' developmental phase. Any of the psychic danger situations can evoke regression to manifestations of 'anal narcissim'--an attempt to master overwhelming feeling by a kind of emotional sphincter action, narrowing down the world to the controllable and the predictable. The basic assumption here is Fliess's idea that the attainment of anal sphincter control functions--with, as-it-were, 'psychic resonance'--as a means to master primal (murderous, cannibalistic) affect. For optimal psychic development, a proper balance must be attained between anal control of, and anal expression of, instinctual derivatives--especially of affect laden with aggression.

  15. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma presenting as a peri-anal abscess.

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Hasanga; Gorissen, Kym; Francis, Leo; Chow, Carina

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing peri-anal abscess can be difficult to manage and is often attributed to chronic disease. This case documents a male in his seventh decade who presented with multiple peri-anal collections. The abscess cavity had caused necrosis of the internal sphincter muscles resulting in faecal incontinence. Biopsies were conclusive for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A de-functioning colostomy was performed and the patient was initiated on CHOP-R chemotherapy. Anal lymphoma masquerading as a peri-anal abscess is rare. A high degree of suspicion must be maintained for an anal abscess which does not resolve with conservative management. PMID:24898408

  16. Macrophage density in pharyngeal and laryngeal muscles greatly exceeds that in other striated muscles: an immunohistochemical study using elderly human cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sunki; Kitamura, Kei; Masaaki, Kasahara; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in aging-related muscle atrophy (i.e., sarcopenia). We examined macrophage density in six striated muscles (cricopharyngeus muscle, posterior cricoarytenoideus muscle, genioglossus muscle, masseter muscle, infraspinatus muscle, and external anal sphincter). We examined 14 donated male cadavers and utilized CD68 immunohistochemistry to clarify macrophage density in muscles. The numbers of macrophages per striated muscle fiber in the larynx and pharynx (0.34 and 0.31) were 5–6 times greater than those in the tongue, shoulder, and anus (0.05–0.07) with high statistical significance. Thick muscle fibers over 80 µm in diameter were seen in the pharynx, larynx, and anal sphincter of two limited specimens. Conversely, in the other sites or specimens, muscle fibers were thinner than 50 µm. We did not find any multinuclear muscle cells suggestive of regeneration. At the beginning of the study, we suspected that mucosal macrophages might have invaded into the muscle layer of the larynx and pharynx, but we found no evidence of inflammation in the mucosa. Likewise, the internal anal sphincter (a smooth muscle layer near the mucosa) usually contained fewer macrophages than the external sphincter. The present result suggest that, in elderly men, thinning and death of striated muscle fibers occur more frequently in the larynx and pharynx than in other parts of the body. PMID:27722010

  17. Pharmaco-mechanical coupling in the response to acetylcholine and substance P in the smooth muscle of the rat iris sphincter.

    PubMed

    Banno, H; Imaizumi, Y; Watanabe, M

    1985-08-01

    In the rat iris sphincter muscle contractile responses to transmural stimulation consisted of two components, a fast cholinergic followed by a slow non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) one. The magnitude of the latter varied widely and was on average 5% of that of the cholinergic component. Exogenous substance P (1 nM-1 microM) produced a concentration-dependent contraction, the maximum amplitude of which was as large as that produced by acetylcholine (ACh). Capsaicin (10 microM) induced a transient contraction only once in each preparation. After the treatment with capsaicin the NANC component disappeared. Neither nerve nor direct electrical stimulation with short pulses elicited any active change in the membrane potential under physiological conditions, but an action potential was triggered by direct stimulation when the extracellular Ca ion was totally replaced by Ba ion. Under the latter conditions spontaneous spike potentials occurred repetitively. ACh and substance P produced a large contraction without modifying the membrane potential. This was also the case in the presence of 5 mM Ba. These results suggest that substance P-ergic innervation may have a far lesser physiological significance than that which has been described in rabbits and that pure pharmaco-mechanical coupling is characteristic of the responses to acetylcholine, substance P, and nerve stimulation in the rat iris sphincter muscle.

  18. Post- and pre-synaptic action of isotocin in the upper esophageal sphincter muscle of the eel: its role in water drinking.

    PubMed

    Sakihara, Takashi; Watanabe, Yohei; Mukuda, Takao; Ando, Masaaki

    2007-11-01

    Isotocin is a fish analogue of the mammalian hormone oxytocin. To elucidate sites of action of isotocin (IT) in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) muscle, a key muscle in swallowing, IT was applied after treatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX). Even after blocking nerve activity with TTX, IT relaxes the UES muscle in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that IT receptor(s) is present on the muscle cells. Similar relaxation was also obtained by application of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), forskolin (FSK) and 8-bromo-adenosine, 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BrcAMP) after pretreatment with TTX, suggesting that the relaxing effect (postsynaptic action) of IT may be mediated by cAMP. In contrast to such relaxing effect, IT enhanced the UES contraction induced by repetitive electrical field stimulation (EFS). Such enhancement was blocked by an IT receptor antagonist, suggesting that this effect is also mediated by IT receptor(s). Similar enhancement was also induced by IBMX, FSK and 8BrcAMP, suggesting the enhancing effect is also mediated by cAMP. However, no enhancing effect of IT was observed when the muscle was stimulated by carbachol, or after treatment with curare or TTX, denying the postsynaptic modulatory action of IT and suggesting presynaptic action for IT, i.e., accelerating acetylcholine release. Summarizing these results, role of IT in precisely regulating the drinking rate in the seawater eel is discussed.

  19. 2D DIGE Does Not Reveal all: A Scotopic Report Suggests Differential Expression of a Single “Calponin Family Member” Protein for Tetany of Sphincters!

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Using 2D differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS), a recent report by Rattan and Ali (2015) compared proteome expression between tonically contracted sphincteric smooth muscles of the internal anal sphincter (IAS), in comparison to the adjacent rectum [rectal smooth muscles (RSM)] that contracts in a phasic fashion. The study showed the differential expression of a single 23 kDa protein SM22, which was 1.87 fold, overexpressed in RSM in comparison to IAS. Earlier studies have shown differences in expression of different proteins like Rho-associated protein kinase II, myosin light chain kinase, myosin phosphatase, and protein kinase C between IAS and RSM. The currently employed methods, despite its high-throughput potential, failed to identify these well-characterized differences between phasic and tonic muscles. This calls into question the fidelity and validatory potential of the otherwise powerful technology of 2D DIGE/MS. These discrepancies, when redressed in future studies, will evolve this recent report as an important baseline study of “sphincter proteome.” Proteomics techniques are currently underutilized in examining pathophysiology of hypertensive/hypotensive disorders involving gastrointestinal sphincters, including achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), spastic pylorus, seen during diabetes or chronic chemotherapy, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and recto-anal incontinence. Global proteome mapping may provide instant snapshot of the complete repertoire of differential proteins, thus expediting to identify the molecular pathology of gastrointestinal motility disorders currently labeled “idiopathic” and facilitating practice of precision medicine. PMID:26151053

  20. The Possibility of Muscle Tissue Reconstruction Using Shape Memory Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Masaru; Amae, Shintaro; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Okuyama, Takeshi; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuki, Hidetoshi

    2005-01-01

    Severe dysfunction of muscle tissues can be treated by transplantation but the success rate is still not high enough. One possibility instead is to replace the dysfunctional muscle with artificial muscles. This article introduces a unique approach using shape memory alloys (SMAs) to replace the anal sphincter muscle for solving the problem of fecal incontinence. The use of SMAs that exhibit a two-way shape memory effect allows the device to function like a sphincter muscle and facilitates simple design. In this article, we will give a brief introduction to the functional material—SMA—together with its medical applications, and will follow this with a description of the recent progress in research and development of an SMA-based artificial sphincter. The possibility of its commercialization will also be discussed. PMID:19521522

  1. Sphincter lesions observed on ultrasound after transanal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mora López, Laura; Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the morphological impact of transanal endoscopic surgery on the sphincter apparatus using the modified Starck classification. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 118 consecutive patients undergoing Transanal Endoscopic Operation/Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery (TEO/TEM) from March 2013 to May 2014 was performed. All the patients underwent an endoanal ultrasound prior to surgery and one and four months postoperatively in order to measure sphincter width, identify sphincter defects and to quantify them in terms of the level, depth and size of the affected anal canal. To assess the lesions, we used the “modified” Starck classification, which incorporates the variable “sphincter fragmentation”. The results were correlated with the Wexner incontinence questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 118 patients, twelve (sphincter lesions) were excluded. The results of the 106 patients were as follows after one month: 31 (29.2%) lesions found on ultrasound after one month, median overall Starck score of 4 (range 3-6); 10 (9.4%) defects in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) and 3 (2.8%) in the external anal sphincter (EAS); 17 patients (16%) had fragmentation of the sphincter apparatus with both sphincters affected in one case. At four months: 7 (6.6%) defects, all in the IAS, overall median Starck score of 4 (range 3-6). Mean IAS widths were 3.5 mm (SD 1.14) preoperatively, 4.38 mm (SD 2.1) one month postoperatively and 4.03 mm (SD 1.46) four months postoperatively. The only statistically significant difference in sphincter width in the IAS measurements was between preoperatively and one month postoperatively. No incontinence was reported, even in cases of ultrasound abnormalities. CONCLUSION: TEO/TEM may produce ultrasound abnormalities but this is not accompanied by clinical changes in continence. The modified Starck classification is useful for describing and managing these disorders. PMID:26674666

  2. Modern management of anal fistula

    PubMed Central

    Limura, Elsa; Giordano, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Ideal surgical treatment for anal fistula should aim to eradicate sepsis and promote healing of the tract, whilst preserving the sphincters and the mechanism of continence. For the simple and most distal fistulae, conventional surgical options such as laying open of the fistula tract seem to be relatively safe and therefore, well accepted in clinical practise. However, for the more complex fistulae where a significant proportion of the anal sphincter is involved, great concern remains about damaging the sphincter and subsequent poor functional outcome, which is quite inevitable following conventional surgical treatment. For this reason, over the last two decades, many sphincter-preserving procedures for the treatment of anal fistula have been introduced with the common goal of minimising the injury to the anal sphincters and preserving optimal function. Among them, the ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract procedure appears to be safe and effective and may be routinely considered for complex anal fistula. Another technique, the anal fistula plug, derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa, is safe but modestly effective in long-term follow-up, with success rates varying from 24%-88%. The failure rate may be due to its extrusion from the fistula tract. To obviate that, a new designed plug (GORE BioA®) was introduced, but long term data regarding its efficacy are scant. Fibrin glue showed poor and variable healing rate (14%-74%). FiLaC and video-assisted anal fistula treatment procedures, respectively using laser and electrode energy, are expensive and yet to be thoroughly assessed in clinical practise. Recently, a therapy using autologous adipose-derived stem cells has been described. Their properties of regenerating tissues and suppressing inflammatory response must be better investigated on anal fistulae, and studies remain in progress. The aim of this present article is to review the pertinent literature, describing the advantages and limitations of

  3. [Diagnostics and conservative treatment of anal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Geile, Dorothea; Osterholzer, Georg; Rosenberg, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Anal incontinence is diagnosed primarily by clinical and proctologic examination. Etiological factors of the disease are found in 85% of the patients by additional examinations. Motility dysfunction of colon and rectum has to be excluded (stenosis, dyschezia, internal hernias). Because anal incontinence is a multifactorial disease as a rule, the single compounds have to be diagnosed and have to undergo therapy. Accordingly, useful investigations are: endorectal ultrasound (defect of muscle, inflammatory or tumour infiltration), manometry (alteration of either anal resting pressure and/or anal squeezing pressure) and surface electromyography (ability of contraction, duration of contraction, strength). Neurophysiological examinations are: needle electromyography, pudendal nerve latency time measurement (PNLT). The occurrence of nerve damage determines the outcome of operative intervention! Conservative treatment is indicated in 80 to 90% of all patients, even higher when one includes all patients in the perioperative period. Possible therapy modalities are: nutrition consultation, physiotherapy, pelvic floor training, biofeedback training of pelvic floor and sphincter muscles, electrostimulation and the combination of both (EMG-triggered electrostimulation). Short-term results are satisfying in up to 85% of patients, but later, successful results depend on the patient's willingness or ability to continue training, and on his/her age.

  4. Chronic ethanol feeding produces a muscarinic receptor upregulation, but not a muscarinic supersensitivity in lower esophageal sphincter muscle.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzian, A; Gordon, J H; Willson, C; Urban, G; Fields, J Z

    1992-02-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) are important in esophageal physiology, and mAChR alterations may be involved in ethanol-induced esophageal dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that acute ethanol decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP), whereas withdrawal from chronic ethanol results in pressure increases which are reversible by acute ethanol. To see if this increase in LESP is due to upregulation of mAChR, we evaluated both mAChR binding and dose-response curves for bethanechol and atropine-induced changes in LESP before and after acute and chronic ethanol exposure. The number of mAChR sites (Bmax) in LES (3.4 fmol/mg tissue) was lowered by acute ethanol (1.72, -50%); withdrawal from chronic ethanol raised Bmax (5.2, +54%). Acute injection of ethanol into cats in withdrawal reversed this increase in mAChR density (3.1, -10%). These changes correlated with our earlier data on ethanol-induced changes in LESP. However, the dose-response curve for bethanechol-induced pressure increases shifted to the right [ED25 (micrograms/kg); control, 8.6; withdrawal, 21.3], paralleled by an increase in the number of low-affinity agonist binding sites. Thus, 1) the withdrawal-associated increase in Bmax (up-regulation) is more likely to be a compensatory response to deficits (functional subsensitivity) distal to the receptor recognition site than to proximal deficits; 2) the increase in Bmax does not cause LESP hyperactivity; and 3) receptor binding changes do not necessarily translate into physiological changes. PMID:1346638

  5. Investigation of anal motor characteristics of the sensorimotor response (SMR) using 3-D anorectal pressure topography

    PubMed Central

    Cheeney, Gregory; Remes-Troche, Jose M.; Attaluri, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Desire to defecate is associated with a unique anal contractile response, the sensorimotor response (SMR). However, the precise muscle(s) involved is not known. We aimed to examine the role of external and internal anal sphincter and the puborectalis muscle in the genesis of SMR. Anorectal 3-D pressure topography was performed in 10 healthy subjects during graded rectal balloon distention using a novel high-definition manometry system consisting of a probe with 256 pressure sensors arranged circumferentially. The anal pressure changes before, during, and after the onset of SMR were measured at every millimeter along the length of anal canal and in 3-D by dividing the anal canal into 4 × 2.1-mm grids. Pressures were assessed in the longitudinal and anterior-posterior axis. Anal ultrasound was performed to assess puborectalis morphology. 3-D topography demonstrated that rectal distention produced an SMR coinciding with desire to defecate and predominantly induced by contraction of puborectalis. Anal ultrasound showed that the puborectalis was located at mean distance of 3.5 cm from anal verge, which corresponded with peak pressure difference between the anterior and posterior vectors observed at 3.4 cm with 3-D topography (r = 0.77). The highest absolute and percentage increases in pressure during SMR were seen in the superior-posterior portion of anal canal, reaffirming the role of puborectalis. The SMR anal pressure profile showed a peak pressure at 1.6 cm from anal verge in the anterior and posterior vectors and distinct increase in pressure only posteriorly at 3.2 cm corresponding to puborectalis. We concluded that SMR is primarily induced by the activation and contraction of the puborectalis muscle in response to a sensation of a desire to defecate. PMID:21109594

  6. Spontaneous variation of anal "resting" pressure in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Enck, P; Eggers, E; Koletzko, S; Erckenbrecht, J F

    1991-11-01

    To investigate anal sphincter performance during sleep and after a meal, a two-channel micro-transducer probe was used for 12-h stationary recording of basal anal pressure overnight in eight healthy male volunteers. It was shown that the basal anal pressure ("resting" pressure) exhibits three distinct patterns of cyclic activity changes in all subjects: a long-term rhythm with a prominent decrease of pressure during which sleep was approximately circadian, an ultradian rhythm of approximately 20 to 40 min in length that was more prominent at night, and spontaneous relaxations of the sphincter tone occurring between 3 and 20 times per hour with the maximum frequency after breakfast. These data indicate that the anal sphincter is a dynamic structure not often at rest. Long-term anorectal manometry may be supplementary to short-term clinical evaluation of anal sphincter performance in healthy subjects as well as in patients with defecation disorders.

  7. Diagnostic imaging features of normal anal sacs in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yechan; Jeong, Eunseok; Park, Sangjun; Jeong, Jimo; Choi, Ul Soo; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Namsoo; Lee, Kichang

    2016-09-30

    This study was conducted to provide normal reference features for canine and feline anal sacs using ultrasound, low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiograph contrast as diagnostic imaging tools. A total of ten clinically normal beagle dogs and eight clinically normally cats were included. General radiography with contrast, ultrasonography and low-field MRI scans were performed. The visualization of anal sacs, which are located at distinct sites in dogs and cats, is possible with a contrast study on radiography. Most surfaces of the anal sacs tissue, occasionally appearing as a hyperechoic thin line, were surrounded by the hypoechoic external sphincter muscle on ultrasonography. The normal anal sac contents of dogs and cats had variable echogenicity. Signals of anal sac contents on low-field MRI varied in cats and dogs, and contrast medium using T1-weighted images enhanced the anal sac walls more obviously than that on ultrasonography. In conclusion, this study provides the normal features of anal sacs from dogs and cats on diagnostic imaging. Further studies including anal sac evaluation are expected to investigate disease conditions.

  8. Diagnostic imaging features of normal anal sacs in dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yechan; Jeong, Eunseok; Park, Sangjun; Jeong, Jimo; Choi, Ul Soo; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Namsoo

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to provide normal reference features for canine and feline anal sacs using ultrasound, low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiograph contrast as diagnostic imaging tools. A total of ten clinically normal beagle dogs and eight clinically normally cats were included. General radiography with contrast, ultrasonography and low-field MRI scans were performed. The visualization of anal sacs, which are located at distinct sites in dogs and cats, is possible with a contrast study on radiography. Most surfaces of the anal sacs tissue, occasionally appearing as a hyperechoic thin line, were surrounded by the hypoechoic external sphincter muscle on ultrasonography. The normal anal sac contents of dogs and cats had variable echogenicity. Signals of anal sac contents on low-field MRI varied in cats and dogs, and contrast medium using T1-weighted images enhanced the anal sac walls more obviously than that on ultrasonography. In conclusion, this study provides the normal features of anal sacs from dogs and cats on diagnostic imaging. Further studies including anal sac evaluation are expected to investigate disease conditions. PMID:26645338

  9. Prosthetic Sphincter Controls Urination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenny, John B., Jr

    1986-01-01

    People who lost muscular control of urinary canal through disease or injury aided by prosthetic sphincter. Implanted so it surrounds uretha, sphincter deflated and inflated at will by wearer to start and stop urina tion. Operating pressure adjusted after implantation to accommodate growth or atrophy of urinary canal and prevent tissue damage from excess pressure. Principle adapted to other organs, such as colon, ureter, or ileum.

  10. Excitatory and inhibitory enteric innervation of horse lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, R; Giancola, F; Mazzoni, M; Sorteni, C; Romagnoli, N; Pietra, M

    2015-06-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized, thickened muscle region with a high resting tone mediated by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. During swallowing or belching, the LES undergoes strong inhibitory innervation. In the horse, the LES seems to be organized as a "one-way" structure, enabling only the oral-anal progression of food. We characterized the esophageal and gastric pericardial inhibitory and excitatory intramural neurons immunoreactive (IR) for the enzymes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and choline acetyltransferase. Large percentages of myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal (SMP) plexus nNOS-IR neurons were observed in the esophagus (72 ± 9 and 69 ± 8 %, respectively) and stomach (57 ± 17 and 45 ± 3 %, respectively). In the esophagus, cholinergic MP and SMP neurons were 29 ± 14 and 65 ± 24 vs. 36 ± 8 and 38 ± 20 % in the stomach, respectively. The high percentage of nitrergic inhibitory motor neurons observed in the caudal esophagus reinforces the role of the enteric nervous system in the horse LES relaxation. These findings might allow an evaluation of whether selective groups of enteric neurons are involved in horse neurological disorders such as megaesophagus, equine dysautonomia, and white lethal foal syndrome.

  11. [Structural and functional organization of the upper esophageal sphincter].

    PubMed

    Baĭtinger, V F; Saks, F F; Ettinger, A P

    1989-01-01

    Using traditional anatomical and histological methods, the muscle envelope of the pharynx-esophagus junction was investigated in humans and dogs. In the upper (cranial) portion of the esophagus of man and dogs, an inferior anatomical sphincter was detected which histologically can be referred to the group of rhabdo-sphincters. The upper esophageal sphincter is a purely esophageal structure which in man is located at a distance of 25-30 cm from the maxillary incisors. In adult humans, it is 25-30 mm long and is situated obliquely to the long esophageal axis. The posterior semicircle of the sphincter is located higher than the anterior one. In the area of the upper esophageal sphincter the esophageal wall is of different thickness. Due to the muscle envelope and submucous membrane of the base, the right wall is 1.7-2.0 times thicker than the left, anterior or posterior wall. The data obtained from fiber esophagoscopy of patients and electromyography of the pharynx-esophagus junction of dogs have shown that the upper (cranial) esophageal sphincter control food passage from the pharynx to the esophagus and prevents food reflux to the laryngopharynx, protecting airways from aspiration. PMID:2741289

  12. Neural control of the female urethral and anal rhabdosphincters and pelvic floor muscles

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The urethral rhabdosphincter and pelvic floor muscles are important in maintenance of urinary continence and in preventing descent of pelvic organs [i.e., pelvic organ prolapse (POP)]. Despite its clinical importance and complexity, a comprehensive review of neural control of the rhabdosphincter and pelvic floor muscles is lacking. The present review places historical and recent basic science findings on neural control into the context of functional anatomy of the pelvic muscles and their coordination with visceral function and correlates basic science findings with clinical findings when possible. This review briefly describes the striated muscles of the pelvis and then provides details on the peripheral innervation and, in particular, the contributions of the pudendal and levator ani nerves to the function of the various pelvic muscles. The locations and unique phenotypic characteristics of rhabdosphincter motor neurons located in Onuf's nucleus, and levator ani motor neurons located diffusely in the sacral ventral horn, are provided along with the locations and phenotypes of primary afferent neurons that convey sensory information from these muscles. Spinal and supraspinal pathways mediating excitatory and inhibitory inputs to the motor neurons are described; the relative contributions of the nerves to urethral function and their involvement in POP and incontinence are discussed. Finally, a detailed summary of the neurochemical anatomy of Onuf's nucleus and the pharmacological control of the rhabdosphincter are provided. PMID:20484700

  13. [The anal incontinence-- study on 20 operated cases].

    PubMed

    Iusuf, T; Sârbu, V; Grasa, C; Cristache, C; Botea, F

    2001-01-01

    The authors present 20 cases operated for anal incontinence. Two techniques were performed: direct repair (18 cases) and Musset-Cottrell procedure (2 cases). The results were excellent in 12 cases, good in 5 cases and satisfactory in 3 cases. The method of choice seems to be the direct repair of the anal sphincter after a proper local and general preparation. PMID:12731180

  14. Prosthetic urinary sphincter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, C. R.; Smyly, H. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A pump/valve unit for controlling the inflation and deflation of a urethral collar in a prosthetic urinary sphincter device is described. A compressible bulb pump defining a reservoir was integrated with a valve unit for implantation. The valve unit includes a movable valve member operable by depression of a flexible portion of the valve unit housing for controlling fluid flow between the reservoir and collar; and a pressure sensing means which operates the valve member to relieve an excess pressure in the collar should too much pressure be applied by the patient.

  15. [Epithelium and anal glands in rectal pouches and fistula. Histologic studies of swine with congenital anal atresia].

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, W; Kluth, D; Lierse, W

    1989-02-01

    The epithelial coating of the rectal pouch and fistula was studied morphologically in 33 newborn piglets with high and low forms of anal atresia and was found to be similar to the epithelial coating of the anal canal in normal piglets: the typical epithelium of the rectum changed its character into transitional epithelium at the region of the internal sphincter which surrounded the fistulae in all animals. In the caudal part of the fistula the transitional epithelium was followed by squamous epithelium. Only in male piglets with deformities and recto-urethral fistulae no squamous epithelium was found. In these cases transitional epithelium covered all parts of the fistula and the region of the internal sphincter. Anal glands were found in all animals, with or without anorectal malformations. They always invaded the internal sphincter. According to our morphological studies the fistula in anorectal malformations represents an ectopic anal canal.

  16. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Anal Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Whether you (or ... the topics below to get started. What Is Anal Cancer? What is anal cancer? What are the ...

  17. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Hopman, Wim P.M.; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  18. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Anal Cancer Anal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Anal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Anal Cancer Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Screening ...

  19. Inflatable artificial sphincter - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sphincter dysfunction related to spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. Most experts advise their patients to try medication and bladder retraining therapy first before resorting to this treatment. Alternatives to ...

  20. Designing micro- and nanostructures for artificial urinary sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Deyhle, Hans; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as actuators with muscle-like mechanical properties due to their inherent compliancy and overall performance: the combination of large deformations, high energy densities and unique sensory capabilities. Consequently, such actuators should be realized to replace the currently available artificial urinary sphincters building dielectric thin film structures that work with several 10 V. The present communication describes the determination of the forces (1 - 10 N) and deformation levels (~10%) necessary for the appropriate operation of the artificial sphincter as well as the response time to master stress incontinence (reaction time less than 0.1 s). Knowing the dimensions of the presently used artificial urinary sphincters, these macroscopic parameters form the basis of the actuator design. Here, we follow the strategy to start from organic thin films maybe even monolayers, which should work with low voltages but only provide small deformations. Actuators out of 10,000 or 100,000 layers will finally provide the necessary force. The suitable choice of elastomer and electrode materials is vital for the success. As the number of incontinent patients is steadily increasing worldwide, it becomes more and more important to reveal the sphincter's function under static and stress conditions to realize artificial urinary sphincters, based on sophisticated, biologically inspired concepts to become nature analogue.

  1. Anal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... common type of anal cancer. It starts in cells that line the anal canal and grow into the deeper tissue. Cloacogenic carcinoma. Almost all the rest of anal cancers are tumors that start in cells lining the area between the anus and rectum. ...

  2. [Surgery of anal fistulas].

    PubMed

    Ricchi, E; Carriero, A; Spallanzani, A; Fundarò, S; Heydari, A; Piccoli, M; Gelmini, R

    1997-06-01

    The authors report a study on 120 patients with anal fistula (111 males and 9 females). The average age was 44.3 years (median 44, SD +/- 14.807). 64.1% of patients had an intersphincteric fistula, 23.3% hanal transphincteric fistula, 1.6% a suprasphincteric fistula, 7.5% a horseshoe fistula and the 3.3% an extrasphincteric fistula. We treated 14 patients (11.66%) with direct surgical treatment. The other 106 had various types of treatment depending on the localisation and the involvement of the anorectal sphincter. We had 11 cases (9.1%) of complications, such as recurrence in 5 patients (4.1%) transitory incontinence in 2 cases (1.6%) and finally postoperative bleeding in 3 patients (2.5%). PMID:9324655

  3. The valves, baffles and sphincters of the respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Baggot, M G

    1992-02-01

    'Starting with the integument we see many organs are contractile sacs or multiples thereof which tubes or bags constitute the major part of the entire body' (1). The lungs are a collection of these universal contractile chambers connected in chains and bunches. Such containers typically have muscular walls which stretch and contract to fill and empty also valves or sphincters to regulate the flow between neighbouring chambers. The heart, stomach and uterus are familiar examples. In some systems (e.g. the digestive, renal and respiratory tracts) traffic is also between the milieu exterior and the milieu interior through the organ's wall which is part of the integument. These movements from organ to organ or milieu to milieu involve pressure variations generated by the concerted actions of the mural and valvular muscles. A muscle usually has a doppel-gänger so they are arranged in reciprocating pairs, supinators with pronators, flexors with extensors, chamber walls with sphincters etc.

  4. Comparison of muscle fiber directions between different levator ani muscle subdivisions: in vivo MRI measurements in women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinyong; Miller, Janis M.; Ashton-Miller, James A.; DeLancey, John O. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis This study describes a technique to quantify muscle fascicle directions in the levator ani (LA) and tests the null hypothesis that the in vivo fascicle directions for each LA subdivision subtend the same parasagittal angle relative to a horizontal reference axis. Methods Visible muscle fascicle direction in the each of the three LA muscle subdivisions, the pubovisceral (PVM; synonymous with pubococcygeal), puborectal (PRM), and iliococcygeal (ICM) muscles, as well as the external anal sphincter (EAS), were measured on 3-T sagittal MRI images in a convenience sample of 14 healthy women in whom muscle fascicles were visible. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) angle values relative to the horizontal were calculated for each muscle subdivision. Repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t tests were used to compare muscle groups. Results Pubovisceral muscle fiber inclination was 41±8.0°, PRM was −19±10.1°, ICM was 33±8.8°, and EAS was −43±6.4°. These fascicle directions were statistically different (p<0.001). Pairwise comparisons among levator subdivisions showed angle differences of 60° between PVM and PRM, and 52° between ICM and PRM. An 84° difference existed between PVM and EAS. The smallest angle difference between levator divisions was between PVM and ICM 8°. The difference between PRM and EAS was 24°. All pairwise comparisons were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions The null hypothesis that muscle fascicle inclinations are similar in the three subdivisions of the levator ani and the external anal sphincter was rejected. The largest difference in levator subdivision inclination, 60°, was found between the PVM and PRM. PMID:24832855

  5. Anal cushion lifting method is a novel radical management strategy for hemorrhoids that does not involve excision or cause postoperative anal complications

    PubMed Central

    Ishiyama, Gentaro; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Ishiyama, Yuji; Nishio, Akihiko; Tarumi, Ken; Kawamura, Maiko; Okita, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Toru; Fujimiya, Mineko; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the anal cushion lifting (ACL) method with preliminary clinical results. METHODS: Between January to September 2007, 127 patients who received ACL method for hemorrhoid was investigated with informed consent. In this study, three surgeons who specialized in anorectal surgery performed the procedures. Patients with grade two or more severe hemorrhoids according to Goligher’s classification were considered to be indicated for surgery. The patients were given the choice to undergo either the ACL method or the ligation and excision method. ACL method is an original technique for managing hemorrhoids without excision. After dissecting the anal cushion from the internal sphincter muscle, the anal cushion was lifted to oral side and ligated at the proper position. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients were recorded including complications after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 127 patients were enrolled. Their median age was 42 (19-84) years, and 74.8% were female. In addition, more than 99% of the patients had grade 3 or worse hemorrhoids. The median follow-up period was 26 (0-88) mo, and the median operative time was 15 (4-30) min. After surgery, analgesics were used for a median period of three days (0-21). Pain control was achieved using extra-oral analgesic drugs, although some patients required intravenous injections of analgesic drugs. The median duration of the patients’ postoperative hospital stay was 7 (2-13) d. A total of 10 complications (7.9%) occurred. Bleeding was observed in one patient and was successfully controlled with manual compression. Urinary retention occurred in 6 patients, but it disappeared spontaneously in all cases. Recurrent hemorrhoids developed in 3 patients after 36, 47, and 61 mo, respectively. No anal stenosis or persistent anal pain occurred. CONCLUSION: We consider that the ACL method might be better than all other current methods for managing hemorrhoids. PMID:26525139

  6. Is Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Beneficial for Sphincter Preservation in Low-Lying Rectal Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Ja; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Lyul; Kim, Chan Wook; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study explored the benefit of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) for sphincter preservation in locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer patients who underwent stapled anastomosis, especially in those with deep and narrow pelvises determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with locally advanced low-lying rectal cancer (≤5 cm from the anal verge) who underwent stapled anastomosis were included. Patients were categorized into two groups (PCRT+ vs. PCRT–) according to PCRT application. Patients in the PCRT+ group were matched to those in the PCRT– group according to potential confounding factors (age, gender, clinical stage, and body mass index) for sphincter preservation. Sphincter preservation, permanent stoma, and anastomosis-related complications were compared between the groups. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure 12 dimensions representing pelvic cavity depth and width with which deep and narrow pelvis was defined. The impact of PCRT on sphincter preservation and permanent stoma in pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis was evaluated, and factors associated with sphincter preservation and permanent stoma were analyzed. One hundred sixty-six patients were one-to-one matched between the PCRT+ and PCRT− groups. Overall, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 66.3% and the rates were not different between the 2 groups. Anastomotic complications and permanent stoma occurred nonsignificantly more frequently in the PCRT+ group. PCRT was not associated with higher rate of sphincter preservation in all pelvic dimensions defined as deep and narrow pelvis, while PCRT was related to higher rate of permanent stoma in shorter transverse diameter and interspinous distance. On logistic regression analysis, PCRT was not shown to influence both sphincter preservation and permanent stoma, while longer transverse diameter and interspinous distance were associated with lower rate of permanent stoma. PCRT had

  7. LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER PRESSURE MEASUREMENT UNDER STANDARDIZED INSPIRATORY MANEUVEURS

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Jeany Borges e Silva; DIÓGENES, Esther Cristina Arruda Oliveira; BEZERRA, Patrícia Carvalho; COUTINHO, Tanila Aguiar Andrade; de ALMEIDA, Cícera Geórgia Félix; SOUZA, Miguel Ângelo Nobre e

    2015-01-01

    Background: Through rhythmic variations, the diaphragm influence lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure acting as an external sphincter. LES pressure recording is characterized by increased pressure in inspiration due to contraction of the diaphragmatic crura that involves the sphincter. Aim: To describe a method of measuring LES pressure during standardized inspiratory maneuvers with increasing loads. Methods: The study population comprised of eight healthy female volunteers (average age of 31.5 years). An esophageal high-resolution manometry and impedance system was used for measuring the LES pressure during 3-second inspiratory efforts under 12, 24 and 48 cm H2O loads (Threshold maneuvers). Results: There was a significant difference between the average maximum LES pressure and the average maximum basal LES pressure during the first (76.19±17.92 difference, p=0.0008), second (86.92±19.01 difference, p=0.0004), and third seconds of the maneuver (90.86±17.93 difference, p=0.0002), with 12, 24 and 48 cmH2O loads. Conclusion: This maneuver is a standardization of the inspiratory LES pressure and may better differentiate patients with reflux disease from healthy individuals, and may also be useful for monitoring the treatment of these patients through inspiratory muscle training. PMID:26537140

  8. [Prevention of intraoperative incidental injuries during sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer and management of postoperative complication].

    PubMed

    Han, Fanghai; Li, Hongming

    2016-06-01

    Prevention of intraoperative incidental injuries during radical operation for rectal cancer and management of postoperative complication are associated with successful operation and prognosis of patients. This paper discusses how to prevent such intraoperative incidental injuries and how to manage postoperative complication. (1) Accurate clinical evaluation should be performed before operation and reasonable treatment decision should be made, including determination of the distance from transection to lower margin of the tumor, T and M staging evaluated by MRI, fascia invasion of mesorectum, metastasis of lateral lymph nodes, metastatic station of mesentery lymph node, association between levator ani muscle and anal sphincter, course and length of sigmoid observed by Barium enema, length assessment of pull-through bowel. Meanwhile individual factors of patients and tumors must be realized accurately. (2) Injury of pelvic visceral fascia should be avoided during operation. Negative low and circumference cutting edge must be ensured. Blood supply and adequate length of pull-down bowel must be also ensured. Urinary system injury, pelvic bleeding and intestinal damage should be avoided. Team cooperation and anesthesia procedure should be emphasized. Capacity of handling accident events should be cultivated for the team. (3) intraoperative incidental injuries during operation by instruments should be avoided, such as poor clarity of camera due to spray and smog, ineffective instruments resulted from repeated usage. (4) As to the prevention and management of postoperative complication of rectal cancer operation, prophylactic stoma should be regularly performed for rectal cancer patients undergoing anterior resection, while drainage tube placement does not decrease the morbidities of anastomosis and other complications. After sphincter-preserving surgery for rectal cancer, attentions must be paid to the occurrence of anastomotic bleeding, pelvic bleeding, anastomotic

  9. Anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Schlichtemeier, Steven; Engel, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    An anal fissure is a common, mostly benign, condition that can be acute or chronic. The diagnosis is usually made on history and physical examination, but further investigations are sometimes necessary. Primary fissures are usually benign and located in the posterior or anterior position. Secondary fissures are lateral or multiple and often indicate a more serious underlying pathology. The management of primary anal fissures is generally non-operative and includes increased dietary fibre, sitz baths, topical ointments and botulinum toxin injections. If these treatments are ineffective the patient will need a surgical referral. Secondary anal fissures require further investigation. Multidisciplinary management is preferable and is essential in the case of malignancy. PMID:27041801

  10. Anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    Schlichtemeier, Steven; Engel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY An anal fissure is a common, mostly benign, condition that can be acute or chronic. The diagnosis is usually made on history and physical examination, but further investigations are sometimes necessary. Primary fissures are usually benign and located in the posterior or anterior position. Secondary fissures are lateral or multiple and often indicate a more serious underlying pathology. The management of primary anal fissures is generally non-operative and includes increased dietary fibre, sitz baths, topical ointments and botulinum toxin injections. If these treatments are ineffective the patient will need a surgical referral. Secondary anal fissures require further investigation. Multidisciplinary management is preferable and is essential in the case of malignancy. PMID:27041801

  11. Anal erogeneity: the goose and the rat.

    PubMed

    Shengold, L

    1982-01-01

    A case is presented in which the patient's traumatically derived intense anal erogeneity (associated with traumatic anxiety as well as with castration anxiety) inhibited his phallic sensations and potency and also his power to sustain productive thought. His passive cravings were disguised and reacted against in his compulsive-exhibitionistically phallic role of a Don Juan. He described at least two levels of anal feelings: a dangerous but exciting, tolerable or even pleasurable tension associated with the imago of the goose; and an unbearable, terrifying overcharged level embodied in the imago of the rat. (He had read of, and had felt himself identified with, Freud's Rat Man.) Contrasts are presented with François Rabelais' account of the instinctual development and anal training of Gargantua, in which the connotations of the goose lead to a happy anal, phallic and intellectual control. Generalizations are ventured about the crucial attainment of command over the anal sphincter for the taming of 'primal affect'(Fliess). With early psychopathology there is a defensive overcathexis of anal control (and of anal mechanisms and character traits) to try to contain over-stimulation. In contrast true anal mastery contributes to the acquisition of optimal genital feelings and functioning and to the capacity for sustaining integrative thinking so necessary for 'owning' one's affects and impulses, and therefore for a feeling of identity. Finally, some remarks of Freud on Rabelais are reviewed in relation to levels of urethral erogeneity, seen as developmental way stations between the anal and the phallic, and partaking of both.

  12. [Postpartum levator ani muscle injuries. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Chojnacki, Michał; Borowski, Dariusz; Wielgoś, Mirosław; Węgrzyn, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Levator ani muscle (LAM) injuries are much more frequent than trauma to sphincter ani muscles, but so far they have been omitted in obstetric handbooks. Levator ani avulsion is observed only after vaginal delivery. Forceps delivery second stage of labor ≥ 110 min., fetal head circumference ≥ 35 cm, episiotomy and coincidence of anal sphincter trauma are risk factors for levator ani avulsion. The most vital issue in that type of trauma is pelvic organ prolapse and 2-4-fold higher risk of recurrence after prolapse surgery. The current level of evidence does not allow to conclusively determine the of role of levator avulsion in urinary incontinence. Levator injuries are occult, what constitutes the main diagnostic problem. Until recently magnetic resonance imaging has been the only diagnostic method until the development of 3-dimensional ultrasound. Nowadays, 3-D ultrasound is an essential technique in static and functional diagnosis of the levator ani. There are no effective methods of levator trauma prevention. Except the risk factors reduction, there are some pilot data about positive role of antepartal perineal muscle training. Physiotherapy plays the main role in reducing the effects of levator trauma. Mesh techniques are the most effective operative methods in coincident pelvic organ prolapse with levator avulsion, but there is still a 2-fold higher risk of recurrence.

  13. Lower oesophageal sphincter response to pentagastrin in chagasic patients with megaoesophagus and megacolon.

    PubMed Central

    Padovan, W; Godoy, R A; Dantas, R O; Meneghelli, U G; Oliveira, R B; Troncon, L E

    1980-01-01

    Intraluminal manometric studies were performed in 14 chagasic patients with megaoesophagus, 10 chagasic patients with megacolon, and 15 control subjects. Basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure was 20.27+/-1.16 mmHg (mean+/-SEM) in controls as compared wtih 15.16+/-1.53 mmHg in chagasics with megaoesophagus and 14.38+/-1.50 mmHg in chagasics with megacolon. Dose-response studies to intravenous pentagastrin showed that the chagasic patients exhibited a lower sensitivity to the stimulant than did the controls, as demonstrated by shifting of the dose-response curve to the right and higher individual values of the dose for half maximal contraction (D50). No difference was noted between the calculated maximal contraction (Vmax) of oesophageal sphincter of controls and chagasics. These data are compatible with the hypothesis of an interaction between pentagastrin and cholinergic nervous excitation on oesophageal sphincteric smooth muscle. PMID:6769753

  14. [A cause of terminal constipation: hypertonia of the striated pelvic muscle. Value of complementary studies].

    PubMed

    Veyrac, M; Parelon, G; Daures, J P; Bories, P; Michel, H

    1988-12-01

    The aim of this study was to define an other cause of idiopathic constipation with a mathematic automatic classification Fifty patients were studied by colonic transit time, anorectal manometry and defecography. Three classical causes were found: 12 patients had hypertonic upper anal pressure; 8 patients had abnormal rectonanal inhibitory reflex and 12 patients had anatomic conditions reducing stool frequencies Automatic mathematic classification coming from optimised bowls technic has led to the characterization of a new cause. Eight young women (mean age 33 years) with hypertonic striated pelvic muscles on straining were identified. Three items were significantly different: defect of sphincteric relaxation without high sphincteric pressure; closure or non opening anorectal angle, hypertonic levator ani on straining. There was a significant high frequency (p less than 0.05) of urinary disorders in this new group. All abnormalities occurred during defecation. This group can be studied with other methods: balloon expulsion, anal electromyography. Clinical identity with urinary pathology may be explained by common neurologic disorders of pelvic striated muscle innervation.

  15. Diagnosis of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, V.; Doebroente, Z.; Hajnal, F.; Csernay, L.; Nemessanyi, Z.; Lang, J.; Narai, G.; Szabo, E.

    1983-11-01

    The diagnostic possibility of hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dysfunction was evaluated in 100 cholecystectomized and 28 noncholecystectomized patients. An organic lesion interfering with free bile flow was ruled out in every case. The existence of the syndrome, i.e., the dysfunction of the Oddi's musculature, was verified using the morphine-choleretic test combined with either dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy or (in selected cases) percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Hypertonic Oddi's sphincter dyskinesia can be regarded as an independent clinical syndrome.

  16. The expression of tachykinin receptors in the human lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Chen, Que T; Li, Jing H; Geng, Xian; Liu, Jun F; Li, He F; Feng, Yong; Li, Jia L; Drew, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian tachykinins are a family of neuropeptides which are potent modulators of smooth muscle function with a significant contractile effect on human smooth muscle preparations. Tachykinins act via three distinct G protein-coupled neurokinin (NK) receptors, NK1, NK2 and NK3, coded by the genes TACR1, TACR2 and TACR3 respectively. The purpose of this paper was to measure the mRNA and protein expression of these receptors and their isoforms in the clasp and sling fibers of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex and circular muscle from the adjacent distal esophagus and proximal stomach. We found differences in expression between the different receptors within these muscle types, but the rank order of the receptor expression did not differ between the different muscle types. The rank order of the mRNA expression was TACR2 (α isoform)>TACR2 (β isoform)>TACR1 (short isoform)>TACR1 (long isoform)>TACR3. The rank order of the protein expression was NK2>NK1>NK3. This is the first report of the measurement of the transcript and protein expression of the tachykinin receptors and their isoforms in the muscles of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex. The results provide evidence that the tachykinin receptors could contribute to the regulation of the human lower esophageal sphincter, particularly the TACR2 α isoform which encodes the functional isoform of the tachykinin NK2 receptor was the most highly expressed of the tachykinin receptors in the muscles associated with the lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:26852958

  17. Study of Operated Patients of Lateral Internal Anal Sphincterotomy for Chronic Anal Fissure

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harshad Shankarlal; Chavda, Jagdish; Parikh, Jayesh; Naik, Nehal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Anal fissure causes significant morbidity in the population. It is proposed that elevated sphincter pressures may cause ischaemia of the anal lining and this may be responsible for the pain of anal fissures and their failure to heal. When pharmacologic therapy fails or fissures recur frequently, lateral internal sphincterotomy is the surgical treatment of choice. Material and Methods: Retrospective analysis was done of admitted and operated patients of anal fissure by lateral anal internal sphincterotomy either by open or closed technique between April 2010 and November 2011 in Gujarat Medical Education & Research Society Medical College, Sola, Ahmedabad, India. The follow-up data of all patients was evaluated for pain relief, recurrence, wound infection, incontinence to flatus or stool or both for a period of up to 6 months. Results: Wound infection rate was 10.3% in open method and 4.2% in closed method. Incontinence to flatus was 8.3% in closed method and 3.4% in open method. This was temporary and controlled within a 1 week. Incontinence to stool was 3.4% in open method which was temporary and controlled within 2 weeks while none in closed method. None of the patients in either group had come with recurrence within 6 months follow-up. Conclusion: Lateral anal internal sphincterotomy is safe regarding long term incontinence and effective regarding recurrence. PMID:24551659

  18. Electromagnetic assessment of embedded micro antenna for a novel sphincter in the human body.

    PubMed

    Zan, Peng; Liu, Jinding; Ai, Yutao; Jiang, Enyu

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a wireless, miniaturized, bi-directional telemetric artificial anal sphincter system that can be used for controlling patients' anal incontinence. The artificial anal sphincter system is mainly composed of an executive mechanism, a wireless power supply system and a wireless communication system. The wireless communication system consists of an internal RF transceiver, an internal RF antenna, a data transmission pathway, an external RF antenna and an external RF control transceiver. A micro NMHA (Normal Mode Helical Antenna) has been used for the transceiver of the internal wireless communication system and a quarter wave-length whip antenna of 7.75 cm has been used for the external wireless communication system. The RF carrier frequency of wireless communication is located in a license-free 433.1 MHz ISM (Industry, Science, and Medical) band. The radiation characteristics and SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) are evaluated using the finite difference time-domain method and 3D human body model. Results show that the SAR values of the antenna satisfy the ICNIRP (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection) limitations.

  19. Modern Perspectives in the Treatment of Chronic Anal Fissures

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, R; Parker, MC

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Anal fissures are commonly encountered in routine colorectal practice. Developments in the pharmacological understanding of the internal anal sphincter have resulted in more conservative approaches towards treatment. Simple measures are often effective for early fissures. Glyceryl trinitrate is well established as a first-line pharmacological therapy. The roles of diltiazem and botulinum, particularly as rescue therapy, are not well understood. Surgery has a defined role and should not be discounted completely. METHODS Data were obtained from Medline publications citing ‘anal fissure’. Manual cross-referencing of salient articles was conducted. We have sought to highlight various controversies in the management of anal fissures. FINDINGS Acute fissures may heal spontaneously, although simple conservative measures are sufficient. Idiopathic chronic anal fissures need careful evaluation to decide what therapy is suitable. Pharmacological agents such as glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), diltiazem and botulinum toxin have been subjected to most scrutiny. Though practices in the UK vary, GTN or diltiazem would be suitable as first-line therapy with botulinum toxin used as rescue treatment. Sphincterotomy is indicated for unhealed fissures; fissurectomy has been revisited and advancement flaps have a role in patients in whom sphincter division is not suitable. PMID:17688717

  20. Abnormal electromyographic activity of the urethral sphincter, voiding dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Fowler, C J; Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Parkhouse, H F; Kirby, R S; Jacobs, H S

    1988-12-01

    A potential association between abnormal electromyographic activity--that is, decelerating bursts and complex repetitive discharges--of the urethral sphincter and difficulty in voiding was examined in 57 women with urinary retention. Abnormal electromyographic activity was found in 33. Ultrasonography of the ovaries in 22 of the 33 women showed that 14 had polycystic ovaries. Of the other eight women, two had had oophorectomies, one had shrunken ovaries and ovarian failure, and one had previously undergone oophorectomy and the other ovary could not be seen; in one neither ovary could be seen, and three had ovaries of normal appearance, although two of these women were taking the contraceptive pill. Thirteen of the group had endocrine symptoms and signs characteristic of the polycystic ovary syndrome. Videocystometrography in 17 of the women who were examined by ultrasonography showed low flow rates and high residual volumes of urine after micturition in 12 women who could void, the other five having chronic urinary retention. A speculative hypothesis for the observed association of impaired voiding, abnormal electromyographic activity of the urinary sphincter, and polycystic ovaries is advanced, based on the relative progesterone deficiency that characterises the polycystic ovary syndrome. Progesterone stabilises membranes, and its depletion might permit ephaptic transmission of impulses between muscle fibres in the muscle of the urethral sphincter, giving rise to the abnormal electromyographic activity. This may impair relaxation of the sphincter, resulting in low flow rates of urine, incomplete emptying of the bladder, and, finally, urinary retention.

  1. Simultaneous penile prosthesis and male sling/artificial urinary sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dominic; Romero, Claudio; Alba, Frances; Westney, O Lenaine; Wang, Run

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from urethral sphincteric deficiency is not an uncommon problem. The commonest etiology is intervention for localized prostate cancer and/or radical cystoprostatectomy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Despite advances in surgical technology with robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and nerve sparing techniques, the rates of ED and SUI remain relatively unchanged. They both impact greatly on quality of life domains and have been associated with poor performance outcomes. Both the artificial urinary sphincter and penile prosthesis are gold standard treatments with proven efficacy, satisfaction and durability for end-stage SUI and ED respectively. Simultaneous prosthesis implantation for concurrent conditions has been well described, mostly in small retrospective series. The uptake of combination surgery has been slow due in part to technical demands of the surgery and to an extent, a heightened anxiety over potential complications. This paper aims to discuss the technical aspect of concurrent surgery for both disease entity and the current published outcomes of the various surgical techniques with this approach. PMID:23202702

  2. Anal lesions presenting in a cohort of child gastroenterological examinations. Implications for sexual traumatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Rougé-Maillart, Clotilde; Houdu, Sora; Darviot, Estelle; Buchaillet, Céline; Baron, Céline

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the anal lesions found in children during a pediatric gastroenterology consultation when the reason for the complaint was related to a digestive disease. This prospective descriptive study included 100 children under 15 years of age over a 13-month period, consulting due to digestive symptoms. The children were under 8 years old (90%) and 25% were under 3.1 years old. Constipation was the most frequent reason for consultation (69%). Fifty-one anal lesions were observed, of which 58.8% were anal fissures, 15.7% were skin tags and 5.8% were venous congestions related to straining. Anal fissures and skin tags were located at the median line, according to the clock-face method in supine position. No child had more than two anal lesions. No anal dilatation, sphincter hypotonia, anal scars, anal lacerations or bruises were found. The two most common anal lesions were anal fissures and skin tags. These anal lesions were mainly observed at the median line and were due to constipation. No cases of multiple anal lesions were found in terms of common digestive diseases. PMID:25882145

  3. Effects of botulinum toxin A on the sphincter of Oddi: an in vivo and in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sand, J; Nordback, I; Arvola, P; Porsti, I; Kalloo, A; Pasricha, P

    1998-01-01

    Background—Botulinum toxin A is a potent inhibitor of the release of acetylcholine from nerve endings. Local injection of botulinum toxin has recently been suggested to be helpful in sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia by decreasing sphincter of Oddi pressure. 
Aims—To explore the mechanism of action of botulinum toxin A on sphincter of Oddi (SO) muscle. 
Methods—Four piglets underwent duodenoscopy and SO manometry was performed. After obtaining a baseline pressure, the SO was injected with normal saline and the experiment repeated after one week. The SO was then injected endoscopically with botulinum toxin (40 U) with follow up manometry one week later. The sphincter of Oddi was removed from 10 pigs, cut into three rings, and placed in an organ bath. The force of contraction was measured and registered on a polygraph. Rings were stimulated by 70 V (10 Hz, 0.5 ms) electrical field stimulation for 20 seconds, exogenous acetylcholine (100 µM), and KCl (125 mM). Botulinum toxin (0.1 U/ml) or atropine (1 µM) was added to the incubation medium and the stimulation was repeated. 
Results—Mean basal SO pressure in the pigs remained unchanged after saline injection but decreased to about 50% of baseline value following botulinum toxin injection (p=0.04). The contractions induced by direct stimulation of SO smooth muscle with KCl were not significantly affected by either atropine or botulinum toxin. In all rings exogenous acetylcholine induced contractions, which were totally blocked by atropine, but not by botulinum toxin. Electrical field stimulation induced contractions that were inhibited by both atropine and botulinum toxin. 
Conclusion—Botulinum toxin inhibits pig sphincter of Oddi smooth muscle contractions by a presynaptic cholinergic mechanism, similar to that described in skeletal muscle. 

 Keywords: sphincter of Oddi; botulinum toxin; pig; ex vivo PMID:9616312

  4. Changing patterns of treatment for chronic anal fissure.

    PubMed

    Farouk, R; Gunn, J; Duthie, G S

    1998-05-01

    To assess changing patterns of treatment for chronic anal fissure, a retrospective analysis of treatment for chronic anal fissure within one hospital between January 1990 and December 1996 was undertaken. A total of 221 patients received treatment for a chronic anal fissure in this period, of whom 209 had a surgical procedure. Manual dilatation of the anus was performed in 21 patients (10%) and has not been performed since 1995. Lateral internal sphincterotomy was performed in 183 patients (88%) and continues to be the mainstay of treatment. Five female patients (2%) were identified as having a sphincter defect by anal manometry combined with endoanal ultrasound and were treated by an anal advancement flap. From 1996 onwards, 15 patients (7%) were treated by topical glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) paste as the first line of treatment. Of these patients, nine have experienced healing of their fissure, and three have had relief of pain without healing of the fissure. Three have gone on to have a lateral internal sphincterotomy. Lateral internal sphincterotomy remains the primary form of treatment for chronic anal fissure. GTN cream has increasingly been offered as preliminary treatment over the last 12 months. Perioperative use of endoanal ultrasound allowed identification of patients who may be at high risk of postoperative incontinence from a sphincterotomy. An anal advancement flap has been used as an alternative surgical approach for these patients.

  5. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Sivestrini, Nicola; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26035487

  6. Dilated common duct sign. A potential indicator of a sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    DeRidder, P.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1984-05-01

    The cholescintigraphic findings of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia (SOD) in a 45-year-old woman with persistent right upper quadrant pain and biliary colic are reported. After an overnight fast, the patient was injected with 5 mCi of Tc-99 disofenin and .02 micrograms/kg of cholecystokinin (CCK) post maximal gallbladder filling. Pre and postcholescintiscans were obtained and gallbladder ejection fractions determined. The hepatobiliary scan was normal, except for a delay in biliary-bowel transit. The gallbladder responded normally to CCK, however, the Sphincter of Oddi responded abnormally, as there was a paradoxical response to CCK manifested by a marked dilatation of the common bile duct. It was postulate that this dilatation (the dilated common duct sign) was due to an inappropriate response of the smooth muscle of the Sphincter of Oddi (contraction vs relaxation) to CCK and was the cause of this patient's biliary colic. The dilated common duct sign should alert the physician to the possibility of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia.

  7. MRI of anal cancer: assessing response to definitive chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gourtsoyianni, S; Goh, V

    2014-02-01

    Anal cancer is an uncommon malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract but has a relatively good prognosis with an 80% 5-year overall survival. In this article, we review the role of MRI for assessing treatment response in anal cancer after completion of definitive chemoradiotherapy. New generation MRI scanners with optimal-phased array body coils, resulting in better signal to noise and improved contrast and spatial resolution, have contributed to high-resolution imaging in clinical practice enabling visualization of relevant anatomy including the sphincter complex, adjacent structures, mesorectal and pelvic lymph nodes with a diameter down to 2 mm. Multiplanar, high-resolution T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted sequences have a role in initial locoregional staging of anal SCC, assisting radiotherapy planning, as well as in assessing response to treatment and treatment-related complications. PMID:24072381

  8. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure. PMID:22204800

  9. Human anal motility while fasting, after feeding, and during sleep.

    PubMed

    Orkin, B A; Hanson, R B; Kelly, K A; Phillips, S F; Dent, J

    1991-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the human anal sphincter responds dynamically to changing physiological states. In 19 healthy human subjects, intraluminal anal canal pressure was measured with a 5-cm perfused sleeve sensor during the day while fasting (3 hours) and after feeding (3 hours) and at night during sleep (8 hours). Daytime mean anal canal pressures (+/- SEM) while fasting (50 +/- 3 mm Hg) were similar to those after feeding (49 +/- 3 mm Hg) and to those at night during sleep (49 +/- 3 mm Hg). Marked minute-to-minute variations in mean pressure occurred in all three periods, however, as did large phasic increases and decreases in pressure (greater than 20 mm Hg) and small phasic changes in pressure less than 20 mm Hg (anal slow waves). The minute-to-minute variations in mean pressure were greater during the awake fed state (4 +/- 1 mm Hg/min) than at night during sleep (2 +/- 1 mm Hg/min; P less than 0.03), as were the number of large phasic waves per minute (increases in pressure: awake, fed = 0.5 +/- 1 waves/min, night = 0.3 +/- 0.1 waves/min, P less than 0.05; decreases in pressure: awake, fed = 0.4 +/- 0.1 waves/min, night = 0.2 +/- 0.1 waves/min, P less than 0.05). Anal small waves had a similar frequency of about 17 waves/min in all three states. In conclusion, the anal sphincter maintains a continuous pressure barrier to rectal outflow both during the day and at night during sleep. However, marked minute-to-minute variations in mean pressure and large phasic increases and decreases in pressure do occur. Both are fewer at night during sleep.

  10. Modifications to installed Sphincter design gloveports

    SciTech Connect

    Shetty, S.S.; Gilkison, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of alternative methods for replacing Sphincter designed gloveports in gloveboxes. In addition, the paper discusses modifications that are required on metal glovebox wall panels to allow replacement of the Sphincter gloveports. A review of Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) maintenance records showed that gloveports manufactured by Central Research, Incorporated, provide the lowest risk for failure. This assessment is based on the records of glove-to-port seal life and air in-leakage. These records also indicate the glove changes are made in shorter times with fewer workers than required by alternate gloveport designs studied. These attributes culminate in a significant decrease in radiation exposure and assimilation risk of maintenance personnel replacing gloves. Further, the Central Research design reduces the number of expandable hardware parts required to achieve a glove replacement. This reduction in expendable materials can result in a significant reduction in contaminated waste volume generated during a glove replacement.

  11. Characteristics of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in humans.

    PubMed

    Mittal, R K; McCallum, R W

    1987-05-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESR) were studied in 10 normal healthy subjects. Electrical activity of mylohyoid muscle measured by an electromyogram (MEMG), pressures from pharynx, three esophageal sites, lower esophageal sphincter, and stomach were simultaneously recorded for 1 h, while fasting and 3 h after an 850 kcal meal. Reflux of acid into esophagus and/or occurrence of belching accompanying a TLESR was also monitored. TLESRs occurred with an equal frequency in fasting and postprandial state (6.2 vs. 6.4 h). However, frequency of an acid reflux during a TLESR was much greater postprandially than after fasting (44.8 vs. 9.6%). Belching coincided with 8% of TLESRs. A small MEMG complex and a small pharyngeal complex were present at onset of TLESR in 41.6 and 26.9% of instances, respectively. TLESRs were then categorized as either postswallow, if it occurred within 10 s of a preceding swallow-induced LES relaxation, or isolated, if its onset to previous swallow was greater than 10 s. Esophageal contractions were noticed at onset of 84% of isolated TLESRs. When present at two distal sites, this contraction was always of a simultaneous nature. Esophageal contractions at onset of postswallow TLESR were less frequent (33.3%) but when present were usually observed at the proximal esophageal site. At completion of a TLESR, the LES never recovered without an associated esophageal contraction, the latter was either swallow mediated or a spontaneous simultaneous esophageal contraction. Our data indicate that 1) MEMG and pharyngeal motor events may accompany TLESRs; and 2) esophageal contraction frequently heralds the onset, and it always occurs at completion of a TLESR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Effects of pinaverium bromide on Oddi's sphincter.

    PubMed

    DiSomma, C; Reboa, G; Patrone, M G; Mortola, G P; Sala, G; Ciampini, M

    1986-01-01

    Twelve to 15 days after cholecystectomy, endocholedochal pressure was measured in ten patients before and one hour after oral administration of 15 mg of pinaverium bromide (six patients) or placebo. The mean endocholedochal pressure was 7.1 +/- 0.25 mmHg before and 3.1 +/- 0.2 mmHg after pinaverium (P less than 0.01), and 7.0 +/- 0.2 and 6.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg in the placebo-treated patients. The results suggest that pinaverium bromide has a specific effect on the common bile duct and probably on Oddi's sphincter. PMID:3815457

  13. [Anatomy of the levator ani muscle and implications for obstetrics and gynaecology].

    PubMed

    Nyangoh Timoh, K; Bessede, T; Zaitouna, M; Peschaud, F; Chevallier, J-M; Fauconnier, A; Benoit, G; Moszkowicz, D

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders include urogenital and anorectal prolapse, urinary and faecal incontinence. These diseases affect 25% of patients. Most of time, treatment is primarily surgical with a high post-operative risk of recurrence, especially for pelvic organ prolapse. Vaginal delivery is the major risk factor for pelvic floor disorders through levator ani muscle injury or nerve damage. After vaginal delivery, 20% of patients experiment elevator ani trauma. These injuries are more common in case of instrumental delivery by forceps, prolonged second phase labor, increased neonatal head circumference and associated anal sphincter injuries. Moreover, 25% of patients have temporary perineal neuropathy. Recently, pelvic three-dimensional reconstructions from RMI data allowed a better understanding of detailed levator ani muscle morphology and gave birth to a clear new nomenclature describing this muscle complex to be developed. Radiologic and anatomic studies have allowed exploring levator ani innervation leading to speculate on the muscle and nerve damage mechanisms during delivery. We then reviewed the levator ani muscle anatomy and innervation to better understand pelvic floor dysfunction observed after vaginal delivery.

  14. Role of SM22 in the differential regulation of phasic vs. tonic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish; Ali, Mehboob

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary proteomics studies between tonic vs. phasic smooth muscles identified three distinct protein spots identified to be those of transgelin (SM22). The latter was found to be distinctly downregulated in the internal anal sphincter (IAS) vs. rectal smooth muscle (RSM) SMC. The major focus of the present studies was to examine the differential molecular control mechanisms by SM22 in the functionality of truly tonic smooth muscle of the IAS vs. the adjoining phasic smooth muscle of the RSM. We monitored SMC lengths before and after incubation with pFLAG-SM22 (for SM22 overexpression), and SM22 small-interfering RNA. pFLAG-SM22 caused concentration-dependent and significantly greater relaxation in the IAS vs. the RSM SMCs. Conversely, temporary silencing of SM22 caused contraction in both types of the SMCs. Further studies revealed a significant reverse relationship between the levels of SM22 phosphorylation and the amount of SM22-actin binding in the IAS and RSM SMC. Data showed higher phospho-SM22 levels and decreased SM22-actin binding in the IAS, and reverse to be the case in the RSM SMCs. Experiments determining the mechanism for SM22 phosphorylation in these smooth muscles revealed that Y-27632 (Rho kinase inhibitor) but not Gö-6850 (protein kinase C inhibitor) caused concentration-dependent decreased phosphorylation of SM22. We speculate that SM22 plays an important role in the regulation of basal tone via Rho kinase-induced phosphorylation of SM22.

  15. Anal Warts and Anal Intradermal Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio; Phillips, Benjamin R.

    2011-01-01

    For the last five millennia we have been dealing with the annoyance of verrucas. Anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States and is increasing in incidence. As in other gastrointestinal conditions, HPV infection can lead to a stepwise transition from normal cells to dysplastic cells and then to invasive anal cancer. Knowledge of the natural history of HPV infection, risk factors, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic methods gives us the tools to adequately prevent, evaluate, treat, and counsel our patients. In this review, the authors detail the diagnosis, management, and treatment of anal condyloma and anal intraepithelial neoplasia with a focus on prevention, early detection, and treatment using current data and technology. PMID:22379403

  16. Incontinence of urine of sphincteric origin in the female child.

    PubMed

    Brueziere, J

    1976-01-01

    Urine incontinence of sphincteric origin in the little girl can have several origins: epispadias, hypospadias, bilateral single ectopic ureters, isolated sphincteric agenesis, iatrogenic lesion of the sphincter, complications of ureterocele. Creation of a new urethra alone, whatever the technique used, seldom restores continence. In addition, the proximal urethra is supported by means of an aponeurotic flap, the results improve considerably: in this series, 6 good results out of 7. In surgical correction of epispadias in girls, the author recommends combining the technique described by Islam and supporting the bladder neck by the Goebbel Stoeckel's technique. PMID:800988

  17. Division and repair of the sphincteric mechanism at the gastric outlet in emergency operations for bleeding peptic ulcer. A new technique for use in combination with suture ligation of the bleeding point and highly selective vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, D

    1977-01-01

    In three of 26 patients who were treated by highly selective vagotomy (HSV) plus suture of the bleeding point for massive hemorrhage from peptic ulceration, access to the ulcer could not be obtained by means of a duodenotomy or gastrotomy which spared the pylorus. Instead, a wide gastroduodenotomy was performed, the artery in the base of the ulcer underrun and HSV performed. The gastroduodenotomy incision was closed longitudinally, rather than as a pyloroplasty. In this way, the integrity of the antral mill and of the pyloric sphincter was restored. The patients were followed up for six months, one year and three years respectively, and were found to be in good health, without clinical or radiological evidence of gastric retention or of recurrent ulceration. Thus the sphincteric mechanism at the exit of the stomach can, like the anal sphincter, be divided and subsequently repaired with good restoration of function. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:341823

  18. Anal condyloma acuminatum.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, Tonna

    2009-01-01

    Anal condyloma acuminatum is a human papillomavirus (HPV) that affects the mucosa and skin of the anorectum and genitalia. Anal condyloma acuminatum is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted disease in the United States. To date, there are more than 100 HPV types, with HPV-6, HPV-10, and HPV-11 predominately found in the anogenital region and causing approximately 90% of genital warts. Risk factors for anal condyloma acuminatum include multiple sex partners, early coital age, anal intercourse, and immunosuppression. Transmission occurs by way of skin-to-skin contact through sexual intercourse, oral sex, anal sex, or other contact involving the genital area. The virus may remain latent for months to years until specific mechanisms cause production of viral DNA, leading to the presentation of anal condyloma acuminatum.Patients with anal condyloma acuminatum may be asymptomatic or present with presence of painless bumps, itching, and discharge or bleeding. It is not uncommon to have involvement of more than one area, and multiple lesions may also be present and extend into the anal canal or rectum. To date, there is no serologic testing or culture to detect anal condyloma acuminatum; therefore, diagnosis is made clinically or by detection of HPV DNA. Multiple factors determine the choice of treatment, which may range from patient-applied medications to surgical intervention. Despite treatment choice, recurrence rates are high, indicating the importance of patient education on prevention of HPV infection and reinfection. Unfortunately, at this time, no cure exists for anal condyloma acuminatum; however, recently Gardasil and Cervarix (in Australia only) vaccines have become available and are showing promising results. PMID:19820442

  19. Carcinoma of the anal canal and flow cytometric DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, N. A.; Beart, R. W.; Weiland, L. H.; Cha, S. S.; Lieber, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Using flow cytometric DNA analysis of paraffin embedded tissue, DNA histograms were successfully obtained from the anal cancers of 117 patients. DNA diploid patterns were given by 82 cancers (70%) and DNA non-diploid patterns by 35 cancers (30%): 15 DNA aneuploid, 20 DNA tetraploid. Well differentiated squamous cell cancers were mainly DNA diploid, while a larger proportion of poorly differentiated and small cell cancers were DNA non-diploid. The large majority of stage A cancers were DNA diploid. A greater proportion of tumours that had invaded through the anal sphincter or had lymph node metastases or distant spread were DNA non-diploid. Prognosis was slightly poorer for patients with DNA non-diploid cancers when compared to patients with DNA diploid tumours (P = 0.08) and significantly poorer for individuals with DNA aneuploid anal cancers (P = 0.037). However, in a multivariate analysis model, the DNA ploidy pattern of an anal cancer was not of independent prognostic significance alongside tumour histology and tumour stage. PMID:2803916

  20. Sphincter-saving procedures for distal carcinoma of the rectum.

    PubMed Central

    Yeatman, T J; Bland, K I

    1989-01-01

    Methods of sphincter preservation were developed more than a century ago. Combining these techniques with adequate anterior resection has permitted the resurrection of sphincter-saving procedures that are currently being applied in the therapy of cancer at every level of the rectum. Although Miles' abdominoperineal resection still remains the "gold standard" for the treatment of low rectal neoplasms, restorative resection may now be possible with equivalent oncologic disease control and survival. Further, current trends also suggest that the abdominoperineal resection is being used less frequently in the treatment of most rectal cancers and is being replaced with sphincter-preserving techniques that afford excellent functional results. In this review, the pertinent anorectal anatomy, current issues, and sphincter-saving surgical techniques presently available for the treatment of distal cancers of the rectum are presented. PMID:2642688

  1. Low rectal cancer: Sphincter preserving techniques-selection of patients, techniques and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriou, Nikoletta; Michail, Othon; Moris, Dimitrios; Griniatsos, John

    2015-01-01

    Low rectal cancer is traditionally treated by abdominoperineal resection. In recent years, several new techniques for the treatment of very low rectal cancer patients aiming to preserve the gastrointestinal continuity and to improve both the oncological as well as the functional outcomes, have been emerged. Literature suggest that when the intersphincteric resection is applied in T1-3 tumors located within 30-35 mm from the anal verge, is technically feasible, safe, with equal oncological outcomes compared to conventional surgery and acceptable quality of life. The Anterior Perineal PlanE for Ultra-low Anterior Resection technique, is not disrupting the sphincters, but carries a high complication rate, while the reports on the oncological and functional outcomes are limited. Transanal Endoscopic MicroSurgery (TEM) and TransAnal Minimally Invasive Surgery (TAMIS) should represent the treatment of choice for T1 rectal tumors, with specific criteria according to the NCCN guidelines and favorable pathologic features. Alternatively to the standard conventional surgery, neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy followed by TEM or TAMIS seems promising for tumors of a local stage T1sm2-3 or T2. Transanal Total Mesorectal Excision should be performed only when a board approved protocol is available by colorectal surgeons with extensive experience in minimally invasive and transanal endoscopic surgery. PMID:26191350

  2. Translational and clinical perspectives on sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kyanam Kabir Baig, Kondal Rao; Wilcox, Charles Melbern

    2016-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is a complex pathophysiologic entity that is associated with significant morbidity causing abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. The purpose of this review is to describe the anatomy and physiology of the sphincter of Oddi, to understand the pathologic mechanisms thought to be responsible for symptomatology, review recent major studies, explore endoscopic and pharmacologic therapies and their efficacy, and to explore future research avenues. PMID:27555792

  3. The female urethral syndrome: external sphincter spasm as etiology.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, W E; Firlit, C F; Schoenberg, H W

    1980-07-01

    Many women suffer a constellation of urinary and pelvic symptoms commonly referred to as the urethral syndrome. Numerous medical, surgical and psychological treatment modalities have been used to alleviate the symptoms. Urodynamic techniques were used to study a group of women with the urethral syndrome. Based on the findings of external urethral sphincter spasm and/or pelvic floor hyperactivity the institution of diazepam therapy not only has provided clinical relief but also sphincter synergy as demonstrated by post-treaatment urodynamics.

  4. The posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach.

    PubMed

    Peña, A; Hong, A

    2004-01-01

    The posterior sagittal, transphincteric approach to treat different pelvic problems has been known since last century. Although some surgeons have embraced it and have enthusiastically advocated it s use, it has never become an overly popular technique. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the approach, both from an historical perspective and from the authors experience. The international literature on the subject was reviewed since 1877 up to the present date. A retrospective evaluation of the authors experience was conducted, and the results reviewed. Specific attention was paid to the final result obtained in the treatment of the original condition, surgical complications and the effect of the surgical approach on bowel and urinary control. The experiential review included 114 cases. They were divided into two groups. A included 85 patients who underwent a posterior sagittal transphincteric approach that included 49 cases of Hirschsprung s disease (primary 21, secondary 28), 15 presacral masses; 10 rectaltumors; 7 acquired recto-genito-urinary fistulae; and 4 cases of idiopathic rectal prolapse. Group B included 29 patients who underwent a posterior sagittal trans-anorectal approach, in which the anterior wall of the rectum and the sphincter was divided as well.. This group included 12 cases of urogenital sinuses; 8 acquired urethral stricture or atresia after trauma; and 9 posterior urethral masses. Post-operative bowel control was normal all cases except in those patients whose basic condition had resulted in fecal incontinence, or who had sustained an irreversible injury prior tothe operation. Urinary control was normal except in cases with pre-operative incontinence. Complications included recurrence of recto-genitourinary fistulae in 3 cases, recto-cutaneous fistula in 3 Hirschsprung s patients and 2 partial wound dehisences. The posterior sagittal trans-sphincteric approach represents a useful technical alternative

  5. Length Tension Function of Puborectalis Muscle: Implications for the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence and Pelvic Floor Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Sheean, Geoff; Padda, Bikram S; Rajasekaran, Mahadevan R

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims External anal sphincter (EAS) and puborectalis muscle (PRM) play important role in anal continence function. Based on length-tension measurement, we recently reported that the human EAS muscle operates at short sarcomere length under physiological conditions. Goal of our study was to determine if PRM also operates at the short sarcomere length. Methods Length-tension relationship of the PRM muscle was studied in vivo in 10 healthy nullipara women. Length was altered by vaginal distension using custom-designed probes of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 mm diameters as well as by distending a polyethylene bag with different volumes of water. Probes were equipped with a reverse perfuse sleeve sensor to measure vaginal pressure (surrogate of PRM tension). PRM electromyogram (EMG) was recorded using wire electrodes. Three-dimensional ultra-sound images were obtained to determine effect of vaginal distension on PRM length. Results Ultrasound images demonstrate distension volume dependent increase in PRM length. Rest and squeeze pressures of vaginal bag increased with the increase in bag volume. Similarly, the change in vaginal pressure, which represents the PRM contraction increased with the increase in the probe size. Increase in probe size was not associated with an increase in EMG activity (a marker of neural drive) of the PRM. Conclusions Probe size dependent increase in PRM contraction pressure, in the presence of constant EMG (neural input) proves that the human PRM operates at short sarcomere length. Surgically adjusting the PRM length may represent a novel strategy to improve treat anal continence and possibly other pelvic floor disorders. PMID:25273124

  6. Motor function of the opossum sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed Central

    Toouli, J; Dodds, W J; Honda, R; Sarna, S; Hogan, W J; Komarowski, R A; Linehan, J H; Arndorfer, R C

    1983-01-01

    We studied the opossum sphincter of Oddi (SO) because in this species the SO is approximately 3 cm in length and its extraduodenal location permits recording of motor activity with negligible interference from duodenal motor activity. The SO segment of 120 animals was evaluated by one or more of the following: (a) intraluminal manometry; (b) electromyography; (c) common bile duct (CBD) flow monitored by a drop counter; (d) cineradiography of intraductal contrast medium; and (e) histologic examination. SO pull-throughs using an infused catheter of 0.6-mm o.d. invariably showed a high pressure zone (HPZ) of 18 +/- 3 SE mm Hg in the terminal 4-5 mm of the SO segment. This HPZ had a narrow lumen, 0.5-0.7 mm in diam, and prominent circular muscle. The HPZ in the terminal SO had both active and passive components. HPZ with minimal amplitude and a paucity of underlying smooth muscle were present inconstantly at the junction of the SO segment with the CBD and pancreatic duct, respectively. The dominant feature of the SO segment was rhythmic peristaltic contractions that originated in the proximal SO and propagated toward the duodenum. These contractions occurred spontaneously at a rate of 2-8/min, ranged up to 200 mm Hg in magnitude, had a duration of approximately 5 s and were not abolished by tetrodotoxin. Concurrent myoelectric and manometric recordings showed that each phasic contraction was immediately preceded by an electrical spike burst. Simultaneous recordings of cineradiography, CBD inflow of contrast medium, SO manometry, and SO electromyography indicated that rhythmic peristaltic contractions stripped contrast medium from the SO into the duodenum. During SO systole, CBD emptying was transiently interrupted, whereas SO filling occurred during the diastolic interval between SO peristaltic contractions. SO distention increased the frequency of SO peristalsis. We conclude that (a) the dominant feature of the opossum SO is rhythmic peristaltic contractions that

  7. Motor function of the opossum sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Toouli, J; Dodds, W J; Honda, R; Sarna, S; Hogan, W J; Komarowski, R A; Linehan, J H; Arndorfer, R C

    1983-02-01

    We studied the opossum sphincter of Oddi (SO) because in this species the SO is approximately 3 cm in length and its extraduodenal location permits recording of motor activity with negligible interference from duodenal motor activity. The SO segment of 120 animals was evaluated by one or more of the following: (a) intraluminal manometry; (b) electromyography; (c) common bile duct (CBD) flow monitored by a drop counter; (d) cineradiography of intraductal contrast medium; and (e) histologic examination. SO pull-throughs using an infused catheter of 0.6-mm o.d. invariably showed a high pressure zone (HPZ) of 18 +/- 3 SE mm Hg in the terminal 4-5 mm of the SO segment. This HPZ had a narrow lumen, 0.5-0.7 mm in diam, and prominent circular muscle. The HPZ in the terminal SO had both active and passive components. HPZ with minimal amplitude and a paucity of underlying smooth muscle were present inconstantly at the junction of the SO segment with the CBD and pancreatic duct, respectively. The dominant feature of the SO segment was rhythmic peristaltic contractions that originated in the proximal SO and propagated toward the duodenum. These contractions occurred spontaneously at a rate of 2-8/min, ranged up to 200 mm Hg in magnitude, had a duration of approximately 5 s and were not abolished by tetrodotoxin. Concurrent myoelectric and manometric recordings showed that each phasic contraction was immediately preceded by an electrical spike burst. Simultaneous recordings of cineradiography, CBD inflow of contrast medium, SO manometry, and SO electromyography indicated that rhythmic peristaltic contractions stripped contrast medium from the SO into the duodenum. During SO systole, CBD emptying was transiently interrupted, whereas SO filling occurred during the diastolic interval between SO peristaltic contractions. SO distention increased the frequency of SO peristalsis. We conclude that (a) the dominant feature of the opossum SO is rhythmic peristaltic contractions that

  8. Sphincter electromyography in patients after radical prostatectomy and cystoprostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Christmas, T J; Nagendran, K; Kirby, R S

    1992-04-01

    Urethral sphincter weakness may occur after major pelvic surgery and urinary incontinence, either temporary or permanent, may result. In order to determine whether the cavernous nerves described by Donker and Walsh carry fibres to the distal urethral sphincter as well as those supplying the corporal bodies, we have studied prospectively the sphincter electromyography in 2 groups of 10 patients: (1) those who had undergone nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy for prostatic carcinoma and (2) those who has undergone radical cystoprostatectomy for bladder carcinoma. This study group was compared with a control group of normal individuals. The results showed significant differences in duration of motor units between the control group and prostatectomy group and between the control group and cystectomy group but no significant difference between the 2 operated groups. There was no significant difference in amplitude of the motor units, the sacral reflex latencies or the pudendal somatosensory evoked potentials between all 3 groups. It was therefore concluded that division of the cavernous nerve of Walsh does not compromise distal urethral sphincter function. Furthermore, radical transabdominal lower urinary tract surgery may induce significant electromyographic changes in the external sphincter which may not be clinically evident. This may potentially affect continence later if second-stage urinary reconstructive surgery is undertaken.

  9. Steinert's syndrome presenting as anal incontinence: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Myotonic dystrophy (MD) or Steinert's syndrome is a rare cause of chronic diarrhea and anal incontinence. In the presence of chronic diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness, neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case Presentation We present the case of a 45-year-old Turkish man with Steinert's syndrome, who was not diagnosed until the age of 45. Conclusions In clinical practice, the persistence of diarrhea and fecal incontinence with muscle weakness should suggest that the physician perform an anal manometric study and electromyography. Neuromuscular disorders such as myotonic dystrophy should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:21838873

  10. Heterosexual anal sexuality and anal sex behaviors: a review.

    PubMed

    McBride, Kimberly R; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2010-03-01

    Little research addresses the role of anal sexuality and anal sexual behaviors as a widely practiced but relatively less frequent element of a heterosexual sexual repertoire. However, the importance of anal sex in sexual health is increasingly well-defined by epidemiological and clinical studies. This article reviews existing data on a range of heterosexual anal sex practices and provides conceptual and methodological recommendations for new research.

  11. Detrusor sphincter dyssynergia: a review of physiology, diagnosis, and treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) is the urodynamic description of bladder outlet obstruction from detrusor muscle contraction with concomitant involuntary urethral sphincter activation. DSD is associated with neurologic conditions such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, and spina bifida and some of these neurogenic bladder patients with DSD may be at risk for autonomic dysreflexia, recurrent urinary tract infections, or upper tract compromise if the condition is not followed and treated appropriately. It is diagnosed most commonly during the voiding phase of urodynamic studies using EMG recordings and voiding cystourethrograms, although urethral pressure monitoring could also potentially be used. DSD can be sub-classified as either continuous or intermittent, although adoption of this terminology is not widespread. There are few validated oral pharmacologic treatment options for this condition but transurethral botulinum toxin injection have shown temporary efficacy in reducing bladder outlet obstruction. Urinary sphincterotomy has also demonstrated reproducible long term benefits in several studies, but the morbidity associated with this procedure can be high. PMID:26904418

  12. Upper esophageal sphincter mechanical states analysis: a novel methodology to describe UES relaxation and opening

    PubMed Central

    Omari, Taher I.; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Dinning, Philip; Costa, Marcello; Rommel, Nathalie; Cock, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation of neural inputs to these muscles, the intrinsic cricopharyngeus muscle and extrinsic suprahyoid muscles, results in their contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to calculate the “mechanical states” of the muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Diseases that alter the neural pathways to these muscles can result in weakening the muscle contractility and/or decreasing the muscle compliance, all of which can cause dysphagia. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle is difficult and as the current interpretation of UES motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during swallow can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the UES and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern the timing and extent of UES opening during swallowing. To achieve this we initially analyzed swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and UES pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of the lumen when compared to videofluoroscopy. Then using a database of pressure-impedance studies, recorded from young and aged healthy controls and patients with motor neuron disease, we calculated the UES mechanical states in relation to a standardized swallowed bolus volume, normal aging and dysphagia pathology. Our results indicated that eight

  13. A new theory of micturition and urinary continence based on histomorphological studies. 3. The two parts of the musculus sphincter urethrae: physiological importance for continence in rest and stress.

    PubMed

    Dorschner, W; Stolzenburg, J U

    1994-01-01

    The urethral component of continence is the object of a lively discussion. A large number of the examiners interpret the external striated urethral muscle as part of the muscular pelvic diaphragm, formed partially or completely by the so-called musculus transversus perinei profundus. About 30,000 histological sections have been examined by light microscopy in a systematical manner. In contrast to numerous suggestions in the literature the musculus sphincter urethrae has been found to be an independent morphological unit in our investigation. It is separated from the surroundings by a segment of connective tissue. Furthermore, with the help of transversal, sagittal and frontal serial sections it was possible to show that the musculus transversus perinei profundus does not exist. In the female as well as in the male in the direction of the urethra the outer sphincter always borders on a layer of smooth muscle cells. In order to distinguish both parts the terms musculus sphincter urethrae transversostriatus and musculus sphincter urethrae glaber are introduced. In the context of a new continence theory three structures capable of occluding the urinary bladder will be discussed. It should be emphasized that the musculus sphincter urethrae glaber makes long-term continence possible.

  14. Encopresis and anal masturbation.

    PubMed

    Aruffo, R N; Ibarra, S; Strupp, K R

    2000-01-01

    Current pediatric and psychiatric studies on encopresis and its treatment are heavily influenced by mechanical, physiological, and behavioral considerations. Although psychodynamic treatment has generally been considered to be of little benefit, and its findings suspect, the authors suggest that a psychodynamic approach adds substantially to the understanding of some cases of encopresis; that the anal sensations and anal erotic feelings reported by a number of encopretic children are intense, and that the encopretic symptom, soiling, in these children is the result of a conscious form of anal masturbation in which the fecal mass is used for stimulation; and that any study of encopresis is incomplete that does not include what encopretic children, engaged in a sound therapeutic relationship, know and say about their soiling. The authors further suggest that physical treatments of those children whose encopresis is psychologically driven may be contraindicated. The presence of a large stool does not in itself substantiate a physical illness. Further research is needed to elucidate the prevalence of anal masturbation in encopretic children. PMID:11212192

  15. Opium-related sphincter of Oddi dysfunction causing double duct sign

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder Singh; Chaudhary, Vinita; Dhaka, Narendra; Manrai, Manish; Sivalingam, Jegan; Sharma, Ravi; Dutta, Usha; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Double duct sign where there is a simultaneous dilatation of both the common bile duct (CBD) and pancreatic duct is usually associated with sinister causes like malignancies of pancreatic head or ampulla. Occasionally, benign causes like chronic pancreatitis or sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) may cause double duct sign. Chronic opium abuse is a rare cause of the double duct sign, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings of this rare entity have been occasionally reported. We report about a 54-year-old male with a history of chronic alcohol and opioid abuse evaluated for episodes of abdominal pain and found to have opioid-related SOD and improved with biliary sphincterotomy. EUS was done to rule out malignancy and revealed hypoechoic prominence around terminal CBD suggestive of hypertrophied muscle. PMID:27503161

  16. Opium-related sphincter of Oddi dysfunction causing double duct sign.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder Singh; Chaudhary, Vinita; Dhaka, Narendra; Manrai, Manish; Sivalingam, Jegan; Sharma, Ravi; Dutta, Usha; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Double duct sign where there is a simultaneous dilatation of both the common bile duct (CBD) and pancreatic duct is usually associated with sinister causes like malignancies of pancreatic head or ampulla. Occasionally, benign causes like chronic pancreatitis or sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) may cause double duct sign. Chronic opium abuse is a rare cause of the double duct sign, and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings of this rare entity have been occasionally reported. We report about a 54-year-old male with a history of chronic alcohol and opioid abuse evaluated for episodes of abdominal pain and found to have opioid-related SOD and improved with biliary sphincterotomy. EUS was done to rule out malignancy and revealed hypoechoic prominence around terminal CBD suggestive of hypertrophied muscle. PMID:27503161

  17. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  18. Botulinum toxin for chronic anal fissure after biliopancreatic diversion for morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Vanella, Serafino; Brisinda, Giuseppe; Marniga, Gaia; Crocco, Anna; Bianco, Giuseppe; Maria, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of botulinum toxin in patients with chronic anal fissure after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) for severe obesity. METHODS: Fifty-nine symptomatic adults with chronic anal fissure developed after BPD were enrolled in an open label study. The outcome was evaluated clinically and by comparing the pressure of the anal sphincters before and after treatment. All data were analyzed in univariate and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Two months after treatment, 65.4% of the patients had a healing scar. Only one patient had mild incontinence to flatus that lasted 3 wk after treatment, but this disappeared spontaneously. In the multivariate analysis of the data, two registered months after the treatment, sex (P = 0.01), baseline resting anal pressure (P = 0.02) and resting anal pressure 2 mo after treatment (P < 0.0001) were significantly related to healing rate. CONCLUSION: Botulinum toxin, despite worse results than in non-obese individuals, appears the best alternative to surgery for this group of patients with a high risk of incontinence. PMID:22416176

  19. Generation of nitric oxide in the opossum lower esophageal sphincter during physiological experimentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se-Joon; Park, Hyojin; Chang, Jin Hyuck; Conklin, Jeffrey L

    2006-04-30

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), given in vivo, modulates opossum esophageal motor functions by inducing the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which increases nitric oxide (NO) production. Superoxide, a NO scavenger, is generated during this endotoxemia. Superoxide is cleared by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) to protect the physiological function of NO. This study examined whether lower esophageal sphincter (LES) motility, NO release, and iNOS and nitrotyrosine accumulation in the LES are affected by LPS in vitro. Muscle strips from the opossum LES were placed in tissue baths containing oxygenated Krebs buffer. NO release was measured with a chemiluminescence NOx analyzer, and Western blots were performed to analyze iNOS and nitrotyrosine production. The percent change in resting LES tone after a 6-hour exposure to LPS was significantly increased compared to pretreatment values. The percent LES relaxation upon electrical stimulation was significantly decreased in the control group at 6 hours, indicating that the LPS treatment had an effect. The NO concentration in the tissue bath of LPS- treated muscle without nerve stimulation was significantly less than that of LPS treatment combined with SOD/CAT or SOD/CAT alone. iNOS and nitrotyrosine were detectable and increased over time in the LES muscle of both the control and LPS-treated groups. Antioxidant enzymes may play a role in regulating NO-mediated neuromuscular functions in the LES. PMID:16642552

  20. Lubrication Theory Model to Evaluate Surgical Alterations in Flow Mechanics of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sudip K.; Brasseur, James G.; Zaki, Tamer; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2003-11-01

    Surgery is commonly used to rebuild a weak lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and reduce reflux. Because the driving pressure (DP) is proportional to muscle tension generated in the esophagus, we developed models using lubrication theory to evaluate the consequences of surgery on muscle force required to open the LES and drive the flow. The models relate time changes in DP to lumen geometry and trans-LES flow with a manometric catheter. Inertial effects were included and found negligible. Two models, direct (opening specified) and indirect (opening predicted), were combined with manometric pressure and imaging data from normal and post-surgery LES. A very high sensitivity was predicted between the details of the DP and LES opening. The indirect model accurately captured LES opening and predicted a 3-phase emptying process, with phases I and III requiring rapid generation of muscle tone to open the LES and empty the esophagus. Data showed that phases I and III are adversely altered by surgery causing incomplete emptying. Parametric model studies indicated that changes to the surgical procedure can positively alter LES flow mechanics and improve clinical outcomes.

  1. A clinical experience with dantrolene sodium for external urinary sphincter hypertonicity in spinal cord injured patients.

    PubMed

    Hackler, R H; Broecker, B H; Klein, F A; Brady, S M

    1980-07-01

    Significant bladder residual urine is secondary to pelvic floor skeletal muscle hypertonicity in some spinal cord injury patients with suprasacral or mixed lesions. Fifteen patients with residual urine volumes greater than 150 cc were treated with dantrolene sodium because of its ability to decrease skeletal muscle contractibility. All of the patients had urethral closure pressures greater than 100 cm. water. Of the 15 patients 8 benefited from dantrolene sodium therapy and were maintained on external condom urinary drainage. Five of these 8 patients required up to 600 mg. dantrolene sodium daily to affect this result. The residual urine volume decreased to less than 100 cc and the post-therapy decrease in urethral pressure averaged 77 cm. water (49 per cent). The patients in the failure group (residual urine greater than 150 cc) had an average decrease in urethral pressure of 21 cm. water (16 per cent). Detrusor hyporeflexia possibly contributed to the failure rate. In summary, dantrolene sodium seems to be beneficial in some patients with external urinary sphincter hypertonicity. However, it will not supplant external sphincterotomy in the more complete male spinal cord injury patient in whom reflex incontinence is of minimal concern. Dantrolene sodium could be an ideal treatment of patients with incomplete neurologic lesions in whom continence might be preserved. The drug will have to be effective at low doses to obviate the major side effect of over-all muscle weakness.

  2. Anal anatomy and normal histology.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Priti

    2012-12-01

    The focus of this article is the anatomy and histology of the anal canal, and its clinical relevance to anal cancers. The article also highlights the recent histological and anatomical changes to the traditional terminology of the anal canal. The terminology has been adopted by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, separating the anal region into the anal canal, the perianal region and the skin. This paper describes the gross anatomy of the anal canal, along with its associated blood supply, venous and lymphatic drainage, and nerve supply. The new terminology referred to in this article may assist clinicians and health care providers to identify lesions more precisely through naked eye observation and without the need for instrumentation. Knowledge of the regional anatomy of the anus will also assist in management decisions.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, H J; DeMeester, T R; Naspetti, R; Jamieson, J; Perry, R E

    1991-01-01

    The resistance of the lower esophageal sphincter to reflux of gastric juice is determined by the integrated effects of radial pressures exerted over the entire length of the sphincter. This can be quantitated by three-dimensional computerized imaging of sphincter pressures obtained by a pullback of radially oriented pressure transducers and by calculating the volume of this image, in other words, the sphincter pressure vector volume. Validation studies showed that sphincter imaging based on a stepwise pullback of a catheter with four or eight radial side holes is superior to a rapid motorized pullback. Compared with 50 healthy volunteers, the total and abdominal sphincter pressure vector volume was lower in 150 patients with increased esophageal acid exposure (p less than 0.001) and decreased with increasing esophageal mucosal damage (p less than 0.01). Calculation of the sphincter pressure vector volume was superior to standard techniques in identifying a mechanically defective sphincter as the cause of increased esophageal acid exposure, particularly in patients without mucosal damage. The Nissen and Belsey fundoplication increased the total and intra-abdominal sphincter pressure vector volume (p less than 0.001) and normalized the three-dimensional sphincter image. Failure to do so was associated with recurrent or persistent reflux. These data indicate that three-dimensional imaging of the lower esophageal sphincter improves the identification of patients who would benefit from an antireflux procedure. Analysis of the three-dimensional sphincter pressure profile should become the standard for evaluation of the lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:1953093

  4. A quantitative model of myosin phosphorylation and the photomechanical response of the isolated sphincter pupillae of the frog iris.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, L; Gu, F J

    1987-01-01

    The time courses of isometrically recorded photomechanical responses of isolated sphincter pupillae of Rana pipiens can be accurately predicted by a set of differential equations derived from phosphorylation theory of smooth muscle contraction. We compared actual light-stimulated contractions with calculated ones over a wide range of stimulus intensities (56-fold) and durations (0.4-4.0 s). The hypothetical Ca++-calmodulin-myosin light chain kinase cascade acts as a "valve" to control the flow of ATP through a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. When the rate of flow of ATP through the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle is increased, the percentage of phosphorylated myosin increases. The time courses of the concentrations of phosphorylated myosin during different responses are seen to be functions of the time courses of the opening and closing of the coupling cascade "valve." The calculations predict experimentally measurable intermediate variables, which can aid the investigation of the application of quantitative phosphorylation theory to amphibian sphincter pupillae and to smooth muscle in general. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:3496922

  5. The Influence of Antral Ulcers on Intramural Gastric Nerve Projections Supplying the Pyloric Sphincter in the Pig (Sus scrofa domestica)—Neuronal Tracing Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zalecki, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background Gastric ulcerations in the region of antrum pylori represent a serious medical problem in humans and animals. Such localization of ulcers can influence the intrinsic descending nerve supply to the pyloric sphincter. The pyloric function is precisely regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic nerves. Impaired neural regulation could result in pyloric sphincter dysfunction and gastric emptying malfunction. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of gastric antral ulcerations on the density and distribution of intramural gastric descending neurons supplying the pyloric sphincter in pigs. Methodology/Principal Findings The experiment was performed on 2 groups of pigs: healthy gilts (n=6) and gilts with experimentally induced peptic ulcers in the region of antrum pylori (n=6). Gastric neurons supplying pyloric sphincter were labeled using the retrograde neuronal tracing technique (20μl of Fast Blue tracer injected into the pyloric sphincter muscle). After a week survival period the animals were sacrificed and the stomachs were collected. Then, the stomach wall was cross-cut into 0.5cm thick sections taken in specified intervals (section I - 1.5cm; section II - 3.5cm; section III - 5.5cm; section IV – 7.5cm) starting from the sphincter. Consecutive microscopic slices prepared from each section were analyzed under fluorescent microscope to count traced neurons. Obtained data were statistically analyzed. The total number of FB-positive perikarya observed within all studied sections significantly decreased from 903.3 ± 130.7 in control to 243.8 ± 67.3 in experimental animals. In healthy pigs 76.1 ± 6.7% of labeled neurons were observed within the section I, 23.53 ± 6.5% in section II and only occasional cells in section III. In experimental animals, as many as 93.8 ± 2.1% of labeled cells were observed within the section I and only 6.2 ± 2.2% in section II, while section III was devoid of such neurons. There were no traced perikarya in section IV

  6. Efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of perianal hidradenitis suppurativa, complicated by anal fistulae: A report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Takiyama, Hirotoshi; Kazama, Shinsuke; Tanoue, Yusuke; Yasuda, Koji; Otani, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Junichiro; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Hata, Keisuke; Kawai, Kazushige; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Miyagawa, Takuya; Yamada, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Perianal hidradenitis suppurativa (PHS) is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease of the apocrine glands present in the skin and soft tissue adjacent to the anus. It is often misdiagnosed or treatment is delayed, resulting in the formation of an abscess or, in the worst case, leading to sepsis. It is difficult to treat perianal lesions merged with fistulae completely due to its high recurrence rate. Therefore, we should diagnose it correctly and treat it with appropriate methods. Presentation of case We report two cases of PHS with anal fistulae that were examined preoperatively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and treated safely by surgery without any recurrence. Discussion The anal sphincter area cannot be visualized and evaluated directly by fistulography. Also CT has only limited resolution, making it difficult to distinguish between soft tissues and inflammatory streaks. Endosonography is not suitable for the examination of supra-sphincteric or extra-sphincteric extensions, as it is limited by insufficient penetration of the ultrasonic beams. MRI can demonstrate the entire course of the fistulae owing to its high contrast resolution. Conclusion Our findings support the idea that PHS with complicated anal fistulae can be diagnosed accurately using MRI and treated safely and completely with surgery. PMID:26339787

  7. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  8. Screening for Anal Cancer in Women

    PubMed Central

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Darragh, Teresa M.; Berry-Lawhorn, J. Michael; Roberts, Jennifer Margaret; Khan, Michelle J.; Boardman, Lori A.; Chiao, Elizabeth; Einstein, Mark H.; Goldstone, Stephen E.; Jay, Naomi; Likes, Wendy M.; Stier, Elizabeth A.; Welton, Mark Lane; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of anal cancer is higher in women than men in the general population and has been increasing for several decades. Similar to cervical cancer, most anal cancers are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) and it is believed that anal cancers are preceded by anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Our goal was to summarize the literature on anal cancer, HSIL and HPV infection in women, and provide screening recommendations in women. Methods A group of experts convened by the ASCCP and the International Anal Neoplasia Society reviewed the literature on anal HPV infection, anal SIL and anal cancer in women. Results Anal HPV infection is common in women but is relatively transient in most. The risk of anal HSIL and cancer varies considerably by risk group, with HIV-infected women and those with a history of lower genital tract neoplasia (LGTN) at highest risk compared with the general population. Conclusions While there are no data yet to demonstrate that identification and treatment of anal HSIL leads to reduced risk of anal cancer, women in groups at the highest risk should be queried for anal cancer symptoms and have digital anorectal examinations to detect anal cancers. HIV-infected women and women with LGTN, may be considered for screening with anal cytology with triage to treatment if HSIL is diagnosed. Healthy women with no known risk factors or anal cancer symptoms do not need to be routinely screened for anal cancer or anal HSIL. PMID:26103446

  9. Total proctocolectomy and ileal - anal pouch

    MedlinePlus

    Restorative proctocolectomy; Ileal-anal resection; Ileal-anal pouch; J-pouch; S-pouch; Pelvic pouch; Ileal-anal pouch; Ileal ... RD, Mahmoud N, Maron DJ, Ross HM, Rombeau J. Colon and rectum. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, ...

  10. Do We Know What Causes Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... anal cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes anal cancer? Researchers have found some risk factors that increase ... now being done to learn how HPV might cause anal cancer. There is good evidence that HPV causes many ...

  11. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 {+-} 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 {+-} 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  12. Sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative radiotherapy for low rectal cancers: feasibility, oncologic results and quality of life outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Allal, A S; Bieri, S; Pelloni, A; Spataro, V; Anchisi, S; Ambrosetti, P; Sprangers, M A G; Kurtz, J M; Gertsch, P

    2000-01-01

    The present study assesses the choice of surgical procedure, oncologic results and quality of life (QOL) outcomes in a retrospective cohort of 53 patients with low-lying rectal cancers (within 6 cm of the anal verge) treated surgically following preoperative radiotherapy (RT, median dose 45 Gy) with or without concomitant 5-fluorouracil. QOL was assessed in 23 patients by using two questionnaires developed by the QOL Study Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer: EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-CR38. After a median interval of 29 days from completion of RT, abdominoperineal resection (APR) was performed in 29 patients (55%), low anterior resection in 23 patients (20 with coloanal anastomosis) and transrectal excision in one patient. The 3-year actuarial overall survival and locoregional control rates were 71.4% and 77.5% respectively, with no differences observed between patients operated by APR or restorative procedures. For all scales of EORTC QLQ-C30 and EORTC QLQ-CR38, no significant differences in median scores were observed between the two surgical groups. Although patients having had APR tended to report a lower body image score (P = 0.12) and more sexual dysfunction in male patients, all APR patients tended to report better physical function, future perspective and global QOL. In conclusion, sphincter-sparing surgery after preoperative RT seems to be feasible, in routine practice, in a significant proportion of low rectal cancers without compromising the oncologic results. However, prospective studies are mandatory to confirm this finding and to clarify the putative QOL advantages of sphincter-conserving approaches. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10735495

  13. PERFACT procedure to treat supralevator fistula-in-ano: A novel single stage sphincter sparing procedure

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively perform the PERFACT procedure in supralevator anal fistula/abscess. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging was done preoperatively in all the patients. Proximal cauterization around the internal opening, emptying regularly of fistula tracts and curettage of tracts (PERFACT) was done in all patients with supralevator fistula or abscess. All types of anal fistula and/or abscess with supralevator extension, whether intersphincteric or transsphincteric, were included in the study. The internal opening along with the adjacent mucosa was electrocauterized. The resulting wound was left open to heal by secondary intention so as to heal (close) the internal opening by granulation tissue. The supralevator tract/abscess was drained and thoroughly curetted. It was regularly cleaned and kept empty in the postoperative period. The primary outcome parameter was complete fistula healing. The secondary outcome parameters were return to work and change in incontinence scores (Vaizey objective scoring system) assessed preoperatively and at 3 mo after surgery. RESULTS: Seventeen patients were prospectively enrolled and followed for a median of 13 mo (range 5-21 mo). Mean age was 41.1 ± 13.4 years, M:F - 15:2. Fourteen (82.4%) had a recurrent fistula, 8 (47.1%) had an associated abscess, 14 (82.4%) had multiple tracts and 5 (29.4%) had horseshoe fistulae. Infralevator part of fistula was intersphincteric in 4 and transsphincteric in 13 patients. Two patients were excluded. Eleven out of fifteen (73.3%) were cured and 26.7% (4/15) had a recurrence. Two patients with recurrence were reoperated on with the same procedure and one was cured. Thus, the overall healing rate was 80% (12/15). All the patients could resume normal work within 48 h of surgery. There was no deterioration in incontinence scores (Vaizey objective scoring system). This is the largest series of supralevator fistula-in-ano (SLF) published to date. CONCLUSION: PERFACT procedure is an effective single

  14. Black Anal Canal: Acute Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Catarina; Gonçalves, Cláudia; Alves, Paulo; Gil, Inês; Canhoto, Manuela; Silva, Filipe; Cotrim, Isabel; Amado, Cristina; Eliseu, Liliana; Vasconcelos, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemia of the rectum or anal canal resulting in necrosis is extremely uncommon because both the rectum and the anal canal have excellent blood supplies. We present a case with spontaneous necrosis of the anal canal without rectal involvement. Surgical debridement was accomplished, and the recovery was uneventful. The patient was elderly, with probable atherosclerotic arterial disease, and presented with hypotension. Due to the lack of other precipitating factors, the hypoperfusion hypothesis seems to be the most suitable in this case. To the best of our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature on this subject.

  15. Black Anal Canal: Acute Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Barbeiro, Sandra; Martins, Catarina; Gonçalves, Cláudia; Alves, Paulo; Gil, Inês; Canhoto, Manuela; Silva, Filipe; Cotrim, Isabel; Amado, Cristina; Eliseu, Liliana; Vasconcelos, Helena

    2016-08-01

    Acute ischemia of the rectum or anal canal resulting in necrosis is extremely uncommon because both the rectum and the anal canal have excellent blood supplies. We present a case with spontaneous necrosis of the anal canal without rectal involvement. Surgical debridement was accomplished, and the recovery was uneventful. The patient was elderly, with probable atherosclerotic arterial disease, and presented with hypotension. Due to the lack of other precipitating factors, the hypoperfusion hypothesis seems to be the most suitable in this case. To the best of our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature on this subject. PMID:27626027

  16. Black Anal Canal: Acute Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Catarina; Gonçalves, Cláudia; Alves, Paulo; Gil, Inês; Canhoto, Manuela; Silva, Filipe; Cotrim, Isabel; Amado, Cristina; Eliseu, Liliana; Vasconcelos, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemia of the rectum or anal canal resulting in necrosis is extremely uncommon because both the rectum and the anal canal have excellent blood supplies. We present a case with spontaneous necrosis of the anal canal without rectal involvement. Surgical debridement was accomplished, and the recovery was uneventful. The patient was elderly, with probable atherosclerotic arterial disease, and presented with hypotension. Due to the lack of other precipitating factors, the hypoperfusion hypothesis seems to be the most suitable in this case. To the best of our knowledge, no similar cases have been reported in the literature on this subject. PMID:27626027

  17. Species differences in the effects of prostaglandins on inositol trisphosphate accumulation, phosphatidic acid formation, myosin light chain phosphorylation and contraction in iris sphincter of the mammalian eye: interaction with the cyclic AMP system.

    PubMed

    Yousufzai, S Y; Chen, A L; Abdel-Latif, A A

    1988-12-01

    Comparative studies on the effects of prostaglandins (PGs) on 1,2-diacylglycerol, measured as phosphatidic acid (PA), and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production, cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation, myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and contraction in the iris sphincter smooth muscle of rabbit, bovine and other mammalian species were undertaken and functional and biochemical relationships between the IP3-Ca++ and cAMP second messenger systems were demonstrated. The findings obtained from these studies can be summarized as follows: 1) all PGs investigated, including PGE2, PGF2 alpha, PGF2 alpha-ester, PGE1 and PGA2 increased IP3 accumulation and PA formation, and the extent of stimulation was dependent on the animal species. Thus, PGF2 alpha-ester (1 microM), the most potent of the PGs, increased IP3 accumulation in rabbit and bovine sphincters by 33 and 58%, respectively, and increased PA formation by 67 and 56%, respectively. The PG increased IP3 accumulation in both rabbit and bovine sphincters very rapidly (T1/2 values about 26 sec) and in a dose-dependent manner. 2) The PG had no effect on MLC phosphorylation in the rabbit sphincter, but it increased that of the bovine by 36%. 3) The PG increased cAMP formation by 75% in the rabbit sphincter but it had no effect on that of the bovine. 4) The PG induced a maximal contractile response in the bovine sphincter but it had no effect on that of the rabbit. 5) In the bovine, PGA2 induced IP3 accumulation and contraction, without an effect on cAMP formation; however, in the rabbit, cat and dog it increased cAMP formation and had no effect on IP3 accumulation and contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The appearances on ultrasound of the female urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Leonor de Gonzalez, E; Cosgrove, D O; Joseph, A E; Murch, C; Naik, K

    1988-08-01

    A rounded or ovoid midline structure with mean measurements of 1.30 cm x 1.33 cm x 0.96 cm in longitudinal, transverse and antero-posterior dimensions was routinely imaged at the bladder base in 97 female patients on pelvic ultrasound examination. Its position and appearance are reminiscent of a smaller version of the male prostate, and it has been dubbed the "female pseudoprostate". It appears to correspond with the external rhabdo-sphincter of the bladder. Its rounded shape may be confusing but it should not be misread as pathological. PMID:3046696

  19. [Design of an artificial sphincter system with bio-feedback function based on MSP430].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-kan; Yan, De-tian

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we advance a new treating method for rectectomy postoperative anus incontinence, which is called "artificial sphincter system with biofeedback-function". The system simulates the function of human's sphincter and has entered into a stage of simulation experiments on animals. PMID:16494055

  20. Electrocautery for Precancerous Anal Lesions

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  1. Upper sphincter function during transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (tLOSR); it is mainly about microburps.

    PubMed

    Pandolfino, J E; Ghosh, S K; Zhang, Q; Han, A; Kahrilas, P J

    2007-03-01

    Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (tLOSRs) are both a dominant mechanism of reflux and an element of the belch reflex. This study aimed to analyse the interplay between reflux and upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) activity during meal-induced tLOSRs. Fifteen normal subjects were studied with a solid-state high-resolution manometry assembly positioned to record from the hypopharynx to the stomach and a catheter pH electrode 5 cm above the LOS. Subjects ate a 1000-calorie high-fat meal and were monitored for 120 min in a sitting posture. The relationship among tLOSRs, common cavities, pressure changes within the oesophagus and UOS contractile activity were analysed. A total of 218 tLOSRs occurred among the 15 subjects. The majority (79%) were coupled with UOS relaxation and 84% (145/173) of these occurred in association with a common cavity. Upper oesophageal sphincter relaxation was usually preceded by a pressure change in the oesophagus; however, some relaxations (16%) occurred without a discernable increase in pressure or before the pressure increase began. Acid reflux did not appear to play a role in determining UOS response to tLOSRs. The majority of post-prandial tLOSRs were associated with brief periods of UOS relaxation, likely permissive of gas venting (microburps). Intraoesophageal pressure changes likely modulate this UOS response; however, an anticipatory characteristic was evident in some subjects. Whether or not GORD patients with extra-oesophageal symptoms exhibit an exaggeration of the UOS relaxation response during reflux is yet to be determined.

  2. 3-Hydroxymethyl coenzyme A reductase inhibition attenuates spontaneous smooth muscle tone via RhoA/ROCK pathway regulated by RhoA prenylation.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Satish

    2010-06-01

    RhoA prenylation may play an important step in the translocation of RhoA in the basal internal anal sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle tone. Statins inhibit downstream posttranslational RhoA prenylation by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibition (HMGCRI). The role of statins in relation to RhoA prenylation in the pathophysiology of the spontaneously tonic smooth muscle has not been investigated. In the present studies, we determined the effect of classical HMGCRI simvastatin on the basal IAS tone and RhoA prenylation and in the levels of RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) in the cytosolic vs. membrane fractions of the smooth muscle. Simvastatin produced concentration-dependent decrease in the IAS tone (via direct actions at the smooth muscle cells). The decrease in the IAS tone by simvastatin was associated with the decrease in the prenylation of RhoA, as well as RhoA/ROCK in the membrane fractions of the IAS, in the basal state. The inhibitory effects of the HMGCRI were completely reversible by geranylgeranyltransferase substrate geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Relaxation of the IAS smooth muscle via HMGCRI simvastatin is mediated via the downstream decrease in the levels of RhoA prenylation and ROCK activity. Studies support the concept that RhoA prenylation leading to RhoA/ROCK translocation followed by activation is important for the basal tone in the IAS. Data suggest that the role of HMG-CoA reductase may go beyond cholesterol biosynthesis, such as the regulation of the smooth muscle tone. The studies have important implications in the pathophysiological mechanisms and in the novel therapeutic approaches for anorectal motility disorders.

  3. Smooth Muscle Precursor Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Yan Hui; Wei, Yi; Green, Morgaine; Wani, Prachi; Zhang, Pengbo; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in using stem cells (SC) to regenerate a deficient urethral sphincter in patients with urinary incontinence. The smooth muscle component of the sphincter is a significant contributor to sphincter function. However, current translational efforts for sphincter muscle restoration focus only on skeletal muscle regeneration because they rely on adult mesenchymal SC as cell source. These adult SC do not yield sufficient smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for transplantation. We may be able to overcome this limitation by using pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to derive SMCs. Hence, we sought to investigate whether smooth muscle precursor cells (pSMCs) derived from human PSCs can restore urethral function in an animal model generated by surgical urethrolysis and ovariectomy. Rats were divided into four groups: control (no intervention), sham saline (surgery + saline injection), bladder SMC (surgery + human bladder SMC injection), and treatment (surgery + pSMC injection, which includes human embryonic stem cell (hESC) H9-derived pSMC, episomal reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived pSMC, or viral reprogrammed iPSC-derived pSMC). pSMCs (2 × 106 cells/rat) were injected periurethrally 3 weeks postsurgery. Leak point pressure (LPP) and baseline external urethral sphincter electromyography were measured 5 weeks postinjection. Both iPSC-derived pSMC treatment groups showed significantly higher LPP compared to the sham saline group, consistent with restoration of urethral sphincter function. While the difference between the H9-derived pSMC treatment and sham saline group was not significant, it did show a trend toward restoration of the LPP to the level of intact controls. Our data indicate that pSMCs derived from human PSCs (hESC and iPSC) can restore sphincter function. PMID:26785911

  4. The Anal Fistula Plug versus the mucosal advancement flap for the treatment of Anorectal Fistula (PLUG trial)

    PubMed Central

    van Koperen, Paul J; Bemelman, Willem A; Bossuyt, Patrick MM; Gerhards, Michael F; Eijsbouts, Quirijn AJ; van Tets, Willem F; Janssen, Lucas WM; Dijkstra, F Robert; van Dalsen, Annette D; Slors, J Frederik M

    2008-01-01

    Background Low transsphincteric fistulas less than 1/3 of the sphincter complex are easy to treat by fistulotomy with a high success rate. High transsphincteric fistulas remain a surgical challenge. Various surgical procedures are available, but recurrence rates of these techniques are disappointingly high. The mucosal flap advancement is considered the gold standard for the treatment of high perianal fistula of cryptoglandular origin by most colorectal surgeons. In the literature a recurrence rate between 0 and 63% is reported for the mucosal flap advancement. Recently Armstrong and colleagues reported on a new biologic anal fistula plug, a bioabsorbable xenograft made of lyophilized porcine intestinal submucosa. Their prospective series of 15 patients with high perianal fistula treated with the anal fistula plug showed promising results. The anal fistula plug trial is designed to compare the anal fistula plug with the mucosal flap advancement in the treatment of high perianal fistula in terms of success rate, continence, postoperative pain, and quality of life. Methods/design The PLUG trial is a randomized controlled multicenter trial. Sixty patients with high perianal fistulas of cryptoglandular origin will be randomized to either the fistula plug or the mucosal advancement flap. Study parameters will be anorectal fistula closure-rate, continence, post-operative pain, and quality of life. Patients will be followed-up at two weeks, four weeks, and 16 weeks. At the final follow-up closure rate is determined by clinical examination by a surgeon blinded for the intervention. Discussion Before broadly implementing the anal fistula plug results of randomized trials using the plug should be awaited. This randomized controlled trial comparing the anal fistula plug and the mucosal advancement flap should provide evidence regarding the effectiveness of the anal fistula plug in the treatment of high perianal fistulas. Trial registration ISRCTN: 97376902 PMID:18573198

  5. Surgery for Crohn's anal fistulas.

    PubMed

    Sugita, A; Koganei, K; Harada, H; Yamazaki, Y; Fukushima, T; Shimada, H

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the features of Crohn's anal fistulas and to evaluate the efficacy of seton treatment. In 119 patients with Crohn's disease, the incidence of anal fistula was 56% (67/119), with no significant difference in the incidence among patients with ileitis, colitis, and ileocolitis. "Intractable" anal fistulas were found in 17% of patients with ileitis, compared to 64% of those with colitis (P = 0.051) and 68% of those with ileocolitis (P = 0.014). Seton treatment, i.e., non-cutting, long-term seton drainage, was performed for 21 patients (5 with intersphincteric, and 16 with transsphincteric fistulas). In the 16-month follow up, 9 patients required redrainage for recurrent fistulous abscess, mainly because of progressive colorectal disease. Finally, a good result was obtained in 17 of the 21 patients (81%) and no recurrent fistulous abscess developed in the 8 patients in whom all setons were removed. Anal continence was preserved in all the patients. These results indicate that anal fistulas with Crohn's ileitis were cured more easily than those with colitis or ileocolitis, and that seton treatment was effective for intersphincteric fistula with multiple fistula openings and for transphincteric fistulas in patients exhibiting remission of intestinal Crohn's disease. PMID:8563879

  6. Effects of Larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) on Heart Rate and Electrically Evoked Electromyographic Response of the External Anal Sphincter in Cattle.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norditerpenoid alkaloids of larkspur (Delphinium spp.) are competitive antagonists of nicotinic cholinergic receptors and poison cattle with, high mortality. Of the norditerpenoids, the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine type (MSAL-type) alkaloids are most toxic. This study tested the hyp...

  7. Esophageal wall blood perfusion during contraction and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Kim, Young Sun

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that esophageal contraction reduces esophageal wall perfusion in an animal study. Our aim was to determine esophageal wall blood perfusion (EWBP) during esophageal contraction and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in humans. We studied 12 healthy volunteers. A custom-designed laser Doppler probe was anchored to the esophageal wall, 4–6 cm above the LES, by use of the Bravo pH system so that the laser light beam stay directed toward the esophageal mucosa. A high-resolution manometry equipped with impedance electrodes recorded esophageal pressures and reflux events. Synchronized pressure, impedance, pH, and EWBP recordings were obtained during dry and wet swallows and following a meal. Stable recordings of laser Doppler EWBP were only recorded when the laser Doppler probe was firmly anchored to the esophageal wall. Esophageal contractions induced by dry and wet swallows resulted in 46 ± 9% and 60 ± 10% reduction in the EWBP, respectively (compared to baseline). Reduction in EWBP was directly related to the amplitude (curvilinear fit) and duration of esophageal contraction. Atropine reduced the esophageal contraction amplitude and decreased the EWBP reduction associated with esophageal contraction. TLESRs were also associated with reduction in the EWBP, albeit of smaller amplitude (29 ± 3%) but longer duration (19 ± 2 s) compared with swallow-induced esophageal contractions. We report 1) an innovative technique to record EWBP for extended time periods in humans and 2) contraction of circular and longitudinal muscle during peristalsis and selective longitudinal muscle contraction during TLESR causes reduction in the EWBP; 3) using our innovative technique, future studies may determine whether esophageal wall ischemia is the cause of esophageal pain/heartburn. PMID:22790599

  8. Outcomes of esophageal surgery, especially of the lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; Siboni, Stefano; Saino, Greta I; Cavadas, Demetrio; Braghetto, Italo; Csendes, Attila; Korn, Owen; Figueredo, Edgar J; Swanstrom, Lee L; Wassenaar, Eelco

    2013-10-01

    This paper includes commentaries on outcomes of esophageal surgery, including the mechanisms by which fundoduplication improves lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure; the efficacy of the Linx™ management system in improving LES function; the utility of radiologic characterization of antireflux valves following surgery; the correlation between endoscopic findings and reported symptoms following antireflux surgery; the links between laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and decreased LES pressure, endoscopic esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the less favorable outcomes following fundoduplication among obese patients; the application of bioprosthetic meshes to reinforce hiatal repair and decrease the incidence of paraesophageal hernia; the efficacy of endoluminal antireflux procedures, and the limited efficacy of revisional antireflux operations, underscoring the importance of good primary surgery and diligent work-up to prevent the necessity of revisional procedures. PMID:24117632

  9. [Day surgery for anal disease].

    PubMed

    Takano, M

    2000-10-01

    Historically, patients with anal diseases treated on a day surgery basis had inadequate cure rates and a high complication rate. After World War II, modern treatment methods were learned from the UK and USA and improved in Japan. However, the improved radical methods were so complex that approximately 2 weeks' hospitalization was needed. Recently, day surgery for various diseases including hemorrhoids has been recommended by the Japanese ministry of Health and Welfare. However, the characteristics of anal anatomy and physiology make the smooth healing of wounds difficult and tend to cause postoperative pain, bleeding, infection, prolonged healing time, etc. To prevent such difficulties, care must be well planned following the critical path of informed consent, careful surgery, postoperative observation, and management at home. However, hospital staff in charge of such surgery are under so much stress that only patients with less severe anal disease without local or systemic complications should be selected for day surgery.

  10. Conservative treatment for anal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Anal incontinence (AI) in adults is a troublesome condition that negatively impacts upon quality of life and results in significant embarrassment and social isolation. The conservative management of AI is the first step and targets symptomatic relief. The reported significant improvement with conservative treatments for AI is close to 25% and involves prescribed changes in lifestyle habits, a reduced intake of foods that may cause or aggravate diarrhea or rectal urgency, and the use of specific anti-diarrheal agents. The use of a mechanical barrier in the form of an anal plug and the outcomes and principles of pelvic kinesitherapies and biofeedback options are outlined. This review discusses a gastroenterologist's approach towards conservative therapy in patients referred with anal incontinence. PMID:24759347

  11. New Artificial Urinary Sphincter Devices in the Treatment of Male Iatrogenic Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Vakalopoulos, Ioannis; Kampantais, Spyridon; Laskaridis, Leonidas; Chachopoulos, Vasileios; Koptsis, Michail; Toutziaris, Chrysovalantis

    2012-01-01

    Severe persistent stress incontinence following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer treatment, although not very common, remains the most annoying complication affecting patient's quality of life, despite good surgical oncological results. When severe incontinence persists after the first postoperative year and conservative treatment has been failed, surgical treatment has to be considered. In these cases it is generally accepted that artificial urinary sphincter is the gold standard treatment. AUS 800 by American Medical Systems has been successfully used for more than 35 years. Recently three more sphincter devices, the Flow-Secure, the Periurethral Constrictor, and the ZSI 375, have been developed and presented in the market. A novel type of artificial urinary sphincter, the Tape Mechanical Occlusive Device, has been inserted in live canines as well as in human cadavers. These new sphincter devices are discussed in this paper focusing on safety and clinical results. PMID:22567002

  12. A series of six cases of sphincter of Oddi pathology in the cat (2008-2009).

    PubMed

    Furneaux, Robert W

    2010-10-01

    The sphincter of Oddi (SO) is located within the wall of the duodenum as the terminal part of the common bile duct. Six cats are reported with obstructive processes within their SO. Three of them may have had some form of sphincter dysfunction associated with the pre-existing complex known as 'inflammatory bowel disease' (IBD), two may have had the equivalent of the infant human condition known as 'bile plug syndrome' and the sixth had sphincter dysfunction associated with a tumour at the confluence of the common and right hepatic duct. In all six cases, the sphincter obstructions were surgically managed. The outcomes for 4/6 were favourable but 1/6 was euthanased intraoperatively, and 1/6 had a metastatic neoplasia and was euthanased 2 months postoperatively.

  13. The effect of pinaverium bromide (LA 1717) on the lower oesophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Wöltje, M; Huchzermeyer, H

    1982-01-01

    An acute, double-blind study was carried out in 8 healthy male volunteers to investigate any effect of a new antispasmodic, pinaverium bromide, compared with placebo on the lower oesophageal sphincter. Manometric measurements showed no significant differences in resting pressures either after placebo or a therapeutic dose (200 mg) of pinaverium bromide, suggesting that the active drug does not cause any impairment of function of the lower oesophageal sphincter. PMID:7128186

  14. Leg raise increases pressure in lower and upper esophageal sphincter among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bitnar, P; Stovicek, J; Andel, R; Arlt, J; Arltova, M; Smejkal, M; Kolar, P; Kobesova, A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between posturally increased intra-abdominal pressure and lower/upper esophageal sphincter pressure changes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We used high resolution manometry to measure pressure changes in lower and upper esophageal sphincter during bilateral leg rise. We also examined whether the rate of lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure would increase during leg raise differentially in individuals with versus without normal resting pressure. Fifty eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease participated in the study. High resolution manometry was performed in relaxed supine position, then lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure was measured. Finally, the subjects were instructed to keep their legs lifted while performing 90-degree flexion at the hips and knees and the pressure was measured again. Paired t-test and independent samples t-test were used. There was a significant increase in both lower (P < 0.001) and upper esophageal sphincter pressure (P = 0.034) during leg raise compared to the initial resting position. Individuals with initially higher pressure in lower esophageal sphincter (>10 mmHg) exhibited a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with initially lower pressure (pressure ≤10 mmHg; P = 0.002). Similarly individuals with higher resting upper esophageal sphincter pressure (>44 mmHg) showed a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with lower resting pressure (≤44 mmHg; P < 0.001). The results illustrate the influence of postural leg activities on intraesophageal pressure in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, indicating by means of high resolution manometry that diaphragmatic postural and sphincter function are likely interrelated in this population. PMID:27634073

  15. Leg raise increases pressure in lower and upper esophageal sphincter among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bitnar, P; Stovicek, J; Andel, R; Arlt, J; Arltova, M; Smejkal, M; Kolar, P; Kobesova, A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relation between posturally increased intra-abdominal pressure and lower/upper esophageal sphincter pressure changes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We used high resolution manometry to measure pressure changes in lower and upper esophageal sphincter during bilateral leg rise. We also examined whether the rate of lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure would increase during leg raise differentially in individuals with versus without normal resting pressure. Fifty eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease participated in the study. High resolution manometry was performed in relaxed supine position, then lower and upper esophageal sphincter pressure was measured. Finally, the subjects were instructed to keep their legs lifted while performing 90-degree flexion at the hips and knees and the pressure was measured again. Paired t-test and independent samples t-test were used. There was a significant increase in both lower (P < 0.001) and upper esophageal sphincter pressure (P = 0.034) during leg raise compared to the initial resting position. Individuals with initially higher pressure in lower esophageal sphincter (>10 mmHg) exhibited a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with initially lower pressure (pressure ≤10 mmHg; P = 0.002). Similarly individuals with higher resting upper esophageal sphincter pressure (>44 mmHg) showed a greater pressure increase during leg raise than those with lower resting pressure (≤44 mmHg; P < 0.001). The results illustrate the influence of postural leg activities on intraesophageal pressure in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, indicating by means of high resolution manometry that diaphragmatic postural and sphincter function are likely interrelated in this population.

  16. Nicotinic Receptor Subtypes Mediating Relaxation of the Normal Human Clasp and Sling Fibers of the Upper Gastric Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Michael R.; Braverman, Alan S.; Vegesna, Anil K.; Miller, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper function of the gastroesophageal high pressure zone is essential for the integrity of the antireflux barrier. Mechanisms include tonic contractions as well as the decreased tone during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. Methods We characterized the pharmacology of nicotinic receptors mediating relaxations of the human upper gastric sphincter (clasp and sling fibers) using currently available subtype selective nicotinic antagonists in tissue from organ transplant donors. Donors with either a history of gastroesophageal reflux disease or histologic evidence of Barrett’s esophagus were excluded. Clasp and sling muscle fiber strips were used for one of three paradigms. For paradigm 1, each strip was exposed to carbachol, washed, exposed to nicotinic antagonists then re-exposed to carbachol. In paradigm 2, strips were exposed to a near maximally effective bethanechol concentration then nicotine was added. Strips then were washed, exposed to nicotinic antagonists then re-exposed to bethanechol followed by nicotine. In paradigm 3, strips were exposed to bethanechol then choline or cytisine. Key Results 100 µM methyllycaconitine has no inhibitory effects on relaxations, eliminating homomeric α7 subtypes. Subtypes composed of α4β2 subunits are also eliminated because choline acts as an agonist and dihydro-beta-erythroidine is ineffective. Conclusions & Inferences Because mecamylamine blocks the relaxations and both choline and cytisine act as agonists in both clasp and sling fibers, the nicotinic receptor subtypes responsible for these relaxations could be composed of α3β4β2, α2β4 or α4β4 subunits. PMID:24827539

  17. [Evaluation of surgical treatment of anal fistula].

    PubMed

    Fall, B; Mbengue, M; Diouf, M L; Ndiaye, A; Diarra, O; Ba, M

    2001-01-01

    Second reason for consultations in proctology in our department after hemorroïds-linked illnesses, fistulas in ano constitute a chronic disease which causes therapeutic difficulties linked mainly to the futur functionning of the sphincter, especially in its most complex types. In our group of 43 patients in whom surgical exploration with stylet was the key of the diagnosis, the anorectoscopy and even less chirurgical examination were not often contributive, the fear of post-operative incontinence forced us to prefer ligation-section with rubber every time that the sphincter was involved. With our results, the majority of patients (41/43) healed in normal periods with a sufficient functionning of the anus. This result confirmed our attitude towards the sphincter: that is to save if possible.

  18. Interstitial curietherapy in the conservative treatment of anal and rectal cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Papillon, J.; Montbarbon, J.F.; Gerard, J.P.; Chassard, J.L.; Ardiet, J.M. )

    1989-12-01

    Conservative treatment has become a valid alternative to radical surgery in most cases of cancer of the anal canal and in selected cases of cancer of the low rectum. In this strategy interstitial curietherapy has an appreciable role to play. The results of a series of 369 patients followed more than 3 years indicate that implantation of Iridium-192 is effective not as sole treatment but as a booster dose 2 months after a course of external beam or intracavitary irradiation. The dose delivered did not exceed 20 to 30 Gy and the implantations were always performed in one plane using either a plastic template or a steel fork. Three groups of cases must be considered: (a) among 221 patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal, the rate of death related to treatment failures was 20% and among the patients cured more than 90% retained normal sphincter function. (b) In 90 patients with T1-T2 invasive adenocarcinoma of the rectum, Iridium-192 was carried out after four applications of contact X ray therapy. The rate of control was 84%. (c) In 62 elderly, poor risk patients with T2-T3 tumor of the low rectum initially suitable for an abdomino-perineal resection, a tentative extension of the field of conservation was made using a split-course protocol combining a short course of external beam irradiation at a dose of 30-35 Gy in 10 fractions over 12 days and an Iridium-192 implant. The rate of death due to treatment failures was 14.5% and among the patients controlled 97% had a normal anal function. These results show that implantations of Iridium-192 may contribute to the control of anal and rectal cancers and may spare many patients a permanent colostomy, but the treatment requires great care in patient selection, treatment protocol, technical details, and follow-up. This treatment policy must be conceived as a team work of radiation oncologists and surgeons.

  19. Normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangdong; Liu, Tieyan; Zhao, Jing; Sun, Jingyi; Chen, Yuefeng; Sun, Pengyu; Wang, Xuesong; Liu, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this research, the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males has been studied. Methods: The sagittal, coronal, and axial T2-weighted non-fat suppressed fast spin-echo images of pelvic cavities of 86 Chinese young males were studied. Result: Urethral sphincter complex threaded through the prostate and divided it into 2 parts: transition zone (TZ), periurethral glands internal to the urethral sphincter and peripheral zone (PZ), central zone (CZ), anterior fibromuscular stroma (AFS) zone external to the urethral sphincter. The length of urethral striated sphincter is 12.26-20.94 mm (mean 16.59 mm) at membranous urethra. Conclusions: In this paper, we summarized the normal anatomic relationship between urethral sphincter complex and zones of prostrate in young Chinese males with no urinary control problems. PMID:26629244

  20. Characteristics and frequency of transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter in patients with reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, R K; McCallum, R W

    1988-09-01

    Electromyogram of the submental muscles, esophageal manometry, and pH studies were simultaneously performed in an unselected group of 12 patients with subjective and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease to determine the frequency of transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and mechanisms of GER. Findings from these patients were compared with data from 10 asymptomatic healthy volunteers. Recordings were obtained for 1 h in the fasting state and 3 h after a standard 850-kcal meal. Transient relaxation of the LES was the only mechanism of acid reflux in normal subjects and accounted for 73.0% of the episodes of acid reflux in patients with GER disease. In both normal subjects and patients with GER, a large number of transient relaxations were associated at their onset with an attenuated submental EMG complex, a small pharyngeal contraction, and an esophageal contraction. The incidences of these associated events were similar in the two study populations. The frequency of transient relaxation of the LES in patients with GER was identical to that of controls. The frequency did not differ even in 9 patients with GER disease who had endoscopic esophagitis. Thirty-six percent of transient relaxations in the normal subjects were accompanied by pH evidence of reflux, but in the GER patients with endoscopic esophagitis 65% of the transient LES relaxations resulted in a reflux event. Acid reflux at the moment of deep inspiration was the second most common mechanism of GER in our patients. Four patients who demonstrated this mechanism had hiatal hernias and more severe esophagitis than the rest of the group. Our findings confirm that transient relaxation of the LES is the major mechanism of GER in patients with reflux esophagitis. However, the similar frequency of this relaxation in GER patients and in healthy asymptomatic subjects suggests that factors other than transient LES relaxation play an important role in the pathogenesis of

  1. The impact of androgen deprivation on artificial urinary sphincter outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, George C.; Linder, Brian J.; Rivera, Marcelino E.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Rangel, Laureano J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) causes systemic tissue atrophy. It is unclear if this tissue atrophy adversely impacts artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) outcomes. We sought to evaluate the effect of ADT on adverse AUS outcomes. Methods We retrospectively identified 518 men undergoing primary AUS placement at our institution between 1998 and 2014. Rates of device explant for infection/erosion, mechanical failure, and urethral atrophy in men with >6 months of ADT use within 2 years prior to AUS placement were compared to ADT naive men. Results Fifty of the patients (50/518, 9.7%) had >6 months of ADT use within 2 years prior to AUS placement while 442 were ADT naive. Multivariable survival analysis of AUS events by competing risks failed to show any effect of ADT on device explantation for infection/erosion (HR 1.12, P=0.68), replacement for mechanical failure (HR 0.92, P=0.77), or urethral atrophy (HR 0.77, P=0.46). Conclusions This study did not show evidence supporting differences in adverse AUS outcomes between men with ADT use and ADT naive men. PMID:27785433

  2. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  3. Increase of lower esophageal sphincter pressure after osteopathic intervention on the diaphragm in patients with gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    da Silva, R C V; de Sá, C C; Pascual-Vaca, Á O; de Souza Fontes, L H; Herbella Fernandes, F A M; Dib, R A; Blanco, C R; Queiroz, R A; Navarro-Rodriguez, T

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease may be clinical or surgical. The clinical consists basically of the use of drugs; however, there are new techniques to complement this treatment, osteopathic intervention in the diaphragmatic muscle is one these. The objective of the study is to compare pressure values in the examination of esophageal manometry of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) before and immediately after osteopathic intervention in the diaphragm muscle. Thirty-eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease - 16 submitted to sham technique and 22 submitted osteopathic technique - were randomly selected. The average respiratory pressure (ARP) and the maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) of the LES were measured by manometry before and after osteopathic technique at the point of highest pressure. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney, and magnitude of the technique proposed was measured using the Cohen's index. Statistically significant difference in the osteopathic technique was found in three out of four in relation to the group of patients who performed the sham technique for the following measures of LES pressure: ARP with P= 0.027. The MEP had no statistical difference (P= 0.146). The values of Cohen d for the same measures were: ARP with d= 0.80 and MEP d= 0.52. Osteopathic manipulative technique produces a positive increment in the LES region soon after its performance.

  4. Altered pharyngeal muscles in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Caviness, John N; Samanta, Johan E; Beach, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Dysphagia (impaired swallowing) is common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and is related to aspiration pneumonia, the primary cause of death in PD. Therapies that ameliorate the limb motor symptoms of PD are ineffective for dysphagia. This suggests that the pathophysiology of PD dysphagia may differ from that affecting limb muscles, but little is known about potential neuromuscular abnormalities in the swallowing muscles in PD. This study examined the fiber histochemistry of pharyngeal constrictor and cricopharyngeal sphincter muscles in postmortem specimens from 8 subjects with PD and 4 age-matched control subjects. Pharyngeal muscles in subjects with PD exhibited many atrophic fibers, fiber type grouping, and fast-to-slow myosin heavy chain transformation. These alterations indicate that the pharyngeal muscles experienced neural degeneration and regeneration over the course of PD. Notably, subjects with PD with dysphagia had a higher percentage of atrophic myofibers versus with those without dysphagia and controls. The fast-to-slow fiber-type transition is consistent with abnormalities in swallowing, slow movement of food, and increased tone in the cricopharyngeal sphincter in subjects with PD. The alterations in the pharyngeal muscles may play a pathogenic role in the development of dysphagia in subjects with PD.

  5. Phase relation changes between the firings of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and muscle spindle afferents in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions in brain-dead human and patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schalow, G

    2010-01-01

    1. Single-nerve fibre action potentials (APs) were recorded with 2 pairs of wire electrodes from lower sacral nerve roots during surgery in patients with spinal cord injury and in a brain-dead human. Conduction velocity distribution histograms were constructed for afferent and efferent fibres, nerve fibre groups were identified and simultaneous impulse patterns of alpha and gamma-motoneurons and secondary muscle spindle afferents (SP2) were constructed. Temporal relations between afferent and efferent APs were analyzed by interspike interval (II) and phase relation changes to explore the coordinated self-organization of somatic and parasympathetic neuronal networks in the sacral micturition centre during continence functions under physiologic (brain-dead) and pathophysiologic conditions (spinal cord injury). 2. In a paraplegic with hyperreflexia of the bladder, urinary bladder stretch (S1) and tension receptor afferents (ST) fired already when the bladder was empty, and showed a several times higher bladder afferent activity increase upon retrograde bladder filling than observed in the brain-dead individual. Two alpha2-motoneurons (FR) innervating the external bladder sphincter were already oscillatory firing to generate high activity levels when the bladder was empty. They showed activity levels with no bladder filling, comparable to those measured at a bladder filling of 600 ml in the brain-dead individual. A bladder storage volume of 600 ml was thus lost in the paraplegic, due to a too high bladder afferent input to the sacral micturition center, secondary to inflammation and hypertrophy of the detrusor. 3. In a brain-dead human, 2 phase relations existed per oscillation period of 160 ms between the APs of a sphincteric oscillatory firing alpha2-motoneuron, a dynamic fusimotor and a secondary muscle spindle afferent fibre. Following stimulation of mainly somatic afferent fibres, the phase relations changed only little. 4. In a paraplegic with dyssynergia of the

  6. Effects of sphincter of Oddi motility on the formation of cholesterol gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Zhong-Hou; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Wang, Xin-Xing; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe; Ma, Bang-Zhen; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Zhang, Zhen-Hai

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms and effects of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility on cholesterol gallbladder stone formation in guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups, the control group (n = 10) and the cholesterol gallstone group (n = 24), which was sequentially divided into four subgroups with six guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice. The guinea pigs in the cholesterol gallstone group were fed a cholesterol lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9, and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity were obtained by a multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Cholecystokinin-A receptor (CCKAR) expression levels in SO smooth muscle were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin, and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at each stage in the process of cholesterol gallstone formation. RESULTS: The gallstone formation rate was 0%, 0%, 16.7%, and 83.3% in the 3, 6, 9, and 12 wk groups, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity in the 9 wk group, the amplitude of myoelectric activity in the 9 and 12 wk groups, and the amplitude and the frequency of SO in the 9 wk group were all significantly decreased compared to the control group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased markedly in the 12 wk group, and the CCKAR expression levels increased in the 6 and 12 wk groups compared to the control group. Serum VIP was elevated significantly in the 9 and 12 wk groups and gastrin decreased significantly in the 3 and 9 wk groups. There was no difference in serum CCK-8 between the groups. CONCLUSION: A cholesterol gallstone-causing diet can induce SO dysfunction. The increasing tension of the SO along with its decreasing activity may play an important role in cholesterol gallstone formation. Expression changes of CCKAR in SO smooth muscle and serum

  7. Medication Effects on Periurethral Sensation and Urethral Sphincter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Greer, W. Jerod; Gleason, Jonathan L.; Kenton, Kimberly; Szychowski, Jeff M.; Goode, Patricia S; Richter, Holly E

    2014-01-01

    Aim To characterize urethral neuromuscular function before and 2 weeks after medication therapy. Methods Premenopausal women without lower urinary tract symptoms were randomly allocated to one of six medications for 2 weeks (pseudoephedrine ER 120mg, imipramine 25mg, cyclobenzaprine 10mg, tamsulosin 0.4mg, solifenacin 5mg or placebo). At baseline and after medication, participants underwent testing: quantitative concentric needle EMG (CNE) of the urethral sphincter using automated Multi-Motor Unit Action Potential (MUP) software; current perception threshold (CPT) testing to measure periurethral sensation; and standard urodynamic pressure flow studies (PFS). Nonparametric tests were used to compare pre-post differences. Results 56 women had baseline testing; 48 (85.7%) completed follow-up CNE, and 49 (87.5%) completed follow-up CPT and PFS testing. Demographics showed no significant differences among medication groups with respect to age (mean 34.3 ± 10.1), BMI (mean 31.8 ± 7.5), parity (median 1, range 0–7), or race (14% Caucasian, 80% African American). PFS parameters were not significantly different within medication groups. No significant pre-post changes in CNE values were noted; however, trends in amplitudes were in a direction consistent with the expected physiologic effect of the medications. With CPT testing, a trend toward increased urethral sensation at the 5 Hz stimulation level, was observed following treatment with pseudoephedrine (0.15 to 0.09 mA at 5Hz; P=0.03). Conclusion In women without LUTS, pseudoephedrine improved urethral sensation, but not urethral neuromuscular function on CNE or pressure flow studies. Imipramine, cyclobenzaprine, tamsulosin, solifenacin, and placebo did not change urethral sensation or neuromuscular function. PMID:25185603

  8. Artificial urinary sphincters for male stress urinary incontinence: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Cordon, Billy H; Singla, Nirmish; Singla, Ajay K

    2016-01-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS), which has evolved over many years, has become a safe and reliable treatment for stress urinary incontinence and is currently the gold standard. After 4 decades of existence, there is substantial experience with the AUS. Today AUS is most commonly placed for postprostatectomy stress urinary incontinence. Only a small proportion of urologists routinely place AUS. In a survey in 2005, only 4% of urologists were considered high-volume AUS implanters, performing >20 per year. Globally, ~11,500 AUSs are placed annually. Over 400 articles have been published regarding the outcomes of AUS, with a wide variance in success rates ranging from 61% to 100%. Generally speaking, the AUS has good long-term outcomes, with social continence rates of ~79% and high patient satisfaction usually between 80% and 90%. Despite good outcomes, a substantial proportion of patients, generally ~25%, will require revision surgery, with the rate of revision increasing with time. Complications requiring revision include infection, urethral atrophy, erosion, and mechanical failure. Most infections are gram-positive skin flora. Urethral atrophy and erosion lie on a spectrum resulting from the same problem, constant urethral compression. However, these two complications are managed differently. Mechanical failure is usually a late complication occurring on average later than infection, atrophy, or erosions. Various techniques may be used during revisions, including cuff relocation, downsizing, transcorporal cuff placement, or tandem cuff placement. Patient satisfaction does not appear to be affected by the need for revision as long as continence is restored. Additionally, AUS following prior sling surgery has comparable outcomes to primary AUS placement. Several new inventions are on the horizon, although none have been approved for use in the US at this point. PMID:27445509

  9. Artificial urinary sphincters for male stress urinary incontinence: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cordon, Billy H; Singla, Nirmish; Singla, Ajay K

    2016-01-01

    The artificial urinary sphincter (AUS), which has evolved over many years, has become a safe and reliable treatment for stress urinary incontinence and is currently the gold standard. After 4 decades of existence, there is substantial experience with the AUS. Today AUS is most commonly placed for postprostatectomy stress urinary incontinence. Only a small proportion of urologists routinely place AUS. In a survey in 2005, only 4% of urologists were considered high-volume AUS implanters, performing >20 per year. Globally, ~11,500 AUSs are placed annually. Over 400 articles have been published regarding the outcomes of AUS, with a wide variance in success rates ranging from 61% to 100%. Generally speaking, the AUS has good long-term outcomes, with social continence rates of ~79% and high patient satisfaction usually between 80% and 90%. Despite good outcomes, a substantial proportion of patients, generally ~25%, will require revision surgery, with the rate of revision increasing with time. Complications requiring revision include infection, urethral atrophy, erosion, and mechanical failure. Most infections are gram-positive skin flora. Urethral atrophy and erosion lie on a spectrum resulting from the same problem, constant urethral compression. However, these two complications are managed differently. Mechanical failure is usually a late complication occurring on average later than infection, atrophy, or erosions. Various techniques may be used during revisions, including cuff relocation, downsizing, transcorporal cuff placement, or tandem cuff placement. Patient satisfaction does not appear to be affected by the need for revision as long as continence is restored. Additionally, AUS following prior sling surgery has comparable outcomes to primary AUS placement. Several new inventions are on the horizon, although none have been approved for use in the US at this point. PMID:27445509

  10. [Anal fissure--a new therapy concept].

    PubMed

    Hetzer, F H; Baumann, M; Röthlin, M

    2000-08-24

    The anal fissure is one of the most frequent causes for anal pain. Conservative treatment usually consists of laxatives, local anesthetics and nitroglycerin cream. These therapies have a high recurrency rate. Surgical interventions, i.e. manual dilatation and sphincterotomy are fraught with the danger of fecal incontinence. The completely reversible effect of botulinum toxin injection opens new possibilities in the treatment of anal fissures. Its use is discussed as part of a 3-stage therapeutic regimen.

  11. Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) approach for large juxta-anal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Nicolas; Wörns, Marcus-Alexander; dos Santos, Daniel Pinto; Lang, Hauke; Huber, Tobias; Kneist, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rarely found in the rectum. Large rectal GISTs in the narrow pelvis sometimes require extended abdominal surgery to obtain free resection margins, and it is a challenge to preserve sufficient anal sphincter and urogenital function. Here we present a 56-year-old male with a locally advanced juxta-anal non-metastatic GIST of approximately 10 cm in diameter. Therapy with imatinib reduced the tumour size and allowed partial intersphincteric resection (pISR). The patient underwent an electrophysiology-controlled nerve-sparing hybrid of laparoscopic and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) in a multimodal setting. The down-to-up approach provided sufficient dissection plane visualisation and allowed the confirmed nerve-sparing. Lateroterminal coloanal anastomosis was performed. Follow-up showed preserved urogenital function and good anorectal function, and the patient remains disease-free under adjuvant chemotherapy as of 12 months after surgery. This report suggests that the TAMIS approach enables extraluminal high-quality oncological and function-preserving excision of high-risk GISTs. PMID:27279406

  12. Cisplatin and Fluorouracil Compared With Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Inoperable Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Anal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Anal Basaloid Carcinoma; Anal Canal Cloacogenic Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Anal Canal Carcinoma; Recurrent Anal Canal Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Anal Canal Cancer; Stage IV Anal Canal Cancer

  13. Smooth muscle in the wall of the developing human urinary bladder and urethra.

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, S A; Gosling, J A

    1983-01-01

    A series of human fetal and neonatal specimens ranging in age from the second month of intrauterine development to 4 1/2 years after birth has been examined using histological and histochemical techniques. In both sexes histologically differentiated smooth muscle cells were evident in the bladder wall from the 52 mm crown-rump length stage onwards--urethral smooth muscle was not distinguishable until 119 mm crown-rump length. In addition to relatively late differentiation, urethral smooth muscle was histochemically distinct from the urinary bladder detrusor muscle. Sex differences in the arrangement and innervation of smooth muscle in the proximal urethra have also been observed, and these findings lend support to the presence of a pre-prostatic urethra sphincter. It seems likely that this sphincter acts principally to prevent reflux of ejaculate into the bladder during seminal emission. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6654742

  14. Intersphincteric anal lipofilling with micro-fragmented fat tissue for the treatment of faecal incontinence: preliminary results of three patients

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Michele; Massa, Salvatore; Amato, Bruno; Gentile, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Faecal incontinence is a very debilitating problem. Many techniques have been proposed to treat this condition, with controversial results. Autologous transplant of fat tissue is an established procedure used for the repair of tissue damage, and recent studies revealed the potentiality of tissue regeneration by human adipose-derived stem cells. We treated this condition with the injection, in the intersphincteric anal groove, of lipoaspirate processed by an innovative technology (Lipogems). The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of Lipogems injection for the treatment of faecal incontinence. In February 2014 we treated 3 patients with faecal incontinence. The surgical procedure required three phases: lipoaspiration, processing of lipoaspirate with the Lipogems system, and injection of the obtained product in the intersphincteric anal groove. An accurate proctological examination followed at 1 week, 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Each patient reported an improved Wexner incontinence score at 1 month after the procedure. We observed an increase of resting pressure (by at least 10 mm Hg) and thickness of the internal anal sphincter respectively at ano-rectal manometry and by ultrasound (US) evaluation at the sixth month of follow-up. Our preliminary results are encouraging, but multicentric studies with longer follow-up are needed to validate this novel technique for treatment of faecal incontinence. PMID:26240640

  15. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  16. Sphincter of Oddi Manometry: Reproducibility of Measurements and Effect of Sphincterotomy in the EPISOD Study

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Alejandro L; Pauls, Qi; Durkalski-Mauldin, Valerie; Cotton, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The reproducibility of sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) measurements and results of SOM after sphincterotomy has not been studied sufficiently. The aim of our study is to evaluate the reproducibility of SOM and completeness of sphincter ablation. Methods The recently published Evaluating Predictors and Interventions in sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (EPISOD) study included 214 subjects with post-cholecystectomy pain, and fit the criteria of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction type III. They were randomized into 3 arms, irrespective of manometric findings: sham (no sphincterotomy), biliary sphincterotomy, and dual (biliary and pancreatic). Thirty-eight subjects had both biliary and pancreatic manometries performed twice, at baseline and at repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography after 1–11 months. Sham arm was examined to assess the reproducibility of manometry, and the treatment arms to assess whether the sphincterotomies were complete (elevated pressures were normalized). Results Biliary and pancreatic measurements were reproduced in 7/14 (50%) untreated subjects. All 12 patients with initially elevated biliary pressures in biliary and dual sphincterotomy groups normalized after biliary sphincterotomy. However, 2 of 8 subjects with elevated pancreatic pressures in the dual sphincterotomy group remained abnormal after pancreatic sphincterotomy. Paradoxically, normal biliary pressures became abnormal in 1 of 15 subjects after biliary sphincterotomy, and normal pancreatic pressures became abnormal in 5 of 15 patients after biliary sphincterotomy, and in 1 of 9 after pancreatic sphincterotomy. Conclusions Our data suggest that SOM measurements are poorly reproducible, and question whether we could adequately perform pancreatic sphincterotomy. PMID:26951046

  17. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  18. Prophylactic HPV vaccination and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Stier, Elizabeth A; Chigurupati, Nagasudha L; Fung, Leslie

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. High risk populations include HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV-negative MSM, HIV-positive women and heterosexual men and women with a history of cervical cancer. HPV has been detected in over 90% of anal cancers. HPV16 is the most common genotype detected in about 70% of anal cancers. The quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccine has been demonstrated to prevent vaccine associated persistent anal HPV infections as well as anal intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (AIN2+) in young MSM not previously infected. A retrospective analysis also suggests that qHPV vaccination of older MSM treated for AIN2+ may significantly decrease the risk of recurrence of the AIN2+. The HPV types detected in anal cancer are included in the 9-valent vaccine. Thus, the 9-valent HPV vaccine, when administered to boys and girls prior to the onset of sexual activity, should effectively prevent anal cancer. PMID:26933898

  19. Orthognathic Consequences of Sphincter Pharyngoplasty in Cleft Patients: A 2-Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikane, Frances; Lai, Li Han; Hui, Brian K.; Martins, Deborah B.; Farias-Eisner, Gina; Mandelbaum, Rachel S.; Hoang, Han; Bradley, James P.; Wilson, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding long-term sequelae of cleft treatment is paramount in the refinement of treatment algorithms to accomplish optimized immediate and long-term outcomes. In this study, we reviewed sphincter pharyngoplasties as a method of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) treatment in relationship to orthognathic surgery. Methods: Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients, 15 years of age and older, were reviewed for demographics, VPI surgery, revisions, and subsequent orthognathic surgery at 2 institutions. Chi-square test, Student’s t test, and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: In 214 patients reviewed (mean age, 19.5 years), 61.7% were male, 18.2% had isolated cleft palate, 61.2% had unilateral cleft lip and palate, and 20.6% had bilateral cleft lip and palate. A total of 33.6% were diagnosed with VPI and received a sphincter pharyngoplasty (mean age, 11.9 years). When subsequent orthognathic surgery was examined, sphincter pharyngoplasty was not associated with maxillary advancement (P = 0.59) but did correlate with an increase in mandibular surgery from 2.8% to 11.1% (P = 0.02). The indications for mandibular surgery in the pharyngoplasty population were related to congenital micrognathia. When cephalometric analyses were evaluated, sphincter pharyngoplasty resulted in a decreased sella-to-nasion-to-B point angle (mean, 79.0–76.3 degrees, P = 0.02) and a higher incidence of normal to class II maxillomandibular relationships as defined by A point-to-nasion-to-B point angles >0.5 (P = 0.02). Conclusions: Sphincter pharyngoplasty decreases anterior mandibular growth and the discrepancy between maxillomandibular skeletal relationships because of the frequent predisposition of cleft patients to maxillary hypoplasia. In patients with congenital mandibular micrognathia, a small increase in mandibular surgeries may occur. PMID:27200238

  20. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure and increases frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Akash; Meshram, Megha; Gopan, Amrit; Ganjewar, Vaibhav; Kumar, Praveen; Bhatia, Shobna J

    2012-06-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (tLESR) and decreased basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure are postulated mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). There is conflicting evidence on the effect of carbonated drinks on lower esophageal sphincter function. This study was conducted to assess the effect of a carbonated beverage on tLESR and LES pressure. High resolution manometry tracings (16 channel water-perfused, Trace 1.2, Hebbard, Australia) were obtained in 18 healthy volunteers (6 men) for 30 min each at baseline, and after 200 mL of chilled potable water and 200 mL of chilled carbonated cola drink (Pepsi [Pepsico India Ltd]). The sequence of administration of the drinks was determined by random number method generated by a computer. The analysis of tracings was done using TRACE 1.2 software by a physician who was unaware of the sequence of administration of fluids. The mean (SD) age of the participant was 37.3 (12.9) years. The median (range) frequency of tLESr was higher after the carbonated beverage (10.5 [0-26]) as compared to baseline (0 [0-3], p = 0.005) as well as after water (1 [0-14], p = 0.010). The LES pressure decreased after ingestion of the carbonated beverage (18.5 [11-37] mmHg) compared to baseline (40.5 [25-66] mmHg, p = 0.0001) and after water (34 [15-67] mmHg, p = 0.003). Gastric pressure was not different in the three groups. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage increases tLESr and lowers LES pressure in healthy subjects.

  1. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure and increases frequency of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Akash; Meshram, Megha; Gopan, Amrit; Ganjewar, Vaibhav; Kumar, Praveen; Bhatia, Shobna J

    2012-06-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (tLESR) and decreased basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure are postulated mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux (GER). There is conflicting evidence on the effect of carbonated drinks on lower esophageal sphincter function. This study was conducted to assess the effect of a carbonated beverage on tLESR and LES pressure. High resolution manometry tracings (16 channel water-perfused, Trace 1.2, Hebbard, Australia) were obtained in 18 healthy volunteers (6 men) for 30 min each at baseline, and after 200 mL of chilled potable water and 200 mL of chilled carbonated cola drink (Pepsi [Pepsico India Ltd]). The sequence of administration of the drinks was determined by random number method generated by a computer. The analysis of tracings was done using TRACE 1.2 software by a physician who was unaware of the sequence of administration of fluids. The mean (SD) age of the participant was 37.3 (12.9) years. The median (range) frequency of tLESr was higher after the carbonated beverage (10.5 [0-26]) as compared to baseline (0 [0-3], p = 0.005) as well as after water (1 [0-14], p = 0.010). The LES pressure decreased after ingestion of the carbonated beverage (18.5 [11-37] mmHg) compared to baseline (40.5 [25-66] mmHg, p = 0.0001) and after water (34 [15-67] mmHg, p = 0.003). Gastric pressure was not different in the three groups. Ingestion of a carbonated beverage increases tLESr and lowers LES pressure in healthy subjects. PMID:22791463

  2. Dynamic and ultrastructural study of sphincter of Oddi in early-stage cholelithiasis in rabbits with hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Guo; Wang, Yao-Cheng; Du, Fan; Yu, Hou-Jun

    2000-02-01

    AIM:To study the relationship between pre-formation of gallstone and the kinetics and ultra-structure of sphincter of Oddi.METHODS:Adult female rabbits were used and divided into 3 groups,and fed with either normal or high cholesterol diet for four or eight weeks.Each group contained eight rabbits. The manometry of sphincter of Oddi, biliary cineradiography, gallbladder volume measurement and ultrastructure observation under electron microscope were performed.RESULTS:In groups I and II,the basal pressure in low-pressure ampulla or high pressure zone of sphincter of Oddi was elevated,the amplitude of phasic contraction was decreased and the volume of gallbladder were increased, with a significant difference (P < 0.01) from those of control. Gallstones were found in group II rabbits (7/8). Under cineradiography, low-pressure ampulla showed a spasmodic status without apparent peristaltic contraction. Under electron microscope, inside the muscular cells of sphincter of Oddi, loosening of micro filament and swelling of plasmosomes which congregated at the top were observed. The amount showed no obvious change under nitric oxide synthase (NOS) stain.CONCLUSION:Twisting of the microfilament and disarrangement of kink macula densa inside the muscular cells suggested that the sphincter of Oddi was under spasmodic status. The impaired diastolic function caused and aggravated the stasis of cystic bile. The swelling plasmosome could be one of the important factors in elevating the tonic pressure of sphincter of Oddi.

  3. [Treatment of anorectal diseases].

    PubMed

    Herold, A

    2007-02-14

    HAEMORRHOIDAL DISEASE: Stage orientated treatment of haemorrhoidal disease using conservative and operative measures provides high healing rates with low complication- and recurrence rates. ANAL FISSURE: Muscle relaxing ointments (Nitrates, Ca-channel-blocker) are the treatment of choice for chronic anal fissure. In cases of insufficiency fissurectomy provides high healing rates. ABSCESS AND ANAL FISTULA: Anal fistulae are treated with respect of their involvement of the anal sphincters. Distal fistulae are completely excised reaching high healing rates, proximal fistulae are treated using local flap procedures with healing rates reaching 50 to 80%. ANAL INCONTINENCE: Treatment of anal incontinence is depending on the severity and on the etiology of the disease. The following procedures are used: conservative: improving consistency, physical exercises, electrostimulation Biofeedback-Training surgical: Sphincterreconstruction, Pre-anal Repair, Post-anal Repair, Total Pelvic Floor Repair, Dynamic Graciloplasty, Artificial Anal Sphincter, Sacralnervestimulation, Stoma

  4. [The treatment of acute reflex urinary retention after operations in the area of the rectal sphincter].

    PubMed

    Iaitskiĭ, N A; Aĭvazian, I A; Al-Shukhri, S Kh; Gorbachev, A G

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of a new peptide medicine-Prostatilen was studied when using it in acute postoperative retention of urine. Under observation there were 87 patients of 23-78 years of age after hemorrhoidectomy, plasty of the rectal sphincter or dissection of its fissure etc. The patients endured the treatment with Prostatilen well. Self-dependent urination was recovered during the nearest 40 min after injection of 5 mg of the medicine. In the treatment of 23 patients it was used prophylactically before the appearance of a micturate urge. In 14 of them the postoperative period was smooth, in 9 patients the self-dependent urination was recovered following one additional injection. Clinical observations confirm that Proctatilen has a regulating effect upon the bladder tone which allows it to be recommended as a medicine for prevention of acute reflex retention of urine after operations in the area of the rectal sphincter.

  5. Effects of octreotide on lower esophageal sphincter in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Barrioz, T; Borderie, C; Strock, P; Ingrand, P; Fort, E; Silvain, C; Beauchant, M

    1998-07-01

    We investigated the effects of octreotide infusion on the contractile activity of the esophageal body and lower esophageal sphincter in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices. Esophageal manometry was performed in 36 alcoholic cirrhotic patients. They were randomly allocated to three groups and received the following treatments blindly for 90 min: an initial 100-microg intravenous bolus followed by a continuous 25 microg/hr octreotide infusion (group I, N= 13), a continuous 25 micro/hr octreotide infusion without an initial bolus (group II, N=13), and a continuous placebo infusion (group III, N=10). Before drug infusion, mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure and mean esophageal body contraction pressure and duration were similar in the three groups. Compared to the placebo group, lower esophageal sphincter pressure increased significantly in groups I and II, 30 min (30%, 22%, 3% respectively; P= 0.006), 60 min (44%, 35%, 0.6%; P=0.0002), and 90 min (67%, 41%, 2.5%; P=0.0001) after octreotide infusion, as did esophageal body contraction pressure and duration. We conclude that octreotide has a potent effect on LES tone in cirrhotic patients.

  6. The artificial urinary sphincter and male sling for postprostatectomy incontinence: Which patient should get which procedure?

    PubMed Central

    Dobberfuhl, Amy D.

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is the most efficacious treatment for postprostatectomy incontinence. The ideal surgical approach depends on a variety of patient factors including history of prior incontinence surgery or radiation treatment, bladder contractility, severity of leakage, and patient expectations. Most patients choose to avoid a mechanical device, opting for the male sling over the artificial urinary sphincter. The modern male sling has continued to evolve with respect to device design and surgical technique. Various types of slings address sphincteric incompetence via different mechanisms of action. The recommended surgery, however, must be individualized to the patient based on degree of incontinence, detrusor contractility, and urethral compliance. A thorough urodynamic evaluation is indicated for the majority of patients, and the recommendation for an artificial urinary sphincter, a transobturator sling, or a quadratic sling will depend on urodynamic findings and the patient's particular preference. As advancements in this field evolve, and our understanding of the pathophysiology of incontinence and mechanisms of various devices improves, we expect to see continued evolution in device design. PMID:26966721

  7. Comparative Relaxant Effects of Ataciguat and Zaprinast on Sheep Sphincter of Oddi

    PubMed Central

    Çakmak, Erol; Yönem, Özlem; Saraç, Bülent; Parlak, Mesut; Çelik, Cumali; Ataseven, Hilmi; Bağcivan, İhsan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Relaxing the sphincter of Oddi (SO) is an important process during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. This issue suggests that the easier the sphincterotomy and cannulation, the more post-ERCP complications decrease. Aims: To compare the relaxant effects of ataciguat (a novel soluble guanylyl cyclase activator) and zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 5) on sheep SO in vitro, thus testing whether they can be used during ERCP. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Sheep SO rings were placed in tissue baths and their isometric tension to ataciguat and zaprinast were tested. We also tested their isometric tension against ataciguat in the presence of 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazole (4,3-a) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) which is a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Results: Ataciguat and zaprinast both triggered concentration addicted relaxation on sheep SO rings (p=0.0018, p=0.0025 respectively) but the relaxation of the ataciguat was significantly greater than that of zaprinast at all concentrations (p=0.0024). It was observed that decreased relaxation responses were initiated by ataciguat in the presence of ODQ (p=0.0012). Conclusion: Ataciguat and zaprinast both have relaxing effects on sphincter of Oddi, although that of zaprinast is lower. We believe that ataciguat and zaprinast can be used in ERCP procedures in order to relax the sphincter of Oddi and thus can be used locally in order to decrease complications.

  8. Comparative Relaxant Effects of Ataciguat and Zaprinast on Sheep Sphincter of Oddi

    PubMed Central

    Çakmak, Erol; Yönem, Özlem; Saraç, Bülent; Parlak, Mesut; Çelik, Cumali; Ataseven, Hilmi; Bağcivan, İhsan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Relaxing the sphincter of Oddi (SO) is an important process during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. This issue suggests that the easier the sphincterotomy and cannulation, the more post-ERCP complications decrease. Aims: To compare the relaxant effects of ataciguat (a novel soluble guanylyl cyclase activator) and zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 5) on sheep SO in vitro, thus testing whether they can be used during ERCP. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Sheep SO rings were placed in tissue baths and their isometric tension to ataciguat and zaprinast were tested. We also tested their isometric tension against ataciguat in the presence of 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazole (4,3-a) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) which is a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. Results: Ataciguat and zaprinast both triggered concentration addicted relaxation on sheep SO rings (p=0.0018, p=0.0025 respectively) but the relaxation of the ataciguat was significantly greater than that of zaprinast at all concentrations (p=0.0024). It was observed that decreased relaxation responses were initiated by ataciguat in the presence of ODQ (p=0.0012). Conclusion: Ataciguat and zaprinast both have relaxing effects on sphincter of Oddi, although that of zaprinast is lower. We believe that ataciguat and zaprinast can be used in ERCP procedures in order to relax the sphincter of Oddi and thus can be used locally in order to decrease complications. PMID:27606143

  9. [Factors influencing physiologic pressure variations of the lower esophageal sphincter in healthy probands].

    PubMed

    Bilic, A; Vuckovic, B; Pilas, V; Bakula, B; Hrgovic, Z; Kesselman-Evans, Z; Radosevic, J

    1990-01-01

    Manometric characteristics of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) in 59 healthy persons have been investigated. The aim of the investigation was to find out possible physiological changes of LES pressures considering posture, part of the day, maximal inspiration and expiration, empty or partially full stomach and abdominal compression. It has been proved that the minimal value of lower esophageal sphincter pressure in all the investigated patients was 1.77 kPA (13.3 mm Hg) while the maximal one was 4.53 kPa (34.0 mm Hg). The absolute difference between the lowest and the highest measured lower esophageal sphincter pressure was 1.43 kPa (10.77 mm Hg). The mean value of all pressures was 2.99 kPa (22.4 mm Hg). It seems that the posture during pressure measuring is irrelevant. The pressure does not vary more significantly considering neither the time of the day nor any exertion of the examinee. PMID:2353565

  10. Treatment of fecal incontinence - review of observational studies (OS) and randomized controlled trials (RCT) related to injection of bulking agent into peri-anal tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Novel treatments are needed to augment medical therapy for fecal incontinence. Methods Medline and Google search (fecal incontinence and injection treatment), English publications. Results Twenty-two observational studies and 4 randomized controlled trials were identified. OS mostly with limited sample sizes reported promising results. Repeated injection was necessary in some patients. Effect on anal sphincter pressures was highly variable. Significant improvements in the length of anal high-pressure zone, asymmetry index and maximum tolerable rectal volume were suggested. Four randomized controlled trials (n=176) revealed: 1. Short-term benefits from injection of Bioplastique under ultrasound guidance compared with digital guidance; 2. Silicone biomaterial (PTQ) provided some advantages and was safer than carbon-coated beads (Durasphere); 3. PTQ did not demonstrate clinical benefit compared to control injection of saline; 4. There was significant improvement at 6 weeks post injection, but no difference between Bulkamid and Permacol. A 2010 Cochrane review, however, noted that these data were inconclusive due to limited number and methodological weaknesses. Conclusion Further studies are warranted to assess patient-centered outcomes (e.g. adequate relief) in addition to the attenuation of severity of incontinence symptoms in ambulatory patients. In nursing home residents, cost-effectiveness studies combining injection treatment and prompted voiding (to mitigate constraints of immobility and dementia) in preventing peri-anal skin complications deserves to be considered. PMID:22586538

  11. Proctology - diseases of the anal region.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Proctology is a medical subspecialty that encompasses diseases of the perianal region, anal canal, and rectum. Dermatologists play a pivotal role in this realm, as inflammatory perianal disorders, infectious and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as perianal tumors and their precursor lesions fall within the core competency of dermatology. In a concise manner, the present article highlights all relevant disease groups in the field of proctology. With a particular focus on aspects pertinent to dermatologists, this includes inflammatory disorders, "classic" proctologic diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, malignancies of the anal region, as well as pathogen-induced diseases. Despite the wide variety of disorders, there are only five key symptoms prompting patients to consult a proctologist, including anal pruritus and burning, discharge, bleeding, pain, and foreign body sensation. A simple algorithm, which incorporates these symptoms as well as key clinical features, may assist in quickly establishing the correct diagnosis in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27027745

  12. HPV infection, anal intra-epithelial neoplasia (AIN) and anal cancer: current issues

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is well known as the major etiological agent for ano-genital cancer. In contrast to cervical cancer, anal cancer is uncommon, but is increasing steadily in the community over the last few decades. However, it has undergone an exponential rise in the men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV + groups. HIV + MSM in particular, have anal cancer incidences about three times that of the highest worldwide reported cervical cancer incidences. Discussion There has therefore traditionally been a lack of data from studies focused on heterosexual men and non-HIV + women. There is also less evidence reporting on the putative precursor lesion to anal cancer (AIN – anal intraepithelial neoplasia), when compared to cervical cancer and CIN (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia). This review summarises the available biological and epidemiological evidence for HPV in the anal site and the pathogenesis of AIN and anal cancer amongst traditionally non-high risk groups. Summary There is strong evidence to conclude that high-grade AIN is a precursor to anal cancer, and some data on the progression of AIN to invasive cancer. PMID:22958276

  13. Artificial muscle: the human chimera is the future.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, P

    2011-12-14

    Severe heart failure and cerebral stroke are broadly associated with the impairment of muscular function that conventional treatments struggle to restore. New technologies enable the construction of "smart" materials that could be of great help in treating diseases where the main problem is muscle weakness. These materials "behave" similarly to biological systems, because the material directly converts energy, for example electrical energy into movement. The extension and contraction occur silently like in natural muscles. The real challenge is to transfer this amazing technology into devices that restore or replace the mechanical function of failing muscle. Cardiac assist devices based on artificial muscle technology could envelope a weak heart and temporarily improve its systolic function, or, if placed on top of the atrium, restore the atrial kick in chronic atrial fibrillation. Artificial sphincters could be used to treat urinary incontinence after prostatectomy or faecal incontinence associated with stomas. Artificial muscles can restore the ability of patients with facial paralysis due to stroke or nerve injury to blink. Smart materials could be used to construct an artificial oesophagus including peristaltic movement and lower oesophageal sphincter function to replace the diseased oesophagus thereby avoiding the need for laparotomy to mobilise stomach or intestine. In conclusion, in the near future, smart devices will integrate with the human body to fill functional gaps due to organ failure, and so create a human chimera.

  14. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  15. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  16. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  17. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  18. Extracellular matrix composition of the cricopharyngeus muscle.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Raquel Aguiar; Sennes, Luiz Ubirajara; Mauad, Thais; Imamura, Rui; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Carrau, Ricardo Luis

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the presence and distribution of total collagen, type I and type III collagen, elastic fibers, fibronectin, and versican in the endomysium of cricopharyngeus muscles from adults of various ages. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of human cricopharyngeus muscles. Twenty-seven muscles obtained from autopsies of men and women ranging in age from 28 to 92 years were analyzed with the Picrosirius method, oxidized Weigert resorcin-fuchsin, immunohistochemistry, and image analysis. Collagen had the highest density among the analyzed components. Elastic fibers surrounded each muscle cell; they were aligned longitudinally by their long axis and associated with traversing fibers, thereby forming a fiber network with embedded muscle cells. The fibronectin and versican contents varied widely among the specimens. We found no statistically significant differences between the proportion of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and factors such as gender and race. We conclude that the higher proportion of type I and type III collagen is compatible with the cricopharyngeus muscle's sphincteric behavior, and the arrangement of the elastic fibers may also contribute to the muscle's elasticity. We found no statistically significant correlation between the ECM components and age. PMID:21874509

  19. What's New in Anal Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for anal cancer What’s new in anal cancer research and treatment? Important research ... cancer cells is expected to help scientists develop new drugs to fight this disease. Early detection Ongoing ...

  20. Teaching Men's Anal Pleasure: Challenging Gender Norms with "Prostage" Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branfman, Jonathan; Ekberg Stiritz, Susan

    2012-01-01

    To help students critique sex/gender norms, sexuality educators should address men's anal pleasure. Men's anal receptivity blurs accepted binaries like male/female, masculine/feminine, and straight/queer. By suppressing men's receptivity, the taboo against men's anal pleasure helps legitimize hegemonic sex/gender beliefs--and the sexism,…

  1. Midwestern Rural Adolescents' Anal Intercourse Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dake, Joseph A.; Price, James H.; McKinney, Molly; Ward, Britney

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of anal intercourse and its associated risk behaviors in a sample of Midwestern, predominantly white rural adolescents. Most of the research on this activity has been local or regional studies, with urban East and West Coast racial and ethnic minority adolescents. Methods: A…

  2. Physiological and Functional Evaluation of the Transposed Human Pylorus as a Distal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Gupta, Vishal; Jauhari, Ramendra; Srivastava, Rajendra N; Misra, Asha; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Studies evaluating the human pylorus as a sphincter are scanty and contradictory. Recently, we have shown technical feasibility of transposing the human pylorus for end-stage fecal incontinence. This unique cohort of patients provided us an opportunity to study the sphincter properties of the pylorus in its ectopic position. Methods Antro-pylorus transposition on end sigmoid colostomies (n = 3) and in the perineum (n = 15) was performed for various indications. Antro-pylorus was assessed functionally (digital examination, high resolution spatiotemporal manometry, barium retention studies and colonoscopy) and by imaging (doppler ultrasound, MRI and CT angiography) in its ectopic position. Results The median resting pressure of pylorus on colostomy was 30 mmHg (range 28-38). In benign group, median resting pressure in perineum was 12.5 mmHg (range 6-44) that increased to 21.5 mmHg (range 12-29) (P = 0.481) and 31 mmHg (range 16-77) (P = 0.034) on first and second follow-up, respectively. In malignant group, median post-operative pressures were 20 mmHg (range 14-36) and 21 mmHg (range 18-44) on first and second follow-up, respectively. A definite tone and gripping sensation were felt in all the patients on digital examination. On distal loopogram, performed through the diverting colostomies, barium was retained proximal to the neo-pyloric valve. Both perineal ultrasound and MRI showed viable transposed graft. CT angiography and color doppler studies confirmed vascular flow in the transposed position. Conclusions The human pyloric valve can function as a tonic sphincter when removed from the gastroduodenal continuity. PMID:22837874

  3. Ceratocricoid muscle: an embryological and anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Maranillo, Eva; Vázquez, Teresa; Mirapeix, Rosa; León, Xavier; McHanwell, Stephen; Quer, Miquel; Sañudo, José Ramón

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed to document the prevalence and morphology of the ceratocricoid muscle in a large sample of fetuses and adults and to explain its possible origin in a sample of embryos. Forty-five embryos, thirty-four fetuses, and ninety human larynges from adults with no known laryngeal pathology were studied. The muscle was observed in 23% of the fetal sample and in 14% of the adult sample. No significant differences were observed in the laterality in any of the groups. The ceratocricoid muscle is attached between the cricoid lamina and the inferior horn of the thyroid cartilage and also into the capsule of the cricothyroid joint. The muscle is innervated by several branches (between one and three) from the anterior division of the recurrent laryngeal nerve as it courses behind the cricothyroid joint. The ceratocricoid muscle develops from tissue within the mesenchymal bridge which connects the external and internal laryngeal sphincters or rings from embryonic stages 15-20. The close relationship of the ceratocricoid muscle to the recurrent laryngeal nerve could mean that it can exert pressure on this nerve. This may be a possible explanation for the causation of certain idiopathic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies.

  4. [Electric activity of striated muscles of the cervical part of the rabbit esophagus under conditions of hunger, food intake and satiation].

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A

    1990-07-01

    The experiments of free-moving rabbits have shown that the muscles of the proximal zone in the esophageal cervical part functions as the superior esophageal sphincter. In hunger stage the motor unit activity of the sphincter has regular low-amplitude discharge with monomodal distribution of interspike intervals. The process of food satisfaction leads to the appearance of burst-like unit activity with bimodal distribution of interspike intervals. During the food intake reorganization of the motor unit activity of the esophageal cervical part is manifested in characteristic patterns of interspike interval distribution.

  5. Dysregulation of Autophagy Contributes to Anal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carchman, Evie H.; Matkowskyj, Kristina A.; Meske, Louise; Lambert, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process that removes and recycles unnecessary/dysfunctional cellular components, contributing to cellular health and survival. Autophagy is a highly regulated cellular process that responds to several intracellular signals, many of which are deregulated by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection through the expression of HPV-encoded oncoproteins. This adaptive inhibitory response helps prevent viral clearance. A strong correlation remains between HPV infection and the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anus, particularly in HIV positive and other immunosuppressed patients. We hypothesize that autophagy is inhibited by HPV–encoded oncoproteins thereby promoting anal carcinogenesis (Fig 1). Materials and Methods HPV16 transgenic mice (K14E6/E7) and non-transgenic mice (FVB/N), both of which do not spontaneously develop anal tumors, were treated topically with the chemical carcinogen, 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), to induce anal cancer. The anuses at different time points of treatment (5, 10, 15 and 20 weeks) were analyzed using immunofluorescence (IF) for two key autophagy marker proteins (LC3β and p62) in addition to histological grading. The anuses from the K14E6/E7 mice were also analyzed for visual evidence of autophagic activity by electron microscopy (EM). To see if there was a correlation to humans, archival anal specimens were assessed histologically for grade of dysplasia and then analyzed for LC3β and p62 protein content. To more directly examine the effect of autophagic inhibition on anal carcinogenesis, nontransgenic mice that do not develop anal cancer with DMBA treatment were treated with a known pharmacologic inhibitor of autophagy, chloroquine, and examined for tumor development and analyzed by IF for autophagic proteins. Results Histologically, we observed the progression of normal anoderm to invasive SCC with DMBA treatment in K14E6/E7 mice but not in nontransgenic

  6. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  7. A three-dimensional muscle activity imaging technique for assessing pelvic muscle function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Dan; Timm, Gerald W.

    2010-11-01

    A novel multi-channel surface electromyography (EMG)-based three-dimensional muscle activity imaging (MAI) technique has been developed by combining the bioelectrical source reconstruction approach and subject-specific finite element modeling approach. Internal muscle activities are modeled by a current density distribution and estimated from the intra-vaginal surface EMG signals with the aid of a weighted minimum norm estimation algorithm. The MAI technique was employed to minimally invasively reconstruct electrical activity in the pelvic floor muscles and urethral sphincter from multi-channel intra-vaginal surface EMG recordings. A series of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the performance of the present MAI technique. With appropriate numerical modeling and inverse estimation techniques, we have demonstrated the capability of the MAI technique to accurately reconstruct internal muscle activities from surface EMG recordings. This MAI technique combined with traditional EMG signal analysis techniques is being used to study etiologic factors associated with stress urinary incontinence in women by correlating functional status of muscles characterized from the intra-vaginal surface EMG measurements with the specific pelvic muscle groups that generated these signals. The developed MAI technique described herein holds promise for eliminating the need to place needle electrodes into muscles to obtain accurate EMG recordings in some clinical applications.

  8. Posterior Sagittal Mesh Rectopexy (PSMR) and Anal Encirclement with Polypropylene Mesh for Correction of Complete Rectal Prolapse-a New Application.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sukumar

    2015-06-01

    The posterior sagittal route is utilized as an alternative to the abdominal and perineal routes for the operation of a complete rectal prolapse (syn. procidentia). A mesh is interposed between the rectum and sacrum. The mesh also acts as a sling suspended from the sacrum. The levator muscle is repaired from behind. Anal encirclement is made to correct a patulous anus.

  9. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin after coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Van Deventer, G; Kamemoto, E; Kuznicki, J T; Heckert, D C; Schulte, M C

    1992-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that differences in the processing of raw coffee beans can account for some of the variability in gastric effects of coffee drinking. Coffees were selected to represent several ways that green coffee beans are treated, ie, processing variables. These included instant and ground coffee processing, decaffeination method (ethyl acetate or methylene chloride extraction), instant coffee processing temperature (112 degrees F or 300 degrees F), and steam treatment. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin was measured in eight human subjects after they consumed each of the different coffees. Consumption of coffee was followed by a sustained decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure (P less than 0.05) except for three of the four coffees treated with ethyl acetate regardless of whether or not they contained caffeine. Caffeinated ground coffee stimulated more acid secretion that did decaf ground coffees (P less than 0.05), but not more than a steam-treated caffeinated coffee. Instant coffees did not differ in acid-stimulating ability. Ground caffeinated coffee resulted in higher blood gastrin levels than other ground coffees (P less than 0.05). Freeze-dried instant coffee also tended toward higher gastrin stimulation. It is concluded that some of the observed variability in gastric response to coffee consumption can be traced to differences in how green coffee beans are processed.

  10. Safety analysis of first 1000 patients treated with magnetic sphincter augmentation for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lipham, J C; Taiganides, P A; Louie, B E; Ganz, R A; DeMeester, T R

    2015-01-01

    Antireflux surgery with a magnetic sphincter augmentation device (MSAD) restores the competency of the lower esophageal sphincter with a device rather than a tissue fundoplication. As a regulated device, safety information from the published clinical literature can be supplemented by tracking under the Safe Medical Devices Act. The aim of this study was to examine the safety profile of the MSAD in the first 1000 implanted patients. We compiled safety data from all available sources as of July 1, 2013. The analysis included intra/perioperative complications, hospital readmissions, procedure-related interventions, reoperations, and device malfunctions leading to injury or inability to complete the procedure. Over 1000 patients worldwide have been implanted with the MSAD at 82 institutions with median implant duration of 274 days. Event rates were 0.1% intra/perioperative complications, 1.3% hospital readmissions, 5.6% endoscopic dilations, and 3.4% reoperations. All reoperations were performed non-emergently for device removal, with no complications or conversion to laparotomy. The primary reason for device removal was dysphagia. No device migrations or malfunctions were reported. Erosion of the device occurred in one patient (0.1%). The safety analysis of the first 1000 patients treated with MSAD for gastroesophageal reflux disease confirms the safety of this device and the implantation technique. The overall event rates were low based on data from 82 institutions. The MSAD is a safe therapeutic option for patients with chronic, uncomplicated gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  11. A Catheter-Based Acoustic Interrogation Device for Monitoring Motility Dynamics of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qian; Yadid-Pecht, Orly; Sadowski, Daniel C.; Mintchev, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents novel minimally-invasive, catheter-based acoustic interrogation device for monitoring motility dynamics of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A micro-oscillator actively emitting sound wave at 16 kHz is located at one side of the LES, and a miniature microphone is located at the other side of the sphincter to capture the sound generated from the oscillator. Thus, the dynamics of the opening and closing of the LES can be quantitatively assessed. In this paper, experiments are conducted utilizing an LES motility dynamics simulator. The sound strength is captured by the microphone and is correlated to the level of LES opening and closing controlled by the simulator. Measurements from the simulator model show statistically significant (p < 0.05) Pearson correlation coefficients (0.905 on the average in quiet environment and 0.736 on the average in noisy environment, D.O.F. = 9). Measuring the level of LES opening and closing has the potential to become a valuable diagnostic technique for understanding LES dysfunction and the disorders associated with it. PMID:25120160

  12. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin after coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Van Deventer, G; Kamemoto, E; Kuznicki, J T; Heckert, D C; Schulte, M C

    1992-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that differences in the processing of raw coffee beans can account for some of the variability in gastric effects of coffee drinking. Coffees were selected to represent several ways that green coffee beans are treated, ie, processing variables. These included instant and ground coffee processing, decaffeination method (ethyl acetate or methylene chloride extraction), instant coffee processing temperature (112 degrees F or 300 degrees F), and steam treatment. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin was measured in eight human subjects after they consumed each of the different coffees. Consumption of coffee was followed by a sustained decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure (P less than 0.05) except for three of the four coffees treated with ethyl acetate regardless of whether or not they contained caffeine. Caffeinated ground coffee stimulated more acid secretion that did decaf ground coffees (P less than 0.05), but not more than a steam-treated caffeinated coffee. Instant coffees did not differ in acid-stimulating ability. Ground caffeinated coffee resulted in higher blood gastrin levels than other ground coffees (P less than 0.05). Freeze-dried instant coffee also tended toward higher gastrin stimulation. It is concluded that some of the observed variability in gastric response to coffee consumption can be traced to differences in how green coffee beans are processed. PMID:1551346

  13. LINX(™) Reflux Management System: magnetic sphincter augmentation in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; DeMeester, Tom R; Ganz, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), commonly manifested by heartburn or regurgitation, is a chronic, progressive condition in which failed sphincter function allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways and the mouth. Chronic GERD affects 10% of Western society. The majority of patients receive adequate relief from proton pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms that cannot be addressed by increasing the dose of medications. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the surgical gold standard; however, the level of technical difficulty and its side effects have limited its use to less than 1% of the GERD population. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to persist with medical therapy, even when inadequate to control symptoms and complications of the disease. Consequently, a significant gap in the treatment continuum for GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX(™) Reflux Management System (Torax Medical) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the physiologic function of the sphincter barrier with a simple and reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and can be easily reversed if necessary.

  14. Influence of different intragastric stimuli on triggering of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Stakeberg, J; Lehmann, A

    1999-04-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux in the dog is mainly caused by transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation (TLOSR), the major stimulus for which is distension of the stomach. The possibility that liquid and/or acid sensors in the proximal stomach reduce the incidence and/or shorten the duration of TLOSR was addressed in the present study. Manometric recordings of the pharynx, oesophagus, lower oesophageal sphincter and stomach were made in awake dogs equipped with an oesophagostomy. TLOSRs were induced by insufflation of air or infusion of liquid nutrients with varying pH. Intragastric distension with air provoked TLOSRs with a significantly shorter duration than those seen after distension with liquid (4.3 +/- 0.5 vs 9.6 +/- 0.3 sec; P < 0.05). There were fewer TLOSRs at high intragastric pH (pH 5.0: 3.1 +/- 0.5/90 min) than at low pH (pH 1.5: 5.5 +/- 0.9/90 min, P < 0.05). Successfully propagated peristalsis following a TLOSR was more common after stimulation with liquid than with air. It can be concluded that there are H(+)-sensing mechanisms in the stomach which stimulate triggering of TLOSR. In addition, the reduced duration of TLOSR during air insufflation shows that the physical state of the distending stimulus can affect the patterning of TLOSR.

  15. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  16. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  17. Comparison between anal endosonography and digital examination in the evaluation of anal fistulae.

    PubMed

    Choen, S; Burnett, S; Bartram, C I; Nicholls, R J

    1991-04-01

    A prospective trial was performed comparing the accuracy of digital examination and anal endosonography in defining the anatomy of anal fistulae. Before operation 38 consecutive patients were assessed by the consultant in charge of the case, by a research fellow and by anal endosonography involving two radiologists. These findings were compared with the operative findings. Consultants correctly identified 26 of 33 internal openings, 29 of 34 primary tracks and 15 of 21 secondary tracks. The research fellow correctly identified 26 internal openings, 24 primary tracks and 10 secondary tracks. There was no significant difference between the accuracy of consultants and the research fellow. Anal endosonography identified 10 internal openings based on initial criteria. This rose to 24 when revised ultrasonographic criteria were applied. There was no statistical difference between consultant assessment and anal ultrasonography in correctly identifying intersphincteric and transphincteric tracks. Ultrasonography is unable to assess primary superficial, suprasphincteric and extrasphincteric tracks or secondary supralevator and infralevator tracks. Consultant assessment of secondary supralevator and infralevator tracks was correct in 78 per cent of cases. PMID:2032103

  18. Anal Cancer: An Examination of Radiotherapy Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Lim, Faye

    2011-04-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9811, ACCORD-03, and ACT II Phase III trials in anal cancer showed no benefit for cisplatin-based induction and maintenance chemotherapy, or radiation dose-escalation >59 Gy. This review examines the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation (CRT) in anal cancer, and discusses potential alternative radiotherapy strategies. The evidence for the review was compiled from randomized and nonrandomized trials of radiation therapy and CRT. A total of 103 retrospective/observational studies, 4 Phase I/II studies, 16 Phase II prospective studies, 2 randomized Phase II studies, and 6 Phase III trials of radiotherapy or chemoradiation were identified. There are no meta-analyses based on individual patient data. A 'one-size-fits-all' approach for all stages of anal cancer is inappropriate. Early T1 tumors are probably currently overtreated, whereas T3/T4 lesions might merit escalation of treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy or the integration of biological therapy may play a role in future.

  19. [The oral sucker muscles of six representatives of the order Paramphistomatida (Plathelminthes, Trematoda)].

    PubMed

    Burdakova, E N; Yastrebova, I V; Yastrebov, M V

    2015-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of muscles in the oral suckers of six trematode species belonging to five families of the order Paramphistomatida is described. The functional load and adaptive significance of different muscle groups in the suckers themselves and the associated structures--preoral lip and muscular cap--are discussed. Complete section series in three projections have been examined; this demonstrates the presence of previously unnoticed structures, namely, semicircular and diagonal muscles, regulating shape of the oral cavity, and short longitudinal muscles, acting as a sphincter, as well as localization of the largest internal muscles on the sucker lateral sides. It has been shown that the presence of internal longitudinal muscles suggests that the organs in question are closer to the oral suckers of other trematodes rather than to their pharynxes.

  20. Effect of analgesic drugs on the electromyographic activity of the gastrointestinal tract and sphincter of Oddi and on biliary pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, J C; Senninger, N; Runkel, N; Herfarth, C; Messmer, K

    1986-01-01

    Continuous biliary pressure and electromyographic activity of the sphincter of Oddi and gastrointestinal tract were recorded in conscious opossums following administration of analgesic drugs. Morphine, meperidine, and pentazocin increased significantly the duration of the migrating motor complex (MMC) cycle. Periods of 1-2 minutes of intense burst of spike potentials were seen in the sphincter of Oddi and duodenum following administration of morphine (8 experiments), meperidine (6 experiments), and pentazocin (3 experiments). The biliary pressure in the control studies was similar to that following administration of all analgesics in the animals with gallbladder and following instillation of tramadol, metamizol, and acetylsalicylic acid in animals with no gallbladder. However, the biliary pressure was significantly higher following administration of morphine, meperidine, and pentazocin in the animals with no gallbladder. It is concluded from this study that morphine, meperidine, and pentazocin may cause important disturbances in the motility of the sphincter of Oddi and gastrointestinal tract. These myoelectric disturbances may cause an increase in the biliary pressure in animals that have been subjected to cholecystectomy, but not in animals with intact gallbladder. The gallbladder may accommodate the bile produced by the liver during periods of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction and thus impede an increase in the biliary pressure. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. FIGS. 3A and B. PMID:3729583

  1. Region-related modular nerve-dependent motor activity in anorectum--cholinergic and nitrergic contribution to rat model.

    PubMed

    Stavreva, Galya; Radomirov, Radomir

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances of enteric nerve-mediated anorectal evacuation mechanisms have medical and social impact. The study aimed at further eliciting the contribution of cholinergic and nitrergic neurotransmission systems to modular nerve networks in different regions of Wistar rat anorectum. Electrical field stimulation (EFS, 0.8 ms, 40 V, 2, 5 or 10 Hz, 20 s), computerized mechanographic on-line setup and drugs were used to evaluate the motor responses of isolated rings from circular muscle of rectum (proximal, middle, and distal part), internal anal sphincter, and anal canal. Twitch-like frequency-dependent contractions, more pronounced in rectal preparations, characterized the modular motor responses of rectal circular muscle rings and anal canal. Depending on the frequency of stimulation, the motor activity of internal anal sphincter varied from deep long-lasting relaxation to initial short-lasting relaxation, followed by a contraction. Electrically-evoked responses of anorectal preparations were tetrodotoxin (0.1 microM)-sensitive. In the presence of atropine (0.3 microM) the contractions of rectal rings decreased, relaxation of internal anal sphincter increased and inhibition of the contractions of the anal canal occurred, followed by relaxation. During atropine treatment, NG-nitro-L-arginine (0.5 microM) increased the contractile responses and suppressed internal anal sphincter relaxations. L-arginine (0.5 microM) decreased the contractions and extended the relaxations of internal anal sphincter and anal canal. Our results suggest that cholinergic and nitrergic systems are not equally involved in modular nerve networks of various regions of anorectum. Cholinergic transmission is more expressed in distal rectum, underlying its contractile potency, while nitric oxide-dependent transmission(s) control the relaxation ability of the internal anal sphincter and anal canal.

  2. Prolonged esophagitis after primary dysfunction of the pyloric sphincter in the rat and therapeutic potential of the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Dobric, Ivan; Drvis, Petar; Petrovic, Igor; Shejbal, Drazen; Brcic, Luka; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Batelja, Lovorka; Sever, Marko; Kokic, Neven; Tonkic, Ante; Zoricic, Ivan; Mise, Sandro; Staresinic, Mario; Radic, Bozo; Jakir, Ana; Babel, Jaksa; Ilic, Spomenko; Vuksic, Tihomir; Jelic, Ivan; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2007-05-01

    Seven or fourteen days or twelve months after suturing one tube into the pyloric sphincter (removed by peristalsis by the seventh day), rats exhibit prolonged esophagitis with a constantly lowered pressure not only in the pyloric, but also in the lower esophageal sphincter and a failure of both sphincters. Throughout the esophagitis experiment, gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL 14736) is given intraperitoneally once a day (10 microg/kg, 10 ng/kg, last application 24 h before assessment), or continuously in drinking water at 0.16 microg/ml, 0.16 ng/ml (12 ml/rat per day), or directly into the stomach 5 min before pressure assessment (a water manometer connected to the drainage port of a Foley catheter implanted into the stomach either through an esophageal or duodenal incision). This treatment alleviates i) the esophagitis (macroscopically and microscopically, at either region or interval), ii) the pressure in the pyloric sphincter, and iii) the pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (cmH2O). In the normal rats it increases lower esophageal sphincter pressure, but decreases the pyloric sphincter pressure. Ranitidine, given using the same protocol (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, once daily; 0.83 mg/ml in drinking water; 50 mg/kg directly into the stomach) does not have an effect in either rats with esophagitis or in normal rats. PMID:17452811

  3. The effect of HCl infusion in the lower part of the oesophagus on the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Wallin, L; Boesby, S; Madsen, T

    1978-01-01

    A measuring unit combined with a perfused catheter has been developed for measurement of the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure. The system is able to register pressure measurements using either intermittent or continuous withdrawal of the catheter, at the same flow rate (0.5 ml/min). Repeated measurements of pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure have been made on eight healthy volunteers. No differences were found in the sphincter pressures measured by the continuous and the intermittent withdrawal techniques (p greater than 0.10); the coefficient of variation was 0.18 for both techniques. The pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure was measured during infusion of 0.1 N HCl (5 ml/min) 5 cm proximally to the gastro-oesophageal sphincter. There was an increase in the pharyngo-oesophageal sphincter pressure after 1 min of infusion (p less than 0.05). Measurements after 5 min and 10 min were no different from the initial value; thus a fall was observed between the first and the fifth minute (p less than 0.05). The observed rise in sphincter pressure may be explained as a response acting to prevent gastro-oesophageal reflux from entering the pharynx.

  4. Californium-252 brachytherapy for anal and ano-rectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, B.; Maruyama, Y.; Proudfoot, W.; Malcolm, A.

    1986-01-01

    Surgery has historically been the standard treatment for anal, ano-rectal and rectal carcinoma but is prone to local or regional failure. Over the past 15 years there has been increasing interest in and success with radiation therapy and combined chemoradiotherapy for treatment of anal and ano-rectal cancers. Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with external beam teletherapy has been investigated for anal and ano-rectal lesions at the Univ. of Kentucky with encouraging results.

  5. Can a meta-analysis answer the question: is mucosectomy and handsewn or double-stapled anastomosis better in ileal pouch-anal anastomosis?

    PubMed

    Schluender, Stefanie J; Mei, Ling; Yang, Huiying; Fleshner, Phillip R

    2006-10-01

    Although ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the procedure of choice for polyposis and ulcerative colitis with medically refractory disease or dysplasia, controversy exists concerning whether mucosal preservation with double-stapled (DS) IPAA is superior to mucosectomy and handsewn (HS) IPAA anastomosis for postoperative function. Prospective studies have shown no statistically significant differences. The use of meta-analysis can strengthen statistical power by combining the data from related studies. A meta-analysis was performed to determine whether there was a significant difference in functional and manometric outcome between HS-IPAA and DS-IPAA. Prospective, randomized studies were identified using a literature search. Functional outcome variables included number of normal continence, minor incontinence, nocturnal evacuation, the ability to discriminate flatus from stool, and antidiarrheal medication. Manometric outcomes included postoperative resting and squeeze anal pressures. Four prospective, randomized trials were identified. Of the 184 total patients, the HS-IPAA group included 86 patients (48 men and 38 women) and the DS-IPAA group included 98 patients (49 men and 49 women). There were no significant differences in functional outcome between HS-IPAA and DS-IPAA. In addition, there was no significant difference in sphincter resting and squeeze pressures between the two patient groups. This meta-analysis demonstrates that DS-IPAA offers no advantage in functional or manometric outcome when compared with HS-IPAA.

  6. Anal squamous cell carcinoma: An evolution in disease and management

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Marc C; Maykel, Justin; Johnson, Eric K; Steele, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Anal cancer represents less than 1% of all new cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. Yet, despite the relative paucity of cases, the incidence of anal cancer has seen a steady about 2% rise each year over the last decade. As such, all healthcare providers need to be cognizant of the evaluation and treatment of anal squamous cell carcinoma. While chemoradiation remains the mainstay of therapy for most patients with anal cancer, surgery may still be required in recurrent, recalcitrant and palliative disease. In this manuscript, we will explore the diagnosis and management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anus. PMID:25278699

  7. Carcinoma of the anal canal: radiation or radiation plus chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, B.J.

    1983-09-01

    An editorial is presented which discusses the treatment of carcinoma of the anal canal. Following the initial report of the successful preoperative use of combined chemotherapy and radiation by Nigro in 1974, several centers have confirmed the effectiveness of such combinations either as preoperative or as definitive treatment of anal carcinomas, and many patients are now being referred for radiation therapy. The article by Cantril in this issue describe the successful treatment of anal carcinomas by radiation alone, and raises the important issue of whether radiation plus chemotherapy is more effective treatment than radiation alone for squamous or cloacogenic carcinomas arising in the anal canal or perianal area. Several studies are cited.

  8. Microbial-powered artificial muscles for autonomous robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Anderson, Iain A.; Gisby, Todd; Wang, Cheng-Hung; Rossiter, Jonathan

    2009-03-01

    We consider the embodiment of a microbial fuel cell using artificial muscle actuators. The microbial fuel cell digests organic matter and generates electricity. This energy is stored in a capacitor bank until it is discharged to power one of two complimentary artificial muscle technologies: the dielectric elastomer actuator and the ionic-polymer metal composite. We study the ability of the fuel cell to generate useful actuation and consider appropriate configurations to maximally exploit both of these artificial muscle technologies. A prototype artificial sphincter is implemented using a dielectric elastomer actuator. Stirrer and cilia mechanisms motivate experimentation using ionic polymer metal composite actuators. The ability of the fuel cell to drive both of these technologies opens up new possibilities for truly biomimetic soft artificial robotic organisms.

  9. Risk of Anal Cancer in People Living with HIV: Addressing Anal Health in the HIV Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Walker, Crystal Martin; Likes, Wendy; Bernard, Marye; Kedia, Satish; Tolley, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Anal health and anal cancer are rarely addressed in HIV primary care. We sought to understand factors that impeded or promoted addressing anal health in HIV primary care from providers' perspectives. In this exploratory study, HIV primary care providers from the Mid-South region of the United States participated in brief individual interviews. We analyzed transcribed data to identify barriers and facilitators to addressing anal health. Our study sample included five physicians and four nurse practitioners. The data revealed a number of barriers such as perception of patient embarrassment, provider embarrassment, external issues such as time constraints, demand of other priorities, lack of anal complaints, lack of resources, and gender discordance. Facilitators included awareness, advantageous circumstances, and the patient-provider relationship. Anal health education should be prioritized for HIV primary care providers. Preventive health visits should be considered to mitigate time constraints, demands for other priorities, and unequal gender opportunities. PMID:27080925

  10. Laparoscopic implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter around the prostatic urethra

    PubMed Central

    Chłosta, Piotr; Aboumarzouk, Omar; Bondad, Jasper; Szopiński, Tomasz; Korzelik, Ignacy; Borówka, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the first laparoscopic periprostatic implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) after a transurethral resection of the prostate. Background The implantation of an AUS is a standard procedure for severe urinary incontinence. In men it is usually implanted through a perineal approach, with the cuff placed around the bulbous urethra, bladder neck, or even around the prostate. Method We report a laparoscopic periprostatic implantation of an AUS after a transurethral resection of a prostate in a 72-year-old-man with incontinence. Results The operative duration was 180 min and the blood loss was 150 mL. There were no complications. After activating the AUS the patient was totally continent. Conclusion The laparoscopic periprostatic implantation of an AUS is a safe, effective and considerably less invasive procedure. PMID:26413345

  11. Novel management approach to connecting tube erosion of artificial urinary sphincter.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Akwasi A; Mohamed, Mahmoud A; Mahdy, Ayman E

    2014-04-01

    Artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) erosion often involve the urethral cuff and is managed by complete or partial device removal. Abdominal wall erosion of AUS tubing has not been previously reported and its management is unknown. We report tube erosion (TE) of AUS successfully managed without device explant. An 81-year-old male with AUS for post-prostatectomy incontinence presented with TE at the site of inguinal incision without signs or symptoms of infection. The exposed tube was reduced and wound was closed after copious antibiotic solution irrigation. No complications were noted at 2 month follow up. AUS-TE can be successfully managed conservatively with antiseptic wound site irrigation and reinsertion in absence of infection.

  12. Neuro-regulation of lower esophageal sphincter function as treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Anupender Singh; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2008-02-21

    The junction between the esophagus and the stomach is a specialized region, composed of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and its adjacent anatomical structures, the gastric sling and crural diaphragm. Together these structures work in a coordinated manner to allow ingested food into the stomach while preventing reflux of gastric contents across the esophago-gastric junction (EGJ) into the esophagus. The same zone also permits retrograde passage of air and gastric contents into esophagus during belching and vomiting. The precise coordination required to execute such a complicated task is achieved by a finely-regulated high-pressure zone. This zone keeps the junction between esophagus and stomach continuously closed, but is still able to relax briefly via input from inhibitory neurons that are responsible for its innervation. Alterations of the structure and function of the EGJ and the LES may predispose to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

  13. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction and the Formation of Adult Choledochal Cyst Following Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hong-Tian; Wang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Liang, Bin; Zeng, Jian-Ping; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine the causes underlying the formation of adult choledochal cyst. Anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction is the most widely accepted theory regarding the etiology of choledochal cyst. However, choledochal cysts have been found in patients in the absence of this anomaly. Because the number of adult patients with choledochal cyst is increasing, it is important to address this controversy. Bile amylase levels in the cysts of 27 patients (8 males and 19 females) who had undergone cholecystectomy were retrospectively evaluated. The average age of the 27 patients was 45.8 ± 10.1 years and the majority (85.2%) were diagnosed with Todani type I cysts. None of the patients had dilatation of the common bile duct prior to surgery. There were 6 (22.2%) patients with anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. However, amylase levels did not significantly differ between patients with and without this anomaly (P = 0.251). According to bile amylase levels, pancreatobiliary reflux was present in 21 (77.8%) patients. The mean amylase level significantly differed in patients with pancreatobiliary reflux (23,462 ± 11,510 IU/L) and those without (235 ± 103 IU/L) (P < 0.001). In patients with pancreatobiliary reflux, only 4 patients had anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. That is, the majority of patients (17/21, 81%) having pancreatobiliary reflux did not have an anomalous junction of the pancreatic and biliary ducts. Since the only explanation for pancreatobiliary reflux in patients with a normal pancreaticobiliary junction is sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, we proposed that the formation of adult choledochal cyst is mainly due to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. PMID:26632721

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac in a spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Goodnight, Andrea L; Traslavina, Ryan P; Emanuelson, Karen; Affolter, Verena K; Gaffney, Patricia M; Vernau, William; Williams, Colette; Wu, Connie I-kuan; Sturges, Beverly K; Lowenstine, Linda J

    2013-12-01

    A 25-yr-old spayed female spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) developed intermittent right pelvic limb lameness that persisted following conservative medical therapy. No obvious musculoskeletal lesions were noted on initial physical exam; however, spinal radiography was suspicious for possible intervertebral degenerative joint disease or discospondylitis. Despite prolonged medical therapy, the lameness progressed to minimal weight bearing and marked muscle atrophy of the right pelvic limb. Electromyography showed spontaneous activity in the muscles of right sciatic nerve distribution. Sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities in the right tibial and peroneal nerves were undetectable and markedly reduced, respectively. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed a large, space-occupying mass on the right side of the sacrum and pelvis. Antemortem fine-needle aspiration of the mass and postmortem histopathology resulted in diagnosis of a high-grade squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac is very rare in domestic dogs and previously unreported in spotted hyenas. PMID:24450071

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac in a spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Goodnight, Andrea L; Traslavina, Ryan P; Emanuelson, Karen; Affolter, Verena K; Gaffney, Patricia M; Vernau, William; Williams, Colette; Wu, Connie I-kuan; Sturges, Beverly K; Lowenstine, Linda J

    2013-12-01

    A 25-yr-old spayed female spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) developed intermittent right pelvic limb lameness that persisted following conservative medical therapy. No obvious musculoskeletal lesions were noted on initial physical exam; however, spinal radiography was suspicious for possible intervertebral degenerative joint disease or discospondylitis. Despite prolonged medical therapy, the lameness progressed to minimal weight bearing and marked muscle atrophy of the right pelvic limb. Electromyography showed spontaneous activity in the muscles of right sciatic nerve distribution. Sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities in the right tibial and peroneal nerves were undetectable and markedly reduced, respectively. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed a large, space-occupying mass on the right side of the sacrum and pelvis. Antemortem fine-needle aspiration of the mass and postmortem histopathology resulted in diagnosis of a high-grade squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac. Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal sac is very rare in domestic dogs and previously unreported in spotted hyenas.

  16. Longitudinal Muscle Dysfunction in Achalasia Esophagus and Its Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Bhargava, Valmik

    2013-01-01

    Muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Goal of this review is to summarize the role of longitudinal muscle in physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging that measure circular and longitudinal muscle contraction respectively reveal that during peristalsis 2 layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the other hand, during transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), longitudinal muscle contracts independently of circular muscle. Recent studies provide novel insights, i.e., longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus induces LES relaxation and possibly descending relaxation of the esophagus. In achalasia esophagus and other motility disorders there is discoordination between the 2 muscle layers. Longitudinal muscle contraction patterns are different in the recently described three types of achalasia identified by high-resolution manometry. Robust contraction of the longitudinal muscle in type II achalasia causes pan-esophageal pressurization and is the mechanism of whatever little esophageal emptying that take place in the absence of peristalsis and impaired LES relaxation. It may be that preserved longitudinal muscle contraction is also the reason for superior outcome to medical/surgical therapy in type II achalasia esophagus. Prolonged contractions of longitudinal muscles of the esophagus is a possible mechanism of heartburn and "angina like" pain seen in esophageal motility disorders and possibly achalasia esophagus. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are on the horizon. Neuro-pharmacologic control of circular and longitudinal muscles is different, which provides an important opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus. PMID:23667744

  17. Adenocarcinoma of the anal canal: A report of two cases with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Medha Pradip; Momin, Yasmin Altaf; Pandav, Amitkumar Bapuso; Sulhyan, Kalpana Ranjitsingh

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the anal canal accounts for about 20% of all anal canal cancers. It is subclassified into two types. (1) Colorectal type, which arises from the mucosa above dentate line and (2) extramucosal type, which includes adenocarcinoma arising in anorectal fistulae and adenocarcinoma arising from anal glands. Anal gland adenocarcinomas are extremely rare. In this article, we present two cases of anal adenocarcinoma, one colorectal type, and other anal gland carcinoma along with review of literature. PMID:27510691

  18. Traces: making sense of urodynamics testing--part 7: Evaluation of bladder filling/storage: Evaluation of urethral sphincter incompetence and stress urinary incontinence.

    PubMed

    Gray, Mikel

    2011-01-01

    The "Traces" series discusses how the urodynamic clinician generates usable data from a filling cystometrogram. Part 7 focuses on the question, "Is the urethral sphincter mechanism competent?" From a practical viewpoint, this question can be divided into two queries: 1) does this patient have observable urodynamic stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and 2) does this patient have intrinsic urethral sphincter incompetence, also referred to as intrinsic sphincter deficiency or a low pressure urethra? Signs of SUI include clinician observation of urine loss with coughing or during Valsalva's maneuver. Urodynamic SUI is the observation of urine loss with increased abdominal and intravesical pressures in the absence of a detrusor contraction. The most commonly used techniques for assessment of urethral sphincter function and SUI are the urethral pressure profile and the abdominal leak point pressure. Both are useful for answering these queries, but both tests are vulnerable to physiologic and technical artifacts that must be minimized to produce technically accurate and clinically meaningful results.

  19. Controversies in the treatment of common anal problems

    PubMed Central

    Sagap, Ismail; Remzi, Feza H

    2006-01-01

    Treating common benign anal diseases has evolved towards more outpatient procedures with better outcome. However, minimizing post-procedure morbidities such as pain and the avoidance incontinence remain the most significant concerns. We introduce some controversies and highlight the developments in current surgical practice for the treatment of common anal problems. PMID:16718832

  20. Anal cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia screening: A review

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Ira L; Fang, Sandy H

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the early diagnosis of anal cancer and its precursor lesions through routine screening. A number of risk-stratification strategies as well as screening techniques have been suggested, and currently little consensus exists among national societies. Much of the current clinical rationale for the prevention of anal cancer derives from the similar tumor biology of cervical cancer and the successful use of routine screening to identify cervical cancer and its precursors early in the disease process. It is thought that such a strategy of identifying early anal intraepithelial neoplasia will reduce the incidence of invasive anal cancer. The low prevalence of anal cancer in the general population prevents the use of routine screening. However, routine screening of selected populations has been shown to be a more promising strategy. Potential screening modalities include digital anorectal exam, anal Papanicolaou testing, human papilloma virus co-testing, and high-resolution anoscopy. Additional research associating high-grade dysplasia treatment with anal cancer prevention as well as direct comparisons of screening regimens is necessary to develop further anal cancer screening recommendations. PMID:26843912

  1. Update on anal fistulae: Surgical perspectives for the gastroenterologist

    PubMed Central

    Tabry, Helena; Farrands, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Anal fistulae are common and debilitating; they are characterized by severe pain and discharge. They arise following infection near the anal canal, or as a primary event from an abscess in the abdomen, fistulating into the vagina or perianal skin. The term ‘cryptoglandular’ is given to abscesses arising from the anal glands. For many years, the treatment of choice was to lay open the fistula; however, this risks causing incontinence with potentially devastating consequences. Alternative surgical treatments include setons, fibrin glue, collagen plugs and flaps to cover the internal fistula opening. These have achieved varying degrees of success, as will be discussed. The present review also discusses anal fistulae in light of much recently published literature. Currently, anal fistulae remain challenging and require specialist expertise; however, new treatment options are on the horizon. PMID:22175058

  2. An experimental model of prolonged esophagitis with sphincter failure in the rat and the therapeutic potential of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Igor; Dobric, Ivan; Drvis, Petar; Shejbal, Drazen; Brcic, Luka; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Batelja, Lovorka; Kokic, Neven; Tonkic, Ante; Mise, Stjepan; Baotic, Tomislav; Staresinic, Mario; Radic, Bozo; Jakir, Ana; Vuksic, Tihomir; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-11-01

    We report a simple novel rat model that combines prolonged esophagitis and parallel sphincters failure. The anti-ulcer gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, which was found to be stable in gastric juice, and is being evaluated in inflammatory bowel disease trials, is an anti-esophagitis therapy that recovers failed sphincters. Twelve or twenty months after the initial challenge (tubes sutured into sphincters for one week and then spontaneously removed by peristalsis), rats exhibit prolonged esophagitis (confluent hemorrhagic and yellowish lesions, thinner epithelium and superficial corneal layer, with stratification derangement); constantly lowered pressure of both sphincters (assessed by using a water manometer connected to the drainage port of a Foley catheter implanted into the stomach either through esophageal or duodenal incision); and both lower esophageal and pyloric sphincter failure. Throughout the esophagitis experiment, BPC 157 was given at either 10 micro g/kg, i.p., once a day (last application 24 h before assessment) or alternatively, it was given continuously in drinking water at 0.16 micro g/ml (12 ml/rat). This treatment recovers i) esophagitis (macroscopically and microscopically, at either region or investigated time period) and ii) pressure in both sphincters (cmH2O). In addition, BPC 157 (10 micro g/kg) or saline (1 ml/rat, 5 ml/kg) was specifically given directly into the stomach; pressure assessment was performed at 5 min thereafter. The effect of BPC 157 is specific because in normal rats, it increases lower esophageal sphincter-pressure, but decreases pyloric sphincter-pressure. Ranitidine, given as the standard drug using the same protocol (50 mg/kg, i.p., once daily; 0.83 mg/ml in drinking water; or 50 mg/kg directly into the stomach) had no effect. PMID:17116974

  3. Selectivity of muscarinic agonists including (+/-)-aceclidine and antimuscarinics on the human intraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; DeSantis, L; Patil, P N

    1998-08-01

    The average EC50 value and the maximum response of carbachol on the human circular ciliary muscle obtained within 24 h of postmortem hypoxia was 517 nmol/l and 135 mg, respectively. These values for carbachol did not differ significantly from that of the longitudinal ciliary muscle. However, when tested at 1 mumol/l of carbachol, the peak response of the longitudinal muscle occurred at 59 sec vs 173 sec for that of the circular muscle of 70 year old donors. The relative potency of the muscarinic agonists on the circular muscle was oxotremorine-M, 1 > carbachol, 1/4 > pilocarpine, 1/19 > aceclidine, 1/132. The relative order of potency of agonists was similar for the longitudinal muscle. Only pilocarpine and aceclidine were partial agonists which produced 80-85% of the maximum response. When compared with the EC50 values of aceclidine on the iris sphincter and the longitudinal ciliary muscles, the agonist potency was only 1/28 for the latter tissue. Implications of these findings in relation to the use of these agonists in glaucoma are discussed. The pKB values of muscarinic antagonists on the circular ciliary muscle were: atropine, 8.8; cyclopentolate, 7.8; tropicamide, 7.4; P.F. HHSiD, 7.0; pirenzepine, 6.4; and methoctramine, 5.7. Nearly equal pKB values of each antagonist were obtained for the longitudinal ciliary muscle and iris sphincter. Based on the affinity constants of various competitive antagonists, the human iris as well as ciliary muscles may contain M3, M2 or M4 subtypes of muscarinic receptors.

  4. Resolution of Fundic Gland Polyposis following Laparoscopic Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation and Subsequent Cessation of Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeyer, Joel R.; Connolly, Erin E.; Wittchow, Richard J.; Kothari, Shanu N.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric polyps occur from a variety of sources and are found commonly on upper endoscopy. We present the case of a 49-year-old female who presented for evaluation for antireflux surgery with a history of fundic gland polyposis who required twice-daily proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for control of her gastric reflux. After verifying that she met criteria for surgery, she underwent an uncomplicated laparoscopic magnetic sphincter augmentation placement. With the cessation of PPIs following surgery, the fundic gland polyposis resolved. Fundic gland polyps may occur sporadically or within certain syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis. Multiple possible inciting factors exist, including the use of PPIs. This is the first reported case of the resolution of numerous fundic gland polyps following the completion of laparoscopic magnetic sphincter augmentation. PMID:26600954

  5. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  6. Viability and MR detectability of iron labeled mesenchymal stem cells used for endoscopic injection into the porcine urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Will, Susanne; Martirosian, Petros; Eibofner, Frank; Schick, Fritz; Bantleon, Rüdiger; Vaegler, Martin; Grözinger, Gerd; Claussen, Claus D; Kramer, Ulrich; Schmehl, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Direct stem cell therapies for functionally impaired tissue require a sufficient number of cells in the target region and a method for verifying the fate of the cells in the subsequent time course. In vivo MRI of iron labeled mesenchymal stem cells has been suggested to comply with these requirements. The study was conducted to evaluate proliferation, migration, differentiation and adhesion effects as well as the obtained iron load of an iron labeling strategy for mesenchymal stem cells. After injection into the porcine urethral sphincter, the labeled cells were monitored for up to six months using MRI. Mesenchymal stem cells were labeled with ferucarbotran (60/100/200 µg/mL) and ferumoxide (200 µg/mL) for the analysis of migration and viability. Phantom MR measurements were made to evaluate effects of iron labeling. For short and long term studies, the iron labeled cells were injected into the porcine urethral sphincter and monitored by MRI. High resolution anatomical images of the porcine urethral sphincter were applied for detection of the iron particles with a turbo-spin-echo sequence and a gradient-echo sequence with multiple TE values. The MR images were then compared with histological staining. The analysis of cell function after iron labeling showed no effects on proliferation or differentiation of the cells. Although the adherence increases with higher iron dose, the ability to migrate decreases as a presumed effect of iron labeling. The iron labeled mesenchymal stem cells were detectable in vivo in MRI and histological staining even six months after injection. Labeling with iron particles and subsequent evaluation with highly resolved three dimensional data acquisition allows sensitive tracking of cells injected into the porcine urethral sphincter for several months without substantial biological effects on mesenchymal stem cells.

  7. Upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities are strongly predictive of treatment response in patients with achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Simon C; Ciarleglio, Maria; Chavez, Yamile Haito; Clarke, John O; Stein, Ellen; Chander Roland, Bani

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between upper esophageal sphincter abnormalities achalasia treatment METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 41 consecutive patients referred for high resolution esophageal manometry with a final manometric diagnosis of achalasia. Patients were sub-divided by presence or absence of Upper esophageal sphincter (UES) abnormality, and clinical and manometric profiles were compared. Correlation between UES abnormality and sub-type (i.e., hypertensive, hypotensive or impaired relaxation) and a number of variables, including qualitative treatment response, achalasia sub-type, co-morbid medical illness, psychiatric illness, surgical history, dominant presenting symptom, treatment type, age and gender were also evaluated. RESULTS: Among all 41 patients, 24 (58.54%) had a UES abnormality present. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of age, gender or any other clinical or demographic profiles. Among those with UES abnormalities, the majority were either hypertensive (41.67%) or had impaired relaxation (37.5%) as compared to hypotensive (20.83%), although this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.42). There was no specific association between treatment response and treatment type received; however, there was a significant association between UES abnormalities and treatment response. In patients with achalasia and concomitant UES abnormalities, 87.5% had poor treatment response, while only 12.5% had favorable response. In contrast, in patients with achalasia and no UES abnormalities, the majority (78.57%) had good treatment response, as compared to 21.43% with poor treatment response (P = 0.0001). After controlling for achalasia sub-type, those with UES abnormality had 26 times greater odds of poor treatment response than those with no UES abnormality (P = 0.009). Similarly, after controlling for treatment type, those with UES abnormality had 13.9 times greater odds of poor treatment response

  8. Endoscopic sphincterotomy: follow-up evaluation of effects on the sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Geenen, J E; Toouli, J; Hogan, W J; Dodds, W J; Stewart, E T; Mavrelis, P; Riedel, D; Venu, R

    1984-10-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) alters the structure and motor function of the sphincter of Oddi (SO). The magnitude and duration of these changes, however, have not been critically examined. Before ES, 22 patients with common bile duct stones were evaluated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. The pressure gradient between the common bile duct and the duodenum, the SO basal pressure, and the SO peak phasic pressures were obtained. After ES, the electrosurgical incision length was determined using the extended papillotome and an inflated Fogarty balloon as reference. A high correlation existed between the endoscopist's estimate of ES incision size using this technique and the actual length of simulated incisions fashioned in cardboard mounts. These studies were repeated in all 22 patients at 1-yr follow-up and in 8 of these patients at 2-yr follow-up. At 12 mo and 24 mo after ES, the common bile duct (CBD) to duodenal pressure gradient and the sphincter of Oddi basal pressure were virtually eliminated. The amplitude of SO phasic contractions was significantly diminished 12 mo after ES (124 +/- 16 mmHg to 37 +/- 10 mmHg; p less than 0.001), but 24 mo after ES, SO phasic contraction amplitude was not significantly different from the values before ES. Incision length at 1-yr follow-up was reduced in the group of 22 patients from 11.6 +/- 0.8 mm to 8.3 +/- 0.5 mm (p less than 0.001), and in the group of 8 patients from 11.0 +/- 1.5 mm to 7.5 +/- 0.7 mm (p less than 0.025). After an additional 12 mo, however, i.e., 24 mo after ES, the incision length was 6.5 +/- 0.7 mm. There was no significant difference in incision length between the 12-mo and 24-mo examinations. We conclude that after ES, incision length decreases during the first year. There appears to be no further significant reduction in incision length at 2 yr. In addition, the reduction of the CBD to duodenal pressure gradient and the SO basal pressure remain unchanged for at least 2 yr. These manometric

  9. Dual Implantation of Artificial Urinary Sphincter and Inflatable Penile Prostheses for Concurrent Male Urinary Incontinence and Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaiji, Tariq F.

    2011-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence secondary to sphincter dysfunction are common conditions affecting many men worldwide with a negative effect on quality of life. They are encountered in a number of etiologies most commonly following radical prostatectomy in which they coexist in the same patient. Implantations of an artificial urinary sphincter and inflatable penile prosthesis have proven to be effective in the treatment of both conditions should conservative and minimally invasive measures fail. The recent literature has shown that dual implantation of these devices is feasible and safe with a durable clinical outcome. Once indicated, this can be done in a synchronous or nonsynchronous manner; however, the emerging of the single transverse scrotal incision as well as advancement in the prostheses has made synchronous dual implantation more favourable and appealing option. It provides time and cost savings with an evidence of high patient satisfaction. Synchronous dual implantation should be offered initially when indicated. This paper discusses the surgical techniques of artificial urinary sphincter and inflatable penile prosthesis dual implantation in the management of concurrent moderate-to-severe urinary incontinence and medically refractive erectile dysfunction, in addition to highlighting the existing literature pertaining to this approach. PMID:22162678

  10. [Function of the upper esophageal sphincter after denervation of recurrent laryngeal nerves and intramural nerves of the cervical esophagus in dogs].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Y; Higashino, M; Osugi, H; Tokuhara, T; Kinoshita, H

    1994-09-01

    The upper esophageal sphincter prevents reflux into the pharynx. If it functions improperly, aspiration pneumonia can result. We studied the functioning of the sphincter in unanesthetized dogs after denervation under anesthesia of the recurrent laryngeal nerves. The pressure of the sphincter at rest was measured by manometry with a transducer that measured pressure around the tip of a catheter. Then the pressure in response to inflation of a balloon to the diameter of 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 cm at 5 and 10 cm aboral to the sphincter was measured. Next, the pressure during perfusion of 0.1 N HCl or NaOH 10 cm aboral to the sphincter was measured. These studies were done first in 10 dogs that had undergone only gastrostomy for measurements (controls). Measurements were repeated after the left recurrent laryngeal nerve in the controls was cut (L group), after the right recurrent laryngeal nerve in the L group was cut (B group), and after transection of the esophagus 7 cm aboral to the sphincter in the B group (T group). The differences in the pressure at rest were not significant. In each group, balloon inflation to any diameter tested and at either position made the pressure rise above that at rest. This pressure in the L, B, and T groups, however, was significantly lower than in the controls. When the balloon was inflated to 2.5 cm when it was 10 cm aboral to the sphincter, the pressure in the T group was significantly lower than in the B group. When HCl or NaOH were perfused, the pressure increased gradually in the controls, but not in the other groups. In conclusion, although recurrent laryngeal nerves did not affect the function of the sphincter at rest, they were the afferent routes of the contraction by the sphincter as a reflex following distension or chemical stimulation of the esophagus. The intramural nerve network of the cervical esophagus may be another reflex route of contraction of the upper esophageal sphincter.

  11. In vitro effect of nicorandil on the carbachol-induced contraction of the lower esophageal sphincter of the rat.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Tomonori; Adachi, Takeshi; Fujisawa, Susumu; Hongoh, Mai; Ohba, Takayoshi; Ono, Kyoichi

    2016-08-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized region of the esophageal smooth muscle that allows the passage of a swallowed bolus into the stomach. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a major role in LES relaxation. Nicorandil possesses dual properties of a NO donor and an ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP channel) agonist, and is expected to reduce LES tone. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of nicorandil on the LES. Rat LES tissues were placed in an organ bath, and activities were recorded using an isometric force transducer. Carbachol-induced LES contraction was significantly inhibited by KATP channel agonists in a concentration-dependent manner; pinacidil > nicorandil ≈ diazoxide. Nicorandil-induced relaxation of the LES was prevented by pretreatment with glibenclamide, whereas N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and iberiotoxin were ineffective at preventing nicorandil-induced LES relaxation. Furthermore, nicorandil did not affect high K(+)-induced LES contraction. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed expression of KCNJ8 (Kir6.1), KCNJ11 (Kir6.2), ABCC8 (SUR1) and ABCC9 (SUR2) subunits of the KATP channel in the rat lower esophagus. These findings indicate that nicorandil causes LES relaxation chiefly by activating the KATP channel, and that it may provide an additional pharmacological tool for the treatment of spastic esophageal motility disorders. PMID:27562702

  12. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and PAR2 but not PAR4 mediate relaxations in lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Che

    2007-07-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), PAR2 and PAR4 activation can alter the gastrointestinal motility. To investigate effects mediated by PARs in the lower esophageal sphincter, we measured contraction or relaxation of transverse strips from the guinea-pig lower esophageal sphincter caused by PAR1 (TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2), PAR2 (SLIGKV-NH2 and SLIGRL-NH2) and PAR4 peptide agonists (GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2) as well as PAR protease activators (thrombin and trypsin). In resting lower esophageal sphincter strips, TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2 caused moderate concentration-dependent relaxation whereas thrombin did not cause any relaxation or contraction. Furthermore, in carbachol-contracted strips, TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2 caused marked whereas thrombin caused mild concentration-dependent relaxation. These indicate the existence of PAR1 mediating relaxation. Similarly, in resting lower esophageal sphincter strips, trypsin caused moderate concentration-dependent relaxation whereas SLIGRL-NH2 and SLIGKV-NH2 did not cause any relaxation or contraction. In addition, in carbachol-contracted strips, trypsin caused marked whereas SLIGRL-NH2 and SLIGKV-NH2 caused mild concentration-dependent relaxation. These indicate the existence of PAR2 mediating relaxation. The relaxant response of thrombin, TFLLR-NH2, trypsin and SLIGKV-NH2 was insensitive to atropine or tetrodotoxin, suggesting a direct effect. The relaxant response of trypsin was not affected by apamin, charybdotoxin, indomethacin and capsaicin but was attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indicating involvement of NO. FSLLR-NH2, a PAR1 control peptide, and VKGILS-NH2, a PAR2 control peptide, as well as all three PAR4 peptide agonists, GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2, did not cause any relaxation or contraction. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PAR1 and PAR2 but not PAR4 mediate relaxations in the guinea-pig lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:17335921

  13. Mechanism of bombesin-induced tonic contraction of the porcine lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Chung; Chang, Li-Ching; Lin, Kai-Jen; Tey, Shu-Leei; Su, Yu-Tsun; Liu, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Tong-Rong; Huang, Shih-Che

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder that is related to an incompetent lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Previous studies showed that bombesin could increase LES pressure in humans and opossums. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of bombesin on porcine LES contraction. We used the selective agonists, neuromedin B (NMB), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), and [D-Tyr(6),Apa-4Cl(11),Phe(13),Nle(14)]bombesin-(6-14) (DTACPN-BN), as well as receptor antagonists of bombesin receptor subtype 2 (BB2), and 3 (BB3) for ex vivo contraction studies. Atropine, nifedipine, tetrodotoxin, and ω-conotoxin GVIA were used to explore the agonist-induced LES contraction mechanism. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were applied to detect bombesin receptor expression. Our results indicate that GRP and DTACPN-BN, but not NMB, induced tonic contractions of the porcine LES in a dose-dependent manner, and the contractions were inhibited with selective BB2 and BB3 antagonists. The GRP-induced contraction is mainly caused by L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx. However, DTACPN-BN-induced contractions are associated with neuronal conduction. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed that BB2 and BB3 were expressed in the porcine LES. Bombesin-induced tonic contraction of the LES is mediated through BB2 and BB3. Bombesin, BB2, and BB3 agonists might have the potential to treat GERD. PMID:26522854

  14. Pancreatitis following bile duct sphincter of Oddi manometry: utility of the aspirating catheter.

    PubMed

    Sherman, S; Hawes, R H; Troiano, F P; Lehman, G A

    1992-01-01

    The aspirating sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) catheter was shown to reduce the frequency of post-procedure pancreatitis from 31% to 4% following a pancreatic duct evaluation. This study was designed to prospectively evaluate the utility of the aspirating manometry catheter in reducing the frequency of pancreatic enzyme elevation and clinical pancreatitis following isolated bile duct manometry. Thirty-eight patients were randomly assigned to undergo bile duct SOM with the standard perfusion (infused group) catheter or the aspirating catheter (aspirated group). Overall, the frequency of both amylase and lipase level elevation at least two times the upper limits of normal was 30% at 2 hours, 25% at 6 hours, and 18% at 18 hours after the procedure and was similar for the aspirated and infused groups. No episodes of clinical pancreatitis occurred in either group. The SOM catheter was perfused with full-strength contrast in 12 consecutive patients undergoing a bile duct evaluation. Only one patient had any contrast material identified in the pancreatic duct. The results of this study support the theory that increased pancreatic duct hydrostatic pressure is the major cause for post-SOM pancreatitis and suggests that SOM evaluation of the bile duct alone appears to be safe.

  15. Mechanism of bombesin-induced tonic contraction of the porcine lower esophageal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Chung; Chang, Li-Ching; Lin, Kai-Jen; Tey, Shu-Leei; Su, Yu-Tsun; Liu, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Tong-Rong; Huang, Shih-Che

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder that is related to an incompetent lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Previous studies showed that bombesin could increase LES pressure in humans and opossums. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of bombesin on porcine LES contraction. We used the selective agonists, neuromedin B (NMB), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), and [D-Tyr6,Apa-4Cl11,Phe13,Nle14]bombesin-(6-14) (DTACPN-BN), as well as receptor antagonists of bombesin receptor subtype 2 (BB2), and 3 (BB3) for ex vivo contraction studies. Atropine, nifedipine, tetrodotoxin, and ω-conotoxin GVIA were used to explore the agonist-induced LES contraction mechanism. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were applied to detect bombesin receptor expression. Our results indicate that GRP and DTACPN-BN, but not NMB, induced tonic contractions of the porcine LES in a dose-dependent manner, and the contractions were inhibited with selective BB2 and BB3 antagonists. The GRP-induced contraction is mainly caused by L-type Ca2+ channel-mediated Ca2+ influx. However, DTACPN-BN-induced contractions are associated with neuronal conduction. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed that BB2 and BB3 were expressed in the porcine LES. Bombesin-induced tonic contraction of the LES is mediated through BB2 and BB3. Bombesin, BB2, and BB3 agonists might have the potential to treat GERD. PMID:26522854

  16. Surgical treatment of tumors of the distal rectum with sphincter preservation.

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, T M; Oh, C; Steinhagen, R M; Greenstein, A J; Perez, C; Aufses, A H

    1992-01-01

    One hundred one patients with villous adenoma or invasive carcinoma of the distal rectum treated with local excision or coloanal anastomosis were studied. Twenty-three (45%) of the 51 patients with villous adenomas had transanal excision, another 23 (45%) had a posterior proctotomy, and five (10%) had a coloanal anastomosis. Only two patients with a villous adenoma developed a recurrence requiring repeat local excision. Fifteen (30%) of the 50 patients with invasive cancer were treated by transanal excision. All had tumors confined to the submucosa or superficial muscularis. Eighteen (85%) of 21 patients having posterior proctotomy also had tumors with similar depth of invasion. Six (43%) of the 14 patients having coloanal anastomosis had Dukes' B tumors, six (43%) were Dukes' C, and another two (14%) underwent palliative resection. The overall actuarial 5-year survival was 77%. Only four patients treated by transanal excision or posterior proctotomy died of metastatic disease. In the coloanal group, two of 12 patients undergoing curative resection died of recurrent cancer, and another has a pelvic recurrence. Villous adenomas of the distal rectum and selected carcinomas may be treated with local excision and coloanal anastomosis with preservation of sphincter function with good results. PMID:1417192

  17. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction Type III: New studies suggest new approaches are needed

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C Mel

    2015-01-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) has been classified into three types based upon the presence or absence of objective findings including liver test abnormalities and bile duct dilatation. Type III is the most controversial and is classified as biliary type pain in the absence of any these objective findings. Many prior studies have shown that the clinical response to endoscopic therapy is higher based upon the presence of these objective criteria. However, there has been variable correlation of the manometry findings to outcome after endoscopic therapy. Nevertheless, manometry and sphincterotomy has been recommended for Type III patients given the overall response rate of 33%, although the reported response rates are highly variable. However, all of the prior data was non-blinded and non-randomized with variable follow-up. The evaluating predictors in SOD study - a prospective randomized blinded sham controlled one year outcome study showed no correlation between manometric findings and outcome after sphincterotomy. Furthermore, patients receiving sham therapy had a statistically significantly better outcome than those undergoing biliary or dual sphincterotomy. This study calls into question the whole concept of SOD Type III and, based upon prior physiologic studies, one can suggest that SOD Type III likely represents a right upper quadrant functional abdominal pain syndrome and should be treated as such. PMID:26019439

  18. Brachytherapy and Local Excision for Sphincter Preservation in T1 and T2 Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grimard, Laval Stern, Hartley; Spaans, Johanna N. M.Sc.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of brachytherapy after local excision (LE) in the treatment of T1 and T2 rectal cancer at risk of recurrence due to residual subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2007, 32 patients undergoing LE and brachytherapy were followed prospectively for a mean of 6.2 years. Estimates of local recurrence (LR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were generated. Treatment-related toxicity and the effect of known prognostic factors were determined. Results: There were 8 LR (3 T1, 5 T2), of which 5 were salvaged surgically. Median time to the 8 LR was 14 months, and the 5-year rate of local control was 76%. Although there have been 9 deaths to date, only 5 were from disease. Five-year DSS and OS rates were 85% and 78%, respectively. There were 4 cases of Grade 2-3 radionecrosis and 1 case of mild stool incontinence. The sphincter was preserved in 27 of 32 patients. Conclusion: Local excision and adjuvant brachytherapy for T1 and T2 rectal cancer is an appealing treatment alternative to immediate radical resection, particularly in the frail and elderly who are unable to undergo major surgery, as well as for patients wanting to avoid a permanent colostomy.

  19. Effect of caffeine on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in Thai healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lohsiriwat, S; Puengna, N; Leelakusolvong, S

    2006-01-01

    Caffeine affects many aspects of body function including the gastrointestinal system. A single-blinded experimental study was performed to evaluate the effect of caffeine on lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and esophageal peristaltic contractions in healthy Thai adults. The volunteers were six men and six women aged 19-31 years. Subjects drank 100 mL of water. Five wet swallows were performed 30 min after the drink. The basal LES pressure was continuously measured using esophageal manometric technique. They then consumed another 100 mL of water containing caffeine at the dose of 3.5 mg/kg body weight. The swallows and basal LES pressure monitoring were repeated. The results showed no change in basal LES pressure after a water drink while caffeine consumption significantly lowered the pressure at 10, 15, 20 and 25 min. The mean amplitude of contractions and peristaltic velocity were decreased at the distal esophagus at 3 and 8 cm above LES. The mean duration of contraction was decreased at the distal part but increased at the more proximal esophagus. The heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were increased significantly at 10-20 min after caffeine ingestion. This study indicated that caffeine 3.5 mg/kg affected esophageal function, resulting in a decrease in basal LES pressure and distal esophageal contraction, which is known to promote the reflux of gastric contents up into the esophagus.

  20. Expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty for the treatment of OSA: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Kenny P; Pang, Edward B; Win, Ma Thin Mar; Pang, Kathleen A; Woodson, B Tucker

    2016-09-01

    This study seeks to determine the success rates of the expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty and its variants on the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Systematic review and meta-analysis. Two independent searches of MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library and Evidence Based Medicine Reviews to identify publications relevant to OSA and expansion pharyngoplasty. All relevant studies published before 31 March 2015 were included. Five studies were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. The numbers of patients in each paper ranged from 10 to 85 (total = 155), and mean age ranged from 8 to 56 years. Substantial and consistent improvement in PSG outcomes were observed post-expansion pharyngoplasty patients, with or without multilevel surgery groups. The results showed that the expansion pharyngoplasty technique has significantly lower AHI than control group [Standardised mean difference -7.32, 95 %CI (-11.11, -3.52), p = 0.0002]; however, substantial heterogeneity between these studies were observed. The mean pre-operative AHI (in the five papers) improved from 40.0 ± 12.6 to 8.3 ± 5.2 post-operatively. The overall pro-rated pooled success rate for all the patients was 86.3 %. The expansion pharyngoplasty is effective in the management of patients with OSA.

  1. Patterns of esophageal inhibition during swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and transient LES relaxation. Lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, Philippe; Verdier, Eric; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2003-02-01

    Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and esophageal body inhibition co-occur during esophageal peristalsis but not necessarily during pharyngeal stimulation or transient LES relaxation (tLESR). This study examined these relationships and the impact on reflux. Nine young volunteers were studied. An artificial high-pressure zone (HPZ) was established, and pH was recorded 8 and 5 cm proximal to the LES. Pharyngeal stimulation was by water injection and gastric distension with liquid or gas. Peristalsis, pharyngeal stimulation, and spontaneous events were recorded. Swallowing relaxed the LES in 100% of trials (the HPZ in 80%) and caused no reflux. Pharyngeal stimulation relaxed the LES in two-thirds of trials, had no effect on the HPZ, and caused no reflux. Gastric distension was associated with 117 tLESRs, 48% with acid reflux, and 32% with gas reflux; there was no effect on the HPZ. We conclude that LES relaxation is a necessary but not sufficient condition for reflux. LES relaxation and esophageal body inhibition are independent events that may be concurrent (swallowing) or dissociated (tLESR).

  2. Reversal of negative pressure ventilation-induced lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction with metoclopramide.

    PubMed

    Marino, W D; Pitchumoni, C S

    1992-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that lower esophageal sphincter (LES) dysfunction is induced in healthy volunteers placed in negative pressure body ventilators. This is important, because regurgitation of gastric contents and peptic esophagitis are frequent complications of the use of such ventilators. The present study was conducted to determine whether LES dysfunction during the use of these ventilators also occurs in patients with chronic respiratory failure, and whether this dysfunction can be pharmacologically reversed. Seven patients with documented chronic respiratory failure due to COPD were studied. After an overnight fast, esophageal, LES, and gastric pressures were simultaneously recorded in the unassisted state and during mechanically assisted ventilation, after which 10 mg iv metoclopramide were administered to each patient, and pressure recordings were continued for 1 h more. In all seven patients, baseline LES pressures were in the normal range. During the inspiratory cycle of mechanical ventilation, five of the seven patients demonstrated a significant reduction in LES pressure, whereas it was unchanged in the other two. Within 15 min of metoclopramide administration, there was an increase in LES pressure to baseline levels in the five patients in which a significant decrease in LES pressure had occurred. Metoclopramide did not have any effect on the LES pressure of the other two patients. Thus, we conclude that in patients with chronic respiratory failure, as in normals, there is a subset of individuals in whom negative pressure mechanical ventilatory assistance induces dysfunction of the LES, and that this dysfunction is reversible with metoclopramide.

  3. What Are the Risk Factors for Anal Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have few or no known risk factors. Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection Most squamous cell anal cancers ... to be linked to infection by the human papilloma virus (HPV), the same virus that causes cervical ...

  4. Anal Cancer Rates Rising in Many Parts of The World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Health Disparities HPV Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Anal Cancer Health Disparities HPV About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us ...

  5. Anal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P.; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Torres-Cintrón, Mariela; Mercado-Acosta, Juan José; Suárez, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anal cancer is a rare tumor that is associated with oncogenic HPV genotypes. This study aims to compare the age-standardized rates (ASRs) of anal cancer incidence and mortality in men and women living in Puerto Rico (PR) with those of non-Hispanic whites (NHW), non-Hispanic blacks (NHB), and Hispanics (USH) living in the continental United States (US). Methods ASRs were calculated based on cancer data that came from the PR Cancer Central Registry and from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. The age-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) were estimated using Poisson regression models. Results Comparing the period of 2001 to 2004 to that of 1992 to 1996, the incidence of anal cancer increased among NHW, NHB, and PR men. In females, an increase in the incidence was observed for all racial groups except for Puerto Rican women. When evaluating findings by age groups, Puerto Rican men younger than 60 years old had a 20% higher incidence of anal cancer than did USH men of the same age strata (RR: 2.20; 95% CI = 1.48–3.29). However, Puerto Rican females had a lower incidence of anal cancer than NHW and NHB women. An increased percent change in mortality was observed only in NHW and NHB men. A decreasing trend was observed in all racial/ethnic groups except for NHW women. Conclusion Our results support the notion that there are racial/ethnic differences in anal cancer incidence and mortality, with potential disparities among men and women in PR compared with USH men and women. Given the increasing incidence trends in anal cancer, particularly among PR, NHW, and NHB men, further investigation is needed to better elucidate screening practices that can aid in the prevention of anal cancer. PMID:23781623

  6. Unprotected anal Intercourse among Iranian Intra-Venous Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Mirabi, Parvaneh; Yarmohmmadi Vasel, Mosaieb; Moazen, Babak; Sehat, Mahmoud; Rezazadeh, Majid; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prevalence and associated factors of unprotected anal intercourse among Iranian male heterosexual Intra-Venous Drug Users (IDUs). Methods: In a cross-sectional study 360 male heterosexual IDUs were sampled from streets of eight different geographical parts of Iran. Variables such as socio-demographics, HIV knowledge (10 items), and HIV attitude (16 items) were entered to a logistic regression to determine the predictors of unprotected anal intercourse during the past month. Results: From all, 20.8% reported unprotected anal intercourse during the past month. HIV knowledge was not significantly different among IDUs with and without unprotected anal intercourse. High age [odds ratio (OR) = 0.954, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.916–0.992] was associated with a lower likelihood of unprotected anal intercourse, while being not married (OR = 2.301, 95% CI = 1.151–4.601), and high perceived HIV risk (OR = 1.776, 95% CI = 1.376–2.290) were associated with a higher likelihood of unprotected anal intercourse. Conclusion: Although the results might not be generalizable to all Iranian IDUs, this study findings may still be helpful for design and implementation of public health programs in Iran to prevent sexual transmission of HIV through IDUs. PMID:24350203

  7. Castanea sativa Mill. extract contracts gallbladder and relaxes sphincter of Oddi in guinea pig: a natural approach to biliary tract motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Micucci, Matteo; Ioan, Pierfranco; Aldini, Rita; Cevenini, Monica; Alvisi, Vittorio; Ruffilli, Corrado; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2014-07-01

    Impaired gallbladder motility is a contributing factor to gallstone formation. Since many drugs delaying intestinal motility inhibit gallbladder emptying, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect on gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi motility of a Natural Chestnut Wood Extract (NEC) that reduces intestinal motility. In order to evaluate the effect of the extract in normal- and high-risk gallstone conditions, the investigation was performed using tissues from animals fed normal and lithogenic diet. Fifty guinea pigs were administered either control or lithogenic diet. The spontaneous motility of the gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi were recorded on isolated gallbladder tissues; thereafter, the effect of NEC on motility was tested and compared with carbachol (CCh), potassium chloride (KCl), noradrenaline (NA), and A71623. Compared to controls, the lithogenic diet induced an irregular and disordered motor pattern in both the gallbladder and sphincter of Oddi. NEC increased gallbladder and decreased sphincter of Oddi spontaneous motility independently of cholinergic, adrenergic, and CCK-1 receptor-mediated pathways both in controls and in lithogenic diet-fed animals, although the effect was lower in the latter group. The effect was reversible and mediated by calcium channels. The natural extract of chestnut increasing gallbladder contraction and inducing the relaxation of the sphincter of Oddi can be of benefit in pathological conditions associated with increased transit time at risk of gallstones.

  8. Calcium Sensitization Mechanisms in Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Perrino, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    An increase in intracellular Ca2+ is the primary trigger of contraction of gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscles. However, increasing the Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofilaments by elevating myosin light chain phosphorylation also plays an essential role. Inhibiting myosin light chain phosphatase activity with protein kinase C-potentiated phosphatase inhibitor protein-17 kDa (CPI-17) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (MYPT1) phosphorylation is considered to be the primary mechanism underlying myofilament Ca2+ sensitization. The relative importance of Ca2+ sensitization mechanisms to the diverse patterns of GI motility is likely related to the varied functional roles of GI smooth muscles. Increases in CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in response to agonist stimulation regulate myosin light chain phosphatase activity in phasic, tonic, and sphincteric GI smooth muscles. Recent evidence suggests that MYPT1 phosphorylation may also contribute to force generation by reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms responsible for maintaining constitutive CPI-17 and MYPT1 phosphorylation in GI smooth muscles are still largely unknown. The characteristics of the cell-types comprising the neuroeffector junction lead to fundamental differences between the effects of exogenous agonists and endogenous neurotransmitters on Ca2+ sensitization mechanisms. The contribution of various cell-types within the tunica muscularis to the motor responses of GI organs to neurotransmission must be considered when determining the mechanisms by which Ca2+ sensitization pathways are activated. The signaling pathways regulating Ca2+ sensitization may provide novel therapeutic strategies for controlling GI motility. This article will provide an overview of the current understanding of the biochemical basis for the regulation of Ca2+ sensitization, while also discussing the functional importance to different smooth muscles of the GI tract. PMID:26701920

  9. Sphincter of Oddi regulates flow by acting as a variable resistor to flow.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y F; Saccone, G T; Thune, A; Baker, R A; Harvey, J R; Toouli, J

    1992-11-01

    Two models of transsphincteric flow and a model evaluating pumping activity were established in the anesthetized Australian brush-tailed possum to determine whether the sphincter of Oddi (SO) acts as a resistor or as a pump. A simple model of transsphincteric flow (inflow only) demonstrated that at physiological common bile duct (CBD) pressure, 9.5 +/- 0.3 cmH2O (n = 7), transsphincteric flow occurred between SO pressure waves (n = 10). A second more complex transsphincteric flow model was established that permitted simultaneous measurements of inflow, outflow, CBD pressure, SO basal pressure, SO contraction frequency, and amplitude. At physiological CBD pressure, inflow always equaled outflow (157.0 +/- 11.2 and 156.4 +/- 11.4 microliters/min, respectively; n = 7). The SO displayed regular contractions superimposed on a basal pressure of 1.1 +/- 0.4 mmHg. Contraction amplitude was 12.6 +/- 3.0 mmHg and the frequency was 3.6 +/- 0.4 contractions/min (n = 7). Pressure waves recorded in the CBD corresponded to the SO contractions and reflected SO activity. Transsphincteric flow occurred between SO contractions and was obstructed by these contractions. Stimulation of SO activity (basal pressure and contraction frequency) with intra-arterial injections of motilin (200 ng/kg) or erythromycin (200 micrograms/kg) abolished transsphincteric flow. Reduction in SO contraction frequency to 72.7 +/- 7.2% (P < 0.01, paired t test) after administration of Cisapride (2 mg/kg iv) increased transsphincteric flow to 147.6 +/- 12.3% (n = 7, P < 0.05, paired t test). In six possums, possible SO pumping action was evaluated. A manometer was connected to the CBD, and a second manometer was connected to the duodenum surrounding the papilla.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1443142

  10. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  11. Effect of Endoscopic Sphincterotomy for Suspected Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction on Pain-Related Disability Following Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Peter B.; Durkalski, Valerie; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Pauls, Qi; Fogel, Evan; Tarnasky, Paul; Aliperti, Giuseppe; Freeman, Martin; Kozarek, Richard; Jamidar, Priya; Wilcox, Mel; Serrano, Jose; Brawman-Mintzer, Olga; Elta, Grace; Mauldin, Patrick; Thornhill, Andre; Hawes, Robert; Wood-Williams, April; Orrell, Kyle; Drossman, Douglas; Robuck, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Abdominal pain after cholecystectomy is common and may be attributed to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. Management often involves endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with manometry and sphincterotomy. OBJECTIVE To determine whether endoscopic sphincterotomy reduces pain and whether sphincter manometric pressure is predictive of pain relief. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS Multicenter, sham-controlled, randomized trial involving 214 patients with pain after cholecystectomy without significant abnormalities on imaging or laboratory studies, and no prior sphincter treatment or pancreatitis randomly assigned (August 6, 2008-March 23, 2012) to undergo sphincterotomy or sham therapy at 7 referral medical centers. One-year follow-up was blinded. The final follow-up visit was March 21, 2013. INTERVENTIONS After ERCP, patients were randomized 2:1 to sphincterotomy (n = 141) or sham (n = 73) irrespective of manometry findings. Those randomized to sphincterotomy with elevated pancreatic sphincter pressures were randomized again (1:1) to biliary or to both biliary and pancreatic sphincterotomies. Seventy-two were entered into an observational study with conventional ERCP managemeny. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Success of treatment was defined as less than 6 days of disability due to pain in the prior 90 days both at months 9 and 12 after randomization, with no narcotic use and no further sphincter intervention. RESULTS Twenty-seven patients (37%; 95%CI, 25.9%-48.1%) in the sham treatment group vs 32 (23%; 95%CI, 15.8%-29.6%) in the sphincterotomy group experienced successful treatment (adjusted risk difference, −15.6%; 95% CI, −28.0% to −3.3%; P = .01). Of the patients with pancreatic sphincter hypertension, 14 (30%; 95% CI, 16.7%-42.9%) who underwent dual sphincterotomy and 10 (20%; 95% CI, 8.7%-30.5%) who underwent biliary sphincterotomy alone experienced successful treatment. Thirty-seven treated patients (26%; 95% CI,19%-34%) and 25 patients

  12. Development of Human Muscle Protein Measurement with MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chen; Evans, Harlan; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that micro-gravity has a strong influence on the human musculoskeletal system. A number of studies have shown that significant changes in skeletal muscles occur in both space flight and bedrest simulation. In our 5 week bedrest study, the cross-sectional area of soleus-gastrocnemius decreased about 12% while the cross-sectional area of anterior calf muscles decreased about 4%. Using volume measurements, these losses increased after 17 weeks to approximately 30% and 21% respectively. Significant muscle atrophy was also found on the SL-J crew members after only 8 days in space. It is important that these effects are fully understood so that countermeasures can be developed. The same knowledge might also be useful in preventing muscle atrophy related to other medical problems. A major problem with anatomical measurements of muscle during bed rest and microgravity is the influence of fluid shifts and water balance on the measurement of muscle volume, especially when the exposure duration is short and the atrophy is relatively small. Fluid shifts were documented in Skylab by visual observations of blood vessel distention, rapid changes in limb volume, center of mass measurements and subjective descriptions such as puffy faces and head fullness. It has been reported that the muscle water content of biopsied soleus muscles decreased following 8 hours of head down tilt bed rest. Three aspects of fluid shifts that can affect volume measurements are: first, the shift of fluid that occurs whenever there is a change from upright to a recumbent position and vice versa; second, the potential for fluid accumulation in the lower limbs resulting from muscle damage caused by overextending atrophied muscle or swelling caused by deconditioned precapillary sphincter muscles during reambulation; third, the net change of hydration level during and after bed rest or spaceflight. Because of these transitory fluid shifts, muscle protein is expected to represent muscle capacity

  13. [Effects of rehabilitation on neurohumoral regulation of the lower esophageal sphincter in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    PubMed

    Efendieva, M T; Razumov, A N; Poroĭkova, M V

    2002-01-01

    The effects of acupuncture or SHF electromagnetic field in combination with iodine-bromine baths on neurohumoral regulation of the lower esophageal sphincter were studied in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. DMW-therapy in combination with iodine-bromine baths lowered initially elevated level of the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) while acupuncture reduced initially elevated levels of gastrin and VIP. These results show pathogenetic validity of using acupuncture or SHF electromagnetic field in combination with iodine-bromine baths in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease of the first or second degree.

  14. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  15. JC Virus T-Antigen Expression in Anal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sonia; Deveraj, Bikash; Miyai, Katsumi; Luo, Linda; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay; Carethers, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Anal carcinoma is thought driven by HPV infection through interrupting function of cell regulatory proteins such as p53 and pRb. JCV expresses a T-antigen (T-Ag) that causes malignant transformation through development of aneuploidy and interaction with some of the same regulatory proteins as HPV. JCV T-Ag is present in brain, gastric and colon malignancies, but has not been evaluated in anal cancers. We examined a cohort of anal cancers for JCV T-Ag and correlated this with clinicopathologic data. Methods Archived anal carcinomas were analyzed for JCV T-Ag expression. DNA from tumor and normal tissue was sequenced for JCV with viral copies determined by qPCR and Southern blotting. HPV and MSI status was correlated with JCV T-Ag expression. Results Of 21 cases of anal cancer (mean age 49 years, 38% female), 12 (57%) were in HIV-positive individuals. All 21 cancers expressed JCV T-Ag, including 9 HPV-negative specimens. More JCV copies were present in cancer vs. surrounding normal tissue (mean 32.54 copies/μg DNA vs. 2.98 copies/μg DNA, P=0.0267). There was no correlation between disease stage and viral copies, nor between viral copies and HIV-positive or -negative status (28.7 vs. 36.34 copies/μg DNA, respectively, P=0.7804). In subset analysis, we found no association between JCV T-Ag expression and HPV or MSI status. Conclusions Anal carcinomas uniformly express JCV T-Ag and contain more viral copies compared to surrounding normal tissue. JCV and its T-Ag oncogenic protein, presumably through interruption of cell regulatory proteins, may play a role in anal cancer pathogenesis. PMID:24048785

  16. HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in anal carcinomas worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, L; Saunier, M; Alvarado, I; Quirós, B; Salmeron, J; Shin, HR; Pirog, E; Guimerà, N; Hernández, GA; Felix, A; Clavero, O; Lloveras, B; Kasamatsu, E; Goodman, MT; Hernandez, BY; Laco, J; Tinoco, L; Geraets, DT; Lynch, CF; Mandys, V; Poljak, M; Jach, R; Verge, J; Clavel, C; Ndiaye, C; Klaustermeier, J; Cubilla, A; Castellsagué, X; Bravo, IG; Pawlita, M; Quint, W; Muñoz, N; Bosch, FX; Sanjosé, S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the human papillomaviruses (HPV) types in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in cancer dataset. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95%CI:85.1–91.0%) and in 95.4% of AIN 2/3 (95%CI:84.2–99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers. In view of HPV DNA results and high proportion of p16INK4a overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions. PMID:24817381

  17. All's Well That Ends Well: Shakespeare's treatment of anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Cosman, B C

    1998-07-01

    Textual and contextual evidence suggests that the French king's fistula, a central plot device in Shakespeare's play All's Well That Ends Well, is a fistula-in-ano. Anal fistula was known to the lay public in Shakespeare's time. In addition, Shakespeare may have known of the anal fistula treatise of John Arderne, an ancestor on Shakespeare's mother's side. Shakespeare's use of anal fistula differs from all previous versions of the story, which first appeared in Boccaccio's Decameron and from its possible historical antecedent, the fistula of Charles V of France. This difference makes sense given the conventions of Elizabethan comedy, which included anal humor. It is also understandable when one looks at what wounds in different locations mean in European legend. In this light, it is not surprising that subsequent expurgations treat Boccaccio's and Shakespeare's fistulas differently, censoring only Shakespeare's. This reading has implications for the staging of All's Well That Ends Well, and for our view of the place of anal fistulas in cultural history.

  18. Nicorandil associated anal ulcers: an estimate of incidence

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, HS; Barakat, T; Moussa, O; Babu, H; Slaughter, T; Palmer, JG; Hinson, FL

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Nicorandil is a commonly prescribed antianginal medication that has been found to be associated with painful anal ulceration. The incidence of this complication is unknown. We have used the best data available to us to make an estimate of this figure in a health district with a remarkably stable population of approximately 200,000 people. METHODS Using an electronic search of all letters generated from colorectal and gastroenterology clinics as well as endoscopy reports from January 2004 to November 2010, patients with anal ulceration who were taking nicorandil were identified. Other causes of ulceration were excluded by biopsy in the majority of cases. The central hospital and community pharmacy database was interrogated to estimate the number of patients who were prescribed nicorandil over a six-year period (2004-2010). RESULTS A total of 30 patients (24 men, 6 women) with a median age of 79.5 years were identified who fulfilled the criteria of: taking nicorandil; having no other identified cause for anal ulceration; and achieving eventual healing after withdrawal of nicorandil. In the six-year period an estimated mean of 1,379 patients were prescribed nicorandil each year. The mean annual incidence of anal ulcers among nicorandil users is therefore calculated to be in the region of 0.37%. CONCLUSIONS Anal ulceration appears to occur in approximately four in every thousand patients prescribed nicorandil each year. Prescribing physicians should explain the risk of this unpleasant complication to their patients. PMID:22507720

  19. The anal personality: self-disclosure, negativism, self-esteem, and superego severity.

    PubMed

    Fischer, R E; Juni, S

    1982-02-01

    Psychoanalytic implications of anal characterology were operationalized, and an experimental situation devised to test hypotheses of various aspects of interpersonal behavior. Subjects selected for the study had been found to score either high or low on Kline's (Ai3) Anality Scale. Self-disclosure and disclosure reciprocity were shown to be negative functions of anality: productivity and superego measures were also shown to be functions of anality. Self-esteem and socio-economic status did not relate to anality levels, while the hypothesis linking anality with negativism was only partially confirmed. Implications for psychoanalytic and social psychology research are discussed.

  20. [Influence of prostatilen on smooth muscle organs functional activity in surgical patients (clinical and experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Al'-Shukri, S Kh; Aĭvazian, A I; Barabanov, S V; Barabanova, V V; Bobkov, Iu A; Gorbachev, A G; Parastaeva, M M

    1999-01-01

    The action of prostatilen on contractile activity of smooth muscles of isolated line slices of urine bladder of Wistar rats (myography) and arterial vessels of cat kidneys (resistography) was studied. On the basis of clinical cases effectiveness of prostatilen was analysed as a treatment restorting urine bladder function in acute reflex urinary retention after operations in the area of rectal sphincter, as well as in treatment of patients with chronic prostatitis. It is shown, that prostatilen produces contractile action on smooth muscles of renal blood vessels in cats and urine bladder walls in rats and it raises contractile activity of smooth muscles of human urine bladder. The results of experimental and clinical investigations make it possible to recommend the application of this bioregulating preparation for treatment and prophylaxis of disturbances in urination.

  1. Anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh for rectal prolapse and incontinence.

    PubMed

    Sainio, A P; Halme, L E; Husa, A I

    1991-10-01

    Seventeen selected patients (mean age, 74 years)--14 with rectal prolapse and 3 with persisting anal incontinence after previous operations--underwent high anal encirclement with polypropylene mesh. There was no operative mortality. Prolapse recurred in 2 (15 percent) of the 13 patients followed up for 6 months or more (mean, 3.5 years). Three (27 percent) of the 11 patients with associated anal incontinence improved functionally, as did the three operated on for persisting incontinence, but only one patient regained normal continence. No breakage, cutting out, or infection related to the mesh was observed. Because of the risk of fecal impaction encountered in three of our patients, the procedure is not advocated for severely constipated patients. Despite the somewhat disappointing results regarding restoration of continence, we find this method useful in patients with rectal prolapse who are unfit for more extensive surgery, in controlling the prolapse to an acceptable degree. PMID:1914725

  2. Anal carcinoma and HIV infection: is it time for screening?

    PubMed

    Herranz-Pinto, P; Sendagorta-Cudós, E; Bernardino-de la Serna, J I; Peña-Sánchez de Rivera, J M

    2014-03-01

    A 38-year-old white man had a 10-year history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (A3), with no episodes of opportunistic diseases and in good immunologic recovery (CD4 cell count: 450 and indetectable HIV viral load) while on HAART. He presented with a two-month history of mild anal symptoms, including pruritus and episodic bleeding. He referred past episodes of anal warts, self-treated with several topical compounds, all proven unsuccessful. Perianal examination showed erythema and scratching. A 0.5cm sized tumor, with infiltration at the base was detected on digital exam, located at 15mm from the anal margin. Local biopsy driven by high-resolution anuscopy (AAR) yielded a final diagnosis of infiltrative epidermoid carcinoma. Might that neoplasia have been prevented?

  3. A case of langerhans cell histiocytosis with anal fistula.

    PubMed

    Akbayram, Sinan; Akgun, Cihangir; Ozen, Suleyman; Kaya, Avni; Tuncer, Oguz; Yuca, Sevil Ari; Caksen, Huseyin; Oner, Ahmet Faik

    2009-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is an uncommon clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by the proliferation and accumulation of Langerhans cells with local infiltration of tissues and organ destruction. LCH takes many clinical forms, affecting different systems and different sites in the same system with variable outcomes. Bone, skin, lymph node, pituitary, liver, lung, bone marrow and spleen involvement can be seen in patients with LCH. Involvement of the perianal site is rare. In this article, a 16-month-old boy with multiple organ involvement including skin, liver, lung, and bone is presented. Aside from these systemic involvements, he also had a simple anal fistula. According to our best knowledge, this case of LCH with anal fistula is only the second to be reported in childhood. We would like to emphasize that LCH may be associated with anal fistula; therefore, we suggest that patients with LCH should be examined for this condition. PMID:20505285

  4. Treatment of peri-anal fistula in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Giuseppe S; Di Carlo, Sara; Tema, Giorgia; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Del Vecchio Blanco, Giovanna; Fiaschetti, Valeria; Maggi, Giulia; Biancone, Livia

    2014-01-01

    Anal fistulas are a common manifestation of Crohn’s disease (CD). The first manifestation of the disease is often in the peri-anal region, which can occur years before a diagnosis, particularly in CD affecting the colon and rectum. The treatment of peri-anal fistulas is difficult and always multidisciplinary. The European guidelines recommend combined surgical and medical treatment with biologic drugs to achieve best results. Several different surgical techniques are currently employed. However, at the moment, none of these techniques appear superior to the others in terms of healing rate. Surgery is always indicated to treat symptomatic, simple, low intersphincteric fistulas refractory to medical therapy and those causing disabling symptoms. Utmost attention should be paid to correcting the balance between eradication of the fistula and the preservation of fecal continence. PMID:25309057

  5. HIV infection connected to rising anal cancer rates in men in the U.S.

    Cancer.gov

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contributes substantially to the epidemic of anal cancer in men, but not women in the United States, according to new research from NCI. Chart shows overall incidence rates of anal cancers in general population

  6. Primary radiation therapy in the treatment of anal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cantril, S.T.; Green, J.P.; Schall, G.L.; Schaupp, W.C.

    1983-09-01

    From 1966 to 1981, 47 patients with a diagnosis of anal carcinoma were irradiated. This group was composed of 23 males and 24 females, with age ranging from 38 to 84 years (average 64.4 years). Five patients were treated preoperatively and 34 were treated definitively with cancericidal doses of irradiation. Acute radiation reactions requiring a rest-break were noted in 28% of patients, but all were managed as outpatients without untoward chronic sequelae. Chronic complications were noted in 13 patients, including two patients who required colostomy for severe anal stenosis and two who required A-P resection for large painful ulcers. Twenty-eight of 35 patients (80%) treated with irradiation alone have remained locally controlled without further treatment. An additional four have been salvaged by surgery. Only three patients had interstitial implants as part of their treatment course. Actuarial survival at five years for the N/sub 0/ patients and the group as a whole are 95.6 and 79.3%, respectively. It is concluded that external beam irradiation alone, properly fractionated to cancericidal doses, can control anal carcinoma with acceptable morbidity rates and without the use of either chemotherapy or interstitial implants in most cases. There is also a strong correlation suggesting that anal intercourse and male homosexuality play a significant role in the etiology of this disease.

  7. Rhizomelia with anal atresia and anophthalmia: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Ozlem, Giray; Elçin, Bora; Ayfer, Ulgenalp; Oguz, Ateş; Erdener, Ozer; Derya, Erçal

    2008-01-01

    We report a newborn who presented with an unreported combination of anophthalmia, anal atresia, rhizomelia, dextrocardia and corpus callosum agenesis. Clinical and postmortem findings did not match any previously described syndromes with the type of anomalies seen in this patient. We suggested that this combination of congenital malformations might represent a new syndrome.

  8. Spectinomycin in the treatment of anal gonorrhea: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Felman, Y M; William, D C; Corsaro, M C

    1978-01-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective study of 125 male patients treated for anal gonorrhea with 4 g of spectinomycin in a social hygiene clinic. Of those treated, nine (7.2%) still had cultures positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae when tested again five to 14 days after treatment.

  9. "Graciloplasty" in treatment of recurrent complete rectal prolapse: case report.

    PubMed

    Khainga, S O

    2007-08-01

    Gracilis muscle flap was used to treat a seven year old boy with a one year history of recurrent rectal prolapse. Initial perineal surgery in form of Thiersch stitch resulted into failure to control rectal prolapse and damage to anal sphincter. Graciloplasty corrected both problems. PMID:17970009

  10. Implantation of Autologous Adipose-Derived Cells Reconstructs Functional Urethral Sphincters in Rabbit Cryoinjured Urethra

    PubMed Central

    Silwal Gautam, Sudha; Ishizuka, Osamu; Lei, Zhang; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Kurizaki, Yoshiki; Kato, Haruaki; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the ability of autologous adipose-derived cells injected into cryoinjured rabbit urethras to improve urinary continence and explored the possible mechanisms by which it occurred. Adipose tissue was harvested from the perivesical region of nine 10-week-old female New Zealand White rabbits and cultured for 7 days. Immediately after harvesting the tissue, we injured the internal urethral orifice by spraying liquid nitrogen for 20 s. The cultured cells expressed the mesenchymal cell marker STRO1, but not muscle cell markers myoglobin or smooth muscle actin (SMA). Just before implantation, the adipose-derived cells were labeled with the PKH26 fluorescent cell linker. Autologous 2.0×106 adipose-derived cells (five rabbits) or a cell-free control solution (four rabbits) was injected around the cryoinjured urethras at 7 days after injury. Fourteen days later, the leak point pressure (LPP) was measured, and the urethras were harvested for immunohistochemical analyses. At 14 days after implantation, LPP of the cell-implanted group was significantly higher compared with the cell-free control group (p<0.05). In immunohistochemical examination, the reconstructed skeletal and smooth muscle areas in the cell-implanted regions were significantly more developed than those in controls (p<0.01). Implanted PKH26-labeled adipose-derived cells were immunohistochemically positive for myoglobin, SMA, and Pax7 antibodies, which are markers for skeletal muscles, smooth muscles, and myoblast progenitor cells, respectively. In addition, these implanted cells were positive for the nerve cell markers, tubulin β3, S100, and the vascular endothelial cell marker, von Willebrand factor. Furthermore, some of the implanted cells were positive for the transforming growth factor β1, nerve growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor. In conclusion, implantation of autologous adipose-derived cells into the cryoinjured rabbit urethras promoted the recovery of urethral

  11. Identifying the best therapy for chronic anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    Madalinski, Mariusz H

    2011-01-01

    Chronic anal fissure (CAF) is a painful tear or crack which occurs in the anoderm. The optimal algorithm of therapy for CAF is still debated. Lateral internal sphincterotomy (LIS) is a surgical treatment, considered as the ‘gold standard’ therapy for CAF. It relieves CAF symptoms with a high rate of healing. Chemical sphincterotomy (CS) with nitrates, calcium blockers or botulinum toxin (BTX) is safe, with the rapid relief of pain, mild side-effects and no risk of surgery or anesthesia, but is a statistically less effective therapy for CAF than LIS. This article considers if aggressive treatment should only be offered to patients who fail pharmacological sphincterotomy. Aspects of anal fissure etiology, epidemiology and pathophysiology are considered with their meaning for further management of CAF. A molecular model of chemical interdependence significant for the chemistry of CAF healing is examined. Its application may influence the development of optimal therapy for CAF. BTX is currently considered the most effective type of CS and discussion in this article scrutinizes this method specifically. Although the effectiveness of BTX vs. LIS has been discussed, the essential focus of the article concerns identifying the best therapy application for anal fissure. Elements are presented which may help us to predict CAF healing. They provide rationale for the expansion of the CAF therapy algorithm. Ethical and economic factors are also considered in brief. As long as the patient is willing to accept the potential risk of fecal incontinence, we have grounds for the ‘gold standard’ (LIS) as the first-line treatment for CAF. The author concludes that, when the diagnosis of the anal fissure is established, CS should be considered for both ethical and economic reasons. He is convinced that a greater understanding and recognition of benign anal disorders by the GP and a proactive involvement at the point of initial diagnosis would facilitate the consideration of CS at

  12. Local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma: Value of various diagnostic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Grabbe, E.; Winkler, R.

    1985-05-01

    The authors reviewed 51 cases of local recurrence after sphincter-saving resection for rectal and rectosigmoid carcinoma to assess the sensitivity of current diagnostic procedures. A combination of followup serum CEA levels and rectoscopy was found to be most efficient during the first two years after surgery in terms of the time frequency, and location of the recurrence as well as the cost-benefit ratio. On the other hand, almost all recurrent lesions developed extraluminally, infiltrating the suture line secondarily; moreover, one fourth extended outside the bowel wall. Thus in addition to endoscopy, CT is useful as a means of defining the entire mass at the anastomosis as well as detecting pericolic recurrence and is essential if repeat resection is contemplated.

  13. Stress urinary incontinence animal models as a tool to study cell-based regenerative therapies targeting the urethral sphincter.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Imbroda, Bernardo; Lara, María F; Izeta, Ander; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-03-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is a major health problem causing a significant social and economic impact affecting more than 200million people (women and men) worldwide. Over the past few years researchers have been investigating cell therapy as a promising approach for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) since such an approach may improve the function of a weakened sphincter. Currently, a diverse collection of SUI animal models is available. We describe the features of the different models of SUI/urethral dysfunction and the pros and cons of these animal models in regard to cell therapy applications. We also discuss different cell therapy approaches and cell types tested in preclinical animal models. Finally, we propose new research approaches and perspectives to ensure the use of cellular therapy becomes a real treatment option for SUI.

  14. Clinical evaluation of a single daily dose of phenylpropanolamine in the treatment of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence in the bitch

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Stéphanie; Rustichelli, Frederico; Noël, Stéphanie; Hamaide, Annick

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to determine the efficacy of a single daily oral dose of phenylpropanolamine (PPA) in the treatment of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) in bitches. Nine bitches diagnosed with USMI were treated with a single daily dose [1.5 mg/kg body weight (BW)] of PPA for at least 1 month. Urethral pressure profiles (UPP) were performed in 7 dogs before treatment and repeated in 4 of them after treatment. Treatment with PPA resulted in long-term continence in 8/9 bitches. One dog did not respond to PPA and was treated surgically later. Recheck UPPs showed a significant increase in maximal urethral closure pressure in the 4 bitches after treatment with PPA compared to before treatment. In conclusion, long-term continence can be achieved in bitches affected with USMI after administration of a single daily dose of PPA (1.5 mg/kg BW). PMID:22043069

  15. Sphincteroplasty of the Sphincter of Oddi in the Treatment of Benign Distal Obstructions of the Bile Duct

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Seventy patients in whom sphincteroplasty was performed by an original technique are presented. In 65 cases the indication was stenosis of the sphincter of oddi, associated or not with cholelithiasis or hepatic hydatid disease. There were relative indications in another 5 patients. Sphincteroplasty was achieved with the aid of an original probe, and average length of the incision of the ampullary area was 28 mm. In the immediate postoperative period there was one case of acute postoperative pancreatitis, one duodenal fistula and an upper digestive haemorrhage; also a residual stone was detected. All these complications have responded favourably to conservative treatment. There was a single death in an old patient with bronchopneumonia. The late results were very good or good with the exception of two cases: one which presented with cholangitis episodes maintained by duodenal stasis, and one female patient, who after one year from sphincteroplasty had to be reoperated on for an hepatic abscess. PMID:2487060

  16. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  17. Plateau pattern of detrusor contraction: A surrogate indicator of presence of external sphincter dysfunction during micturitional phase of urodynamic study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Mayank Mohan; Jain, Saurabh; Mavuduru, Ravimohan; Singh, Shrawan K.; Mandal, Arup K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dysfunctional voiding results from a disturbance in the coordination between sphincter relaxation and detrusor contraction. Video urodynamic studies with electromyography (EMG) are used for diagnosis but have limitations of availability and interpretation. We identified a plateau type voiding detrusor pressure tracing pattern in these patients with a potential of helping diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Urodynamic data and tracings of adult patients having been diagnosed with external urethral sphincter dysfunction (EUSD) were retrospectively analyzed. The urodynamic studies comprised of pressure flow studies, micturitional urethral pressure profilometry, and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG). Diagnosis of EUSD was based on the presence of intermittent or continuous narrowing in the region of EUS on VCUG along with a urethral-vesical pressure gradient of >20 cm H2O in males and >5 cm H2O in females. Results: A total of 25 patients (14 men and 11 women) with a mean age 36.6 ± 16.5 years, presented with lower urinary tract symptoms (international prostate symptom score 18 ± 5) and were diagnosed with EUSD on urodynamics/cystourethrography. The cause of EUSD was neurogenic DESD in four, dysfunctional voiding in 20 and voluntary pelvic floor squeeze in one. Resting maximum urethral closure pressure at EUS was 142.2 ± 38.3 cmH2O in both sexes. Three patients had detrusor overactivity. EMG activity during voiding was high in 10 patients, low in three, inconclusive in seven, and not performed in three. A plateau type pattern of detrusor contraction was observed in all the patients. This was qualitatively different from the roughly bell-shaped curve of detrusor contraction in men with prostatic obstruction (n = 14) and women with stress urinary incontinence (n = 11). Conclusions: Patients with EUSD have a characteristic plateau pattern of detrusor contraction on urodynamics which can be used as a surrogate for urodynamic diagnosis of nonrelaxing EUSD. PMID

  18. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction and the Formation of Adult Choledochal Cyst Following Cholecystectomy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hong-Tian; Wang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Liang, Bin; Zeng, Jian-Ping; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2015-11-01

    To determine the causes underlying the formation of adult choledochal cyst.Anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction is the most widely accepted theory regarding the etiology of choledochal cyst. However, choledochal cysts have been found in patients in the absence of this anomaly. Because the number of adult patients with choledochal cyst is increasing, it is important to address this controversy.Bile amylase levels in the cysts of 27 patients (8 males and 19 females) who had undergone cholecystectomy were retrospectively evaluated.The average age of the 27 patients was 45.8 ± 10.1 years and the majority (85.2%) were diagnosed with Todani type I cysts. None of the patients had dilatation of the common bile duct prior to surgery. There were 6 (22.2%) patients with anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. However, amylase levels did not significantly differ between patients with and without this anomaly (P = 0.251). According to bile amylase levels, pancreatobiliary reflux was present in 21 (77.8%) patients. The mean amylase level significantly differed in patients with pancreatobiliary reflux (23,462 ± 11,510 IU/L) and those without (235 ± 103 IU/L) (P < 0.001). In patients with pancreatobiliary reflux, only 4 patients had anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. That is, the majority of patients (17/21, 81%) having pancreatobiliary reflux did not have an anomalous junction of the pancreatic and biliary ducts.Since the only explanation for pancreatobiliary reflux in patients with a normal pancreaticobiliary junction is sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, we proposed that the formation of adult choledochal cyst is mainly due to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction.

  19. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction and the Formation of Adult Choledochal Cyst Following Cholecystectomy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hong-Tian; Wang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Liang, Bin; Zeng, Jian-Ping; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2015-11-01

    To determine the causes underlying the formation of adult choledochal cyst.Anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction is the most widely accepted theory regarding the etiology of choledochal cyst. However, choledochal cysts have been found in patients in the absence of this anomaly. Because the number of adult patients with choledochal cyst is increasing, it is important to address this controversy.Bile amylase levels in the cysts of 27 patients (8 males and 19 females) who had undergone cholecystectomy were retrospectively evaluated.The average age of the 27 patients was 45.8 ± 10.1 years and the majority (85.2%) were diagnosed with Todani type I cysts. None of the patients had dilatation of the common bile duct prior to surgery. There were 6 (22.2%) patients with anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. However, amylase levels did not significantly differ between patients with and without this anomaly (P = 0.251). According to bile amylase levels, pancreatobiliary reflux was present in 21 (77.8%) patients. The mean amylase level significantly differed in patients with pancreatobiliary reflux (23,462 ± 11,510 IU/L) and those without (235 ± 103 IU/L) (P < 0.001). In patients with pancreatobiliary reflux, only 4 patients had anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction. That is, the majority of patients (17/21, 81%) having pancreatobiliary reflux did not have an anomalous junction of the pancreatic and biliary ducts.Since the only explanation for pancreatobiliary reflux in patients with a normal pancreaticobiliary junction is sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, we proposed that the formation of adult choledochal cyst is mainly due to sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. PMID:26632721

  20. Bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) selectively stimulate intracellular calcium signaling in different cat iris sphincter cells.

    PubMed

    Spada, Clayton S; Krauss, Achim H-P; Woodward, David F; Chen, June; Protzman, Charles E; Nieves, Amelia L; Wheeler, Larry A; Scott, David F; Sachs, George

    2005-01-01

    Bimatoprost is a synthetic analog of prostaglandin F(2 alpha) ethanolamide (prostamide F(2 alpha)), and shares a pharmacological profile consistent with that of the prostamides. Like prostaglandin F(2 alpha) carboxylic acid, bimatoprost potently lowers intraocular pressure in dogs, primates and humans. In order to distinguish its mechanism of action from prostaglandin F(2 alpha), fluorescence confocal microscopy was used to examine the effects of bimatoprost, prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and 17-phenyl prostaglandin F(2 alpha) on calcium signaling in resident cells of digested cat iris sphincter, a tissue which exhibits contractile responses to both agonists. Constant superfusion conditions obviated effective conversion of bimatoprost. Serial challenge with 100 nM bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) consistently evoked responses in different cells within the same tissue preparation, whereas prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and 17-phenyl prostaglandin F(2 alpha) elicited signaling responses in the same cells. Bimatoprost-sensitive cells were consistently re-stimulated with bimatoprost only, and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) sensitive cells could only be re-stimulated with prostaglandin F(2 alpha). The selective stimulation of different cells in the same cat iris sphincter preparation by bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha), along with the complete absence of observed instances in which the same cells respond to both agonists, strongly suggests the involvement of distinct receptors for prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and bimatoprost. Further, prostaglandin F(2 alpha) but not bimatoprost potently stimulated calcium signaling in isolated human embryonic kidney cells stably transfected with the feline- and human-prostaglandin F(2 alpha) FP-receptor and in human dermal fibroblast cells, and only prostaglandin F(2 alpha) competed with radioligand binding in HEK-feFP cells. These studies provide further evidence for the existence of a bimatoprost-sensitive receptor that is distinct from

  1. Optical induction of muscle contraction at the tissue scale through intrinsic cellular amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jonghee; Choi, Myunghwan; Ku, Taeyun; Choi, Won Jong; Choi, Chulhee

    2014-08-01

    The smooth muscle cell is the principal component responsible for involuntary control of visceral organs, including vascular tonicity, secretion, and sphincter regulation. It is known that the neurotransmitters released from nerve endings increase the intracellular Ca(2+) level in smooth muscle cells followed by muscle contraction. We herein report that femtosecond laser pulses focused on the diffraction-limited volume can induce intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the irradiated smooth muscle cell without neurotransmitters, and locally increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels are amplified by calcium-induced calcium-releasing mechanisms through the ryanodine receptor, a Ca(2+) channel of the endoplasmic reticulum. The laser-induced Ca(2+) increases propagate to adjacent cells through gap junctions. Thus, ultrashort-pulsed lasers can induce smooth muscle contraction by controlling Ca(2+), even with optical stimulation of the diffraction-limited volume. This optical method, which leads to reversible and reproducible muscle contraction, can be used in research into muscle dynamics, neuromuscular disease treatment, and nanorobot control. PMID:23650149

  2. Nitric oxide: Mediator of nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerve-induced responses of opossum esophageal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.; Du, C.; Conklin, J.L.; Ledlow, A.; Bates, J.N. )

    1991-03-15

    Nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) nerves of the opossum esophagus mediate relaxation of circular muscle from the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and the off contraction of circular esophageal muscle. The latencies between the end of the stimulus and the off contraction describe a gradient such that the latency is longest in muscle from the caudad esophagus. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, and nitric oxide were used to test the hypothesis that NO is a mediator of these nerve-induced responses. Both electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic esophageal nerves and exogenous NO relaxed LES muscle. Only EFS-induced relaxation was inhibited by L-NNA. L-arginine, the substrate for NO synthase, antagonized the inhibitory effect of L-NNA. Exogenous NO neither relaxed nor contracted circular esophageal muscle. Both the amplitude and the latency of the off contraction were diminished by L-NNA. L-arginine antagonized the action of L-NNA. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine also attenuated the gradient in the latency of the off response by shortening latencies in muscle form the caudad esophagus. It had no effect on cholinergic nerve-induced contraction of longitudinal esophageal muscle. These data support the hypothesis that NO or an NO-containing compound mediates NANC nerve-induced responses of the esophagus and LES.

  3. Muscles of facial expression in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes): descriptive, comparative and phylogenetic contexts

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Anne M; Waller, Bridget M; Parr, Lisa A; Bonar, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Facial expressions are a critical mode of non-vocal communication for many mammals, particularly non-human primates. Although chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) have an elaborate repertoire of facial signals, little is known about the facial expression (i.e. mimetic) musculature underlying these movements, especially when compared with some other catarrhines. Here we present a detailed description of the facial muscles of the chimpanzee, framed in comparative and phylogenetic contexts, through the dissection of preserved faces using a novel approach. The arrangement and appearance of muscles were noted and compared with previous studies of chimpanzees and with prosimians, cercopithecoids and humans. The results showed 23 mimetic muscles in P. troglodytes, including a thin sphincter colli muscle, reported previously only in adult prosimians, a bi-layered zygomaticus major muscle and a distinct risorius muscle. The presence of these muscles in such definition supports previous studies that describe an elaborate and highly graded facial communication system in this species that remains qualitatively different from that reported for other non-human primate species. In addition, there are minimal anatomical differences between chimpanzees and humans, contrary to conclusions from previous studies. These results amplify the importance of understanding facial musculature in primate taxa, which may hold great taxonomic value. PMID:16441560

  4. A rare case of anal porocarcinoma treated by electrochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Lorenzo, Borgognoni; Pescitelli, Leonardo; Leonardo, Pescitelli; Urso, Carmelo; Carmelo, Urso; Brandani, Paola; Paola, Brandani; Sestini, Serena; Serena, Sestini; Chiarugi, Cristina; Cristina, Chiarugi; Gelli, Riccardo; Riccardo, Gelli; Giannotti, Vanni; Vanni, Giannotti; Gerlini, Gianni; Gianni, Gerlini

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of an old woman with an eccrine porocarcinoma unusually localized in the perianal area treated by electrochemotherapy, a new technique, emerging as a very effective local treatment of different skin metastases and selected primary tumors. Electrochemotherapy was performed taking into account patient wishes and refusal of demolitive surgery. The electrochemotherapy treatment was well tolerated by the patient, it gave an excellent clinical response and a complete clinical regression with no sphincter dysfunction and signs of relapse observed during follow-up. The case is of particular interest for the exceptional localization of porocarcinoma for the first time treated by electrochemotherapy in this area. Electrochemotherapy could be considered as an alternative option for selected cases of cutaneous tumors. PMID:25525852

  5. The Urethral Rhabdosphincter, Levator Ani Muscle, and Perineal Membrane: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Gen

    2014-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the rhabdosphincter and adjacent tissues is mandatory during urologic surgery to ensure reliable oncologic and functional outcomes. To characterize the levator ani (LA) function for the urethral sphincter, we described connective tissue morphology between the LA and urethral rhabdosphincter. The interface tissue between the LA and rhabdosphincter area in males contained abundant irregularly arrayed elastic fibers and smooth muscles. The male rhabdosphincter was positioned alongside the LA to divide the elevation force and not in-series along the axis of LA contraction. The male perineal membrane was thin but solid and extends along the inferior margin or bottom of the rhabdosphincter area. In contrast, the female rhabdosphincter, including the compressor urethrae and urethrovaginal sphincter muscles, was embedded in the elastic fiber mesh that is continuous with the thick, multilaminar perineal membrane. The inferomedial edge of the female LA was attached to the upper surface of the perineal membrane and not directly attached to the rhabdosphincter. We presented new diagrams showing the gender differences in topographical anatomy of the LA and rhabdosphincter. PMID:24877147

  6. Tumors and Tumorlike Conditions of the Anal Canal and Perianal Region: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Surabhi, Venkateswar R; Menias, Christine O; Amer, Ahmed M; Elshikh, Mohamed; Katabathina, Venkata S; Hara, Amy K; Baughman, William C; Kielar, Ania; Elsayes, Khaled M; Siegel, Cary L

    2016-01-01

    Tumors and tumorlike conditions of the anus and perianal region originate from the anal canal and anal margin or result from direct extension of tumors from adjacent organs. The anatomy of the anal canal is complex, and its different histologic characteristics can lead to diverse pathologic conditions. The anal canal extends from the anorectal junction to the anal verge. The World Health Organization classification of anal canal tumors includes (a) anal intraepithelial neoplasia, the precursor of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and (b) invasive tumors. Invasive tumors are further classified on the basis of cell type as epithelial tumors (SCC, adenocarcinoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, small cell carcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma), nonepithelial tumors, carcinoid tumors, melanoma, and secondary tumors (direct spread from rectal, cervical, or prostate carcinoma). The anal margin, or perianal skin, lies outside the anal verge and encompasses a radius of 5 cm from the anal verge. Tumors in the anal margin are classified according to the World Health Organization classification of skin tumors. Anal margin tumors include SCC, anal intraepithelial neoplasia, also known as Bowen disease, adenocarcinoma and its precursor Paget disease, basal cell carcinoma, and verrucous carcinoma (Buschke-Löwenstein tumor), which is a rare variant of SCC. Imaging plays an important role in the evaluation, staging, and follow-up of patients with anal and perianal tumors. However, because of the overlap in imaging features among these diverse entities, a definitive diagnosis is best established at histopathologic examination. Nevertheless, familiarity with the pathogenesis, imaging features, and treatment of these tumors can aid radiologic diagnosis and guide appropriate patient treatment. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618320

  7. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  8. Anal cancer treatment: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ghosn, Marwan; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Abdayem, Pamela; Antoun, Joelle; Nasr, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancers (AC) are relatively rare tumors. Their incidence is increasing, particularly among men who have sex with other men due to widespread infection by human papilloma virus. The majority of anal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, and they are treated according to stage. In local and locally advanced AC, concomitant chemoradiation therapy based on mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the current best treatment, while metastatic AC, chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin remains the gold standard. There are no indications for induction or maintenance therapies in locally advanced tumors. Many novel strategies, such as targeted therapies, vaccination, immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy are in clinical trials for the treatment of AC, with promising results in some indications. PMID:25741135

  9. Innovations in chronic anal fissure treatment: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Aaron; Tan, Kok-Yang; Seow-Choen, Francis

    2010-01-01

    A chronic anal fissure is a common perianal condition. This review aims to evaluate both existing and new therapies in the treatment of chronic fissures. Pharmacological therapies such as glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), Diltiazem ointment and Botulinum toxin provide a relatively non-invasive option, but with higher recurrence rates. Lateral sphincterotomy remains the gold standard for treatment. Anal dilatation has no role in treatment. New therapies include perineal support devices, Gonyautoxin injection, fissurectomy, fissurotomy, sphincterolysis, and flap procedures. Further research is required comparing these new therapies with existing established therapies. This paper recommends initial pharmacological therapy with GTN or Diltiazem ointment with Botulinum toxin as a possible second line pharmacological therapy. Perineal support may offer a new dimension in improving healing rates. Lateral sphincterotomy should be offered if pharmacological therapy fails. New therapies are not suitable as first line treatments, though they can be considered if conventional treatment fails. PMID:21160880

  10. Contact sensitization in the anal and genital area.

    PubMed

    Bauer, A; Oehme, S; Geier, J

    2011-01-01

    We analysed the patch test results in 1,374 patients suffering from dermatoses in the anogenital area (n = 561 genital dermatoses, n = 470 anal dermatoses, n = 343 anogenital dermatoses) patch tested in 44 dermatological departments of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology from 2004 to 2008. All other patients patch tested during this time period without anogenital dermatoses formed the control group (n = 49, 142). Of the total study group, 662 (48.2%) patients were male. 179 (13%) had a past or present atopic dermatitis. The vast majority of the patients was older than 40 years (n = 989, 72%). Suspected allergen sources were first of all topical medicaments, followed by cosmetics, cleansing agents, clothes, rubber products, systemic medicaments and disinfectants. Allergic contact dermatitis was diagnosed in 409 (29.8%) of the tested patients. Patients with anogenital dermatoses were sensitized mainly to active agents of topical medicaments, in particular bufexamac (5.3%). Sensitization pattern and sensitization rates observed in patients with genital and anal involvement differed significantly. Patients with anal disease had significantly higher sensitization rates for bufexamac (9.4 vs. 1.1%), fragrance mix I (8.7 vs. 4.2%) and II (4.5 vs. 2.6%), propolis (5.4 vs. 1.9%) and methyldibromoglutaronitrile (6.3 vs. 4.1%). Patients with chronic anal dermatoses seem to have a higher risk to develop sensitizations to topically applied products and drugs than patients with genital dermatoses. Recommended patch test series (German Contact Dermatitis Research Group) are standard series, local anaesthetics series, topical antibiotics, antimycotics, steroids, ointment bases and preservative series as well as the patients' own products.

  11. [Hemorrhoidal disease accompanied by anal prolapsus and its treatment methods].

    PubMed

    Dzhavalov, É A; Khalilova, L F

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate specifications of the surgery, its post-operative period and complications in patients with traditional hemorrhoidectomy which is a procedure performed by using a linear stapler along with a circular resection of prolapsed mucosal and sub-mucosal layers of lower rectal ampulla with the utilization of Longo technique. The study was conducted with the participation of 398 patients with the hemorrhoidal disease accompanied by anal prolapsus of which 338 (84%) were composed of males and 65 (16%) of females. Out of 398 patients, 308 (77%) underwent stapler hemorrohidectomy using linear stapler, 74 (19%) patients had conventional hemorrhoidectomy with the utilization of electric coagulation and 16 (4%) of them received circular hemorroidopexy using Longo technique. According to the data obtained during this research linear stapler use in the treatment of hemorroidal desease, accompanied by anal prolapses is an effective and technically simple solution to the problem. This method is implemented quickly, allows to cover greater part of abnormally changed cavernous tissue and conduct persist lifting of anal canal mucosal layer. It is also a safe method without any disease relapses.

  12. [Hemorrhoidal disease accompanied by anal prolapsus and its treatment methods].

    PubMed

    Dzhavalov, É A; Khalilova, L F

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate specifications of the surgery, its post-operative period and complications in patients with traditional hemorrhoidectomy which is a procedure performed by using a linear stapler along with a circular resection of prolapsed mucosal and sub-mucosal layers of lower rectal ampulla with the utilization of Longo technique. The study was conducted with the participation of 398 patients with the hemorrhoidal disease accompanied by anal prolapsus of which 338 (84%) were composed of males and 65 (16%) of females. Out of 398 patients, 308 (77%) underwent stapler hemorrohidectomy using linear stapler, 74 (19%) patients had conventional hemorrhoidectomy with the utilization of electric coagulation and 16 (4%) of them received circular hemorroidopexy using Longo technique. According to the data obtained during this research linear stapler use in the treatment of hemorroidal desease, accompanied by anal prolapses is an effective and technically simple solution to the problem. This method is implemented quickly, allows to cover greater part of abnormally changed cavernous tissue and conduct persist lifting of anal canal mucosal layer. It is also a safe method without any disease relapses. PMID:24781070

  13. Carcinoma of the anal sac glands in ranch mink.

    PubMed

    Hadlow, W J

    1985-05-01

    During a 14-year period, carcinoma of the anal sac apocrine glands was found in 52 pastel and 8 sapphire mink (Mustela vison) kept for studies on slow viral diseases. The pastel mink varied in age from 72 to 135 months (mean age 108 months), the sapphire mink from 63 to 100 months (mean age 81 months). All but one pastel mink were females. The primary tumor varied in size from masses that caused bulges in the perineum to those that were found only after microscopic examination of the anal sac glands. Although the primary tumor grew mainly by expansion with little local infiltration, 41 of the 60 tumors had metastasized to the regional lymph nodes and sometimes also to more distant sites. The striking propensity of the carcinoma to metastasize while still small, even microscopic, often resulted in massive secondary growths, notably in the iliac lymph nodes. Hypercalcemia did not accompany the carcinoma. Its varied microscopic appearance included solid, glandular, squamous cell, and spindle or round cell components. Combinations of them formed mixed or complex histologic patterns, no doubt largely attributable to neoplastic proliferation of myoepithelial cells and squamous metaplasia of the apocrine gland epithelium. Although its cause remains obscure, the carcinoma appeared to arise from small foci of hyperplastic apocrine glands, sometimes in relation to both anal sacs. The tumor is a common and distinctive expression of neoplasia in older ranch mink.

  14. Anatomical considerations of the longitudinal pharyngeal muscles in relation to their function on the internal surface of pharynx.

    PubMed

    Choi, Da-Yae; Bae, Jung-Hee; Youn, Kwan-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Jin; Hu, Kyung-Seok

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the topography of the longitudinal pharyngeal muscles and to relate the findings to pharyngeal muscular function. Forty-four specimens (22 right and 22 left sides) from embalmed Korean adult cadavers (13 males, 9 females; age range, 46-89 years; mean age, 69.2 years) were used in this study. The palatopharyngeus muscle originated from the palatine aponeurosis and the median part of the soft palate on oral aspect; it ran downward and lateralward, respectively. The palatopharyngeus muscle, which held the levator veli palatini, was divided into two bundles, medial and lateral, according to the positional relationship with the levator veli palatini. The lateral bundle of the palatopharyngeus muscle was divided into two parts: longitudinal and transverse. The pharyngeal longitudinal muscles were classified into the following four types (I-IV) depending on the area of insertion: they were inserted into the palatine tonsil, epiglottis, arytenoid cartilage, piriform recess, thyroid cartilage, and pharyngeal wall. The transverse part of the palatopharyngeus muscle plays a role as a sphincter. Palatopharyngeus and levator veli palatini muscles help each other to function effectively in the soft palate. The present findings suggest that the pharyngeal muscles are involved not only in swallowing but also in respiration and phonation via their attachment to the laryngeal cartilage.

  15. Conceptualizations of heterosexual anal sex and HIV risk in five East African communities.

    PubMed

    Duby, Zoe; Colvin, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Heterosexual anal sex is underresearched and little understood, particularly in the African context. Existing prevalence data indicate that heterosexual anal sex is a widespread practice, yet little is known about the way in which it is conceptualized and understood. Describing findings from qualitative research conducted in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, we shed light on conceptualizations of heterosexual anal sex and its relation to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These findings suggest that penile-anal sex is practiced by men and women in Africa for a range of reasons, including virginity maintenance, contraception, fulfillment of male pleasure, relationship security, menstruation, in the presence of vaginal complications, financial gain, fidelity, and prestige. Despite anal sex being the most efficient way to transmit HIV sexually, there is widespread lack of knowledge about its risks. These findings describe the ways in which anal sex is conceptualized in five East African communities, highlighting how penile-anal intercourse is often not considered "sex" and how the omission of anal sex in safe-sex messaging is interpreted as meaning that anal sex is safe. In light of its frequency and risks, greater attention must be paid to heterosexual anal sex in Africa to ensure a comprehensive approach to HIV prevention.

  16. Straight ileo-anal anastomosis with myectomy as an alternative to ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in restorative proctocolectomy.

    PubMed

    Landi, E; Landa, L; Fianchini, A; Marmorale, C; Piloni, V

    1994-04-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with various types of reservoir is widely used in the elective surgery of ulcerative colitis and familial adenomatous polyposis. Both, advantages and disadvantages of this procedure are well known and documented. Straight ileo-anal anastomosis (IAA) yields unsatisfactory clinical results due to the lack of storage capacity of the distal ileum and the frequency of bowel movements related to high pressure ileal waves. In an attempt to create an alternative to the above procedures, we have performed a straight ileo-anal anastomosis with two rectangular (10 cm x 1 cm) myectomies down to 2 cm, above the anastomotic line. The two myectomies are spaced at 120 degrees to each other and to the mesenteric border of the ileal loop. The rationale of this approach is to reduce the peristaltic drive of the ileum by weakening the muscular wall. This study presents the results in three patients operated on with this new method in the last year.

  17. Effects of Age, Gender, Bolus Condition, Viscosity, and Volume on Pharyngeal and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Pressure and Temporal Measurements during Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Susan G.; Stuart, Andrew; Castell, Donald; Russell, Gregory B.; Koch, Kenneth; Kemp, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of trial (i.e., Trial 1 vs. Trial 2); viscosity (i.e., saliva, thin, nectar-thick, honey-thick, and pudding-thick water); volume (i.e., 5 mL vs. 10 mL); age (i.e., young vs. older adults); and gender on pharyngeal (i.e., upper and lower) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures,…

  18. Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Prevalences and Factors Associated with Abnormal Anal Cytology in HIV-Infected Women in an Urban Cohort from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Paula M.; Lake, Jordan E.; Levi, José Eduardo; Coutinho, José Ricardo; de Andrade, Angela; Heinke, Thais; Derrico, Mônica; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Friedman, Ruth K.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Identifying factors, including human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, associated with abnormal anal cytology in HIV-infected women have implications for anal squamous cell cancer (SCC) prevention in HIV-infected women. Anal and cervical samples were collected for cytology, and tested for high-(HR-HPV) and low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) genotypes in a cross-sectional analysis of the IPEC Women's HIV Cohort (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Multivariate log-binomial regression models estimated prevalence ratios for factors associated with abnormal anal cytology [≥atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, (ASC-US)]. Characteristics of the 863 participants included: median age 42 years, 57% non-white, 79% current CD4+ T-cell count >350 cells/mm3, 53% HIV-1 viral load <50 copies/mL, median ART duration 5.8 years. Fifty-one percent of anal specimens contained ≥1 HR-HPV genotype; 31% had abnormal anal cytology [14% ASC-US, 11% low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesion, (LSIL); 2% atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high-grade SIL (ASC-H); 4% high-grade SIL/cancer (HSIL+)]. In multivariate analysis, cervical LSIL+, nadir CD4+ T-cell count ≤50 cells/mm3, HIV-1 viral load ≥50 copies/mL, and anal HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 33, 45, 52, 56, and 58 were associated with ≥anal ASC-US (p<0.05). Abnormal anal cytology and HR-HPV prevalences were high. HIV-infected women with cervical LSIL+, low nadir CD4+ counts, or detectable HIV-1 viral loads should be a particular focus for enhanced anal SCC screening efforts. PMID:25361401

  19. Effects of pinaverium bromide in the premedication of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography and on motor activity of the sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Lamazza, A; Tofi, A; Bolognese, A; Fontana, B; De Masi, E; Frontespezi, S

    1986-01-01

    A double-blind study was carried out in 18 patients with biliary and pancreatic disease to assess the use of pinaverium bromide in premedication for endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography and its effects on motor activity of the sphincter of Oddi. Patients were divided at random into three groups. One group received 100 mg pinaverium bromide twice daily for 3 days before and then 100 mg 1 hour before the examination, the second group received placebo, and the third had no medication. All patients received 10 to 20 mg diazepam intravenously 10 minutes before endoscopy. Assessments were made of the transit time of various endoscopic phases and patients' tolerance of the procedure. The effects of treatment on the sphincter of Oddi were estimated by means of endoscopic manometry. The results showed that pinaverium bromide allowed transit time reduction in endoscopic procedure, a greater tolerance on the part of the patient and marked reduction in the amplitude and duration of the phasic activity of the sphincter. PMID:3780291

  20. Location of the lower oesophageal sphincter and the squamous columnar mucosal junction in 109 healthy controls and 778 patients with different degrees of endoscopic oesophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Csendes, A; Maluenda, F; Braghetto, I; Csendes, P; Henriquez, A; Quesada, M S

    1993-01-01

    In this study the location of the lower oesophageal sphincter measured by manometry and the location of the squamous columnar junction measured by endoscopy were determined in 109 healthy controls and 778 patients with different degrees of endoscopic oesophagitis. No significant differences in the prevalence and severity of the heartburn and regurgitation were observed when different degrees of oesophagitis were compared but dysphagia was more common and severe in patients with complicated Barrett's oesophagus (p < 0.001). This group also showed a male predominance and older age compared with other groups. The total length of the oesophagus, measured by the location of the distal end of the lower oesophageal sphincter was similar in all patients; however, the location of the squamous columnar junction extended more proximally and was related to the increasing severity of endoscopic oesophagitis. The manometric defects at the cardia were more frequent in severe oesophagitis (p < 0.001). These results suggest that, during the course of oesophagitis, the squamous columnar junction is displaced proximally. This displacement is limited to the mucosa, however, and does not involve the muscular layer, because the lower oesophageal sphincter undergoes no dislocation. PMID:8432446

  1. Fistula-in-ano. A manometric study.

    PubMed

    Belliveau, P; Thomson, J P; Parks, A G

    1983-03-01

    The functional outcome of fistula surgery can be quantitated by anal manometry. A closed, water-filled microballoon (0.5 X 1.0 cm) system was used to measure resting anal pressure and maximal squeeze pressure in 47 patients with anal fistulas at St. Mark's Hospital. After treatment of intersphincteric fistulas, there was a significant reduction in resting pressure in the distal 2 cm. In treated transphincteric fistulas and suprasphincteric fistulas, anal pressure was reduced in the distal 3 cm. A significant lower pressure was measured in patients having the external sphincter divided, compared with those having the muscle preserved. Disturbance of continence was related to abnormally low resting pressure in six patients. This study supports attempts at sphincter preservation in fistula surgery. PMID:6825520

  2. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  3. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000111.htm Eye muscle repair - discharge To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle problems that ...

  4. High-Resolution Manometry Evaluation of the Pharynx and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Motility in Patients with Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mariano A; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2015-10-01

    The motility of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) is still poorly understood. It is also unclear if the motility of this area may be compromised in patients with achalasia. This study aims to evaluate the motility of the pharynx, UES, and proximal esophagus in patients with esophageal achalasia. Sixty patients with achalasia underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) (52 % females, mean age 54 years). Esophageal dilatation was classified according to the radiologic diameter in Type I (<4 cm): 6 %; Type II (4-7 cm): 36 %; Type III (7-10 cm): 34 %; and Type IV (>10 cm): 24 %. HRM classified 43 % of the patients as Chicago Type I and 57 % as Type II. Manometric parameters were compared to normal values obtained from a previous study in volunteers. The motility of the velopharynx showed short, premature, and hypertonic contraction. The epiglottis also showed hypertonic contraction. The UES had increased residual pressure. Chicago classification Type II patients had higher UES residual pressure (p = 0.03). The degree of esophageal dilatation did not correlate with manometric parameters. Achalasia may affect the motility of the pharyngo-upper esophageal area. The changes observed may represent functional alterations to prevent aspiration, especially in patients with Chicago classification Type II achalasia.

  5. Anal Pap Screening for HIV-infected Men Who Have Sex With Men: Practice Improvement.

    PubMed

    Welbeck, Monique

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) have the highest rates of anal dysplasia and anal cancer when compared to HIV-uninfected MSM and when compared to HIV-infected heterosexual men and women. Despite significantly increasing rates of anal dysplasia and anal cancer in HIV-infected MSM, in many settings, no standard protocol is in place to screen for anal dysplasia in this high-risk group. A practice improvement project was conducted at a primary care health center to educate the HIV health care team about anal Pap screening in an effort to increase provider knowledge and rates of anal Pap screening performed as part of primary comprehensive care for HIV-infected MSM. Increased health care provider knowledge of anal Pap screening within this setting resulted in increased anal Pap screening for HIV-infected MSM. Routine screening leads to improved surveillance and treatment of precancerous lesions, decreasing morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected MSM.

  6. FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of anal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, Shane E.; Grigsby, Perry W. . E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu; Siegel, Barry A.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Surgical staging and treatment of anal carcinoma has been replaced by noninvasive staging studies and combined modality therapy. In this study, we compare computed tomography (CT) and physical examination to [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the staging of carcinoma of the anal canal, with special emphasis on determination of spread to inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between July 2003 and July 2005, 41 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved anal carcinoma underwent a complete staging evaluation including physical examination, CT, and 2-FDG-PET/CT. Patients ranged in age from 30 to 89 years. Nine men were HIV-positive. Treatment was with standard Nigro regimen. Results: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) detected 91% of nonexcised primary tumors, whereas CT visualized 59%. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal uptake in pelvic nodes of 5 patients with normal pelvic CT scans. FDG-PET/CT detected abnormal nodes in 20% of groins that were normal by CT, and in 23% without abnormality on physical examination. Furthermore, 17% of groins negative by both CT and physical examination showed abnormal uptake on FDG-PET/CT. HIV-positive patients had an increased frequency of PET-positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: [{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography detects the primary tumor more often than CT. FDG-PET/CT detects substantially more abnormal inguinal lymph nodes than are identified by standard clinical staging with CT and physical examination.

  7. Biomaterials in the Treatment of Anal Fistula: Hope or Hype?

    PubMed Central

    Scoglio, Daniele; Walker, Avery S.; Fichera, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Anal fistula (AF) presents a chronic problem for patients and colorectal surgeons alike. Surgical treatment may result in impairment of continence and long-term risk of recurrence. Treatment options for AFs vary according to their location and complexity. The ideal approach should result in low recurrence rates and minimal impact on continence. New technical approaches involving biologically derived products such as biological mesh, fibrin glue, fistula plug, and stem cells have been applied in the treatment of AF to improve outcomes and decrease recurrence rates and the risk of fecal incontinence. In this review, we will highlight the current evidence and describe our personal experience with these novel approaches. PMID:25435826

  8. Unexpected Anal Squamous Cells Carcinoma after Open Hemorrhoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Navarra; Valentina, Abruzzese; Federico, Sista; Renato, Pietroletti

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of unexpected anal squamous cells carcinoma found in hemorrhoidectomy specimen. The patient had a 3-year history of prolapsing hemorrhoids. A prolapsing hemorrhoid was present at eleven o'clock in lithotomy. Milligan-Morgan was performed and gross examination of the specimen was unremarkable. Histopathologic evaluation showed noninvasive squamous cells carcinoma. The present case report evidences the opportunity of routine histopathologic analysis of hemorrhoidal specimens particularly in case of long-standing prolapse. Questions arise in the option of those techniques where no specimens are collected or tissue is excised far from deceased area. PMID:25922781

  9. Unexpected anal squamous cells carcinoma after open hemorrhoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Luca, Navarra; Valentina, Abruzzese; Federico, Sista; Renato, Pietroletti

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of unexpected anal squamous cells carcinoma found in hemorrhoidectomy specimen. The patient had a 3-year history of prolapsing hemorrhoids. A prolapsing hemorrhoid was present at eleven o'clock in lithotomy. Milligan-Morgan was performed and gross examination of the specimen was unremarkable. Histopathologic evaluation showed noninvasive squamous cells carcinoma. The present case report evidences the opportunity of routine histopathologic analysis of hemorrhoidal specimens particularly in case of long-standing prolapse. Questions arise in the option of those techniques where no specimens are collected or tissue is excised far from deceased area.

  10. Malignant melanoma of the anal canal: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Barbus, Roxana; Rancea, Alin; Fetica, Bogdan; Spârchez, Zeno

    2009-01-01

    This article is one case report of 49 year-old woman diagnosed with malignant melanoma of the anal canal. The tumor was detected at early stage and initially treated with local excision, followed by adjuvant interstitial brachytherapy. Since the patient complained of painful local ulceration and atypical cells were found at biopsy, abdominoperineal resection of the rectum was performed and a sterile specimen was obtained, proving the efficacy of adjuvant brachytherapy for local control. Patient is now considered disease free for 30 months after primary treatment.

  11. A rare case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as anal fissure

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; INTAGLIATA, E.; FIUMARA, P.F.; VILLARI, L.; MARCHESE, S.; CACCIOLA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a tumor composed of myeloblasts occurring at an extramedullary site. It may develop in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myeloproliferative or myelodysplastic syndrome, sometimes preceding onset of the systemic disease. Frequent sites of myeloid sarcoma are bones or various soft tissues. Gastrointestinal involvement is very rare. We report a unique case of myeloid sarcoma presenting as a painful anal fissure, in a patient with a history of acute myeloid leukemia. The diagnosis was achieved by a surgical excisional biopsy and immunoistochemical staining. PMID:26712260

  12. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n = 20) and male (n = 17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p)  = p × ACSA(max)  × L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy.

  13. The hero, the anima and the claustrum: anality and idealization.

    PubMed

    Meredith-Owen, William

    2012-04-01

    Joe Redfearn's (1979) classic paper 'The captive, the treasure, the hero and the anal stage of development' is recognized as seminal to the development of Jungian thought about anality, particularly its integration with mainstream (Freudian, Kleinian) psychoanalytic perspectives. This paper develops such an approach through drawing on contributions from Meltzer, Green, Bion, Chasseguet-Smirgel and Kernberg. More specifically, it is argued that over-investment in hero and anima archetypal configurations may represent an attempt to replace the resource of the internal parental couple that, at the level of unconscious phantasy, has been destroyed by the aggrieved child's attack on the primal scene. Unless this usually dissociated sadism can be integrated, the creative epistemophilic instinct may remain blunted, giving rise, through projective identification, to the adoption of a pseudo-adult identity based on appropriation or assertion. This in turn may lead to manic attempts to reach authentic ('animating') experience through the (often erotized) excitement of heroic endeavour. Consideration of both Redfearn's and the author's own clinical material demonstrates how close attention to process as well as content is fundamental to revealing and addressing such likely-to-be dissociated scenarios. PMID:22444354

  14. Comprehensive multiplatform biomarker analysis of 199 anal squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Smaglo, Brandon G.; Tesfaye, Anteneh; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Meyer, Joshua E.; Wang, Jue; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Arguello, David; Boland, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is a rare, HPV-associated malignancy typically diagnosed in early stages and definitively treated with chemoradiation. In situations where patients exhibit metastatic or recurrent disease, treatment options are severely limited. In this study, molecular alterations were identified that could be used to aid in therapeutic decisions for patients with metastatic or recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma. Specimens from patients with this cancer were tested via a multiplatform profiling service (Caris Life Sciences, Phoenix, AZ) consisting of gene sequencing, protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and gene amplification with in situ hybridization. Utilizing these techniques, novel treatment strategies that could be explored were identified, including potential benefit with anti-EGFR therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, topoisomerase inhibitors, and taxanes. The frequency of overexpression of proteins that mark resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, such as MRP1 (chemotherapy efflux pump), ERCC1 (resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy), and thymidylate synthase (resistance to fluoropyrimidines) were also identified, suggesting a lack of benefit. This multiplatform strategy could be explored for its potential to generate a personalized treatment selection for patients with advanced ASCC, provide a guide for future therapeutic development for this cancer, and be extended to other rare cancer types as well. PMID:26498363

  15. Comprehensive multiplatform biomarker analysis of 199 anal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Smaglo, Brandon G; Tesfaye, Anteneh; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; Meyer, Joshua E; Wang, Jue; Gatalica, Zoran; Reddy, Sandeep; Arguello, David; Boland, Patrick M

    2015-12-22

    Anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is a rare, HPV-associated malignancy typically diagnosed in early stages and definitively treated with chemoradiation. In situations where patients exhibit metastatic or recurrent disease, treatment options are severely limited. In this study, molecular alterations were identified that could be used to aid in therapeutic decisions for patients with metastatic or recurrent anal squamous cell carcinoma. Specimens from patients with this cancer were tested via a multiplatform profiling service (Caris Life Sciences, Phoenix, AZ) consisting of gene sequencing, protein expression by immunohistochemistry, and gene amplification with in situ hybridization. Utilizing these techniques, novel treatment strategies that could be explored were identified, including potential benefit with anti-EGFR therapies, immune checkpoint inhibitors, topoisomerase inhibitors, and taxanes. The frequency of overexpression of proteins that mark resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, such as MRP1 (chemotherapy efflux pump), ERCC1 (resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy), and thymidylate synthase (resistance to fluoropyrimidines) were also identified, suggesting a lack of benefit. This multiplatform strategy could be explored for its potential to generate a personalized treatment selection for patients with advanced ASCC, provide a guide for future therapeutic development for this cancer, and be extended to other rare cancer types as well. PMID:26498363

  16. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  17. Use of hollow microneedles for targeted delivery of phenylephrine to treat fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hyesun; Han, Mee-Ree; Kang, Nae-Gyu; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jung Ho

    2015-06-10

    A hollow microneedle (HM) was prepared to deliver a phenylephrine (PE) solution into the anal sphincter muscle as a method for treating fecal incontinence. The goal of this study was the local targeted delivery of PE into the sphincter muscle through the perianal skin with minimal pain using hollow microneedles, resulting in the increase of resting anal sphincter pressure. PE was administered on the left and the right sides of the anus of a rat through the perianal skin using 1.5mm long HM. An in vivo imaging system study was conducted after injection of Rhodamine B, and a histological study was performed after injection of gentian violet. The resting anal sphincter pressure in response to various drug doses was measured by using an air-charged catheter. Anal pressure change produced by HM administration was compared with change produced by intravenous injection (IV), subcutaneous (SC) injection and intramuscular (IM) injection. The change in mean blood pressure produced by HM administration as a function of PE dose was compared with change produced by PBS injection. A pharmacokinetic study of the new HM administration method was performed. A model drug solution was localized in the muscle layer under the perianal skin at the injection site and then diffused out over time. HM administration of PE induced significant contraction of internal anal sphincter pressure over 12h after injection, and the maximum anal pressure was obtained between 5 and 6h. Compared to IV, SC and IM treatments, HM treatment produced greater anal pressure. There was no increase in blood pressure after HM administration of PE within the range of predetermined concentration. Administration of 800μg/kg of PE using HM produced 0.81±0.38h of tmax. Our study suggests that HM administration enables local delivery of a therapeutic dose of PE to the anal sphincter muscle layer with less pain. This new treatment has great potential as a clinical application because of the ease of the procedure

  18. Anal Intercourse and Sexual Risk Factors among College Women, 1993-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Diana; Ellingson, Lyndall; Votaw, Karen S.; Schaefer, Elizabeth Ann

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine trends and sexual risk behaviors associated with anal intercourse among college women over an 8-year period. Methods: A sexual activity questionnaire was used to collect data from 813 students enrolled in a women's health course. Results: Thirty-two percent of the women had engaged in anal intercourse, and this measure was…

  19. Resisting the "Condom Every Time for Anal Sex" Health Education Message

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jeffery; Neville, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ensuring men who have sex with men (MSM) adopt and maintain condom use for anal sex is a challenging health education goal. In order to inform the development of social marketing practices to encourage safe-sex practices, the views of MSM about a key HIV health education message ("using a condom every time for anal sex") were sought.…

  20. Pulling Seton: Combination of mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanah, Ahmad; Rezazadehkermani, Mohammad; Hosseiniasl, Seyed Mohammad; Farghadin, Afrouz; Ghahramani, Leila; Bananzadeh, Alimohammad; Roshanravan, Reza; Izadpanah, Ahad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Seton-based techniques are among popular methods for treating high type anal fistula. These techniques are categorized to cutting and noncutting regarding their mechanism of action. In this report we are about to describe a new technique, which is a combination of both mechanisms; we call it Pulling Seton. Materials and Methods: In this technique after determining internal and external orifice of fistula, fistulectomy is done from both ends to the level of external sphincteric muscle. Finally, a remnant of fistula, which remains beneath external sphincteric muscle is excised, and Seton is passed instead of it and tied externally. After the wound heals, patient is asked to pull down the Seton for 3–4 min, 4 times a day. We prospectively enrolled 201 patients with high type anal fistula in this study. Results: Seton gradually passes through external sphincteric muscle till it is displaced outwards or removed by a surgeon via a small incision. 94% of patients treated by this method accomplished their treatment completely without recurrence. None of the patients developed permanent fecal or gas incontinence. Only 5% of patients developed with recurrence of fistula. Since Seton traction is not permanent in this technique, Seton cuts external sphincter slowly, and minimal rate of incontinence is reported. Conclusion: Pulling Seton seems to be an efficient way in treating high type anal fistula with minimal rate of recurrence and complications such as incontinence and authors suggest further randomized studies to compare its efficacy with other Seton-based techniques. PMID:27169099

  1. Transcorporal artificial urinary sphincter in radiated and non - radiated compromised urethra. Assessment with a minimum 2 year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Long, Erwann Le; Rebibo, John David; Nouhaud, Francois Xavier; Grise, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose to assess the efficacy of transcorporal artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation on continence for male stress urinary incontinence in cases of prior surgical treatment or/and radiation failure, and as a first option in radiation patients. Materials and Methods From March 2007 to August 2012, 37 male patients were treated with transcorporal AUS AMS™ 800. Twelve patients had primary placement of transcorporal cuff, a surgical option due to a previous history of radiation and 25 patients had secondary procedure after failure of AUS or urinary incontinence surgery. Functional urinary outcomes were assessed by daily pad use, 24-hour Pad-test and ICIQ-SF questionnaire. Quality of life and satisfaction were assessed based on I-QoL and PGI-I questionnaires. Results After a median of 32 months, the continence rate (0 to 1 pad) was 69.7%. Median pad test was 17.5g (0-159), mean ICIQ-SF score was 7.3/21 (±5.4) and mean I-QoL score was 93.9/110. A total of 88% of the patients reported satisfaction with the AUS. The 5-year actuarial revision-free for AUS total device was 51%. Patients for primary implant for radiation were not more likely to experience revision than non-radiation patients. Preservation of erections was reported in half of the potent patients. Conclusions Transcorporal AUS cuff placement is a useful alternative procedure option for severe male UI treatment, especially in patients with a compromised urethra after prior surgery or radiation. A high continence rate was reported and implantation as first option in radiation patients should be considered. PMID:27286112

  2. A human model of restricted upper esophageal sphincter opening and its pharyngeal and UES deglutitive pressure phenomena.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hongmei; Mei, Ling; Sharma, Tarun; Kern, Mark; Sanvanson, Patrick; Shaker, Reza

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia due to upper esophageal sphincter (UES) dysfunction is commonly encountered in the clinical setting. Selective experimental perturbation of various components of the deglutitive apparatus can provide an opportunity to improve our understanding of the swallowing physiology and pathophysiology. The aim is to characterize the pharyngeal and UES deglutitive pressure phenomena in an experimentally induced restriction of UES opening in humans. We studied 14 volunteers without any dysphagic symptoms (7 men, 66 ± 11 yr) but with various supraesophageal reflux symptoms. To induce UES restriction, we used a handmade device that with adjustment could selectively apply 0, 20, 30, or 40 mmHg pressure perpendicularly to the cricoid cartilage. Deglutitive pharyngeal and UES pressure phenomena were determined during dry and 5- and 10-ml water swallows × 3 for each of the UES perturbations. External cricoid pressure against the UES resulted in a significant increase in hypopharyngeal intrabolus pressure and UES nadir deglutitive relaxation pressure for all tested swallowed volumes (P < 0.05). Application of external cricoid pressure increased the length of the UES high pressure zone from 2.5 ± 0.2 to 3.1 ± 0.2, 3.5 ± 0.1, and 3.7 ± 0.1 cm for 20, 30, and 40 mmHg cricoid pressure, respectively (P < 0.05). External cricoid pressure had no significant effect on pharyngeal peristalsis. On the other hand, irrespective of external cricoid pressure deglutitive velopharyngeal contractile integral progressively increased with increased swallowed volumes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, acute experimental restriction of UES opening by external cricoid pressure manifests the pressure characteristics of increased resistance to UES transsphincteric flow observed clinically without affecting the pharyngeal peristaltic contractile function. PMID:27198193

  3. Exploring dynamics of anal sex among female sex workers in Andhra Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Saroj; Krishna, Rama; Prabhakar, Parimi; Panyam, Swarup; Anand, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The anal sex among heterosexual couples is on the rise as reported in many scientific studies. Considering that unprotected anal sex has higher risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission than the vaginal sex, we undertook a study to understand the anal sex practices among Female Sex Workers (FSW). Materials and Methods: The study was conducted among FSW attending 11 randomly selected sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics in Bill and Melinda Gates supported targeted interventions in Andhra Pradesh. A structured questionnaire was administered to the 555 FSW attending these clinics by project clinic counselors. Informed consent was obtained from all the study participants. Results: Engaging in anal sex was self reported by 22% of sex workers, though demand from clients was reported to be much higher (40%). The reasons for anal sex practices included more money (61%), clout/influence of the client (45%), risk of losing client (27%), and forced sex (1.2%). Factors associated with anal sex were higher number of clients, higher duration of sex work, higher income, and older age group. Associated risks perceived by FSW were bleeding and injury to anal canal (98%) while only 28% associated it with higher HIV transmission risk. Reported Condom and lubricant use was about 88% and 39% respectively. Conclusion: The study shows that there is frequent anal sex, inconsistent condom and infrequent lubricant usage, economic and physical coercion, and low awareness of STI/HIV transmission risk among FSW, which have serious implications for HIV prevention programmes. There is a need to focus on anal sex education and use of lubricants along with condoms during anal sex in FSW-targeted interventions in AP. PMID:22529447

  4. Planar spin-transfer device with dynamical polarizer and analizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaliy, Yaroslaw; Kravchenko, Anton

    2011-03-01

    The behavior of the planar spin-transfer devices with monodomain magnetic layers can be described by the macrospin Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with spin-transfer terms. The LLG description of a device with two layers is simplified after applying the overdamped, large easy-plane anisotropy approximation. A decrease of the magnetic layer thickness asymmetry creates a transition from the conventional polarizer-analizer (``fixed layer -- free layer'') operation regime to the regime of the nearly identical magnets. Here electric current leads to a ``Slonczewski windmill'' dynamic state, rather than producing the magnetic switching. The ``windmill'' precession state of a device with two free layers was investigated by numerical solution of the LLG equation.

  5. Unusual fibularis (peroneus) muscle.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Philip A

    2015-10-01

    Routine dissection has identified a previously unrecorded fibularis (peroneus) muscle in a 74-year-old male cadaver. The anomalous fibularis muscle was found lying immediately antero-medial to the fibularis longus (FL) muscle of the left leg. The anomalous muscle arose from the muscle belly of the FL in the proximal 1/2 of the leg. The muscle belly gave way to a long slender tendon that continued distally behind the lateral malleolus and inserted onto the superficial aspect of the inferior fibular retinaculum. The current finding and clinical significance are discussed.

  6. An analysis of survival and treatment failure following abdominoperineal and sphincter-saving resection in Dukes' B and C rectal carcinoma. A report of the NSABP clinical trials. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project.

    PubMed Central

    Wolmark, N; Fisher, B

    1986-01-01

    Abdominoperineal resections for rectal carcinoma are being performed with decreasing frequency in favor of sphincter-saving resections. It remains, however, to be unequivocally demonstrated that sphincter preservation has not resulted in compromised local disease control, disease-free survival, and survival. Accordingly, it is the specific aim of this endeavor to compare local recurrence, disease-free survival, and survival in patients with Dukes' B and C rectal cancer undergoing curative abdominoperineal resection or sphincter-saving resection. For the purpose of this study, 232 patients undergoing abdominoperineal resection and 181 subjected to sphincter-saving resections were available for analysis from an NSABP randomized prospective clinical trial designed to ascertain the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in rectal carcinoma (protocol R-01). The mean time on study was 48 months. Analyses were carried out comparing the two operations according to Dukes' class, the number of positive nodes, and tumor size. The only significant differences in disease-free survival and survival were observed for the cohort characterized by greater than 4 positive nodes and were in favor of patients treated with sphincter-saving resections. A patient undergoing sphincter-saving resection was 0.62 times as likely to sustain a treatment failure as a similar patient undergoing abdominoperineal resection (p = 0.07) and 0.49 times as likely to die (p = 0.02). The inability to demonstrate an attenuated disease-free survival and survival for patients treated with sphincter-saving resection was in spite of an increased incidence of local recurrence (anastomotic and pelvic) observed for the latter operation when compared to abdominoperineal resection (13% vs. 5%). A similar analysis evaluating the length of margins of resection in patients undergoing sphincter-preserving operations indicated that treatment failure and survival were not significantly different in patients whose distal resection

  7. Correlates of Heterosexual Anal Intercourse Among Substance-Using Club-Goers

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven P.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Inciardi, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Anal sexual intercourse represents the highest transmission risk for infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet much of what we know about anal sex is based on men who have sex with men (MSM). Less is known about heterosexual adults who practice anal sex, especially those who may be at risk for HIV such as substance users. The present study examined the demographic, sexual behaviors, substance use, and psychosocial correlates of recent anal intercourse among a heterosexual young adult sample of nightclub goers who also use substances. Data were drawn from an on-going natural history study of participants (n=597) in Miami's club scene who use club drugs, use prescription medications for non-medical reasons, and were regular attendees of nightclubs. Participants who reported anal sex (n=118) were more likely to be male, of moderate income, Latino, trade sex, have unprotected sex, and report victimization. Event-based and qualitative studies are needed to better understand the context in which anal sex occurs. Interventions that target heterosexual populations should include discussion about the risks of anal sex. PMID:20217224

  8. An integrative review of guidelines for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jessica S; Holstad, Marcia M; Thomas, Tami; Bruner, Deborah Watkins

    2014-07-01

    HIV-infected individuals are 28 times more likely than the general population to be diagnosed with anal cancer. An integrative review of recommendations and guidelines for anal cancer screening was performed to provide a succinct guide to inform healthcare clinicians. The review excluded studies that were of non-HIV populations, redundant articles or publications, non-English manuscripts, or nonclinical trials. The review found no formal national or international guidelines exist for routine screening of anal cancer for HIV-infected individuals. To date, no randomized control trial provides strong evidence supporting efficaciousness and effectiveness of an anal cancer screening program. The screening recommendations from seven international-, national-, and state-based reports were reviewed and synthesized in this review. These guidelines suggest anal cancer screening, albeit unproven, may be beneficial at decreasing the incidence of anal cancer. This review highlights the paucity of screening-related research and is an area of need to provide clear direction and to define standard of care for anal cancer screening in HIV-infected persons.

  9. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  10. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  11. Tissue engineered bulking agent with adipose-derived stem cells and silk fibroin microspheres for the treatment of intrinsic urethral sphincter deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li Bing; Cai, Hong Xia; Chen, Long Kun; Wu, Yan; Zhu, Shou An; Gong, Xiao Nan; Xia, Ya Xian; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Zou, Xiao Hui

    2014-02-01

    In this study we developed a tissue engineered bulking agent that consisted of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and silk fibroin microspheres to treat stress urinary incontinence caused by severe intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD). ISD models were established by completely transection of the bilateral pudendal nerve (PNT) and confirmed by the decreased leak-point pressure (LPP) and increased lumen area of urethra. Injection of silk fibroin microspheres could recover LPP and lumen area at 4 weeks but its efficacy disappears at 8, 12 weeks. Moreover, it was exciting to find that tissue engineered bulking agent brought long-term efficacy (at 4, 8, 12 weeks post-injection) on the recovery of LPP and lumen area. Concomitantly with the function, tissue engineered bulking agent treated group also improved the urethral sphincter structure as exhibited by better tissue regeneration. The findings showed that silk fibroin microspheres alone could work effectively in short-term, while tissue engineered bulking agent that combined silk fibroin microspheres with ADSCs exhibited promising long-term efficacy. This study developed a new strategy of tissue engineered bulking agent for future ISD therapy.

  12. Healthy Muscles Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my muscles more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Injuries Almost everyone has had sore muscles ... If you have been inactive, “start low and go slow” by gradually increasing how often and how ...

  13. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  14. Retrospective Audit of the Management of Anal Insertion of Foreign Bodies: A Holistic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Ahmed; Chukwuma, Jude

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with voluntary anal insertion of a foreign body (IFB) present to the emergency department and are then managed by the surgical team. This report reviews the medical literature on IFB and includes results of a chart review of operative logged interventions and clinically coded procedures for anal IFBs at a single acute hospital in the United Kingdom between May 2009 and September 2013. The objective was to establish the current practice in the management of anal IFB and update a framework for the initial workup, surgical procedure, and appropriate mental health intervention. PMID:27247831

  15. Chronic constipation due to delayed diagnosis of a congenital anal web.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Neilendu; Alkhouri, Naim; Seifarth, Federico G

    2012-07-01

    Congenital anal web is a rare form of anorectal malformation. In cases of delayed diagnosis, patients can present with signs ranging from mild constipation to complete bowel obstruction. The diagnosis is made by thorough anorectal inspection and a digital rectal exam. We present the case of a 9-month-old boy with Down's syndrome with chronic constipation secondary to an anal web. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of an anal web in a patient with Down's syndrome presenting with severe chronic constipation. PMID:22271242

  16. Exercising with a Muscle Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: • cramping in muscles (probably related to insufficient energy supply for muscles) • pain in muscles • weakness of exercised muscles • dark urine that looks like cola, following exercise (seek ...

  17. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  18. Identification of motor neurons and a mechanosensitive sensory neuron in the defecation circuitry of Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Bingxue; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2014-10-30

    Defecation allows the body to eliminate waste, an essential step in food processing for animal survival. In contrast to the extensive studies of feeding, its obligate counterpart, defecation, has received much less attention until recently. In this study, we report our characterizations of the defecation behavior of Drosophila larvae and its neural basis. Drosophila larvae display defecation cycles of stereotypic frequency, involving sequential contraction of hindgut and anal sphincter. The defecation behavior requires two groups of motor neurons that innervate hindgut and anal sphincter, respectively, and can excite gut muscles directly. These two groups of motor neurons fire sequentially with the same periodicity as the defecation behavior, as revealed by in vivo Ca(2+) imaging. Moreover, we identified a single mechanosensitive sensory neuron that innervates the anal slit and senses the opening of the intestine terminus. This anus sensory neuron relies on the TRP channel NOMPC but not on INACTIVE, NANCHUNG, or PIEZO for mechanotransduction.

  19. Sphincter of Oddi Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes episodes of severe abdominal pain. Doctor-Patient Communication Doctors often consider SOD in patients who experience ... with a long-term digestive disorder. Doctor - Patient Communication How to help your doctor to help you ...

  20. Inflatable artificial sphincter

    MedlinePlus

    ... can flow out. Other surgeries to treat urine leakage and incontinence include: Anterior vaginal wall repair Urinary ... off your urethra to stop urine flow or leakage. A balloon, which is placed under your belly ...

  1. Glucocorticoids and Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Sue C; Furlow, J David

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to regulate protein metabolism in skeletal muscle, producing a catabolic effect that is opposite that of insulin. In many catabolic diseases, such as sepsis, starvation, and cancer cachexia, endogenous glucocorticoids are elevated contributing to the loss of muscle mass and function. Further, exogenous glucocorticoids are often given acutely and chronically to treat inflammatory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in muscle atrophy. This chapter will detail the nature of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy and discuss the mechanisms thought to be responsible for the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids on muscle. PMID:26215994

  2. Oxidative Metabolism in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Binzoni, T.; Quaresima, V.

    1997-06-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantages and problems of near-infrared spectroscopy measurements, in resting and exercising skeletal muscles studies, are discussed through some representative examples.

  3. Toward an understanding of the context of anal sex behavior in ethnic minority adolescent women.

    PubMed

    Dimmitt Champion, Jane; Roye, Carol F

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the context of anal sex behavior among ethnic minority adolescent women has public health implications for behavioral sexual health promotion and risk reduction interventions. African-American (n = 94) and Mexican-American (n = 465) women (14-18 years of age) enrolled in a clinical trial completed semi-structured interviews to assess psychosocial and situational factors and relationships to sexual risk behavior, substance use, sexually transmitted infection/HIV acquisition, and violence. Bivariate analyses with comparisons by anal sex experiences identified differences by ethnicity and higher self-reported histories of sexual risk behaviors, substance use, violence, and stressful psychosocial and situational factors among adolescent women experiencing anal sex. Predictors of anal sex identified through logistic regression included Mexican-American ethnicity, ecstasy use, methamphetamine use, childhood sexual molestation, oral sex, and sex with friends for benefits.

  4. Treating High-grade Lesions to Prevent Anal Cancer in HIV-infected People

    Cancer.gov

    This study, called the ANCHOR trial, will investigate whether screening and prevention methods similar to those used to prevent cervical cancer can help prevent anal cancer in HIV-infected men and women.

  5. Anal extrusion of migrated ventriculo-peritoneal shunt catheter: An unusual complication and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarkari, Avijit; Borkar, Sachin A.; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Authors present an unusual case of anal extrusion of peritoneal end of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt in a 2-year-old male child. Pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this rare complication of a very commonly performed neurosurgical procedure.

  6. Anal Papilloma: An Exceptional Presentation of Fibrocystic Disease in Anogenital Mammary-Like Glands

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Priya; Esakkai, Muthuvel; Venugopal, Palani; Kannaiyan, Ilavarasan; Srinivasan, Chitra; Reddy, Punuru Tejashwini; Ebenezer, Evelyn Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Previously ectopic breast tissue was thought to be derived from the caudal remnants of the primitive embryonic milk ridges; anogenital mammary-like glands are presently considered as normal constituents of the anogenital region. We report a case of young female, who presented with an anal papilloma. Histopathological examination revealed extensive fibrocystic changes in anogenital mammary-like glands. To date, a lot of benign changes and a wide range of benign and malignant neoplasms have been reported in these glands. However, extensive fibrocystic change of these glands in anal region is very rare. In addition, fibrocystic disease of anal mammary glands, masquerading clinically as an anal papilloma, has not been reported in literature. Hence, it is essential for clinicians and the pathologists to be aware of such a rare presentation. The features of fibrocystic disease in perianal region are also discussed. PMID:26495147

  7. Correlates of anal sex roles among Malay and Chinese MSM in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dangerfield, Derek T; Gravitt, Patti; Rompalo, Anne M; Tai, Raymond; Lim, Sin How

    2016-03-01

    Identifying roles for anal sex is an important issue for populations of MSM. We describe the prevalence of identifying as being 'top', 'bottom', 'versatile', or 'don't know/not applicable' among Malay and Chinese MSM in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and behavioural outcomes according to these labels for sexual role identity. Data analysis was conducted on a survey administered during weekly outreach throughout Kuala Lumpur in 2012. Pearson's Chi square tests were used to compare demographic and behavioural characteristics of MSM who reported roles for anal sex. Binary logistic regression was used to explore the odds of behavioural outcomes among MSM who identified as 'bottom', 'versatile,' and 'don't know' compared to MSM who reported that 'top' was their sexual role. Labels for anal sex roles were significantly associated with condom use for last anal sex. Among MSM who used labels for anal sex roles, MSM who identified as 'bottom' had highest level of not using condoms for last anal sex (24.1%, p = .045). In binary logistic regression model, identifying as 'top' was significantly associated with reporting using a condom during last anal sex and reported consistent condom use for anal sex in the past six months (p = .039 and .017, respectively). With regard to sexual role identity, some MSM may be a part of a special subgroup of at-risk men to be targeted. Future research should evaluate the origins, meanings, and perceptions of these labels, and the developmental process of how these MSM identify with any of these categories. Research should also uncover condom use decision making with regard to these labels for sexual positioning. PMID:25887064

  8. Deposition of anal-sac secretions by captive wolves (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asa, C.S.; Peterson, E.K.; Seal, U.S.; Mech, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    Deposition of anal-sac secretions by captive wolves was investigated by a labelling technique using protein-bound iodine125 and food dye. Wolves deposited secretions on some but not all scats. Adult males, especially the alpha male, deposited anal-sac secretions more frequently while defecating than did females or juveniles. Secretions sometimes also were deposited independently of defecation, suggesting a dual role in communication by these substances.

  9. Correlates of anal sex roles among Malay and Chinese MSM in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dangerfield, Derek T; Gravitt, Patti; Rompalo, Anne M; Tai, Raymond; Lim, Sin How

    2016-03-01

    Identifying roles for anal sex is an important issue for populations of MSM. We describe the prevalence of identifying as being 'top', 'bottom', 'versatile', or 'don't know/not applicable' among Malay and Chinese MSM in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and behavioural outcomes according to these labels for sexual role identity. Data analysis was conducted on a survey administered during weekly outreach throughout Kuala Lumpur in 2012. Pearson's Chi square tests were used to compare demographic and behavioural characteristics of MSM who reported roles for anal sex. Binary logistic regression was used to explore the odds of behavioural outcomes among MSM who identified as 'bottom', 'versatile,' and 'don't know' compared to MSM who reported that 'top' was their sexual role. Labels for anal sex roles were significantly associated with condom use for last anal sex. Among MSM who used labels for anal sex roles, MSM who identified as 'bottom' had highest level of not using condoms for last anal sex (24.1%, p = .045). In binary logistic regression model, identifying as 'top' was significantly associated with reporting using a condom during last anal sex and reported consistent condom use for anal sex in the past six months (p = .039 and .017, respectively). With regard to sexual role identity, some MSM may be a part of a special subgroup of at-risk men to be targeted. Future research should evaluate the origins, meanings, and perceptions of these labels, and the developmental process of how these MSM identify with any of these categories. Research should also uncover condom use decision making with regard to these labels for sexual positioning.

  10. An Electronic Daily Diary Study of Anal Intercourse in Drug-Using Women.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Grace L; Fisher, Dennis G; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2015-12-01

    Women (N = 138) with histories of illicit drug use were recruited into an electronic diary study that used Android smartphones for data collection. The diary was to be completed each day for 12 weeks using an "app" created in HTML5 and accessed over the Internet via smartphone. Data collection included information on sexual behaviors with up to 10 partners per day and contextual factors surrounding sexual behavior such as drug use before/after, type of sexual behavior (oral, vaginal, anal), and other activities such as using condoms for vaginal and anal intercourse and use of sexual lubricants. The sample was predominantly African American (58 %); 20 % Latina, 20 % White and 2 % reported as Other. Most women reported either less than a high school education (33 %) or having a high school diploma (33 %). The mean age was 39 years (SD = 11.78). Anal intercourse occurred on days when women also reported using illicit drugs, specifically methamphetamine and cocaine. Anal intercourse was not an isolated sexual activity, but took place on days when vaginal intercourse and giving and receiving oral sex also occurred along with illicit drug use. Anal intercourse also occurred on days when women reported they wanted sex. HIV prevention interventions must address the risks of anal intercourse for women, taking into account concurrent drug use and sexual pleasure that may reduce individual harm-reduction behaviors. PMID:25835461

  11. Addressing Risk and Reluctance at the Nexus of HIV and Anal Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I; Cassel, Kevin; Shiramizu, Bruce; Stotzer, Rebecca L; Robles, Andrew; Kapua, Cathy; Orton, Malulani; Milne, Cris; Sesepasara, Maddalynn

    2016-01-01

    Anal cancer disproportionately burdens persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) regardless of natal sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, and ethnic identity. Culturally competent communications are recommended to address health disparities, with sociocultural relevance ensured through constituent dialogic processes. Results are presented from six provider focus groups conducted to inform the promotion/education component of a Hawai'i-based project on anal cancer screening tools. Krueger's focus group methodology guided discussion queries. Verbatim transcripts of digitally recorded discussions were analyzed using grounded theory and PEN-3 procedures. Adherence to an audit trail ensured analytic rigor. Grounded theory analysis detected the overall theme of risk and reluctance to anal cancer screening, characterized by anal cancer not being "on the radar" of PLHIV, conflicting attributions of the anus and anal sex, fear of sex-shaming/-blaming, and other interrelated conceptual categories. PEN-3 analysis revealed strategies for destigmatizing anal cancer, through "real talk" (proactive, candid, nonjudgmental discussion) nested in a framework of sexual health and overall well-being, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, transgender persons, and other marginalized groups. Application of strategies for health practice are specific to the Hawai'i context, yet may offer considerations for developing strengths-based, culturally relevant screening promotion/education with diverse PLHIV in other locales. PMID:26630979

  12. An Electronic Daily Diary Study of Anal Intercourse in Drug-Using Women

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Women (N = 138) with histories of illicit drug use were recruited into an electronic diary study that used Android smartphones for data collection. The diary was to be completed each day for 12 weeks using an “app” created in HTML5 and accessed over the Internet via smartphone. Data collection included information on sexual behaviors with up to 10 partners per day and contextual factors surrounding sexual behavior such as drug use before/after, type of sexual behavior (oral, vaginal, anal), and other activities such as using condoms for vaginal and anal intercourse and use of sexual lubricants. The sample was predominantly African American (58 %); 20 % Latina, 20 % White and 2 % reported as Other. Most women reported either less than a high school education (33 %) or having a high school diploma (33 %). The mean age was 39 years (SD = 11.78). Anal intercourse occurred on days when women also reported using illicit drugs, specifically methamphetamine and cocaine. Anal intercourse was not an isolated sexual activity, but took place on days when vaginal intercourse and giving and receiving oral sex also occurred along with illicit drug use. Anal intercourse also occurred on days when women reported they wanted sex. HIV prevention interventions must address the risks of anal intercourse for women, taking into account concurrent drug use and sexual pleasure that may reduce individual harm-reduction behaviors. PMID:25835461

  13. Addressing Risk and Reluctance at the Nexus of HIV and Anal Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ka‘opua, Lana Sue I.; Cassel, Kevin; Shiramizu, Bruce; Stotzer, Rebecca L.; Robles, Andrew; Kapua, Cathy; Orton, Malulani; Milne, Cris; Sesepasara, Maddalynn

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancer disproportionately burdens persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) regardless of natal sex, sexual orientation, gender expression, and ethnic identity. Culturally competent communications are recommended to address health disparities, with sociocultural relevance ensured through constituent dialogic processes. Results are presented from six provider focus groups conducted to inform the promotion/education component of a Hawai‘i-based project on anal cancer screening tools. Krueger’s focus group methodology guided discussion queries. Verbatim transcripts of digitally recorded discussions were analyzed using grounded theory and PEN-3 procedures. Adherence to an audit trail ensured analytic rigor. Grounded theory analysis detected the overall theme of risk and reluctance to anal cancer screening, characterized by anal cancer not being “on the radar” of PLHIV, conflicting attributions of the anus and anal sex, fear of sex-shaming/-blaming, and other interrelated conceptual categories. PEN-3 analysis revealed strategies for destigmatizing anal cancer, through “real talk” (proactive, candid, nonjudgmental discussion) nested in a framework of sexual health and overall well-being, with additional tailoring for relevance to Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders, transgender persons, and other marginalized groups. Application of strategies for health practice are specific to the Hawai‘i context, yet may offer considerations for developing strengths-based, culturally relevant screening promotion/education with diverse PLHIV in other locales. PMID:26630979

  14. Human papillomavirus in anal squamous cell carcinoma: an angel rather than a devil?

    PubMed

    Ravenda, Paola Simona; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Nicola; Barberis, Massimo; Bottiglieri, Luca; Chiocca, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancer is a rare disease with an increasing incidence worldwide but, unfortunately, even today the scientific community still has a limited knowledge and limited options of treatment. More than 50% of patients with anal cancer presenting at diagnosis with locoregional disease have good chances of cure with chemoradiotherapy (CT-RT). However, once patients develop metastatic spread, the prognosis is very poor. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in more than 80% of anal cancers and while multiple etiologic connections between HPV infection and anal cancer have already been well elucidated, its prognostic and/or predictive role is currently under investigation, especially among immunocompetent patients affected by this disease. In a single-institutional set, we have retrospectively analysed clinical data of 50 consecutive cases homogeneously treated with CT-RT for stage I-III anal squamous cell carcinoma. We found that HPV-positive anal cancers had a statistically significant improved five-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to HPV-negative group. These findings could be explained by an increased chemo/radiosensitivity of HPV-positive tumours. Further efforts should be directed towards a better understanding of HPV-related oncogenesis and towards designing novel tailored strategies for the management of this disease both in terms of prevention and treatment. PMID:25987898

  15. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche human papillomavirus (HPV) linear array for HPV genotyping in anal swab samples.

    PubMed

    Low, Huey Chi; Silver, Michelle I; Brown, Brandon J; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M; Gravitt, Patti E; Woo, Yin Ling

    2015-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we evaluated the performance of the Hybribio GenoArray (GA) for genotyping HPV in anal samples, against the reference standard Roche Linear Array (LA). Anal swab samples were obtained from sexually active men who have sex with men. Following DNA extraction, each sample was genotyped using GA and LA. The overall interassay agreement, type-specific, and single and multiple genotype agreements were evaluated by kappa statistics and McNemar's χ(2) tests. Using GA and LA, 68% and 76% of samples were HPV DNA positive, respectively. There was substantial interassay agreements for the detection of all HPV genotypes (κ = 0.70, 86% agreement). Although LA was able to detect more genotypes per sample, the interassay agreement was acceptable (κ = 0.53, 63% agreement). GA had poorer specific detection of HPV genotypes 35, 42, and 51 (κ < 0.60). In conclusion, GA and LA showed good interassay agreement for the detection of most HPV genotypes in anal samples. However, the detection of HPV DNA in up to 76% of anal samples warrants further evaluation of its clinical significance. PMID:25502520

  16. Comparison of Hybribio GenoArray and Roche Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Linear Array for HPV Genotyping in Anal Swab Samples

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Michelle I.; Brown, Brandon J.; Leng, Chan Yoon; Blas, Magaly M.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Woo, Yin Ling

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causally associated with anal cancer, as HPV DNA is detected in up to 90% of anal intraepithelial neoplasias and anal cancers. With the gradual increase of anal cancer rates, there is a growing need to establish reliable and clinically relevant methods to detect anal cancer precursors. In resource-limited settings, HPV DNA detection is a potentially relevant tool for anal cancer screening. Here, we evaluated the performance of the Hybribio GenoArray (GA) for genotyping HPV in anal samples, against the reference standard Roche Linear Array (LA). Anal swab samples were obtained from sexually active men who have sex with men. Following DNA extraction, each sample was genotyped using GA and LA. The overall interassay agreement, type-specific, and single and multiple genotype agreements were evaluated by kappa statistics and McNemar's χ2 tests. Using GA and LA, 68% and 76% of samples were HPV DNA positive, respectively. There was substantial interassay agreements for the detection of all HPV genotypes (κ = 0.70, 86% agreement). Although LA was able to detect more genotypes per sample, the interassay agreement was acceptable (κ = 0.53, 63% agreement). GA had poorer specific detection of HPV genotypes 35, 42, and 51 (κ < 0.60). In conclusion, GA and LA showed good interassay agreement for the detection of most HPV genotypes in anal samples. However, the detection of HPV DNA in up to 76% of anal samples warrants further evaluation of its clinical significance. PMID:25502520

  17. Effect of electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients refractory to proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Soffer, Edy; Rodríguez, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gómez, Beatriz; Neto, Manoel G; Crowell, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of lower esophageal sphincter (LES)-electrical stimulation therapy (EST) in a subgroup of patients that reported only partial response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy, compared to a group of patient with complete response. METHODS: Bipolar stitch electrodes were laparoscopically placed in the LES and connected to an implantable pulse generator (EndoStim BV, the Hague, the Netherlands), placed subcutaneously in the anterior abdominal wall. Stimulation at 20 Hz, 215 μsec, 3-8 mAmp in 30 min sessions was delivered starting on day 1 post-implant. Patients were evaluated using gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-HRQL, symptom diaries; esophageal pH and esophageal manometry before and up to 24 mo after therapy and results were compared between partial and complete responders. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with GERD on LES-EST were enrolled and received continuous per-protocol stimulation through 12 mo and 21 patients completed 24 mo of therapy. Of the 23 patients, 16 (8 male, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years) had incomplete response to PPIs prior to LES-EST, while 7 patients (5 male, mean age 52.7 ± 4.7) had complete response to PPIs. In the sub-group with incomplete response to PPIs, median (IQR) composite GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 9.5 (9.0-10.0) at baseline on-PPI and 24.0 (20.8-26.3) at baseline off-PPI to 2.5 (0.0-4.0) at 12-mo and 0.0 (0.0-2.5) at 24-mo follow-up (P < 0.05 compared to on-and off-PPI at baseline). Median (IQR) % 24-h esophageal pH < 4.0 at baseline in this sub-group improved significantly from 9.8% (7.8-11.5) at baseline to 3.0% (1.9-6.3) at 12 mo (P < 0.001) and 4.6% (2.0-5.8) at 24 mo follow-up (P < 0.01). At their 24-mo follow-up, 9/11 patients in this sub-group were completely free of PPI use. These results were comparable to the sub-group that reported complete response to PPI therapy at baseline. No unanticipated implantation or stimulation-related adverse events, or any untoward sensation

  18. Wide disparities in attitudes and practices regarding Type II sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: a survey of expert U.S. endoscopists

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Rabindra R.; Klapman, Jason; Komanduri, Srinadh; Shah, Janak N.; Wani, Sachin; Muthusamy, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sphincter of Oddi manometry (SOM) is recommended in the evaluation of suspected Type II sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD2), though its utility is uncertain. Little is known about the practice of expert endoscopists in the United States regarding SOD2. Methods: An anonymous electronic survey was distributed to 128 expert biliary endoscopists identified from U.S. advanced endoscopy training programs. Results: The response rate was 46.1 % (59/128). Only 55.6 % received training in SOM, and 49.2 % currently perform SOM. For biliary SOD2, 33.3 % routinely obtain SOM, 33.3 % perform empiric sphincterotomy, and 26.3 % perform single session endoscopic ultrasound/endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (EUS/ERCP). In contrast, an equal number (35.1 %) favor SOM or single session EUS/ERCP for suspected acute idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis, while 19.3 % would perform empiric sphincterotomy. Those who perform SOM believe it to be important in predicting response to treatment compared with those who do not (71.8 % vs 23.1 %, P = 0.01). Yet only 51.7 % of this group performs SOM for suspected SOD2. Most (78.6 %) believe that < 50 % of patients report improvement in symptoms after sphincterotomy. Common reasons for not obtaining SOM included unreliable results (50 %), and procedure-related risks (39.3 %). Most (59.3 %) believe SOD2 is at least in part a functional disorder; only 3.7 % felt SOD is a legitimate disorder of the sphincter of Oddi. Conclusions: Our survey of U.S. expert endoscopists suggests that SOM is not routinely performed for SOD2 and concerns regarding its associated risks and validity persist. Most endoscopists believe SOD2 is at least in part a functional disorder that will not respond to sphincterotomy in the majority of cases. PMID:27652298

  19. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  20. CLSM Analysis of the Phalloidin-Stained Muscle System of the Nemertean Proboscis and Rhynchocoel.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, Alexei V

    2015-12-01

    The proboscis and rhynchocoel musculature of 56 nemertean species was studied using phalloidin labelling and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Six types of muscle layers are found in the anterior proboscis of the nemerteans: inner circular, inner diagonal, inner longitudinal, outer diagonal, outer circular, and outer longitudinal. Only the inner circular and inner longitudinal muscle layers are present in all the nemerteans studied. Ten types of arrangement of the proboscis musculature are described. Three primary types ('palaeotype', 'heterotype', and 'hoplotype') correspond to the three nemertean supergroups (Palaeonemertea, Heteronemertea, and Hoplonemertea). The evolutionary transformations of the initial 'palaeotype' proboscis proceeded in two primary ways: increasing bilateral symmetry (Callinera, Hubrechtella, and most of Heteronemertea) and increasing polyradial symmetry (Baseodiscidae, Oxypolellinae, and Hoplonemertea). The musculature of the middle portion of the proboscis differs among the three groups with armature: Palaeonemertea (genus Callinera), Polystilifera, and Monostilifera. The musculature of the stylet apparatus of the monostiliferous nemerteans is more complicated than that of the polystiliferous nemerteans, and consists of four muscle components--basal and anterior sphincters, radial and longitudinal musculature. Among the studied monostiliferans, the different components of the stylet musculature are developed to varying degrees. In addition, data on the structure of the rhynchocoel with interwoven musculature are provided. The taxonomic significance and phylogenetic interpretation of the proboscis and rhynchocoel musculature is discussed. PMID:26654037

  1. Oral and anal sex practices among high school youth in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the full range of sexual behaviors of young people is crucial in developing appropriate interventions to prevent and control sexually transmitted infections including HIV. However, such information is meager in developing countries. The objective of this study was to describe oral and anal sex practices and identify associated factors among high school youth. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among high school youth in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A multi-stage sampling procedure was followed to select a representative sample of school youth. The total sample size for this study was 3840. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Data analysis was guided by the ecological framework. Results The overall proportion of people who reported ever having oral sex was 5.4% (190) and that of anal sex was 4.3% (154). Of these 51.6% (98) had oral sex and 57.1% (87) had anal sex in the past 12 months. Multiple partnerships were reported by 61.2% of the respondents who had oral sex and 51.1% of students practicing anal sex. Consistent condom use was reported by 12.2% of those practicing oral sex and 26.1% of anal sex. Reasons for oral and anal sex included prevention of pregnancy, preserving virginity, and reduction of HIV and STIs transmission. Oral sex practice was strongly and significantly associated with perception of best friends engagement in oral sex (AOR = 5.7; 95% CI 3.6-11.2) and having illiterate mothers (AOR = 11.5; 95%CI 6.4-18.5). Similarly, anal sex practice was strongly and significantly associated with favorable attitude towards anal sex (AOR = 6.2; 95%CI 3.8-12.4), and perceived best friends engagement in anal sex (AOR = 9.7; 95%CI 5.4-17.7). Conclusion Considerable proportion of adolescents had engaged in oral and anal sex practices. Multiple sexual partnerships were common while consistent condom use was low. Sexual health education and behavior change communication strategies need to cover a full range of

  2. Muscle development and obesity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The formation of skeletal muscle from the epithelial somites involves a series of events triggered by temporally and spatially discrete signals resulting in the generation of muscle fibers which vary in their contractile and metabolic nature. The fiber type composition of muscles varies between individuals and it has now been found that there are differences in fiber type proportions between lean and obese animals and humans. Amongst the possible causes of obesity, it has been suggested that inappropriate prenatal environments may ‘program’ the fetus and may lead to increased risks for disease in adult life. The characteristics of muscle are both heritable and plastic, giving the tissue some ability to adapt to signals and stimuli both pre and postnatally. Given that muscle is a site of fatty acid oxidation and carbohydrate metabolism and that its development can be changed by prenatal events, it is interesting to examine the possible relationship between muscle development and the risk of obesity. PMID:19279728

  3. Pyloric Sphincter Dysfunction in nNOS−/− and W/Wv Mutant Mice: Animal Models of Gastroparesis and Duodeno-gastric Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Sivarao, Digavalli V.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Goyal, Raj K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and & Aims Nitrergic nerves and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) have been implicated in the regulation of pyloric motility. The purpose of these studies was to define their roles in pyloric function in vivo. Methods Pyloric sphincter manometry was performed in wild type (WT) controls, neuronal nitric oxide synthase deficient (nNOS−/−) and ICC deficient W/Wv mice, and the effect of deafferented cervical vagal stimulation was examined. Results Mice showed a distinct ~ 0.6 mm wide zone of high pressure at the antro-duodenal junction, representing the pyloric sphincter. In WT, the pylorus exhibited tonic active pressure of 12.4±1.6 mm Hg with superimposed phasic contractions. The motility indices, minute motility index (MMI) and the total myogenic activity (TMA) were reduced by vagal stimulation and the reduction was antagonized by nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NAME. In nNOS−/− mice, pyloric basal tone, MMI and TMA were not significantly different from the controls, but vagal stimulation paradoxically increased pyloric motility. In contrast, the W/Wv mice had significantly reduced resting pyloric pressure that was suppressed by vagal stimulation in an L-NAME-sensitive manner. The stomachs of fasted nNOS−/− mice showed solid food residue and bezoar formation, while W/Wv mice showed bile reflux. Conclusion (1) In nNOS−/− mice, loss of nitrergic pyloric inhibition leads to gastric stasis and bezoars; (2) In contrast, basal pyloric hypotension with normal nitrergic inhibition predisposes W/Wv mice to duodeno-gastric bile reflux. PMID:18640116

  4. Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation for Gastroesophageal Reflux at 5 Years: Final Results of a Pilot Study Show Long-Term Acid Reduction and Symptom Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Greta; Bonavina, Luigi; Lipham, John C.; Dunn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: As previously reported, the magnetic sphincter augmentation device (MSAD) preserves gastric anatomy and results in less severe side effects than traditional antireflux surgery. The final 5-year results of a pilot study are reported here. Patients and Methods: A prospective, multicenter study evaluated safety and efficacy of the MSAD for 5 years. Prior to MSAD placement, patients had abnormal esophageal acid and symptoms poorly controlled by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Patients served as their own control, which allowed comparison between baseline and postoperative measurements to determine individual treatment effect. At 5 years, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) questionnaire score, esophageal pH, PPI use, and complications were evaluated. Results: Between February 2007 and October 2008, 44 patients (26 males) had an MSAD implanted by laparoscopy, and 33 patients were followed up at 5 years. Mean total percentage of time with pH <4 was 11.9% at baseline and 4.6% at 5 years (P < .001), with 85% of patients achieving pH normalization or at least a 50% reduction. Mean total GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 25.7 to 2.9 (P < .001) when comparing baseline and 5 years, and 93.9% of patients had at least a 50% reduction in total score compared with baseline. Complete discontinuation of PPIs was achieved by 87.8% of patients. No complications occurred in the long term, including no device erosions or migrations at any point. Conclusions: Based on long-term reduction in esophageal acid, symptom improvement, and no late complications, this study shows the relative safety and efficacy of magnetic sphincter augmentation for GERD. PMID:26437027

  5. Muscle Changes in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Siparsky, Patrick N.; Kirkendall, Donald T.; Garrett, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle physiology in the aging athlete is complex. Sarcopenia, the age-related decrease in lean muscle mass, can alter activity level and affect quality of life. This review addresses the microscopic and macroscopic changes in muscle with age, recognizes contributing factors including nutrition and changes in hormone levels, and identifies potential pharmacologic agents in clinical trial that may aid in the battle of this complex, costly, and disabling problem. Level of Evidence: Level 5. PMID:24427440

  6. Therapeutic management of anal eczema: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Havlickova, B; Weyandt, G H

    2014-01-01

    Aim To conduct a systematic review of treatments for anal eczema (AE). Methods We conducted a Medline search for clinical trial data for the treatment of perianal diseases including AE, including papers not published in the English language. We assessed the study reports using the system recommended by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. No meta-analysis was attempted. Results The evidence base for topical treatments used to treat AE is very poor: there are very few studies and many of those that exist are of poor quality. The best evidence was found for medications that are yet to be licensed for AE. Among products with existing licences for the treatment of eczema, our assessment found some evidence to support the continued use of mild-to-moderate corticosteroids first line in most patients. Discussion Features of the perianal region, and the fact that it is almost always occluded, mean that not all medications recommended in the general treatment guidelines for eczema are appropriate for AE. However, there are no specific treatment guidelines for these patients. This may in part be because of the lack of high-quality evidence-based medicine in this therapy area. Many frequently prescribed medications were developed and licensed many years ago, in an era when clinical trial design was not expected to be as rigorous as it is today. Conclusion This review highlights the need to conduct more high-quality clinical trials in patients with AE in order that specific guidelines for the management of this difficult proctological condition can be prepared. PMID:24898365

  7. IMRT treatment of anal cancer with a scrotal shield

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, Rodney C.; Wu, Q. Jackie; McMahon, Ryan; Czito, Brian; Willett, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The risk of sterility in males undergoing radiotherapy in the pelvic region indicates the use of a shielding device, which offers protection to the testes for patients wishing to maintain fertility. The use of such devices in the realm of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the pelvic region can pose many obstacles during simulation, treatment planning, and delivery of radiotherapy. This work focuses on the development and execution of an IMRT plan for the treatment of anal cancer using a scrotal shielding device on a clinical patient. An IMRT plan was developed using Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), using a wide array of gantry angles as well as fixed jaw and fluence editing techniques. When possible, the entire target volume was encompassed by the treatment field. When the beam was incident on the scrotal shield, the jaw was fixed to avoid the device and the collimator rotation optimized to irradiate as much of the target as possible. This technique maximizes genital sparing and allows minimal irradiation of the gonads. When this fixed-jaw technique was found to compromise adequate coverage of the target, manual fluence editing techniques were used to avoid the shielding device. Special procedures for simulation, imaging, and treatment verification were also developed. In vivo dosimetry was used to verify and ensure acceptable dose to the gonads. The combination of these techniques resulted in a highly conformal plan that spares organs and risk and avoids the genitals as well as entrance of primary radiation onto the shielding device.

  8. Anal Intercourse among Young Heterosexuals in Three US STD Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Gorbach, Pamina M.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hess, Kristen L.; Stoner, Bradley P.; Martin, David H.; Holmes, King K.

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine factors associated with heterosexual anal intercourse (AI). Methods Between 2001 and 2004, 890 heterosexual adults aged 18-26 attending public STD clinics in Seattle, New Orleans and St Louis were interviewed using CASI and tested for sexually transmitted infections (STI) Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, and genital herpes (HSV-2). Characteristics associated with AI were identified using logistic regression. Results Overall 289 (32%) reported ever having had AI, 201 (26.5%) reported AI with at least one of their last three partners and 17% reported AI with their last partner. Fewer females than males reported condom use at last AI (24% vs. 47%, p<0.001). Ever having AI was associated with sex on the same day as meeting a partner (AOR 3.5 [95% CI 1.94-6.15]), receiving money for sex (AOR 3.3 [1.40-7.75]), and >3 lifetime sex partners (AOR 2.2 [1.17-4.26]) among women, and sex on the same day as meeting a partner (AOR 2.0 [1.28-3.14]) and paying for sex (AOR 1.8 [1.00-3.15]) among men. AI with the last partner was associated with sex toy use (AOR 5.3 [2.35-12.0]) and having concurrent partners (AOR 2.3 [1.18-4.26]) among men, and with sex within a week of meeting (AOR 2.7 [1.21-5.83]), believing the partner was concurrent (AOR 2.6 [1.38-4.83]), and partnership duration >3 months (AOR 3.2 [1.03-10.1]) among women. Prevalent STI was not associated with AI. Conclusions Many young heterosexuals attending STD clinics reported AI, which was associated with other sexual risk behaviors, suggesting a confluence of risks for HIV infection. PMID:19265740

  9. Felching among men who engage in barebacking (unprotected anal sex).

    PubMed

    Klein, Hugh

    2012-04-01

    Felching (sucking or eating semen out of someone's anus) is a sexual behavior about which virtually nothing has been written in the scholarly literature, despite the fact that it appears to be a not-uncommon practice among certain subpopulations of men who have sex with men (MSM). This study examined three broad research questions: (1) How common is felching? (2) How does a desire for felching relate to other HIV risk practices and risk behavior preferences? (3) What factors are associated with the desire to engage in felching? The data were from a content analysis study of one of the largest Internet websites specifically targeting MSM looking for partners for unprotected sex. A total of 1,316 profiles on the site were analyzed and selected randomly based on users' ZIP codes. Felching was mentioned as a sought-after practice in approximately one-sixth of the men's profiles. Men who wanted to find felching partners were significantly more likely than those not searching for felching partners to seek other types of risky sex, including unprotected oral and unprotected anal sex, and various enhanced risk preferences (e.g., having sex while high, multiple-partner sex, unwillingness to withdraw the penis prior to internal ejaculation). Multivariate analysis revealed several factors that were related to an interest in identifying partners online for felching, including race/ethnicity, indifference to sex partners' HIV serostatus, several sensation-seeking measures (e.g., wanting "wild" or "uninhibited" sex, self-identification as a "bug chaser"), and eroticizing ejaculatory fluids. PMID:21573705

  10. Initial prevalence of anal human papilloma virus infection in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Grąt, Michał; Grąt, Karolina; Hołówko, Wacław; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Walter de Walthoffen, Szymon; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Kobryń, Konrad; Patkowski, Waldemar; Majewski, Sławomir; Młynarczyk, Grażyna; Krawczyk, Marek

    2014-08-01

    Although liver transplant recipients are at increased risk of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related anal cancer, limited data are available regarding the initial prevalence of anal HPV infection in this population. Anal swabs collected from 50 liver transplant recipients within the first three postoperative weeks were subjected to real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of the four HPV genotypes: 6, 11, 16, and 18. Predictors of any, low-risk, and high-risk anal HPV infection were evaluated. Overall, the prevalence of any anal HPV infection was 18.0%, with the corresponding rates for high- and low-risk HPV genotypes being 8.0% and 10.0%, respectively. Infection with any type of anal HPV was higher in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (P = 0.027), ≥3 sexual partners (P = 0.031), and alcoholic liver disease (P = 0.063). HBV infection was the only factor significantly associated with high-risk HPV infection (P = 0.038). Male sex (P = 0.050), age ≥52 years (P = 0.016), ≥30 sexual partners (P = 0.003), age at first intercourse ≤18 years (P = 0.045), and time since first intercourse ≥38 years (P = 0.012) were identified as predictors of low-risk HPV infection. These results indicate that HPV vaccination of liver transplant candidates and screening for anal HPV infection in high-risk groups should be considered.

  11. Tumor Response and Survival Predicted by Post-Therapy FDG-PET/CT in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Myerson, Robert J.; Fleshman, James W.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDG uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer.

  12. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  13. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2015-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best “treatment”. PMID:27027021

  14. Acute ethanol inhibits calcium influxes into esophageal smooth but not striated muscle: a possible mechanism for ethanol-induced inhibition of esophageal contractility.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzian, A; Zorub, O; Sayeed, M; Urban, G; Sweeney, C; Winship, D; Fields, J

    1994-09-01

    In both humans and cats, EtOH administered in vivo and acutely decreases contractility of smooth muscle of lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and lower esophagus (LE), but not striated muscle of upper esophagus. To see if these effects are associated with perturbation of Ca++ homeostasis, esophageal muscle slices were incubated in vitro with EtOH and then 45Ca++. At steady-state Ca++ uptake, some slices were exposed to 1 microM carbachol (CCH). Although 100 mM EtOH had no effect on Ca++ uptake into resting or stimulated striated muscle of upper esophagus, it significantly inhibited Ca++ uptake into smooth muscle of LES and LE. For unstimulated LE and resting LES, 100 mM EtOH significantly inhibited both initial uptake and steady-state levels, whereas lower doses had no significant effect. EtOH at 100 mM also affected changes in Ca++ content induced by CCH stimulation. CCH increased total exchangeable tissue Ca++ content in LE, whereas it decreased Ca++ content in LES. EtOH at 100 mM blunted these CCH-induced effects in both LES and LE. In contrast to resting muscle, inhibition of CCH-stimulated LE muscle was not limited to 100 mM EtOH, because substantial and significant inhibition was also seen at EtOH doses of 25 and 50 mM, doses which are relevant even in social drinking. Thus, EtOH inhibition of Ca++ influx into esophageal muscle is selective for smooth muscle, can occur at pharmacologically relevant EtOH doses and could be the underlying mechanism for EtOH's inhibition of contractility of esophageal smooth muscle. PMID:7932153

  15. Bougie dilators: simple, safe and cost-effective treatment for Crohn’s-related fibrotic anal strictures

    PubMed Central

    Kashkooli, Soleiman B.; Samanta, Sujon; Rouhani, Mehrdad; Akbarzadeh, Shoaleh; Saibil, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Summary Anal strictures with fibrotic induration have been shown to develop in up to 50% of all patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) with anal ulceration. We evaluate the technical feasibility, safety and long-term efficacy of bougie dilation for a subgroup of patients with symptomatic Crohn’s-related fibrotic anal strictures. Bougie dilation is simple to perform, relatively inexpensive and has a low risk of complications. PMID:26204140

  16. [The treatment of fecal incontinence].

    PubMed

    Romano, G; Bianco, F; Espodito, P

    2003-12-01

    The treatment of faecal incontinence includes: the education of the patient, medical therapy, biofeedback and sphincteric exercises, surgical therapy. Conservative, non-surgical treatment is almost always the initial therapeutic approach, except in those cases in which an evident defect of the sphincter muscle is present. Surgical treatment has seen a noteworthy increase in the last fifteen years as a consequence of the development of new surgical techniques. These techniques include: external anal sphincter plasty, pelvic floor plasties, sacral neuromodulation, muscular transpositions with or without electrostimulation, artificial anal sphincter. These procedures may be employed as first or second level treatment depending on the type of pathology considered and its aetiology. The 1st results achieved by surgical treatment authorise us to believe that reconversion with artificial sphincter is a valid alternative to graciloplasty, notwithstanding the fact that its costs are higher. Attentive pre- operative assessment of patients is important. Patients must be strongly motivated and able to manage the new condition. Although further studies are necessary, the degree of satisfactory of the 1st patients operated is the best stimulus for pursuing the development of this technique.

  17. [Operative treatment of fecal incontinence in coccyx agenesis in children after surgical correction of Hirschsprung's disease].

    PubMed

    Vakhidov, A Sh; Sulaĭmanov, A S; Shakhramov, Sh B

    2001-02-01

    The coccygeal agenesis is one of causes of the external anal sphincter functional insufficiency after performing operations for Hirschsprung's disease in children. The frequency of its diagnosis had constituted 6.2%, in 14.6% it was the causative factor of fecal incontinence after the operation. In coccygeal agenesis the normal anatomy of the pelvic floor muscles become disordered. It is convenient to perform the anomaly correction during the radical operation conduction for the main disease.

  18. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection Among Young Healthy Women in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Felipe A.; Quint, Wim; Gonzalez, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Herrero, Rolando; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Schiffman, Mark; Struijk, Linda; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; DelVecchio, Corey; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), yet little is known about anal HPV infection among healthy young women. Methods. A total of 2017 sexually active women in the control arm of an HPV-16/18 vaccine trial had a single anal specimen collected by a clinician at the 4-year study visit. Samples were tested for HPV by SPF10 PCR/DEIA/LiPA25, version 1. Results. A total of 4% of women had HPV-16, 22% had oncogenic HPV, and 31% had any HPV detected in an anal specimen. The prevalence of anal HPV was higher among women who reported anal intercourse, compared with those who did not (43.4% vs 28.4%; P < .001). Among women who reported anal intercourse, cervical HPV (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.3 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.4–8.2]), number of sex partners (aOR, 2.2 [95% CI, 1.1–4.6] for ≥4 partners), and number of anal intercourse partners (aOR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.1–3.3] for ≥2 partners) were independent risk factors for anal HPV detection. Among women who reported no anal intercourse, cervical HPV (aOR, 4.7 [95% CI, 3.7–5.9]), number of sex partners (aOR, 2.4 [95% CI, 1.7–3.4] for ≥4 partners), and report of anal fissures (aOR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1–4.8]) were associated with an increased odds of anal HPV detection. Conclusion. Anal HPV is common among young women, even those who report no anal sex, and was associated with cervical HPV infection. Anal fissures in women who report never having had anal intercourse may facilitate HPV exposure. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00128661. PMID:22850119

  19. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  20. Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection among HIV-Infected Men in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Shinwon; Cho, Heerim; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Eun ju; Lee, Su jin; Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Ki Hyung; Moon, Eunsoo; Cho, Hong Je

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the epidemiology on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among HIV-infected men in Korea. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, genotype distribution and risk factors associated with anal HPV infection among HIV-infected men in Korea. Methods A single-center cross-sectional study was conducted with HIV-infected men in Korea. Participants completed a detailed sexual behavior risk factor questionnaire. Anal samples were collected for cytology and HPV genotyping. Factors associated with anal HPV infection were assessed using multivariable logistic regression, stratifying by sexual behaviour. Results A total of 201 HIV-infected men were included in the study: 133 were from men who have sex with men (MSM) and 68 from men who have sex with women (MSW). Any anal HPV infection was detected in 82.7% of HIV-infected MSM and in 51.5% of HIV- infected MSW (P < 0.001). High-risk HPV (HR-HPV) prevalence was higher among MSM (47.4%) than MSW (25.0%; P = 0.002). The HR-HPV types identified most frequently were HPV 16 (11%), HPV 18 (9.9%), and HPV 58 (5%) in MSM, and HPV 58(11%) and HPV 16 (8.9%) in MSW. Prevalence of any HPV types in 9-valent vaccine types was higher among MSM than MSW (47.4% vs 22.1%. P = 0.001). Abnormal anal cytology was more commonly detected in MSM than MSW (42.9% vs.19.1%, P < 0.001). In HIV-infected MSM, higher number of lifetime male sex partners was significantly associated with any anal HPV infection, but age was a significant risk factor associated with anal HR-HPV infection. Conclusion Anal HPV infection was highly prevalent in HIV-infected MSM in Korea, and also commonly found in HIV-infected MSW. In HIV-infected MSM, the significant risk factor for being infected with any HPV infection was lifetime number of male sexual partners, and with anal oncogenic HPV infection was age. PMID:27548632

  1. Anal heterosex among young people and implications for health promotion: a qualitative study in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Marston, C; Lewis, R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore expectations, experiences and circumstances of anal sex among young people. Design Qualitative, longitudinal study using individual and group interviews. Participants 130 men and women aged 16–18 from diverse social backgrounds. Setting 3 contrasting sites in England (London, a northern industrial city, rural southwest). Results Anal heterosex often appeared to be painful, risky and coercive, particularly for women. Interviewees frequently cited pornography as the ‘explanation’ for anal sex, yet their accounts revealed a complex context with availability of pornography being only one element. Other key elements included competition between men; the claim that ‘people must like it if they do it’ (made alongside the seemingly contradictory expectation that it will be painful for women); and, crucially, normalisation of coercion and ‘accidental’ penetration. It seemed that men were expected to persuade or coerce reluctant partners. Conclusions Young people's narratives normalised coercive, painful and unsafe anal heterosex. This study suggests an urgent need for harm reduction efforts targeting anal sex to help encourage discussion about mutuality and consent, reduce risky and painful techniques and challenge views that normalise coercion. PMID:25122073

  2. Anal Cancer Screening in an Urban HIV Clinic: Provider Perceptions and Practice.

    PubMed

    Sowah, Leonard Anang; Buchwald, Ulrike K; Riedel, David J; Gilliam, Bruce L; Khambaty, Mariam; Fantry, Lori; Spencer, Derek E; Weaver, Jeffery; Taylor, Gregory; Skoglund, Mary; Amoroso, Anthony; Redfield, Robert R

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we sought to understand the perceptions and practice of providers on anal cancer screening in HIV-infected patients. Providers in an academic outpatient HIV practice were surveyed. Data were analyzed to determine the acceptability and perceptions of providers on anal Papanicolaou tests. Survey response rate was 55.3% (60.7% among male and 47.4% among female providers). One-third of the providers had received screening requests from patients. Female providers had higher self-rated comfort with anal Papanicolaou tests, with a mean score of 7.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.7-9.5) compared to 3.6 (95% CI 1.5-5.7) for male providers, P = .02. Sixty-seven percent of male providers and 37.5% of female providers would like to refer their patients for screening rather than perform the test themselves. Only 54.2% of our providers have ever performed anal cytology examination. Our survey revealed that not all providers were comfortable performing anal cancer screening for their patients.

  3. Properties of HPV-positive and HPV-negative anal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, G R; Lu, Q L; Love, S B; Talbot, I C; Northover, J M

    1996-12-01

    Evidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) can be found in up to 85 per cent of anal carcinomas. In the vulva, a discrete subset of HPV-positive carcinomas which show koilocytic morphology and distinct clinical features has recently been identified (warty carcinoma). The morphological and prognostic features of HPV-positive and HPV-negative anal carcinomas were compared in this study of the tumour distribution of HPV DNA. Vulval and anal neoplasia are similar in many ways and we have also looked to see if their similarity extends to 'warty' morphology in relation to HPV status. Thirty-five resection specimens of anal carcinoma were examined with biotin-labelled probes for HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 DNA, using a non-isotopic in situ hybridization (ISH) technique. No tumour was found to contain HPV 6, 11, or 18. Twenty-four (72 per cent) showed positivity for HPV 16 DNA. Staining was homogeneous and independent of local squamous, basaloid, or ductal differentiation. The majority of tumours showed staining suggestive of episomal, non-productive HPV infection. HPV-positive tumours were more likely to occur in the anal canal than perianally and to show a mixed squamous and basaloid appearance. No difference between the two groups was found in patient age, presence of adjacent dysplasia, ductal differentiation, or prognosis. There was no correlation between condylomatous tumour morphology and HPV 16 DNA positivity; thus, a subset equivalent to vulval warty carcinoma could not be identified. PMID:9014857

  4. Structure of Skeletal Muscle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cells, Tissues, & Membranes Cell Structure & Function Cell Structure Cell Function Body Tissues Epithelial Tissue Connective Tissue Muscle Tissue ... nerves. This is directly related to the primary function of skeletal muscle, ... an impulse from a nerve cell. Generally, an artery and at least one vein ...

  5. Autoimmune muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Mammen, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Patients with polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) present with the subacute onset of symmetric proximal muscle weakness, elevated muscle enzymes, myopathic findings on electromyography, and autoantibodies. DM patients are distinguished by their cutaneous manifestations. Characteristic features on muscle biopsy include the invasion of nonnecrotic muscle fibers by T cells in PM, perifascicular atrophy in DM, and myofiber necrosis without prominent inflammation in IMNM. Importantly, these are regarded as autoimmune diseases and most patients respond partially, if not completely, to immunosuppressive therapy. Patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM) usually present with the insidious onset of asymmetric weakness in distal muscles (e.g., wrist flexors, and distal finger flexors), often when more proximal muscle groups are relatively preserved. Although IBM muscle biopsies usually have focal invasion of myofibers by lymphocytes, the majority of IBM biopsies also include rimmed vacuoles. While most IBM patients do have autoantibodies, treatment with immunosuppressive agents does not improve their clinical course. Along with the presence of abnormally aggregated proteins on muscle biopsy, the refractory nature and relentless course of IBM suggest that the underlying pathophysiology may include a dominant myodegenerative component. This chapter will focus on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment of the autoimmune myopathies and IBM. An emphasis will be placed on recent advances, indicating that these are a diverse family of diseases and that each of more than a dozen myositis autoantibodies is associated with a distinct clinical phenotype. PMID:27112692

  6. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  7. Types of muscle tissue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The 3 types of muscle tissue are cardiac, smooth, and skeletal. Cardiac muscle cells are located in ... heart, appear striated, and are under involuntary control. Smooth muscle fibers are located in walls of hollow ...

  8. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J.; Talbot, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A trophy of skeletal muscle; muscle a trophy associated with manned space flight; the nature, causes, and mechanisms of muscle atrophy associated with space flight, selected physiological factors, biochemical aspects, and countermeasures are addressed.

  9. Onion artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chang, Pei-Zen; Lai, Hsi-Mei; Chang, Shing-Yun; Huang, Pin-Chun; Jeng, Huai-An

    2015-05-01

    Artificial muscles are soft actuators with the capability of either bending or contraction/elongation subjected to external stimulation. However, there are currently no artificial muscles that can accomplish these actions simultaneously. We found that the single layered, latticed microstructure of onion epidermal cells after acid treatment became elastic and could simultaneously stretch and bend when an electric field was applied. By modulating the magnitude of the voltage, the artificial muscle made of onion epidermal cells would deflect in opposing directions while either contracting or elongating. At voltages of 0-50 V, the artificial muscle elongated and had a maximum deflection of -30 μm; at voltages of 50-1000 V, the artificial muscle contracted and deflected 1.0 mm. The maximum force response is 20 μN at 1000 V.

  10. Cytological Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions Associated with Anal High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Northern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Ruanpeng, Darin; Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Supindham, Taweewat; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Sukpan, Kornkanok; Utaipat, Utaiwan; Miura, Toshiyuki; Kosashunhanan, Natthapol; Saokhieo, Pongpun; Songsupa, Radchanok; Wongthanee, Antika

    2016-01-01

    Background Anal cancer, one of human papillomavirus (HPV) related malignancies, has increased in recent decades, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-infected (HIV+) persons. We aimed to explore the prevalence of anal squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASIL) using Papanicolau (Pap) screening among MSM in northern Thailand and its associated factors. Methods Two hundreds MSM aged ≥18 years reporting receptive anal intercourse in the prior 6 months were recruited from July 2012 through January 2013. Medical history and behavioral data were collected by staff interview and computer-assisted self interview. Anal Pap smear, HPV genotyping, and HIV testing were performed. Two pathologists blinded to HPV and HIV status reported cytologic results by Bethesda classification. Results Mean age was 27.2 years (range 18–54). Overall, 86 (43.0%) had ASIL: 28 (14.2%) with atypical cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 1 (0.5%) with atypical squamous cells—cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H), 56 (28.4%) with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), and 1 (0.5%) with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). ASIL was associated by univariate analysis (p ≤0.05) with older age, gender identity other than bisexual (i.e., gay men and transgender women), rectal douching, anal symptoms, genital warts, HIV positivity, and high-risk-HPV infection. However, on multiple logistic regression ASIL was associated only with high-risk HPV type (p = 0.002) and HIV infection (p = 0.01). Conclusions ASIL is quite common in high-risk MSM in northern Thailand and is associated with high-risk HPV types and HIV infection. Routine anal Pap screening should be considered, given the high frequency of ASIL, particularly in the HIV+. High resolution anoscopy (HRA), not done here, should be to confirm PAP smears whose sensitivity and specificity are quite variable. Timely HPV vaccination should be considered for this population

  11. Monitoring Murine Skeletal Muscle Function for Muscle Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    The primary function of skeletal muscle is to generate force. Muscle force production is compromised in various forms of acquired and/or inherited muscle diseases. An important goal of muscle gene therapy is to recover muscle strength. Genetically engineered mice and spontaneous mouse mutants are readily available for preclinical muscle gene therapy studies. In this chapter, we outlined the methods commonly used for measuring murine skeletal muscle function. These include ex vivo and in situ analysis of the contractile profile of a single intact limb muscle (the extensor digitorium longus for ex vivo assay and the tibialis anterior muscle for in situ assay), grip force analysis, and downhill treadmill exercise. Force measurement in a single muscle is extremely useful for pilot testing of new gene therapy protocols by local gene transfer. Grip force and treadmill assessments offer body-wide evaluation following systemic muscle gene therapy. PMID:21194022

  12. Summary of emerging targets in anal cancer: the case for an immunotherapy based-approach

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Van

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal (SCCA) remains a less common gastrointestinal malignancy despite a continued increase in the annual incidence in the United States and globally. The vast majority of all cases are attributed to persistent infection and integration into host cell DNA by human papillomavirus (HPV). For patients with metastatic anal cancer, there is currently no accepted consensus standard of care. Given the viral etiology associated with the oncogenesis of this tumor, great interest exists for the development of immunotherapy as a novel approach to improving clinical outcomes for patients afflicted with this disease. This review highlights various immunotherapies under investigation in the treatment of advanced human malignancies and discusses their potential as future treatments for metastatic anal cancer. PMID:27747086

  13. Long head of biceps femoris flap in anal fistula treatment: anatomical study and case report.

    PubMed

    Terryn, F X; Leonard, D; Chateau, F

    2015-01-01

    In case of complex anal fistulae, the treatment can include muscular flaps. The gracilis transposition flap is the gold-standard in perineal reconstructive surgery, with wide use during the past decades. However, in some cases, this flap is too short to reach difficult locations such as the posterior perineum. The long head of the biceps femoris, which has already been studied in the electrically stimulated neosphincter formation, could be more appropriate in such clinical situations. Furthermore, its potential advantages, amongst which an excellent functional outcome, would be to allow persistent prone position, during both treatment and reconstruction, as well as a more favorable intramuscular vascularisation. We report the case of a 39-year-old man with a complex recurrent transphincteric posterior anal fistula with an external orifice in the right buttock and complicated with a severe cellulitis, treated with an endo-anal flap combined with a long head of biceps femoris pediculised flap. PMID:26021955

  14. Distinct Ecological Niche of Anal, Oral, and Cervical Mucosal Microbiomes in Adolescent Women

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin C.; Zolnik, Christine P.; Usyk, Mykhaylo; Chen, Zigui; Kaiser, Katherine; Nucci-Sack, Anne; Peake, Ken; Diaz, Angela; Viswanathan, Shankar; Strickler, Howard D.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Burk, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Human body sites represent ecological niches for microorganisms, each providing variations in microbial exposure, nutrient availability, microbial competition, and host immunological responses. In this study, we investigated the oral, anal, and cervical microbiomes from the same 20 sexually active adolescent females, using culture-independent, next-generation sequencing. DNA from each sample was amplified for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and sequenced on an Illumina platform using paired-end reads. Across the three anatomical niches, we found significant differences in bacterial community composition and diversity. Overall anal samples were dominated with Prevotella and Bacteriodes, oral samples with Streptococcus and Prevotella, and cervical samples with Lactobacillus. The microbiomes of a few cervical samples clustered with anal samples in weighted principal coordinate analyses, due in part to a higher proportion of Prevotella in those samples. Additionally, cervical samples had the lowest alpha diversity. Our results demonstrate the occurrence of distinct microbial communities across body sites within the same individual.

  15. Diversity of human papillomavirus in the anal canal of men: The HIM study

    PubMed Central

    Sichero, Laura; Nyitray, Alan G.; Nunes, Emily Montosa; Nepal, Bal; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Sobrinho, João S.; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R.; Villa, Luisa L.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with development of anogenital lesions in men. There are no reports describing the distribution of non-alpha HPV types in the anal canal of a sexually diverse men group. The HIM (HPV in Men) Study is a multicenter study of the natural history of HPV infection in Brazil, Mexico and USA. At baseline, 12% of anal canal specimens PCR HPV-positive were not typed by the Roche Linear Array and were considered unclassified. Our goal was characterizing HPVs among these unclassified specimens at baseline and assess associations with participant socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics. Unclassified HPVs were typed by sequencing amplified PGMY09/11 products or cloning of PGMY/GP+ nested amplicons followed by sequencing. Further analysis was conducted using FAP primers. Of men with unclassified HPV at the anal canal, most (89.1%) were men who have sex with women (MSW). Readable sequences were produced for 62.8% of unclassified specimens, of which 75.2% were characterized HPV types. A total of 18, 26, and 3 different α-, β- and γ-HPV types were detected, respectively. Compared to older men (45-70 years), α-HPVs were more commonly detected among young men (18-30 years) whereas β-HPVs were more frequent among mid-adult men (31-44 years). β-HPVs were more common among heterosexual men (85.0%) than non-heterosexual men. β2-HPV types composed all β-HPVs detected among non-heterosexual men. The high prevalence of β-HPV in the anal canal of men who do not report receptive anal sex is suggestive of other forms of transmission that do not involve penile-anal intercourse. PMID:25698660

  16. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Malignancies: A Preliminary Toxicity and Disease Outcomes Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pepek, Joseph M.; Willett, Christopher G.; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to reduce toxicities associated with chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of anal cancer. This study reports the results of using IMRT in the treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Records of patients with anal malignancies treated with IMRT at Duke University were reviewed. Acute toxicity was graded using the NCI CTCAEv3.0 scale. Overall survival (OS), metastasis-free survival (MFS), local-regional control (LRC) and colostomy-free survival (CFS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Forty-seven patients with anal malignancy (89% canal, 11% perianal skin) were treated with IMRT between August 2006 and September 2008. Median follow-up was 14 months (19 months for SCC patients). Median radiation dose was 54 Gy. Eight patients (18%) required treatment breaks lasting a median of 5 days (range, 2-7 days). Toxicity rates were as follows: Grade 4: leukopenia (7%), thrombocytopenia (2%); Grade 3: leukopenia (18%), diarrhea (9%), and anemia (4%); Grade 2: skin (93%), diarrhea (24%), and leukopenia (24%). The 2-year actuarial overall OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 85%, 78%, 90% and 82%, respectively. For SCC patients, the 2-year OS, MFS, LRC, and CFS rates were 100%, 100%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. Conclusions: IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer results in significant reductions in normal tissue dose and acute toxicities versus historic controls treated without IMRT, leading to reduced rates of toxicity-related treatment interruption. Early disease-related outcomes seem encouraging. IMRT is emerging as a standard therapy for anal cancer.

  17. Diversity of human papillomavirus in the anal canal of men: the HIM Study.

    PubMed

    Sichero, L; Nyitray, A G; Nunes, E M; Nepal, B; Ferreira, S; Sobrinho, J S; Baggio, M L; Galan, L; Silva, R C; Lazcano-Ponce, E; Giuliano, A R; Villa, L L

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with the development of anogenital lesions in men. There are no reports describing the distribution of non-α HPV types in the anal canal of a sexually diverse group of men. The HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study is a multicentre study on the natural history of HPV infection in Brazil, Mexico, and the USA. At baseline, 12% of anal canal PCR HPV-positive specimens were not typed by the Roche Linear Array, and were considered to be unclassified. Our goals were to characterize HPVs among these unclassified specimens at baseline, and to assess associations with participant socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics. Unclassified HPVs were typed by sequencing of amplified PGMY09/11 products or cloning of PGMY/GP + nested amplicons followed by sequencing. Further analysis was conducted with FAP primers. Of men with unclassified HPV in the anal canal, most (89.1%) were men who have sex with women. Readable sequences were produced for 62.8% of unclassified specimens, of which 75.2% were characterized HPV types. Eighteen, 26 and three different α-HPV, β-HPV and γ-HPV types were detected, respectively. α-HPVs were more commonly detected among young men (18-30 years) than among older men (45-70 years), whereas β-HPVs were more frequent among mid-adult men (31-44 years). β-HPVs were more common among heterosexual men (85.0%) than among non-heterosexual men. All β-HPVs detected among non-heterosexual men were β2-HPV types. The high prevalence of β-HPV in the anal canal of men who do not report receptive anal sex is suggestive of other forms of transmission that do not involve penile-anal intercourse.

  18. Pelvic floor muscle functioning in women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reissing, E D; Brown, C; Lord, M J; Binik, Y M; Khalifé, S

    2005-06-01

    Vaginal sEMG biofeedback and pelvic floor physical therapists' manual techniques are being increasingly included in the treatment of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS). Successful treatment outcomes have generated hypotheses concerning the role of pelvic floor pathology in the etiology of VVS. However, no data on pelvic floor functioning in women with VVS compared to controls are available. Twenty-nine women with VVS were matched to 29 women with no pain with intercourse. Two independent, structured pelvic floor examinations were carried out by physical therapists blind to the diagnostic status of the participants. Results indicated that therapists reached almost perfect agreement in their diagnosis of pelvic floor pathology. A series of significant correlations demonstrated the reliability of assessment results across muscle palpation sites. Women with VVS demonstrated significantly more vaginal hypertonicity, lack of vaginal muscle strength, and restriction of the vaginal opening, compared to women with no pain with intercourse. Anal palpation could not confirm generalized hypertonicity of the pelvic floor. We suggest that pelvic floor pathology in women with VVS is reactive in nature and elicited with palpations that result in VVS-type pain. Treatment interventions need to recognize the critical importance of addressing the conditioned, protective muscle guarding response in women with VVS.

  19. Respiratory Muscle Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gransee, Heather M.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle’s plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles. PMID:23798306

  20. Anal Canal Carcinoma in a Child With Disorders of Sex Development.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Horikawa, Reiko; Masaki, Hidekazu; Yoshioka, Takako; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Kanamori, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal in children is rare. To date, the etiology and outcome of this condition have been not fully understood. Here, we report an 11-year-old child with anal canal cancer who had concomitant disorders of sex development. Radiotherapy followed by salvage surgery achieved disease-free survival of 3 years. Since overexpression of cell cycle regulatory protein p16 was immunohistochemically evident in tumor tissue, human papillomavirus infection was considered as a causative factor in the carcinogenesis.

  1. Muscle regeneration after sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Adrien; Rocheteau, Pierre; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Severe critical illness is often complicated by intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), which is associated with increased ICU and post-ICU mortality, delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and long-term functional disability. Several mechanisms have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ICU-AW, but muscle regeneration has not been investigated to any extent in this context, even though its involvement is suggested by the protracted functional consequences of ICU-AW. Recent data suggest that muscle regeneration could be impaired after sepsis, and that mesenchymal stem cell treatment could improve the post-injury muscle recovery. PMID:27193340

  2. Muscle fiber type distribution in climbing Hawaiian gobioid fishes: ontogeny and correlations with locomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Cediel, Roberto A; Blob, Richard W; Schrank, Gordon D; Plourde, Robert C; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2008-01-01

    Three species of Hawaiian amphidromous gobioid fishes are remarkable in their ability to climb waterfalls up to several hundred meters tall. Juvenile Lentipes concolor and Awaous guamensis climb using rapid bursts of axial undulation, whereas juvenile Sicyopterus stimpsoni climb using much slower movements, alternately attaching oral and pelvic sucking disks to the substrate during prolonged bouts of several cycles. Based on these differing climbing styles, we hypothesized that propulsive musculature in juvenile L. concolor and A. guamensis would be dominated by white muscle fibers, whereas S. stimpsoni would exhibit a greater proportion of red muscle fibers than other climbing species. We further predicted that, because adults of these species shift from climbing to burst swimming as their main locomotor behavior, muscle from adult fish of all three species would be dominated by white fibers. To test these hypotheses, we used ATPase assays to evaluate muscle fiber type distribution in Hawaiian climbing gobies for three anatomical regions (midbody, anal, and tail). Axial musculature was dominated by white muscle fibers in juveniles of all three species, but juvenile S. stimpsoni had a significantly greater proportion of red fibers than the other two species. Fiber type proportions of adult fishes did not differ significantly from those of juveniles. Thus, muscle fiber type proportions in juveniles appear to help accommodate differences in locomotor demands among these species, indicating that they overcome the common challenge of waterfall climbing through both diverse behaviors and physiological specializations. PMID:18222661

  3. Muscle fiber type distribution in climbing Hawaiian gobioid fishes: ontogeny and correlations with locomotor performance.

    PubMed

    Cediel, Roberto A; Blob, Richard W; Schrank, Gordon D; Plourde, Robert C; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2008-01-01

    Three species of Hawaiian amphidromous gobioid fishes are remarkable in their ability to climb waterfalls up to several hundred meters tall. Juvenile Lentipes concolor and Awaous guamensis climb using rapid bursts of axial undulation, whereas juvenile Sicyopterus stimpsoni climb using much slower movements, alternately attaching oral and pelvic sucking disks to the substrate during prolonged bouts of several cycles. Based on these differing climbing styles, we hypothesized that propulsive musculature in juvenile L. concolor and A. guamensis would be dominated by white muscle fibers, whereas S. stimpsoni would exhibit a greater proportion of red muscle fibers than other climbing species. We further predicted that, because adults of these species shift from climbing to burst swimming as their main locomotor behavior, muscle from adult fish of all three species would be dominated by white fibers. To test these hypotheses, we used ATPase assays to evaluate muscle fiber type distribution in Hawaiian climbing gobies for three anatomical regions (midbody, anal, and tail). Axial musculature was dominated by white muscle fibers in juveniles of all three species, but juvenile S. stimpsoni had a significantly greater proportion of red fibers than the other two species. Fiber type proportions of adult fishes did not differ significantly from those of juveniles. Thus, muscle fiber type proportions in juveniles appear to help accommodate differences in locomotor demands among these species, indicating that they overcome the common challenge of waterfall climbing through both diverse behaviors and physiological specializations.

  4. Innervation of Extrahepatic Biliary Tract, With Special Reference to the Direct Bidirectional Neural Connections of the Gall Bladder, Sphincter of Oddi and Duodenum in Suncus murinus, in Whole-Mount Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Yi, S-Q; Ren, K; Kinoshita, M; Takano, N; Itoh, M; Ozaki, N

    2016-06-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is one of the most important symptoms in post-cholecystectomy syndrome. Using either electrical or mechanical stimulation and retrogradely transported neuronal dyes, it has been demonstrated that there are direct neural pathways connecting gall bladder and the sphincter of Oddi in the Australian opossum and the golden hamster. In the present study, we employed whole-mount immunohistochemistry staining to observe and verify that there are two different plexuses of the extrahepatic biliary tract in Suncus murinus. One, named Pathway One, showed a fine, irregular but dense network plexus that ran adhesively and resided on/in the extrahepatic biliary tract wall, and the plexus extended into the intrahepatic area. On the other hand, named Pathway Two, exhibiting simple, thicker and straight neural bundles, ran parallel to the surface of the extrahepatic biliary tract and passed between the gall bladder and duodenum, but did not give off any branches to the liver. Pathway Two was considered to involve direct bidirectional neural connections between the duodenum and the biliary tract system. For the first time, morphologically, we demonstrated direct neural connections between gall bladder and duodenum in S. murinus. Malfunction of the sphincter of Oddi may be caused by injury of the direct neural pathways between gall bladder and duodenum by cholecystectomy. From the viewpoint of preserving the function of the major duodenal papilla and common bile duct, we emphasize the importance of avoiding kocherization of the common bile duct so as to preserve the direct neural connections between gall bladder and sphincter of Oddi. PMID:26179953

  5. Conversations for providers caring for patients with rectal cancer: Comparison of long-term patient-centered outcomes for patients with low rectal cancer facing ostomy or sphincter-sparing surgery.

    PubMed

    Herrinton, Lisa J; Altschuler, Andrea; McMullen, Carmit K; Bulkley, Joanna E; Hornbrook, Mark C; Sun, Virginia; Wendel, Christopher S; Grant, Marcia; Baldwin, Carol M; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Temple, Larissa K F; Krouse, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    For some patients with low rectal cancer, ostomy (with elimination into a pouch) may be the only realistic surgical option. However, some patients have a choice between ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery. Sphincter-sparing surgery has been preferred over ostomy because it offers preservation of normal bowel function. However, this surgery can cause incontinence and bowel dysfunction. Increasingly, it has become evident that certain patients who are eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery may not be well served by the surgery, and construction of an ostomy may be better. No validated assessment tool or decision aid has been published to help newly diagnosed patients decide between the two surgeries or to help physicians elicit long-term surgical outcomes. Furthermore, comparison of long-term outcomes and late effects after the two surgeries has not been synthesized. Therefore, this systematic review summarizes controlled studies that compared long-term survivorship outcomes between these two surgical groups. The goals are: 1) to improve understanding and shared decision-making among surgeons, oncologists, primary care providers, patients, and caregivers; 2) to increase the patient's participation in the decision; 3) to alert the primary care provider to patient challenges that could be addressed by provider attention and intervention; and 4) ultimately, to improve patients' long-term quality of life. This report includes discussion points for health care providers to use with their patients during initial discussions of ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery as well as questions to ask during follow-up examinations to ascertain any long-term challenges facing the patient. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:387-397. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Conversations for providers caring for patients with rectal cancer: Comparison of long-term patient-centered outcomes for patients with low rectal cancer facing ostomy or sphincter-sparing surgery.

    PubMed

    Herrinton, Lisa J; Altschuler, Andrea; McMullen, Carmit K; Bulkley, Joanna E; Hornbrook, Mark C; Sun, Virginia; Wendel, Christopher S; Grant, Marcia; Baldwin, Carol M; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Temple, Larissa K F; Krouse, Robert S

    2016-09-01

    For some patients with low rectal cancer, ostomy (with elimination into a pouch) may be the only realistic surgical option. However, some patients have a choice between ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery. Sphincter-sparing surgery has been preferred over ostomy because it offers preservation of normal bowel function. However, this surgery can cause incontinence and bowel dysfunction. Increasingly, it has become evident that certain patients who are eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery may not be well served by the surgery, and construction of an ostomy may be better. No validated assessment tool or decision aid has been published to help newly diagnosed patients decide between the two surgeries or to help physicians elicit long-term surgical outcomes. Furthermore, comparison of long-term outcomes and late effects after the two surgeries has not been synthesized. Therefore, this systematic review summarizes controlled studies that compared long-term survivorship outcomes between these two surgical groups. The goals are: 1) to improve understanding and shared decision-making among surgeons, oncologists, primary care providers, patients, and caregivers; 2) to increase the patient's participation in the decision; 3) to alert the primary care provider to patient challenges that could be addressed by provider attention and intervention; and 4) ultimately, to improve patients' long-term quality of life. This report includes discussion points for health care providers to use with their patients during initial discussions of ostomy and sphincter-sparing surgery as well as questions to ask during follow-up examinations to ascertain any long-term challenges facing the patient. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:387-397. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26999757

  7. Muscles of the Trunk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Muscular System » Muscle Groups » Trunk Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  8. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment. PMID:25673127

  9. Muscle biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle biopsy involves removal of a plug of tissue usually by a needle to be later used for examination. Sometimes ... there is a patchy condition expected an open biopsy may be used. Open biopsy involves a small ...

  10. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbison, G. J. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  11. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  12. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  13. Bound potassium in muscle II.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Z

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to decide between the alternatives a) the ionized K+ is in a dissolved state in the muscle water, or b) a part of the muscle potassium is in a "bound' state. Sartorius muscles of Rana esculenta were put into glicerol for about one hour at 0-2 degrees C. Most of muscle water came out, but most of muscle potassium remained in the muscles. In contrast to this: from muscle in heat rigor more potassium was released due to glicerol treating than from the intact ones. 1. Supposition a) is experimentally refuted. 2. Supposition b) corresponds to the experimental results. PMID:6969511

  14. OBLIQUELY STRIATED MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbluth, Jack

    1967-01-01

    Segments of the obliquely striated body muscle of Ascaris were fixed at minimum body length after treatment with acetylcholine and at maximum body length after treatment with piperazine citrate and then studied by light and electron microscopy. Evidence was found for two mechanisms of length change: sliding of thin filaments with respect to thick filaments such as occurs in cross-striated muscle, and shearing of thick filaments with respect to each other such that the degree of their stagger increases with extension and decreases with shortening. The shearing mechanism could account for great extensibility in this muscle and in nonstriated muscles in general and could underlie other manifestations of "plasticity" as well. In addition, it is suggested that the contractile apparatus is attached to the endomysium in such a way that the sarcomeres can act either in series, as in cross-striated muscle, or individually. Since the sarcomeres are virtually longitudinal in orientation and are almost coextensive with the muscle fiber, it would, therefore, be possible for a single sarcomere contracting independently to develop tension effectively between widely separated points on the fiber surface, thus permitting very efficient maintenance of isometric tension. PMID:6040534

  15. Head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Tzahor, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    The developmental paths that lead to the formation of skeletal muscles in the head are distinct from those operating in the trunk. Craniofacial muscles are associated with head and neck structures. In the embryo, these structures derive from distinct mesoderm populations. Distinct genetic programs regulate different groups of muscles within the head to generate diverse muscle specifications. Developmental and lineage studies in vertebrates and invertebrates demonstrated an overlap in progenitor populations derived from the pharyngeal mesoderm that contribute to certain head muscles and the heart. These studies reveal that the genetic program controlling pharyngeal muscles overlaps with that of the heart. Indeed cardiac and craniofacial birth defects are often linked. Recent studies suggest that early chordates, the last common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates, had an ancestral pharyngeal mesoderm lineage that later during evolution gave rise to both heart and craniofacial structures. This chapter summarizes studies related to the origins, signaling, genetics, and evolution of the head musculature, highlighting its heterogeneous characteristics in all these aspects.

  16. Characterization and virulence of Beauveria bassiana associated with auger beetle (Sinoxylon anale) infesting allspice (Pimenta dioica).

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, C M; Jacob, T K; Devasahayam, S; D'Silva, Sharon; Nandeesh, P G

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of auger beetle, Sinoxylon anale Lesne (Bostrichidae: Coleoptera), a destructive pest of cosmopolitan occurrence is reported for the first time on allspice trees, Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. in Kerala, India. The insects bored through the basal region of fresh twigs resulting in dieback symptoms. Morphological characterization and sequencing of a partially amplified fragment of the mitochondrial CO1 gene (696bp) revealed the insect to be Sinoxylon anale. An entomopathogenic fungus was isolated from infected cadavers of S. anale that was identified as Beauveria bassiana (Bals.-Criv.) Vuill., sensu stricto (s.s.) (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) based on morphological and molecular studies. The partial sequences of the ITS, TUB, TEF and Bloc gene regions were sequenced. The fungus grew well in ambient room temperature conditions (28-32±2°C; 60-70% relative humidity) and the infection process on the insect was documented by scanning electron microscopy. Bioassay studies with the isolate indicated that the fungus was virulent against adult beetles as evidenced by the LC50 (3.6×10(6)conidia/ml) and ST50 values (6.8days at a dose of 1×10(7)conidia/ml and 5.8days at a dose of 1×10(8)conidia/ml, respectively). This is the first record of B. bassiana naturally infecting S. anale and the fungus holds promise to be developed as a mycoinsecticide.

  17. Manitoba-oculo-tricho-anal (MOTA) syndrome is caused by mutations in FREM1

    PubMed Central

    Slavotinek, Anne M; Baranzini, Sergio E; Schanze, Denny; Labelle-Dumais, Cassandre; Short, Kieran M; Chao, Ryan; Yahyavi, Mani; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Chu, Catherine; Musone, Stacey; Wheatley, Ashleigh; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Marles, Sandra; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Maga, A Murat; Hassan, Mohamed G; Gould, Douglas B; Madireddy, Lohith; Li, Chumei; Cox, Timothy C; Smyth, Ian; Chudley, Albert E; Zenker, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Manitoba-oculo-tricho-anal (MOTA) syndrome is a rare condition defined by eyelid colobomas, cryptophthalmos and anophthalmia/ microphthalmia, an aberrant hairline, a bifid or broad nasal tip, and gastrointestinal anomalies such as omphalocele and anal stenosis. Autosomal recessive inheritance had been assumed because of consanguinity in the Oji-Cre population of Manitoba and reports of affected siblings, but no locus or cytogenetic aberration had previously been described. Methods and results This study shows that MOTA syndrome is caused by mutations in FREM1, a gene previously mutated in bifid nose, renal agenesis, and anorectal malformations (BNAR) syndrome. MOTA syndrome and BNAR syndrome can therefore be considered as part of a phenotypic spectrum that is similar to, but distinct from and less severe than, Fraser syndrome. Re-examination of Frem1bat/bat mutant mice found new evidence that Frem1 is involved in anal and craniofacial development, with anal prolapse, eyelid colobomas, telecanthus, a shortened snout and reduced philtral height present in the mutant mice, similar to the human phenotype in MOTA syndrome. Conclusions The milder phenotypes associated with FREM1 deficiency in humans (MOTA syndrome and BNAR syndrome) compared to that resulting from FRAS1 and FREM2 loss of function (Fraser syndrome) are also consistent with the less severe phenotypes resulting from Frem1 loss of function in mice. Together, Fraser, BNAR and MOTA syndromes constitute a clinically overlapping group of FRAS–FREM complex diseases. PMID:21507892

  18. Patterns of Vaginal, Oral, and Anal Sexual Intercourse in an Urban Seventh-Grade Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Christine M.; Peskin, Melissa Fleschler; Addy, Robert C.; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Tortolero, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examines the prevalence of vaginal, oral, and anal intercourse among a population of urban, public middle school students, the characteristics of early sexual initiators, and the sequence of sexual initiation. Such data are limited for early adolescents. Methods: A total of 1279 seventh-grade students (57.3% female, 43.6%…

  19. A calculus within an anal fistula tract in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M E; Shumo, A I

    2001-02-01

    A non-insulin dependent diabetic patient with a chronic anal fistula underwent fistulectomy. At operation a calculus was discovered. The patient had an uneventful recovery and healing of the wound in 4 weeks duration. The only case reported previously was in a nondiabetic patient and interestingly from this department. PMID:11299415

  20. Anal extrusion of migrated ventriculo-peritoneal shunt catheter: An unusual complication and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarkari, Avijit; Borkar, Sachin A.; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Authors present an unusual case of anal extrusion of peritoneal end of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt in a 2-year-old male child. Pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this rare complication of a very commonly performed neurosurgical procedure. PMID:27695576

  1. Characterization and virulence of Beauveria bassiana associated with auger beetle (Sinoxylon anale) infesting allspice (Pimenta dioica).

    PubMed

    Senthil Kumar, C M; Jacob, T K; Devasahayam, S; D'Silva, Sharon; Nandeesh, P G

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of auger beetle, Sinoxylon anale Lesne (Bostrichidae: Coleoptera), a destructive pest of cosmopolitan occurrence is reported for the first time on allspice trees, Pimenta dioica (L.) Merr. in Kerala, India. The insects bored through the basal region of fresh twigs resulting in dieback symptoms. Morphological characterization and sequencing of a partially amplified fragment of the mitochondrial CO1 gene (696bp) revealed the insect to be Sinoxylon anale. An entomopathogenic fungus was isolated from infected cadavers of S. anale that was identified as Beauveria bassiana (Bals.-Criv.) Vuill., sensu stricto (s.s.) (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) based on morphological and molecular studies. The partial sequences of the ITS, TUB, TEF and Bloc gene regions were sequenced. The fungus grew well in ambient room temperature conditions (28-32±2°C; 60-70% relative humidity) and the infection process on the insect was documented by scanning electron microscopy. Bioassay studies with the isolate indicated that the fungus was virulent against adult beetles as evidenced by the LC50 (3.6×10(6)conidia/ml) and ST50 values (6.8days at a dose of 1×10(7)conidia/ml and 5.8days at a dose of 1×10(8)conidia/ml, respectively). This is the first record of B. bassiana naturally infecting S. anale and the fungus holds promise to be developed as a mycoinsecticide. PMID:27480402

  2. Treatment of anal human papillomavirus-associated disease: a long term outcome study.

    PubMed

    Nathan, M; Hickey, N; Mayuranathan, L; Vowler, S L; Singh, N

    2008-07-01

    Treatment for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal canal disease has been unsatisfactory. The objective of our study was to determine the treatment outcome in our cohort with anal HPV disease. Overall, 181 patients were evaluated over a median period of 19.1 months (range = 2.8-125.5). Eighty-eight patients (48.6%) with high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and 82 patients (45.3%) with low-grade AIN underwent treatment. One hundred and forty-one patients (77.9%) received laser ablative treatment as an outpatient procedure. The treatment yielded cure, defined as a disease-free state at 12 months after treatment, in 63.0% (114/181). Median time to cure for the cohort was 31.5 months (95% confidence interval: 23.0-40.0). Treatment outcome showed no evidence of being affected by age, sexual preference, history of smoking or presence of high-grade disease. Median time to cure was significantly affected by a positive HIV status (P = 0.02) and the extent (volume) of the disease (P = 0.01). Contrary to the current view that treatment of HPV-related anal disease is difficult, unrewarding due to recurrences and may lead to substantial morbidity, we demonstrate that effective treatment is possible for both low- and high-grade AIN. These findings should help with the general desire to introduce screening for AIN for at-risk groups. PMID:18574114

  3. High reproducibility of histological diagnosis of human papillomavirus-related intraepithelial lesions of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer M; Jin, Fengyi; Thurloe, Julia K; Biro, Clare; Poynten, Isobel M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Fairley, Christopher K; Templeton, David J; Carr, Andrew D; Garland, Suzanne M; Hillman, Richard J; Cornall, Alyssa M; Grulich, Andrew E; Farnsworth, Annabelle

    2015-06-01

    In a natural history study of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-related lesions, we examined the reproducibility of histological high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). Three expert anogenital pathologists share the reporting of histological specimens from the Study of the Prevention of Anal Cancer (SPANC), utilising Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) criteria. In total, 194 previously reported biopsies were randomly chosen within diagnostic strata [50 HSIL-anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) 3; 45 HSIL-AIN 2; 49 'flat' low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL); 50 'exophytic' LSIL; and 50 negative for squamous intraepithelial lesion] and reviewed by each of these three pathologists. Consensus was defined as agreement between at least two review diagnoses, using a binary classification of HSIL and non-HSIL, or if consensus was not obtained in this way, it was achieved through a multiheader microscope session by the three pathologists. We found very high agreement between original and consensus diagnoses (Kappa = 0.886) and between each pathologist's review and consensus (Kappas = 0.926, 0.917 and 0.905). Intra-observer agreement for the three pathologists was 0.705, 1.000 and 0.854. This high level of diagnostic reproducibility indicates that the findings of SPANC should be robust and provide reliable information about HPV-related anal canal disease. PMID:25938361

  4. Chin tuck against resistance (CTAR): new method for enhancing suprahyoid muscle activity using a Shaker-type exercise.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Wai Lam; Khoo, Jason Kai Peng; Rickard Liow, Susan J

    2014-04-01

    For patients with dysphagia resulting from upper esophageal sphincter dysfunction, strengthening the suprahyoid muscles through therapeutic exercise has proved effective in restoring oral feeding. The aim of this study was to compare the maximum and mean surface electromyography (sEMG) activity of the suprahyoid muscles during the Chin Tuck Against Resistance (CTAR) exercise and the Shaker exercise for both isokinetic and isometric tasks. During the CTAR exercises, the participant is seated while tucking the chin to compress an inflatable rubber ball, whereas during the Shaker exercise, the participant is lay supine while lifting the head to look at the feet. Forty healthy participants (20 males, 20 females) aged 21-39 years completed all four tasks in counterbalanced order, with measures of resting activation taken prior to each exercise. Although subjective feedback suggested that the sitting position for CTAR is less strenuous than the supine position for Shaker, the results of separate analyses showed significantly greater maximum sEMG values during the CTAR isokinetic and isometric exercises than during the equivalent Shaker exercises, and significantly greater mean sEMG values were observed for the CTAR isometric exercise than for the Shaker isometric exercise. Clinical trials are now needed, but the CTAR exercises appear effective in exercising the suprahyoid muscles, and they could achieve therapeutic effects comparable to those of Shaker exercises, with the potential for greater compliance by patients.

  5. Squamous-cell Carcinoma of the Anus and Anal Canal: An Analysis of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, W. B.

    1941-01-01

    The analysis is of 55 cases admitted into St. Mark's Hospital from 1922 to 1940. The incidence was 3.35% of all cases of cancer of the rectum, anal canal and anus admitted during this period. Sex distribution—27 males and 28 females. The average age (61.7 years) is higher than that of columnar-cell carcinoma of the rectum (57.4 years). Histology.—The cases have been graded into three grades of malignancy—low grade, medium grade, and high grade. Low grade squamous carcinoma is twice as frequent in men as in women, and generally originates at the anal margin. Medium grade squamous carcinoma is equally distributed between men and women; it may arise at the anus or in the anal canal. High grade squamous carcinoma is much more common in the female sex and is almost entirely limited to the anal canal. Quadrant affected—about one-third of the anal margin growths and one-half of the anal canal growths were situated anteriorly. Differential diagnosis from simple papilloma, simple ulcer, chronic inflammation, tuberculous ulcer, tuberculide, primary chancre, amœbic ulcer, basal-cell carcinoma, columnar-cell carcinoma. Biopsy and grading essential before treatment is decided upon. The results of treatment in the three grades of malignancy are described. The best results were obtained in the early low-grade cases treated by interstitial radium needling. In the medium and high grades only three five-year survivals can be reported and these followed excision of the rectum. The management of the inguinal glands is discussed and the importance of a very close post-operative supervision emphasized. Squamous carcinoma of the anal canal may cause lymphatic metastases in the superior hæmorrhoidal glands; there have been four such cases in this series. Diathermy perineal excision is indicated in these cases. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 6aFig. 6bFig. 7Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:19992316

  6. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). Methods We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. Results We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Conclusion The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  7. Efficacy and safety of helical tomotherapy with daily image guidance in anal canal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Berardino; Jumeau, Raphael; Bouchaab, Hasna; Vallet, Véronique; Matzinger, Oscar; Troussier, Idriss; Mirimanoff, René-Olivier; Wagner, Anna Dorothea; Hanhloser, Dieter; Bourhis, Jean; Ozsahin, Esat Mahmut

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), also using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) techniques, has been only recently introduced for treating anal cancer patients. We report efficacy and safety HT, and daily image-guided RT (IGRT) for anal cancer. Materials and methods We retrospectively analyzed efficacy and toxicity of HT with or without chemotherapy for anal cancer patients. Local control (LC) and grade 3 or more toxicity rate (CTC-AE v.4.0) were the primary endpoints. Overall (OS), disease-free (DFS), and colostomy-free survival (CFS) are also reported. Results Between October 2007 and May 2014, 78 patients were treated. Fifty patients presented a stage II or stage IIIA (UICC 2002), and 33 presented a N1-3 disease. Radiotherapy consisted of 36 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) delivered on the pelvis and on the anal canal, with a sequential boost up to 59.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) delivered to the anal and to nodal gross tumor volumes. Concomitant chemotherapy was delivered in 73 patients, mainly using mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil (n = 30) or mitomycin C and capecitabine combination (n = 37). After a median follow-up period of 47 months (range 3-75), the five-year LC rate was 83.8% (95% CI 76.2-91.4%). Seven patients underwent a colostomy because of local recurrence (n = 5) or pretreatment dysfunction (n = 2). Overall incidence of grade 3 acute toxicity was 24%, mainly as erythema (n = 15/19) or diarrhea (n = 7/19). Two patients presented a late grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anal incontinence). No grade 4 acute or late toxicity was recorded. Conclusions HT with daily IGRT is efficacious and safe in the treatment of anal canal cancer patients, and is considered in our department standard of care in this clinical setting. PMID:27034083

  8. Role of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Management of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena; Ricardi, Umberto; Milanesi, Enrica; Cassoni, Paola; Baccega, Massimo; Filippini, Claudia; Racca, Patrizia; Lesca, Adriana; Munoz, Fernando H.; Fora, Gianluca; Skanjeti, Andrea; Cravero, Francesca; Morino, Mario

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pre- and post-treatment staging of anal cancer are often inaccurate. The role of positron emission tomograpy-computed tomography (PET-CT) in anal cancer is yet to be defined. The aim of the study was to compare PET-CT with CT scan, sentinel node biopsy results of inguinal lymph nodes, and anal biopsy results in staging and in follow-up of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three consecutive patients diagnosed with anal cancer underwent PET-CT. Results were compared with computed tomography (CT), performed in 40 patients, and with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) (41 patients) at pretreatment workup. Early follow-up consisted of a digital rectal examination, an anoscopy, a PET-CT scan, and anal biopsies performed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment. Data sets were then compared. Results: At pretreatment assessment, anal cancer was identified by PET-CT in 47 patients (88.7%) and by CT in 30 patients (75%). The detection rates rose to 97.9% with PET-CT and to 82.9% with CT (P=.042) when the 5 patients who had undergone surgery prior to this assessment and whose margins were positive at histological examination were censored. Perirectal and/or pelvic nodes were considered metastatic by PET-CT in 14 of 53 patients (26.4%) and by CT in 7 of 40 patients (17.5%). SNB was superior to both PET-CT and CT in detecting inguinal lymph nodes. PET-CT upstaged 37.5% of patients and downstaged 25% of patients. Radiation fields were changed in 12.6% of patients. PET-CT at 3 months was more accurate than PET-CT at 1 month in evaluating outcomes after chemoradiation therapy treatment: sensitivity was 100% vs 66.6%, and specificity was 97.4% vs 92.5%, respectively. Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Conclusions: In this series, PET-CT detected the primary tumor more often than CT. Staging of perirectal/pelvic or inguinal lymph nodes was better with PET-CT. SNB was more accurate in staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  9. ["ReMeEx", the adjustable-tension suburetral sling in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence due to intrinsic sphincteric dysfunction (type III)].

    PubMed

    Cortese, P; Gallo, F; Gastaldi, E; Schenone, M; Ninotta, G; Gilberti, C

    2009-01-01

    The anti-incontinence methods "tension free" may be insufficient in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (IUS) due to intrinsic sphincteric dysfunction (ISD). We report our findings on the use of the suburetral sling with adjustable tension "Remeex" sistem in the treatment of 24 patients. METHODS. Between May 2002 and February 2008, 24 patients with IUS of type III, were subjected to suburetral sling "Reemex." Positioning. The intervention provides a vaginal access to the positioning of suburetral sling and an access to the positioning of a varitensor which the wires are connected at the sling seats, recovered by the passage of a Stamey needle carrier of. The average operative time was approximately 70 minutes, the resignation was in I-II day. The tension of the sling was adjusted the day following intervention by turning the screw connected to the varitensor. Patients were followed with physical examination and completed the Korman's questionnaire about the quality of life. RESULTS. At a follow-up average 30 months, 21 patients (87.5%) were perfectly continent with improvement of quality of life. Among the complications, wound infection occurred in 2 patients (8%); 1 (4%) with mild recurrence IUS; 1 (4%) reported "de novo" urgency, 1 (4%) reported urinary retention. CONCLUSIONS. Our data show that the use of the suburetral sling "ReMeEx" is a effective option in the treatment of IUS due to ISD which is a condition often secondary to urogynecologic surgery and refractory to common techniques antincontinence.

  10. Muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle after repetitive muscle activation: comparison to the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Kashima, Koji; Higashinaka, Shuichi; Watanabe, Naoshi; Maeda, Sho; Shiba, Ryosuke

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle to those of the biceps brachii muscle during repetitive muscle movements. Seventeen asymptomatic female subjects participated in this study. Each subject, on separate days, undertook a 5-minute unilateral chewing gum task on the right side and a 5-minute flexion-extension exercise on the right hand with a 2kg dumbbell. Using a handheld hardness meter, muscle hardness was measured in the right masseter and in the biceps brachii muscle at eight time points (before the task, immediately after the task, and at 1, 3, 5, 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the task), and the data obtained before and after the task on each muscle were compared. Comparisons of the normalized data were also performed between the two muscles at each time point. As a result, a significant increase in muscle hardness was seen at 1 minute after the task in the biceps brachii muscle (p=0.0093). In contrast, the masseter muscle showed a tendency to lower hardness, with the lowest point of hardness occurring at 10 minutes after the task (p = 0.0160). Between the two muscles, there was a difference in the normalized data immediately after the task, and at 1, 5, and 10 minutes after the task (0.01 muscle hardness characteristics of the masseter muscle completely differed from those of the biceps brachii muscle after repetitive muscle activation.

  11. Localized volume effects for late rectal and anal toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V. . E-mail: j.lebesque@nki.nl; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Slot, Annerie; Dielwart, Michel F.H.; Koper, Peter C.M.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters derived from anorectal, rectal, and anal wall dose distributions that correlate with different late gastrointestinal (GI) complications after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 641 patients from a randomized trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. Toxicity was scored with adapted Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria and five specific complications. The variables derived from dose-volume histogram of anorectal, rectal, and anal wall were as follows: % receiving {>=}5-70 Gy (V5-V70), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}). The anus was defined as the most caudal 3 cm of the anorectum. Statistics were done with multivariate Cox regression models. Median follow-up was 44 months. Results: Anal dosimetric variables were associated with RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}2 (V5-V40, D{sub mean}) and incontinence (V5-V70, D{sub mean}). Bleeding correlated most strongly with anorectal V55-V65, and stool frequency with anorectal V40 and D{sub mean}. Use of steroids was weakly related to anal variables. No volume effect was seen for RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}3 and pain/cramps/tenesmus. Conclusion: Different volume effects were found for various late GI complications. Therefore, to evaluate the risk of late GI toxicity, not only intermediate and high doses to the anorectal wall volume should be taken into account, but also the dose to the anal wall.

  12. Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression associates with progression of anal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wan-Hsiang; Miyai, Katsumi; Sporn, Judith C; Luo, Linda; Wang, Jean Y J; Cosman, Bard; Ramamoorthy, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The macroH2A histone variants are epigenetic marks for inactivated chromatin. In this study, we examined the expression of macroH2A2 in anal neoplasm from anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) to anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods AIN and anal SCC samples were analysed for macroH2A2 expression, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). The association of macroH2A2 expression with clinical grade, disease recurrence, overall survival and viral involvement was determined. Results macroH2A2 was expressed in normal squamous tissue and lower grade AIN (I and II). Expression was lost in 38% of high-grade AIN (III) and 71% of anal SCC (p=0.002). Patients with AIN with macroH2A2-negative lesions showed earlier recurrence than those with macroH2A2-positive neoplasm (p=0.017). With anal SCC, macroH2A2 loss was more prevalent in the HPV-negative tumours. Conclusions Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression is associated with the progression of anal neoplasm and can be used as a prognostic biomarker for high-grade AIN and SCC. PMID:26658220

  13. Papillary Immature Metaplasia of the Anal Canal: A Low-grade Lesion That Can Mimic a High-grade Lesion.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jennifer M; Cornall, Alyssa M; Ekman, Deborah; Law, Carmella; Poynten, I Mary; Jin, Fengyi; Hillman, Richard J; Templeton, David J; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Thurloe, Julia K; Grulich, Andrew E; Farnsworth, Annabelle

    2016-03-01

    In a natural history study of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-related lesions among homosexual men in Sydney, Australia, we identified 15 examples of papillary immature metaplasia (PIM) in anal biopsy samples. PIM has previously been described in the cervix, but not in the anal canal. PIM is a form of exophytic low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (eLSIL) also known as condyloma. In contrast to the maturing keratinocytes and koilocytosis seen in conventional eLSIL, the slender papillary structures of PIM have a surface population of immature squamous cells. In our anal samples PIM was characterized by close proximity to conventional eLSIL, was negative for p16 (p16) expression, and revealed the presence of a single low-risk HPV genotype (either 6 or 11) in laser capture microdissected lesions. The clinical significance of recognizing PIM lies in preventing misdiagnosis as high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, (the presumed precursor to anal cancer), due to the morphologic immaturity of the cell population. In routine practice, awareness of anal canal PIM and p16 immunostaining will prevent this. Further study of the natural history of anal canal PIM is needed. PMID:26551619

  14. Genetic Architecture of the Variation in Male-Specific Ossified Processes on the Anal Fins of Japanese Medaka.

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, Maiko; Fujimoto, Shingo; Yoshida, Kohta; Yamahira, Kazunori; Kitano, Jun

    2015-10-28

    Traits involved in reproduction evolve rapidly and show great diversity among closely related species. However, the genetic mechanisms that underlie the diversification of courtship traits are mostly unknown. Japanese medaka fishes (Oryzias latipes) use anal fins to attract females and to grasp females during courtship; the males have longer anal fins with male-specific ossified papillary processes on the fin rays. However, anal fin morphology varies between populations: the southern populations tend to have longer anal fins and more processes than the northern populations. In the present study, we conducted quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to investigate the genetic architecture underlying the variation in the number of papillary processes of Japanese medaka fish and compared the QTL with previously identified QTL controlling anal fin length. First, we found that only a few QTL were shared between anal fin length and papillary process number. Second, we found that the numbers of papillary processes on different fin rays often were controlled by different QTL. Finally, we produced another independent cross and found that some QTL were repeatable between the two crosses, whereas others were specific to only one cross. These results suggest that variation in the number of papillary processes is polygenic and controlled by QTL that are distinct from those controlling anal fin length. Thus, different courtship traits in Japanese medaka share a small number of QTL and have the potential for independent evolution.

  15. Genetic Architecture of the Variation in Male-Specific Ossified Processes on the Anal Fins of Japanese Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Kawajiri, Maiko; Fujimoto, Shingo; Yoshida, Kohta; Yamahira, Kazunori; Kitano, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Traits involved in reproduction evolve rapidly and show great diversity among closely related species. However, the genetic mechanisms that underlie the diversification of courtship traits are mostly unknown. Japanese medaka fishes (Oryzias latipes) use anal fins to attract females and to grasp females during courtship; the males have longer anal fins with male-specific ossified papillary processes on the fin rays. However, anal fin morphology varies between populations: the southern populations tend to have longer anal fins and more processes than the northern populations. In the present study, we conducted quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to investigate the genetic architecture underlying the variation in the number of papillary processes of Japanese medaka fish and compared the QTL with previously identified QTL controlling anal fin length. First, we found that only a few QTL were shared between anal fin length and papillary process number. Second, we found that the numbers of papillary processes on different fin rays often were controlled by different QTL. Finally, we produced another independent cross and found that some QTL were repeatable between the two crosses, whereas others were specific to only one cross. These results suggest that variation in the number of papillary processes is polygenic and controlled by QTL that are distinct from those controlling anal fin length. Thus, different courtship traits in Japanese medaka share a small number of QTL and have the potential for independent evolution. PMID:26511497

  16. Muscle wasting in cancer.

    PubMed

    Johns, N; Stephens, N A; Fearon, K C H

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscle loss appears to be the most significant clinical event in cancer cachexia and is associated with a poor outcome. With regard to such muscle loss, despite extensive study in a range of models, there is ongoing debate as to whether a reduction in protein synthesis, an increase in degradation or a combination of both is the more relevant. Each model differs in terms of key mediators and the pathways activated in skeletal muscle. Certain models do suggest that decreased synthesis accompanied by enhanced protein degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) is important. Murine models tend to involve rapid development of cachexia and may represent more acute muscle atrophy rather than the chronic wasting observed in humans. There is a paucity of human data both at a basic descriptive level and at a molecular/mechanism level. Progress in treating the human form of cancer cachexia can only move forwards through carefully designed large randomised controlled clinical trials of specific therapies with validated biomarkers of relevance to underlying mechanisms. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  17. Muscle Injuries in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Delos, Demetris; Maak, Travis G.; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Muscle injuries are extremely common in athletes and often produce pain, dysfunction, and the inability to return to practice or competition. Appropriate diagnosis and management can optimize recovery and minimize time to return to play. Evidence Acquisition: Contemporary papers, both basic science and clinical medicine, that investigate muscle healing were reviewed. A Medline/PubMed search inclusive of years 1948 to 2012 was performed. Results: Diagnosis can usually be made according to history and physical examination for most injuries. Although data are limited, initial conservative management emphasizing the RICE principles and immobilization of the extremity for several days for higher grade injuries are typically all that is required. Injection of corticosteroids may clinically enhance function after an acute muscle strain. Additional adjunctive treatments (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, platelet-rich plasma, and others) to enhance muscle healing and limit scar formation show promise but need additional data to better define their roles. Conclusion: Conservative treatment recommendations will typically lead to successful outcomes after a muscle injury. There is limited evidence to support most adjunctive treatments. PMID:24459552

  18. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  19. Inspiratory muscle training improves antireflux barrier in GERD patients.

    PubMed

    Nobre e Souza, Miguel Ângelo; Lima, Maria Josire Vitorino; Martins, Giovanni Bezerra; Nobre, Rivianny Arrais; Souza, Marcellus Henrique Loiola Ponte; de Oliveira, Ricardo Brandt; dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar

    2013-12-01

    The crural diaphragm (CD) is an essential component of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ), and inspiratory exercises may modify its function. This study's goal is to verify if inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves EGJ motility and gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Twelve GER disease [GERD; 7 males, 20-47 yr, 9 esophagitis, and 3 nonerosive reflex disease (NERD)] and 7 healthy volunteers (3 males, 20-41 yr) performed esophageal pH monitoring, manometry, and heart rate variability (HRV) studies. A 6-cm sleeve catheter measured average EGJ pressure during resting, peak inspiratory EGJ pressures during sinus arrhythmia maneuver (SAM) and inhalations under 17-, 35-, and 70-cmH2O loads (TH maneuvers), and along 1 h after a meal. GERD patients entered a 5-days-a-week IMT program. One author scored heartburn and regurgitation before and after IMT. IMT increased average EGJ pressure (19.7 ± 2.4 vs. 29.5 ± 2.1 mmHg; P < 0.001) and inspiratory EGJ pressure during SAM (89.6 ± 7.6 vs. 125.6 ± 13.3 mmHg; P = 0.001) and during TH maneuvers. The EGJ-pressure gain across 35- and 70-cmH2O loads was lower for GERD volunteers. The number and cumulative duration of the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations decreased after IMT. Proximal progression of GER decreased after IMT but not the distal acid exposure. Low-frequency power increased after IMT and the higher its increment the lower the increment of supine acid exposure. IMT decreased heartburn and regurgitation scores. In conclusion, IMT improved EGJ pressure, reduced GER proximal progression, and reduced GERD symptoms. Some GERD patients have a CD failure, and IMT may prove beneficial as a GERD add-on treatment.

  20. A Beetle Flight Muscle Displays Leg Muscle Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Toshiki; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Sato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Mado