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Sample records for analgesia del trabajo

  1. Obstetric Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Thistlewood, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article deals with current knowledge about labour pain; the effects of labour pain on the parturient, the fetus, and uterine activity; the benefits and risks of the various labour-pain options; and the parturient's right to exercise informed choice of analgesia options. PMID:21253234

  2. [The work of Santiago Ramón y Cajal in the Revista Trimestral Micrográfica (Trabajos del Laboratorio de Investigaciones Biológicas)].

    PubMed

    Gamundí, A; Timoner, G; Nicolau, M C; Rial, R V; Esteban, S; Langa, M A

    This paper is based on a study of Revista Trimestral Micrografica (Trabajos del Laboratorio de Investigaciones Biologicas) between its creation by Santiago Ramon y Cajal in 1896 and his death in 1934. The journal Revista Trimestral Micrografica was the main way in which Santiago Ramon y Cajal and his school published their work since its creation. Ramon y Cajal created the journal for two main reasons: first, he needed a rapid system to publish his own work; second, the journal could serve to encourage his pupils. The journal published many important reports defending the neuronal theory which expanded the cellular one to include the nervous system.

  3. Modern neuraxial labour analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sng, Ban L; Kwok, Sarah C; Sia, Alex T H

    2015-06-01

    Neuraxial analgesia is considered the gold standard of labour analgesia as it provides the most effective method of pain relief during childbirth. In this article, we explore the recent advances in the initiation and maintenance of epidural analgesia. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia, computer-integrated patient-controlled epidural analgesia, intermittent epidural bolus (programmed intermittent bolus, automated mandatory bolus) and variable frequency automated mandatory bolus administration are techniques that allow the individualized titration and optimization of labour analgesia. The debate has moved on to finding the optimal settings for epidural bolus dosing, time intervals and frequency for epidural analgesia with the hope of improving safety and efficacy as well as patient satisfaction. We examine these recent developments in pump technology and epidural delivery systems and evaluate how these have enhanced the mothers' birthing experiences.

  4. Analgesia after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Zoka

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses postoperative analgesia in patients with end-stage liver disease who have undergone liver transplantation (LT). Postoperative analgesia determines how patients perceive LT. Although important, this topic is underrepresented in the current literature. With an increased frequency of fast tracking in LT, efficient intra- and postoperative analgesia are undergoing changes. We herein review the current literature, compare the benefits and disadvantages of the therapeutic options, and make recommendations based on the current literature and clinical experience. PMID:26413222

  5. Advances in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cynthia A

    2010-01-01

    The pain of childbirth is arguably the most severe pain most women will endure in their lifetimes. The pain of the early first stage of labor arises from dilation of the lower uterine segment and cervix. Pain from the late first stage and second stage of labor arises from descent of the fetus in the birth canal, resulting in distension and tearing of tissues in the vagina and perineum. An array of regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic, and nonpharmacologic techniques are currently used for labor analgesia. Nonpharmacologic methods are commonly used, but the effectiveness of these techniques generally lacks rigorous scientific study. Continuous labor support has been shown to decrease the use of pharmacologic analgesia and shorten labor. Intradermal water injections decrease back labor pain. Neuraxial labor analgesia (most commonly epidural or combined spinal-epidural) is the most effective method of pain relief during childbirth, and the only method that provides complete analgesia without maternal or fetal sedation. Current techniques commonly combine a low dose of local anesthetic (bupivacaine or ropivacaine) with a lipid soluble opioid (fentanyl or sufentanil). Neuraxial analgesia does not increase the rate of cesarean delivery compared to systemic opioid analgesia; however, dense neuraxial analgesia may increase the risk of instrumental vaginal delivery. PMID:21072284

  6. Mouse anesthesia and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sean; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2015-03-02

    Providing anesthesia and analgesia for mouse subjects is a common and critical practice in the laboratory setting. These practices are necessary for performing invasive procedures, achieving prolonged immobility for sensitive imaging modalities (magnetic resonance imaging for instance), and providing intra- and post-procedural pain relief. In addition to facilitating the procedures performed by the investigator, the provision of anesthesia and analgesia is crucial for the preservation of animal welfare and for humane treatment of animals used in research. Furthermore, anesthesia and analgesia are important components of animal use protocols reviewed by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, requiring careful consideration and planning for the particular animal model. In this article, we provide technical outlines for the investigator covering the provision of anesthesia by two routes (injectable and inhalant), guidelines for monitoring anesthesia, current techniques for recognition of pain, and considerations for administering preventative analgesia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Obstetric analgesia - update 2016.

    PubMed

    Heesen, Michael; Klimek, Markus

    2016-07-07

    Neuraxial labor analgesia can be initiated via combined spinal-epidural (CSE) or stand-alone epidural. Pros and cons of these techniques are outlined in this review. In recent years computer-integrated patient-controlled epidural analgesia (CI-PCEA) and programed intermittent epidural boluses (PIEB) have been developed, adding to continuous infusion and PCEA for the maintenance of neuraxial analgesia. Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) and fever can occur secondary to labor epidural that both have clinical relevance for the care givers. Insights into the mechanism of epidural fever and treatment strategies for PDPH are outlined. Due to the increase in obesity the specific considerations for this patient group are discussed. New data have been presented for remifentanil, an ultra-shortly acting opioid, that is used in obstetric analgesia. Without breaking new data, the use of nitrous oxide especially by midwives has a kind of renaissance, and this will be discussed, too.

  8. Multimodal analgesia and regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tornero Tornero, C; Fernández Rodríguez, L E; Orduña Valls, J

    Multimodal analgesia provides quality analgesia, with fewer side effects due to the use of combined analgesics or analgesic techniques. Regional anaesthesia plays a fundamental role in achieving this goal. The different techniques of regional anaesthesia that include both peripheral and central blocks in either a single dose or in continuous infusion help to modulate the nociceptive stimuli that access the central level. The emergence of the ultrasound as an effective system to perform regional anaesthesia techniques has allowed the development of new regional anaesthesia techniques that formerly could not be carried out since only neurostimulation or skin references were used. It is essential to take into account that even with effective blocking it is advisable to associate other drugs by other routes, in this way we will be able to reduce the required doses individually and attempt to achieve a synergistic, not purely additive, effect. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Levobupivacaine for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Makhni, Reena; Sethi, Savinder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combined spinal-epidural analgesia has become the preferred technique for labor analgesia as it combines the benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of epidural catheter. Study was carried out with the primary aim to compare levobupivacaine and ropivacaine with fentanyl in terms of onset and duration of sensory block and to know maternal and fetal outcome. Materials and Methods: In a prospective randomized double-blind study, 60 primipara of the American Society of Anesthesiologists health status Class I and II with singleton pregnancy in active stage of labor were randomly allocated into two groups of 30 each. Group A received 3 mg intrathecal levobupivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top-ups of 14 ml of levobupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 30 μg whereas Group B received 4 mg intrathecal ropivacaine with 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top-ups of 14 ml of ropivacaine 0.2% with fentanyl 30 μg. Patients were monitored for sensory and motor block characteristics, hemodynamics, maternal and fetal outcome, side effects, and complications. These characteristics were analyzed using the “Chi-square tests” and “unpaired t-test.” Results: Onset of analgesia was rapid in Group A (4.72 ± 0.54 min) as compared to Group B (5.58 ± 0.49 min). Duration of analgesia was also prolonged in Group A (117.00 ± 11.86 min) as compared to Group B (90.17 ± 8.85 min). Patients remained hemodynamically stable and side effects, and complications were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: Levobupivacaine with fentanyl leads to early onset and prolonged duration of analgesia as compared to ropivacaine with fentanyl during labor analgesia. PMID:27746539

  10. [Placebo analgesia and sleep].

    PubMed

    Chouchou, F; Lavigne, G-J

    2014-10-01

    The placebo response is a psychobiological phenomenon for clinical benefits following the administration of an inert substance whatever its form. This phenomenon can be attributed to a wide range of neurobiological processes, such as expectations of relief, the Pavlovian conditioning and learning, emotional regulation, and reward mechanisms, which are themselves under the influence of processes that take place during sleep. The study of placebo analgesia in healthy from a placebo conditioning associated with analgesic suggestions has highlighted a relationship between sleep, expectations of relief and placebo analgesia: when the induction is persuasive before sleep, expectations of relief modulate placebo response the next morning and paradoxical sleep correlates negatively with both expectations and the placebo response. When the analgesic experience before sleep is less persuasive, expectations of relief are still present but no longer interact with placebo analgesia while paradoxical sleep no longer correlates with the analgesic placebo response. Sleep-processes especially during paradoxical sleep seem to influence the relationship between expectations of relief and placebo analgesia. In this review, we describe the relationship between sleep and placebo analgesia, the mechanisms involved in the placebo response (e.g., conditioning, learning, memory, reward) and their potential link with sleep that could make it a special time for the building placebo response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  12. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  13. Procedural sedation analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sheta, Saad A

    2010-01-01

    The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades.Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA). The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interventions. The goals of PSA in four different multidisciplinary practices namely; emergency, dentistry, radiology and gastrointestinal endoscopy are discussed in this review article. Some procedures are painful, others painless. Therefore, goals of PSA vary widely. Sedation management can range from minimal sedation, to the extent of minimal anesthesia. Procedural sedation in emergency department (ED) usually requires combinations of multiple agents to reach desired effects of analgesia plus anxiolysis. However, in dental practice, moderate sedation analgesia (known to the dentists as conscious sedation) is usually what is required. It is usually most effective with the combined use of local anesthesia. The mainstay of success for painless imaging is absolute immobility. Immobility can be achieved by deep sedation or minimal anesthesia. On the other hand, moderate sedation, deep sedation, minimal anesthesia and conventional general anesthesia can be all utilized for management of gastrointestinal endoscopy. PMID:20668560

  14. [Analgesia Nociception Index for perioperative analgesia monitoring in spinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Turan, Guldem; Ar, Arzu Yıldırım; Kuplay, Yıldız Yigit; Demiroluk, Oznur; Gazi, Mustafa; Akgun, Nur; Celikoglu, Erhan

    The Analgesia Nociception Index is an index used to measure the levels of pain, sympathetic system activity and heart rate variability during general anesthesia. In our study, Analgesia Nociception Index monitoring in two groups who had undergone spinal stabilization surgery and were administered propofol-remifentanil (Total Intravenous Anesthesia) and sevoflurane-remifentanyl anesthesia was compared regarding its significance for prediction of postoperative early pain. BIS and Analgesia Nociception Index monitoring were conducted in the patients together with standard monitoring. During induction, fentanyl 2μg.kg(-1), propofol 2.5mg.kg(-1) and rocuronium 0.6mg.kg(-1) were administered. During maintenance, 1.0 MAC sevoflurane+remifentanil 0.05-0.3μg.kg(-1).min(-1) and propofol 50-150μg.kg(-1).min+remifentanil 0.05-0.3μg.kg(-1).min(-1) were administered in Group S and Group T, respectively. Hemodynamic parameters, BIS and Analgesia Nociception Index values were recorded during surgery and 30min postoperatively. Postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) values at 30minutes were recorded. While no difference was found between mean Analgesia Nociception Index at all times of measurement in both groups, Analgesia Nociception Index measurements after administration of perioperative analgesic drug were recorded to be significantly higher compared to baseline values in both groups. There was correlation between mean values of Analgesia Nociception Index and VAS after anesthesia. Analgesia Nociception Index is a valuable parameter for monitoring of perioperative and postoperative analgesia. In spine surgery, similar analgesia can be provided in both Total Intravenous Anesthesia with remifentanil and sevoflurane administration. Analgesia Nociception Index is efficient for prediction of the need for analgesia during the early postoperative period, and therefore is the provision of patient comfort. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por

  15. Labour analgesia: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Sunil T

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the field of labour analgesia have tread a long journey from the days of ether and chloroform in 1847 to the present day practice of comprehensive programme of labour pain management using evidence-based medicine. Newer advances include introduction of newer techniques like combined spinal epidurals, low-dose epidurals facilitating ambulation, pharmacological advances like introduction of remifentanil for patient-controlled intravenous analgesia, introduction of newer local anaesthetics and adjuvants like ropivacaine, levobupivacaine, sufentanil, clonidine and neostigmine, use of inhalational agents like sevoflourane for patient-controlled inhalational analgesia using special vaporizers, all have revolutionized the practice of pain management in labouring parturients. Technological advances like use of ultrasound to localize epidural space in difficult cases minimizes failed epidurals and introduction of novel drug delivery modalities like patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps and computer-integrated drug delivery pumps have improved the overall maternal satisfaction rate and have enabled us to customize a suitable analgesic regimen for each parturient. Recent randomized controlled trials and Cochrane studies have concluded that the association of epidurals with increased caesarean section and long-term backache remains only a myth. Studies have also shown that the newer, low-dose regimes do not have a statistically significant impact on the duration of labour and breast feeding and also that these reduce the instrumental delivery rates thus improving maternal and foetal safety. Advances in medical technology like use of ultrasound for localizing epidural space have helped the clinicians to minimize the failure rates, and many novel drug delivery modalities like PCEA and computer-integrated PCEA have contributed to the overall maternal satisfaction and safety. PMID:21189877

  16. Labour analgesia and obstetric outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cambic, C R; Wong, C A

    2010-12-01

    Neuraxial analgesic techniques are the gold standards for pain relief during labour and delivery. Despite the increased use and known benefits of neuraxial labour analgesia, there has been significant controversy regarding the impact of neuraxial analgesia on labour outcomes. Review of the evidence suggests that effective neuraxial labour analgesia does not increase the rate of Caesarean delivery, even when administered early in the course of labour; however, its use is associated with a prolonged second stage of labour. Effective second-stage analgesia might also be associated with an increased rate of instrumental vaginal delivery.

  17. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information.

  18. Epidural analgesia during labor vs no analgesia: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Wesam Farid; Al-Metwalli, Roshdi; Mostafa, Manal

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epidural analgesia is claimed to result in prolonged labor. Previous studies have assessed epidural analgesia vs systemic opioids rather than to parturients receiving no analgesia. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of epidural analgesia on labor duration compared with parturients devoid of analgesia. Methods: One hundred sixty nulliparous women in spontaneous labor at full term with a singleton vertex presentation were assigned to the study. Parturients who request epidural analgesia were allocated in the epidural group, whereas those not enthusiastic to labor analgesia were allocated in the control group. Epidural analgesia was provided with 20 mL bolus 0.5% epidural lidocaine plus fentanyl and maintained at 10 mL for 1 h. Duration of the first and second stages of labor, number of parturients receiving oxytocin, maximal oxytocin dose required for each parturient, numbers of instrumental vaginal, vacuum-assisted, and cesarean deliveries and neonatal Apgar score were recorded. Results: There was no statistical difference in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor, instrumental delivery, vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rates, the number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7 between both groups and number of parturients receiving oxytocin, however, the maximal oxytocin dose was significantly higher in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia by lidocaine (0.5%) and fentanyl does not prolong labor compared with parturients without analgesia; however, significant oxytocin augmentation is required during the epidural analgesia to keep up the aforementioned average labor duration. PMID:22412775

  19. Analgesia for shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Parkin, John; Keeley FX, Francis X; Timoney, Anthony G

    2002-04-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of and patient preference for analgesia used during shock wave lithotripsy by comparing diclofenac alone with a combination of diclofenac and patient controlled analgesia, that is alfentanil. A total of 64 patients were treated using a Lithotriptor S (Dornier Medical Systems, Marietta, Georgia) and randomized to receive diclofenac alone or combined with an alfentanil patient controlled analgesia pump. If treated twice, they crossed over to the alternative form of analgesia. A record was maintained of the site and size of the stone, maximum power achieved, number of shocks, amount of alfentanil used and need for additional analgesia. After treatment patients scored on a visual analog scale the maximum level of pain and satisfaction with analgesia. There was no difference in the mean size of the stone treated (8.6 and 7.5 mm.), energy level (71% and 71% or approximately 17 kV.) or number of shocks (3,000 and 2,900, respectively) in the groups. Only 2 patients in the diclofenac group required additional analgesia and there were no significant side effects from either treatment. The mean pain scores were not significantly different in the diclofenac and patient controlled analgesia groups (3.54 and 2.93, respectively, (p = 0.34), although those on patient controlled analgesia were more satisfied (7.72 versus 9.14, p = 0.04). Of the 38 patients who presented twice 58% preferred diclofenac alone. This study suggests that there is no significant difference in the level of pain experienced with diclofenac alone or when combined with an alfentanil patient controlled analgesia pump during shock wave lithotripsy. However, patients are more satisfied with treatment when a patient controlled analgesia pump is available.

  20. [Piroxicam in analgesia].

    PubMed

    Eandi, M; della Pepa, C; Rubinetto, M P

    1991-01-31

    Piroxicam, a NSAID with a proved analgesic and antiphlogistic efficacy, largely used in rheumatic-orthopedic pathologies, has an antalgic action also in extra-rheumatic pathologies, such as postoperative and dental pain and primary dysmenorrhea. This is probably due both to a peripheral mechanism, at the injured site level, which is particularly widespread, and goes from prostaglandin inhibition to suppression of the synthesis of different algesiogenic substances (oxygen free radicals, lytic enzymes), and to a direct non endorphin-mediated action at central level. The data base considered in this review, concerning piroxicam in extra-rheumatic analgesia, is of about 2,500 patients, in 26 clinical studies, mostly with an experimental double-blind placebo-controlled design or vs other NSAIDs. The doses ranged from 5 to 40 mg in a single administration: the doses of 20 and 40 mg showed an immediate analgesic effect, with the onset of analgesia within 30 min./1 hour from the administration. Analgesic activity was intense, comparable or superior to that of other drugs (aspirin, codeine, other NSAIDs) and more prolonged, often lasting as long as 24 hours. Tolerability of this data base was very satisfactory and comparable to that of the placebo, incidence of side effects being negligible.

  1. [Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Barratt-Due, Andreas; Hagen, Inger; Dahl, Vegard

    2005-09-22

    Experience from our hospital has shown a significant increase in the use of epidural analgesia during labour. We wanted to see if this was a general trend in Norway, and wanted to find out for what kind of labour analgesia was offered in the different labour wards. A questionnaire concerning obstetric analgesia and anaesthetic methods for caesarean section was sent to chief anaesthetists and head midwives in Norwegian hospitals. The information was compared to an identical questionnaire from 1996. In addition, data concerning obstetric analgesia was collected from the Norwegian Medical Birth Register. 77% of the anaesthetic departments and 88% of the labour wards responded to the questionnaire. The use of epidural analgesia was on an average 20.6% (range 0-40.5%), which is twice as much as in 1996. 75% answered that the parturients' wish for epidural analgesia was reason enough to give an epidural. 84% of caesarean sections were performed in regional anaesthesia and 16% were done in general anaesthesia. This represents a significant reduction in the use of general anaesthesia. 85% of the labour wards offered acupuncture, which is a tremendous increase compared to 1996. Systemic opioids are still widely used, and pethidine is still the most frequently used opioid. Pethidine's negative side effect profile has been widely focused on during the past decade. The hospital's information on the various analgesic methods available for labour analgesi, is clearly improved since 1996. Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals has improved substantially since the last survey.

  2. [Postoperative analgesia and dexamethasone].

    PubMed

    Miralles, F S; Cárceles, M D; Micol, J A; Hernández, J; del Pino, A

    1989-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, prospective study was carried out in 100 patients who had undergone some type of surgical treatment in order to evaluate the degree of pain and relief of pain, the degree of achieved analgesia according to the opinion of the observer and consumption of analgesic agents. The evaluation was carried out on seven occasions during the first 12 hours of the postoperative period. Patients received dexamethasone (4 mg before or after the operation or 8 mg after the operation), 6-methylprednisolone (16 mg at the end of the operation) or nothing (control group). Regardless of type, dose or timing of administration of the drugs, all patients receiving corticosteroids presented less pain, more relief of pain (expressed by themselves or in opinion of the observer) and needed lower doses of analgesics during the studied time.

  3. Popularizing labor analgesia in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zi Tian; Gao, Xue Lian; Yang, Hui Xia

    2007-09-01

    In China many women in labor are young primigravidas whose fear of labor pain leads them to request cesarean deliveries. While the rate of cesarean deliveries has reached 50% in many hospitals, less than 1% of women in labor are given neuraxial analgesia. The necessary equipment is seldom available in China and many physicians have misconceptions about the risks associated with neuraxial analgesia, which are low with the ultra-low-dosages used today. However, attitudes have begun to change. Meetings held in China have brought together Chinese physicians and world experts on the various epidural and combined spinal-epidural techniques. Thanks to the information and support provided at these meetings clinical trials were carried out, more than 5000 women benefited from labor analgesia, and publications appeared in Chinese journals. An effective, safe, and cost-effective way to provide analgesia to women in labor may slow the increase in cesarean delivery rates across China and improve women's health in general.

  4. [Intravenous remifentanyl for labor analgesia].

    PubMed

    Arnal, D; Serrano, M L; Corral, E M; García del Valle, S

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous remifentanil may be the preferred analgesic when regional techniques are contraindicated. To perform a systematic review on the use of remifentanil for analgesia in labor. We searched MEDLINE (January 1995-August 2007) for studies on obstetric analgesia with remifentanil. We found 32 references representing the use of remifentanil in 257 women in labor. In most cases, patients reported relief of pain and a high level of satisfaction, with no severe side effects in mothers or neonates. When compared with meperidine and nitrous oxide in clinical trials, remifentanil provided better analgesia with fewer adverse effects. Analgesia with intravenous remifentanil is more effective and safer than other alternatives to regional analgesic techniques in obstetrics. Nevertheless, the optimum system for infusing the drug must b e established and further studies of maternal and fetal safety should be carried out.

  5. [Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dahl, V; Hagen, I E; Raeder, J C

    1998-04-30

    We report the results of a questionnaire sent to anaesthetists and midwives on the use of obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in Norwegian hospitals in 1996. 95% of the 49 hospitals involved responded to the questionnaire, representing a total of 56,884 births. The use of epidural analgesia in labour varied from 0 to 25% in the different hospitals with a mean value of 15%. Epidural analgesia was much more widely used in university and regional hospitals than in local hospitals (p < 0.001). Five of the local hospitals did not offer epidural analgesia during labour at all. The combination of low-dose local anaesthetic and an opioid (either sufentanil or fentanyl) had not been introduced in nine of the hospitals (20%). The optimal use of epidural analgesia to relieve labour pain was judged to be more frequent by the anaesthetists than by the midwives (19% versus 11%, p < 0.01). In response to what factors limited the frequency of epidural analgesia, the anaesthetists specified factors related to the attitude of the midwife, and the midwives specified factors related to the anaesthetist. Only five of the hospitals provided written information on the various analgesic methods that could be employed during labour. The majority of midwives considered the analgesic methods employed on their maternity ward to be good or excellent. The frequency of Caesarean section was 12%; spinal anaesthesia was used in 55%, epidural anaesthesia in 17%, and general anaesthesia in 28% of the cases.

  6. Continuous epidural analgesia, a new prospect in analgesia of newborns.

    PubMed

    Mixa, V; Nedomova, B; Berka, I

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of continuous caudal epidural block in post-operative analgesia in very young children has been growing. This method of analgesia is used in major abdominal and urological surgeries. A local anaesthetic, usually levobupivacaine, is administered through an epidural catheter introduced via hiatus canalis sacralis. The usual type of the catheter is Arrow G20 armed with a metal spiral, which can be used for children of up to approximately 2000 g of body weight. We want to introduce a modification of the method which uses the thin silicone catheter Premicath G28. This catheter allows for the administration of caudal epidural analgesia even in premature children of approximately 500 g of body weight. This solution eliminates adverse effects of systemic opioid analgesia, accelerates surgical wound healing and disconnection from ventilation system, and improves the potential of enteral nutrition. Depth and quality of analgesia in very young children are monitored using a complex scheme called Comfort Neo Scale (Tab. 1, Fig. 2, Ref. 7).

  7. Methoxyflurane analgesia for burns dressings

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Kathleen J.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for analgesia for burns dressings are discussed. Methoxyflurane has proved satisfactory in a clinical trial, and can be administered by one of two types of vaporizer. The possibility of nephrotoxicity due to methoxyflurane has not been eliminated. PMID:5024149

  8. Effect of labor analgesia on labor outcome.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Stephen H; Abdallah, Faraj W

    2010-06-01

    Labor is among the most painful experiences that humans encounter. Neuraxial analgesia is the most effective means of treating this pain. In this review, we discussed the effect of neuraxial analgesia on the progress of labor when compared with parenteral opioids. We then compared initiation of analgesia with a combined spinal-epidural technique (CSE) to conventional epidural analgesia. Finally we discussed the impact of neuraxial analgesia, given early in labor, compared with later administration. Compared with parenteral opioids, neuraxial analgesia does not increase the incidence of cesarean section, although it is associated with a longer (approximately 16 min) second stage of labor. The incidence of operative vaginal delivery is higher in the epidural group but this may be due to indirect reasons such as changes in physician behavior. There was no difference in labor outcome when CSE was compared with low-concentration epidural analgesia, but higher concentrations may prolong labor. Early administration of neuraxial analgesia does not increase the incidence of operative delivery or prolong labor. Neuraxial analgesia does not interfere with the progress or outcome of labor. There is no need to withhold neuraxial analgesia until the active stage of labor.

  9. Placebo analgesia: understanding the mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Medoff, Zev M; Colloca, Luana

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Expectations of pain relief drive placebo analgesia. Understanding how expectations of improvement trigger distinct biological systems to shape therapeutic analgesic outcomes has been the focus of recent pharmacologic and neuroimaging studies in the field of pain. Recent findings indicate that placebo effects can imitate the actions of real painkillers and promote the endogenous release of opioids and nonopioids in humans. Social support and observational learning also contribute to placebo analgesic effects. Distinct psychological traits can modulate expectations of analgesia, which facilitate brain pain control mechanisms involved in pain reduction. Many studies have highlighted the importance and clinical relevance of these responses. Gaining deeper understanding of these pain modulatory mechanisms has important implications for personalizing patient pain management. PMID:25806903

  10. Obstetric analgesia. Clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Kanto, J

    1986-01-01

    All drugs used in obstetric analgesia are more or less lipophilic, their site of action is in the central nervous system, and they have good membrane penetrability in the fetomaternal unit. Thus the dose and method of administration as well as the duration of treatment are important clinical determinants of drug effects in the fetus and newborn. In the past, too much emphasis has been placed on fetomaternal blood concentration ratios of different agents; it is now appreciated that the extent of fetal tissue distribution and the neonatal elimination rate are pharmacokinetically much more important. Extensive fetal tissue distribution is reflected in a low fetomaternal drug concentration ratio, which may be followed by prolonged neonatal elimination of the drug. Currently, the most effective and safest method for obstetric analgesia is regional epidural administration of bupivacaine or lignocaine (lidocaine); only low doses are needed and the newborn is able to handle these agents efficiently. On the basis of pharmacokinetic and neurobehavioural assessments, inhalational anaesthetic agents appear to be more attractive than pethidine (meperidine) or benzodiazepines. Intermittent administration and fast pulmonary elimination of inhalational agents ensure that long-lasting residual effects are unlikely to occur. The kinetics of epidural and intrathecal opiates explain the problems associated with their use in obstetrics. Among the newer drugs used in obstetric analgesia, the properties of meptazinol and isoflurane appear interesting and these agents warrant further study. All drugs used in obstetric analgesia have a potentially detrimental effect on the neonate and, therefore, knowledge of fetal and neonatal pharmacokinetics is of importance to the clinician.

  11. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vuilleumier, Pascal H; Stamer, Ulrike M; Landau, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism) seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone) is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration. PMID:23226064

  12. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  13. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga Secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C; De Koninck, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Labor analgesia for the obese parturient.

    PubMed

    Ellinas, Elizabeth H

    2012-10-01

    Obese parturients present obstetric anesthesia providers with multiple challenges, including increased incidence of maternal coexisting disease, labor complications, and potential for difficult initiation and failure of neuraxial labor analgesia. This focused review discusses these challenges, and suggests potential methods to increase labor analgesia success in this population.

  15. Hypnotic analgesia: a constructivist framework.

    PubMed

    Chapman, C R; Nakamura, Y

    1998-01-01

    Hypnotic analgesia remains an enigma. Recent neuroscience studies demonstrate that widespread distributed processing occurs in the brains of individuals experiencing pain. Emerging research and theory on the mechanisms of consciousness, along with this evidence, suggest that a constructivist framework may facilitate both pain research and the study of hypnosis. The authors propose that the brain constructs elements of pain experience (pain schemata) and embeds them in ongoing consciousness. The contents of immediate consciousness feed back to nonconscious, parallel distributed processes to help shape the character of future moments of consciousness. Hypnotic suggestion may interact with such processing through feedback mechanisms that prime associations and memories and thus shape the formation of future experience.

  16. Perioperative analgesia outcomes and strategies.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Amit; Mancuso, Kenneth F; Owen, Christopher Paul; Lissauer, Jonathan; Merritt, Christopher K; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-06-01

    Despite an appreciation for many unwanted physiological effects from inadequate pain postoperative relief, moderate to severe postoperative pain remains commonplace. Though treatment options have evolved in recent years, including improvement in medications, multimodal regimens, and regional anesthetic techniques, including ultrasound and continuous catheters, outcomes data indicate that many of these strategies are associated with varying degrees of morbidity and mortality. This review focuses on the importance of effective postoperative analgesia and both short- and long-term effects associated with inadequate management. A careful literature review of emphasizing treatment options and potential pathogenesis associated with these strategies is emphasized in this review.

  17. [Trial of analgesia by acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Leger, L; Lande, M; Lepoivre, M

    The clinical trial involved 31 cases, 10 in stomatology. Acupuncture may produce analgesia after simple premedication. Of 21 abdominal operations, in 5 completion of effect using local infiltration of a few millilitres of lignocaine or intravenous pentazocine was required. In 7, general anaesthesia was required to complete the operation. All patients not receiving supplementary general anaesthesia were able to eat normally as soon as they were back in bed, passed flactus the same day and had a bowel movement the next day. Ten stomatological operations may be considered to be successful. Further pursual of these trials is justified.

  18. Ion channels in analgesia research.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Tamara; Simon, Sidney A; Islas, Leon D

    2010-01-01

    Several recent techniques have allowed us to pinpoint the receptors responsible for the detection of nociceptive stimuli. Among these receptors, ion channels play a fundamental role in the recognition and transduction of stimuli that can cause pain. During the last decade, compelling evidence has been gathered on the role of the TRPV1 channel in inflammatory and neuropathic states. Activation of TRPV1 in nociceptive neurons results in the release of neuropeptides and transmitters, leading to the generation of action potentials that will be sent to higher CNS areas, where they will often be perceived as pain. Its activation will also evoke the peripheral release of pro-inflammatory compounds that may sensitize other neurons to physical, thermal, or chemical stimuli. For these reasons, and because its continuous activation causes analgesia, TRPV1 is now considered a viable drug target for clinical use in the management of pain. Using the TRPV1 channel as an example, here we describe some basic biophysical approaches used to study the properties of ion channels involved in pain and in analgesia.

  19. [Pneumoencephalotomography under diaz-analgesia and narco-analgesia].

    PubMed

    Bergeron, J L; Renou, A M; Boulard, G; Vernhiet, J; Nicod, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors reported 92 observations of anesthesia for gaseous encephalotomography interest the adult. The contrast produce is air. 49 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. 25 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, succinylcholine, N2O to 60 p. 100. 18 under narco-analgesia and myoresolution. +Fentyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. The conditions of the study are described in the first part. The results and their analysis permit the appreciation of: - the patient confort, the quality of the examination; -the respect of the hemodynamics for this examination, reputed to be "difficult"; -the immediatly noticeable diminution of side effects; -the absence of side effects; -the justification and interesting of the control ventilation; -the quality of waking up. In the conclusion the authors underline the interest of their different techniques and the possibility of using them in operations in sitting position in neurosurgery, and all important chirurgical intervention.

  20. Partial reinforcement, extinction, and placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    Au Yeung, Siu Tsin; Colagiuri, Ben; Lovibond, Peter F; Colloca, Luana

    2014-06-01

    Numerous studies indicate that placebo analgesia can be established via conditioning procedures. However, these studies have exclusively involved conditioning under continuous reinforcement. Thus, it is currently unknown whether placebo analgesia can be established under partial reinforcement and how durable any such effect would be. We tested this possibility using electrocutaneous pain in healthy volunteers. Sixty undergraduates received placebo treatment (activation of a sham electrode) under the guise of an analgesic trial. The participants were randomly allocated to different conditioning schedules, namely continuous reinforcement (CRF), partial reinforcement (PRF), or control (no conditioning). Conditioning was achieved by surreptitiously reducing pain intensity during training when the placebo was activated compared with when it was inactive. For the CRF group, the placebo was always followed by a surreptitious reduction in pain during training. For the PRF group, the placebo was followed by a reduction in pain stimulation on 62.5% of trials only. In the test phase, pain stimulation was equivalent across placebo and no placebo trials. Both CRF and PRF produced placebo analgesia, with the magnitude of initial analgesia being larger after CRF. However, although the placebo analgesia established under CRF extinguished during test phase, the placebo analgesia established under PRF did not. These findings indicate that PRF can induce placebo analgesia and that these effects are more resistant to extinction than those established via CRF. PRF may therefore reflect a novel way of enhancing clinical outcomes via the placebo effect.

  1. Partial reinforcement, extinction, and placebo analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Siu Tsin Au; Colagiuri, Ben; Lovibond, Peter F.; Colloca, Luana

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that placebo analgesia can be established via conditioning procedures. However, these studies have exclusively involved conditioning under continuous reinforcement. Thus, it is currently unknown whether placebo analgesia can be established under partial reinforcement and how durable any such effect would be. We tested this possibility using electro-cutaneous pain in healthy volunteers. Sixty undergraduates received placebo treatment (activation of a sham electrode) under the guise of an analgesic trial. The participants were randomly allocated to different conditioning schedules, namely continuous reinforcement (CRF), partial reinforcement (PRF), or control (no conditioning). Conditioning was achieved by surreptitiously reducing pain intensity during training when the placebo was activated compared with when it was inactive. For the CRF group, the placebo was always followed by a surreptitious reduction in pain during training. For the PRF group, the placebo was followed by a reduction in pain stimulation on 62.5% of trials only. In the test phase, pain stimulation was equivalent across placebo and no placebo trials. Both continuous and partial reinforcement produced placebo analgesia, with the magnitude of initial analgesia being larger following continuous reinforcement. However, while the placebo analgesia established under continuous reinforcement extinguished during test phase, the placebo analgesia established under partial reinforcement did not. These findings indicate that partial reinforcement can induce placebo analgesia and that these effects are more resistant to extinction than those established via continuous reinforcement. Partial reinforcement may, therefore, reflect a novel way of enhancing clinical outcomes via the placebo effect. PMID:24602997

  2. Epidural analgesia improves postoperative nitrogen balance.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, M R; Fernades, A; Mordhorst, R; Kehlet, H

    1978-01-01

    Postoperative nitrogen balance was monitored in twelve patients undergoing hysterectomy under either epidural analgesia or general anaesthesia. The mean cumulative five-day nitrogen losses were significantly lower after epidural analgesia than after general anaesthesia. Nitrogen sparing presumably results from inhibiting the stress-induced release of catabolic hormones, since epidural analgesia abolished postoperative hyperglycaemia and increase in plasma cortisol concentrations. No adverse effects of inhibiting the stress response were observed. Neurogenic stimuli thus play a crucial part in the catabolic response to surgery. Inhibiting the endocrine metabolic response to trauma by neurogenic blockade may reduce the morbidity precipitated in high-risk patients by the catabolic response to surgery. PMID:638618

  3. Epidural analgesia for labor: Current techniques

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcos; Halpern, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is an extremely effective and popular treatment for labor pain. In this review, we trace the history of the use of epidural analgesia and its refinements. We then outline the goals of treatment and methods used to attain those goals. The use of low concentrations of local anesthetics, combined with lipid-soluble opioids, does not impede the progress of labor or depress the newborn. The incidence of side effects is low. Maintenance of analgesia that allows patient control enhances patient satisfaction. PMID:23144567

  4. AMPAkines and morphine provide complementary analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongjun; Liu, Kevin; Martinez, Erik; Dale, Jahrane; Huang, Dong; Wang, Jing

    2017-09-15

    Glutamate signaling in the central nervous system is known to play a key role in pain regulation. AMPAkines can enhance glutamate signaling through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. previous studies have shown that AMPAkines are effective analgesic agents, and their site of action is likely in the brain. It is not known, however, if AMPAkines can provide complementary analgesia in combination with opioids, the most commonly used analgesics. Here, we show that the co-administration of an AMPAkine with morphine can provide additional analgesia, both in naïve rats and in rats that experience postoperative pain. Furthermore, we show that this AMPAkine can be administered directly into the prefrontal cortex to provide analgesia, and that prefrontal AMPAkine infusion, similar to systemic administration, can provide added pain relief to complement morphine analgesia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Post-caesarean analgesia: What is new?

    PubMed

    Kerai, Sukhyanti; Saxena, Kirti Nath; Taneja, Bharti

    2017-03-01

    Adequate post-operative analgesia after caesarean section (CS) is vital as it impacts the distinct surgical recovery requirements of the parturient. Although newer analgesic modalities and drugs for post-caesarean analgesia have been introduced over the recent years, review of the literature suggests suggests that we are far from achieving the goals of optimum post-operative analgesia. We conducted a systematic review of recent advances in modalities for post-caesarean analgesia. After systematic search and quality assessment of studies, we included a total of 51 randomised controlled trials that evaluated the role of opioids, transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block, wound infiltration/infusion, ketamine, gabapentin and ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block (II-IH NB) for post-caesarean analgesia. Administration of opioids still remains the gold standard for post-operative analgesia, but the associated troublesome side effects have led to the mandatory incorporation of non-opioid analgesics in post-CS analgesia regime. Among the non-opioid techniques, TAP block is the most investigated modality of the last decade. The analgesic efficacy of TAP block as a part of multimodal analgesia is established in post-CS cases where intrathecal morphine is not employed and in CS under general anaesthesia. Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, COX-I inhibitors and intravenous paracetamol are found to be useful in post-operative analgesic regimen. The perioperative use of ketamine is found useful only in CS done under spinal anaesthesia; no benefit is seen where general anaesthesia is employed. Wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, systemic gabapentin and II-IH NB need further trials to assess their efficacy.

  6. Post-caesarean analgesia: What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Kerai, Sukhyanti; Saxena, Kirti Nath; Taneja, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Adequate post-operative analgesia after caesarean section (CS) is vital as it impacts the distinct surgical recovery requirements of the parturient. Although newer analgesic modalities and drugs for post-caesarean analgesia have been introduced over the recent years, review of the literature suggests suggests that we are far from achieving the goals of optimum post-operative analgesia. We conducted a systematic review of recent advances in modalities for post-caesarean analgesia. After systematic search and quality assessment of studies, we included a total of 51 randomised controlled trials that evaluated the role of opioids, transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block, wound infiltration/infusion, ketamine, gabapentin and ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block (II-IH NB) for post-caesarean analgesia. Administration of opioids still remains the gold standard for post-operative analgesia, but the associated troublesome side effects have led to the mandatory incorporation of non-opioid analgesics in post-CS analgesia regime. Among the non-opioid techniques, TAP block is the most investigated modality of the last decade. The analgesic efficacy of TAP block as a part of multimodal analgesia is established in post-CS cases where intrathecal morphine is not employed and in CS under general anaesthesia. Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, COX-I inhibitors and intravenous paracetamol are found to be useful in post-operative analgesic regimen. The perioperative use of ketamine is found useful only in CS done under spinal anaesthesia; no benefit is seen where general anaesthesia is employed. Wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, systemic gabapentin and II-IH NB need further trials to assess their efficacy. PMID:28405033

  7. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications. This descriptive study was conducted to determine which...surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period. A...hospital. A description of the patients age, gender, type of surgery, type of epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and

  8. Hypno-analgesia and acupuncture analgesia: a neurophysiological reality?

    PubMed

    Saletu, B; Saletu, M; Brown, M; Stern, J; Sletten, I; Ulett, G

    1975-01-01

    The effects of hypnosis, acupuncture and analgesic drugs on the subjective experience of pain and on objective neurophysiological parameters were investigated. Pain was produced by brief electric stimuli on the wrist. Pain challengers were: hypnosis (induced by two different video tapes), acupuncture (at specific and unspecific loci, with and without electrical stimulation of the needles), morphine and ketamine. Evaluation of clinical parameters included the subjective experience of pain intensity, blood pressure, puls, temperature, psychosomatic symptoms and side effects. Neurophysiological parameters consisted of the quantitatively analyzed EEG and somatosensory evlked potential (SEP). Pain was significantly reduced by hypnosis, morphine and ketamine, but not during the control seesion. Of the four acupuncture techniques, only electro-acupuncture at specific loci significantly decreased pain. The EEG changes during hypnosis were dependent on the wording of the suggestion and were characterized by an increase of slow and a decrease of fast waves. Acupuncture induced just the opposite changes, which were most significant when needles were inserted at traditional specific sites and stimulated electrically. The evoked potential findings suggested that ketamine attenuates pain in the thalamo-cortical pathways, while hypnosis, acupuncture and morphine induce analgesia at the later CNS stage of stimulus processing. Finally some clinical-neurophysiological correlations were explored.

  9. [Analgesia of labor in women with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Neymark, M I; Kovalev, A I

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with a study of duration of physiological labors in women with diabetes mellitus. 120 women were devided into three groups according to method of analgesia. We assessed data of central haemodynamics, efficacy of analgesia, glucose level in blood, conditions of fetus and newborn. We found that epidural analgesia with bupivacaine hydrochloride was an optimal method of labor analgesia in women with diabetes mellitus. This method provided a stabilization of glucose level in blood, normalization of data of central haemodynamics and allowed to avoid anomalies of labor Analgesia with promedol and paracetamol is a preferable method in case of presence of epidural analgesia contraindications.

  10. Postoperative analgesia for supratentorial craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Dilmen, Ozlem Korkmaz; Akcil, Eren Fatma; Tunali, Yusuf; Karabulut, Esra Sultan; Bahar, Mois; Altindas, Fatis; Vehid, Hayriye; Yentur, Ercument

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence of moderate to severe pain is high in patients following craniotomy. Although optimal analgesic therapy is mandatory, there is no consensus regarding analgesic regimen for post-craniotomy pain exists. This study aimed to investigate the effects of morphine and non-opioid analgesics on postcraniotomy pain. This prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study included eighty three patients (ASA 1, II, and III) scheduled for elective supratentorial craniotomy. Intravenous dexketoprofen, paracetamol and metamizol were investigated for their effects on pain intensity, morphine consumption and morphine related side effects during the first 24h following supratentorial craniotomy. Patients were treated with morphine based patient controlled analgesia (PCA) for 24h following surgery and randomized to receive supplemental IV dexketoprofen 50mg, paracetamol 1g, metamizol 1g or placebo. The primary endpoint was pain intensity, secondary endpoint was the effects on morphine consumption and related side effects. When the whole study period was analyzed with repeated measures of ANOVA, the pain intensity, cumulative morphine consumption and related side effects were not different among the groups (p>0.05). This study showed that the use of morphine based PCA prevented moderate to severe postoperative pain without causing any life threatening side effects in patients undergoing supratentorial craniotomy with a vigilant follow up during postoperative 24h. Although we could not demonstrate statistically significant effect of supplemental analgesics on morphine consumption, it was lower in dexketoprofen and metamizol groups than control group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Opioid receptor heteromers in analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Cristina M.; Gomes, Ivone; Stockton, Steven D.; Lim, Maribel P.; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2013-01-01

    Opiates such as morphine and fentanyl, a major class of analgesics used in the clinical management of pain, exert their effects through the activation of opioid receptors. Opioids are among the most commonly prescribed and frequently abused drugs in the USA; however, the prolonged use of opiates often leads to the development of tolerance and addiction. Although blockade of opioid receptors with antagonists such as naltrexone and naloxone can lessen addictive impulses and facilitate recovery from overdose, systemic disruption of endogenous opioid receptor signalling through the use of these antagonistic drugs can have severe side effects. In the light of these challenges, current efforts have focused on identifying new therapeutic targets that selectively and specifically modulate opioid receptor signalling and function so as to achieve analgesia without the adverse effects associated with chronic opiate use. We have previously reported that opioid receptors interact with each other to form heteromeric complexes and that these interactions affect morphine signalling. Since chronic morphine administration leads to an enhanced level of these heteromers, these opioid receptor heteromeric complexes represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction. In this review, we discuss the role of heteromeric opioid receptor complexes with a focus on mu opioid receptor (MOR) and delta opioid receptor (DOR) heteromers. We also highlight the evidence for altered pharmacological properties of opioid ligands and changes in ligand function resulting from the heteromer formation. PMID:22490239

  12. [Systemic analgesia after peripheral block].

    PubMed

    Berti, M; Danelli, G; Albertin, A; Deni, F; Moizo, E; Muzzolon, F

    2001-09-01

    Over the past few years, increasing emphasis has been placed on the need to improve the management of acute pain. Despite a growing trend in acute pain management, many difficulties are still present for the treatment of postoperative pain. Loco-regional techniques together with an effective pain management should accelerate rehabilitation, decrease risk of postoperative complications and speed return to normal activities. A multimodal approach should be used for a reduction of pharmacological side effects, improving pain reduction. The association between NSAIDs and opioids permits reduction of full dose opioids with better pain relief and less side effects. If NSAIDs are contraindicated, acetaminophen is an alternative, though considered by someone to be an NSAID It's action is believed to result from inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis within the central nervous system. It doesn't cause gastrointestinal ulceration or bleeding, but we have to note that large amounts may lead to hepatic necrosis. Newer NSAIDs (COX-2 inhibitors), affect mainly COX-2, and appear to be associated with less adverse effect. Rofecoxib showed a reduction of morphine consuming after spinal fusion and has been admitted by FDA for the treatment of post operative pain. Newer methods of pain relief, as patient controlled analgesia (PCA), can provide excellent and safe pain relief. When high-tech options such as PCA are used, patients need a management by an anesthesiologist-based acute pain service (APS), allowing a better pain relief with less side effects compared to patients supervised by less experienced medical staff.

  13. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a result of non-availability due to logistic problems. Remifentanil, a synthetic opioid, is very suitable for patient controlled analgesia. Recent studies show that epidural analgesia is superior to remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in terms of pain intensity score; however there was no difference in satisfaction with pain relief between both treatments. Methods/design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled study that assesses the cost-effectiveness of remifentanil patient controlled analgesia compared to epidural analgesia. We hypothesize that remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is as effective in improving pain appreciation scores as epidural analgesia, with lower costs and easier achievement of 24 hours availability of pain relief for women in labour and efficient pain relief for those with a contraindication for epidural analgesia. Eligible women will be informed about the study and randomized before active labour has started. Women will be randomly allocated to a strategy based on epidural analgesia or on remifentanil patient controlled analgesia when they request pain relief during labour. Primary outcome is the pain appreciation score, i.e. satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcome parameters are costs, patient satisfaction, pain scores (pain-intensity), mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal side effects. The economic analysis will be performed from a short-term healthcare perspective. For both strategies the cost of perinatal care for mother and child, starting at the onset of labour and ending ten days after delivery, will be registered and compared. Discussion This study, considering cost effectiveness of remifentanil as

  15. Epidural labour analgesia using Bupivacaine and Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Syal, K; Dogra, RK; Ohri, A; Chauhan, G; Goel, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the effects of addition of Clonidine (60 μg) to Epidural Bupivacaine (0.125%) for labour analgesia, with regard to duration of analgesia, duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section, foetal outcome, patient satisfaction and side effects. Patients & Methods: On demand, epidural labour analgesia was given to 50 nulliparous healthy term parturients (cephalic presentation), divided in two groups randomly. Group I received bupivacaine (0.125%) alone, whereas Group II received bupivacaine (0.125%) along with Clonidine (60 μg). 10 ml of 0.125% bupivacaine was injected as first dose and further doses titrated with patient relief (Numerical Rating Scale <3). Top ups were given whenever Numerical Rating Scale went above 5. Results: There was statistically significant prolongation of duration of analgesia in Group II, with no difference in duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section or foetal outcome. Also clonidine gave dose sparing effect to bupivacaine and there was better patient satisfaction without any significant side effects in Group II. Conclusion: Clonidine is a useful adjunct to bupivacaine for epidural labour analgesia and can be considered as alternative to opioids. PMID:21804714

  16. Postoperative analgesia by intravenous clonidine.

    PubMed

    Bernard, J M; Hommeril, J L; Passuti, N; Pinaud, M

    1991-10-01

    Clonidine, an alpha 2 adrenoreceptor agonist, has nonopiate antinociceptive properties, which might be an alternative for postoperative analgesia free of opioid-induced side effects. To document the analgesic properties of intravenous clonidine during the postoperative period, 50 ASA physical status 1 patients, immediately after spinal fusion, were randomly assigned to two groups, blindly administered either clonidine (5 micrograms/kg infused the 1st h and then 0.3 microgram-1.kg-1.h-1 during 11 h) or a placebo. A visual analog scale graded from 0 (no pain) to 100 mm was used to assess pain before clonidine or placebo administration (T0), at the end of the loading dose (T1) and then every 2 h (T3, T5, T7, T9, and T11). Morphine (0.1 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly after each pain measurement if the score was greater than 50 mm. No morphine was given at T0. Hemodynamics, blood gases and plasma clonidine concentrations were measured each time the pain score was measured. The pain score decreased from 42 +/- 5 to 26 +/- 3 mm (mean +/- standard error) in the clonidine group whereas it was unchanged in the placebo group despite a greater morphine requirement (dose for each patient: 3.8 +/- 1 vs. 10.8 +/- 1.2 mg). Clonidine delayed the onset of pain and the first request for morphine injection. Mean arterial pressure decreased to 74 +/- 2 mmHg in the clonidine group (-26 +/- 2 vs. -15 +/- 2% in the placebo group at T11) despite a significant increase in the cumulative fluid volume.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Analgesia inhibitory system involvement in nonacupuncture point-stimulation-produced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Takeshige, C; Kobori, M; Hishida, F; Luo, C P; Usami, S

    1992-03-01

    Acupuncture analgesia (AA), caused by low-frequency stimulation of an acupuncture point (AP)--in this case the tibial muscle--was augmented. Nonacupuncture analgesia (NAA), caused under certain circumstances by stimulation of a nonacupuncture point (NAP)--in this case the abdominal muscle--was unmasked by lesion in the lateral centromedian nucleus of the thalamus (L-CM) or part of the posterior hypothalamus (I-PH). Stimulation in these regions suppressed the augmented part of the AA and blocked the NAA. These regions were, collectively, given the name analgesia inhibitory system. NAA was abolished, the same as AA, by hypophysectomy. The pathways from the AP and NAP to the pituitary gland were different. AA was naloxone reversible, and NAA was dexamethasone reversible. The analgesia inhibitory system is activated nonspecifically by stimulation of either an AP or NAP. It ascends to the I-PH, thence to the L-CM, and ultimately inhibits the pathway nonspecifically connected to the NAP and AP in the lateral part of the periaqueductal central gray (PAG), without affecting the pathway specifically connected to the AP. Thus, only stimulation of an AP will produce analgesia, whereas stimulation of an NAP will not normally produce analgesia. Stress-induced analgesia (SIA) is produced in a different way than AA or NAA.

  18. Rebuilding the labor curve during neuraxial analgesia.

    PubMed

    Frigo, Maria Grazia; Larciprete, Giovanni; Rossi, Federica; Fusco, Paolo; Todde, Cristina; Jarvis, Sheba; Panetta, Valentina; Celleno, Danilo

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the pattern of labor progression among nulliparous women under neuraxial analgesia to obtain a new, specific reference labor curve and to compare the different effects of epidural and combined spinal epidural (CSE) analgesia on the progression of labor. This perspective cohort study was carried out in the Obstetrics and Gynecology tertiary care unit. Six hundred nulliparous parturients were enrolled. A total of 545 nulliparous women were assigned to receive either epidural (272) or CSE (273) analgesia during labor. The mean duration of the first stage was 4 h and 30 min (SD 1.52 h) and the mean duration of the second stage was 1 h and 10 min (SD 0.43). In the second stage, the CSE analgesia labors showed an overall faster progression compared to the epidural labors but both lasted longer than the duration reported by Zhang (53 min) and Friedman (39 min). Both the first and the second-stage duration were significantly lower if neuraxial analgesia was performed as a CSE procedure with respect to the simple epidural procedure (first stage 4 h and 1 min vs. 4 h and 60 min, P = 0.043; second stage 1 h and 5 min vs 1 h and 15 min, P = 0.0356). The pattern of labor progression in contemporary obstetrics differs significantly from the Friedman curve. Based on these observations, we can obtain a more comprehensive knowledge of the partogram's modifications due to the analgesia. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2011 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Nitrous oxide for labor analgesia: Utilization and predictors of conversion to neuraxial analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Caitlin D; Butwick, Alexander J; Riley, Edward T; Carvalho, Brendan

    2017-08-01

    We examined the characteristics of women who choose nitrous oxide for labor analgesia and identified factors that predict conversion from nitrous oxide to labor neuraxial analgesia. Retrospective descriptive study. Labor and Delivery Ward. 146 pregnant women who used nitrous oxide for analgesia during labor and delivery between September 2014 and September 2015. Chart review only. Demographic, obstetric, and intrapartum characteristics of women using nitrous oxide were examined. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with conversion from nitrous oxide to neuraxial analgesia. Data are presented as n (%), median [IQR], adjusted relative risk (aRR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as appropriate. During the study period, 146 women used nitrous oxide for labor analgesia (accounting for 3% of the total deliveries). The majority (71.9%) of women who used nitrous oxide were nulliparous, and over half (51.9%) had expressed an initial preference for "nonmedical birth." The conversion rate to neuraxial blockade was 63.2%, compared to a concurrent institutional rate of 85.1% in women who did not use nitrous oxide. Factors associated with conversion from nitrous oxide to neuraxial blockade were labor induction (aRR=2.0, CI 1.2-3.3) and labor augmentation (aRR=1.7, CI 1.0-2.9). Only a small number of women opted to use nitrous oxide during labor, analgesia was minimal, and most converted to neuraxial analgesia. Women with induced and augmented labors should be counseled about the increased likelihood that they will convert to neuraxial analgesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electroacupuncture analgesia in a rabbit ovariohysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Parmen, Valentin

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of electroacupuncture analgesia (EAA) at local and paravertebral acupoints for a rabbit undergoing an ovariohysterectomy. Twelve clinically healthy New Zealand white rabbits were chosen and divided into two groups: the control group (5 rabbits) and the experimental group (7 rabbits). A neuroleptanalgesic (ketamine + xylazine) was administered to the control group (NLA group); the experimental group received EAA treatment (EAA group). The EAA treatment includes one acupuncture formula for local stimulation at the incision site and systemic stimulation. Results of clinical research have shown postoperative analgesia using EAA treatment to be superior to that using NLA. The average postoperative recovery time was 5.2 times longer in the NLA group than in the EAA group. Because consciousness was maintained, EAA presented an advantage in thermoregulation. Animals administered NLA had prolonged thermal homeostasis because of neurovegetative disconnection. For the EAA group, the operative times were characterized as excellent (28%, p = 0.28) or good (72%, p = 0.72). Local stimulation at the incision site provided excellent analgesia of the abdominal wall (100%). In conclusion, EA can provide general analgesia with a considerable analgesic effect for a rabbit undergoing an ovariohysterectomy, resulting in a short postoperative recovery time. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Analgesia and sedation after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andrew R; Jackman, Lara

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, the importance of appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and analgesia during cardiac surgery has become recognized as a factor in postoperative recovery. This includes the early perioperative management of the neonate undergoing radical surgery and more recently the care surrounding fast-track and ultra fast-track surgery. However, outside these areas, relatively little attention has focused on postoperative sedation and analgesia within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). This reflects perceived priorities of the primary disease process over the supporting structure of PICU, with a generic approach to sedation and analgesia that can result in additional morbidities and delayed recovery. Management of the marginal patient requires optimisation of not only cardiac and other attendant pathophysiology, but also every aspect of supportive care. Individualized sedation and analgesia strategies, starting in the operating theater and continuing through to hospital discharge, need to be regarded as an important aspect of perioperative care, to speed the process of recovery. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Remifentanil for labor analgesia: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yayoi; Baghirzada, Leyla; Sumikura, Hiroyuki; Balki, Mrinalini

    2016-12-01

    Japan has seen significant developments in obstetric anesthesia in recent years, including the establishment of the Japanese Society of Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology. However, labor pain, which is one of the most important issues in obstetric practice, is still not treated aggressively. The rate of epidural administration for labor analgesia is very low in Japan as compared to other developed countries. Remifentanil has been used for labor analgesia, as part of general anesthesia for cesarean delivery, as well as for various fetal procedures around the world. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) with remifentanil is considered to be a reasonable option for labor pain relief. Several studies have demonstrated its efficacy with minimal maternal and neonatal adverse effects. On the other hand, reports of cases of maternal cardiac and respiratory arrest with remifentanil IVPCA within the past couple of years have redirected our attention to its safe use. Remifentanil IVPCA warrants one-to-one nursing monitoring, appropriate education of healthcare providers, continuous maternal oxygen saturation monitoring, end-tidal CO2 monitoring, and availability of both maternal and neonatal resuscitation equipment. This article provides an overview of knowledge and principles of using remifentanil IVPCA for labor analgesia and introduces its potential usage in Japan.

  3. Codeine and 6-acetylcodeine analgesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Milo, Steven; Ansonoff, Michael; King, Michael; Rossi, Grace C; Zuckerman, Amy; Pintar, John; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2006-01-01

    1. Acetylation of morphine at the 6-position changes its pharmacology. To see if similar changes are seen with codeine, we examined the analgesic actions of codeine and 6-acetylcodeine. 2. Like codeine, 6-acetylcodeine is an effective analgesic systemically, supraspinally and spinally, with a potency approximately a third that of codeine. 3. The sensitivity of 6-acetylcodeine analgesia to the mu-selective antagonists beta-FNA and naloxonazine confirmed its classification as a mu opioid. However, it differed from the other mu analgesics in other paradigms. 4. Antisense mapping revealed the sensitivity of 6-acetylcodeine to probes targeting exons 1 and 2 of the mu opioid receptor gene (Oprm), a profile distinct from either codeine or morphine. Although heroin analgesia also is sensitive to antisense targeting exons 1 and 2, heroin analgesia also is sensitive to the antagonist 3-O-methylnaltrexone, while 6-acetylcodeine analgesia is not. 5. Thus, 6-acetylcodeine is an effective mu opioid analgesic with a distinct pharmacological profile.

  4. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    violations. VI ABSTRACT Postoperative pain is an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications...This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when...epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and treatments were recorded and cross-tabulated. The following surgical categories

  5. Progress in analgesia for labor: focus on neuraxial blocks

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghe, J Sudharma; Birnbach, David J

    2010-01-01

    Neuraxial analgesia is widely accepted as the most effective and the least depressant method of providing pain relief in labor. Over the last several decades neuraxial labor analgesia techniques and medications have progressed to the point now where they provide high quality pain relief with minimal side effects to both the mother and the fetus while maximizing the maternal autonomy possible for the parturient receiving neuraxial analgesia. The introduction of the combined spinal epidural technique for labor has allowed for the rapid onset of analgesia with minimal motor blockade, therefore allowing the comfortable parturient to ambulate. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia techniques have evolved to allow for more flexible analgesia that is tailored to the individual needs of the parturient and effective throughout the different phases of labor. Computer integrated systems have been studied to provide seamless analgesia from induction of neuraxial block to delivery. New adjuvant drugs that improve the effectiveness of neuraxial labor analgesia while decreasing the side effects that may occur due to high dose of a single drug are likely to be added to future labor analgesia practice. Bupivacaine still remains a popular choice of local anesthetic for labor analgesia. New local anesthetics with less cardiotoxicity have been introduced, but their cost effectiveness in the current labor analgesia practice has been questioned. PMID:21072273

  6. Resolving the Brainstem Contributions to Attentional Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Jonathan C.W.; Davies, Wendy-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Previous human imaging studies manipulating attention or expectancy have identified the periaqueductal gray (PAG) as a key brainstem structure implicated in endogenous analgesia. However, animal studies indicate that PAG analgesia is mediated largely via caudal brainstem structures, such as the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and locus coeruleus (LC). To identify their involvement in endogenous analgesia, we used brainstem optimized, whole-brain imaging to record responses to concurrent thermal stimulation (left forearm) and visual attention tasks of titrated difficulty in 20 healthy subjects. The PAG, LC, and RVM were anatomically discriminated using a probabilistic atlas. Pain ratings disclosed the anticipated analgesic interaction between task difficulty and pain intensity (p < 0.001). Main effects of noxious thermal stimulation were observed across several brain regions, including operculoinsular, primary somatosensory, and cingulate cortices, whereas hard task difficulty was represented in anterior insular, parietal, and prefrontal cortices. Permutation testing within the brainstem nuclei revealed the following: main effects of task in dorsal PAG and right LC; and main effect of temperature in RVM and a task × temperature interaction in right LC. Intrasubject regression revealed a distributed network of supratentorial brain regions and the RVM whose activity was linearly related to pain intensity. Intersubject analgesia scores correlated to activity within a distinct region of the RVM alone. These results identify distinct roles for a brainstem triumvirate in attentional analgesia: with the PAG activated by attentional load; specific RVM regions showing pronociceptive and antinociceptive processes (in line with previous animal studies); and the LC showing lateralized activity during conflicting attentional demands. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attention modulates pain intensity, and human studies have identified roles for a network of forebrain structures plus

  7. Resolving the Brainstem Contributions to Attentional Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jonathan C W; Davies, Wendy-Elizabeth; Pickering, Anthony E

    2017-03-01

    Previous human imaging studies manipulating attention or expectancy have identified the periaqueductal gray (PAG) as a key brainstem structure implicated in endogenous analgesia. However, animal studies indicate that PAG analgesia is mediated largely via caudal brainstem structures, such as the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and locus coeruleus (LC). To identify their involvement in endogenous analgesia, we used brainstem optimized, whole-brain imaging to record responses to concurrent thermal stimulation (left forearm) and visual attention tasks of titrated difficulty in 20 healthy subjects. The PAG, LC, and RVM were anatomically discriminated using a probabilistic atlas. Pain ratings disclosed the anticipated analgesic interaction between task difficulty and pain intensity (p < 0.001). Main effects of noxious thermal stimulation were observed across several brain regions, including operculoinsular, primary somatosensory, and cingulate cortices, whereas hard task difficulty was represented in anterior insular, parietal, and prefrontal cortices. Permutation testing within the brainstem nuclei revealed the following: main effects of task in dorsal PAG and right LC; and main effect of temperature in RVM and a task × temperature interaction in right LC. Intrasubject regression revealed a distributed network of supratentorial brain regions and the RVM whose activity was linearly related to pain intensity. Intersubject analgesia scores correlated to activity within a distinct region of the RVM alone. These results identify distinct roles for a brainstem triumvirate in attentional analgesia: with the PAG activated by attentional load; specific RVM regions showing pronociceptive and antinociceptive processes (in line with previous animal studies); and the LC showing lateralized activity during conflicting attentional demands.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attention modulates pain intensity, and human studies have identified roles for a network of forebrain structures plus

  8. The effects of maternal labour analgesia on the fetus.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2010-06-01

    Maternal labour pain and stress are associated with progressive fetal metabolic acidosis. Systemic opioid analgesia does little to mitigate this stress, but opioids readily cross the placenta and cause fetal-neonatal depression and impair breast feeding. Pethidine remains the most widely used, but alternatives, with the possible exception of remifentanil, have little more to offer. Inhalational analgesia using Entonox is more effective and, being rapidly exhaled by the newborn, is less likely to produce lasting depression. Neuraxial analgesia has maternal physiological and biochemical effects, some of which are potentially detrimental and some favourable to the fetus. Actual neonatal outcome, however, suggests that benefits outweigh detrimental influences. Meta-analysis demonstrates that Apgar score is better after epidural than systemic opioid analgesia, while neonatal acid-base balance is improved by epidural compared to systemic analgesia and even compared to no analgesia. Successful breast feeding is dependent on many factors, therefore randomized trials are required to elucidate the effect of labour analgesia.

  9. Nefopam and Ketamine Comparably Enhance Postoperative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kapfer, Barbara; Alfonsi, Pascal; Guignard, Bruno; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Summary Opioids alone sometimes provide insufficient postoperative analgesia. Co-administration of drugs may reduce opioid use and to improve opioid efficacy. We therefore tested the hypothesis that administration of ketamine or nefopam, to postoperative patients with pain only partly alleviated by morphine, limits the amount of subsequent opioid necessary to produce adequate analgesia. Patients (n=77) recovering from major surgery were given up to 9 mg intravenous morphine. Those still suffering from pain were randomly assigned to blinded administration of: 1) isotonic saline (Control, n=21); 2) ketamine 10 mg (Ketamine, n=22); or, 3) nefopam 20 mg (Nefopam, n=22). Three-mg morphine boluses were subsequently given at 5-minute intervals until adequate analgesia was obtained, or 60 minutes elapsed after the beginning of the study drug administration, or ventilation became insufficient (respiratory rate < 10 breath/minute or saturation by pulse oxymetery < 95%). Supplemental morphine (i.e., after test drug administration) requirements were significantly greater in the Control group [17 ± 10 (SD) mg] than in the Nefopam (10 ± 5 mg, P < 0.005) or Ketamine (9 ± 5 mg, P < 0.001) groups. Morphine titration was successful in all Ketamine and Nefopam patients, but failed in four Control patients (two from respiratory toxicity and two from persistent pain). Tachycardia and profuse sweating were more frequent in patients given nefopam and sedation was greater with ketamine; however, the incidence of other potential complications did not differ between groups. Implications We conclude that ketamine 10 mg and nefopam 20 mg comparably potentiate opioid analgesia, each reducing opioid need by approximately 40%. Ketamine administration was associated with sedation whereas nefopam produced tachycardia and sweating. However, none of the side effects was serious. Either drug can thus be used to potentiate opioid analgesia. PMID:15616073

  10. Intrathecal injection of morphine for obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Baraka, A; Noueihid, R; Hajj, S

    1981-02-01

    Intrathecal injection of morphine was used to provide obstetric analgesia in 20 primiparous women in labor. When the cervix was at least 3 cm dilated, morphine, 1 or 2 mg, was injected intrathecally. In all parturients, labor pains were completely relieved after 15-60 min and analgesia lasted as long as eight to 11 hours. The analgesia was not associated with any alteration of pin-prick sensation or motor power, and there was no change in the arterial blood pressure or heart rate. All infants were delivered vaginally by use of episiotomy annd a low forceps, except two infants of mothers in the 2 mg of morphine group who needed cesarean section. During the second stage of labor, analgesia was supplemented by lidocaine, 2 per cent, using local perineal infiltration in 14 parturients and pudendal block in two parturients, and by epidural block in four parturients. Nineteen of the 20 newborns cried immediately at birth, and had Apgar scores o 7-9 at 1 min and 8-10 at 5 min. During the first 24 hours of life, the neurobehavioral responses of all newborns were scored as normal. Systemic maternal side effects such as somnolence, nausea, vomiting, and itching occurred in a high proportion of the parturients. However, in the majority of cases, these side effects were mild. Only two parturients of the 2 mg morphine group complained of marked somnolence, itching, and vomiting, which persisted post partum; these were effectively reversed by the specific antagonist naloxone. The analgesic effect of intrathecal morphine can be attributed to its action on the opiate receptors in the substantia gelatinosa of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. However, supraspinal effects of morphine cannot be excluded. The low lipid solubility of morphine can explain its slow onset and prolonged duration of action. Also, this will result in minimal systemic absorption of morphine, which protects the fetus and results in selective maternal analgesia.

  11. Opioid Analgesia in P450 Gene Cluster Knockout Mice: A Search for Analgesia-Relevant Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Nalwalk, Julia W.; Ding, Xinxin; Scheer, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), which are well-known drug-metabolizing enzymes, are thought to play a signal transduction role in µ opioid analgesia and may serve as high-affinity 3H-cimetidine (3HCIM) binding sites in the brain. 3HCIM binding sites may also be related to opioid or nonopioid analgesia. However, of the more than 100 murine P450 enzymes, the specific isoform(s) responsible for either function have not been identified. Presently, three lines of constitutive P450 gene cluster knockout (KO) mice with full-length deletions of 14 Cyp2c, 9 Cyp2d, and 7 Cyp3a genes were studied for deficiencies in 3HCIM binding and for opioid analgesia. Liver and brain homogenates from all three genotypes showed normal 3HCIM binding values, indicating that gene products of Cyp2d, Cyp3a, and Cyp2c are not 3HCIM-binding proteins. Cyp2d KO and Cyp3a KO mice showed normal antinociceptive responses to a moderate systemic dose of morphine (20 mg/kg, s.c.), thereby excluding 16 P450 isoforms as mediators of opioid analgesia. In contrast, Cyp2c KO mice showed a 41% reduction in analgesic responses following systemically (s.c.) administered morphine. However, the significance of brain Cyp2c gene products in opioid analgesia is uncertain because little or no analgesic deficits were noted in Cyp2c KO mice following intracerebroventricular or intrathecalmorphine administration, respectively. These results show that the gene products of Cyp2d and Cyp3a do not contribute to µ opioid analgesia in the central nervous system. A possible role for Cyp2c gene products in opioid analgesia requires further consideration. PMID:26109562

  12. [The efficacy and safety of continuous epidural analgesia versus intradural-epidural analgesia during labor].

    PubMed

    Gómez, P; Echevarría, M; Calderón, J; Caba, F; Martínez, A; Rodríguez, R

    2001-05-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of intradural-epidural analgesia in comparison with continuous epidural analgesia during labor and childbirth. Forty-two women whose labor began spontaneously were enrolled and distributed randomly in two groups. The intradural-epidural analgesia group (IEA, n = 21) received 25 microgram of intradural fentanyl with 2.5 mg of isobaric bupivacaine with adrenalin, after which analgesia was maintained with epidural administration of one 8 mL bolus of 0.125% bupivacaine, followed by perfusion of a balanced concentration at a rate of 8 ml/h. Patients in the continuous epidural analgesia group (CEA, n = 21) were given 8 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine with adrenalin; the epidural perfusion of 0.125% bupivacaine and 1 microgram/ml of fentanyl was started at the same rate as in the IEA group. We recorded pain as assessed on a visual analog scale, extension of sensory and motor block, maternal hemodynamic constants, number of boluses of bupivacaine used, total doses of bupivacaine and oxytocin, instruments needed for childbirth, and side effects (pruritus, nausea and vomiting). Analgesic efficacy during the first 30 minutes was greater in the IEA group. The total dose of bupivacaine, required top-up boluses, and the extension of sensory block at 30 minutes, one hour and two hours were also significantly less in the IEA group. The incidence of pruritus was higher in the IEA group. No significant differences were observed for other variables. Intradural-epidural analgesia provides effective analgesia for labor, with rapid onset, reduced extension of sensory block, lower total doses of local anesthetics and few side effects.

  13. Relationship between obstetric analgesia and time of effective breast feeding.

    PubMed

    Crowell, M K; Hill, P D; Humenick, S S

    1994-01-01

    The Infant Breast-feeding Assessment Tool (IBFAT) was used to assess the time of effective breast feeding in 48 healthy term infants born to mothers having their first or second baby. Infants of mothers who received an analgesia (butorphanol or nalbuphine) in labor (n = 26) were compared with infants whose mothers did not receive any labor analgesia (n = 22). Timing of the administration of labor analgesia was also examined with infants whose mothers received no analgesia or analgesia within an hour of birth compared with infants whose mothers received analgesia more than one hour before birth. Infants of first-time breast-feeding mothers took longer to establish effective feeding compared with infants of second-time breast-feeding mothers. Male infants also took longer. Labor analgesia significantly affected mother-rated IBFAT scores when initiation time was considered. Infants who received analgesia within an hour of birth, or no analgesia, and who initiated breast feeding early, established effective feeding significantly earlier than infants with longer duration of analgesia and later initiation of breast feeding.

  14. [Labor analgesia by one anesthesiologist in a small obstetric clinic].

    PubMed

    Ono, Kenji

    2007-09-01

    In Japan, about 40% of all the parturients give birth in small obstetrician's clinics. There is no anesthesiologist in most clinics. The labor analgesia is not performed or is performed by the obstetrician in many facilities. In this paper the author reports labor analgesia by one anesthetist in a small obstetric clinic in Japan. The management of labor analgesia of this hospital is as follows; 1) The anesthesiologist explains the method and risks of labor analgesia to the patient in the outpatient clinic. The induced labor is recommended to the parturients who request labor analgesia. 2) The combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) is provided for labor analgesia with a local anesthetic of low concentration and fentanyl. 3) CSEA is usually administered upon the request of a parturient and continued till the end of the delivery. Adequate pain relief and high satisfaction were ascertained by the questionnaire to the parturients who had received labor analgesia in this hospital. The number of parturients who request labor analgesia is increasing. However, it is difficult or almost impossible to provide labor analgesia by one anesthetist for 24 hours and 365 days.

  15. Prehospital analgesia with nitrous oxide/oxygen.

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, K. D.

    1981-01-01

    A pilot study of prehospital analgesia with 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen was undertaken in patients experiencing severe pain from various sources. Under the supervision of an ambulance attendant N2O/O2 was administered through a face mask held by the patient and connected to a portable regulator/tank unit. Two types of units were evaluated -- Entonox (with premixed N2O and O2) and Nitronox (with separate cylinders of N2O and O2, the gases being mixed at the time of administration). Of the 72 patients 69 obtained worthwhile analgesia (marked or partial relief of pain) during treatment in the field or in the ambulance. There were no serious side effects, and those that did occur reflected N2O's expected action (e.g., giddiness). N2O/O2 is thus considered a safe and effective analgesic, suitable for use by ambulance personnel. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:7306895

  16. Acupuncture for analgesia in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Fry, Lindsey M; Neary, Susan M; Sharrock, Joseph; Rychel, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture for analgesia is growing rapidly in popularity with veterinarians and pet owners. This article summarizes the mechanisms of analgesia derived from acupuncture and reviews current literature on the topic. Areas covered include the local effects at area of needle insertion, systemic effects secondary to circulating neurotransmitters and changes in cell signaling, central nervous system effects including the brain and spinal cord, and myofascial trigger point and pathology treatment. Clinical applications are discussed and suggested in each section. When used by appropriately trained professionals, acupuncture offers a compelling and safe method for pain management in our veterinary patients and should be strongly considered as a part of multimodal pain management plans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analgesia for small animal thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Kyriaki; Papazoglou, Lysimachos; Savvas, Ioannis; Kazakos, Georgios

    2009-09-01

    Thoracic surgery in small animals is considered a painful procedure, resulting in alterations in pulmonary function and respiratory mechanics. Modifications in surgical approach and technique and selection of the appropriate analgesic protocol may improve outcomes in dogs and cats after thoracic surgery. Systemic administration of opioids and other agents, intercostal and intrapleural blocks, and epidural analgesia are among the most common options for pain management after thoracic surgery in small animals.

  18. Anesthesia and analgesia in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Galatos, Apostolos D

    2011-03-01

    Physical or chemical restraint, with or without local anesthesia, has been extensively used to perform diagnostic or minor surgical procedures in small ruminants. However, anesthetic and analgesic techniques are required when specific diagnostic procedures and painful surgery are to be performed. Apart from improving animal welfare standards, anesthesia and analgesia are essential to make the procedures easier and improve both animal and personnel safety. This article provides an overview of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and techniques commonly used in sheep and goats.

  19. Remifentanil for labor analgesia: an evidence-based narrative review.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, M; Carvalho, B

    2016-02-01

    This manuscript reviews the available literature on remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia in labor focusing on efficacy and safety. Remifentanil compares favorably to other potent systemic opioids but with fewer opioid-related neonatal effects. However, remifentanil provides modest and short-lasting labor analgesia that is consistently inferior when compared to neuraxial analgesia. The initial analgesic effect provided with remifentanil also diminishes as labor progresses. In several studies, remifentanil induced significant respiratory depressant effects in laboring women with episodes of desaturation, hypoventilation and even apnea. Given the safety concerns, we recommend that remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia should not be a routine analgesia technique during labor. In cases where neuraxial analgesia is refused or contraindicated and the use of remifentanil justified, continuous and careful monitoring is required to detect respiratory depression to provide safe care of both the pregnant woman and unborn child.

  20. Ambulatory labor analgesia: what does an obstetrician need to know?

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2004-05-01

    A simple statement that describes the degree of the patient's satisfaction with the pain relief from her labor epidural analgesia has often assessed the quality of labor analgesia as perceived by the patient. Many laboring parturients, midwives, obstetricians and anesthesiologists are increasingly concerned by the limitations of traditional epidural labor analgesia. In general, women dislike the inability to void, the often-dense motor block, the feeling of numbness of the lower body, the total lack of the urge to bear down, and the complete perineal anesthesia. Continuous search for balanced labor analgesia that provides relief from pain, while preserving motor function, has led to the development of an ambulatory labor analgesia technique. This article assesses the validity of various strongly advocated opinions as to whether parturients benefit from ambulation in labor and also reviews the current trends in ambulatory labor analgesia.

  1. Preemptive analgesia in children. Does it exist?

    PubMed

    Ho, J W; Khambatta, H J; Pang, L M; Siegfried, R N; Sun, L S

    1997-01-01

    Preemptive analgesia has been evident in animals, but few adult human studies exist demonstrating this concept exist, and there are fewer still in children. Caudal epidural blocks with local anesthetics are often placed for postoperative analgesia in children. This study evaluated whether these blocks are more effective when placed prior to surgical incision. Children aged 1-6 years and ASA I and II (n = 51), undergoing elective herniorrhaphy, orchidopexy, or circumcision were randomly assigned to receive a caudal epidural block with 0.6 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine, either before incision (n = 28) or after surgery (n = 23). In all patients, anesthesia was induced and maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide, and halothane, and caudal epidural blocks were placed. Postoperative pain was scored by a blinded observer using a Faces Pain Scale in the recovery room and was also assessed at home by the parents. Analgesic requirement during the 24-hour period was recorded. The Faces Pain Scale scores and analgesic requirements did not differ between the groups, either in the recovery room or at home (P > .05). Although preemptive analgesia has been successfully demonstrated in some earlier clinical studies, our results indicate that pre- and postincisional caudal epidural blocks with 0.25% bupivacaine were equally effective in children.

  2. An analgesia circuit activated by cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Meng, I D; Manning, B H; Martin, W J; Fields, H L

    1998-09-24

    Although many anecdotal reports indicate that marijuana and its active constituent, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), may reduce pain sensation, studies of humans have produced inconsistent results. In animal studies, the apparent pain-suppressing effects of delta-9-THC and other cannabinoid drugs are confounded by motor deficits. Here we show that a brainstem circuit that contributes to the pain-suppressing effects of morphine is also required for the analgesic effects of cannabinoids. Inactivation of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) prevents the analgesia but not the motor deficits produced by systemically administered cannabinoids. Furthermore, cannabinoids produce analgesia by modulating RVM neuronal activity in a manner similar to, but pharmacologically dissociable from, that of morphine. We also show that endogenous cannabinoids tonically regulate pain thresholds in part through the modulation of RVM neuronal activity. These results show that analgesia produced by cannabinoids and opioids involves similar brainstem circuitry and that cannabinoids are indeed centrally acting analgesics with a new mechanism of action.

  3. Offset analgesia is reduced in older adults.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Kelly M; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Fillingim, Roger B; Riley, Joseph L

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that aging is associated with dysfunctional changes in pain modulatory capacity, potentially contributing to increased incidence of pain in older adults. However, age-related changes in offset analgesia (offset), a form of temporal pain inhibition, remain poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate age differences in offset analgesia of heat pain in healthy younger and older adults. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying offset, an additional aim of the study was to test offset at 2 anatomical sites with known differences in nociceptor innervation. A total of 25 younger adults and 20 older adults completed 6 offset trials in which the experimental heat stimulus was presented to the volar forearm and glabrous skin of the palm. Each trial consisted of 3 continuous phases: an initial 15-second painful stimulus (T1), a slight increase in temperature from T1 for 5 seconds (T2), and a slight decrease back to the initial testing temperature for 10 seconds (T3). During each trial, subjects rated pain intensity continuously using an electronic visual analogue scale (0-100). Older adults demonstrated reduced offset compared to younger adults when tested on the volar forearm. Interestingly, offset analgesia was nonexistent on the palm for all subjects. The reduced offset found in older adults may reflect an age-related decline in endogenous inhibitory systems. However, although the exact mechanisms underlying offset remain unknown, the absence of offset at the palm suggests that peripheral mechanisms may be involved in initiating this phenomenon.

  4. Anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cooper, John E

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have long played an important role in biomedical research in such fields as genetics, physiology, and development. However, with few exceptions, scientists, veterinarians, and technicians have paid little attention to the anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of these diverse creatures. Indeed, some standard research procedures are routinely performed without anesthesia. Yet various chemical agents are available for the immobilization or anesthesia of invertebrates, ranging from gases or volatile liquids that can be pumped into either an anesthetic chamber (for terrestrial species) or a container of water (aquatic species), to benzocaine and other substances for fish. Many invertebrates are not difficult to immobilize or anesthetize and the procedures recommended in this article appear to be safe; however, none should be considered totally risk-free. Analgesia of invertebrates is as yet a largely unexplored field; until scientific data are available, other measures can promote the well-being of these animals in the laboratory. For euthanasia, various methods (physical or chemical or a combination of both) have been recommended for different taxa of invertebrates, but most have not been properly studied under laboratory conditions and some can be problematic in the context of research procedures and tissue harvesting. Furthermore, relevant data are scattered, sometimes available only in languages other than English, and there is no international approach for seeking and collating such information. In this article I review various methods of anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia for terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates, as well as areas requiring further research.

  5. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour: randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    PubMed Central

    Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J; Hollmann, Markus W; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A H M; Logtenberg, Sabine L M; van der Salm, Paulien C M; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M; Struys, Michel M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine women’s satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. Design Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. Setting 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants Women with an intermediate to high obstetric risk with an intention to deliver vaginally. To exclude a clinically relevant difference in satisfaction with pain relief of more than 10%, we needed to include 1136 women. Because of missing values for satisfaction this number was increased to 1400 before any analysis. We used multiple imputation to correct for missing data. Intervention Before the onset of active labour consenting women were randomised to a pain relief strategy with patient controlled remifentanil or epidural analgesia if they requested pain relief during labour. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was satisfaction with pain relief, measured hourly on a visual analogue scale and expressed as area under the curve (AUC), thus providing a time weighted measure of total satisfaction with pain relief. A higher AUC represents higher satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity scores, mode of delivery, and maternal and neonatal outcomes. Analysis was done by intention to treat. The study was defined as an equivalence study for the primary outcome. Results 1414 women were randomised, of whom 709 were allocated to patient controlled remifentanil and 705 to epidural analgesia. Baseline characteristics were comparable. Pain relief was ultimately used in 65% (447/687) in the remifentanil group and 52% (347/671) in the epidural analgesia group (relative risk 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 1.48). Cross over occurred in 7% (45/687) and 8% (51/671) of women, respectively. Of women primarily treated with remifentanil, 13% (53/402) converted to epidural analgesia, while in women primarily treated with epidural analgesia 1% (3/296) converted to remifentanil. The

  6. Hands-and-knees positioning during labor with epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Stremler, Robyn; Halpern, Stephen; Weston, Julie; Yee, Jennifer; Hodnett, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Hands-and-knees position has shown promise as an intervention to improve labor and birth outcomes, but no reports exist that examine its use with women laboring with epidural analgesia. Concerns of safety, effects on analgesia, and acceptability of use may limit use of active positioning during labor with regional analgesia. This article presents a case study series of 13 women who used hands-and-knees position in the first stage of labor.

  7. The dynamics of epidural and opioid analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Zondag, Dirkje C; Gross, Mechthild M; Grylka-Baeschlin, Susanne; Poat, Angela; Petersen, Antje

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the association of analgesia, opioids or epidural, or the combination of both with labour duration and spontaneous birth in nulliparous women. A secondary data analysis of an existing cohort study was performed and included nulliparous women (n = 2074). Durations of total labour and first and second labour stage were calculated with Kaplan-Meier estimation for the four different study groups: no analgesia (n = 620), opioid analgesia (n = 743), epidural analgesia (n = 482), and combined application (n = 229). Labour duration was compared by Cox regression while adjusting for confounders and censoring for operative births. Logistic regression was used to investigate the association between the administration of different types of analgesia and mode of birth. Most women in the combined application group were first to receive opioid analgesia. Women with no analgesia had the shortest duration of labour (log rank p < 0.001) and highest chance of a spontaneous birth (p < 0.001). If analgesia was administered, women with opioids had a shorter first stage (p = 0.018), compared to women with epidural (p < 0.001) or women with combined application (p < 0.001). Women with opioids had an increased chance to reach full cervical dilatation (p = 0.006). Women with epidural analgesia (p < 0.001) and women with combined application (p < 0.001) had a prolonged second stage and decreased chance of spontaneous birth compared to women without analgesia. Women with opioids had a prolonged first stage, but increased chance to reach full cervical dilatation. Women with epidural analgesia and women with both opioid and epidural analgesia had a prolonged first and second stage and a decreased chance of a spontaneous birth.

  8. Biological rhythms of spinal-epidural labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Waleska Schneider; Hidalgo, Maria Paz Loayza; Torres, Iraci da Silva Lucena; Caumo, Wolnei

    2010-06-01

    Pain exhibits temporal variations in intensity due to multiple factors, including endogenous neuroendocrine and various external influences that vary over the 24 h. Also, medications can vary in potency and/or toxicity according to the time when they are administered. However, there is no consensus among studies regarding the 24-h pattern of analgesia during labor. Taking into account the time-of-day when labor analgesia is administered, this study aimed to answer two questions: (i) Is there diurnal variation in visual analogue scale (VAS)-rated pain relief and duration of intrathecal analgesia in patients undergoing labor analgesia? (ii) If there is, what is the influence of the duration of labor on the diurnal variation of the level of pain relief and duration of intrathecal analgesia? This prospective cohort included 41 healthy, nulliparous women in the first stage of labor undergoing spinal-epidural (CSE) analgesia using fentanyl combined with bupivacaine. Subjects had an epidural catheter fitted for additional, patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) if their pain relief was unsatisfactory. The number of VAS assessments (n = 558) was divided into six time periods of the 24 h. The adjusted coefficient of determination (r(2)), the proportion of the variance explained by the association between the duration of labor and the temporal pattern of the outcomes variable, was 58% (r(2) = 0.58) for pain relief and 44% (r(2) = 0.44) for duration of intrathecal analgesia. The peak effect of labor analgesia occurred between 02:00 and 05:59 h. However, the duration of intrathecal analgesia showed two peaks, i.e., at approximately 00:00 and approximately 12:00 h. These results demonstrate that labor analgesia achieved by fentanyl combined with bupivacaine shows a diurnal pattern in pain relief and duration of spinal analgesia. However, part of these temporal patterns was explained by the association with duration of labor.

  9. A qualitative analysis of parturients' perspectives on neuraxial labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Toledo, P; Sun, J; Peralta, F; Grobman, W A; Wong, C A; Hasnain-Wynia, R

    2013-04-01

    The decision to use, or not use, neuraxial analgesia is complex and likely multi-factorial. The objectives of this study were to understand parturients' concerns about neuraxial analgesia, and the reasons for not anticipating the use of neuraxial analgesia using qualitative methodology. English-speaking, term parturients, who had not requested or received labor analgesia, were recruited for this mixed-methods study. In addition to a quantitative survey, the results of which have been published elsewhere, women were asked open-ended questions regarding concerns about neuraxial analgesia and reasons for not anticipating its use. Answers were recorded verbatim and analyzed using qualitative methodology. Interviews were conducted with 509 women. Thirty-nine percent of patients expressed some concern about neuraxial analgesia. These concerns were thematically represented by misunderstandings about neuraxial analgesia, general fears about the procedure, and lack of trust in providers. Many of the concerns were misunderstandings that were not supported by the medical literature. Of the 129 patients who did not anticipate using neuraxial analgesia, 23% stated that this was because they desired a natural childbirth and/or control over their labor experience, whereas 46% cited concerns about the procedure and its complications as the basis for their decision. Many women who anticipate not using neuraxial analgesia may be basing their decision on an inaccurate understanding of the risks of the procedure. Improved patient education and counseling that target specific areas of concern may address these misunderstandings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated. PMID:26678391

  11. EXPERIMENTAL GENERALIZED ANALGESIA AFTER EXPOSURE TO SOME WAR GASES

    PubMed Central

    Auer, John

    1922-01-01

    Cats gassed with dimethylsulfate or chloropicrin in such concentration that death generally results within 4 days, usually exhibit a marked generalized analgesia, both superficial and deep. Gassed cats react with no obvious sign of pain to operative interferences, including laparotomy and gentle friction of the parietal-peritoneum. The analgesia develops within a few hours after gassing, and reaches its maximum in about 24 hours. With dimethylsulfate the analgesia may persist for 6 months; with chloropicrin practically normal sensitiveness has been observed 7 days after gassing. This analgesia is considered to be caused and maintained largely by a general, low grade, tissue aspbyxia which is chiefly of pulmonic origin. PMID:19868605

  12. Does analgesia mask diagnosis of appendicitis among children?

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Rudy; Goldman, Ran D.

    2007-01-01

    QUESTION Can analgesia be given safely to patients with suspected appendicitis prior to surgical evaluation without masking physical signs and symptoms? ANSWER Withholding analgesia from patients with acute abdominal pain and suspected appendicitis is common. This practice, however, is not supported by published literature. Although a few trials have noted some changes in abdominal examination with analgesia, this has not been associated with any changes in patient outcome. If patients are in pain, analgesia is warranted. Larger multicentre trials are needed to establish practice guidelines. PMID:17872606

  13. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  14. Analgesia by telemedically supported paramedics compared with physician-administered analgesia: A prospective, interventional, multicentre trial.

    PubMed

    Brokmann, J C; Rossaint, R; Hirsch, F; Beckers, S K; Czaplik, M; Chowanetz, M; Tamm, M; Bergrath, S

    2016-08-01

    In German emergency medical services (EMS), the analgesia is restricted to physicians. In this prospective, interventional, multicentre trial, complications with and quality of telemedically delegated analgesia were evaluated. If prehospital analgesia was necessary, five telemedically equipped paramedic ambulances from four different districts could consult a telemedicine centre. Analgesics were delegated based on a predefined algorithm. Telemedically assisted cases were compared with local historical regular EMS missions using matched pairs. The primary outcome was the frequency of therapeutic complications (respiratory/circulatory insufficiency, allergic reactions). Secondary outcomes were quality of analgesia (11-point numerical rating scale, NRS) and the frequency of nausea/vomiting. Analgesia was necessary in 106 telemedically assisted missions. In 23 cases, the telemedical procedure was used until an EMS physician arrived. Of the remaining 83 cases, 80 could be matched to comparable controls. Complications did not occur in either the study group or the control group (0 vs. 0; p = N/A). Complete NRS documentation was noted in 65/80 (study group) and 32/80 (control group) cases (p < 0.0001). Adequate initial pain reduction (quality indicator: reduction of NRS ≥ 2 points or NRS < 5 at end of mission) occurred in 61/65 versus 31/32 cases (p = 1.0); NRS reduction during mission was 3.78 ± 2.0 versus 4.38 ± 2.2 points (p = 0.0159). Nausea and vomiting occurred with equal frequency in both groups. Telemedical delegation of analgesics to paramedics was safe and led to a pain reduction superior to the published minimum standard in both groups. The documentation quality was better in the telemedicine group. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: Little is known about the safety and quality of prehospital analgesia carried out by emergency medical services (EMS). Beside potential quality problems, in some countries meaningful pain reduction is limited by legal

  15. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  16. Routine labour epidural analgesia versus labour analgesia on request: a randomised non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Wassen, M M L H; Smits, L J M; Scheepers, H C J; Marcus, M A E; Van Neer, J; Nijhuis, J G; Roumen, F J M E

    2015-02-01

    To assess the effect on mode of delivery of the routine use of labour epidural analgesia (EA) compared with analgesia on request. Randomised non-inferiority trial. One university and one non-university teaching hospital in The Netherlands. Women with a singleton pregnancy in cephalic presentation beyond 36 + 0 weeks' gestation. Participants were randomly allocated to receive either routine EA or analgesia on request. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) analyses were performed, with confidence intervals (CI) calculated for the differences in percentages or means. Rate of operative delivery (instrumental vaginal or caesarean), labour characteristics, and adverse labour and neonatal outcomes. A total of 488 women were randomly allocated to the routine EA (n = 233) or analgesia on request group (n = 255). In the routine EA group, 89.3% (208/233) received EA. According to ITT analysis, 34.8% (81/233) women in the routine EA group had an operative delivery, compared with 26.7% (68/255) in the analgesia on request group (difference 8.1%, 95% CI -0.1 to 16.3). The difference in rate of operative deliveries according to the PP analysis was statistically significant (difference 8.9%, 95% CI 0.4 to 17.4). Inferiority of EA could not be rejected, as in both analyses the upper bound of the confidence interval exceeded the pre-specified inferiority criterion of +10%. Women in the routine EA group had more adverse effects, including hypotension (difference 9.5%, 95% CI 4.2 to 14.9), and motor blockade (difference 6.8%, 95% CI 1.1 to 12.5). Non-inferiority of routine EA could not be demonstrated in this trial. Routine EA use is likely to lead to more operative deliveries and more maternal adverse effects. The results of our study do not justify routine use of EA. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. Influence of adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms in baclofen induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, L; Rifo, J; Contreras, E

    1988-01-01

    1. Baclofen induced analgesia was confirmed by means of the mouse hot plate test. 2. Physostigmine significantly increased the response to baclofen whilst neostigmine was ineffective. Baclofen analgesia was reduced by atropine. 3. The response to baclofen was increased by the administration of tolazoline, propranolol and nadolol. In contrast, the analgesic response to morphine was attenuated by the antiadrenergic drugs phenoxybenzamine, tolazoline and nadolol.

  18. The Neuroanatomy of Sexual Dimorphism in Opioid Analgesia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-13

    Review The neuroanatomy of sexual dimorphism in opioid analgesia Dayna R. Loyd a, Anne Z. Murphy b,⁎ a Pain Management Research Area, United States...correlate of sexually dimorphic pain and analgesia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Sex...antinociception is sexually dimorphic and dependent on gonadal hormones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

  19. Use of epidural analgesia in post-operative pain management.

    PubMed

    Weetman, Carole; Allison, Wendy

    This article provides an overview of the use of epidural infusion analgesia in the management of patients with post-operative pain. Epidural analgesia is an effective method for relieving pain and has minimal side effects. However, life-threatening complications can occur and nurses need to be able to identify these and provide safe care for patients.

  20. [PERIOPERATIVE ANALGESIA INFLUENCE ON MOTHER REHABILITATION PERIOD AFTER CESAREAN SECTION].

    PubMed

    Sedykh, S V

    2015-01-01

    Early breast-feeding is a standard of perinatal care currently. After cesarean section it can be possible in case of early mother activation (verticalization). Assessment of perioperative analgesia influence on activation timing was the aim of our research. We included 120 parturient women. It was proved, that local analgesia using in postoperative period promotes early mother verticaliration, and optimal breast-feeding starting.

  1. Anesthesia and analgesia for pectus excavatum surgery.

    PubMed

    Mavi, Jagroop; Moore, David L

    2014-03-01

    The technique of choice for surgical correction of pectus excavatum is the Nuss procedure, a minimally invasive technique in which rigid metal bars are placed transthoracically beneath the sternum and costal cartilages until permanent remodeling of the chest wall has occurred. Intraoperatively, anesthesia focuses on three areas: the potential for catastrophic blood loss caused by perforation of large capacitance vessels and the heart, the potential for malignant arrhythmias, and the consequences of bilateral iatrogenic pneumothoraces. Postoperatively, analgesia is institutionally dependent and controversial, based on usage and type of regional anesthesia. The necessity of multimodal analgesic techniques creates a common ground across different hospital systems.

  2. Techniques for the maintenance of epidural labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Capogna, Giorgio; Stirparo, Silvia

    2013-06-01

    After initiating neuraxial labor analgesia, there are many techniques that can be used to maintain analgesia for the duration of labor. In this review, we have examined the new techniques of maintenance of epidural labor analgesia recently proposed to overcome the undesirable effects of continuous infusion and patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). As labor progresses, there is a greater need for analgesia. PCEA with basal infusion, automated intermittent mandatory boluses, programmed intermittent epidural boluses and computer-integrated PCEA have been introduced to combine the advantages of a manual bolus and continuous infusion, thus matching infusion rate and bolus modality to the patient's analgesic needs. Increased maternal satisfaction, reduced anesthetic consumption and decreased incidence of motor block are features of these new maintenance techniques. Technology has now provided us with more advanced drug delivery systems that may have the potential to fulfill the maternal requirements of a safe, natural, and painless childbirth, tailoring the analgesic regimen for each parturient's need.

  3. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  4. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, S; Tan, T; Walsh, A; Carey, M

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  5. The experience of giving birth with epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Keller, Kurt Dauer

    2014-06-01

    There is a lack of literature about what constitutes good midwifery care for women who have epidural analgesia during labour. It is known that an increasing number of women receive epidural analgesia for labour pain. We also know that while women rate the painkilling effect of the epidural analgesia as high, in general, their satisfaction with labour is unchanged or even lower when epidural analgesia is used. How do women experience being in labour with epidural analgesia, and what kind of midwifery care do they, consequently, need? A field study and semi-structured interviews were conducted on a phenomenological basis. Nine nulliparous women were observed from initiation of epidural analgesia until birth of their baby. They were interviewed the day after the birth and again 2 months later. The involved midwives were interviewed 2-3h after the birth. Initiation of epidural analgesia can have considerable implications for women's experience of labour. Two different types of emotional reactions towards epidural analgesia are distinguished, one of which is particularly marked by a subtle sense of worry and ambivalence. Another important finding refers to the labouring woman's relationship with the midwife, which represents an essential influencing factor on the woman' experience of labour. Within this relationship, some rather unnoticed matters of communication and recognition appear to be of decisive significance. After initiation of epidural analgesia the requirements of midwifery care seem to go beyond how women verbalise and define their own needs. The midwife should be attentive to the labouring woman's type of emotional reaction to epidural analgesia and her possible intricate worries. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intrapleural analgesia after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia Gomes da; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Leite, Fernanda; Hasimoto, Erica Nishida; Barros, Guilherme Antonio Moreira de

    2011-12-01

    To compare analgesia traditionally used for thoracic sympathectomy to intrapleural ropivacaine injection in two different doses. Twenty-four patients were divided into three similar groups, and all of them received intravenous dipyrone. Group A received intravenous tramadol and intrapleural injection of saline solution. Group B received intrapleural injection of 0.33% ropivacaine, and Group C 0.5% ropivacaine. The following aspects were analyzed: inspiratory capacity, respiratory rate and pain. Pain was evaluated in the immediate postoperative period by means of the visual analog scale and over a one-week period. In Groups A and B, reduced inspiratory capacity was observed in the postoperative period. In the first postoperative 12 hours, only 12.5% of the patients in Groups B and C showed intense pain as compared to 25% in Group A. In the subsequent week, only one patient in Group A showed mild pain while the remainder reported intense pain. In Group B, half of the patients showed intense pain, and in Group C, only one presented intense pain. Intrapleural analgesia with ropivacaine resulted in less pain in the late postoperative period with better analgesic outcomes in higher doses, providing a better ventilatory pattern.

  7. Regional analgesia in postsurgical critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Moliner Velázquez, S; Rubio Haro, R; De Andrés Serrano, C; De Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2017-03-01

    Regional analgesia intrinsically, based on its physiological effects, is routinely used for the perioperative treatment of pain associated with surgical procedures. However, in other areas such as the non-surgical treatment of acute pain for patients in a critical condition, it has not been subjected to specific prospective studies. If we confine ourselves to the physiological effects of the nerve block, in a situation of stress, the indications for regional anaesthesia in this group of patients extend to the management of a wide variety of medical as well as postsurgical conditions, of trauma patients and of other painful procedures performed in the patient's bed. The critical patient certainly must be analyzed individually as their own primary conditions is of vital importance, as well as any associated conditions they have developed that can potentially increase the risk of systemic toxicity or morbidity, such as, coagulopathies, infection, immunosuppressive states, sedation and problems associated with mechanical ventilation. This review aims to assess the role of regional analgesia in critically ill patients, placing it within the algorithm decision tree of the professional responsible for patients in critical care units, all based on the evidence of potential benefits according to the published literature.

  8. [Maternal postures and epidural analgesia during labour].

    PubMed

    Ducloy-Bouthors, A-S; De Gasquet, B; Davette, M; Cuisse, M

    2006-06-01

    The evolution of birth is of interest for obstetricians and midwives. Postures with asymmetric stretching and balance, kneeling, or sitting have been claimed to be able to help foetal head rotation. Although walking during labour have no influence on the outcome of labour, hip-flexed postures enlarging the pelvic diameter are yet evaluated to improve the obstetric course of labour. In a prospective randomised study including 93 parturients, we compared the supine 30 degrees lateral tilt (control group) to three hip-flexed postures: sitting (S), right hip-flexed left lateral position (L) and left hip-flexed right lateral position (R). Epidural analgesia with 12 ml ropivacaine 0.1% and sufentanil 0.5 microg/ml was administered over a period of six minutes. The total epidural spread was 15+/-0.3 dermatomes and the upper level of thermo-analgesic blockade reached T7-T8 (T5 to T10) in each group. There were no differences between groups for the left and right total spread and upper level of epidural blockade, for the time to maximal block and pain relief. There was no motor block and no maternal or foetal side effects. We conclude that, for the three hip-flexed postures tested, position does not influence local anesthetic spread or symmetry of analgesia after induction of obstetric epidural anaesthesia.

  9. [Ketorolac vs metamizol preemptive analgesia in children].

    PubMed

    Peñuelas-Acuña, Juana; Oriol-López, S Alejandra; Hernández-Bernal, Clara E; Castelazo Arredondo, J Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Preventive analgesia produced by ketorolac and metamizol was evaluated during a prospective study randomized in two groups. One hundred twenty children were included aged from 3 to 6 years who underwent surgery by different procedures. Analgesic dose was applied 15 min prior to surgery by intravenous (i.v.) via. Technique used was inhaled general anesthesia; use of opioids was avoided. Pain evaluation at the end of surgery (and during the following 48 to 72 h) as well as bleeding time, platelet count, and alterations in white blood cell count were dependent variables. As soon as patients arrived in the recovery room, pain was measured by modified McGrath scales and the chromatic EVA. In ketorolac group, 40% of children showed no pain and 55% presented mild to moderate pain (1-6). In metamizol group, 40% of children referred no pain, while 55% evaluated pain as minimal to moderate. Analgesia produced by both drugs presented no significant statistical diference (p > 0.5). Troughout followup, maximum pain referred had a values of 6 and 7, respectively, for ketorolac and metamizol. Fifteen min after analgesic dose, pain was referred as 3 and 4. No alterations were observed in bleeding time, platelet count, and white blood cell count. We conclude that both analgesics prevent hyperalgesia during post-surgical period.

  10. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia.

  11. Intracortical modulation, and not spinal inhibition, mediates placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    Martini, M; Lee, M C H; Valentini, E; Iannetti, G D

    2015-02-01

    Suppression of spinal responses to noxious stimulation has been detected using spinal fMRI during placebo analgesia, which is therefore increasingly considered a phenomenon caused by descending inhibition of spinal activity. However, spinal fMRI is technically challenging and prone to false-positive results. Here we recorded laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) during placebo analgesia in humans. LEPs allow neural activity to be measured directly and with high enough temporal resolution to capture the sequence of cortical areas activated by nociceptive stimuli. If placebo analgesia is mediated by inhibition at spinal level, this would result in a general suppression of LEPs rather than in a selective reduction of their late components. LEPs and subjective pain ratings were obtained in two groups of healthy volunteers - one was conditioned for placebo analgesia while the other served as unconditioned control. Laser stimuli at three suprathreshold energies were delivered to the right hand dorsum. Placebo analgesia was associated with a significant reduction of the amplitude of the late P2 component. In contrast, the early N1 component, reflecting the arrival of the nociceptive input to the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), was only affected by stimulus energy. This selective suppression of late LEPs indicates that placebo analgesia is mediated by direct intracortical modulation rather than inhibition of the nociceptive input at spinal level. The observed cortical modulation occurs after the responses elicited by the nociceptive stimulus in the SI, suggesting that higher order sensory processes are modulated during placebo analgesia.

  12. Patient controlled opioid analgesia versus non-patient controlled opioid analgesia for postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    McNicol, Ewan D; Ferguson, McKenzie C; Hudcova, Jana

    2015-06-02

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2006. Patients may control postoperative pain by self administration of intravenous opioids using devices designed for this purpose (patient controlled analgesia or PCA). A 1992 meta-analysis by Ballantyne et al found a strong patient preference for PCA over non-patient controlled analgesia, but disclosed no differences in analgesic consumption or length of postoperative hospital stay. Although Ballantyne's meta-analysis found that PCA did have a small but statistically significant benefit upon pain intensity, a 2001 review by Walder et al did not find statistically significant differences in pain intensity or pain relief between PCA and groups treated with non-patient controlled analgesia. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of patient controlled intravenous opioid analgesia (termed PCA in this review) versus non-patient controlled opioid analgesia of as-needed opioid analgesia for postoperative pain relief. We ran the search for the previous review in November 2004. For this update, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2014, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1966 to 28 January 2015), and EMBASE (1980 to 28 January 2015) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in any language, and reference lists of reviews and retrieved articles. We selected RCTs that assessed pain intensity as a primary or secondary outcome. These studies compared PCA without a continuous background infusion with non-patient controlled opioid analgesic regimens. We excluded studies that explicitly stated they involved patients with chronic pain. Two review authors independently extracted data, which included demographic variables, type of surgery, interventions, efficacy, and adverse events. We graded each included study for methodological quality by assessing risk of bias and employed the GRADE approach to assess the overall quality of the evidence. We performed meta-analysis of outcomes that

  13. Effectiveness and safety of continuous ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block versus epidural analgesia after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fedriani de Matos, J J; Atienza Carrasco, F J; Díaz Crespo, J; Moreno Martín, A; Tatsidis Tatsidis, P; Torres Morera, L M

    2017-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is associated with severe postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to compare continuous ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block with continuous epidural analgesia, both with low concentrations of local anaesthetic after total knee arthroplasty. A prospective, randomised, unblinded study of 60 patients undergoing total knee replacement, randomised into two groups. A total of 30 patients received continuous epidural block, while the other 30 received continuous ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block, as well as using 0.125% levobupivacaine infusion in both groups. Differences in pain control, undesirable effects, and complications between the two techniques were assessed, as well as the need for opioid rescue and the level of satisfaction with the treatment received during the first 48hours after surgery. No differences were found in demographic and surgical variables. The quality of analgesia was similar in both groups, although in the first six hours after surgery, patients in the epidural group had less pain both at rest and with movement (P=.007 and P=.011). This difference was not observed at 24hours (P=.084 and P=.942). Pain control at rest in the femoral block group was better at 48hours after surgery than in the epidural group (P=.009). The mean consumption of morphine and level of satisfaction were similar. Epidural analgesia showed the highest rate of side effects (P=.003). Continuous ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block provides analgesia and morphine consumption similar to epidural analgesia, with the same level of satisfaction, but with a lower rate of side effects after total knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis and evaluation of the effectiveness of epidural analgesia and its relationship with eutocic or dystocic delivery.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Migallón, V; Sánchez, E; Raynard, M; Miranda, A; Borràs, R M

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the difference in the verbal rating scale with regard to obstructed labour and induced labour, so that obstructed labour and foetal macrosomia have been related to a greater sensation of pain during labour, particularly in the first stage. Even the epidural analgesia is linked to the need for instrumented or caesarean section due to foetal obstruction. The goal of the study is to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of epidural analgesia in normal versus obstructed labour. One hundred and eighty pregnant women were included in an observational, analytical, longitudinal and prospective study, that was performed in the Obstetrics Department of the Hospital Universitario Dexeus. All the nulliparous or multiparous over 36 weeks of pregnancy, after 3cm of cervical dilatation in spontaneous or induced labor were included. All the patients were given epidural analgesia according to protocol. The basic descriptive methods were used for the univariate statistical analysis of the sample and the Mann-Whitney U test was used for the comparison of means between both groups. The correlations between variables were studied by means of the Spearman coefficient of correlation. The differences regarded as statistically significant are those whose P<.05. In our population there were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of epidural analgesia in normal versus obstructed labour. Patients who got epidural analgesia and had obstructed labors have the same degree of verbal rating scale as patients that do not had obstructed labors (P>.05). Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Expectancy and treatment interactions: A dissociation between acupuncture analgesia and expectancy evoked placebo analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jian; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Polich, Ginger; Kirsch, Irving; Vangel, Mark; Zyloney, Carolyn; Rosen, Bruce; Gollub, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in placebo research have demonstrated the mind’s power to alter physiology. In this study, we combined an expectancy manipulation model with both verum and sham acupuncture treatments to address: 1) how and to what extent treatment and expectancy effects --including both subjective pain intensity levels (pain sensory ratings) and objective physiological activations (fMRI) -- interact; and 2) if the underlying mechanism of expectancy remains the same whether placebo treatment is given alone or in conjunction with active treatment. The results indicate that although verum acupuncture + high expectation and sham acupuncture + high expectation induced subjective reports of analgesia of equal magnitude, fMRI analysis showed that verum acupuncture produced greater fMRI signal decrease in pain related brain regions during application of calibrated heat pain stimuli on the right arm. We believe our study provides brain imaging evidence for the existence of different mechanisms underlying acupuncture analgesia and expectancy evoked placebo analgesia. Our results also suggest that the brain network involved in expectancy may vary under different treatment situations (verum and sham acupuncture treatment). PMID:19159691

  16. Effect of combined spinal-epidural analgesia versus epidural analgesia on labor and delivery duration.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Ramirez, Javier; Haya, Javier; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Gil-Trujillo, Silvia; Garrido-Esteban, Rosa A; Bernal, Ginés

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) can decrease the known epidural effect of lengthening delivery. Between April and May 2010, 144 women undergoing childbirth in hospital with epidural pain relief were randomized to receive either low-dose epidural analgesia (LEA) or CSEA. The spinal component included 2.5mg of bupivacaine, 25 μg of fentanyl, and 200 μg of morphine. The epidural component of the CSEA procedure was started once pain returned. The primary outcome was total labor duration measured from the time of initiation of labor analgesia to delivery. The difference in duration between LEA (n=72) and CSEA (n=72) was 5 minutes for labor (P=0.82), 2 minutes for delivery (P=0.60), and 7 minutes for total labor duration (P=0.75). The combined group used less levobupivacaine (P<0.001) and had lower sensory blockade at the dermatomal level (P=0.037). Women in the CSEA group had a higher incidence of pruritus (P=0.002) and lightheadedness (P=0.02) during labor; and a higher incidence of pruritus (P=0.002), nausea-vomiting (P=0.026), and drowsiness (P=0.003) in the postpartum period. As compared with LEA, CSEA did not shorten the duration of labor length; however, it did reduce levobupivacaine consumption and motor weakness. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analgesia and chemical restraint for the emergent veterinary patient.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Doris H

    2008-11-01

    Frequently, analgesics are withheld in the emergent patient based on common misconceptions. Concerns expressed are that analgesics "mask" physiologic indicators of patient deterioration or that potential toxicity and adverse reactions associated with drug administration outweigh the benefits gained. Appropriate selection of drugs and doses as described in this article allow the veterinarian to achieve analgesia, in addition to sedation or restraint when needed, without unwarranted fears. Guidelines are provided for typical situations encountered in trauma patients to provide a safe starting point for providing analgesia. Caution required in these cases is also discussed, with emphasis on individualization of the approach to analgesia and chemical restraint.

  18. Epidural Analgesia for Labor: Continuous Infusion Versus Programmed Intermittent Bolus.

    PubMed

    Onuoha, Onyi C

    2017-03-01

    Despite the traditional practice to maintain labor analgesia with a combination of continuous epidural infusion and patient-controlled epidural analgesia using an automated epidural pump; compelling data now shows that bolus injection through the epidural catheter may result in better distribution of anesthetic solution in the epidural space. The programmed intermittent epidural bolus technique is proposed as a better maintenance mode and may represent a more effective mode of maintaining epidural analgesia for labor, especially prolonged labor. Additional prospective and adequately powered studies are needed to confirm findings and determine the optimal combination of volume, rate, time, and drug concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Advantages and guidelines for using epidural drugs for analgesia.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, P J

    1992-03-01

    The administration of drugs by the epidural route is a safe and effective method for providing analgesia before, during, and after a surgical procedure. Local anesthetics administered by this route block nociceptive input as well as providing excellent muscle relaxation for surgery. The use of local anesthetics may be associated with short-term motor dysfunction and hypotension as a result of sympathetic blockade. Morphine given by the epidural route also provides effective analgesia and has the advantages of giving more prolonged analgesia with no effect on either motor or sympathetic pathways.

  20. [Analgesia, sedation and relaxation in the child with mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    Valdivielso-Serna, A

    2008-02-01

    The basic concepts of sedation and analgesia and the tools to asses the level of sedation and analgesia are review. The different methods of sedation and the non pharmacological interventions are described. Sedatives, analgesics and muscle relaxants, their pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics in children, their indications in specific situations (intubation, pain control, sedation and neuromuscular blocking) are reviewed. The etiology of patient-ventilator asynchrony in ventilated children and how to treat it are analyzed, giving guides of how to adapt sedation to the level of mechanical ventilation therapy. Finally, general recommendations are given for the analgesia and sedation in mechanically ventilated children.

  1. Analgesia for people with acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Carter, David; Amblum-Almer, Jeshni

    2015-04-01

    Around 302,000 people with soft-tissue ankle injuries present to UK emergency departments every year (Ferran and Maffulli 2006). These patients are generally treated conservatively with analgesia, ice, compression and elevation, and rest. There is some discussion in the literature about whether or not people with these injuries should be treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with some authors claiming that the inflammatory response following injury is part of the healing process and should not be halted. This article examines the literature on the efficacy of administering NSAIDs as the first-line drug management for ankle sprain. It also considers cost of treatment, prescribing practice and contraindications of NSAIDs.

  2. [Pethidine or nalbuphine for obstetric analgesia?].

    PubMed

    Mitterschiffthaler, G; Huter, O

    1991-05-01

    Because of the risk of ventilatory depression, agonistic and partially agonistic/antagonistic opiates are well suited for providing pain relief in obstetrics. We compared two groups of 20 women each with pregnancy on term who received equipotent doses of nalbuphin (0.1 mg/kg) and pethidin (0.8 mg/kg) intramuscularly. We found a significantly longer (6h) and better analgesic effect in the nalbuphin group but also a significantly more pronounced sedation. Other side effects were fewer in this last-named group. There were no differences in the behaviour of the babies between both groups. We consider that because of the "ceiling effect" of ventilatory depression, nalbuphin may allow better analgesia without the risk of ventilatory depression of both mother and newborn.

  3. [Possible and proved benefits of peridural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Marsili, I; Paladini, A; Varrassi, G

    2004-05-01

    Regional anesthesia is supposed to be of some help in improving the outcome of surgical patients. Actually this assumption is largely accepted, even if clear scientific demonstrations have not been obtained. At present there are data showing the advantages, as to survival and complications, especially for major orthopedic surgery. These data have been shown by important and clarifying meta-analyses. Unfortunately, for other types of surgery, advantages have been scarcely demonstrated, due to the low number of patients involved in clinical trials. Anyway, it is underlined that regional anesthesia, and especially epidural block, is much more convenient for the patients than general anesthesia. It seems also convenient from the economic point of view, since the pharmaco-economic studies present in the literature showed the possibility to save money, using regional anesthesia and regional analgesia.

  4. [Jacuzzi-immersion for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Eldor, J; Burstein, M; Dudakova, I; Stark, M

    1992-12-15

    The effect of immersion in a jacuzzi in relieving labor pains, and on cervical dilatation was examined in 40 parturients. They were immersed in the jacuzzi during labor for an average of 25.5 minutes. Labor pains decreased during immersion by 2.59 degrees (scale of 0-10) compared with an average increase in labor pains of 0.25 degrees in 40 control women who were not immersed (p < 0.01). The cervical opening increased during immersion by an average of 1.5 cm in the test group, compared with 0.3 cm in the controls (p < 0.01). Immersion in a jacuzzi during labor is apparently associated with analgesia and accelerated cervical dilatation.

  5. Intrathecal diamorphine (heroin) for obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sneyd, J R; Meyer-Witting, M

    1992-05-01

    Intrathecal diamorphine (heroin, diacetyl morphine) 2.5 mg in isotonic saline 2.5 ml was given to 13 patients in labour through a 26 gauge Quincke needle. Three patients were given epidural bupivacaine at a mean of 295 min after injection of diamorphine and a further 2 used 50% nitrous oxide during the second stage of labour. Eight patients needed no additional analgesia for labour although 1 received a pudendal nerve block for forceps delivery. No neonatal complications attributable to diamorphine were observed. There was a high incidence of post partum headache (6/13 cases). The use of a Sprotte needle and a fine spinal catheter might overcome the limitations of spinal headache and limited duration of action respectively.

  6. Use of adrenaline in obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Holdcroft, A

    1992-11-01

    A questionnaire on the use of adrenaline in obstetric analgesia was completed by 87 obstetric anaesthetists: 71% of consultants in teaching hospitals were prepared to use adrenaline mixed with local anaesthetics compared with 33% of consultants in district hospitals; they had a similar duration of obstetric anaesthetic experience. Test doses containing adrenaline were not commonly used in labour, but were more often used prior to elective Caesarean section. Adrenaline was used with either lignocaine or bupivacaine; few consultants used both solutions. Contraindications to the use of adrenaline in the nonuser group were in decreasing order of rank: neurological damage, pregnancy-induced hypertension, stenotic valvular heart disease, sickle cell disease or trait of fetal distress. Overall, the contraindications related to the systemic absorption of adrenaline were most common.

  7. Electroacupuncture analgesia for surgery in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duck-Hwan; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Song, Kun-Ho; Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Seong-Ho; Kwon, Geon-Oh; Kim, In-Bong; Kim, Young-Chan; Cho, Jin-Haeng; Kwon, Young-Yi; Kim, Jae-Wung

    2004-01-01

    To establish the proper analgesic method by electroacupuncture (EA) for bovine surgery, the analgesic effect of dorsal and lumbar acupoints, in addition to the combination with dorsal and lumbar acupoints, were investigated in the present study. Four Korean native cattle (two males and two females) and 24 Holstein-Friesian cattle (all females) were used. The experimental animals were divided into four groups according to used acupoints: dorsal acupoint group (Tian Ping [GV-20] and Bai Hui [GV-5]: 7 heads), lumbar acupoint group (Yap Pang 1 [BL-21], Yao Pang 2 [BL-23], Yao Pang 3 [BL-24] and Yao Pang 4 [BL-25]; 5 heads), dorsal-lumbar acupoint group (Yao Pang 1 [BL-21], Yao Pang 2 [BL-23], Yao Pang 3 [BL-24] and Bai Hui [GV-5]; 8 heads) and control group (non-acupoints, the last intercostals space and the femoral area; 3 heads). The acupoints were stimulated with currents of 2-6 V (30 Hz) in dorsal acupoint group, 0.5-2.0 V (30 Hz) in lumbar acupoint group and 0.3-2.5 V (30 Hz) in dorsal-lumbar acupoint group. Recumbency time was 10 seconds to 1 minute (except one case) and induction time of analgesia was approximately 1 to 6 minutes in dorsal acupoint group. Analgesic effect was systemic, including the extremities in dorsal acupoint group. During the EA, the consciousness was evident and blepharo-reaction was still present under EA in dorsal acupoint group. During the surgery, grades of analgesic effect were 6 excellent (6/7, 87.5%) and 1 good (1/7, 14.3%). In addition, induction time for analgesia was about 10 minutes in both lumbar and dorsal-lumbar acupoint groups. Analgesic areas were found in abdominal areas from the last intercostal spaces to the femoral areas, except lower abdomen in lumbar and lumbar-dorsal acupoint groups. The consciousness was evident and standing position was maintained during EA stimulation in contrast to that of dorsal excellent (1/5, 20.0%), 3 good (3/5, 60.0%) and 1 poor (1/5, 20.0%) in the lumbar acupoint group. Additionally, grades

  8. The closed co-axial analgesia system.

    PubMed

    Waaben, J; Jørgensen, S; Oxhøj, H; Arnsbo, P

    1980-10-01

    A twin-tube system for nitrous oxide analgesia in dental surgeries is described. The system is a non-polluting modification of the Mapleson A system, employing the principle of co-axial tubing introduced by Bain & Spoerel (1972). Active, continuous and calibrated gas removal takes place via the co-axial tubing by means of an ejector flowmeter. Investigation of the dynamic pressure excursions occurring at the nose-piece are fully compatible with normal breathing. Gas contamination of the dental environment can be reduced by at least 90%. The system described is safe and easy to handle. It is made of light-weight material and is adaptable to the equipment available. No rebreathing takes place when using a fresh gas inflow of 150 ml/kg body weight/min.

  9. Efficacy of subarachnoid meperidine for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Swayze, C R; Skerman, J H; Walker, E B; Sholte, F G

    1991-01-01

    Meperidine is an opioid agonist with known weak local anesthetic properties. To determine the efficacy of subarachnoid meperidine as a labor and delivery analgesic, 20 term parturients were given 10 mg meperidine via continuous spinal catheter. Visual analog pain scores on a ten-point scale and patient satisfaction scores on a four-point scale were measured before and after establishment of the block and one hour after maximum block was achieved. Time to pain relief and return of pain was recorded. Additional doses of 7 mg meperidine were given subarachnoid via the catheter when patients requested additional analgesia. Follow-up assessment 24 hours postpartum was used to determine overall patient satisfaction. Visual analog pain scale scores (mean +/- SD) were 8.57 +/- 1.43 before block, 0.62 +/- 0.89 immediately after block, and 0.33 +/- 0.57 at one hour after block (p less than 0.0001). Patient satisfaction scale scores (mean +/- SD) were 0.83 +/- 0.88 before block, 3.90 +/- 0.37 immediately after block, and 3.85 +/- 0.31 at one hour after block (p less than 0.0001). At follow-up, 14 of 18 patients rated satisfaction as excellent, with the remaining 4 rating it as good. Expulsive efforts were excellent in 14, good in 3, and fair in 1; 2 patients had cesarean sections. Mean time to onset of pain relief was 3.9 minutes (range, 2-12), with analgesia lasting a mean of 83 minutes (range, 38-180). Two patients developed slight motor block. Side effects appeared insidiously and are similar to those observed with other neuraxial opioids.

  10. Specifying the nonspecific components of acupuncture analgesia.

    PubMed

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially nonspecific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred one patients who developed pain of ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0 to 10) after third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients' perception of the treatment (active or placebo) and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed before and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P=.240), but there was a large and significant nonspecific effect of placebo acupuncture (P<.001), which increased over time. Interestingly, however, looking at perceived treatment allocation, there was a significant effect of acupuncture (P<.001), indicating that patients who believed they received active acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings after both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%). This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions, nonspecific factors such as patients' perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment. To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice, it may therefore be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of obstetric analgesia in Sweden 1983-1986.

    PubMed

    Gerdin, E; Cnattingius, S

    1990-09-01

    The use of obstetric analgesia was investigated in a Swedish population-based prospective study of 335,207 births, which represents almost all women who had vaginal deliveries in Sweden between 1983 and 1986. Lumbar epidural analgesia (EDA) was used in 16%, paracervical block (PCB) in 12%, pethidine or morphine in 49% and pudendal block in 62%. All four types of analgesia were much more commonly used by nulliparae than multiparae. Variables such as maternal age, smoking, nationality, relationship with the infant's father and gestational age had only moderate influence on the rates of different types of analgesia. EDA and PCB were more frequently used in larger than in smaller hospitals and in the daytime than at night. No such differences were found for pethidine or morphine, or pudendal block, which were administered routinely by midwives.

  12. Central neuraxial analgesia for labor: an update of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sodha, Serena; Reeve, Alexandra; Fernando, Roshan

    2017-09-01

    Numerous techniques are in use to provide analgesia for labor, of which central neuraxial block is widely considered superior to non-neuraxial options. Central neuraxial techniques have evolved over many years to provide greater efficacy, safety and maternal satisfaction. This narrative review focuses on the literature relating to central neuraxial labor analgesia from the past 5 years, from November 2010 to October 2015. We discuss the evidence related to the various central neuraxial techniques used, the increasingly widespread use of ultrasound guidance and the evidence surrounding other novel methods of central neuraxial block insertion. The timing of institution of central neuraxial analgesia in labor is considered, as are the advances in maintenance regimens for labor analgesia.

  13. The Role of Multimodal Analgesia in Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kurd, Mark F; Kreitz, Tyler; Schroeder, Gregory; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2017-04-01

    Optimal postoperative pain control allows for faster recovery, reduced complications, and improved patient satisfaction. Historically, pain management after spine surgery relied heavily on opioid medications. Multimodal regimens were developed to reduce opioid consumption and associated adverse effects. Multimodal approaches used in orthopaedic surgery of the lower extremity, especially joint arthroplasty, have been well described and studies have shown reduced opioid consumption, improved pain and function, and decreased length of stay. A growing body of evidence supports multimodal analgesia in spine surgery. Methods include the use of preemptive analgesia, NSAIDs, the neuromodulatory agents gabapentin and pregabalin, acetaminophen, and extended-action local anesthesia. The development of a standard approach to multimodal analgesia in spine surgery requires extensive assessment of the literature. Because a substantial number of spine surgeries are performed annually, a standardized approach to multimodal analgesia may provide considerable benefits, particularly in the context of the increased emphasis on accountability within the healthcare system.

  14. Labor Epidural Analgesia and Breastfeeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    French, Cynthia A; Cong, Xiaomei; Chung, Keun Sam

    2016-08-01

    Despite widespread use of epidural analgesia during labor, no consensus has been reached among obstetric and anesthesia providers regarding its effects on breastfeeding. The purpose of this review was to examine the relationship between labor epidural analgesia and breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published in 1990 or thereafter, using the search term breastfeeding combined with epidural, labor epidural analgesia, labor analgesia, or epidural analgesia Of 117 articles, 23 described empirical studies specific to labor epidural analgesia and measured a breastfeeding outcome. Results were conflicting: 12 studies showed negative associations between epidural analgesia and breastfeeding success, 10 studies showed no effect, and 1 study showed a positive association. Most studies were observational. Of 3 randomized controlled studies, randomization methods were inadequate in 2 and not evaluable in 1. Other limitations were related to small sample size or inadequate study power; variation and lack of information regarding type and dosage of analgesia or use of other intrapartum interventions; differences in timing, definition, and method of assessing breastfeeding success; or failure to consider factors such as mothers' intention to breastfeed, social support, siblings, or the mother's need to return to work or school. It is also unclear to what extent results are mediated through effects on infant neurobehavior, maternal fever, oxytocin release, duration of labor, and need for instrumental delivery. Clinician awareness of factors affecting breastfeeding can help identify women at risk for breastfeeding difficulties in order to target support and resources effectively.

  15. Is epidural analgesia during labor related to retained placenta?

    PubMed

    Sarit, Avraham; Sokolov, Amit; Many, Ariel

    2016-05-01

    To explore the influence of epidural analgesia on the course of the third stage of labor and on the incidence of the complete retained placenta as well as retained parts of the placenta. This is a population-based cohort study in a tertiary medical center. We collected data from all 4227 spontaneous singleton vaginal deliveries during 6 months and compared the incidence of retained placenta in deliveries with epidural analgesia with those without analgesia. Multivariable logistic regression was used to control for possible confounders. More than two-thirds of the women (69.25%) used epidural analgesia during their delivery. A need for intervention due to placental disorder during the third stage of labor was noted in 4.2% of all deliveries. Epidural analgesia appeared to be significantly (P=0.028) related to placental disorders compared with no analgesia: 4.8% vs. 3%, respectively. Deliveries with manual interventions during the third stage, for either complete retained placenta or suspected retained parts of the placenta, were associated with the use of epidural analgesia (P=0.008), oxytocin (P=0.002) and older age at delivery (P=0.000), but when including all factors in a multivariable analysis, using a stepwise logistic regression, the factors that were independently associated with interventions for placental disruption during the third stage of delivery were previous cesarean section, oxytocin use and, marginally, older age. Complete retained placenta and retained parts of the placenta share the same risk factors. Epidural analgesia does not directly influence the incidence of complete retained placenta or retained parts, though clinically linked through increased oxytocin use. The factors that were independently associated with interventions for placental disruption during the third stage of delivery were previous cesarean section, oxytocin use and older age.

  16. Stability of piritramide in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) solutions.

    PubMed

    Remane, D; Scriba, G; Meissner, W; Hartmann, M

    2009-06-01

    For patient controlled analgesia, syringes with solutions of 1.5 mg/ml piritramide in 0.9% aqueous sodium chloride are used. The physical and chemical stability for dilutions of the commercially available preparation of piritramide is limited up to 72 hours by the manufacturer. Since application duration for patient-controlled analgesia can exceed that limited time, stability was investigated by HPLC. Our results show that these solutions are chemically stable over a time period of 60 days.

  17. Epidural analgesia in labour and risk of caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Bannister-Tyrrell, Melanie; Ford, Jane B; Morris, Jonathan M; Roberts, Christine L

    2014-09-01

    A Cochrane Systematic Review of randomised controlled trials of epidural analgesia compared with other or no analgesia in labour reported no overall increased risk of caesarean delivery. However, many trials were affected by substantial non-compliance, and there are concerns about the external validity of some trials for contemporary maternity populations. We aimed to explore the association between epidural analgesia in labour and caesarean delivery in clinical practice and compare with findings from randomised controlled trials. Population-based cohort of pregnant women (n = 210 708) without major obstetrical complications who delivered a singleton live infant in hospitals in New South Wales, Australia, 2007-10. Data were obtained from linked, validated population-based data collections. Propensity score matching was used to examine the association between epidural analgesia in labour and caesarean delivery. Epidural analgesia in labour was used by a third (31.5%, n = 66 317) of the women, and 9.8% (n = 20 531) had a caesarean delivery. Epidural analgesia in labour was associated with increased risk of caesarean delivery {risk ratio [RR] 2.5, [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5, 2.6]}. The association with epidural analgesia in labour was higher for caesarean delivery for failure to progress {RR 3.0, [95% CI 2.9, 3.0]} than for caesarean delivery for fetal distress {RR 1.9, [95% CI 1.8, 2.0]}. Epidural analgesia in labour is associated with caesarean delivery in a large maternity population. Population-based studies contribute important data about obstetrical care, when research settings and participants may not represent the clinical settings or broader population in which obstetrical interventions in labour are applied. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Obstetric analgesia and fetal aortic blood flow during labour.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, A; Bernow, J; Marsál, K

    1987-04-01

    Fetal aortic blood flow was studied in 50 women during labour, using a method combining real-time ultrasonography and a pulsed Doppler technique. Eleven women had no analgesia, 24 women received 75-100 mg pethidine intramuscularly, 12 epidural analgesia with 0.25% bupivacaine and three paracervical block with 0.125% bupivacaine. Fetal aortic blood flow increased during labour from 200 to 245 ml/min/kg in the group without analgesia (P less than 0.05) and from 211 to 236 ml/min/kg in the group with epidural analgesia (P less than 0.05) but decreased insignificantly from 216 to 204 ml/min/kg after pethidine. After paracervical block the aortic blood flow fell in two out of three fetuses. Not only is epidural analgesia the most effective means of pain relief during labour, it is also the type of obstetric analgesia that interferes least with the physiological response to labour in terms of its effect on the fetal blood flow.

  19. Modern neuraxial labor analgesia: options for initiation, maintenance and drug selection.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, M

    2009-11-01

    In the present review we outline the state-of-the-art of neuraxial analgesia. As neuraxial analgesia remains the gold standar of analgesia during labor, we review the most recent literature on this topic. The neuraxial analgesia techniques, types of administration, drugs, adjuvants, and adverse effects are investigated from the references. Most authors would agree that central neuraxial analgesia is the best form to manage labor pain. When neuraxial analgesia is administered to the parturient in labor, different management choices must be made by the anesthetist: how will we initiate analgesia, how will analgesia be maintained, which local anesthetic will we use for neuraxial analgesia and which adjuvant drugs will we combine? The present manuscript tries to review the literature to answer these questions.

  20. Analgesia with interfascial continuous wound infiltration after laparoscopic colon surgery: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Telletxea, S; Gonzalez, J; Portugal, V; Alvarez, R; Aguirre, U; Anton, A; Arizaga, A

    2016-04-01

    For major laparoscopic surgery, as with open surgery, a multimodal analgesia plan can help to control postoperative pain. Placing a wound catheter intraoperatively following colon surgery could optimize the control of acute pain with less consumption of opioids and few adverse effects. We conducted a prospective, randomized, study of patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic colon surgery for cancer in Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were recruited and randomly allocated to wound catheter placement plus standard postoperative analgesia or standard postoperative analgesia alone. A physician from the acute pain management unit monitored all patients for pain at multiple points over the first 48 hours after surgery. The primary outcome variables were verbal numeric pain scale scores and amount of intravenous morphine used via patient controlled infusion. 92 patients were included in the study, 43 had a wound catheter implanted and 49 did not. Statistically significant differences in morphine consumption were observed between groups throughout the course of the treatment period. The mean total morphine consumption at the end of the study was 5.63±5.02mg among wound catheter patients and 21. 86±17.88mg among control patients (P=.0001). Wound catheter patients had lower pain scale scores than control patients throughout the observation period. No adverse effects associated with the wound catheter technique were observed. The wound catheter group showed lower hospital stays with statistically significant difference (P=.02). In patients undergoing laparoscopic colon surgery, continuous infusion of local anaesthetics through interfascial wound catheters during the first 48h aftersurgery reduced the level of perceived pain and also reduced parenteral morphine consumption with no associated adverse effects and lower hospital stays. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor

  1. Multimodal intrathecal analgesia in refractory cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Mastenbroek, Thierry C; Kramp-Hendriks, Bianca J; Kallewaard, Jan Willem; Vonk, Johanna M

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pain treatment has improved over the last decades. The majority of this population can be treated effectively with analgesics following the Guidelines of the original World Health Organisation (WHO). Unfortunately 10-15% of these patients still suffer from severe and refractory cancer pain, especially in the terminal phases of disease and require additional pain management modalities. Therefore, end-stage clinical interventions are particularly needed to minimize the perception of pain. With intrathecal therapy (ITT), drugs are delivered close to their site of action in the central nervous system avoiding first-pass metabolism and blood-brain barrier. It may improve analgesia with a smaller dose and possibly achieve a reduction in systemic or cerebral side effects compared to oral supplied medication alone. Multimodal analgesia enables further dose reduction with improved analgesia and fewer side effects. In this retrospective research we investigated the effectiveness and side-effect profile of intrathecal morphine, bupivacaine and clonidine. Patients were followed until death occurred. Pain scores and side effects were recorded before initiating ITT (T0), just after initiating ITT (T1), at hospital discharge (T2), in the ambulant setting (T3) and the last obtained scores before death occurred (T4). Nine patients were included who suffered from severe and refractory cancer pain, not reacting to conventional pain management or had intolerable side effects. Primary tumour location was pancreatic (4), urothelial (3) and prostate (2). Primary pain was considered neuropathic or mixed neuropathic-nociceptive. The treatment team consisted of an anaesthetist, specialized nurse in coordination with primary physician, treating oncologist and specialized home care. All patients were free of pain after initiation of the intrathecal therapy. The average follow-up period was 11 weeks in which there was a slight increase in NRS-score. In the last days before death

  2. Monoaminergic mechanisms of stimulation-produced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Akil, H; Liebeskind, J C

    1975-08-29

    The roles played by the cerebral monoamines (dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin) in stimulation-produced analgesia (SPA) have been investigated in the rat employing the tail flick test. SPA was elicited through bipolar electrodes chronically implanted in the mesencephalic periaqeductal gray matter, an area previously shown to yield potent and reliable analgesic effects. Four approaches were used to alter transmission in monoamine pathways. (1) Depletion of monoamines by administration of tetrabenazine (TBZ), p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT), or disulfiram. (2) Replacement of depleted monoamine stores by appropiate precursors (5-HTP or L-DOPA) in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor. (3) Potentiation of monoamine systems by administration of precursors to previously untreated animals or by administration of a dopamine receptor stimulator, apomorphine. (4) Blockade of catecholamine receptors by haloperidol or of dopamine receptors by pimozide. These four approaches yielded internally consistent results. Depletion of all 3 monoamines (TBZ) led to a powerful inhibition of SPA. Original levels of SPA were restored by injection of either 5-HTP or L-DOPA. Specific depletion of serotonin (PCPA) caused a reduction in SPA, whereas elevation of serotonin levels (5-HTP) caused an increase in SPA. Dopamine receptor blockade (pimozide) decreased SPA, whereas the precursor (L-DOPA) and a dopamine receptor stimulator (apomorphine) increased SPA. On the other hand, selective depletion of noradrenaline (disulfiram) caused an increase in SPA; and at a time when noradrenaline levels are depressed and dopamine levels are elevated (AMPT + L-DOPA), SPA was seen to be particularly enhanced. thus, dopamine and serotonin appear to facilitate SPA, whereas noradrenaline appears to inhibit it. When a general catecholamine receptor blocker (haloperidol) was employed, SPA was diminished, suggesting that the influence of dopamine in SPA is

  3. Peripheral morphine analgesia in dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Likar, R; Sittl, R; Gragger, K; Pipam, W; Blatnig, H; Breschan, C; Schalk, H V; Stein, C; Schäfer, M

    1998-05-01

    The recent identification of opioid receptors on peripheral nerve endings of primary afferent neurons and the expression of their mRNA in dorsal root ganglia support earlier experimental data about peripheral analgesic effects of locally applied opioids. These effects are most prominent under localized inflammatory conditions. The clinical use of such peripheral analgesic effects of opioids was soon investigated in numerous controlled clinical trials. The majority of these have tested the local, intraarticular administration of morphine in knee surgery and have demonstrated potent and long-lasting postoperative analgesia. As the direct application of morphine into the pain-generating site of injury and inflammation appears most promising, we examined direct morphine infiltration of the surgical site in a unique clinical model of inflammatory tooth pain. Forty-four patients undergoing dental surgery entered into this prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Before surgery they received, together with a standard local anesthetic solution (articaine plus epinephrine) a submucous injection of either 1 mg of morphine (group A) or saline (group B). Postoperative pain intensity was assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS) and numeric rating scale (NRS) at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h after surgery. In addition, patients recorded the occurrence of side effects and the supplemental consumption of diclofenac tablets. Results of 27 patients were analyzed (group A: n=14, group B: n=13). Pain scores which were moderate to severe preoperatively were reduced to a similar extent in both groups up to 8 h postoperatively. Thereafter, pain scores in group A were significantly lower than those in group B for up to 24 h, demonstrating the analgesic efficacy of additional morphine. The time to first analgesic intake and the total amount of supplemental diclofenac were less in group A than in group B. No serious side effects were reported. Our results show that 1 mg of

  4. Opioid analgesia in neonates following cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Gregory B; Golianu, Brenda

    2007-03-01

    Pain in the newborn is complex, involving a variety of receptors and mechanisms within the developing nervous system. When pain is generated, a series of sequential neurobiologic changes occur within the central nervous system. If pain is prolonged or repetitive, the developing nervous system could be permanently modified, with altered processing at spinal and supraspinal levels. In addition, pain is associated with a number of adverse physiologic responses that include alterations in circulatory (tachycardia, hypertension, vasoconstriction), metabolic (increased catabolism), immunologic (impaired immune response), and hemostatic (platelet activation) systems. This "stress response" associated with cardiac surgery in neonates could be profound and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Neonates undergoing cardiac operations are exposed to extensive tissue damage related to surgery and additional painful stimulation related to endotracheal and thoracostomy tubes that may remain in place for variable periods of time following surgery. In addition, postoperatively neonates endure repeated procedural pain from suctioning of endotracheal tubes, placement of vascular catheters, and manipulation of wounds (eg, sternal closure) and dressings. The treatment and/or prevention of pain are widely considered necessary for humanitarian and physiologic reasons. Improved clinical and developmental outcomes underscore the importance of providing adequate analgesia for newborns who undergo major surgery, mechanical ventilation, and related procedures in the intensive care unit. This article reviews published information regarding opioid administration and associated issues of tolerance and abstinence syndromes (withdrawal) in neonates with an emphasis on those having undergone cardiac surgery.

  5. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-12-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  6. [Nitrous oxide - oxygen analgesia in aesthetic dermatology].

    PubMed

    Drosner, M

    2013-06-01

    Local anaesthesia often is insufficient for more extensive procedures. Instead of general anaesthesia or sedation, pediatricians, gynaecologists and dentists increasingly use nitrous oxide (N2O). This study evaluates the suitability of this form of anesthesia in dermatology. In 24 patients (18 w, 6 m, mean age 49 y.) N2O/O2 inhalation (Livopan®) was used during 46 procedures with indications including fractional RF/wrinkle reduction, IPL/rosacea, q-sw. laser/tattoos and hemosiderosis as well as fractional Er:Glass laser for scars and hypopigmentation. In 26 procedures subjective pain intensity was measured (visual analogue scale 0-10). With N2O the treatment pain was lowered from 6.6 ± 1.6 to 2.9 ± 1.7 (median, p = 0.000). 23/24 patients chose N2O for their next treatment. Beside euphoria, fatigue, slight drowsiness, dizziness, nausea or change in auditory perception, no other side effects occurred. The pronounced analgesia, the easy self-administration, the fast onset and complete recovery after a few minutes and the low ratio of side effects make the N2O/O2 inhalation to an ideal addendum in the management of larger painful procedures in dermatology as long as contraindications and safety precautions are respected.

  7. [Epidemiology of complications of obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Palot, M; Visseaux, H; Botmans, C; Pire, J C

    1994-01-01

    Epidural analgesia (EA) is the best technique to obtain pain relief during labour. But the needle, the catheter and the local anaesthetics (LA) are 3 reasons to cause maternal complications. In France we do not know the exact number of EA performed every year and it is very difficult to appreciate the incidence of maternal complications. Therefore, it is necessary to know it and try to reduce the incidence of some of them. Maternal complications after EA are classically: 1. caused by catheter or needle: massive subarachnoid injection, toxic intravenous injection with convulsions and/or cardiac arrest; 2. secondary to infectious problems: meningitis or epidural abscess; 3. due to LA with the very rare anaphylactoid reactions; 4. due to prolonged neurologic complications with epidural and subdural haematomas, subarachnoid cysts or arachnoiditis. These complications are rare: 1/4,700 in the largest series of literature, involving more than 500,000 EA. In France, we tried to quantify maternal complications among nearly 300,000 EA performed over a period of 5 years. The overall incidence of serious complications was 1/4,005 EA. The most frequent are accidental dural puncture (1/156), massive subarachnoid injections (1/8,010) and convulsions (1/9,011). The incidence of these 3 complications must be reduced by better training, material or attention during bolus injection of LA.

  8. Newborn Analgesia Mediated by Oxytocin during Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Michel; Minlebaev, Marat; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Tyzio, Roman; Taccola, Giuliano; Janackova, Sona; Gataullina, Svetlana; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Giniatullin, Rashid; Khazipov, Rustem

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling pain in newborns during delivery are poorly understood. We explored the hypothesis that oxytocin, an essential hormone for labor and a powerful neuromodulator, exerts analgesic actions on newborns during delivery. Using a thermal tail-flick assay, we report that pain sensitivity is two-fold lower in rat pups immediately after birth than 2 days later. Oxytocin receptor antagonists strongly enhanced pain sensitivity in newborn, but not in 2-day-old rats, whereas oxytocin reduced pain at both ages suggesting an endogenous analgesia by oxytocin during delivery. Similar analgesic effects of oxytocin, measured as attenuation of pain-vocalization induced by electrical whisker pad stimulation, were also observed in decerebrated newborns. Oxytocin reduced GABA-evoked calcium responses and depolarizing GABA driving force in isolated neonatal trigeminal neurons suggesting that oxytocin effects are mediated by alterations of intracellular chloride. Unlike GABA signaling, oxytocin did not affect responses mediated by P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors. In keeping with a GABAergic mechanism, reduction of intracellular chloride by the diuretic NKCC1 chloride co-transporter antagonist bumetanide mimicked the analgesic actions of oxytocin and its effects on GABA responses in nociceptive neurons. Therefore, endogenous oxytocin exerts an analgesic action in newborn pups that involves a reduction of the depolarizing action of GABA on nociceptive neurons. Therefore, the same hormone that triggers delivery also acts as a natural pain killer revealing a novel facet of the protective actions of oxytocin in the fetus at birth.

  9. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed. PMID:28096620

  10. [Epidural obstetric analgesia, maternal fever and neonatal wellness parameters].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; Delgado Arnáiz, C; Rodríguez Caravaca, G; Serrano Rodríguez, M L; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2005-04-01

    To study the relation between epidural analgesia and the development of maternal fever during labor and childbirth, and to determine the possible relation between that association and neonatal welfare and in the performance of tests to rule out sepsis in newborns. Prospective study of all women who gave birth at Fundación Hospital Alcorcón over a period of 3 years. All the women were offered epidural analgesia based on infusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine and 2 microg x mL(-1). Data collected were age, nulliparity, epidural analgesia infusion, induction of labor, uterine stimulation with oxytocin, type of birth, fetal weight, duration of dilation and expulsion, Apgar score (at 1 and 5 minutes), umbilical artery pH, and maternal temperature. Data for 4364 women were analyzed. Fever developed during labor in 5.7%; 93.7% of the fevers occurred in women receiving epidural analgesia (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that independent risk factors for the development of fever were epidural analgesia (odds ratio [OR], 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-3.04), nulliparity (OR, 2,929; 95% CI, 2.005-4.279), fetal weight (OR, 1.484; 95% CI, 1.102-2.001), and duration of labor (OR, 1.003; 95% CI, 1.003-1.004). No significant differences in Apgar score at 5 minutes or umbilical artery pH were found between the women with and without fever. Tests to rule out sepsis were ordered for 85.1% of the infants of mothers with fever after epidural analgesia. Epidural analgesia was associated with greater risk of developing fever in mothers giving birth, but that association had no repercussion on the neonatal wellness parameters studied.

  11. Practice Bulletin No. 177 Summary: Obstetric Analgesia and Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    Labor causes severe pain for many women. There is no other circumstance in which it is considered acceptable for an individual to experience untreated severe pain that is amenable to safe intervention while the individual is under a physician's care. Many women desire pain management during labor and delivery, and there are many medical indications for analgesia and anesthesia during labor and delivery. In the absence of a medical contraindication, maternal request is a sufficient medical indication for pain relief during labor. A woman who requests epidural analgesia during labor should not be deprived of this service based on the status of her health insurance. Third-party payers that provide reimbursement for obstetric services should not deny reimbursement for labor analgesia because of an absence of "other medical indications." Anesthesia services should be available to provide labor analgesia and surgical anesthesia in all hospitals that offer maternal care (levels I-IV) (1). Although the availability of different methods of labor analgesia will vary from hospital to hospital, the methods available within an institution should not be based on a patient's ability to pay.The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists believes that in order to allow the maximum number of patients to benefit from neuraxial analgesia, labor nurses should not be restricted from participating in the management of pain relief during labor. Under appropriate physician supervision, labor and delivery nursing personnel who have been educated properly and have demonstrated current competence should be able to participate in the management of epidural infusions.The purpose of this document is to review medical options for analgesia during labor and anesthesia for surgical procedures that are common at the time of delivery. Nonpharmacologic options such as massage, immersion in water during the first stage of labor, acupuncture, relaxation, and hypnotherapy are not covered in this

  12. Practice Bulletin No. 177: Obstetric Analgesia and Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    Labor causes severe pain for many women. There is no other circumstance in which it is considered acceptable for an individual to experience untreated severe pain that is amenable to safe intervention while the individual is under a physician's care. Many women desire pain management during labor and delivery, and there are many medical indications for analgesia and anesthesia during labor and delivery. In the absence of a medical contraindication, maternal request is a sufficient medical indication for pain relief during labor. A woman who requests epidural analgesia during labor should not be deprived of this service based on the status of her health insurance. Third-party payers that provide reimbursement for obstetric services should not deny reimbursement for labor analgesia because of an absence of "other medical indications." Anesthesia services should be available to provide labor analgesia and surgical anesthesia in all hospitals that offer maternal care (levels I-IV) (). Although the availability of different methods of labor analgesia will vary from hospital to hospital, the methods available within an institution should not be based on a patient's ability to pay.The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists believes that in order to allow the maximum number of patients to benefit from neuraxial analgesia, labor nurses should not be restricted from participating in the management of pain relief during labor. Under appropriate physician supervision, labor and delivery nursing personnel who have been educated properly and have demonstrated current competence should be able to participate in the management of epidural infusions.The purpose of this document is to review medical options for analgesia during labor and anesthesia for surgical procedures that are common at the time of delivery. Nonpharmacologic options such as massage, immersion in water during the first stage of labor, acupuncture, relaxation, and hypnotherapy are not covered in this

  13. An evaluation of epidural analgesia following circumferential belt lipectomy.

    PubMed

    Michaud, André-Paul; Rosenquist, Richard W; Cram, Albert E; Aly, Al S

    2007-08-01

    Belt lipectomy combines traditional abdominoplasty with a circumferential excision of skin and fat, with resultant buttock and lateral thigh lifts. Because of the extensive nature of the procedure, postoperative pain management can be difficult. Epidural analgesia has been shown to be efficacious in treating postoperative pain. This study compares the postoperative use of epidural analgesia with more traditional pain management regimens in a large series of belt lipectomy patients. Charts of 62 belt lipectomy patients were examined retrospectively. Postoperative pain control regimen, pain scores, total amount of opioids administered, and side effects encountered were recorded. Twenty-seven patients had traditional pain control regimens, opioids on demand, and pain control pumps. Thirty-five patients received epidural analgesia as their primary mode of postoperative pain control. Pain scores and total nonepidural opioids used were lower in the epidural analgesia group on postoperative days 0 and 1 compared with the nonepidural group. The two groups converged on postoperative days 2 through 5, sharing similar pain scores and opioid use after discontinuation of epidural analgesia. The incidence of side effects was similar in the two groups, with the exception of pruritus, which was much more prominent in the epidural group. Eight of the 35 epidural patients (23 percent) experienced transient and minor complications associated with epidural therapy; several resolved spontaneously, whereas the balance resolved with cessation or modification of the epidural infusion. Epidural analgesia is more effective than traditional pain control methods in reducing immediate postoperative pain in belt lipectomy patients. On the basis of these findings, epidural analgesia should also be considered for postoperative pain management in other truncal procedures.

  14. Neuraxial analgesia versus intravenous remifentanil for pain relief in early labor in nulliparous women.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohamed Taha; Hassanin, Maher Z

    2012-12-01

    To assess if there is a difference in duration of labor, the mode of delivery, average Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain scores, maternal overall satisfaction with analgesia, side effects and neonatal outcomes in nulliparous women who received early labor analgesia with either epidural, patient-controlled IV analgesia (PCIA) with remifentanil or combined spinal-epidural (CSE) techniques. This is a prospective randomized interventional study. The study included 1,140 healthy nulliparous women (with term, singleton pregnancies) early in labor, requesting labor analgesia, during the period from September 2009 to August 2011 at TAIBA Hospital in Kuwait. The participants were randomized to receive either epidural analgesia (Group I), or PCIA with remifentanil (Group II) or CSE analgesia (Group III). The primary outcome was the rate of cesarean delivery. CSE analgesia was associated with a statistically highly significant decrease in labor duration (from analgesia to vaginal delivery), duration of latent and active phases of the first stage, and duration of the second stage of labor, average VAS pain scores, and a highest maternal overall satisfaction score with analgesia (P<0.01) as compared to epidural analgesia or PCIA with remifentanil. In terms of labor duration, average VAS pain scores, and maternal overall satisfaction score with analgesia, CSE analgesia is superior to that provided by epidural analgesia or PCIA with remifentanil for pain relief in early labor in nulliparous women. However, there were no differences in the mode of delivery, side effects or neonatal outcomes between the three techniques.

  15. The influence of time of day of administration on duration of opioid labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Scavone, Barbara M; McCarthy, Robert J; Wong, Cynthia A; Sullivan, John T

    2010-10-01

    Medications administered into the epidural or intrathecal space for labor analgesia may demonstrate variable effects dependent on time of day, and this may affect clinical research trials investigating the pharmacology of specific drugs. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the effect of time of day of administration of intrathecal fentanyl and systemic hydromorphone labor analgesia from data collected as part of a randomized clinical trial examining the influence of analgesia method on labor outcome. Six hundred ninety-two healthy parturients were randomized early in labor to receive combined spinal-epidural (intrathecal fentanyl 25 μg followed by a lidocaine and epinephrine containing epidural test dose) versus systemic (hydromorphone 1 mg IV and 1 mg IM) labor analgesia at first analgesia request. No further analgesics were administered until the patient requested additional analgesia (second analgesia request). Subjects were assigned to the daytime group (DAY) if initial analgesia (neuraxial or systemic) was administered between the hours of 07:01 and 23:00 and to the nighttime group (NIGHT) if it was administered between 23:01 and 07:00. Within each mode of analgesia study arm (neuraxial or systemic), the DAY and NIGHT groups were compared. The primary outcome variable was analgesia duration, defined as the time interval from administration of labor analgesia until the second analgesia request. Cervical dilation at first and second analgesia requests, pain score at first analgesia request, and average amount of pain between analgesia administration and second analgesia request were also compared between DAY and NIGHT groups. Rhythm analyses for duration of analgesia, cervical dilation, and pain scores were performed. There was no difference in the median duration of either neuraxial or systemic analgesia in DAY versus NIGHT subjects, and no harmonic variation was observed for analgesia duration. Rhythm analysis demonstrated a 24-h harmonic cycle for

  16. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  17. Epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Walaszczyk, Malgorzata; Knapik, Piotr; Misiolek, Hanna; Korlacki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Parents have the right to decide on behalf of their children and deny consent to regional anaesthesia. The investigators decided to investigate quality of postoperative analgesia in adolescents undergoing epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure. Material/Methods The study subjects were 61 adolescents aged 11–18 years who underwent pectus excavatum repair with the Nuss procedure. Patients were divided into epidural (n=41) and opioid (n=20) groups, depending on their parents’ consent to epidural catheter insertion. Intraoperatively, 0.5% epidural ropivacaine with fentanyl or intermittent intravenous injections of fentanyl were used. Postoperative analgesia was achieved with either epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl, or subcutaneous morphine via an intraoperatively inserted “butterfly” cannula. Additionally, both groups received metamizol and paracetamol. Primary outcome variables were postoperative pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale and Prince Henry Hospital Pain Score). Secondary outcome variables included hemodynamic parameters, additional analgesia and side effects. Results Heart rate and blood pressure values in the postoperative period were significantly higher in the opioid group. Pain scores requiring intervention were noted almost exclusively in the opioid group. Conclusions Denial of parental consent to epidural analgesia following the Nuss procedure results in significantly worse control of postoperative pain. Our data may be useful when discussing with parents the available anaesthetic techniques for exceptionally painful procedures. PMID:22037752

  18. Distraction analgesia in chronic pain patients: the impact of catastrophizing.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Kristin L; Campbell, Claudia; Martel, Marc O; Greenbaum, Seth; Wasan, Ajay D; Borsook, David; Jamison, Robert N; Edwards, Robert R

    2014-12-01

    Diverting attention away from noxious stimulation (i.e., distraction) is a common pain-coping strategy. Its effects are variable across individuals, however, and the authors hypothesized that chronic pain patients who reported higher levels of pain catastrophizing would derive less pain-reducing benefit from distraction. Chronic pain patients (n=149) underwent psychometric and quantitative sensory testing, including assessment of the temporal summation of pain in the presence and absence of a distracting motor task. A simple distraction task decreased temporal summation of pain overall, but, surprisingly, a greater distraction analgesia was observed in high catastrophizers. This enhanced distraction analgesia in high catastrophizers was not altered when controlling for current pain scores, depression, anxiety, or opioid use (analysis of covariance [ANCOVA]: F=8.7, P<0.005). Interestingly, the magnitude of distraction analgesia was inversely correlated with conditioned pain modulation (Pearson R=-0.23, P=0.005). Distraction produced greater analgesia among chronic pain patients with higher catastrophizing, suggesting that catastrophizing's pain-amplifying effects may be due in part to greater attention to pain, and these patients may benefit from distraction-based pain management approaches. Furthermore, these data suggest that distraction analgesia and conditioned pain modulation may involve separate underlying mechanisms.

  19. Multimodal Analgesia in the Hip Fracture Patient.

    PubMed

    Fabi, David W

    2016-05-01

    Hip fracture is one of the most common injuries among the elderly and, because the population is aging, it is expected to remain a major clinical challenge and public health problem for the foreseeable future. The clinical importance of early mobilization and prompt participation in physical therapy after hip fracture surgery is now widely recognized. Because postoperative pain can impair mobility and delay physical therapy, much attention is now being paid to finding more effective ways of controlling pain after hip fracture. Oversedation with opioid drugs inhibits communication between the patient and the health care team, can delay ambulation and rehabilitation therapy, and may increase the probability of the patient requiring a skilled nursing facility, which adds further cost to the overall health care system. Multiple pain pathways contribute to the perception of postoperative pain, and although opioids are highly effective in blocking nociceptive pain through inhibition of the mu receptors, they do not block other pain pathways. Multimodal analgesia involves the use of several anesthetic and analgesic modalities that are strategically combined to block pain perception at different sites in the peripheral and central nervous systems. This balanced, multifaceted approach provides more effective control of postoperative pain than opioid drugs alone, allows lower doses of opioids to be used as part of the multimodal regimen (thereby reducing the risk of opioid-related adverse events and complications), and may facilitate more rapid recovery and improve certain outcome measures related to recovery time. One prospective randomized study evaluating the clinical value of multimodal pain management in elderly patients undergoing bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty found that a multimodal regimen, including preemptive pain medication and intraoperative periarticular injections, reduced pain on postoperative days 1 and 4, and reduced overall opioid use. This article describes

  20. Placebo-like analgesia via response imagery.

    PubMed

    Peerdeman, K J; van Laarhoven, A I M; Bartels, D J P; Peters, M L; Evers, A W M

    2017-09-01

    Placebo effects on pain are reliably observed in the literature. A core mechanism of these effects is response expectancies. Response expectancies can be formed by instructions, prior experiences and observation of others. Whether mental imagery of a response can also induce placebo-like expectancy effects on pain has not yet been studied systematically. In Study 1, 80 healthy participants were randomly allocated to (i) response imagery or (ii) control imagery. In Study 2, 135 healthy participants were randomly allocated to (i) response imagery with a verbal suggestion regarding its effectiveness, (ii) response imagery only, or (iii) no intervention. In both studies, expected and experienced pain during cold pressor tests were measured pre- and post-intervention, along with psychological and physiological measures. Participants rated pain as less intense after response imagery than after control imagery in Study 1 (p = 0.044, ηp2 = 0.054) and as less intense after response imagery (with or without verbal suggestion) than after no imagery in Study 2 (p < 0.001, ηp2 = 0.154). Adding a verbal suggestion did not affect pain (p = 0.068, ηp2 = 0.038). The effects of response imagery on experienced pain were mediated by expected pain. Thus, in line with research on placebo effects, the current findings indicate that response imagery can induce analgesia, via its effects on response expectancies. The reported studies extend research on placebo effects by demonstrating that mental imagery of reduced pain can induce placebo-like expectancy effects on pain. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  1. NOP Receptor Mediates Anti-analgesia Induced by Agonist-Antagonist Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Gear, Robert W.; Bogen, Oliver; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ~90 minutes after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69,593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  2. Role of collagen fibers in acupuncture analgesia therapy on rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojia; Ding, Guanghong; Huang, Hong; Lin, Jun; Yao, Wei; Zhan, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Acupuncture, a traditional Chinese therapeutic technique, has been put into practice for more than 4000 years and widely used for pain management since 1958. However, what is the mechanism underlying the acupuncture for analgesia effects by stimulation of acupoints, what substances receive the original mechanical acupuncture signals from the acupoints, or what transforms these signals into effective biological signals are not well understood. In this work, the role of collagen fibers at acupoints during acupuncture analgesia on rats was investigated. When the structure of the collagen fibers at Zusanli (ST36) was destroyed by injection of type I collagenase, the needle force caused by the acupuncture declined and the analgesic effects of rotation or lift-thrusting manipulations was attenuated accompanying the restraint of the degranulation ratios of mast cells. We propose that collagen fibers play an important role in acupuncture-induced analgesia, and they participate in signal transmission and transform processes.

  3. Sedation and analgesia for the pediatric trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Grabinsky, Andreas; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2012-01-01

    The number of children requiring sedation and analgesia for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures has increased substantially in the last decade. Both anesthesiologist and non-anesthesiologists are involved in varying settings outside the operating room to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia. Procedural sedation has become standard of care and its primary aim is managing acute anxiety, pain, and control of movement during painful or unpleasant procedures. There is enough evidence to suggest that poorly controlled acute pain causes suffering, worse outcome, as well as debilitating chronic pain syndromes that are often refractory to available treatment options. This article will provide strategies to provide safe and effective sedation and analgesia for pediatric trauma patients. PMID:23181210

  4. Liposomal extended-release bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Mark; O’Brien, Michael J; Savoie, Felix H; You, Zongbing

    2013-01-01

    When physicians consider which analgesia to use postsurgery, the primary goal is to relieve pain with minimal adverse side effects. Bupivacaine, a commonly used analgesic, has been formulated into an aqueous suspension of multivesicular liposomes that provide long-lasting analgesia for up to 72 hours, while avoiding the adverse side effects of opioids. The increased efficacy of liposomal extended-release bupivacaine, compared to bupivacaine hydrochloride, has promoted its usage in a variety of surgeries including hemorrhoidectomy, bunionectomy, inguinal hernia repair, total knee arthroplasty, and augmentation mammoplasty. However, like other bupivacaine formulations, the liposomal extended-release bupivacaine does have some side effects. In this brief review, we provide an update of the current knowledge in the use of bupivacaine for postsurgical analgesia. PMID:24043932

  5. Codeine analgesia is due to codeine-6-glucuronide, not morphine.

    PubMed

    Vree, T B; van Dongen, R T; Koopman-Kimenai, P M

    2000-01-01

    Eighty per cent of codeine is conjugated with glucuronic acid to codeine-6-glucuronide. Only 5% of the dose is O-demethylated to morphine, which in turn is immediately glucuronidated at the 3- and 6-position and excreted renally. Based on the structural requirement of the opiate molecule for interaction with the mu-receptor to result in analgesia, codeine-6-glucuronide in analogy to morphine-6-glucuronide must be the active constituent of codeine. Poor metabolisers of codeine, those who lack the CYP450 2D6 isoenzyme for the O-demethylation to morphine, experience analgesia from codeine-6-glucuronide. Analgesia of codeine does not depend on the formation of morphine and the metaboliser phenotype.

  6. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    PubMed Central

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  7. A randomized, double-masked, multicenter comparison of the safety of continuous intrathecal labor analgesia using a 28-gauge catheter versus continuous epidural labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Arkoosh, Valerie A; Palmer, Craig M; Yun, Esther M; Sharma, Shiv K; Bates, James N; Wissler, Richard N; Buxbaum, Jodie L; Nogami, Wallace M; Gracely, Edward J

    2008-02-01

    Continuous intrathecal labor analgesia produces rapid analgesia or anesthesia and allows substantial flexibility in medication choice. The US Food and Drug Administration, in 1992, removed intrathecal microcatheters (27-32 gauge) from clinical use after reports of neurologic injury in nonobstetric patients. This study examined the safety and efficacy of a 28-gauge intrathecal catheter for labor analgesia in a prospective, randomized, multicenter trial. Laboring patients were randomly assigned to continuous intrathecal analgesia with a 28-gauge catheter (n = 329) or continuous epidural analgesia with a 20-gauge catheter (n = 100), using bupivacaine and sufentanil. The primary outcome was the incidence of neurologic complications, as determined by masked neurologic examinations at 24 and 48 h postpartum, plus telephone follow-up at 7-10 and 30 days after delivery. The secondary outcomes included adequacy of labor analgesia, maternal satisfaction, and neonatal status. No patient had a permanent neurologic change. The continuous intrathecal analgesia patients had better early analgesia, less motor blockade, more pruritus, and higher maternal satisfaction with pain relief at 24 h postpartum. The intrathecal catheter was significantly more difficult to remove. There were no significant differences between the two groups in neonatal status, post-dural puncture headache, hemodynamic stability, or obstetric outcomes. Providing intrathecal labor analgesia with sufentanil and bupivacaine via a 28-gauge catheter has an incidence of neurologic complication less than 1%, and produces better initial pain relief and higher maternal satisfaction, but is associated with more technical difficulties and catheter failures compared with epidural analgesia.

  8. DHEA administration modulates stress-induced analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Torres, Iraci L S; Oliveira, Carla; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques

    2016-04-01

    An important aspect of adaptive stress response is the pain response suppression that occurs during or following stress exposure, which is often referred to as acute stress-induced analgesia. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) participates in the modulation of adaptive stress response, changing the HPA axis activity. The effect of DHEA on the HPA axis activity is dependent on the state and uses the same systems that participate in the regulation of acute stress-induced analgesia. The impact of DHEA on nociception has been studied; however, the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia is not known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia and determine the best time for hormone administration in relation to exposure to stressor stimulus. The animals were stressed by restraint for 1h in a single exposure and received treatment with DHEA by a single injection before the stress or a single injection after the stress. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus. Serum corticosterone levels were measured. DHEA administered before exposure to stress prolonged the acute stress-induced analgesia. This effect was not observed when the DHEA was administered after the stress. DHEA treatment in non-stressed rats did not alter the nociceptive threshold, suggesting that the DHEA effect on nociception is state-dependent. The injection of DHEA had the same effect as exposure to acute stress, with both increasing the levels of corticosterone. In conclusion, acute treatment with DHEA mimics the response to acute stress indexed by an increase in activity of the HPA axis. The treatment with DHEA before stress exposure may facilitate adaptive stress response, prolonging acute stress-induced analgesia, which may be a therapeutic strategy of interest to clinics.

  9. Racial differences in the use of epidural analgesia for labor.

    PubMed

    Glance, Laurent G; Wissler, Richard; Glantz, Christopher; Osler, Turner M; Mukamel, Dana B; Dick, Andrew W

    2007-01-01

    There is strong evidence that pain is undertreated in black and Hispanic patients. The association between race and ethnicity and the use of epidural analgesia for labor is not well described. Using the New York State Perinatal Database, the authors examined whether race and ethnicity were associated with the likelihood of receiving epidural analgesia for labor after adjusting for clinical characteristics, demographics, insurance coverage, and provider effect. This retrospective cohort study was based on 81,883 women admitted for childbirth between 1998 and 2003. Overall, 38.3% of the patients received epidural analgesia for labor. After adjusting for clinical risk factors, socioeconomic status, and provider fixed effects, Hispanic and black patients were less likely than non-Hispanic white patients to receive epidural analgesia: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78-0.93) for white/Hispanic and 0.78 (0.74-0.83) for blacks compared with non-Hispanic whites. Compared with patients with private insurance, patients without insurance were least likely to receive epidural analgesia (adjusted odds ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.64-0.89). Black patients with private insurance had similar rates of epidural use to white/non-Hispanic patients without insurance coverage: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.66 (95% CI, 0.53-0.82) for white/non-Hispanic patients without insurance versus 0.69 (0.57-0.85) for black patients with private insurance. Black and Hispanic women in labor are less likely than non-Hispanic white women to receive epidural analgesia. These differences remain after accounting for differences in insurance coverage, provider practice, and clinical characteristics.

  10. Battlefield Analgesia: TCCC Guidelines Are Not Being Followed.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Steven G; Robinson, John B; Mabry, Robert L; Howard, Jeffrey T

    2015-01-01

    Servicemembers injured in combat often experience moderate to severe acute pain. Early and effective pain control in the prehospital setting has been shown to reduce the sequelae of untreated pain. Current data suggest that lack of point-of-injury (POI) analgesia has significant, downstream effects on healthcare quality and associated costs. This was a process improvement project to determine the current rate of adherence to existing prehospital pain management guidelines. The records of patients who had sustained a major injury and met current Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) criteria for POI analgesia from July 2013 through March 2014 were reviewed to determine if pain medication was given in accordance with existing guidelines, including medication administration and routes. On 31 October 2013, the new TCCC guidelines were released. The "before" period was from July 2013 through October 2013. The "after" period was from November 2013 through March 2014. During the project period, there were 185 records available for review, with 135 meeting TCCC criteria for POI analgesia (68 pre-, 66 postintervention). Prior to 31 October 2013, 17% of study patients received analgesia within guidelines at the POI compared with 35% in the after period. The most common medication administered pre-and post-release was oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate. Special Operations Forces had higher adherence rates to TCCC analgesia guidelines than conventional forces, but these still were low. Less than half of all eligible combat casualties receive any analgesia at the POI. Further research is needed to determine the etiology of such poor adherence to current TCCC guidelines. 2015.

  11. [Epidural analgesia during labour: maternal, fetal and neonatal aspects].

    PubMed

    Soncini, E; Grignaffini, A; Anfuso, S; Cavicchioni, O

    2003-06-01

    The most effective technique for eliminating labour and childbirth pain is continuous lumbar epidural analgesia. The preoccupation regarding the possible negative effects on the time taken for labour and on dystocias in general represents one of the greatest hindrances in the way of its wider use. The purpose of the present study is to monitor the effects of continuous lumbar epidural analgesia on delivery times, on the state of the fetus, on the incidence of dystocic deliveries and on neonatal outcome. Comparative prospective study. The data relating to the deliveries of 148 nulliparas and 51 pluriparas at term, submitted to epidural analgesia at the Obstetric Clinic of the University of Parma in 1999-2000 were compared with data from 144 nulliparas in labour and 60 pluriparas without epidural analgesia, selected in random fashion out of 4251 women who delivered children in the same period. The anesthetic procedure employed consisted in an injection of 20 mg/10 ml ropivacaine and 50 mg fentanyl in the epidural space at intervals of 1-2 h. The duration of the dilatation period was not influenced by administration of epidural analgesia while the expulsion period was longer in the course of epidural analgesia. There were no significant differences between delivery modalities in the 2 groups either as regards vaginal operative delivery or the number of cesarean sections for dystocia. The cardiotocographic profile was similar in the 2 groups. The neonatal outcome (Apgar index at 1' and 5' and transfer to the intensive care department) did not show significant differences, confirming the absence of noteworthy side-effects even from the neonatal standpoint. The use of low concentrations of ropivacaine (0.2%) associated with fentanyl in the epidural space proved to be a safe and effective technique for controlling labour and delivery pain.

  12. Improvement of 'dynamic analgesia' does not decrease atelectasis after thoracotomy.

    PubMed

    Boisseau, N; Rabary, O; Padovani, B; Staccini, P; Mouroux, J; Grimaud, D; Raucoules-Aimé, M

    2001-10-01

    There is still controversy concerning the beneficial aspects of 'dynamic analgesia' (i.e. pain while coughing or moving) on the reduction of postoperative atelectasis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) prevents these abnormalities as opposed to multimodal analgesia with i.v. patient controlled analgesia (i.v. PCA) after thoracotomy. Fifty-four patients undergoing thoracotomy (lung cancer) were randomly assigned to one of the two groups. Clinical respiratory characteristics, arterial blood gas, and pulmonary function tests (forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s) were obtained before surgery and on the next 3 postoperative days. Atelectasis was compared between the two groups by performing computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest at day 3. Postoperative respiratory function and arterial blood gas values were reduced compared with preoperative values (mean (SD) FEV1 day 0: 1.1 (0.3) litre; 1.3 (0.4) litre) but there was no significant difference between groups at any time. PCA and TEA provided a good level of analgesia at rest (VAS day 0: 21 (15/100); 8 (9/100)), but TEA was more effective for analgesia during mobilization (VAS day 0: 52 (3/100); 25 (17/100)). CT scans revealed comparable amounts of atelectasis (expressed as a percentage of total lung volume) in the TEA (7.1 (2.8)%) and in the i.v. PCA group (6.71 (3.2)%). There was no statistical difference in the number of patients presenting with at least one atelectasis of various types (lamellar, plate, segmental, lobar).

  13. Neonatal morphine enhances nociception and decreases analgesia in young rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo Hua; Sweitzer, Sarah M

    2008-03-14

    The recognition of the impact of neonatal pain experience on subsequent sensory processing has led to the increased advocacy for the use of opioids for pain relief in infants. However, following long-term opioid exposure in intensive care units more than 48% of infants exhibited behaviors indicative of opioid abstinence syndrome, a developmentally equivalent set of behaviors to opioid withdrawal as seen in adults. Little is known about the long-term influence of repeated neonatal morphine exposure on nociception and analgesia. To investigate this, we examined mechanical and thermal nociception on postnatal days 11, 13, 15, 19, 24, 29, 39 and 48 following subcutaneous administration of morphine (3 mg/kg) once daily on postnatal days 1-9. The cumulative morphine dose-response was assessed on postnatal days 20 and 49, and stress-induced analgesia was assessed on postnatal days 29 and 49. Both basal mechanical and thermal nociception in neonatal, morphine-exposed rats were significantly lower than those in saline-exposed, handled-control rats and naive rats until P29. A rightward-shift of cumulative dose-response curves for morphine analgesia upon chronic neonatal morphine was observed both on P20 and P49. The swim stress-induced analgesia was significantly decreased in neonatal morphine-exposed rats on P29, but not on P49. These data indicate that morphine exposure equivalent to the third trimester of gestation produced prolonged pain hypersensitivity, decreased morphine antinociception, and decreased stress-induced analgesia. The present study illustrates the need to examine the long-term influence of prenatal morphine exposure on pain and analgesia in the human pediatric population.

  14. Analgesia in Amphibians: Preclinical Studies and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preclinical studies of analgesia in amphibians or recommendations for clinical use of analgesics in amphibian species are extremely limited. This article briefly reviews the issues surrounding the use of analgesics in amphibians starting with common definitions of pain and analgesia when applied to non-human animals. Nociceptive and endogenous opioid systems in amphibians are reviewed and results of preclinical research on opioid and non-opioid analgesics summarized. Recommended opioid and non-opioid analgesics are summarized and practical recommendations made for their clinical use. PMID:21074701

  15. Sedation and Analgesia in the Performance of Interventional Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Interventional procedures can produce pain, anxiety, and physical and mental distress. Analgesia and sedation in the interventional radiology suite are given routinely during interventional procedures and allow a safe, comfortable, and technically successful procedure to be performed. Appropriate sedation decreases patient movement, patient anxiety, pain perception, and is crucial to successfully perform percutaneous interventions. A thorough understanding of the preoperative patient assessment, intraprocedural monitoring, pharmacologic characteristics of medications, postoperative care, and treatment of complications is required for the practicing interventionalist. Complications related to sedation and analgesia can occur secondary to preexisting medical conditions, incorrect drug administration, and/or inadequate patient monitoring.1,2 PMID:22550378

  16. Hyperventilation-induced tetany associated with epidural analgesia for labor.

    PubMed

    Ray, N; Camann, W

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of painful carpo-pedal spasm associated with the initiation of epidural analgesia for labor. The patient, an otherwise healthy primigravida in early labor at term, was experiencing severe hyperventilation as a result of inappropriate use of the Lamaze breathing technique. Bilateral carpo-pedal spasm occurred, and produced severe pain. Resolution of symptoms coincided with onset of effective epidural labor pain relief. A diagnostic challenge was presented to the anesthesiologist, as the symptoms could have been consistent with subdural block, local anesthetic toxicity, high sensory level of analgesia or eclamptic neuro-excitation activity.

  17. Safety and risks of nitrous oxide labor analgesia: a review.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Judith P

    2011-01-01

    This review of the safety and risks of nitrous oxide (N(2) O) labor analgesia presents results of a search for evidence of its effects on labor, the mother, the fetus, the neonate, breastfeeding, and maternal-infant bonding. Concerns about apoptotic damage to the brains of immature mammals exposed to high doses of N(2) O during late gestation, possible cardiovascular risks from hyperhomocysteinemia caused by N(2) O, a hypothesis that children exposed to N(2) O during birth are more likely to become addicted to amphetamine drugs as adults, and possible occupational risks for those who provide care to women using N(2) O/O(2) labor analgesia are discussed in detail. Research relevant to the 4 special concerns and to the effects of N(2) O analgesia on labor and the mother-child dyad were examined in depth. Three recent reviews of the biologic, toxicologic, anesthetic, analgesic, and anxiolytic effects of N(2) O; 3 reviews of the safety of 50% N(2) O/oxygen (O(2) ) in providing analgesia in a variety of health care settings; and a 2002 systematic review of N(2) O/O(2) labor analgesia were used. Nitrous oxide analgesia is safe for mothers, neonates, and those who care for women during childbirth if the N(2) O is delivered as a 50% blend with O(2) , is self-administered, and good occupational hygiene is practiced. Because of the strong correlation between dose and harm from exposure to N(2) O, concerns based on effects of long exposure to high anesthetic-level doses of N(2) O have only tenuous, hypothetical pertinence to the safety of N(2) O/O(2) labor analgesia. Nitrous oxide labor analgesia is safe for the mother, fetus, and neonate and can be made safe for caregivers. It is simple to administer, does not interfere with the release and function of endogenous oxytocin, and has no adverse effects on the normal physiology and progress of labor. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  18. Comparison of relative oxycodone consumption in surgical pleth index-guided analgesia versus conventional analgesia during sevoflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, So Hyun; Park, Sangwoo; Kim, Heezoo; Lee, Il Ok; Kong, Myoung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The surgical pleth index (SPI) is proposed for titration of analgesic drugs during general anesthesia. Several reports have investigated the effect of SPI on the consumption of opioids including remifentanil, fentanyl, and sufentanil during anesthesia, but there are no reports about oxycodone. We aimed to investigate intravenous oxycodone consumption between SPI-guided analgesia and conventional analgesia practices during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: Forty-five patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were randomly assigned to an SPI group (SPI-guided analgesia group, n = 23) or a control group (conventional analgesia group, n = 22). Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane to achieve bispectral index values between 40 and 60. In the SPI group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at SPI values over 50; in the control group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at the occurrence of tachycardia or hypertension event. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption and extubation time were recorded. The number of hemodynamic and somatic movement events was recorded, as were postoperative pain and recovery scores. Results: Patients’ characteristics were comparable between the groups. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption in the SPI group was significantly lower than the control group (3.5 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 2.4 mg; P = 0.012). Extubation time was significantly shorter in the SPI group (10.6 ± 3.5 vs 13.4 ± 4.6 min; P = 0.026). Hemodynamic and somatic movement events during anesthesia were comparable between the groups, as were numeric rating scales for pain and modified Aldrete scores at postanesthesia care unit. Conclusions: SPI-guided analgesia reduces intravenous oxycodone consumption and extubation time compared with conventional analgesia based on clinical parameters during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:27583920

  19. Electroacupuncture analgesia in rat ankle sprain pain model: neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Koo, Sung Tae; Kim, Jae Hyo; An, Kyungeh; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2010-02-01

    Acupuncture, an alternative medical therapy with a long history, is appealing because it can activate endogenous analgesic mechanisms by minimally invasive means. The mechanisms of acupuncture, however, are not well understood yet. The following sentence was removed from our original manuscript. One of the major problems impeding understanding of the acupuncture mechanism is lack of experimental models that mimic various forms of persistent pain that respond to acupuncture in humans. In this review, we summarize and discuss previous and recent findings regarding electroacupuncture-induced analgesia in an ankle sprain pain model and the potential underlying mechanisms of acupuncture. A novel model of ankle sprain pain is introduced recently and the mechanism of electroacupuncture-induced analgesia in this model has been explored. The following sentence was removed from our original manuscript. This model provides a reproducible and quantifiable index of persistent pain at the ankle joint in rats. Acupuncture at a remote site produces long-lasting and powerful analgesia. The consistent analgesic effect of acupuncture in this model has allowed us to pursue the underlying neural mechanisms. These studies provide insight into the mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia in one particular form of persistent pain, and hopefully will allow us to expand our knowledge to other painful conditions.

  20. Epidural morphine analgesia in Guillain Barré syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Genis, D; Busquets, C; Manubens, E; Dávalos, A; Baró, J; Oterino, A

    1989-01-01

    Severe pain is a frequent symptom in the Guillain Barré syndrome and can be intense, long lasting and with no response to the usual analgesics, including parenteral opiates. Epidural analgesia using morphine chloride in low doses has satisfactorily relieved pain in this disease in nine patients. PMID:2795070

  1. Bayesian prediction of placebo analgesia in an instrumental learning model

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, Ye-Seul; Wallraven, Christian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2017-01-01

    Placebo analgesia can be primarily explained by the Pavlovian conditioning paradigm in which a passively applied cue becomes associated with less pain. In contrast, instrumental conditioning employs an active paradigm that might be more similar to clinical settings. In the present study, an instrumental conditioning paradigm involving a modified trust game in a simulated clinical situation was used to induce placebo analgesia. Additionally, Bayesian modeling was applied to predict the placebo responses of individuals based on their choices. Twenty-four participants engaged in a medical trust game in which decisions to receive treatment from either a doctor (more effective with high cost) or a pharmacy (less effective with low cost) were made after receiving a reference pain stimulus. In the conditioning session, the participants received lower levels of pain following both choices, while high pain stimuli were administered in the test session even after making the decision. The choice-dependent pain in the conditioning session was modulated in terms of both intensity and uncertainty. Participants reported significantly less pain when they chose the doctor or the pharmacy for treatment compared to the control trials. The predicted pain ratings based on Bayesian modeling showed significant correlations with the actual reports from participants for both of the choice categories. The instrumental conditioning paradigm allowed for the active choice of optional cues and was able to induce the placebo analgesia effect. Additionally, Bayesian modeling successfully predicted pain ratings in a simulated clinical situation that fits well with placebo analgesia induced by instrumental conditioning. PMID:28225816

  2. Multimodal analgesia for perioperative pain in three cats.

    PubMed

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Monteiro-Steagall, Beatriz P

    2013-08-01

    Adequate pain relief is usually achieved with the simultaneous use of two or more different classes of analgesics, often called multimodal analgesia. The purpose of this article is to highlight the use of perioperative multimodal analgesia and the need to individualize the treatment plan based on the presenting condition, and to adjust it based on the response to analgesia for a given patient. This case series presents the alleviation of acute pain in three cats undergoing different major surgical procedures. These cases involved the administration of different classes of analgesic drugs, including opioids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tramadol, ketamine, gabapentin and local anesthetics. The rationale for the administration of analgesic drugs is discussed herein. Each case presented a particular challenge owing to the different cause, severity, duration and location of pain. Pain management is a challenging, but essential, component of feline practice: multimodal analgesia may minimize stress while controlling acute perioperative pain. Individual response to therapy is a key component of pain relief in cats.

  3. [Progresses of studies on acupuncture analgesia for postoperative reaction].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ting; Fu, Guo-Qiang; Shen, Wei-Dong

    2013-02-01

    A large number of clinical trials and animal experiments have been carried out to focus on neurochemical mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia including postoperation pain relief, which may provide guidance for developing a novel clinical approach for postoperative analgesia. In the present paper, the authors review new progresses of researches on acupuncture analgesia for postoperative pain and side effects in the past few years from thyroidectomy, chest surgery, abdominal surgery, five sense organs (ear, nose, eye and throat) surgery, and others. Regarding the mechanism of acupuncture, central neurotransmitters (including the endop endorphin, 5-HT, gamma-aminobutyric acid, etc.), immune cytokines, cytokines from the spinal glia cells are complicated in the process of acupuncture analgesia. A lot of findings of researches demonstrated that acupuncture therapy is effective in reducing postoperative pain and adverse reactions as nausea, vomiting, etc. As a common technique widely used in the field of clinical medicine, the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture therapy for relieving post-surgery pain and side-effects should be studied profoundly in the future.

  4. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hajnour, Mohamed S; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications.

  5. Ingestion analgesia occurs when a bad taste turns good.

    PubMed

    Foo, Hayley; Mason, Peggy

    2011-12-01

    During ingestion of water, chocolate, sucrose, and saccharin, pain-related behaviors are suppressed. This ingestion analgesic effect is reversed when the hedonic valence of a food is switched from "good" to "bad" as occurs during conditioned taste aversion. Here, we tested the converse hedonic shift to determine if ingestion analgesia occurs when 0.3 M NaCl is made palatable by inducing a sodium appetite. In Experiment 1, sham- and sodium-depleted rats were tested for paw withdrawal and lick latencies to brief noxious heat during quiet wake and intraoral NaCl ingestion. Only sodium-depleted rats showed a suppression of heat-evoked reactions during NaCl ingestion. In Experiment 2, we tested whether this analgesic effect is mediated by the brainstem nucleus raphe magnus (NRM). Inactivation of NRM with muscimol blocked ingestion analgesia during NaCl ingestion by sodium-depleted rats. This attenuation was not due to a hyperalgesic effect of NRM inactivation. Muscimol microinjections into a nearby region, the nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO), were ineffective. The present findings demonstrate that the internal milieu of an animal can modify ingestion analgesia, and that the analgesia during NaCl ingestion by sodium hungry rats is mediated by NRM. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Subdural Hematoma Associated With Labor Epidural Analgesia: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Lim, Grace; Zorn, Jamie M; Dong, Yuanxu J; DeRenzo, Joseph S; Waters, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    This report aimed to describe the characteristics and impact of subdural hematoma (SDH) after labor epidural analgesia. Eleven obstetric patients had SDHs associated with the use of labor epidural analgesia over 7 years at a tertiary care hospital. Ten of 11 patients had signs consistent with postdural puncture headache before the diagnosis of SDH. Five patients (45%) had a recognized unintentional dural puncture, 1 (9%) had a combined spinal-epidural with a 24-gauge needle, and 5 (45%) had no recognized dural puncture. For 10 of the 11 cases, SDH was diagnosed at a mean of 4.1 days (range, 1-7 days) after performance of labor epidural analgesia; one case was diagnosed at 25 days. Ten (91%) of 11 cases had a second hospital stay for a mean of 2.8 days (range, 2-4 days) for observation, without further requirement for neurosurgical intervention. One case (9%) had decompressive hemicraniectomy after becoming unresponsive. The observed rate of labor epidural analgesia-associated SDH was 0.026% (11 in 42,969, approximately 1:3900), and the rate of SDH was 1.1% (5 in 437, approximately 1:87) if a recognized dural puncture occurred during epidural catheter placement. Subdural hematoma after labor epidural anesthesia is rare but potentially more common than historically estimated. Cases of postdural puncture headache after labor epidural anesthesia should be monitored closely for severe neurologic signs and symptoms that could herald SDH.

  7. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hajnour, Mohamed S.; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications. PMID:28217071

  8. Side effects of pain and analgesia in animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Jirkof, Paulin

    2017-03-22

    This review highlights selected effects of untreated pain and of widely used analgesics such as opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and antipyretics, to illustrate the relevance of carefully planned, appropriate and controlled analgesia for greater reproducibility in animal experiments involving laboratory rodents.

  9. Focused local anesthesia and analgesia for head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Herlich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Facility in the use of head and neck regional blocks will provide excellent perioperative analgesia and patient satisfaction. The scope of ambulatory surgical care for head and neck surgery will undoubtedly increase as expertize in these blocks expand in the face of strict criteria for patient selection. Supplemental sedation will be more precise with the intended result of less hangover and nausea and vomiting.

  10. Labour epidural analgesia in Poland in 2009 - a survey.

    PubMed

    Furmanik, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Labour analgesia in most developed countries is funded by the state, available to every woman in labour, and plays an important role in the everyday activities of most anaesthetists. This paper presents the second part of an Obstetric Anaesthesia Survey which was conducted in 2009. The first part of the Survey, relating to anaesthesia for caesarean sections, was published in 2010. The author sent out 432 questionnaires containing questions about hospital size and location, staffing levels and numbers of deliveries per year. There were also questions regarding regional and other pain relief methods used in labour, ways of administration, drugs used and monitoring of patients. The response rate was 24%. Around 45% of responding hospitals had only 1-3 deliveries per year, which makes it difficult to provide separate obstetric anaesthetic cover. Only ten hospitals (11%) employed an anaesthetist for the labour ward. Epidural analgesia was used in 55% of hospitals but only 20% provided the service for 24 hours per day and free of charge. Entonox was used very occasionally, but the most common means of pain relief was pethidine injection. There were marked differences in the medication used for labour epidurals, with 18% of units using high concentrations of local anaesthetics which could result in motor block. Despite a lack of regulations in Polish law and a lack of proper training in 50% of units, midwives were looking after the patients with established labour epidural which could create medico-legal consequences. There was also a marked variation in the parameters monitored during labour analgesia. Epidural labour analgesia was offered for 24 hours per day and free of charge in only 20% of hospitals. Without public pressure it will be difficult to get more funding from the National Health Fund (NFZ) to enable other hospitals, especially those with small obstetric units, to introduce regional labour analgesia. Although the 2009 guidelines addressed most of the issues

  11. [The role of Ach in the central nerve system on pain modulation and analgesia].

    PubMed

    Xu, G; Duanmu, Z; Yin, Q

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews the main results in recent years of studies on the role of central Ach in pain modulation and analgesia, including: (1) cholinergically induced analgesia (CIA). Cholinomimetic drugs raised the pain threshold or inhibited the unit discharges of hypothalamus parafascicularis nuclens in rats, and these actions were revised by atropine not by nicotine. (2) Ach and acupuncture analgesia (AA). The effect of electroacupuncture was changed by administration of HC-3, atropine, etc. (3) Ach and stress analgesia (SA). Scopolamine reduced the hind foot shock induced analgesia, and this kind of SA was probably mediated by m-receptors existed at supraspinal, rather than spinal level. Swimming and immobilization analgesia were also related to Ach. These data suggested that the central cholinergic system is very important in pain modulation and analgesia and the central Ach is essential transmitter or modulator in this analgesic pathway. But the problem is whether the mechanism of CIA is involved in opiate analgesic system or not.

  12. EFFECT OF EPIDURAL ANALGESIA ON LABOR AND ITS OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Sadia; Anwar, Muhannad Waseem; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is an effective and popular way to relieve labour pain but it may interfere with normal mechanism of labour. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of labour in women with effective epidural analgesia in terms of duration of labour, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome. This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Shaikh Zayed Federal Postgraduate Medical Institute and Hospital, Lahore. One hundred pregnant women were selected by non-probability convenient sampling method. Subjects were divided into two groups of. 50 each as per convenience. Patients of any gravidity at term from 37-41 weeks were included in the sample. Epidural analgesia was applied to group B and distilled water to group A at the lumber region and the progress of labour, mode of delivery and effects on Apgar scores of neonates were evaluated. Out of hundred patients, 77 had normal duration of second stage while 23 had prolonged second stage. Among them, 18 patients (36%) were in epidural group and 5 patients (10%) in non-epidural group, while 4 patients (8%) in epidural group developed intra-partum complications; whereas among non-epidural group had such complications. 65 patients had spontaneous vaginal delivery while 35 patients had instrumental delivery. Among them 29 patients (58%) were in epidural group while only 6 patients (12%) were in non-epidural group. Babies born had Apgar score 5/10 (21.8%), 6/10 (59.4%) and 7/10 (17.8%) at 1 minute and 8/10 (74.3%) and 9/10 (24.8%) at 5 minutes in both groups and none of them needed bag and mask resuscitation. Epidural analgesia does prolong the duration of second stage of labour and increases the instrumental delivery rate. Neonatal outcome is satisfactory while only a few intra-partum complications are found with epidural analgesia.

  13. Epidural analgesia associated with better survival in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, F J; Abegg, R; van der Linden, J C; Cornelisse, H G J M; van Dorsten, F R C; Lemmens, V E; Bosscha, K

    2015-08-01

    Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for potentially curable colon cancer. Otherwise, the surgical stress response might increase the likelihood of cancer dissemination during and after cancer surgery. There is growing evidence that the type of anaesthesia during cancer surgery plays a role in the metastatic process. Therefore, we assessed if the method of anaesthesia is associated with long-term survival after colon cancer surgery. A retrospective single-centre study was conducted including 588 patients who underwent colorectal cancer surgery, TNM stage I-IV, in the Jeroen Bosch Hospital between 1995 and 2003. The Cox proportional hazard model was used for statistical analysis. Adjustments were made for age, sex, comorbidity, TNM stage, chemotherapy, emergency surgery status and year of incidence. Of the 588 primary colon cancer patients with a median age of 70 years, 399 (68 %) patients underwent colon surgery with epidural anaesthesia, whilst 189 (32 %) patients were operated without epidural anaesthesia. Five-year survival for patients not receiving epidural analgesia was 42 % versus 51 % for patients receiving epidural analgesia (p = 0.03). This effect remained after adjustment for relevant patient, tumour, and treatment characteristics (hazard ratio (HR) 1.30 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.59), p = 0.01). Subgroup analysis in patients of 80 years and older (n = 100) showed also a better overall survival after receiving epidural analgesia (HR 1.74 (95 % CI 1.11-2.72), p = 0.01). Epidural analgesia during colon cancer surgery was associated with a better overall survival. Prospective trials evaluating the effects of locoregional analgesia on colon cancer recurrence are warranted.

  14. Comparison of Transversus Abdominis Plane Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine versus Continuous Epidural Analgesia versus Intravenous Opioid Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Ayad, Sabry; Babazade, Rovnat; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Nadar, Vinayak; Lokhande, Chetan; Makarova, Natalya; Khanna, Rashi; Sessler, Daniel I.; Turan, Alparslan

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is considered the standard of care but cannot be provided to all patients Liposomal bupivacaine has been approved for field blocks such as transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks but has not been clinically compared against other modalities. In this retrospective propensity matched cohort study we thus tested the primary hypothesis that TAP infiltration are noninferior (not worse) to continuous epidural analgesia and superior (better) to intravenous opioid analgesia in patients recovering from major lower abdominal surgery. 318 patients were propensity matched on 18 potential factors among three groups (106 per group): 1) TAP infiltration with bupivacaine liposome; 2) continuous Epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine; and; 3) intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). We claimed TAP noninferior (not worse) over Epidural if TAP was noninferior (not worse) on total morphine-equivalent opioid and time-weighted average pain score (10-point scale) within first 72 hours after surgery with noninferiority deltas of 1 (10-point scale) for pain and an increase less of 20% in the mean morphine equivalent opioid consumption. We claimed TAP or Epidural groups superior (better) over IV PCA if TAP or Epidural was superior on opioid consumption and at least noninferior on pain outcome. Multivariable linear regressions within the propensity-matched cohorts were used to model total morphine-equivalent opioid dose and time-weighted average pain score within first 72 hours after surgery; joint hypothesis framework was used for formal testing. TAP infiltration were noninferior to Epidural on both primary outcomes (p<0.001). TAP infiltration were noninferior to IV PCA on pain scores (p = 0.001) but we did not find superiority on opioid consumption (p = 0.37). We did not find noninferiority of Epidural over IV PCA on pain scores (P = 0.13) and nor did we find superiority on opioid consumption (P = 0.98). TAP infiltration with liposomal bupivacaine and

  15. Posterior paramedian subrhomboidal analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia for pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Casey L; Berry, Stepheny; Howard, James; De Ruyter, Martin; Thepthepha, Melissa; Nazir, Niaman; McDonald, Tracy; Dalton, Annemarie; Moncure, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Rib fractures are common in trauma admissions and are associated with an increased risk of pulmonary complications, intensive care unit admissions, and mortality. Providing adequate pain control in patients with multiple rib fractures decreases the risk of adverse events. Thoracic epidural analgesia is currently the preferred method for pain control. This study compared outcomes in patients with multiple acute rib fractures treated with posterior paramedian subrhomboidal (PoPS) analgesia versus thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). This prospective study included 30 patients with three or more acute rib fractures admitted to a Level I trauma center. Thoracic epidural analgesia or PoPS catheters were placed, and local anesthesia was infused. Data were collected including patients' pain level, adjunct morphine equivalent use, adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, and discharge disposition. Nonparametric tests were used and two-sided p < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Nineteen (63%) of 30 patients received TEA and 11 (37%) of 30 patients received PoPS. Pain rating was lower in the PoPS group (2.5 vs. 5; p = 0.03) after initial placement. Overall, there was no other statistically significant difference in pain control or use of oral morphine adjuncts between the groups. Hypotension occurred in eight patients, 75% with TEA and only 25% with PoPS. No difference was found in adverse events, length of stay, lung volumes, or discharge disposition. In patients with rib fractures, PoPS analgesia may provide pain control equivalent to TEA while being less invasive and more readily placed by a variety of hospital staff. This pilot study is limited by its small sample size, and therefore additional studies are needed to prove equivalence of PoPS compared to TEA. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  16. [Postoperative pain management after minimally invasive hysterectomy: thoracic epidural analgesia versus intravenous patient-controlled analgesia].

    PubMed

    Hensel, M; Frenzel, J; Späker, M; Keil, E; Reinhold, N

    2013-10-01

    In view of the development of innovative and non-traumatic surgical techniques, postoperative pain management should be carried out depending on the invasiveness of the intervention. In the present study two analgesic strategies were compared in patients undergoing minimally invasive hysterectomy: epidural analgesia (EDA) and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (iv-PCA). For this prospective case controlled study 60 women with benign uterine diseases undergoing vaginal hysterectomy (VH) or laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) were enrolled. Patients were divided for analysis into two groups (n=30 each) according to the postoperative analgesic strategy (EDA group versus iv-PCA group). A matched-pair analysis was applied (matching criteria: risk assessment, surgeon and age of patient) to minimize the differences between both groups. Patients were evaluated with respect to the extent of pain determined by a numeric rating scale (NRS 0-10 scale), analgesic consumption, rate of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), mobilization from bed, oral intake of nutrition, complications, duration of stay in the recovery room as well as hospital stay and health-related quality of life (SF-36 Health Survey; collected before and 6 weeks after surgery). Laparoscopically assisted removal of the uterus was carried out in 22 women and by vaginal hysterectomy in 38 women. No significant differences between the study groups were seen in the duration of surgery (iv-PCA 58 ± 25 min versus EDA 60 ± 26 min). Demographic data of both groups as well as intraoperative hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were comparable to a great extent. Compared to the iv-PCA group, women in the EDA group showed lower NRS values (p<0.01): recovery room admission 4.7 ± 2.5 iv-PCA vs. 0.9 ± 1.3 EDA, recovery room discharge 3.8 ± 1.8 iv-PCA vs. 1.0 ± 1.2 EDA, day of surgery at 8 p.m. 5.0 ± 2.1 iv-PCA vs. 1.8 ± 2.3 EDA and first postoperative day at 8 a.m. 3.5 ± 1.7 iv-PCA vs

  17. [Obstetric analgesia using nitralgin inhalation and lumbal peridural anesthesia (a model for obstetric analgesia)].

    PubMed

    Hardonyi, A; Sándor, C; Barkai, L; Koltai, M

    1990-06-10

    Authors report the systems of anesthesia used at their ward for delivery in the last eight years. Nitralgin inhalation is used since 1981, lumbar peridural anesthesia is used since 1983. Of 13,458 deliveries in case of 3893 parturiants Nitralgin analgesia was used, while LEDA was used for 2300 parturients. By means of Nitralgin inhalation system it could be assured in the delivery room to apply the pain relief gas mixture (Nitralgin) simultaneously for several parturients. With direction of anesthesiologists employed for the ward the LEDA was attained by gynecologists knowing the use and application of general anesthesia. Thus the continuous application of both procedures can be ensured in 24 hours a day. In our study the frequency of vacuum extraction (0.26 p. c.) and that of Cesarean section (12.81 p. c.) did not increase. With application of these methods it could be achieved that 60 p. c. of vaginal deliveries are performed with anesthesia. Authors propose their system for wider application since in the same ward more and more parturients can be applied anesthesia for pain relief at vaginal delivery.

  18. Does intrapartum epidural analgesia affect nulliparous labor and postpartum urinary incontinence?

    PubMed

    Liang, Ching-Chung; Wong, Shu-Yam; Chang, Yao-Lung; Tsay, Pei-Kwei; Chang, Shuenn-Dhy; Lo, Liang-Ming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of epidural analgesia on nulliparous labor and delivery remains controversial. In addition, pregnancy and delivery have long been considered risk factors in the genesis of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). We sought to determine the effect of epidural analgesia and timing of administration on labor course and postpartum SUI. Five hundred and eighty three nulliparous women were admitted for vaginal delivery at > or = 36 gestational weeks. We compared various obstetric parameters and SUI, at puerperium and 3 months postpartum, among patients who had epidural and non-epidural analgesia, and among those who had early (cervical dilatation < 3 cm) and late (cervical dilatation > or = 3 cm) epidural analgesia. When compared with the non-epidural analgesia group (n = 319), the group that received epidural analgesia (n = 264) had significant prolongation of the first and second stages of labor, and higher likelihood for instrumental and cesarean delivery but similar incidence of severe vaginal laceration and postpartum SUI. Except for the first stage of labor, early administration of epidural analgesia did not result in a significant influence on obstetric parameters or an increased incidence of postpartum SUI. Our findings showed that epidural analgesia is associated with an increased risk of prolonged labor, and instrumental and cesarean delivery but is not related to increased postpartum SUI. Regarding the impact of the timing of epidural analgesia given in the labor course, the first stage of labor appeared to last longer when analgesia was administered early rather than late.

  19. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  20. A review of postoperative analgesia for breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gloria S; Ilfeld, Brian M

    2016-11-01

    An online database search with subsequent article review was performed in order to review the various analgesic modalities for breast cancer surgery. Of 514 abstracts, 284 full-length manuscripts were reviewed. The effect of pharmacologic interventions is varied (NSAIDS, opioids, anticonvulsants, ketamine, lidocaine). Likewise, data from high-quality randomized, controlled studies on wound infiltration (including liposome encapsulated) and infusion of local anesthetic are minimal and conflicting. Conversely, abundant evidence demonstrates paravertebral blocks and thoracic epidural infusions provide effective analgesia and minimize opioid requirements, while decreasing opioid-related side effects in the immediate postoperative period. Other techniques with promising - but extremely limited - data include cervical epidural infusion, brachial plexus, interfascial plane and interpleural blocks. In conclusion, procedural interventions involving regional blocks are more conclusively effective than pharmacologic modalities in providing analgesia to patients following surgery for breast cancer.

  1. CNS Animal fMRI imaging in Pain and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2010-01-01

    Animal imaging of brain systems offers exciting opportunities to better understand the neurobiology of pain and analgesia. Overall functional studies have lagged behind human studies as a result of technical issues including the use of anesthesia. Now that many of these issues have been overcome including the possibility of imaging awake animals, there are new opportunities to study whole brain systems neurobiology of acute and chronic pain as well as analgesic effects on brain systems de novo (using pharmacological MRI) or testing in animal models of pain. Understanding brain networks in these areas may provide new insights into translational science, and use neural networks as a “language of translation” between preclinical to clinical models. In this review we evaluate the role of functional and anatomical imaging in furthering our understanding in pain and analgesia. PMID:21126534

  2. The association between epidural labor analgesia and maternal fever.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Katherine W; Segal, B Scott

    2013-09-01

    The association between epidural labor analgesia and maternal fever is complex and controversial. Observational, retrospective, before-and-after, and randomized controlled trials all support the association, with the most current evidence supporting the mechanistic involvement of noninfectious inflammation. Considering the clinically significant neonatal consequences that have been previously demonstrated, and the possibility of more common subclinical fetal brain injury that animal models imply, the avoidance of maternal fever during labor is imperative. With the current popularity of epidural analgesia in labor, it is important that clinicians delineate how epidurals cause maternal fever and how to block the noninfectious inflammatory response that seems to warm a subset of women laboring with epidurals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Suckling- and sucrose-induced analgesia in human newborns.

    PubMed

    Blass, E M; Watt, L B

    1999-12-01

    This experiment had three goals: 1. To identify the basis of sucking-induced analgesia in healthy, term, newborn humans undergoing the painful, routine, procedure of heel lance and blood collection. 2. To evaluate how taste-induced and sucking-induced analgesias combine to combat pain. 3. To determine whether facial grimacing was an accurate index of diminished pain, or whether it was linked to tissue trauma. We report that: 1. Sucking an unflavored pacifier was analgesic when and only when suck rate exceeded 30 sucks/min. 2. The combination of sucrose and nonnutritive sucking was remarkably analgesic; we saw no behavioral indication in nine of the ten infants that the heel lance had even occurred. 3. Grimacing was reduced to almost naught by procedures that essentially eliminated crying and markedly reduced heart rate during the blood harvesting procedure.

  4. Patient-controlled analgesia after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Sarah

    Patient-controlled analgesia is a method of pain control that allows the patient to self-administer opioid medication as and when it is needed. Pain is a personal experience and one pain-relieving intervention may not be effective for all patients. This article reviews the literature on patient-controlled analgesia, particularly with reference to patients after coronary artery bypass grafting. Pain policies and education programmes need to be proactive in addressing staff and patient gaps in knowledge and misconceptions about pain assessment and management. Nurses need to appreciate the nature and importance of research in promoting a more critical approach to patient care and the development of quality nursing practice.

  5. Patients' direct experiences as central elements of placebo analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Nørskov, Kathrine Næsted; Petersen, Gitte Laue; Price, Donald D.

    2011-01-01

    Placebo analgesic effects appear to be related to patients' perception of the therapeutic intervention. In this paper, we review quantitative findings of how the relationship with the physician and the verbal suggestions given for relief may influence patients' perception of a treatment and how patients' expectations and emotional feelings may affect treatment outcome. We also present qualitative data from interviews with patients who have experienced pain relief following a placebo or an active treatment. A special focus is given to the temporal development of placebo analgesia at psychological and neurophysiological levels. Finally, we discuss the extent to which the quantitative and qualitative findings supplement or contrast with each other, and we touch upon possible implications of patients' direct experience as central for placebo analgesia. PMID:21576149

  6. Epidural analgesia during labour - maternal understanding and experience - informed consent.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, K; Chin, D; Drew, A

    2015-01-01

    Women obtain information on epidural analgesia from various sources. For epidural for pain relief in labour this is provided by the anaesthetist as part of the consenting process. There is much discussion about the inadequacy of this consenting process; we report on women's knowledge, experience and recall of this process at a regional hospital with a 24-h epidural service. Fifty-four women were interviewed within 72 h of a vaginal birth. 91% of the women had acquired information from friends, relatives and antenatal classes. Lack of recall of benefits of epidural analgesia accounted for 26 (38%) and 25 (26%) of the responses, respectively. Similarly in terms of amount of pain relief they could expect, 13 (21%) could not remember and 13 (21%) thought that it may not work. We suggest use of varying methods of disseminating information and wider utilisation of anaesthetists in the antenatal educational programmes.

  7. [Patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with remifentanil as an alternative to epidural analgesia during labor: case series and discussion of medicolegal aspects].

    PubMed

    Frambach, T; Wirbelauer, J; Schelling, P; Rieger, L; Muellenbach, R M; Roewer, N; Kranke, P

    2010-08-01

    Epidural analgesia is considered as the standard method for labor analgesia by inducing a minimal negative impact on labor while providing effective analgesia. Labor analgesia in the absence of epidural analgesia is difficult to achieve with the commonly used analgesic interventions. If epidural analgesia is not feasible due to coagulation disorders, anticoagulation, inability to insert an epidural catheter or due to the mother''s refusal to accept neuraxial analgesia, there is a need for interventions to cope with labor pain. So far, pethidine, diamorphine, meptazinol and spasmolytics remain the most widely used substances for IM and IV use. Unfortunately, in addition to not being very effective, these interventions may be associated with undesirable side effects for the parturient and the newborn. For a decade, anaesthesiologists have experienced the unique properties of remifentanil in the settings of surgical anaesthesia and conscious sedation since it was introduced for labor analgesia. Unfortunately, remifentanil is not licensed for administration to the pregnant patient, and it is unlikely that the manufacturers would consider the cost justified. Therefore, relevant concerns, legal issues and precautions are discussed based on the presentation of case series and a protocol is presented on how the use of remifentanil can be safely implemented for labor analgesia in selected situations. Proper informed consent, appropriate monitoring for the mother and the newborn, one-to-one nursing or midwifery care as well as the availability of an attending physician experienced in neonatal resuscitation and an anaesthesiologist with experience regarding the use of remifentanil are important to ensure that this method retains its good reputation for obstetric analgesia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Intra-articular clonidine analgesia after knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buerkle, H; Huge, V; Wolfgart, M; Steinbeck, J; Mertes, N; Van Aken, H; Prien, T

    2000-05-01

    Recently, it was suggested that peripherally-mediated analgesia can be accomplished by the intra-articular delivery of the mu-opioid morphine or of the a2-agonist clonidine. This clinical study assesses the potential peripheral analgesic effect of the combination of morphine and clonidine after intra-articular administration. Sixty patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists status I or II) undergoing arthroscopic repair of the knee during general anaesthesia were randomized to receive after operation, in a double-blind manner, either 1 mg morphine intra-articularly (group 1); 150 microg clonidine intra-articularly (group 2); or 1 mg morphine + 150 microg clonidine intra-articularly (group 3); or normal saline intra-articularly (group 4) in a volume of 30 mL, respectively. Visual analogue pain scores (VAS), duration of analgesia as defined by first demand for supplemental analgesics, subsequent 24 h consumption of postoperative supplementary analgesics, and patient satisfaction were evaluated. Co-administration of morphine + clonidine (group 3) resulted in a significant VAS reduction at 2 h after injection compared with the other groups. There was a tendency towards a lower need for supplementary rescue analgesia and towards a more prolonged analgesia in group 3 (211 min +/- 224 min SD) compared with group 1 (173 min +/- 197 min SD) and group 4 (91 min +/- 21 min SD). More patients were very satisfied with the postoperative analgesic regimen receiving the combination of morphine and clonidine (group 3) at 24 h postoperatively. Thus we conclude, that the peripheral co-delivery of an opioid and an a2-agonist will result in improved postoperative pain relief, when compared with each single agent given alone.

  9. Preemptive analgesia: the prevention of neurogenous orofacial pain.

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic neurogenous pain is often an extremely difficult condition to manage. In the orofacial region, trauma from injury or dental procedures may lead to the development of severe neuralgic pains and major distress to the patient. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the use of adequate preemptive regional anesthesia, systemic analgesia, and the avoidance of repeated, painful stimuli may reduce the incidence of this problem. PMID:8934952

  10. Unilateral anhidrosis: A rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Gultekin; Gundogdu, Ahmet Gokhan; Alkan, Güzide; Baysalman, Hatice Baran; Kaplan, Tevfik

    2016-02-01

    Management of pain following thoracotomy is an important issue for the control of early morbidity. We herein present the case of a patient who was referred to our hospital after a fall from a height. Right-sided multiple rib fractures, hemopneumothorax, and diaphragmatic rupture were detected. Thoracic epidural catheterization was performed for pain management just before thoracotomy. The patient developed unilateral anhidrosis postoperatively. We discuss this rare complication of thoracic epidural analgesia with a review of relevant literature.

  11. [Levobupivacaine in obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia. Where is its place?].

    PubMed

    Bremerich, D H; Zwissler, B

    2004-07-01

    Levobupivacaine, the S-enantiomer of racemic bupivacaine, will be available in Germany in mid-2004. Pharmacological studies demonstrated that, compared to bupivacaine, levobupivacaine has equal local anaesthetic potency with reduced potential for cardiac and CNS toxicity. This review introduces the new long-acting amide local anaesthetic levobupivacaine to the reader and evaluates its place in obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia compared to bupivacaine and ropivacaine.

  12. Multimodal analgesia versus traditional opiate based analgesia after cardiac surgery, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate if an opiate sparing multimodal regimen of dexamethasone, gabapentin, ibuprofen and paracetamol had better analgesic effect, less side effects and was safe compared to a traditional morphine and paracetamol regimen after cardiac surgery. Methods Open-label, prospective randomized controlled trial. 180 patients undergoing cardiac procedures through median sternotomy, were included in the period march 2007- August 2009. 151 patients were available for analysis. Pain was assessed with the 11-numeric rating scale (11-NRS). Results Patients in the multimodal group demonstrated significantly lower average pain scores from the day of surgery throughout the third postoperative day. Extensive nausea and vomiting, was found in no patient in the multimodal group but in 13 patients in the morphine group, p < 0.001. Postoperative rise in individual creatinine levels demonstrated a non-significant rise in the multimodal group, 33.0±53.4 vs. 19.9±48.5, p = 0.133. Patients in the multimodal group suffered less major in-hospital events in crude numbers: myocardial infarction (MI) (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), stroke (0 vs. 3, p = 0.075), dialysis (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (0 vs. 1, p = 0.31). 30-day mortality was 1 vs. 2, p = 0.54. Conclusions In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, a multimodal regimen offered significantly better analgesia than a traditional opiate regimen. Nausea and vomiting complaints were significantly reduced. No safety issues were observed with the multimodal regimen. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01966172 PMID:24650125

  13. Epidural analgesia during labor and delivery: effects on the initiation and continuation of effective breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zorina Marzan; Heaman, Maureen I

    2005-08-01

    This prospective cohort study examined the association between epidural analgesia during labor and delivery, infant neurobehavioral status, and the initiation and continuation of effective breastfeeding. Healthy, term infants delivered vaginally by mothers who received epidural analgesia (n = 52) or no analgesia (n = 63) during labor and delivery were assessed at 8 to 12 hours postpartum, followed by a telephone interview with the mothers at 4 weeks postpartum. There was no significant difference between the epidural analgesia and no-analgesia groups in breastfeeding effectiveness or infant neurobehavioral status at 8 to 12 hours or in the proportion of mothers continuing to breastfeed at 4 weeks. Therefore, epidural analgesia did not appear to inhibit effective breastfeeding. There was a positive correlation between infant neurobehavioral status and breastfeeding effectiveness (Spearman rho = 0.48, P = .01), suggesting that neurobehavioral assessment may prove beneficial in identifying infants at greater risk for breastfeeding difficulties.

  14. Neuraxial analgesia: a review of its effects on the outcome and duration of labor.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hoon; Kwak, Kyung-Hwa

    2013-11-01

    Labor pain is one of the most challenging experiences encountered by females during their lives. Neuraxial analgesia is the mainstay analgesic for intrapartum pain relief. However, despite the increasing use and undeniable advantages of neuraxial analgesia for labor, there have been concerns regarding undesirable effects on the progression of labor and outcomes. Recent evidence indicates that neuraxial analgesia does not increase the rate of Cesarean sections, although it may be associated with a prolonged second stage of labor and an increased rate of instrumental vaginal delivery. Even when neuraxial analgesia is administered early in the course of labor, it is not associated with an increased rate of Cesarean section or instrumental vaginal delivery, nor does it prolong the labor duration. These data may help physicians correct misconceptions regarding the adverse effects of neuraxial analgesia on labor outcome, as well as encourage the administration of neuraxial analgesia in response to requests for pain relief.

  15. Neuraxial analgesia: a review of its effects on the outcome and duration of labor

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Labor pain is one of the most challenging experiences encountered by females during their lives. Neuraxial analgesia is the mainstay analgesic for intrapartum pain relief. However, despite the increasing use and undeniable advantages of neuraxial analgesia for labor, there have been concerns regarding undesirable effects on the progression of labor and outcomes. Recent evidence indicates that neuraxial analgesia does not increase the rate of Cesarean sections, although it may be associated with a prolonged second stage of labor and an increased rate of instrumental vaginal delivery. Even when neuraxial analgesia is administered early in the course of labor, it is not associated with an increased rate of Cesarean section or instrumental vaginal delivery, nor does it prolong the labor duration. These data may help physicians correct misconceptions regarding the adverse effects of neuraxial analgesia on labor outcome, as well as encourage the administration of neuraxial analgesia in response to requests for pain relief. PMID:24363839

  16. Phorbol ester suppression of opioid analgesia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.J.; Wang, X.J.; Han, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to be an important substrate in intracellular signal transduction. Very little is known concerning its possible role in mediating opiate-induced analgesia. In the present study, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a selective activator of PKC, was injected intrathecally (ith) to assess its influence on the analgesia induced by intrathecal injection of the mu opioid agonist PL017, the delta agonist DPDPE and the kappa agonist 66A-078. Radiant heat-induced tail flick latency (TFL) was taken as an index of nociception. TPA in the dose of 25-50 ng, which did not affect the baseline TFL, produced a marked suppression of opioid antinociception, with a higher potency in blocking mu and delta than the kappa effect. In addition, mu and delta agonists induced remarkable decreases in spinal cyclic AMP (cAMP) content whereas the kappa effect was weak. The results suggest a cross-talk between the PKC system and the signal transduction pathway subserving opioid analgesia.

  17. Design Plans for an Inexpensive Tail Flick Analgesia Meter

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Aaron; Butcher, Greg Q.; Messina, Troy C.

    2011-01-01

    While the pedagogical benefits of incorporating inquiry driven labs into an undergraduate curriculum are well established, often the prohibitive costs of providing equipment for such labs limits the types of experiences that can be offered. For example, the lab portion of Advanced Neuroscience at Centenary College of Louisiana consists of a semester-long research project developed by the students. Frequently, these junior- and senior-level students generate interesting research questions that must be culled or scaled back simply due to a lack of appropriate equipment. In the most recent iteration of the class, the students wanted to examine analgesia using the tail flick test, a measure of spinal nociception. In this test a rodent subject is restrained; its tail is exposed to a heat source; and the latency to flick its tail away from the noxious stimuli is recorded. As commercial devices were far beyond the lab budget, we sought to develop an inexpensive tail flick analgesia meter that was easy to use and generated reliable data. The prototype device was tested by students in the above-mentioned class and was found to consistently produce reliable data in agreement with the literature. Here we present plans for a tail flick analgesia meter that can be constructed for $50–75, roughly 100 times cheaper than commercial devices. PMID:23626497

  18. Effects of hypnotic analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain.

    PubMed

    DeBenedittis, G; Panerai, A A; Villamira, M A

    1989-01-01

    Mechanisms of hypnotic analgesia are still poorly understood and conflicting data are reported regarding the underlying neurochemical correlates. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hypnotically induced analgesia and hypnotizability on experimental ischemic pain, taking into account pain and distress tolerance as well as the neurochemical correlates. 11 high hypnotizable Ss and 10 low hypnotizable Ss, as determined by scores on the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (Weitzenhoffer & E. R. Hilgard, 1962), were administered an ischemic pain test in both waking and hypnotic conditions. The following variables were measured: (a) pain and distress tolerance, (b) anxiety levels, and (c) plasma concentrations of beta-endorphin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Results confirmed significant increases of pain and distress tolerance during hypnosis as compared to the waking state, with positive correlations between pain and distress relief and hypnotizability. Moreover, a hypnotically induced dissociation between the sensory-discriminative and the affective-motivational dimensions of pain experience was found, but only in high hypnotizable Ss. Hypnotic analgesia was unrelated to anxiety reduction and was not mediated either by endorphins or by ACTH.

  19. Magnesium sulfate for postoperative analgesia after surgery under spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Prerana N; Dhengle, Yamini

    2016-06-01

    Magnesium has been proven to have antinociceptive effects in animal and human models of pain. Its effect is primarily based on the regulation of calcium influx into the cell, which is natural physiological calcium antagonism and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonism. One hundred and eight patients undergoing surgery with spinal anesthesia received either 250 mg of intravenous magnesium sulfate followed by an infusion of 500 mg magnesium sulfate (25 mg/mL) at the rate of 20 mL/hour; or the same volume of normal saline (control group) as bolus and infusion. The primary end-points in the study were to evaluate the analgesic effect and duration of sensory and motor blockade. The secondary end-points included assessment of hemodynamic effects of intravenous magnesium sulfate and rescue analgesia requirement. Sensory and motor blockade, respectively, were 25 minutes and 34 minutes shorter in the control group. Less patients in the magnesium group (33% vs. 53.7%) than in control group required rescue analgesia in the postoperative period. The control group required rescue analgesia nearly 3 hours earlier than the magnesium group. Only one patient in the control group experienced bradycardia. There was no event of intraoperative hypotension in either of the groups. Intravenous magnesium sulfate when given as a bolus, followed by an infusion, delayed and decreased the need of rescue analgesics after spinal anesthesia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Bilateral Heel Numbness due to External Compression during Obstetric Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Vivian P.; Zegers, Marie P.A.; Koppen, Hille

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who developed bilateral heel numbness after obstetric epidural analgesia. We diagnosed her with bilateral neuropathy of the medial calcaneal nerve, most likely due to longstanding pressure on both heels. Risk factors for the development of this neuropathy were prolonged labour with spinal analgesia and a continuation of analgesia during episiotomy. Padded footrests decrease pressure and can possibly prevent this neuropathy. PMID:25802500

  1. Comparing analgesia and μ-opioid receptor internalization produced by intrathecal enkephalin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Song, Bingbing; Lao, Lijun; Pérez, Orlando A.; Kim, Woojae; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Opioid receptors in the spinal cord produce strong analgesia, but the mechanisms controlling their activation by endogenous opioids remain unclear. We have previously shown in spinal cord slices that peptidases preclude μ-opioid receptor (MOR) internalization by opioids. Our present goals were to investigate whether enkephalin-induced analgesia is also precluded by peptidases, and whether it is mediated by MORs or δ-opioid receptors (DORs). Tail-flick analgesia and MOR internalization were measured in rats injected intrathecally with Leu-enkephalin and peptidase inhibitors. Without peptidase inhibitors, Leu-enkephalin produced neither analgesia nor MOR internalization at doses up to 100 nmol, whereas with peptidase inhibitors it produced analgesia at 0.3 nmol and MOR internalization at 1 nmol. Leu-enkephalin was ten times more potent to produce analgesia than to produce MOR internalization, suggesting that DORs were involved. Selective MOR or DOR antagonists completely blocked the analgesia elicited by 0.3 nmol Leu-enkephalin (a dose that produced little MOR internalization), indicating that it involved these two receptors, possibly by an additive or synergistic interaction. The selective MOR agonist endomorphin-2 produced analgesia even in the presence of a DOR antagonist, but at doses substantially higher than Leu-enkephalin. Unlike Leu-enkephalin, endomorphin-2 had the same potencies to induce analgesia and MOR internalization. We concluded that low doses of enkephalins produce analgesia by activating both MORs and DORs. Analgesia can also be produced exclusively by MORs at higher agonist doses. Since peptidases prevent the activation of spinal opioid receptors by enkephalins, the coincident release of opioids and endogenous peptidase inhibitors may be required for analgesia. PMID:17845806

  2. Evolving Role of Local Anesthetics in Managing Postsurgical Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Golembiewski, Julie; Dasta, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Opioid analgesics, the cornerstone of effective postsurgical pain management, may be associated with risk of opioid-related adverse drug events (ADEs) that may complicate the postsurgical experience. Perioperative multimodal analgesic regimens have the potential to improve postsurgical pain control and may permit use of lower analgesic doses and reduce the incidence of opioid-related ADEs. Utility of traditional local anesthetic formulations to provide analgesia over the entire postsurgical period is limited by their short duration of action. Liposome bupivacaine, a liposomal formulation of bupivacaine indicated for single-dose administration into the surgical site to produce postsurgical analgesia, was evaluated in multiple surgical models as part of multimodal analgesic regimens and was found in clinical trials to provide postsurgical analgesia for up to 72 hours. Here, we provide an overview of the available multimodal analgesic options and recent recommendations for optimal postsurgical pain management. A review of the literature was conducted, and results from recent clinical trials are included. The use of a multimodal analgesic regimen, including liposome bupivacaine, can extend the time to first postsurgical opioid use, may reduce postsurgical opioid consumption, and reduce hospital length of stay and costs compared with an opioid-only analgesic regimen. Use of multimodal analgesic regimens is a practical way to achieve good postsurgical analgesia while minimizing reliance on opioids and associated adverse events. Taken as a whole, evidence from the clinical studies of liposome bupivacaine suggests this local anesthetic formulation may be a useful component of multimodal analgesic regimens for managing postsurgical pain in select patients, with the potential to reduce opioid use and opioid-related ADEs in the postsurgical setting. As with bupivacaine, appropriate use of liposome bupivacaine to optimize clinical effects, economic implications, and patient

  3. The influence of analgesia on labor--is it related to primary cesarean rates?

    PubMed

    Wong, Cynthia A

    2012-10-01

    Multiple observational studies have reported an association between neuraxial (epidural, spinal, or combined spinal-epidural) labor analgesia and cesarean delivery. The purpose of this review is to summarize data from controlled trials addressing the question of whether neuraxial labor analgesia causes an increased risk of cesarean delivery. Additionally, the review will discuss whether the timing of initiation of analgesia or the specific type of neuraxial analgesia influences mode of delivery. Finally, the issue of external validity of published trials will be discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Obstetric analgesia and immunoreactive endorphin peptides in maternal plasma during labor.

    PubMed

    Riss, P A; Bieglmayer, C

    1984-01-01

    We studied the effect of obstetric analgesia on maternal plasma levels of immunoreactive endorphin peptides (ir-EP) during labor and the postpartum period in three groups of parturients: group I (n = 22) had no analgesia, group II (n = 20) received pethidine intramuscularly, and group III (n = 10) had continuous epidural analgesia. Initial levels of ir-EP were similar in all three groups. Patients without any medication and patients on pethidine showed a significant rise in ir-EP in late labor and at delivery. Epidural analgesia was characterized by constant levels of ir-EP during labor and an insignificant rise at delivery.

  5. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia in labor does not always improve maternal satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Nikkola, Eeva; Läärä, Arja; Hinkka, Susanna; Ekblad, Ulla; Kero, Pentti; Salonen, Markku

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether patient-controlled epidural analgesia in labor with bupivacaine and fentanyl provides more satisfaction to mothers than intermittent bolus epidural analgesia or patient-controlled epidural analgesia with plain bupivacaine. Ninety mothers with term, uncomplicated pregnancies were randomized to receive intermittent bolus epidural analgesia (bupivacaine + fentanyl), patient-controlled epidural analgesia (bupivacaine + fentanyl), or patient-controlled epidural analgesia (bupivacaine). Pain during labor was evaluated with a visual analog scale. Obstetric and neonatal outcomes were recorded. After delivery, the mothers were given a questionnaire covering the following themes: experience of labor pain, feeling of control, fears and expectations associated with pregnancy/with delivery/with becoming a mother, as well as pain, physical condition and emotions after delivery. To elaborate on these answers, 30 mothers were further randomized to a semistructured interview, in which the same topics were discussed. The main outcome measure was maternal satisfaction. The intermittent bolus epidural analgesia group felt they could influence labor most (p = 0.03), and in the interview they expressed most satisfaction. In this group, the total drug utilization was smallest (bupivacaine: p <0.0001 comparing all groups, fentanyl: p = 0.03 comparing the two fentanyl-receiving groups). No differences in pain occurred. Vomiting (p = 0.04) and pruritus (p <0.0001) were more common or more severe in the groups receiving fentanyl. We found no advantages for patient-controlled epidural analgesia over intermittent bolus epidural analgesia in terms of maternal satisfaction.

  6. [Effects of 15 mcg intrathecal clonidine added to bupivacaine and sufentanil for labor analgesia].

    PubMed

    Labbene, Iheb; Gharsallah, Hedi; Abderrahman, Anis; Belhadj Amor, Mondher; Trabelsi, Walid; Hajjej, Zied; Ferjani, Mustapha

    2011-11-01

    For the combined spinal epidural analgesia for labour, 30 mcg of subarachnoid clonidine has proved its effectiveness to extend the analgesia, but increased severe hemodynamic effects. To assess the effectiveness and the safety of 15 mcg intra thecal clonidine for labour analgesia. Four months, prospective, randomised, simple blind Study, including ASA I or II women, with mono foetal pregnancy. Patients were randomised in 2 groups: SB Group received intra thecal isobaric bupivacaine 2.5 mg and sufentanil 5 mcg and SBC Group received 15 mcg clonidine added to the same doses of bupivacaïne and sufentanil. Epidural analgesia was used when VAS is more than 30. Studied parameters were: delay of installation, duration of analgesia, VAS score, hemodynamic parameters and the incidence of maternal and neonatal side effects. Sixty pregnant women were included (27 in SBC Group and 33 in SB group). The duration of initial analgesia was significantly longer in the SBC group (145 ± 43 min) compared with the SB group (98 ± 28 min). The delay of analgesia, sensory level and motor block level were similar. There was neither significant increase of the low incidence of blood pressure nor of the ephedrine consumption. The abnormalities of fetal heart rate, the mode of delivery and the incidence of side effects were also similar. The addition of 15 mcg intra thecal clonidine to the bupivacaine and the sufentanil during combined spinal epidural analgesia for obstetrical labour results in extended significantly duration of analgesia without increasing side effects.

  7. Does nitrous oxide labor analgesia influence the pattern of neuraxial analgesia usage? An impact study at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Bobb, Lesley E; Farber, Michaela K; McGovern, Catherine; Camann, William

    2016-12-01

    To compare the rate of epidural use before and after the implementation of nitrous oxide (N2O). Data were obtained from a nursing database of N2O usage and our obstetric anesthesia database. We compared 8 months before and 8 months after the introduction of N2O. It was available 24 h/d, 7 d/wk, consistent with neuraxial analgesia availability. Epidural utilization before and after introduction of N2O was compared using χ(2) analysis. Labor and delivery floor. Total number of births over the study period was 8539: 4315 pre-N2O and 4224 post-N2O. The rate of epidural usage was 77% pre-N2O and 74% after N2O (P= not significant, χ(2)). A total of 762 patients used N2O. Monthly analysis showed no change in pattern of neuraxial analgesia use in post-N2O period compared with the pre-N2O period. The introduction of N2O for labor analgesia was not associated with any change in our rate of labor epidural utilization. Under the conditions of our study, these results suggest that N2O does not discourage neuraxial use for labor pain relief. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Continuous Femoral Nerve Block versus Local Infiltration Analgesia as a Postoperative Analgesia in Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Deepika; Mahajan, Hari Krishan; Chauhan, Parshu Ram; Govind, Preeti S; Singh, Pushpinder; Dhanevar, Ravinder; Gupta, Abhinav

    2017-07-01

    Local infiltration of knee joint in arthroplasty, provide postoperative analgesia and preserves motor power of quadriceps, which helps in early mobilisation, as compared to femoral nerve block which paralyses vastus medialis. To compare the quality of postoperative analgesia provided by femoral nerve block and local infiltration in unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). A prospective study was conducted on 60 patients (25-65 years) of ASA I and II, which were randomly(using random number table) divided into two groups - Group 1-femoral nerve block (FNB) and Group 2-Local Infiltration Analgesia (LIA). Patients with chronic pain and on opioids were excluded. Numeric rating scale (primary objective), sedation score, nausea vomiting score and motor power were analysed. The results were analysed by parametric and nonparametric tests using SPSS software version 22. p<0.05 was considered significant. Pain relief was better in FNB Group (p-value <0.001) with less fentanyl demand (p-value <0.001), low sedation score (0.013, 0.179, 0.018, 0.129, 0.287, 0.432) but associated with low muscle power grading (<0.001). FNB has better pain relief than LIA Group but range of motion was reduced in FNB Group grossly, effect on mobilisation remained comparable in both group.

  9. [Combined epidural-spinal analgesia during labor: a quantitative systematic review of the literature (meta-analysis)].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Ramírez, J; Haya Palazuelo, J; Valverde Mantecón, J M

    2013-11-01

    To perform a meta-analysis on the use of combined epidural-intrathecal analgesia during labor, including intrathecal fentanyl and/or morphine compared to usual epidural techniques. A literature search was made looking for randomized clinical trials in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library. The size of the effect for quantitative variables was analyzed by weighted mean difference; for qualitative variables, by odds ratio. Variables analyzed were: labor duration, type of delivery (spontaneous, instrumental and caesarean section), motor blockade, pain, and satisfaction. The analysis used in most cases was a random effects model. A total of 21 trials, which included 3.646 patients, were selected out of the 38 initially found. The type of delivery variable with its 3 subgroups was the only one to show uniformity (p>Q 0.1; I(2)<50%). There were no differences in the variables analyzed except pain, which was advantageous for the group with intrathecal fentanyl or morphine by 0.55 points out of 10. Combined analgesia including intrathecal fentanyl-morphine does not offer significant advantages compared to the standard epidural. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Butorphanol in labour analgesia: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Ajay; Agarwal, Rachana

    2013-01-01

    Objective Parenteral opioids can be administered with ease at a very low cost with high efficacy as labour analgesia. However, there are insufficient data available to accept the benefits of parenteral opioids over other proven methods of labour analgesia. Butorphanol, a new synthetic opioid, has emerged as a promising agent in terms of efficacy and a better safety profile. This study investigates the effect of butorphanol as a labour analgesia to gather further evidence of its safety and efficacy to pave the way for its widespread use in low resource settings. Material and Methods One hundred low risk term consenting pregnant women were recruited to take part in a prospective cohort study. Intramuscular injections of butorphanol tartrate 1 mg (Butrum 1/2mg, Aristo, Mumbai, India) were given in the active phase of labour and repeated two hourly. Pain relief was noted on a 10-point visual pain analogue scale (VPAS). Obstetric and neonatal outcome measures were mode of delivery, duration of labour, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admissions. Collected data were analysed for statistically significant pain relief between pre- and post-administration VPAS scores and also for the incidence of adverse outcomes. Results Pain started to decrease significantly within 15 minutes of administration and reached the nadir (3.08 SD0.51) at the end of two hours. The pain remained below four on the VPAS until the end of six hours and was still significantly low after eight hours. The incidence of adverse outcomes was low in the present study. Conclusion Butorphanol is an effective parenteral opioid analgesic which can be administered with reasonable safety for the mother and the neonate. The study has the drawback of lack of control and small sample size. PMID:24592110

  11. Efficacy of Intravenous Infusion of Acetaminophen for Intrapartum Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Zutshi, Vijay; Rani, Kumari Usha; Patel, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The intensity of pain experienced by women in labour, has been found to affect the progress of labour, foetal well-being and maternal psychology. Adverse effects associated with commonly used opioids for providing intrapartum analgesia have created a need for an alternative non-opioid drug. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of an intravenous infusion of 1000 mg of acetaminophen as an intrapartum analgesic. Materials and Methods The present prospective single-centre, single blind, placebo-controlled randomized interventional study was conducted in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Vardhaman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital over a period of six months from September 2014 to March 2015. After receiving the ethical clearance and written informed consent. The first 200 consecutive parturients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were recruited into the study. Women were then randomised to receive either intravenous 1000 mg (100ml) of acetaminophen (Group A, n=100) or 100 ml normal saline (Group B, n=100). Primary outcome assessed was effectiveness of acetaminophen to provide an adequate amount of analgesia, as measured by a change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain intensity score at various times after drug administration. Secondary outcomes measured were duration of labour, need for additional rescue analgesia and presence of adverse maternal or foetal effect. Results There was pain reduction at 1 and 2 hours in both groups (p<0.001). However, it was more significant in the acetaminophen group, especially at 1 hour. Duration of labour was shortened in both the groups, without any maternal and foetal adverse effects. Conclusion Intravenous acetaminophen is an efficacious non-opioid drug for relieving labour pain without any significant maternal and foetal adverse effects. PMID:27656511

  12. Effect of magnesium infusion on thoracic epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Mitra, Koel; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Roy, Suddhadeb; Sarkar, Aniruddha; Kundu, Sudeshna; Goswami, Anupam; Sarkar, Uday Narayan; Sanki, Prakash; Mitra, Ritabrata

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Patients of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) having an ASA status III or more are likely to be further downgraded by surgery to critical levels of pulmonary function. Aim: To compare the efficacy of thoracic epidural block with (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination and (0.125%) bupivacaine, fentanyl combination with adjunctive intravenous magnesium infusion for the relief of postoperative pain in patients undergoing LVRS. Methods: Patients were operated under general anesthesia. Thirty minutes before the anticipated completion of skin closure in both groups, (Group A and Group B) 7 ml of (0.125%) bupivacaine calculated as 1.5 ml/thoracic segment space for achieving analgesia in dermatomes of T4, T5, T6, T7, and T8 segments, along with fentanyl 50 μg (0.5 ml), was administered through the catheter, activating the epidural block, and the time was noted. Thereafter, in patients of Group A, magnesium sulfate injection 30 mg/kg i.v. bolus was followed by infusion of magnesium sulfate at 10 mg/kg/hr and continued up to 24 hours. Group B was treated as control. Results and Analysis: A significant increase in the mean and maximum duration of analgesia in Group A in comparison with Group B (P<0.05) was observed. Total epidural dose of fentanyl and bupivacaine required in Group A was significantly lower in comparison with Group B in 24 hours. Discussion: Requirement of total doses of local anesthetics along with opioids could be minimized by magnesium infusion; therefore, the further downgradation of patients of LVRS may be prevented. Conclusion: Intravenous magnesium can prolong opioid-induced analgesia while minimizing nausea, pruritus, and somnolence. PMID:21655018

  13. Peripheral nerve catheters and local anesthetic infiltration in perioperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Merritt, Christopher K; Mariano, Edward R; Kaye, Alan David; Lissauer, Jonathan; Mancuso, Kenneth; Prabhakar, Amit; Urman, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve catheters (PNCs) and local infiltration analgesia (LIA) represent valuable options for controlling perioperative pain. PNCs have been increasingly utilized to provide both surgical anesthesia and prolonged postoperative analgesia for a wide variety of procedures. PNCs can be more technically challenging to place than typical single-injection nerve blocks (SINB), and familiarity with the indications, contraindications, relevant anatomy, and appropriate technical skills is a prerequisite for the placement of any PNC. PNCs include risks of peripheral nerve injury, damage to adjacent anatomic structures, local anesthetic toxicity, intravascular injection, risks associated with motor block, risks of unnoticed injury to the insensate limb, and risks of sedation associated with PNC placement. In addition to these common risks, there are specific risks unique to each PNC insertion site. LIA strategies have emerged that seek to provide the benefit of targeted local anesthesia while minimizing collateral motor block and increasing the applicability of durable local anesthesia beyond the extremities. LIA involves the injection and/or infusion of a local anesthetic near the site of surgical incision to provide targeted analgesia. A wide variety of techniques have been described, including single-injection intraoperative wound infiltration, indwelling wound infusion catheters, and the recent high-volume LIA technique associated with joint replacement surgery. The efficacy of these techniques varies depending on specific procedures and anatomic locations. The recent incorporation of ultra-long-acting liposomal bupivacaine preparations has the potential to dramatically increase the utility of single-injection LIA. LIA represents a promising yet under-investigated method of postoperative pain control.

  14. Preoperative ketamine improves postoperative analgesia after gynecologic laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Rebecca F K; Lim, Jean; Chan, Matthew T V; Gin, Tony; Chiu, Wallace K Y

    2004-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the preemptive effect of a small dose of ketamine on postoperative wound pain. In a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial, we compared the analgesic requirement in patients receiving preincision ketamine with ketamine after skin closure or placebo after gynecologic laparoscopic surgery. One-hundred-thirty-five patients were randomly assigned to receive preincision or postoperative ketamine 0.15 mg/kg or saline IV. Anesthetic technique was standardized. Patients were interviewed regularly up to 4 wk after surgery. Pain score, morphine consumption, side effects, and quality of recovery score were recorded. Patients receiving preincision ketamine had a lower pain score in the first 6 h after operation compared with the postoperative (P = 0.001) or placebo groups (P < 0.001). The mean (95% confidence intervals) time to first request for analgesia in the preincision group, 1.8 h (1.4-2.1), was longer than the postoperative group, 1.2 h (0.9-1.5; P < 0.001), or the placebo group, 0.7 h (0.4-0.9; P < 0.001). The mean +/- SD morphine consumption in the preincision group, 1.5 +/- 2.0 mg, was less than that in the postoperative group, 2.9 +/- 3.1 mg (P = 0.04) and the placebo group, 3.4 +/- 2.7 mg (P = 0.003). There was no significant difference among groups with respect to hemodynamic variables or side effects. No patient complained of hallucinations or nightmares. We conclude that a small dose of ketamine is not only safe, but it also provides preemptive analgesia in patients undergoing gynecologic laparoscopic surgery. In women undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery, a small preoperative dose of ketamine (0.15 mg/kg) produced preemptive analgesia. There were no significant hemodynamic and psychological side effects with this dose.

  15. [Sedation and analgesia practices among Spanish neonatal intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Carbajal, R; Courtois, E; Pertega-Diaz, S; Muñiz-Garcia, J; Anand, K J S

    2015-08-01

    Pain management and sedation is a priority in neonatal intensive care units. A study was designed with the aim of determining current clinical practice as regards sedation and analgesia in neonatal intensive care units in Spain, as well as to identify factors associated with the use of sedative and analgesic drugs. A multicenter, observational, longitudinal and prospective study. Thirty neonatal units participated and included 468 neonates. Of these, 198 (42,3%) received sedatives or analgesics. A total of 19 different drugs were used during the study period, and the most used was fentanyl. Only fentanyl, midazolam, morphine and paracetamol were used in at least 20% of the neonates who received sedatives and/or analgesics. In infusions, 14 different drug prescriptions were used, with the most frequent being fentanyl and the combination of fentanyl and midazolam. The variables associated with receiving sedation and/or analgesia were, to have required invasive ventilation (P<.001; OR=23.79), a CRIB score >3 (P=.023; OR=2.26), the existence of pain evaluation guides in the unit (P<.001; OR=3.82), and a pain leader (P=.034; OR=2.35). Almost half of the neonates admitted to intensive care units receive sedatives or analgesics. There is significant variation between Spanish neonatal units as regards sedation and analgesia prescribing. Our results provide evidence on the "state of the art", and could serve as the basis of preparing clinical practice guidelines at a national level. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is a...

  17. Trends in pain relief in labour: implications for obstetric analgesia service in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Imarengiaye, C O

    2005-09-01

    Labour and delivery result in severe pain for most women. Attention to comfort and analgesia for women in labour is important for physiological reasons and out of compassion. A review of common methods of pain relief of labour was done. Inhalation method as well as intravenous administration of opioids for pain relief in labour is fast giving way to lumbar epidural analgesia. The use of local anaesthetic in labour offers superior pain relief, is effective and safe. The inhalation and parenteral routes seem reserved for patients with contraindication to insertion of epidural. The administration of high volume dilute concentration of local anaesthetic plus lipid soluble opioids, with some level of patient's control, appears to be the current trend in the management of labour pains. There is a body of evidence indicating that Nigerian women may want pain relief in labour. However, there is no organised labour analgesia service in Nigeria. An organised obstetric analgesia service can be developed within the limits of available manpower and technology in an emerging country like Nigeria. This article therefore, focuses on trends in obstetric analgesia and its implications on the development of organised obstetric analgesia services in Nigeria. Key words: obstetric analgesia, obstetric analgesia service, Nigeria.

  18. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is a...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is a...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is a...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5160 - Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. 868.5160... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5160 Gas machine for anesthesia or analgesia. (a) Gas machine for anesthesia—(1) Identification. A gas machine for anesthesia is a...

  2. Combined spinal-epidural versus epidural analgesia in labour.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Scott W; Taghizadeh, Neda; Dennis, Alicia T; Hughes, Damien; Cyna, Allan M

    2012-10-17

    Traditional epidural techniques have been associated with prolonged labour, use of oxytocin augmentation and increased incidence of instrumental vaginal delivery. The combined spinal-epidural (CSE) technique has been introduced in an attempt to reduce these adverse effects. CSE is believed to improve maternal mobility during labour and provide more rapid onset of analgesia than epidural analgesia, which could contribute to increased maternal satisfaction. To assess the relative effects of CSE versus epidural analgesia during labour. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (28 September 2011) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We updated the search on 30 June 2012 and added the results to the awaiting classification section. All published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving a comparison of CSE with epidural analgesia initiated for women in the first stage of labour. Cluster-randomised trials were considered for inclusion. Quasi RCTs and cross-over trials were not considered for inclusion in this review. Three review authors independently assessed the trials identified from the searches for inclusion, assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Data were checked for accuracy. Twenty-seven trials involving 3274 women met our inclusion criteria. Twenty-six outcomes in two sets of comparisons involving CSE versus traditional epidurals and CSE versus low-dose epidural techniques were analysed.Of the CSE versus traditional epidural analyses five outcomes showed a significant difference. CSE was more favourable in relation to speed of onset of analgesia from time of injection (mean difference (MD) -2.87 minutes; 95% confidence interval (CI) -5.07 to -0.67; two trials, 129 women); the need for rescue analgesia (risk ratio (RR) 0.31; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.70; one trial, 42 women); urinary retention (RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.79 to 0.95; one trial, 704 women); and rate of instrumental delivery (RR 0.81; 95% CI 0.67 to 0.97; six trials

  3. Unintentional subdural injection: a complication of neuraxial anesthesia/analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hoftman, Nir

    2011-06-01

    Unintentional subdural injection during neuraxial anesthesia/analgesia continues to be a challenge for anesthesiologists. This unusual complication is often poorly recognized, with the diagnosis made in retrospect, or not at all. The clinical presentation of these regional blocks can be heterogeneous, ranging from restricted, patchy, or unilateral sensory blockade all the way to extensive and even life-threatening motor and autonomic nervous system depression. Prompt diagnosis using clinical algorithms and radiographic imaging is crucial for the early discontinuation of the offending catheter. Supportive care is mandatory in cases involving severe depression of consciousness, motor function, and/or sympathetic tone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidural analgesia complicated by dural ectasia in the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Chelsea; Hofkamp, Michael P.; Noonan, Patrick T.; McAllister, Russell K.; Pilkinton, Kimberly A.; Diao, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the Marfan syndrome are considered to be high risk during pregnancy and warrant a complete multidisciplinary evaluation. One goal is to minimize hemodynamic fluctuations during labor since hypertensive episodes may result in aortic dissection or rupture. Although they may prevent these complications, neuraxial techniques may be complicated by dural ectasia. The case of a parturient with the Marfan syndrome and mild dural ectasia is presented. During attempted labor epidural placement, unintentional dural puncture occurred. A spinal catheter was used for adequate labor analgesia, and a resultant postdural puncture headache was alleviated by an epidural blood patch under fluoroscopic guidance. PMID:27695168

  5. Compartment syndrome obscured by post-operative epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Md. Quamar; Ali, Mir Sadat; Al Ruwaili, Majed; Al Sayed, Hassan Noori

    2012-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is an orthopedic emergency that require early recognition and urgent intervention to avoid catastrophic complications. High index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis based on a constellation of signs and symptoms that include pain out of proportion and worsened by passive stretching, altered sensorium and palpable tenseness. Any event thus, that masks pain, may lead to delay the diagnosis of compartment syndrome. We report here a case of polytrauma where post-operative analgesia was administered using epidural catheter, which obscured pain and lead to delay in recognition of compartment syndrome. Authors wish to share a lesson, learned at the expense of tragedy. PMID:24765418

  6. Ultrasound and its evolution in perioperative regional anesthesia and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Edward R; Marshall, Zwade J; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-03-01

    Perioperative regional anesthetic and analgesic techniques have evolved considerably over the past four decades. Perhaps, the most impressive development in recent years has been the rapid adoption and widespread utilization of ultrasound (US) guidance to perform targeted delivery of local anesthetics and catheters in a consistent manner for postoperative pain control. This article briefly reviews the history of US in regional anesthesia and perioperative analgesia, the evidence basis for this practice, the clinical application of novel techniques and imaging modalities, and possible future technology and research directions.

  7. Stress antagonizes morphine-induced analgesia in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Shannon, L.; Heybach, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to restraint stress resulted in antagonism of the analgesic effect of administered morphine in adult male rats. This antagonism of morphine-induced analgesia by restraint stress was not affected by adrenalectomy one day prior to testing, suggesting that stress-induced secretion of corticosteroids is not critical to this antagonism. In addition, parenteral administration of exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) mimicked the effect of stress in antagonizing morphine's analgesic efficacy. The hypothesis that ACTH is an endogenous opiate antagonist involved in modulating pain sensitivity is supported.

  8. Multimodal Analgesia for Acute Postoperative and Trauma-Related Pain.

    PubMed

    Polomano, Rosemary C; Fillman, Mechele; Giordano, Nicholas A; Vallerand, April Hazard; Nicely, Kelly L Wiltse; Jungquist, Carla R

    2017-03-01

    : Multimodal analgesia, which combines analgesic drugs from different classes and employs analgesic techniques that target different mechanisms of pain, is recommended in the treatment of acute postoperative and trauma-related pain because its synergistic effect maximizes pain relief at lower analgesic doses, thereby reducing the risk of adverse drug effects. Using a case-based approach, this article reviews various multimodal analgesic therapies used in the treatment of acute pain; discusses their benefits; and summarizes findings from related research, recommendations from evidence-based practice guidelines, and expert consensus reports.

  9. [Obstetric analgesia in patients with Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome].

    PubMed

    Felten, M L; Mercier, F J; Bonnet, V; Benhamou, D

    2001-11-01

    We report three cases of delivery in two parturients with a Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome. These patients have a rare hereditary disorder that results in three main features: haemangiomas, varicose veins, bone and soft tissue hypertrophy. In the absence of angiographic magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord and of perispinal tissues, arteriovenous malformations of the central nervous system could not been ruled out. Intravenous sufentanil and pudendal block were used for labour analgesia and vaginal delivery respectively; general anaesthesia was used for uterine revision and for caesarean section.

  10. Analgesia and anesthesia for neonates: study design and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Anand, K J S; Aranda, Jacob V; Berde, Charles B; Buckman, Shaavhrée; Capparelli, Edmund V; Carlo, Waldemar A; Hummel, Patricia; Lantos, John; Johnston, C Celeste; Lehr, Victoria Tutag; Lynn, Anne M; Maxwell, Lynne G; Oberlander, Tim F; Raju, Tonse N K; Soriano, Sulpicio G; Taddio, Anna; Walco, Gary A

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the clinical, methodologic, and ethical considerations for researchers interested in designing future trials in neonatal analgesia and anesthesia, hopefully stimulating additional research in this field. The MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane register databases were searched using subject headings related to infant, newborn, neonate, analgesia, anesthesia, ethics, and study design. Cross-references and personal files were searched manually. Studies reporting original data or review articles related to these topics were assessed and critically evaluated by experts for each topical area. Data on population demographics, study characteristics, and cognitive and behavioral outcomes were abstracted and synthesized in a systematic manner and refined by group members. Data synthesis and results were reviewed by a panel of independent experts and presented to a wider audience including clinicians, scientists, regulatory personnel, and industry representatives at the Newborn Drug Development Initiative workshop. Recommendations were revised after extensive discussions at the workshop and between committee members. Designing clinical trials to investigate novel or currently available approaches for analgesia and anesthesia in neonates requires consideration of salient study designs and ethical issues. Conditions requiring treatment include pain/stress resulting from invasive procedures, surgical operations, inflammatory conditions, and routine neonatal intensive care. Study design considerations must define the inclusion and exclusion criteria, a rationale for stratification, the confounding effects of comorbid conditions, and other clinical factors. Significant ethical issues include the constraints of studying neonates, obtaining informed consent, making risk-benefit assessments, defining compensation or rewards for participation, safety considerations, the use of placebo controls, and the variability among institutional

  11. Early versus late initiation of epidural analgesia for labour.

    PubMed

    Sng, Ban Leong; Leong, Wan Ling; Zeng, Yanzhi; Siddiqui, Fahad Javaid; Assam, Pryseley N; Lim, Yvonne; Chan, Edwin S Y; Sia, Alex T

    2014-10-09

    Pain during childbirth is arguably the most severe pain some women may experience in their lifetime. Epidural analgesia is an effective form of pain relief during labour. Many women have concerns regarding its safety. Furthermore, epidural services and anaesthetic support may not be available consistently across all centres. Observational data suggest that early initiation of epidural may be associated with an increased risk of caesarean section, but the same findings were not seen in recent randomised controlled trials. More recent guidelines suggest that in the absence of a medical contraindication, maternal request is a sufficient medical indication for pain relief during labour. The choice of analgesic technique, agent, and dosage is based on many factors, including patient preference, medical status, and contraindications. There is no systematically reviewed evidence on the maternal and foetal outcomes and safety of this practice. This systematic review aimed to summarise the effectiveness and safety of early initiation versus late initiation of epidural analgesia in women. We considered the obstetric and fetal outcomes relevant to women and side effects of the treatments, including risk of caesarean section, instrumental birth and time to birth. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (12 February 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (January 1966 to February 2014), Embase (January 1980 to February 2014) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included all randomised controlled trials involving women undergoing epidural labour analgesia that compared early initiation versus late initiation of epidural labour analgesia. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, extracted the data and assessed the trial quality. Data were checked for accuracy. We included nine studies with a total of 15,752 women.The overall risk of bias of

  12. [medullar adhesive arachnoiditis: a late complication after obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ploteau, S; de Kersaint-Gilly, A; Boog, G

    2004-11-01

    A 30-year-old woman, G3P3, was progressively affected by spastic paraparesis with loss of sensitivity and urinary incontinence due to medullar adhesive arachnoiditis occurring five months after an epidural analgesia for repeat cesarean section. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a voluminous subarachnoid cyst and a septated syringomyelic cavitation attributed to metabisulfite, the preservative of epinephrine and to multiple lidocaine injections through the catheter in the postoperative period. Despite two decompressive neurosurgical operations, the neurological state of the patient continues to worsen.

  13. [3 cases of sedation and analgesia using propofol and remifentanil for labor].

    PubMed

    Fontao Rodríguez, F E

    2003-10-01

    Three women in labor for whom epidural analgesia was contraindicated--2 with sepsis (pylonephritis and chorioamnionitis) and 1 with sacral agenesia--were provided intravenous analgesia with propofol (0.4-1.2 mg/kg/h) and remifentanil (0.033-0.1 microgram/kg/min plus boluses of 20 micrograms controlled by the patient) with oxygen supplementation. Heart rate, noninvasive blood pressure, maternal oxygen saturation and fetal heart rate were monitored. Maternal satisfaction, quality of analgesia, maternal side effects (sedation, depression, breathing, muscle rigidity, nausea, and vomiting) and fetal side effects (heart rate variability and Apgar score) were evaluated. We conclude that in cases where epidural analgesia is contraindicated, intravenous perfusion of low doses of propofol and remifentanil can provide a valid alternative for analgesia during labor.

  14. Postoperative analgesia in the cat after ovariohysterectomy by use of carprofen, ketoprofen, meloxicam or tolfenamic acid.

    PubMed

    Slingsby, L S; Waterman-Pearson, A E

    2000-10-01

    The adequacy of postoperative analgesia was assessed in 40 cats following ovariohysterectomy. At extubation, cats were given one dose of carprofen, ketoprofen, meloxicam or tolfenamic acid. Postoperative analgesia was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) scoring for pain and sedation; measurement of mechanical nociceptive thresholds at the wound; recognition of the requirement for rescue intervention analgesia; and an overall clinical assessment score at 18 hours. VAS pain scores were low throughout the trial, with no significant differences found between the groups. Postoperative mechanical nociceptive thresholds decreased significantly from baseline in all four groups, with no significant differences between the groups. One cat in each of the tolfenamic acid, ketoprofen and meloxicam groups required rescue intervention analgesia. Nine out of 10 cats in all four groups were classified as having desirable overall clinical assessment scores. In summary, all four drugs provided good postoperative analgesia, although none was able to prevent postoperative wound tenderness.

  15. Opioid and nonopioid interactions in two forms of stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Grisel, J E; Fleshner, M; Watkins, L R; Maier, S F

    1993-05-01

    Stressful environmental events activate endogenous mechanisms of pain inhibition. Under some circumstances the analgesia is blocked by naloxone/naltrexone ("opioid"), while under others it is not ("nonopioid"). The existence of these two categories of analgesia leads to the question of how they are related. In a collateral inhibition model proposed by Kirshgessner, Bodnar, and Pasternak (1982), opiate and nonopiate mechanisms were viewed as acting in a mutually inhibitory fashion. In the present experiments, rats were exposed to either of two environmental stressors that produce a nonopioid stress-induced analgesia (SIA) following injections of the opiate antagonist naltrexone or agonist morphine. In the presence of naltrexone, SIA produced by either cold water swim (CWS) or social defeat was enhanced. These same SIAs were found to attenuate the analgesic effect of morphine, demonstrating that an activation of opioid systems can inhibit nonopioid analgesias. These results support an inhibitory interaction of opioid and nonopioid mechanisms in some forms of stress-induced analgesia.

  16. Epidural Analgesia Versus Patient-Controlled Analgesia for Pain Relief in Uterine Artery Embolization for Uterine Fibroids: A Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kooij, Sanne M. van der Moolenaar, Lobke M.; Ankum, Willem M.; Reekers, Jim A.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to compare the costs and effects of epidural analgesia (EDA) to those of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCA) for postintervention pain relief in women having uterine artery embolization (UAE) for systematic uterine fibroids. Methods: Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) based on data from the literature by constructing a decision tree to model the clinical pathways for estimating the effects and costs of treatment with EDA and PCA. Literature on EDA for pain-relief after UAE was missing, and therefore, data on EDA for abdominal surgery were used. Outcome measures were compared costs to reduce one point in visual analogue score (VAS) or numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain 6 and 24 h after UAE and risk for complications. Results: Six hours after the intervention, the VAS was 3.56 when using PCA and 2.0 when using EDA. The costs for pain relief in women undergoing UAE with PCA and EDA were Euro-Sign 191 and Euro-Sign 355, respectively. The costs for EDA to reduce the VAS score 6 h after the intervention with one point compared with PCA were Euro-Sign 105 and Euro-Sign 179 after 24 h. The risk of having a complication was 2.45 times higher when using EDA. Conclusions: The results of this indirect comparison of EDA for abdominal surgery with PCA for UAE show that EDA would provide superior analgesia for post UAE pain at 6 and 24 h but with higher costs and an increased risk of complications.

  17. Fentanyl versus tramadol with levobupivacaine for combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Sharma, Sujata; Kumari, Pratibha; Sudha; Bali, Kusum

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuraxial labor analgesia using new local anesthetics such as levobupivacaine has become very popular by virtue of the safety and lesser motor blockade caused by these agents. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) has become the preferred method for labor analgesia as it combines benefits of both spinal analgesia and flexibility of the epidural catheter. Adding opioids to local anesthetic drugs provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesia but may be associated with several maternal and fetal adverse effects. The purpose of this study is to compare fentanyl and tramadol used in CSEA in terms of duration of analgesia and frequency of the adverse fetomaternal outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 primiparas with a singleton pregnancy in active labor were given CSEA after randomly allocating them in two groups of 30 each. Group I received intrathecal 2.5 mg levobupivacaine + 25 μg fentanyl followed by epidural top ups of 20 ml 0.125% solution of the same combination. Group II received 25 mg tramadol instead of fentanyl. Epidural top ups were given when parturient complained of two painful contractions (visual analogue scale ≥ 4). Data collected were demographic profile of the patients, analgesic qualities, side- effects and the fetomaternal outcome. Results: Patients in Group II had significantly prolonged analgesia (145 ± 9 minutes) than in Group I (95 ± 7 minutes). Patients receiving fentanyl showed rapid onset of analgesia, but there were more incidence of side-effects like shivering, pruritus, transient fetal bradycardia, hypotension, nausea and vomiting. Only side-effect in the tramadol group was nausea and vomiting. During labor, maternal satisfaction was excellent. Conclusions: Adding tramadol to local anesthetic provides prolonged analgesia with minimal side effects. Fentanyl, when used as adjuvant to local anesthetic, has a rapid onset of analgesia but has certain fetomaternal side-effects. PMID:26240543

  18. Effects of epidural analgesia on labor length, instrumental delivery, and neonatal short-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Junichi; Farina, Antonio; Turchi, Giovanni; Hasegawa, Yuko; Zanello, Margherita; Baroncini, Simonetta

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to clarify whether the short-term adverse neonatal outcomes associated with epidural analgesia are due to the epidural analgesia itself or to the instrumental delivery. A retrospective case-control study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between epidural analgesia, labor length, and perinatal outcomes. A total of 350 pregnant women at term who delivered under epidural analgesia (cases) were compared with 1400 patients without epidural analgesia (controls). Vacuum extraction (6.5 vs. 2.9 %) and cesarean section (19.9 vs. 11.1 %) were more frequently performed in the cases than controls (p < 0.001). Using a Kaplan-Meier algorithm, it was determined that the mean lengths of the 1st and 2nd stages of labor and the overall durations of labor and delivery were significantly longer in cases compared with controls. A Cox regression analysis showed that the longer labor remained even after adjustment for parity. The neonatal variables stratified by mode of delivery were not different in cases and controls, except for a slightly lower umbilical arterial pH in spontaneous delivery for the cases group. However, the Apgar scores and umbilical arterial pH were significantly lower in the neonates delivered by vacuum extraction compared with those in the neonates delivered by spontaneous delivery or cesarean section, regardless of whether epidural analgesia was performed. A multivariable analysis showed that vacuum extraction much more consistently affected the arterial pH than the analgesia itself (the β coefficients were -0.036 for epidural analgesia vs. -0.050 for vacuum extraction). Epidural analgesia was associated with slowly progressing labor, thus resulting in an increased rate of instrumental delivery. This instrumental delivery appears to adversely affect the neonatal outcomes more strongly than the analgesia itself.

  19. Significance of Neuronal Cytochrome P450 Activity in Opioid-Mediated Stress-Induced Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hough, Lindsay B.; Nalwalk, Julia W.; Yang, Weizhu; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    Stressful environmental changes can suppress nociceptive transmission, a phenomenon known as “stress-induced analgesia”. Depending on the stressor and the subject, opioid or non-opioid mechanisms are activated. Brain μ opioid receptors mediate analgesia evoked either by exogenous agents (e.g. morphine), or by the release of endogenous opioids following stressful procedures. Recent work with morphine and neuronal cytochrome P450 (P450)-deficient mice proposed a signal transduction role for P450 enzymes in μ analgesia. Since μ opioid receptors also mediate some forms of stress-induced analgesia, the present studies assessed the significance of brain P450 activity in opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia. Two widely-used models of opioid stress-induced analgesia (restraint and warm water swim) were studied in both sexes of wild-type control and P450-deficient (Null) mice. In control mice, both stressors evoked moderate analgesic responses which were blocked by pretreatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, confirming the opioid nature of these responses. Consistent with literature, sex differences (control female > control male) were seen in swim-induced, but not restraint-induced, analgesia. Null mice showed differential responses to the two stress paradigms. As compared with control subjects, Null mice showed highly attenuated restraint-induced analgesia, showing a critical role for neuronal P450s in this response. However, warm water swim-induced analgesia was unchanged in Null vs. control mice. Additional control experiments confirmed the absence of morphine analgesia in Null mice. These results are the first to show that some forms of opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia require brain neuronal P450 activity. PMID:25020125

  20. RESULTS OF THE MEGAVEREBRATE ANALGESIA SURVEY: GIRAFFE AND HIPPOPOTAMUS.

    PubMed

    Boothe, Matthew; Kottwitz, Jack; Harmon, Roy; Citino, Scott B; Zuba, Jeffery R; Boothe, Dawn M

    2016-12-01

    Results of an online survey posted on the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians listserv examined the patterns of analgesic medication and pain management modalities used for captive giraffe and hippopotami. Compiled data included signalment, drugs administered, dosing regimens, subjective efficacy scores, ease of administration, and adverse events. Nineteen institutions exhibiting hippopotami ( Hippopotamus amphibious ) and pygmy hippopotami (Choeropsis liberiensis) and 45 exhibiting giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis spp.) responded. Phenylbutazone was the most-commonly administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), followed by flunixin meglumine, but doses varied widely. Eight institutions reported adverse events from NSAID administration. Tramadol was the most-commonly administered opioid followed by butorphanol. Only one adverse event was reported for opioids. Twenty-three of 45 institutions exhibiting giraffe utilized alternative analgesia methods including gabapentin, glucosamine-chondroitin, local anesthetics, and low level laser therapy. Six of 19 institutions exhibiting hippopotami administered omega 3-6 fatty acids, gabapentin, glucosamine-chondroitin, and α-2 adrenergics to provide analgesia. While all reporting zoological institutions administered similar drugs, there was substantial variation and diversity in both dosing regimens and frequencies, indicating the need for both preclinical and clinical studies supporting dosing regimens.

  1. Human models of pain for the prediction of clinical analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred

    2014-10-01

    Human experimental pain models are widely used to study drug effects under controlled conditions. However, efforts to improve both animal and human experimental model selection, on the basis of increased understanding of the underlying pathophysiological pain mechanisms, have been disappointing, with poor translation of results to clinical analgesia. We have developed an alternative approach to the selection of suitable pain models that can correctly predict drug efficacy in particular clinical settings. This is based on the analysis of successful or unsuccessful empirical prediction of clinical analgesia using experimental pain models. We analyzed statistically the distribution of published mutual agreements or disagreements between drug efficacy in experimental and clinical pain settings. Significance limits were derived by random permutations of agreements. We found that a limited subset of pain models predicts a large number of clinically relevant pain settings, including efficacy against neuropathic pain for which novel analgesics are particularly needed. Thus, based on empirical evidence of agreement between drugs for their efficacy in experimental and clinical pain settings, it is possible to identify pain models that reliably predict clinical analgesic drug efficacy in cost-effective experimental settings.

  2. A pervasive mechanism for analgesia: activation of GIRK2 channels.

    PubMed

    Blednov, Y A; Stoffel, M; Alva, H; Harris, R A

    2003-01-07

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) provide a common link between numerous neurotransmitter receptors and the regulation of synaptic transmission. We asked whether GIRKs specify a single behavioral action that is produced by drugs acting on the diverse receptors coupled with GIRKs. By using GIRK2-null mutant mice, we found marked reduction or complete elimination of the antinociceptive (hot plate test) effects of ethanol, oxotremorine, nicotine, baclofen, clonidine, and the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212. However, ketamine analgesia remained intact. For most drugs, there was a sex difference in antinociceptive action, and the impact of deletion of the GIRK2 channel was less in female mice. The deletion of the GIRK2 channel blocks the opioid-dependent component of stress-induced analgesia (SIA), whereas nonopioid SIA was not changed. We propose that opioid, alpha adrenergic, muscarinic cholinergic, gamma-aminobutyric acid-B, and cannabinoid receptors are coupled with postsynaptic GIRK2 channels in vivo. Furthermore, this pathway accounts for essentially all of the antinociceptive effects in males, although females appear to recruit additional signal transduction mechanisms for some analgesic drugs.

  3. Obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in women with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Chi, Claudia; Lee, Christine A; England, Adrian; Hingorani, Jaishree; Paintsil, James; Kadir, Rezan A

    2009-06-01

    A retrospective review was carried out on the methods of obstetric analgesia/anesthesia used in 80 pregnancies amongst 63 women with inherited bleeding disorders (19 factor XI deficiency, 16 carriers of haemophilia, 15 von Willebrand disease, seven platelet function disorders, four factor VII deficiency, one factor VII and XI deficiency and one factor X deficiency). In 72 pregnancies, the woman was seen antenatally in a multidisciplinary clinic to discuss and plan pain relief options. Regional block was performed for 41 pregnancies. The mothers were known to have a bleeding disorder in 35 of these pregnancies. Prophylactic cover was given in 10 pregnancies prior to the insertion of regional block but not required in the remaining 25 pregnancies because the coagulation defects had spontaneously normalised at term. There were six reported adverse effects from regional block similar to that found in the general population: inadequate anesthesia/analgesia (2), bloody tap (2), hypotension and a possible dural puncture which was treated conservatively. There were no reports of long-term complications. The findings show that it is possible to offer women with inherited bleeding disorders the option of regional block provided their coagulation defects have normalised, either spontaneously during pregnancy or following adequate haemostatic cover.

  4. Expectancy and Conditioning in Placebo Analgesia: Separate or Connected Processes?

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Irving; Kong, Jian; Sadler, Pamela; Spaeth, Rosa; Cook, Amanda; Kaptchuk, Ted; Gollub, Randy

    2014-01-01

    Expectancy and conditioning are often tested as opposing explanations of placebo analgesia, most commonly by pitting the effects of a conditioning procedure against those of a verbally-induced expectation for pain reduction. However, conditioning procedures can also alter expectations, such that the effect of conditioning on pain might be mediated by expectancy. We assessed the effect of conditioning on expected pain and placebo-induced pain reduction. Participants were told that the treatment (real or sham acupuncture) would affect one side of the arm but not the other. Because a real acupuncture effect would not be specific to a randomly selected side of the arm, any difference in pain between the “treated” and the “untreated” side would be a placebo effect. There were no significant main effects or interactions associated with type of acupuncture (real versus sham). In both groups, conditioning decreased expected pain for “treated” location and also increased the placebo effect (i.e., the difference in pain report between “treated” and “untreated” locations). In addition, mediation analysis lent support to the hypothesis that the effects of conditioning on placebo analgesia may be mediated by expectancy, although the size of this indirect effect requires further study. PMID:25093194

  5. BDNF parabrachio-amygdaloid pathway in morphine-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Maysa; Pawlowski, Sophie Anne; Barthas, Florent; Yalcin, Ipek; Kaufling, Jennifer; Dardente, Hugues; Zachariou, Venetia; Dileone, Ralph Joseph; Barrot, Michel; Veinante, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    In addition to its neurotrophic role, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in a wide array of functions, including anxiety and pain. The central amygdaloid nucleus (CeA) contains a high concentration of BDNF in terminals, originating from the pontine parabrachial nucleus. Since the spino-parabrachio-amygdaloid neural pathway is known to convey nociceptive information, we hypothesized a possible involvement of BDNF in supraspinal pain-related processes. To test this hypothesis, we generated localized deletion of BDNF in the parabrachial nucleus using local bilateral injections of adeno-associated viruses in adult floxed-BDNF mice. Basal thresholds of thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were not altered by BDNF loss and no behavioural deficit was noticed in anxiety and motor tests. However, BDNF-deleted animals displayed a major decrease in the analgesic effect of morphine. In addition, intra-CeA injections of the BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc in control mice also decreased morphine-induced analgesia. Finally, the number of c-Fos immunoreactive nuclei after acute morphine injection was decreased by 45% in the extended amygdala of BDNF-deleted animals. The absence of BDNF in the parabrachial nucleus thus altered the parabrachio-amygdaloid pathway. Overall, our study provides evidence that BDNF produced in the parabrachial nucleus modulates the functions of the parabrachio-amygdaloid pathway in opiate analgesia.

  6. [Mechanisms and applications of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in analgesia].

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Hui-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Lei; Tang, Yi; Peng, Wei-Wei; Hu, Li

    2017-06-25

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), as a non-pharmacological and non-invasive analgesic therapy with low-cost, has been widely used to relieve pain in various clinical applications, by delivering current pulses to the skin area to activate the peripheral nerve fibers. Nevertheless, analgesia induced by TENS varied in the clinical practice, which could be caused by the fact that TENS with different stimulus parameters has different biological mechanisms in relieving pain. Therefore, to advance our understanding of TENS in various basic and clinical studies, we discussed (1) neurophysiological and biochemical mechanisms of TENS-induced analgesia; (2) relevant factors that may influence analgesic effects of TENS from the perspectives of stimulus parameters, including stimulated position, pulse parameters (current intensity, frequency, and pulse width), stimulus duration and used times in each day; and (3) applications of TENS in relieving clinical pain, including post-operative pain, chronic low back pain and labor pain. Finally, we propose that TENS may involve multiple and complex psychological neurophysiological mechanisms, and suggest that different analgesic effects of TENS with different stimulus parameters should be taken into consideration in clinical applications. In addition, to optimize analgesic effect, we recommend that individual-based TENS stimulation parameters should be designed by considering individual differences among patients, e.g., adaptively adjusting the stimulation parameters based on the dynamic ratings of patients' pain.

  7. Update on epidural analgesia during labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Lurie, S; Priscu, V

    1993-05-01

    Properly administered epidural analgesia provides adequate pain relief during labor and delivery, shortens the first stage of labor, avoids adverse effects of narcotics, hypnotics, or inhalation drugs and it could be used as anesthesia in case a cesarean section is required. Epidural analgesia should be provided to all patients who need and ask for it with an exception of contraindications such as coagulation disorders, suspected infection or gross anatomic abnormality. The technique must be carried out with care if serious life-threatening complications, such as intravenous or intrathecal injection of local anesthetic, are to be avoided. The aim of many recent investigations has been to reduce the total dose of local anesthetic used. Supplementation of an opioid (mainly fentanyl) and introduction of the patient controlled epidural pump may not only serve this goal, but also reduce the demands on the time of obstetric anesthetists. We conclude that properly and skillfully administered epidural is the best form of pain relief during labor and delivery and we hope that more mothers could enjoy its benefits.

  8. Morphine and hydromorphone epidural analgesia. A prospective, randomized comparison.

    PubMed

    Chaplan, S R; Duncan, S R; Brodsky, J B; Brose, W G

    1992-12-01

    Because evidence from uncontrolled, unblinded studies suggested fewer side effects from epidural hydromorphone than from epidural morphine, we employed a randomized, blinded study design to compare the side effects of lumbar epidural morphine and hydromorphone in 55 adult, non-obstetric patients undergoing major surgical procedures. A bolus dose of epidural study drug was given at least 1 h prior to the conclusion of surgery, followed by a continuous infusion of the same drug for two postoperative days. Infusions were titrated to patient comfort. Visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, VAS sedation scores, and subjective ratings of nausea and pruritus were assessed twice daily. The two treatments provided equivalent analgesia. Sedation scores and prevalence of nausea did not differ significantly between groups. Prevalence of pruritus, however, differed significantly on postoperative day 1, with moderate to severe pruritus reported by 44.4% of patients in the morphine group versus 11.5% in the hydromorphone group (P < .01). On post-operative day 2, reports of pruritus by patients receiving morphine remained higher than those among the hydromorphone-treated subjects, although this difference was no longer statistically significant (32% vs. 16.7%, P = .18). We conclude that lumbar epidural morphine and hydromorphone afford comparable analgesia, but the occurrence of moderate to severe pruritus on the first postoperative day is reduced by the use of hydromorphone.

  9. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase dependence of opioid analgesia: fluconazole does not interfere with remifentanil-mediated analgesia in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Oertel, B G; Vermehren, J; Huynh, T T; Doehring, A; Ferreiros, N; Zimmermann, M; Geisslinger, G; Lötsch, J

    2014-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibitors may reduce opioid analgesia by inhibiting CYP activity-dependent post-opioid receptor signaling pathways in the brain. This suggestion was predicated on observations of highly attenuated morphine antinociception in rodents after intracerebroventricular injection of fluconazole or carrying a neuron-specific deletion of the cytochrome P450 reductase. However, based on assessments of thermal and electrical pain tolerance, respiratory function, and side effects in 21 healthy volunteers, before and during steady-state concentrations of 1.5 and 3.0 ng/ml of remifentanil at the effect site (viz., the central nervous system), administration of 400 mg/day fluconazole for 8 days in a double-blind, placebo-controlled manner failed to attenuate opioid effects. Although CYP inhibitors such as fluconazole are unlikely to attenuate remifentanil analgesia in humans, extrapolation of the findings to other opioids is premature because differences among opioid effects, such as ligand-selective biased signaling at opioid receptors, leave the possibility that CYP-dependent opioid signaling in the brain might be limited to morphine and may not extend to remifentanil.

  10. Naltrexone-sensitive analgesia following exposure of mice to 2450-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR)

    SciTech Connect

    Maillefer, R.H.; Quock, R.M. )

    1991-03-11

    This study was conducted to determine whether exposure to RFR might induce sufficient thermal stress to activate endogenous opioid mechanisms and induce analgesia. Male Swiss Webster mice, 20-25 g, were exposed to 10, 15 or 20 mV/cm{sup 2} RFR in a 2,450-MHz waveguide system for 10 min, then tested in the abdominal constriction paradigm. Specific absorption rates (SAR) were 23.7 W/kg at 10 mW/cm{sup 2}, 34.6 W/kg at 15 mW/cm{sup 2} and 45.5 W/kg at 20 mW/cm{sup 2}. Confinement in the exposure chamber alone did not appreciably alter body temperature but did appear to induce a stress-associated analgesia that was insensitive to the opioid receptor blocker naltrexone. Exposure of confined mice to RFR elevated body temperature and further increased analgesia in SAR-dependent manner. The high-SAR RFR-induced analgesia, but not the hyperthermia, was reduced by naltrexone. These findings suggest that (1) RFR produces SAR-dependent hyperthermia and analgesia and (2) RFR-induced analgesia is mediated by opioid mechanisms while confinement-induced analgesia involves non-opioid mechanisms.

  11. Comparison of parturient - controlled remifentanil with epidural bupivacain and sufentanil for labour analgesia: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stourac, Petr; Suchomelova, Hana; Stodulkova, Marta; Huser, Martin; Krikava, Ivo; Janku, Petr; Haklova, Olga; Hakl, Lubomir; Stoudek, Roman; Gal, Roman; Sevcik, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Epidural analgesia (EA) has significant contraindications including coagulation disorders and parturient refusal. One alternative is intravenous self-administered analgesia using the ultra short-acting opioid remifentanil (rPCA). We compared the efficiency and safety of standard epidural analgesia with parturient-controlled intravenous analgesia using remifentanil as well as personal satisfaction. We enrolled twelve ASA I classified women with singleton pregnancy who delivered vaginally in the period 3/2010-5/2010 and who received rPCA (n=12) in standard analgesic protocol: 20 µg boluses using PCA pump with a lockout interval of 3 min. The control group consisted of 12 pregnant women who received EA (n=12): 0.125% bupivacaine with sufentanil 0.5 µg/mL in top-up boluses every hour until delivery. Data were acquired from standard Acute Pain Service (APS) form and patient medical records (demographic, labour course parameters), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Bromage Scale (BS) and adverse effects of analgesia. There were no demographic or labour course parameter differences between groups (P>0.05). The differences in VAS decrease (P=0.056) and parturient satisfaction (P=0.24) during the whole analgesia administration were statistically insignificant. The main limitation of the study was small sample and enrolment of healthy singleton pregnant women only. Remifentanil use in obstetric analgesia is a viable alternative to EA, especially in cases of EA contraindications and parturient disapproval.

  12. Opioid-Independent Mechanisms Supporting Offset Analgesia and Temporal Sharpening of Nociceptive Information

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, K. T.; Eisenach, J. C.; Tong, C.; Coghill, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms supporting temporal processing of pain remain poorly understood. To determine the involvement of opioid mechanisms in temporal processing of pain, responses to dynamic noxious thermal stimuli and offset analgesia were assessed following administration of naloxone, a μ-opioid antagonist, and on a separate day, during and following intravenous administration of remifentanil, a μ-opioid agonist, in 19 healthy human volunteers. Multiple end points were sampled from real time computerized visual analog scale ratings (VAS, 1–10) to assess thermal sensitivity, magnitude and duration of offset analgesia, and painful after sensations. It was hypothesized that the magnitude of offset analgesia would be reduced by direct opioid antagonism and during states of acute opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), as well as diminished by the presence of exogenous opioids. Surprisingly, the magnitude of offset analgesia was not altered following naloxone administration, during remifentanil infusion, or following the termination of remifentanil infusion. Since thermal hyperalgesia was observed following both drugs, 8 of the original 19 subjects returned for an additional session without drug administration. Thermal hyperalgesia and increased magnitude of offset analgesia were observed across conditions of remifentanil, naloxone and no drug within this subset analysis, indicating that repeated heat testing induced thermal hyperalgesia which potentiated the magnitude of offset analgesia. Thus, it is concluded that the mechanisms subserving temporal processing of nociceptive information are largely opioid-independent, but that offset analgesia may be potentiated by heat-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a proportion of individuals. PMID:22503222

  13. Placebo-induced analgesia in an operant pain model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Todd A.; Price, Donald D.; Caudle, Robert; Murphy, Niall P.; Neubert, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Analgesia is particularly susceptible to placebo responses. Recent studies in humans have provided important insights into the neurobiology underlying placebo-induced analgesia. However, human studies provide incomplete mechanistic explanations of placebo analgesia because of limited capacity to use cellular, molecular, and genetic manipulations. To address this shortcoming, we describe here the development of a rat model of conditioned analgesia in an operant pain assay. Specifically, rats were conditioned to associate a placebo manipulation with the analgesic effect of 1 mg/kg morphine (s.c.) on facial thermal pain. We found that conditioned (placebo) responding bore three of the hallmarks of placebo-induced analgesia: (1) strong inter-animal variability in the response, (2) suppression by the opiate antagonist naloxone (5 mg/kg, s.c.), and (3) a positive predictive relationship between the unconditioned analgesic effect and the conditioned (placebo) effect. Due to the operant nature of the assay and the use of only a mild noxious thermal stimulus, we suggest these results provide evidence of placebo-induced analgesia in a preclinical model that utilizes an affective behavioral endpoint. This finding may provide opportunities for invasive preclinical studies allowing greater understanding of placebo-induced analgesia, thus paving the way for avenues to harness its benefits. PMID:22871471

  14. Opioid-independent mechanisms supporting offset analgesia and temporal sharpening of nociceptive information.

    PubMed

    Martucci, K T; Eisenach, J C; Tong, C; Coghill, R C

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms supporting temporal processing of pain remain poorly understood. To determine the involvement of opioid mechanisms in temporal processing of pain, responses to dynamic noxious thermal stimuli and offset analgesia were assessed after administration of naloxone, a μ-opioid antagonist, and on a separate day, during and after intravenous administration of remifentanil, a μ-opioid agonist, in 19 healthy human volunteers. Multiple end points were sampled from real-time computerized visual analog scale ratings (VAS, 1 to 10) to assess thermal sensitivity, magnitude and duration of offset analgesia, and painful after sensations. It was hypothesized that the magnitude of offset analgesia would be reduced by direct opioid antagonism and during states of acute opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), as well as diminished by the presence of exogenous opioids. Surprisingly, the magnitude of offset analgesia was not altered after naloxone administration, during remifentanil infusion, or after the termination of remifentanil infusion. Because thermal hyperalgesia was observed after both drugs, 8 of the original 19 subjects returned for an additional session without drug administration. Thermal hyperalgesia and increased magnitude of offset analgesia were observed across conditions of remifentanil, naloxone, and no drug within this subset analysis, indicating that repeated heat testing induced thermal hyperalgesia, which potentiated the magnitude of offset analgesia. Thus, it is concluded that the mechanisms subserving temporal processing of nociceptive information are largely opioid-independent, but that offset analgesia may be potentiated by heat-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a proportion of individuals.

  15. Functional network architecture predicts psychologically mediated analgesia related to treatment in chronic knee pain patients.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Javeria Ali; Kong, Jian; Spaeth, Rosa; Khan, Sheraz; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Gollub, Randy L

    2014-03-12

    Placebo analgesia is an indicator of how efficiently the brain translates psychological signals conveyed by a treatment procedure into pain relief. It has been demonstrated that functional connectivity between distributed brain regions predicts placebo analgesia in chronic back pain patients. Greater network efficiency in baseline brain networks may allow better information transfer and facilitate adaptive physiological responses to psychological aspects of treatment. Here, we theorized that topological network alignments in resting state scans predict psychologically conditioned analgesic responses to acupuncture treatment in chronic knee osteoarthritis pain patients (n = 45). Analgesia was induced by building positive expectations toward acupuncture treatment with verbal suggestion and heat pain conditioning on a test site of the arm. This procedure induced significantly more analgesia after sham or real acupuncture on the test site than in a control site. The psychologically conditioned analgesia was invariant to sham versus real treatment. Efficiency of information transfer within local networks calculated with graph-theoretic measures (local efficiency and clustering coefficients) significantly predicted conditioned analgesia. Clustering coefficients in regions associated with memory, motivation, and pain modulation were closely involved in predicting analgesia. Moreover, women showed higher clustering coefficients and marginally greater pain reduction than men. Overall, analgesic response to placebo cues can be predicted from a priori resting state data by observing local network topology. Such low-cost synchronizations may represent preparatory resources that facilitate subsequent performance of brain circuits in responding to adaptive environmental cues. This suggests a potential utility of network measures in predicting placebo response for clinical use.

  16. Placebo conditioning and placebo analgesia modulate a common brain network during pain anticipation and perception

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Alison; El-Deredy, Wael; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Lloyd, Donna; Tracey, Irene; Vogt, Brent A.; Nadeau, Valerie; Jones, Anthony K.P.

    2009-01-01

    The neural mechanisms whereby placebo conditioning leads to placebo analgesia remain unclear. In this study we aimed to identify the brain structures activated during placebo conditioning and subsequent placebo analgesia. We induced placebo analgesia by associating a sham treatment with pain reduction and used fMRI to measure brain activity associated with three stages of the placebo response: before, during and after the sham treatment, while participants anticipated and experienced brief laser pain. In the control session participants were explicitly told that the treatment was inactive. The sham treatment group reported a significant reduction in pain rating (p = 0.012). Anticipatory brain activity was modulated during placebo conditioning in a fronto-cingulate network involving the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial frontal cortex and the anterior mid-cingulate cortex (aMCC). Identical areas were modulated during anticipation in the placebo analgesia phase with the addition of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). However, during altered pain experience only aMCC, post-central gyrus and posterior cingulate demonstrated altered activity. The common frontal cortical areas modulated during anticipation in both the placebo conditioning and placebo analgesia phases have previously been implicated in placebo analgesia. Our results suggest that the main effect of placebo arises from the reduction of anticipation of pain during placebo conditioning that is subsequently maintained during placebo analgesia. PMID:19523766

  17. The use of pupillometry as monitoring of intraoperative analgesia in the consumption of analgesics during the first 12 hours after surgery.

    PubMed

    Abad Torrent, A; Rodríguez Bustamante, V; Carrasco Fons, N; Roca Tutusaus, F J; Blanco Vargas, D; González García, C

    2016-05-01

    .43-2.17) compared with group H-2 (5.66 [1.58]; medium 6, 95% confidence interval 5.05-6.26). Monitoring of the intraoperative analgesia by pupillometry was able to reduce the intensity of the acute postoperative pain and analgesic consumption in the first 12h in the hospital room after major gynecological surgery. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Assisting informed decision making for labour analgesia: a randomised controlled trial of a decision aid for labour analgesia versus a pamphlet

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most women use some method of pain relief during labour. There is extensive research evidence available of pharmacological pain relief during labour; however this evidence is not readily available to pregnant women. Decision aids are tools that present evidence based information and allow preference elicitation. Methods We developed a labour analgesia decision aid. Using a RCT design women either received a decision aid or a pamphlet. Eligible women were primiparous, ≥ 37 weeks, planning a vaginal birth of a single infant and had sufficient English to complete the trial materials. We used a combination of affective (anxiety, satisfaction and participation in decision-making) and behavioural outcomes (intention and analgesia use) to assess the impact of the decision aid, which were assessed before labour. Results 596 women were randomised (395 decision aid group, 201 pamphlet group). There were significant differences in knowledge scores between the decision aid group and the pamphlet group (mean difference 8.6, 95% CI 3.70, 13.40). There were no differences between decisional conflict scores (mean difference -0.99 (95% CI -3.07, 1.07), or anxiety (mean difference 0.3, 95% CI -2.15, 1.50). The decision aid group were significantly more likely to consider their care providers opinion (RR 1.28 95%CI 0.64, 0.95). There were no differences in analgesia use and poor follow through between antenatal analgesia intentions and use. Conclusions This decision aid improves women's labour analgesia knowledge without increasing anxiety. Significantly, the decision aid group were more informed of labour analgesia options, and considered the opinion of their care providers more often when making their analgesia decisions, thus improving informed decision making. Trial Registration Trial registration no: ISRCTN52287533 PMID:20377844

  19. Dexmedetomidine in Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chunguang; Chi, Meiying; Zhang, Yanwei; Zhang, Zongwang; Qi, Feng; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Both dexmedetomidine and sufentanil modulate spinal analgesia by different mechanisms, and yet no human studies are available on their combination for analgesia during the first 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. This CONSORT-prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of dexmedetomidine and sufentanil in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. Ninety women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were divided into 3 equal groups that received sufentanil (Group C; 0.02 μg/kg/h), sufentanil plus dexmedetomidine (Group D1; 0.02 μg/kg/h, each), or sufentanil (0.02 μg/kg/h) plus dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) (Group D2) for 72 hours after surgery in this double-blinded, randomized study. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative sufentanil consumption, whereas the secondary outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale), requirement of narcotic drugs during the operation, level of sedation, Bruggrmann comfort scale, and concerning adverse effects. The postoperative sufentanil consumption was significantly lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C during the observation period (P < 0.05), but lower in Group D2 than in Group D1 at 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery (P < 0.05). The heart rate after intubation and incision was lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C (P < 0.05). On arrival at the recovery room, Groups D1 and D2 had lower mean blood pressure than Group C (P < 0.05). The intraoperative requirement of sevoflurane was 30% lesser in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C. The sedation levels were greater in Groups D1 and D2 during the first hour (P < 0.05). Compared with Groups C and D1, Group D2 showed lower levels of the overall incidence of nausea and vomiting (P < 0.05). Among the tested PCA options, the addition of dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) and sufentanil (0

  20. Epidural Dexamethasone Influences Postoperative Analgesia after Major Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Min; Kim, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Kwon, Jae-Young; Kim, Hae-Kyu; Kim, Hyae-Jin; Cho, Ah-Reum; Do, Wang-Seok; Kim, Hyo Sung

    2017-05-01

    Epidurally administered dexamethasone might reduce postoperative pain. However, the effect of epidural administration of dexamethasone on postoperative epidural analgesia in major abdominal surgery has been doubtful. To investigate the effects and optimal dose of epidural dexamethasone on pain after major abdominal surgery. A prospective randomized, double-blind study. University hospital. One hundred twenty ASA physical status I and II men, scheduled for gastrectomy, were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of 3 treatment regimens (n = 40 in each group): dexamethasone 5 mg (1 mL) with normal saline (1 mL) (group D) or dexamethasone 10 mg (2 mL) (group E) or 2 mL of normal saline (group C) mixed with 8 mL of 0.375% ropivacaine as a loading dose. After the surgery, 0.2% ropivacaine - fentanyl 4 ?g/mL was epidurally administered for analgesia. The infusion was set to deliver 4 mL/hr of the PCEA solution, with a bolus of 2 mL per demand and 15 minutes lockout time. The infused volume of PCEA, intensity of postoperative pain using visual analogue scale (VAS) during rest and coughing, incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), usage of rescue analgesia and rescue antiemetic, and side effects such as respiratory depression, urinary retention, and pruritus were recorded at 2, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after the end of surgery. The resting and effort VAS was significantly lower in group E compared to group C at every time point through the study period. On the contrary, only the resting VAS in group D was lower at 2 hours and 6 hours after surgery. Total fentanyl consumption of group E was significantly lower compared to other groups. There was no difference in adverse effect such as hypotension, bradycardia, PONV, pruritis, and urinary retention among groups. Use of epidural PCA with basal rate might interrupt an accurate comparison of dexamethasone effect. Hyperglycemia and adrenal suppression were not evaluated. Epidural dexamethasone was

  1. [Obstetric epidural analgesia: relationship between obstetric variables and the course of labor].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; Rodríguez Caravaca, G; Serrano Rodríguez, Maria L; Delgado González, T; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2004-03-01

    To analyze the relationship between epidural analgesia and diverse obstetric and fetal variables as well as the impact of epidural analgesia on the rates of instrumental and cesarean delivery. Observational study of women who gave birth at Fundación Hospital Alcorcón over a period of 3 years. All the women were offered obstetric epidural analgesia based on 0.0625% bupivacaine plus 2 microg/mL of fentanyl. The following data were recorded: age, nulliparity (yes/no) administration of epidural analgesia (yes/no), induction of labor (yes/no), stimulation of uterine activity with oxytocin (yes/no), type of delivery, fetal weight, duration of dilation, duration of expulsion, cause of cesarean. The records of 4364 women were gathered. The percentages of inductions, nulliparas, oxytocin stimulation, and fetal weight greater than 4 kg and less than 2.5 kg were higher among women taking epidural analgesia. The age of women who received epidurals was significantly lower. The durations of dilation and expulsion were longer among women receiving epidural analgesia, and epidural analgesia was associated with greater risk of instrumental and cesarean deliveries. The significant increase in administration of epidural blocks over the 3-year period of the study was not accompanied by an increased rate of instrumentally assisted deliveries or cesareans. It is difficult to evaluate the real influence of epidural analgesia on certain aspects of labor and its evolution. The strength of the association between epidural analgesia and greater risk of increased rates of instrumental and cesarean deliveries may be influenced by factors not considered in the present study.

  2. Epidural analgesia during labor: continuous infusion or patient-controlled administration?

    PubMed

    Benhamou, D

    1995-05-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has several advantages over continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine during labor: it produces a good analgesia with a limited sensory spread; generally, less bupivacaine is administered and maternal satisfaction with pain control is increased. However, the quality of analgesia is similar to that obtained with other forms of epidural administration. Moreover, PCEA is only a particular form of epidural and, as such, has the same safety requirements. PCEA does not appear to reduce the workload of the anesthetic team. The cost of the PCA pump will need to be included in future evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio.

  3. Placental abruption occurring soon after labor combined spinal-epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Jaime, F; Degani, J; Lam, N; Allen, G

    2012-10-01

    We present a case of placental abruption necessitating emergency cesarean section in an otherwise uncomplicated patient soon after initiation of combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor. Administration of spinal opioids has the potential to cause fetal bradycardia due to uterine hypertonicity following rapid onset of analgesia. In this case, a previously bloody show before placement of combined spinal-epidural analgesia may have been evidence of a small abruption. We hypothesize that uterine hypertonicity following administration of spinal opioids may have hastened the development of an existing placental abruption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of epidural analgesia on labor and delivery: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gerli, Sandro; Favilli, Alessandro; Acanfora, Marta M; Bini, Vittorio; Giorgini, Carla; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo

    2011-03-01

    Two groups of women have been retrospectively compared: 155 women who received analgesia and 1355 women who delivered without analgesia. The duration of the first stage, second stage, and total duration of labor was longer in epidural group, however epidural analgesia was not demonstrated as an independent risk factor for a prolonged labor. The variable most influencing the total duration of labor and the duration of the first stage was nulliparity; the variables most influencing the duration of the second stage were the older age, a reduced body mass index, a high newborn weight and nulliparity.

  5. Moving beyond the debate: a holistic approach to understanding and treating effects of neuraxial analgesia.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Penny

    2012-12-01

    Neuraxial analgesia is here to stay, yet, spirited debate continues over potential harms and the quality of research that fails to identify them. This paper proposes moving beyond the debate and examining holistically the impact of neuraxial analgesia on the psychophysiology of mother and baby. A review of alterations in functioning of many systems is followed by a suggested four-part protocol to partially restore normal physiology and emotional well-being, and improve outcomes of neuraxial analgesia. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Neuraxial analgesia effects on labour progression: facts, fallacies, uncertainties and the future.

    PubMed

    Grant, E N; Tao, W; Craig, M; McIntire, D; Leveno, K

    2015-02-01

    Approximately 60% of women who labour in the USA receive some form of neuraxial analgesia, but concerns have been raised regarding whether it negatively impacts the labour and delivery process. In this review, we attempt to clarify what has been established as truths, falsities and uncertainties regarding the effects of this form of pain relief on labour progression, negative and/or positive. Additionally, although the term 'epidural' has become synonymous with neuraxial analgesia, we discuss two other techniques, combined spinal-epidural and continuous spinal analgesia, that are gaining popularity, as well as their effects on labour progression. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  7. Neuraxial analgesia effects on labor progression: facts, fallacies, uncertainties, and the future

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Erica N.; Tao, Weike; Craig, Margaret; McIntire, Donald; Leveno, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 60% of women who labor receive some form of neuraxial analgesia, but concerns have been raised regarding whether it negatively impacts the labor and delivery process. In this review, we attempt to clarify what has been established as truths, falsities, and uncertainties regarding the effects of this form of pain relief on labor progression, negative and/or positive. Additionally, although the term “epidural” has become synonymous with neuraxial analgesia, we discuss two other techniques, combined spinal-epidural and continuous spinal analgesia, that are gaining popularity, as well as their effects on labor progression. PMID:25088476

  8. Sedation, analgesia and anesthesia for interventional radiological procedures in adults. Part II. Recommendations for interventional radiologists.

    PubMed

    Venneman, I; Lamy, M

    2000-06-01

    Benzodiazepines are given orally as a premedication before an interventional radiological procedure. Local analgesia is achieved by drugs such as lidocaine, bupivacaine or ropivacaine. General analgesia is obtained by non opioid analgesics and opioid narcotics. For intravenous sedation, benzodiazepines such as ketamine or propofol should be administered under the supervision of an anesthesiologist. A preprocedure consultation with the anesthesiologist is recommended. Monitoring equipments, drugs and nursing staff assistance should be provided in the interventional suite. Vital signs should be monitored for several hours until patient's discharge. Close collaboration between anesthesiologists and interventional radiologists is a prerequisite for achieving high standard sedation and analgesia.

  9. Electroencephalographic signatures of pain and analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Brian W; Bowary, Paul M; Chao, Yu-Chieh; Lii, Theresa R; Saab, Carl Y

    2016-10-01

    Pain modulates rhythmic neuronal activity recorded by Electroencephalography (EEG) in humans. Our laboratory previously showed that rat models of acute and neuropathic pain manifest increased power in primary somatosensory cortex (S1) recorded by electrocorticography (ECoG). In this study, we hypothesized that pain increases EEG power and corticocortical coherence in different rat models of pain, whereas treatments with clinically effective analgesics reverse these changes. Our results show increased cortical power over S1 and prefrontal cortex (PFC) in awake, freely behaving rat models of acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Coherence between PFC and S1 is increased at a late, but not early, time point during the development of neuropathic pain. Electroencephalography power is not affected by ibuprofen in the acute pain model. However, pregabalin and mexiletine reverse the changes in power and S1-PFC coherence in the inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. These data suggest that quantitative EEG might be a valuable predictor of pain and analgesia in rodents.

  10. Acral mutilation and analgesia in 13 French spaniels.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Manon; de Jaham, Caroline; Page, Nadia; Sauve, Frederic; Helie, Pierre

    2005-04-01

    Acral mutilation and analgesia (AMA) is reported in 13 French spaniels in Canada. This newly recognized disorder shares striking similarities in clinical features and biopsy findings to the other acral mutilation syndromes or hereditary sensory neuropathies reported in German short-haired pointer dogs, English pointer dogs and English springer spaniels. Clinical signs are first noted between 3.5 and 12 months of age. Affected dogs lick, bite and severely self-mutilate their distal extremities resulting in ulcers with secondary bacterial infection. Auto-amputation of claws, digits and footpads occurs in severe cases. Single or multiple feet can be affected. Affected dogs walked on their severely mutilated feet without evidence of pain, lameness, or ataxia. The majority of the dogs were euthanized within days to months of diagnosis.

  11. Continuous Spinal Anesthesia for Obstetric Anesthesia and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Veličković, Ivan; Pujic, Borislava; Baysinger, Charles W.; Baysinger, Curtis L.

    2017-01-01

    The widespread use of continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) in obstetrics has been slow because of the high risk for post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) associated with epidural needles and catheters. New advances in equipment and technique have not significantly overcome this disadvantage. However, CSA offers an alternative to epidural anesthesia in morbidly obese women, women with severe cardiac disease, and patients with prior spinal surgery. It should be strongly considered in parturients who receive an accidental dural puncture with a large bore needle, on the basis of recent work suggesting significant reduction in PDPH when intrathecal catheters are used. Small doses of drug can be administered and extension of labor analgesia for emergency cesarean delivery may occur more rapidly compared to continuous epidural techniques. PMID:28861414

  12. Current status of patient-controlled analgesia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, C; Bruera, E

    1997-03-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is a relatively new technique in which patients are able to self-administer small doses of opioid analgesics when needed. Many different devices are available for opioid infusion, including a syringe pump, disposable plastic cylinder, and battery-operated computer-driven pump. These devices allow patients to choose an intermittent (demand) bolus, continuous infusion, or both modes of administration. Parameters, such as route, drug concentration dose, frequency, and maximum daily or hourly dose, are programmed by the physician. The patient decides whether or not to take a dose. Devices can be used to deliver the drug into a running intravenous infusion, the epidural space, or subcutaneously. Controlled trials indicate that PCA is probably superior to regular opioid administration in postoperative pain. Reported advantages include greater patient satisfaction, decreased sedation and anxiety, and reduced nursing time and hospitalization. Preliminary experience suggests that PCA is also useful and safe for cancer pain, but further research is greatly needed.

  13. Intravenous sub-anesthetic ketamine for perioperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Andrew W; Rosenfeld, David M; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, blunts central pain sensitization at sub-anesthetic doses (0.3 mg/kg or less) and has been studied extensively as an adjunct for perioperative analgesia. At sub-anesthetic doses, ketamine has a minimal physiologic impact though it is associated with a low incidence of mild psychomimetic symptoms as well as nystagmus and double vision. Contraindications to its use do exist and due to ketamine's metabolism, caution should be exercised in patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction. Sub-anesthetic ketamine improves pain scores and reduces perioperative opioid consumption in a broad range of surgical procedures. In addition, there is evidence that ketamine may be useful in patients with opioid tolerance and for preventing chronic postsurgical pain.

  14. Reduced nocturnal morphine analgesia in mice following a geomagnetic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Ossenkopp, K P; Kavaliers, M; Hirst, M

    1983-10-10

    Latency to respond to an aversive thermal stimulus and the degree of analgesia induced by morphine were examined in mice injected with either isotonic saline or morphine sulfate (10 mg/kg) during midscotophase of a 12:12 h LD cycle. When mean response latencies were compared to the degree of geomagnetic disturbance (Ap index) present on test days, it was found that during the geomagnetic storm on December 17th, 1982, a significant reduction (P less than 0.01) in response latency was evident in both saline- and morphine-treated mice. The reduction in response latencies was greater, and lasted longer in the morphine-treated animals. It is suggested that the pineal gland may mediate this biomagnetic effect.

  15. A randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and respiratory effects of patient-controlled intravenous remifentanil analgesia and patient-controlled epidural analgesia in laboring women.

    PubMed

    Stocki, Daniel; Matot, Idit; Einav, Sharon; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Ginosar, Yehuda; Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2014-03-01

    Safe and effective alternatives are required in labor when epidural analgesia is not appropriate. We hypothesized that patient-controlled IV remifentanil labor analgesia would not be inferior to patient-controlled epidural labor analgesia. This randomized nonblinded controlled noninferiority study in healthy women with a singleton fetus and vertex presentation was performed at 1 site. Women were randomized to receive patient-controlled IV analgesia titrated from 20 mcg up to a maximum bolus dose of 60 mcg with a lockout interval of 1 to 2 minutes, or patient-controlled epidural analgesia 0.1% bupivacaine with 2 mcg/mL fentanyl (initiation bolus 15 mL; maintenance bolus 10 mL, lockout interval 20 minutes, basal infusion 5 mL/h). Crossover was permitted after 30 minutes. The primary study outcome was efficacy (assessed as hourly numerical rating scale [NRS] pain score [11-point NRS] and maternal satisfaction [11-point NRS]); the secondary outcome was safety (maternal apnea). Supplementary oxygen was administered continuously during the respiratory monitoring period. During the first hour of analgesia, the heart rate, respiratory rate, pulse oximetry (SpO2), and end-tidal CO2, as an indication of apnea, were compared. Apnea lasting >40 seconds was managed by light stimulation by the attending anesthesiologist. Forty women were recruited to the following groups: remifentanil n = 19 (1 exclusion), epidural n = 20. Four crossed over: 3 from the remifentanil to epidural group and 1 from the epidural to remifentanil group. Mean (± SD) baseline NRS pain scores were similar, 8.4 ± 1.5 for remifentanil and 8.7 ± 1.2 for epidural analgesia, P = 0.52. Baseline adjusted mean NRS reduction at 30 minutes for remifentanil was -4.5 (± 0.6) vs -7.1(± 0.6) for epidural analgesia, P < 0.0001 for both. Pain score at 30 minutes was 3.7 ± 2.8 for remifentanil and 1.5 ± 2.2 for epidural analgesia, P = 0.009. Remifentanil was inferior to epidural analgesia with respect to the NRS at

  16. Specifying the non-specific components of acupuncture analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially non-specific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred and one patients who developed pain ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10) following third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients’ perception of the treatment (active or placebo), and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed prior to and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P = 0.240), but a large and significant non-specific effect of placebo acupuncture (P < 0.001), which increased over time. Interestingly, however, looking at perceived treatment allocation, there was a significant effect of acupuncture (P < 0.001) indicating that patients who believed they received active acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings following both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%), This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions non-specific factors such as patients’ perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice it may, therefore, be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. PMID:23707680

  17. Epidural resiniferatoxin induced prolonged regional analgesia to pain.

    PubMed

    Szabo, T; Olah, Z; Iadarola, M J; Blumberg, P M

    1999-09-04

    Adequate treatment of cancer pain remains a significant clinical problem. To reduce side effects of treatment, intrathecal and epidural routes of administration have been used where appropriate to reduce the total dose of agent administered while achieving regional control. Resiniferatoxin (RTX), an ultrapotent capsaicin analog, gives long-term desensitization of nociception via C-fiber sensory neurons. We evaluate here the analgesic effect on rats of epidurally administered RTX, using latency of response to a thermal stimulus in unrestrained animals. Results were compared with those for systemically administered RTX. Vehicle or graded doses of RTX were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) or through an indwelling lumbar (L4) epidural catheter as a single dose. Both routes of application of RTX produced profound thermal analgesia, reaching a plateau within 4-6 h and showing no restoration of pain sensitivity over 7 days. Vehicle was without effect. For the epidural route, the effect was selective as expected for the targeted spinal cord region, whereas the subcutaneous administration of RTX had a generalized analgesic effect. At doses yielding a tripling of back paw withdrawal latency, epidural treatment was 25-fold more effective than the subcutaneous route of application. Consistent with the regional selectivity of the lumbar epidural route, the front paws showed no more effect than by systemic RTX treatment. Binding experiments with [3H]RTX provided further evidence of the segmental desensitization induced by epidural RTX. We conclude that epidural administration of RTX at the lumbar spinal level produces profound, long-lasting, segmental analgesia to C-fiber mediated pain in the rat.

  18. Parent-Controlled Analgesia in Children Undergoing Cleft Palate Repair

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Ho; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Sung Jin; Bai, Sun Jun; Lee, Su Hyun; Park, Beyoung Yun

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to find an optimal basal infusion dose of fentanyl for parent-controlled analgesia (PrCA) in children undergoing cleft palate repair and the degree of parents' satisfaction with PrCA. Thirty consecutive children between 6 months and 2 yr of age were enrolled. At the end of surgery, a PrCA device with a basal infusion rate of 2 mL/hr and bolus of 0.5 mL with lockout time of 15 min was applied. Parents were educated in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) devices, the Wong Baker face pain scoring system, and monitoring of adverse effects of fentanyl. Fentanyl was infused 0.3 µg/kg/hr at first, and we obtained a predetermined fentanyl regimen by the response of the previous patient to a larger or smaller dose of fentanyl (0.1 µg/kg/hr as the step size), using an up-and-down method. ED50 and ED95 by probit analysis were 0.63 µg/kg/hr (95% confidence limits, 0.55-0.73 µg/kg/hr) and 0.83 µg/kg/hr (95% confidence limits, 0.73-1.47 µg/kg/hr), respectively. Eighty seven percent of the parents were satisfied with participating in the PrCA modality. PrCA using fentanyl with a basal infusion rate of 0.63 µg/kg/hr can be applied effectively for postoperative pain management in children undergoing cleft palate repair with a high level of parents' satisfaction. PMID:18303211

  19. Postoperative analgesia comparing levobupivacaine and ropivacaine for brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kunitaro; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Moriyama, Kumi; Sakamoto, Hideaki; Inoue, Tetsuo; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: On a pharmacologic basis, levobupivacaine is expected to last longer than ropivacaine. However, most reports of these anesthetics for brachial plexus block do not suggest a difference in analgesic effect. The aim of this study is to compare the postoperative analgesic effects of levobupivacaine and ropivacaine when used for treating ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block. Methods: A total of 62 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery procedures were prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive levobupivacaine (group L, N = 31) or ropivacaine (group R, N = 31). The duration of analgesia, offset time of motor block, need for rescue analgesics, and sleep disturbance on the night of surgery were recorded. Pain score was recorded on the day of surgery, and on postoperative days 1 and 2. Results: There was no difference in the time interval until the first request for pain medication comparing the two groups (group L: 15.6 [11.4, 16.8] hours; group R: 12.5 [9.4, 16.0] hours, P = 0.32). There was no difference in the duration of motor block (group L: 12.2 [7.6, 14.4] hours; group R: 9.4 [7.9, 13.2] hours, P = 0.44), pain score (P = 0.92), need for rescue analgesics (group L: 55%; group R: 65%, P = 0.6), or rate of sleep disturbance (group L: 61%, group R: 58%, P = 1.0) on comparing the two groups. Conclusions: There was no difference in postoperative analgesia comparing levobupivacaine and ropivacaine when used for brachial plexus block. PMID:28328862

  20. [Comparison of ropivacaine and bupivacaine for epidural analgesia during labor].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Conde, P; Nicolás, J; Rodríguez, J; García-Castaño, M; del Barrio, E; Muriel, C

    2001-05-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy and level of motor block using two local anesthetics, ropivacaine and bupivacaine, during labor. Sixty nulliparous women were enrolled during labor after full-term pregnancies. They were randomly assigned to receive epidural analgesia with ropivacaine (group R) or bupivacaine (group B). Group R patients received 10 ml of 0.18% ropivacaine with 5 microgram/ml of fentanyl followed by continuous epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with 2 microgram/ml of fentanyl at a rate of 10 ml/h. Group B patients received 10 ml of 0.15% bupivacaine with 5 microgram/ml of fentanyl followed by continuous epidural perfusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine with 2 microgram/ml of fentanyl at the same rate. Pain intensity was assessed on a visual analog scale, motor blockade on a Bromage scale, and level of sensory block at different moments. We also recorded total doses of local anesthetic employed during continuous epidural infusion, manner of final delivery, Apgar score, degree of maternal satisfaction and side effects. The demographic and delivery characteristics were similar in both groups. We found no statistically significant differences between the two groups for level of motor blockade, which was nil for 29 patients (96.66%) in group R and 28 patients (93.33%) in group B. No differences in degree of pain or level of sensory block (T8-T10 in both groups) were observed. The total doses of local anesthetic used were similar at 23.7 +/- 11.6 mg in group R and 16.5 +/- 7.3 mg in group B (non-significant difference). Nor did we find differences in manner of delivery, neonatal Apgar scores, degree of maternal satisfaction or side effects. Ropivacaine and bupivacaine are equally effective for epidural analgesia during labor at the doses used and they do not cause a relevant level of motor blockade.

  1. Labor epidural analgesia and the incidence of instrumental assisted delivery.

    PubMed

    Rimaitis, Kęstutis; Klimenko, Olga; Rimaitis, Marius; Morkūnaitė, Asta; Macas, Andrius

    2015-01-01

    To assess the influence of labor epidural analgesia on the course of labor and to determine its association with instrumental assisted delivery rate. A retrospective case-control study was performed during 2007-2011 aiming to identify the relation between epidural analgesia (EA) and instrumental assisted delivery (IAD) rate. All patients in whom instrumental assistance for delivery was applied were allocated into either case (parturients who received EA and had IAD) or control (parturients who did not receive EA but had IAD) groups. Maternal demographic data, pregnancy and delivery characteristics as well as neonatal short-term outcome were studied. A total of 7675 vaginal deliveries occurred during the study period and 187 (2.43%) patients had IAD. Vacuum extraction was applied to 67 (2.16%) parturients who received EA, and to 120 (2.61%) who did not. The median duration of the first stage of labor was 510 min in the EA group as compared to 390 min in the control group (P=0.001). The median duration of the second stage of labor among cases and controls was 60 and 40 min, respectively (P<0.0005). Cases more often had their labor induced by oxytocin 80.3% as compared to 58.3% among controls (P=0.003). There was no significant association between the use of EA and increased IAD rate (OR=0.81; 95% CI, 0.60-1.09). Labor EA did not increase the incidence of IAD and the risk of adverse neonatal outcomes, but was associated with prolonged first and second stages of labor. Copyright © 2015 Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia: interactions between nalbuphine and hydromorphone.

    PubMed

    Parker, R K; Holtmann, B; White, P F

    1997-04-01

    Epidural opioid analgesia can offer advantages over intravenous administration, however, opioid-related side effects are common after epidural administration. We studied the effect of adding nalbuphine (NB), an opioid agonist-antagonist, to hydromorphone (HM) for patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) in 78 healthy women after elective cesarean delivery. Patients were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. The control group received preservative-free HM (Dilaudid) alone, 0.075 mg/mL, while the three study groups received HM, 0.075 mg/mL, containing preservative-free NB (Nubain) 0.02, 0.04, or 0.08 mg/mL. Intraoperatively, all patients received epidural bupivacaine 0.5%. Postoperatively, a patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA) device was connected to the epidural catheter and programmed to deliver a 3-mL loading dose of the analgesic solution. Subsequently, patients could self-administer 2 mL bolus doses on demand with a 30-min lockout interval. Patients were encouraged to ambulate approximately 8 h after surgery, and PCEA therapy was discontinued when a clear liquid diet was tolerated. Visual analog scale scores were used to assess pain at 8-h intervals while using PCEA therapy. Although the overall incidences of nausea (19%-35%) and pruritus (32%-62%) were similar in all four groups, the addition of NB decreased the need for bladder catheterization. The highest NB concentration resulted in increased PCA demands during the 32-h study period. In conclusion, the combination of HM 0.075 mg/mL and NB 0.04 mg/mL resulted in lower nausea scores and a decreased incidence of urinary retention compared with HM alone, without increasing the opioid analgesic requirement.

  3. [Eutopic parturition: psychoprophylaxis or extradural analgesia. Influence on the endocrine response].

    PubMed

    Carrasco, M S; Iglesias, J; Freire, J; Martín, M L; Marín Santana, A; Cobo, I; García Rendón, A

    1989-01-01

    Prolactin, ACTH, cortisol and HGH levels have been studied on 30 pregnant women in three different periods: during the labour, at the delivery and 24 hours later. They were divided into 3 groups depending on the analgesia: I) no analgesia (n = 10); II) psychoprophylaxis (n = 10), and III) extradural analgesia (n = 10). Prolactin levels increased during delivery and 24 hours later. A significant increase of ACTH levels (p less than 0.01) was observed during the delivery in the 3 groups even though they were under hasal values 24 hours later. Cortisol increased 38% (p less than 0.01) and 52% (p less than 0.02) in II and III groups, respectively during the delivery. No difference was found with HGH. Our results suggest that endocrine response modified by labour and delivery doesn't change with different analgesia techniques.

  4. [Maternal behavior toward her newborn infant. Potential modification by peridural analgesia or childbirth preparation].

    PubMed

    Wagner, A; Grenom, A; Pierre, F; Soutoul, J H; Fabre-Nys, C; Krebhiel, D

    1989-01-01

    The effects of sophrology and epidural analgesia on early relationship between the mother and her child were studied on a simple of 190 deliveries. The mothers were observed during and just after delivery. Mothers who had been separated from their child before the end of the observation were excluded from the study. The patients had the choice between epidural analgesia or prenatal care with sophrology. Participation to prenatal courses has statistically a positive effect on the relation between the mother and her child (p less than 0.01). Instead, epidural analgesia and posture have very limited effect on this factor. However, a trend to more interaction is found in multipari and patients who didn't choose epidural analgesia.

  5. [Epidural analgesia in obstetrics: is there an effect on labor and delivery?].

    PubMed

    Segado Jiménez, M I; Arias Delgado, J; Domínguez Hervella, F; Casas García, M L; López Pérez, A; Izquierdo Gutiérrez, C

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is routinely used in obstetrics but has been blamed for possible effects on labor that lead to greater use of instruments or conversion to cesarean delivery. We aimed to assess this possibility in a cohort of obstetric patients receiving or not receiving epidural analgesia. Prospectively enrolled full-term obstetric patients were distributed in 2 groups according to whether they received epidural analgesia or not. We compared maternal and fetal characteristics, obstetric variables, and type of delivery between groups to record the likely causes of difficult labor and delivery and detect a possible influence of epidural analgesia. Of a total of 602 patients, 462 received epidural analgesia and 140 did not. Epidural analgesia was related to a higher rate of use of instruments but not cesareans (P < .01) and more frequent need for oxytocin (30.7% of the epidural analgesia group vs 0% of the group receiving no epidural analgesia, P < .001). The women receiving analgesia also had a longer mean (SD) duration of the dilatation phase of labor (6.4 [4.2] hours in the epidural group vs 4.7 [3.5] hours in the no-epidural group, P < .01) and of the expulsion phase (1.0 [0.6] hours vs 0.7 [0.6] hours, respectively; P<.01). We observed no effects on the incidence of tearing, rate of episiotomy, or other variables. Predictors of instrumentation or conversion to cesarean delivery were longer duration of the first phase (odds ratio [OR] 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.3), longer duration of the second phase (OR 2.3; 95% CI, 1.3-3.9), and maternal obesity (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.9-1.2). Previous deliveries and initiation of epidural analgesia after the fetus has reached Hodge's first plane decreased risk 2.7-fold and 3.03-fold, respectively. Although epidural analgesia has traditionally been associated with a higher incidence of difficult labor and delivery, this association was not unequivocally evident in this cohort of patients. The apparent increase seems

  6. Oral analgesia for relieving post-caesarean pain.

    PubMed

    Mkontwana, Nondumiso; Novikova, Natalia

    2015-03-29

    Oral analgesia is a convenient and widely used form of pain relief following caesarean section. It includes various medications used at different doses alone or in adjunction to other form of analgesia. To determine the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of oral analgesia for post-caesarean pain relief. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 July 2014) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Cluster-randomised trials were eligible for inclusion but none were identified. Quasi-randomised and cross-over trials were not eligible for inclusion.Interventions included oral medication given to women for post-caesarean pain relief compared with oral medication, or placebo/no treatment. Two review authors independently assessed for inclusion all the potential studies and independently assessed trial quality, extracted the data using the agreed data extraction form, and checked them for accuracy. Eight small trials involving 962 women (out of 13 included trials) contributed data to the analysis, of which only four trials had low risk of bias.None of the included studies reported on 'adequate pain relief', which is one of this review's primary outcomes. 1. Opiod analgesics versus placeboBased on one trial involving 120 women, the effect of opioids versus placebo was not significant in relation to the need for additional pain relief (primary outcome) (risk ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06 to 1.92), and the effect in terms of adverse drug effects outcomes was also uncertain (RR 6.58, 95% CI 0.38 to 113.96).Low (75 mg) and high (150 mg) doses of tramadol had a similar effect on the need for additional pain relief (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.12 to 3.78 and RR 0.14, 95% CI 0.01 to 2.68, respectively, one study, 80 women). 2. Non-opioid analgesia versus placeboThe confidence interval for the lower requirement for additional analgesia (primary outcome) with the non-opioid analgesia group

  7. Analgesia for Older Adults with Abdominal or Back Pain in Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Angela M.; Edwards, J. Matthew; Shofer, Frances S.; Holena, Daniel N.; Abbuhl, Stephanie B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association between age and analgesia for emergency department (ED) patients with abdominal or back pain. Methods: Using a fully electronic medical record, we performed a retrospective cohort study of adults presenting with abdominal or back pain to two urban EDs. To assess differences in analgesia administration and time to analgesia between age groups, we used chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis test respectively. To adjust for potential confounders, we used a generalized linear model with log link and Gaussian error. Results: Of 24,752 subjects (mean age 42 years, 65% female, 69% black, mean triage pain score 7.5), the majority (76%) had abdominal pain and 61% received analgesia. The ≥80 years group (n=722; 3%), compared to the 65–79 years group (n=2,080; 8%) and to the <65 years group (n=21,950; 89%), was more often female (71 vs. 61 vs. 65%), black (72 vs. 65 vs. 69%), and had a lower mean pain score (6.6 vs. 7.1 vs. 7.6). Both older groups were less likely to receive any analgesia (48 vs. 59 vs. 62%, p<0.0001) and the oldest group less likely to receive opiates (35 vs. 47 vs. 44%, p<0.0001). Of those who received analgesia, both older groups waited longer for their medication (123 vs. 113 vs. 94 minutes; p<0.0001). After controlling for potential confounders, patients ≥80 years were 17% less likely than the <65 years group to receive analgesia (95% CI 14–20%). Conclusion: Older adults who present to the ED for abdominal or back pain are less likely to receive analgesia and wait significantly longer for pain medication compared to younger adults. PMID:21691471

  8. Sedation and Analgesia in Transportation of Acutely and Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Dawn; Franklin, Kevin; Rigby, Paul; Bergman, Karen; Davidson, Scott B

    2016-06-01

    Transportation of acutely or critically ill patients is a challenge for health care providers. Among the difficulties that providers face is the balance between adequate sedation and analgesia for the transportation event and maintaining acceptable respiratory and physiologic parameters of the patient. This article describes common challenges in providing sedation and analgesia during various phases of transport. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. TRPM8 is the Principal Mediator of Menthol-induced Analgesia of Acute and Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Boyi; Fan, Lu; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Sui, Aiwei; Morris, John B.; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2013-01-01

    Menthol, the cooling natural product of peppermint, is widely used in medicinal preparations for the relief of acute and inflammatory pain in sports injuries, arthritis and other painful conditions. Menthol induces the sensation of cooling by activating TRPM8, an ion channel in cold-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons. Recent studies identified additional targets of menthol, including the irritant receptor, TRPA1, voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. It remains unclear which of these targets contribute to menthol-induced analgesia, or to the irritating side effects associated with menthol therapy. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological approaches in mice to probe the role of TRPM8 in analgesia induced by L-menthol, the predominant analgesic menthol isomer in medicinal preparations. L-menthol effectively diminished pain behavior elicited by chemical stimuli (capsaicin, acrolein, acetic acid), noxious heat and inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant). Genetic deletion of TRPM8 completely abolished analgesia by L-menthol in all these models, while other analgesics (acetaminophen) remained effective. Loss of L-menthol-induced analgesia was recapitulated in mice treated with a selective TRPM8 inhibitor, AMG2850. Selective activation of TRPM8 with WS-12, a menthol derivative we characterized as a specific TRPM8 agonist in cultured sensory neurons and in vivo, also induced TRPM8-dependent analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. L-menthol and WS-12 induced analgesia was blocked by naloxone, suggesting activation of endogenous opioid-dependent analgesic pathways. Our data show that TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. In contrast to menthol, selective TRPM8 agonists may produce analgesia more effectively with diminished side effects. PMID:23820004

  10. TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boyi; Fan, Lu; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Sui, Aiwei; Morris, John B; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2013-10-01

    Menthol, the cooling natural product of peppermint, is widely used in medicinal preparations for the relief of acute and inflammatory pain in sports injuries, arthritis, and other painful conditions. Menthol induces the sensation of cooling by activating TRPM8, an ion channel in cold-sensitive peripheral sensory neurons. Recent studies identified additional targets of menthol, including the irritant receptor, TRPA1, voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors. It remains unclear which of these targets contribute to menthol-induced analgesia, or to the irritating side effects associated with menthol therapy. Here, we use genetic and pharmacological approaches in mice to probe the role of TRPM8 in analgesia induced by L-menthol, the predominant analgesic menthol isomer in medicinal preparations. L-menthol effectively diminished pain behavior elicited by chemical stimuli (capsaicin, acrolein, acetic acid), noxious heat, and inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant). Genetic deletion of TRPM8 completely abolished analgesia by L-menthol in all these models, although other analgesics (acetaminophen) remained effective. Loss of L-menthol-induced analgesia was recapitulated in mice treated with a selective TRPM8 inhibitor, AMG2850. Selective activation of TRPM8 with WS-12, a menthol derivative that we characterized as a specific TRPM8 agonist in cultured sensory neurons and in vivo, also induced TRPM8-dependent analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. L-menthol- and WS-12-induced analgesia was blocked by naloxone, suggesting activation of endogenous opioid-dependent analgesic pathways. Our data show that TRPM8 is the principal mediator of menthol-induced analgesia of acute and inflammatory pain. In contrast to menthol, selective TRPM8 agonists may produce analgesia more effectively, with diminished side effects.

  11. Comparative evaluation of ropivacaine and ropivacaine with dexamethasone in supraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Palaria, Urmila; Sinha, Ajay K.; Punera, D. C.; Pandey, Vijita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mixing of various adjuvants has been tried with local anesthetics in an attempt to prolong anesthesia from peripheral nerve blocks but have met with inconclusive success. More recent studies indicate that 8 mg dexamethasone added to perineural local anesthetic injections augment the duration of peripheral nerve block analgesia. Aims: Evaluating the hypothesis that adding dexamethasone to ropivacaine significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia in supraclavicular brachial plexus block compared with ropivacaine alone. Patients and Methods: It was a randomized, prospective, and double-blind clinical trial. Eighty patients of ASA I and II of either sex, aged 16-60 years, undergoing elective upper limb surgeries were equally divided into two groups and given supraclavicular nerve block. Group R patients (n = 40) received 30 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with distilled water (2 ml)-control group whereas Group D patients (n = 40) received 30 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine with 8 mg dexamethasone (2 ml)-study group. The primary outcome was measured as duration of analgesia that was defined as the interval between the onset of sensory block and the first request for analgesia by the patient. The secondary outcome included maximum visual analogue scale (VAS), total analgesia consumption, surgeon satisfaction, and side effects. Results: Group R patients required first rescue analgesia earlier (557 ± 58.99 min) than those of Group D patients (1179.4 ± 108.60 min), which was found statistically significant in Group D (P < 0.000). The total dose of rescue analgesia was higher in Group R as compared to Group D, which was statistically significant (P < 0.00). Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone (8 mg) to ropivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus approach significantly and safely prolongs motor blockade and postoperative analgesia (sensory) that lasted much longer than that produced by local anesthetic alone. PMID:25886227

  12. Continuous postoperative analgesia via quadratus lumborum block - an alternative to transversus abdominis plane block.

    PubMed

    Visoiu, Mihaela; Yakovleva, Nataliya

    2013-10-01

    Different transversus abdominis plane blocks techniques cause variations in postoperative analgesia characteristics. We report the use of unilateral quadratus lumborum catheter for analgesia following colostomy closure. The catheter was placed under direct ultrasound visualization and had good outcomes: low pain scores and minimal use of rescue analgesic medication. No complications were reported in this pediatric patient. More studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of this regional anesthesia technique.

  13. Ultrasound-guided continuous quadratus lumborum block for postoperative analgesia in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Goswami, Jyotsna; Patro, Viplab

    2015-02-01

    Quadratus lumborum block is a recently introduced variation of transversus abdominis plane block. In this report, we describe the use of ultrasound-guided continuous quadratus lumborum block for postoperative analgesia in a 7-year-old child scheduled to undergo radical nephrectomy (left-sided) for Wilms tumor. The result was excellent postoperative analgesia and minimal requirement for rescue analgesics. The modification described may allow easier placement of a catheter for continuous infusion of local anesthetic.

  14. Role of 'student-to-student local analgesia administration' on undergraduate students' opinions regarding 'pain-free local analgesia technique' in children.

    PubMed

    Kuscu, O O; Kucuktepe, C; Caglar, E; Cildir, S K; Hacinlioglu, N; Sandallı, N

    2013-08-01

    To examine the role of 'student-to-student local analgesia administration' on undergraduate dental students' opinions regarding pain-free local analgesia techniques in children. Grade 3 (n:29), Grade 4 (n:59) and Grade 5 students (n:28) of Yeditepe University, School of Dentistry, Istanbul, Turkey participated in the study. Informed consent and ethical approval were obtained. Students' opinions were evaluated by means of a short survey administered before and after educational activities. Activities were provided in a didactic manner (theoretical, practical and clinical stages) and lasted for 6 months. Theoretical lectures on 'pain-free local analgesia techniques in children' were given to all classes. In the practical stage, 3rd and 4th grade students were paired and performed infiltration analgesia on each other according to the lectured technique. In the final clinical stage, 4th and 5th grade students were supervised, whilst administering the technique on children during their clinical training. Before the activities, only 40% of students believed in the possibility of pain-free local analgesia in children, whereas after the educational activities, the percentage had risen to 68% (P = 0.0001). A significant difference was observed between the opinions of 4th grade students who attended the practical stage and 5th grade students who did not. The role of 'student-to-student local analgesia administration' was found to be significant in changing undergraduate students' opinions about pain-free dental injections in children. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparison of Epidural Analgesia with Transversus Abdominis Plane Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Relief in Patients Undergoing Lower Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Sadasivan Shankar; Bavishi, Harshit; Mohan, Chadalavada Venkataram; Kaur, Navdeep

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anesthesiologists play an important role in postoperative pain management. For analgesia after lower abdominal surgery, epidural analgesia and ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block are suitable options. The study aims to compare the analgesic efficacy of both techniques. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery under spinal anesthesia were randomized to postoperatively receive lumbar epidural catheter (Group E) or ultrasound-guided TAP block (Group T) through intravenous cannulas placed bilaterally. Group E received 10 ml 0.125% bupivacaine stat and 10 ml 8th hourly for 48 h. Group T received 20 ml 0.125% bupivacaine bilaterally stat and 20 ml bilaterally 8th hourly for 48 h. Pain at rest and on coughing, total paracetamol and tramadol consumption were recorded. Results: Analgesia at rest was comparable between the groups in the first 16 h. At 24 and 48 h, Group E had significantly better analgesia at rest (P = 0.001 and 0.004 respectively). Patients in Group E had significantly higher number of patients with nil or mild pain on coughing at all times. Paracetamol consumption was comparable in both groups, but tramadol consumption was significantly higher in Group T at the end of 48 h (P = 0.001). Conclusion: For lower abdominal surgeries, analgesia provided by intermittent boluses of 0.125% is comparable for first 16 h between epidural and TAP catheters. However, the quality of analgesia provided by the epidural catheter is superior to that provided by TAP catheters beyond that both at rest and on coughing with reduced opioid consumption. PMID:28928569

  16. Influence of epidural dexamethasone on maternal temperature and serum cytokine concentration after labor epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Zhong; Hu, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Xia; Qian, Ping; Ge, Jia-Mei; Tang, Bei-Lei

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of epidural dexamethasone on maternal temperature and serum cytokine levels after labor epidural analgesia. Sixty healthy term nulliparas in spontaneous labor were randomized to receive epidural analgesia alone using bupivacaine 0.125% and fentanyl 1 μg/mL (group I) or epidural analgesia combined with dexamethasone 0.2mg/mL (group II) (n=30 per group). Maternal tympanic temperature was measured before epidural analgesia and hourly thereafter until delivery. Maternal and cord venous blood were sampled for analysis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-10 levels. There was no difference in the incidence of intrapartum fever (38 °C or more) between the 2 groups (3/30 versus 1/30, P=0.612). The mean maternal temperature increased with time in group I, with the elevation reaching statistical significance at 4 hours post analgesia and at delivery compared with baseline (P=0.012 and P=0.043, respectively). A similar trend was observed with maternal serum IL-6 levels in group I. In group II, maternal temperature and IL-6 levels did not differ from baseline at any time point during labor. Epidural dexamethasone alleviates maternal temperature elevation after epidural analgesia. This effect can be attributed to the decrease in IL-6 levels. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The TGR5 receptor mediates bile acid–induced itch and analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Alemi, Farzad; Kwon, Edwin; Poole, Daniel P.; Lieu, TinaMarie; Lyo, Victoria; Cattaruzza, Fiore; Cevikbas, Ferda; Steinhoff, Martin; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Guerrero-Alba, Raquel; Valdez-Morales, Eduardo; Cottrell, Graeme S.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Vanner, Stephen J.; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Corvera, Carlos U.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with cholestatic disease exhibit pruritus and analgesia, but the mechanisms underlying these symptoms are unknown. We report that bile acids, which are elevated in the circulation and tissues during cholestasis, cause itch and analgesia by activating the GPCR TGR5. TGR5 was detected in peptidergic neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord that transmit itch and pain, and in dermal macrophages that contain opioids. Bile acids and a TGR5-selective agonist induced hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglia neurons and stimulated the release of the itch and analgesia transmitters gastrin-releasing peptide and leucine-enkephalin. Intradermal injection of bile acids and a TGR5-selective agonist stimulated scratching behavior by gastrin-releasing peptide– and opioid-dependent mechanisms in mice. Scratching was attenuated in Tgr5-KO mice but exacerbated in Tgr5-Tg mice (overexpressing mouse TGR5), which exhibited spontaneous pruritus. Intraplantar and intrathecal injection of bile acids caused analgesia to mechanical stimulation of the paw by an opioid-dependent mechanism. Both peripheral and central mechanisms of analgesia were absent from Tgr5-KO mice. Thus, bile acids activate TGR5 on sensory nerves, stimulating the release of neuropeptides in the spinal cord that transmit itch and analgesia. These mechanisms could contribute to pruritus and painless jaundice that occur during cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:23524965

  18. A Leptin-Mediated Central Mechanism in Analgesia-Enhanced Opioid Reward in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Grewo; Kim, Hyangin; McCabe, Michael F.; Chou, Chiu-Wen; Wang, Shuxing; Chen, Lucy L.; Marota, John J.A.; Blood, Anne; Breiter, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid analgesics are commonly used in chronic pain management despite a potential risk of rewarding. However, it remains unclear whether opioid analgesia would enhance the opioid rewarding effect thereby contributing to opioid rewarding. Utilizing a rat paradigm of conditioned place preference (CPP) combined with ankle monoarthritis as a condition of persistent nociception, we showed that analgesia induced by either morphine or the nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen increased CPP scores in arthritic rats, suggesting that analgesia itself had a rewarding effect. However, arthritic rats exhibited a significantly higher CPP score in response to morphine than ibuprofen. Thus, the rewarding effect of morphine was enhanced in the presence of persistent nociception, producing a phenomenon of analgesia-enhanced opioid reward. At the cellular level, administration of morphine activated a cascade of leptin expression, glial activation, and dopamine receptor upregulation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), while administration of ibuprofen decreased glial activation with no effect on leptin expression in the NAc. Furthermore, the morphine rewarding effect was blocked in leptin deficient ob/ob mice or by neutralizing leptin or interleukin-1β in the NAc without diminishing morphine analgesia. The data indicate that systemic opioid can activate a leptin-mediated central mechanism in the NAc that led to the enhanced opioid rewarding effect. These findings provide evidence for an interaction between opioid analgesia and opioid rewarding, which may have implications in clinical opioid dose escalation in chronic pain management. PMID:25031415

  19. A leptin-mediated central mechanism in analgesia-enhanced opioid reward in rats.

    PubMed

    Lim, Grewo; Kim, Hyangin; McCabe, Michael F; Chou, Chiu-Wen; Wang, Shuxing; Chen, Lucy L; Marota, John J A; Blood, Anne; Breiter, Hans C; Mao, Jianren

    2014-07-16

    Opioid analgesics are commonly used in chronic pain management despite a potential risk of rewarding. However, it remains unclear whether opioid analgesia would enhance the opioid rewarding effect thereby contributing to opioid rewarding. Utilizing a rat paradigm of conditioned place preference (CPP) combined with ankle monoarthritis as a condition of persistent nociception, we showed that analgesia induced by either morphine or the nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen increased CPP scores in arthritic rats, suggesting that analgesia itself had a rewarding effect. However, arthritic rats exhibited a significantly higher CPP score in response to morphine than ibuprofen. Thus, the rewarding effect of morphine was enhanced in the presence of persistent nociception, producing a phenomenon of analgesia-enhanced opioid reward. At the cellular level, administration of morphine activated a cascade of leptin expression, glial activation, and dopamine receptor upregulation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), while administration of ibuprofen decreased glial activation with no effect on leptin expression in the NAc. Furthermore, the morphine rewarding effect was blocked in leptin deficient ob/ob mice or by neutralizing leptin or interleukin-1β in the NAc without diminishing morphine analgesia. The data indicate that systemic opioid can activate a leptin-mediated central mechanism in the NAc that led to the enhanced opioid rewarding effect. These findings provide evidence for an interaction between opioid analgesia and opioid rewarding, which may have implications in clinical opioid dose escalation in chronic pain management. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349779-10$15.00/0.

  20. Postoperative epidural analgesia with bupivacaine and fentanyl: hourly pain assessment in 348 paediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Lejus, C; Surbled, M; Schwoerer, D; Renaudin, M; Guillaud, C; Berard, L; Pinaud, M

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this prospective study was the evaluation of the analgesia provided by an epidural infusion of bupivacaine and fentanyl after different types of surgery in children. Data were collected from 348 epidural analgesia in 87 children below 2 years of age, in 80 children between 2 and 6 years and 181 above 6 years of age, for a median duration of 43 postoperative hours. Bupivacaine (mean concentration 0.185%) and fentanyl (5 microg.kg-1.day-1) were administered on the surgical ward. Pain control was considered excellent in 86% of the 11 072 pain hourly assessments. Analgesia was found to be better for children older than 2 years, and the overall quality of their night's sleep was better than that of older children. Higher pain scores were noted for Nissen fundoplication surgery and club foot repairs. Early discontinuation rarely occurred, and only because of technical problems with the epidural catheter (4%) or insufficient analgesia (6%). Complications were minor (nausea/vomiting 14%, pruritus 0.6%, urinary retention 17%) and easily reversed. This combination of bupivacaine-fentanyl provides safe analgesia after major surgery in children with frequent clinical monitoring. Regular pain assessments of intensity and duration are useful to improve the quality of postoperative analgesia.

  1. Effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Han, Wen; Han, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia.A total of 90 patients, who underwent intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, were included into this study. All patients were randomly divided into 3 groups (each group, n=30): naloxone group (naloxone+fentanyl), tropisetron group (tropisetron+fentanyl), and fentanyl group (fentanyl). Patients in each group were given a corresponding dose of naloxone. Postoperative analgesia effect and the incidence of side effects such as nausea and vomiting were observed.Small doses of naloxone or tropisetron combined with fentanyl used for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia can significantly reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting. Six hours after surgery, visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in patients that underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia using low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl compared with patients who received fentanyl alone; however, the postoperative analgesic effect of tropisetron was not observed. Compared with the combination of tropisetron and fentanyl, low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl can obviously reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and enhance the analgesic effect of fentanyl 6 hours after surgery.Low-dose naloxone can reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, and exhibits a certain synergic analgesic effect.

  2. Differences in postoperative opioid consumption in patients prescribed patient-controlled analgesia versus intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in opioid consumption in patients prescribed patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus intramuscular injection (IMI) in the early postoperative period after open abdominal surgery. A retrospective audit of 115 patients elicited demographic and clinical data. No significant differences were found between the demographic variables of the PCA and IMI groups. There was a significant difference in the mean opioid dose used during the first 3 postoperative days (p < .01). Mean opioid consumption was 136.89 mg for the PCA group and 50.79 mg for the IMI group. Although there was a reduction in the amount of opioid consumed over the first 3 postoperative days, the PCA group consistently consumed more opioid analgesia compared with the IMI group. Furthermore, there was a disproportionate reduction in opioid consumption between the two groups from Day 1 (r = .34; p < .01) to Day 3 (r = .14; p = .14). This study shows that the amount of analgesia consumed during the postoperative period by patients who had abdominal surgery varied markedly depending on the mode of analgesia (PCA or IMI). The difference in analgesic consumption was also found to increase throughout the 3-day postoperative period. This divergence in the amount of opioid consumption between patients who were prescribed PCA and patients who were prescribed IM analgesia heightens the need for vigilance in assessment and management of pain during the early postoperative period, particularly in patients prescribed IM analgesia on an "as-needed" basis.

  3. Early versus late epidural analgesia and risk of instrumental delivery in nulliparous women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wassen, M M L H; Zuijlen, J; Roumen, F J M E; Smits, L J M; Marcus, M A; Nijhuis, J G

    2011-05-01

    Review of the literature regarding the relation between the timing of epidural analgesia and the rate of caesarean or instrumental vaginal deliveries. Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles published until 31 July 2010. Studies were selected in which the effects of early latent phase (defined as a cervical dilatation of 3 cm or less) epidural analgesia (including combined-spinal epidural) and late active phase epidural analgesia on the mode of delivery in nulliparous women at 36 weeks of gestation or more were evaluated. Data extraction was completed by using a data-extraction form. Risk ratio and its 95% confidence intervals were calculated for caesarean delivery and instrumental vaginal delivery. Pooled data were calculated. The search retrieved 20 relevant articles, of which six fulfilled the selection criteria of inclusion. These six studies reported on 15,399 nulliparous women in spontaneous or induced labour with a request for analgesia. Risk of caesarean delivery (pooled risk ratio 1.02, 95% CI 0.96-1.08) or instrumental vaginal delivery (pooled risk ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.89-1.05) was not significantly different between groups. This systematic review showed no increased risk of caesarean delivery or instrumental vaginal delivery for women receiving early epidural analgesia at cervical dilatation of 3 m or less in comparison with late epidural analgesia. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  4. Bilateral interpleural versus lumbar epidural bupivacaine-morphine analgesia for upper abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Demian, Atef D; Wahba, Ashraf M; Atia, Emad M; Hussein, Sami H

    2003-10-01

    This randomized study was designed to compare the effectiveness of bilateral interpleural analgesia with lumbar epidural analgesia, on postoperative pain relief in upper abdominal surgery. The studied patients were randomely allocated into either interpleural group "IP" (n = 15) or epidural group "EP" (n = 15). In "IP" group, preanesthetic bilateral interpleural block was done using a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (0.8 mg/kg) and 2 mg morphine diluted to 50 ml saline for each side. In "EP" group, the same mixture-diluted in 20 ml saline-was injected in the epidural space (L2-3). The general anesthetic technique was the same in both groups. Hemodynamic, gasometric, verbal pain score (VPS) values and complications were compared in both techniques. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) readings were in the accepted normal range in the perioperative period although significant lower readings were detected in "EP" group. No significant differences were displayed in blood gasometric variables between the two groups. There were considerable level of analgesia in both groups in the postoperative period although "EP" analgesia was superior to "IP". More pain free patients (9 versus 4) and significant lower consumption of nalbuphine were detected in "EP" group. The results of this study indicate that bilateral "IP" analgesia may offer a satisfactory analgesia for upper abdominal surgery when the use of other analgesic techniques may be contraindicated.

  5. Ketorolac: safe and effective analgesia for the management of renal cortical tumors with partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Diblasio, Christopher J; Snyder, Mark E; Kattan, Michael W; Russo, Paul

    2004-03-01

    Ketorolac has demonstrated advantages as a supplement to opioid based analgesia in several surgical settings, including donor nephrectomy. To our knowledge there has been no published data to date on the use of ketorolac in patients undergoing partial nephrectomy. We compared analgesia with ketorolac and opioids to analgesia with opioids alone with regard to pain control, postoperative recovery and effects on renal function in patients with renal cortical tumors surgically managed by partial nephrectomy. Records for 154 patients treated with partial nephrectomy for renal cortical tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Clinicopathological variables examined were age, gender, medication use, comorbidity profile, operation side, estimated blood loss, hospital stay, operative duration, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, histopathology results, perioperative transfusion status, ischemia type (warm vs cold vs none), duration of renal artery cross clamping, tumor size and intraparenchymal location, pathological stage and perioperative complications. Postoperative duration to the initiation of solid diet, discontinuation of patient controlled analgesia and overall pain control were assessed. Serum creatinine was measured during the preoperative period, and at 1, 3 or greater and 30 or greater days postoperatively. Patients who received ketorolac demonstrated superior postoperative recovery with an earlier return to solid diet and earlier discontinuation of patient controlled analgesia. Treatment groups were similar with respect to changes in serum creatinine, blood loss, transfusion rates and complication rates. Ketorolac was not associated with an increased risk of acute renal failure. Ketorolac is a safe and effective supplement to opioid based analgesia for pain control after partial nephrectomy.

  6. Preferred spoken language mediates differences in neuraxial labor analgesia utilization among racial and ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Caballero, J A; Butwick, A J; Carvalho, B; Riley, E T

    2014-05-01

    The aims of this study were to assess racial/ethnic disparities for neuraxial labor analgesia utilization and to determine if preferred spoken language mediates the association between race/ethnicity and neuraxial labor analgesia utilization. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 3129 obstetric patients who underwent vaginal delivery at a tertiary care obstetric center. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the relationships between race/ethnicity, preferred spoken language and neuraxial labor analgesia. Hispanic ethnicity (adjusted OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61-0.98) and multiparity (adjusted OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.51-0.69) were independently associated with a reduced likelihood of neuraxial labor analgesia utilization. When preferred spoken language was controlled for, the effect of Hispanic ethnicity was no longer significant (adjusted OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.66-1.08) and only non-English preferred spoken language (adjusted OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.67-0.99) and multiparity (adjusted OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.51-0.69) were associated with a reduced likelihood of neuraxial labor analgesia utilization. This study provides evidence that preferred spoken language mediates the relationship between Hispanic ethnicity and neuraxial labor analgesia utilization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Han, Wen; Han, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia. A total of 90 patients, who underwent intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, were included into this study. All patients were randomly divided into 3 groups (each group, n=30): naloxone group (naloxone+fentanyl), tropisetron group (tropisetron+fentanyl), and fentanyl group (fentanyl). Patients in each group were given a corresponding dose of naloxone. Postoperative analgesia effect and the incidence of side effects such as nausea and vomiting were observed. Small doses of naloxone or tropisetron combined with fentanyl used for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia can significantly reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting. Six hours after surgery, visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in patients that underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia using low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl compared with patients who received fentanyl alone; however, the postoperative analgesic effect of tropisetron was not observed. Compared with the combination of tropisetron and fentanyl, low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl can obviously reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and enhance the analgesic effect of fentanyl 6 hours after surgery. Low-dose naloxone can reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, and exhibits a certain synergic analgesic effect. PMID:27902584

  8. Attenuation of activity in an endogenous analgesia circuit by ongoing pain in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luiz F; Gear, Robert W; Levine, Jon D

    2010-10-13

    Analgesic efficacy varies depending on the pain syndrome being treated. One reason for this may be a differential effect of individual pain syndromes on the function of the endogenous pain control circuits at which these drugs act to produce analgesia. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of diverse (i.e., ongoing inflammatory, neuropathic, or chronic widespread) pain syndromes on analgesia induced by activation of an opioid-mediated, noxious stimulus-induced endogenous pain control circuit. This circuit was activated by subdermal capsaicin injection at a site remote from the site of nociceptive testing. Analgesia was not affected by carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain or the early phase of oxaliplatin neuropathy (a complication of cancer chemotherapy). However, the duration of analgesia was markedly shorter in the late phase of oxaliplatin neuropathy and in alcoholic neuropathy. A model of fibromyalgia syndrome produced by chronic unpredictable stress and proinflammatory cytokines also shortened analgesia duration, but so did the same stress alone. Therefore, since chronic pain can activate neuroendocrine stress axes, we tested whether they are involved in the attenuation of analgesic duration induced by these pain syndromes. Rats in which the sympathoadrenal axis was ablated by adrenal medullectomy showed normal duration pain-induced analgesia in groups with either late-phase oxaliplatin neuropathy, alcoholic neuropathy, or exposure to sound stress. These results support the suggestion that pain syndromes can modulate activity in endogenous pain control circuits and that this effect is sympathoadrenal dependent.

  9. Attenuation of Activity in an Endogenous Analgesia Circuit by Ongoing Pain in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Gear, Robert W.; Levine, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    Analgesic efficacy varies depending on the pain syndrome being treated. One reason for this may be a differential effect of individual pain syndromes on the function of endogenous pain control circuits at which these drugs act to produce analgesia. To test this hypothesis we examined the effects of diverse (i.e., ongoing inflammatory, neuropathic, or chronic widespread) pain syndromes on analgesia induced by activation of an opioid-mediated noxious stimulus-induced endogenous pain control circuit. This circuit was activated by subdermal capsaicin injection at a site remote from the site of nociceptive testing. Analgesia was not affected by carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain nor the early-phase of oxaliplatin neuropathy (a complication of cancer chemotherapy). However, the duration of analgesia was markedly shorter in the late-phase of oxaliplatin neuropathy and in alcoholic neuropathy. A model of fibromyalgia syndrome produced by chronic unpredictable stress and proinflammatory cytokines also shortened analgesia duration, but so did the same stress alone. Therefore, since chronic pain can activate neuroendocrine stress axes, we tested whether they are involved in the attenuation of analgesic duration induced by these pain syndromes. Rats in which the sympathoadrenal axis was ablated by adrenal medullectomy showed normal duration pain-induced analgesia in groups with either late-phase oxaliplatin neuropathy, alcoholic neuropathy, or exposure to sound stress. These results support the suggestion that pain syndromes can modulate activity in endogenous pain control circuits, and this effect is sympathoadrenal dependent. PMID:20943910

  10. A systematic review of intravenous ketamine for postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Kevin; Stirling, Alena; McKay, William P; Lim, Hyun J

    2011-10-01

    Perioperative intravenous ketamine may be a useful addition in pain management regimens. Previous systematic reviews have included all methods of ketamine administration, and heterogeneity between studies has been substantial. This study addresses this issue by narrowing the inclusion criteria, using a random effects model, and performing subgroup analysis to determine the specific types of patients, surgery, and clinical indications which may benefit from perioperative ketamine administration. We included published studies from 1966 to 2010 which were randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled using intravenous ketamine (bolus or infusion) to decrease postoperative pain. Studies using any form of regional anesthesia were excluded. No limitation was placed on the ketamine dose, patient age, or language of publication. Ninety-one comparisons in seventy studies involving 4,701 patients met the inclusion criteria (2,652 in ketamine groups and 2,049 in placebo groups). Forty-seven of these studies were appropriate for evaluation in the core meta-analysis, and the remaining 23 studies were used to corroborate the results. A reduction in total opioid consumption and an increase in the time to first analgesic were observed across all studies (P < 0.001). The greatest efficacy was found for thoracic, upper abdominal, and major orthopedic surgical subgroups. Despite using less opioid, 25 out of 32 treatment groups (78%) experienced less pain than the placebo groups at some point postoperatively when ketamine was efficacious. This finding implies an improved quality of pain control in addition to decreased opioid consumption. Hallucinations and nightmares were more common with ketamine but sedation was not. When ketamine was efficacious for pain, postoperative nausea and vomiting was less frequent in the ketamine group. The dose-dependent role of ketamine analgesia could not be determined. Intravenous ketamine is an effective adjunct for postoperative analgesia

  11. Postoperative pain relief using intermittent intrapleural analgesia following thoracoscopic anterior correction for progressive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thoracoscopic anterior scoliosis instrumentation is a safe and viable surgical option for corrective fusion of progressive adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and has been performed at our centre on 205 patients since 2000. However, there is a paucity of literature reporting on or examining optimum methods of analgesia following this type of surgery. A retrospective study was designed to present the authors’ technique for delivering intermittent local anaesthetic boluses via an intrapleural catheter following thoracoscopic scoliosis surgery; report the pain levels that may be expected and any adverse effects associated with the use of intrapleural analgesia, as part of a combined postoperative analgesia regime. Methods Records for 32 patients who underwent thoracoscopic anterior correction for AIS were reviewed. All patients received an intrapleural catheter inserted during surgery, in addition to patient-controlled opiate analgesia and oral analgesia. After surgery, patients received a bolus of 0.25% bupivacaine every four hours via the intrapleural catheter. Patient’s perceptions of their pain control was measured using the visual analogue pain scale scores which were recorded before and after local anaesthetic administration and the quantity and time of day that any other analgesia was taken, were also recorded. Results 28 female and four male patients (mean age 14.5 ± 1.5 years) had a total of 230 boluses of local anaesthetic administered in the 96 hour period following surgery. Pain scores significantly decreased following the administration of a bolus (p < 0.0001), with the mean pain score decreasing from 3.66 to 1.83. The quantity of opiates via patient-controlled analgesia after surgery decreased steadily between successive 24 hours intervals after an initial increase in the second 24 hour period when patients were mobilised. One intrapleural catheter required early removal due to leakage; there were no other associated

  12. Women's perception of the onset of labour and epidural analgesia: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Antje; Penz, Sarah M; Gross, Mechthild M

    2013-04-01

    childbearing women and their midwives differ in their diagnoses of the onset of labour. The symptoms women use to describe the onset of labour are associated with the process of labour. Perinatal factors and women's attitudes may be associated with the administration of epidural analgesia. Our study aimed to assess the correlation between women's perception of the onset of labour and the frequency and timing of epidural analgesia during labour. prospective cohort study. 41 maternity units in Lower Saxony, Germany. 549 nulliparae (as defined in the "Methods" section) and 490 multiparae giving birth between April and October 2005. Women were included after 34 completed weeks of gestation with a singleton in vertex presentation and planned vaginal birth. the association between women's symptoms at the onset of labour and the administration of epidural analgesia - frequency, timing in relation to onset of labour and cervical dilatation - was assessed. The analysis was performed by Kaplan-Meiers estimation, logistic regression and Cox regression. a total of 174 nulliparae and 49 multiparae received epidural analgesia during labour. Nulliparae received it at a median time of 5.47hrs (range: 0.25-51.17hrs) after onset of labour, at a median cervical dilatation of 3.3cm (range: 1.0-10.0cm). In multiparae, epidural analgesia was applied at a median time of 3.79hrs (range: 0.42-28.55hrs) after onset of labour; the median cervical dilatation was 3.0cm (range: 1.0-8.0cm). Women who were admitted with advanced cervical dilatation received epidural analgesia less often. Women who defined their onset of labour earlier than it was diagnosed by their midwives received epidural analgesia earlier. Gastrointestinal symptoms and irregular pain at the onset of labour were associated with later administration of epidural analgesia. Induction of labour was associated with a reduced interval from the onset of labour to epidural analgesia. women's self-diagnosis of the onset of labour and

  13. Relacion Clasificada de los Trabajos del Departamento (Annotated Bibliography of Department Publications).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zierer, Ernesto, Comp.; And Others

    This is a bibliography of the publications of the Department of Languages and Linguistics at the University of Trujillo in Peru from 1959 through 1974. The 323 entries include works both by department members and others. The bibliography is divided into three main categories: (A) Linguistics, the principal areas being (1) General Studies, (2)…

  14. Guia del Usuario para el Modelo Internacional de Impacto en Trabajos y Desarrollo Economico

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, David; Flores-Espino, Francisco; Uriarte, Caroline; Cox, Sadie

    2016-09-01

    This is a Spanish translation of 'User Guide for the International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model.' The International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (I-JEDI) model is a freely available economic model that estimates gross economic impacts from wind, solar, and geothermal energy projects for several different countries. Building on the original JEDI model, which was developed for the United States, I-JEDI was developed under the USAID Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program to support countries in assessing economic impacts of LEDS actions in the energy sector. I-JEDI estimates economic impacts by characterizing the construction and operation of energy projects in terms of expenditures and the portion of these expenditures made within the country of analysis. These data are then used in a country-specific input-output (I-O) model to estimate employment, earnings, gross domestic product (GDP), and gross output impacts. Total economic impacts are presented as well as impacts by industry. This user guide presents general information about how to use I-JEDI and interpret results as well as detailed information about methodology and model limitations.

  15. Occult Spinal Dysraphism in Obstetrics: A Case Report of Caesarean Section with Subarachnoid Anaesthesia after Remifentanil Intravenous Analgesia for Labour

    PubMed Central

    Valente, A.; Frassanito, L.; Natale, L.; Draisci, G.

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial techniques of anaesthesia and analgesia are the current choice in obstetrics for efficacy and general low risk of major complications. Concern exists about neuraxial anaesthesia in patients with occult neural tube defects, regarding both labour analgesia and anaesthesia for Caesarean section. Recently, remifentanil infusion has been proposed as an analgesic technique alternative to lumbar epidural, especially when epidural analgesia appears to be contraindicated. Here, we discuss the case of a pregnant woman attending at our institution with occult, symptomatic spinal dysraphism who requested labour analgesia. She was selected for remifentanil intravenous infusion for labour pain and then underwent urgent operative delivery with spinal anaesthesia with no complications. PMID:22844625

  16. Tramadol or fentanyl analgesia for ambulatory knee arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cagney, B; Williams, O; Jennings, L; Buggy, D

    1999-03-01

    In a double-blind, randomized, controlled study, 61 patients who received a standardized anaesthetic for day case arthroscopic knee surgery were studied. Group T (n = 31) received tramadol 1.5 mg kg-1, and group F (n = 30) received fentanyl 1.5 micrograms kg-1 at the induction of anaesthesia. All patients also received 20 mL of intra-articular bupivacaine 0.5% at the end of surgery. Assessments were made of pain at rest and on movement, analgesic requirements and side-effects at hourly intervals up to 6 h and by means of a postal questionnaire at 24 h and 48 h post-operatively. Group F had higher pain scores than group T at 4 h only [VAS 3.3 (1.6-5.5) vs. 2.4 (1-4), P = 0.039, respectively; median (interquartile range)]. There were no other significant differences between the groups in terms of pain scores, supplemental analgesic requirements or incidence of side-effects. We conclude that tramadol offers little benefit clinically compared with fentanyl when used at induction of anaesthesia for day case arthroscopic knee surgery. Further studies are indicated in patients with more severe pain to determine the role of tramadol in post-operative analgesia.

  17. Multimodal Analgesia, Current Concepts, and Acute Pain Considerations.

    PubMed

    Helander, Erik M; Menard, Bethany L; Harmon, Chris M; Homra, Ben K; Allain, Alexander V; Bordelon, Gregory J; Wyche, Melville Q; Padnos, Ira W; Lavrova, Anna; Kaye, Alan D

    2017-01-01

    Management of acute pain following surgery using a multimodal approach is recommended by the American Society of Anesthesiologists whenever possible. In addition to opioids, drugs with differing mechanisms of actions target pain pathways resulting in additive and/or synergistic effects. Some of these agents include alpha 2 agonists, NMDA receptor antagonists, gabapentinoids, dexamethasone, NSAIDs, acetaminophen, and duloxetine. Alpha 2 agonists have been shown to have opioid-sparing effects, but can cause hypotension and bradycardia and must be taken into consideration when administered. Acetaminophen is commonly used in a multimodal approach, with recent evidence lacking for the use of IV over oral formulations in patients able to take medications by mouth. Studies involving gabapentinoids have been mixed with some showing benefit; however, future large randomized controlled trials are needed. Ketamine is known to have powerful analgesic effects and, when combined with magnesium and other agents, may have a synergistic effect. Dexamethasone reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting and has been demonstrated to be an effective adjunct in multimodal analgesia. The serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, duloxetine, is a novel agent, but studies are limited and further evidence is needed. Overall, a multimodal analgesic approach should be used when treating postoperative pain, as it can potentially reduce side effects and provide the benefit of treating pain through different cellular pathways.

  18. Regional anaesthesia and analgesia: relationship to cancer recurrence and survival.

    PubMed

    Tedore, T

    2015-12-01

    Cancer treatment is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Surgery is a mainstay of treatment for many tumours, and anaesthetists care for cancer patients on a daily basis. Surgery itself induces a stress response and inhibits the immune system, and cancer surgery is associated with the release of tumour cells systemically. Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that the anaesthetics and adjuvants given in the perioperative period can affect cancer recurrence and survival, perhaps tipping the balance in some instances to determine whether cancer progresses or regresses. Retrospective studies have hinted that regional anaesthesia can play a protective role in cancer surgery, but many of these studies are small and subject to bias. We eagerly await the results of several large, randomized controlled trials examining the impact of regional anaesthesia and analgesia on cancer recurrence and survival. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Kin interaction enhances morphine analgesia in male mice.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, F R

    1998-07-01

    The additive effect of social and pharmacological treatments was evaluated in pairs of male mice. Ineffective and effective doses of morphine (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested on pain threshold in dyads of males at different times after pair formation and drug treatment. During the second hour of social interaction after reunion, saline-injected adult sibling male mice showed a decrease in nociception as measured by the tail-flick test. Pairs of unrelated, unfamiliar control mice showed no changes in pain sensitivity during a 2-h social session. An ineffective dose of 2.5 mg/kg of morphine in non-sibling males, significantly increased tail-flick latencies in sibling pairs, before the effect of the social environment (sibling) reached statistical significance. The higher dose of morphine (5.0 mg/kg) produced analgesia in sibling as well as in non-sibling males, but the effect in the latter disappeared 60 min after drug treatment, whereas siblings were still analgesic. These results indicate that an ineffective dose of morphine, combined with the activation of the endogenous opioid system by social factors, can affect nociception.

  20. Neonatal analgesia: A neglected issue in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Obu, Herbert A.; Chinawa, Josephat M.

    2014-01-01

    Pain control in newborns is poorly understood and often neglected in neonatal practice in many settings in our environment. Managing pain among newborns can be quite challenging and the effectiveness of various interventions used to ameliorate pain in this category of patients are either unknown or poorly understood by many a people engaged in the care of newborns in one way or the other. A search for published works on neonatal analgesia was performed using Google and PubMed. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was also searched. The areas of focus were definition, pathophysiology and management of pain in neonates. Relevant information was extracted and processed. Contrary to what is widely believed in many quarters, howbeit erroneously, there is compelling evidence that newborns do indeed feel pain. Supportive care, comprising of use of sucrose, glucose, breastfeeding, kangaroo mother care are worthwhile measures in ameliorating pain in the newborn. Novel therapies (such as sensorial saturation and swaddling) have been evaluated and proven useful. The use of sedation did not show any beneficial results. PMID:25013246

  1. Emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mathieu; Peretz, Isabelle; Rainville, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The capacity of music to soothe pain has been used in many traditional forms of medicine. Yet, the mechanisms underlying these effects have not been demonstrated. Here, we examine the possibility that the modulatory effect of music on pain is mediated by the valence (pleasant-unpleasant dimension) of the emotions induced. We report the effects of listening to pleasant and unpleasant music on thermal pain in healthy human volunteers. Eighteen participants evaluated the warmth or pain induced by 40.0, 45.5, 47.0 and 48.5 degrees C thermal stimulations applied to the skin of their forearm while listening to pleasant and unpleasant musical excerpts matched for their high level of arousal (relaxing-stimulating dimension). Compared to a silent control condition, only the pleasant excerpts produced highly significant reductions in both pain intensity and unpleasantness, demonstrating the effect of positive emotions induced by music on pain (Pairwise contrasts with silence: p's<0.001). Correlation analyses in the pleasant music condition further indicated that pain decreased significantly (p's<0.05) with increases in self-reports of music pleasantness. In contrast, the unpleasant excerpts did not modulate pain significantly, and warmth perception was not affected by the presence of pleasant or unpleasant music. Those results support the hypothesis that positive emotional valence contributes to music-induced analgesia. These findings call for the integration of music to current methods of pain control.

  2. Analgesia for the cirrhotic patient: a literature review and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Jeremy P; Jayasekera, Chatura; Nicoll, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    The choice of analgesic agent in cirrhotic patients is problematic and must be individualized taking into account several factors including severity of liver disease, history of opioid dependence, and potential drug interactions. With a cautious approach including slow dose up-titration and careful monitoring, effective analgesia can be achieved in most cirrhotic patients without significant side effects or decompensation of their liver disease. Paracetamol is safe in patients with chronic liver disease but reduced doses of 2-3 grams daily is recommended for long-term use. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are best avoided because of risk of renal impairment, hepatorenal syndrome, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Opioids have an increased risk of toxicity particularly in patients with hypoalbuminaemia, and immediate-release as opposed to controlled-release formulations are advised. Co-prescription of laxatives is mandatory to avoid constipation and encephalopathy. Adjuvant analgesics such as tricyclic antidepressants and anti-convulsants may be used cautiously for cirrhotic patients with neuropathic pain. Gabapentin or pregabalin may be better tolerated in cirrhosis because of non-hepatic metabolism and a lack of anti-cholinergic side effects.

  3. RESULTS OF THE MEGAVERTEBRATE ANALGESIA SURVEY: ELEPHANTS AND RHINO.

    PubMed

    Kottwitz, Jack; Boothe, Matthew; Harmon, Roy; Citino, Scott B; Zuba, Jeffery R; Boothe, Dawn M

    2016-03-01

    An online survey utilizing Survey Monkey linked through the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians listserve examined current practices in megavertebrate analgesia. Data collected included drugs administered, dosing regimens, ease of administration, efficacy, and adverse events. Fifty-nine facilities (38 housing elephants, 33 housing rhinoceroses) responded. All facilities administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with phenylbutazone (0.25-10 mg/kg) and flunixin meglumine (0.2-4 mg/kg) being most common. Efficacy was reported as "good" to "excellent" for these medications. Opioids were administered to elephants (11 of 38) and rhinoceroses (7 of 33), with tramadol (0.5-3.0 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.05-1.0 mg/kg) being most common. Tramadol efficacy scores were highly variable in both elephants and rhinoceroses. While drug choices were similar among institutions, substantial variability in dosing regimens and reported efficacy between and within facilities indicates the need for pharmacokinetic studies and standardized methods of analyzing response to treatment to establish dosing regimens and clinical trials to establish efficacy and safety.

  4. Reproducibility of placebo analgesia: Effect of dispositional optimism.

    PubMed

    Morton, Debbie L; Watson, Alison; El-Deredy, Wael; Jones, Anthony K P

    2009-11-01

    Placebo has been shown to be a powerful analgesic with corresponding reduction in the activation of the pain matrix in the brain. However it is not clear whether the placebo response is reproducible within individuals and what role personality traits might play in predicting it. We induced placebo analgesia by conditioning subjects to expect pain reduction following a sham-treatment in the guise of a local anaesthetic cream applied to one arm. Pain ratings were assessed before, during and after treatment. The procedure was repeated in a second session to assess the degree of reproducibility of the response. A high degree of correlation was found between the two sessions for the sham-treatment group (R(2) = 0.55; p < 0.001). Personality questionnaires were given during both experimental sessions to assess key traits such as optimism and state and trait anxiety. A regression model was used to statistically define a placebo responder in terms of personality scores. High dispositional optimism and low state anxiety were found to be significant predictors of placebo response. We suggest that repeated placebo responders are high in dispositional optimism and having a placebo response in the first session causes a drop in state anxiety at the beginning of the repeat session.

  5. Salmon calcitonin potentiates the analgesia induced by antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Ormazábal, M J; Goicoechea, C; Sánchez, E; Martín, M I

    2001-01-01

    Antidepressants are used in the treatment of a variety of pain syndromes. Most of them act by blocking noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) reuptake. It is also well known that the serotonergic system is also involved in calcitonin (CT) analgesia. Taking these two evidences into account, the modification of the analgesic effect of nortriptyline, amitriptyline, and paroxetine in the presence of salmon CT (s-CT) was examined in mice. The forced-swimming test was carried out in order to choose doses of each drug that did not induce an antidepressant effect under our experimental conditions (nortriptyline: 0.2-5 mg/kg ip, amitriptyline: 2.5-20 mg/kg ip, and paroxetine: 5-30 mg/kg ip). The analgesic effect of each antidepressant was then evaluated using the acetic acid test. At the doses tested, the antidepressants induced a dose-dependent analgesic effect. When mice were pre-treated with a subanalgesic dose of s-CT (2.5 IU/kg), the analgesic effect of amitriptyline and paroxetine was significantly increased though no modification was found for nortriptyline. In summary, s-CT was able to increase the analgesic effect of the antidepressant drugs that reduce the uptake of 5-HT, suggesting that the joint administration of antidepressants and CT may be an interesting alternative in pain management.

  6. Preventive analgesia in hip or knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Heredia, J; Loza, E; Cebreiro, I; Ruiz Iban, M Á

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the efficacy and safety of preventive analgesia in patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty due to osteoarthritis. A systematic literature review was performed, using a defined a sensitive strategy on Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library up to May 2013. The inclusion criteria were: patients undergoing knee and/or hip arthroplasty, adults with moderate or severe pain (≥4 on a Visual Analog Scale). The intervention, the use (efficacy and safety) of pharmacological treatment (preventive) close to surgery was recorded. Oral, topical and skin patch drugs were included. Systematic reviews, meta-analysis, controlled trials and observational studies were selected. A total of 36 articles, of moderate quality, were selected. The patients included were representative of those undergoing knee and/or hip arthroplasty in Spain. They had a mean age >50 years, higher number of women, and reporting moderate to severe pain (≥4 on a Visual Analog Scale). Possurgical pain was mainly evaluated with a Visual Analog Scale. A wide variation was found as regards the drugs used in the preventive protocols, including acetaminophen, classic NSAID, Cox-2, opioids, corticosteroids, antidepressants, analgesics for neuropathic pain, as well as others, such as magnesium, ketamine, nimodipine or clonidine. In general, all of them decreased post-surgical pain without severe adverse events. The use or one or more pre-surgical analgesics decreases the use of post-surgical drugs, at least for short term pain. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Tat-Mediated Peptide Intervention in Analgesia and Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Feng; Johns, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-permeable peptide carriers are attractive drug delivery tools. Among such carriers, the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 Tat protein is most frequently used and has been successfully shown to deliver a large variety of cargoes. The Tat PTD can facilitate the uptake of large, biologically active molecules into mammalian cells, and recent studies have shown that it can mediate the delivery of different cargoes into tissues throughout a living organism. Given that the Tat PTD-mediated delivery is size-independent, this technology could make previously non-applicable large molecules usable to modulate biological function in vivo and treat human diseases. It is likely that the peptide carrier-mediated intracellular delivery process encompasses multiple mechanisms, but endocytic pathways are the predominant internalization routes. Tat PTD has been successfully used in preclinical models for the study of cancer, ischemia, inflammation, analgesia, and anesthesia. Our recent studies have shown that intraperitoneally injected fusion Tat peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 can be delivered into the spinal cord to dose-dependently disrupt protein-protein interactions between PSD-95 and NMDA receptors. This peptide significantly inhibits chronic inflammatory pain and reduces the threshold for halothane anesthesia. The ability of the Tat PTD to target any cell is advantageous in some respects. However, the drug delivery system will be more attractive if we can modify the Tat PTD to deliver cargo only into desired organs to avoid possible side effects. PMID:20711510

  8. Overview of current development in patient-controlled analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lindley, C

    1994-09-01

    Over the past two decades, numerous trials have assessed the safety and efficacy of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Advantages over conventional parenteral narcotics reported from these trials include equivalent to superior pain relief, superior patient satisfaction, decreased sedation and anxiety, faster return to normal functional status, and reduction in nursing time and hospitalization. The majority of these trials have been conducted in the postoperative patient population. In the mid to late 1980s, interest arose in applying PCA technology to the management of cancer pain. Factors that served as an impetus for the use of PCA in cancer pain included favorable reports from the postoperative setting and the often-cited statistics regarding the magnitude of the cancer pain problem. Advances in PCA technology coupled with advances in vascular access technology that allow the placement of long-term ports and catheters to facilitate intravenous, epidural, or intrathecal administration of opioid analgesics have made the applicability of PCA in ambulatory cancer patients an attractive option. The greatest breakthrough in PCA technology came with the introduction of devices making it possible to choose between intermittent (demand bolus) and continuous administration (continuous infusion) or both intermittent and continuous modes. A comparison of these types of PCA devices is described. The limitations of the literature involving PCA therapy in cancer patients make it difficult to identify optimal patient selection criteria, PCA administration schedules, drug selection and dosing, and optimal route of administration. The current status and pertinent issues related to these topics are addressed.

  9. Fetal and maternal analgesia/anesthesia for fetal procedures.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Marc; De Buck, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    For many prenatally diagnosed conditions, treatment is possible before birth. These fetal procedures can range from minimal invasive punctions to full open fetal surgery. Providing anesthesia for these procedures is a challenge, where care has to be taken for both mother and fetus. There are specific physiologic changes that occur with pregnancy that have an impact on the anesthetic management of the mother. When providing maternal anesthesia, there is also an impact on the fetus, with concerns for potential negative side effects of the anesthetic regimen used. The question whether the fetus is capable of feeling pain is difficult to answer, but there are indications that nociceptive stimuli have a physiologic reaction. This nociceptive stimulation of the fetus also has the potential for longer-term effects, so there is a need for fetal analgesic treatment. The extent to which a fetus is influenced by the maternal anesthesia depends on the type of anesthesia, with different needs for extra fetal anesthesia or analgesia. When providing fetal anesthesia, the potential negative consequences have to be balanced against the intended benefits of blocking the physiologic fetal responses to nociceptive stimulation. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. [Comparative testing of analgesia induced by polarized light and analgetics].

    PubMed

    Tamarova, Z A; Lymans'kyĭ, Iu P; Huliar, S O

    2005-01-01

    In experiments on mice with the tonic pain locus the comparison of analgesia caused by the action of polarized light on an acupuncture point or by two classic analgetics (analginum, tramadol) was performed. The pain was evoked by hypodermic injection of formalin (30 ml of 5% solution) in the plantar region of hindlimb. Intensity of a pain was judged by duration of painful (licking of the pain locus) and non-painful (slipping, eating, running, washing) behavioral reactions for 60 minutes of observation. In animals which received immediately after creation of the tonic pain locus a single intraperitoneal injection of analginum in a doze of 4.2 mg/kg or 8.3 mg/kg the duration of pain response was reduced by 28.5% and 74.9%, respectively. Tramadol decreased the duration of pain behavioral response by 34.2% and 56.2% in a dose 0.8 mg/kg and 8.3 mg/kg, respectively. Statistically significant attenuation of pain (by 50%) was observed in the group of animals exposed to a 10 minute session of polarized light on the antinociceptive acupoint A-36. Compare to animals that received high dozes of analgetics, activity and behavior in mice subjected to an polarized light differed less from the norm. It is possible to suppose, that polarized light will allow a reduction of pharmacological analgetics use and consequently will reduce the risk of development of undesirable side effects in clinic.

  11. Meditative analgesia: the current state of the field.

    PubMed

    Grant, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    Since the first demonstrations that mindfulness-based therapies could have a positive influence on chronic pain patients, numerous studies have been conducted with healthy individuals in an attempt to understand meditative analgesia. This review focuses explicitly on experimental pain studies of meditation and attempts to draw preliminary conclusions based on the work completed in this new field over the past 6 years. Dividing meditative practices into the broad categories of focused attention (FA) and open monitoring (OM) techniques allowed several patterns to emerge. The majority of evidence for FA practices suggests they are not particularly effective in reducing pain. OM, on the other hand, seems to influence both sensory and affective pain ratings depending on the tradition or on whether the practitioners were meditating. The neural pattern underlying pain modulation during OM suggests meditators actively focus on the noxious stimulation while inhibiting other mental processes, consistent with descriptions of mindfulness. A preliminary model is presented for explaining the influence of mindfulness practice on pain. Finally, the potential analgesic effect of the currently unexplored technique of compassion meditation is discussed.

  12. Spinal analgesia for laparoscopic colonic resection using an enhanced recovery after surgery programme: better analgesia, but no benefits on postoperative recovery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wongyingsinn, M; Baldini, G; Stein, B; Charlebois, P; Liberman, S; Carli, F

    2012-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the impact of an intrathecal mixture of bupivacaine and morphine, when compared with systemic morphine, on the quality of postoperative analgesia and other outcomes in the context of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programme for laparoscopic colonic resection. Fifty patients undergoing general anaesthesia were randomly allocated to receive either a spinal mixture of bupivacaine and morphine followed by oral oxycodone (spinal group) or patient-controlled analgesia (PCA group). The primary outcome was consumption of opioids during the first three postoperative days. Secondary outcomes were pain scores, return of bowel function and dietary intake, readiness to hospital discharge, and length of hospital stay. Postoperative opioid consumption in the spinal group was significantly less over the first three postoperative days (P<0.001). The quality of analgesia at rest in the first 24 h was better in the spinal group (P<0.005). Excessive sedation and respiratory depression were reported in two elderly patients with spinal analgesia. There were no differences between the two groups in other outcomes (return of bowel function and dietary intake, readiness to hospital discharge, and length of hospital stay). When ERAS programme is used for laparoscopic colonic resection, an intrathecal mixture of bupivacaine and morphine was associated with less postoperative opioid consumption, but has no other advantages over systemic opioids.

  13. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol enhances its effect on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2016-03-11

    Clonidine prolongs duration of analgesia when used as an adjunct to local anesthetics for infiltrative cutaneous analgesia, and propranolol produces local anesthesia. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol on the quality and duration of cutaneous analgesia. A rat model of cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) in response to local skin pinprick was employed to evaluate the cutaneous analgesic effect of propranolol combined with clonidine. The long-lasting local anesthetic bupivacaine was used as control. Cutaneous analgesia elicited by propranolol and bupivacaine was dose-dependent, and both propranolol (9.0μmol) and bupivacaine (1.8μmol) produced 100% nociceptive blockade. On an 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the relative potency was bupivacaine [0.48 (0.42-0.55) μmol] greater than propranolol [2.27 (1.98-2.54) μmol] (p<0.01). Subcutaneous saline and clonidine (0.12μmol) did not produce cutaneous analgesia. The mixture of an ineffective-dose clonidine (0.12μmol) and a drug (propranolol or bupivacaine) at ED50 or ED95 increased the potency and extended the duration at producing cutaneous analgesia. The resulting data demonstrated that propranolol is less potent than bupivacaine as an infiltrative anesthetic. Clonidine as an adjuvant for propranolol or bupivacaine has a significant peripheral action in increasing the depth and duration of action on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Expectancy-induced placebo analgesia in children and the role of magical thinking.

    PubMed

    Krummenacher, Peter; Kossowsky, Joe; Schwarz, Caroline; Brugger, Peter; Kelley, John M; Meyer, Andrea; Gaab, Jens

    2014-12-01

    Expectations and beliefs shape the experience of pain. This is most evident in context-induced, placebo analgesia, which has recently been shown to interact with the trait of magical thinking (MT) in adults. In children, placebo analgesia and the possible roles that MT and gender might play as modulators of placebo analgesia have remained unexplored. Using a paradigm in which heat pain stimuli were applied to both forearms, we investigated whether MT and gender can influence the magnitude of placebo analgesia in children. Participants were 49 right-handed children (aged 6-9 years) who were randomly assigned-stratified for MT and gender-to either an analgesia-expectation or a control-expectation condition. For both conditions, the placebo was a blue-colored hand disinfectant that was applied to the children's forearms. Independent of MT, the placebo treatment significantly increased both heat pain threshold and tolerance. The threshold placebo effect was more pronounced for girls than boys. In addition, independent of the expectation treatment, low-MT boys showed a lower tolerance increase on the left compared to the right side. Finally, MT specifically modulated tolerance on the right forearm side: Low-MT boys showed an increase, whereas high-MT boys showed a decrease in heat pain tolerance. This study documented a substantial expectation-induced placebo analgesia response in children (girls > boys) and demonstrated MT and gender-dependent laterality effects in pain perception. The findings may help improve individualized pain management for children. The study documents the first experimental evidence for a substantial expectancy-induced placebo analgesia response in healthy children aged 6 to 9 years (girls > boys). Moreover, the effect was substantially higher than the placebo response typically found in adults. The findings may help improve individualized pain management for children. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  15. [Low back pain and headache during immediate postpartum. Role of obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Palot, P; Jolly, D H; Visseaux, H; Botmans, C; Abdi, M; Gabriel, R; Pire, J C

    1995-01-01

    The rate of low back pain and headache following parturition seems to be higher in patients delivered under epidural analgesia. The aim of this study, performed in the immediate postpartum (up to 3rd day) and including 200 patients delivered vaginally, was to assess the incidence and the risk factors of low back pain and headache. A total of 31.5% of them complained of low back pain (LBP+) after parturition. They were significantly younger than those without low back pain (LBP-) (p < 0.03) and have had significantly more often epidural analgesia (p < 0.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences concerning weight, weight gain, parity, duration of labour and duration of epidural analgesia. The LBP+ patients complained significantly more often of cervical (p < 0.04) and low back pain (p < 0.02) during pregnancy, than the LBP-. In the immediate postpartum period, cervical and dorsal pain as well as headache occurred significantly more often in LBP+ than in LBP+ (p < 0.001). The intensity of low back pain during pregnancy (p < 0.006). Risk factors for postpartum LBP were epidural analgesia (OR = odds ratio = 6.59), LBP (OR = 6.50) and cervical pain (OR = 2.75) during pregnancy. The influence of epidural analgesia is questionable, as there was no difference between duration of labour and duration of epidural analgesia, if used, between the two groups. Patients for whom epidural analgesia was required are probably more susceptible to pain during pregnancy. Patients who suffered from postpartum headache (PPHDA+) were comparable to those who did not (PPDHA-).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Clonidine combined with sufentanil and bupivacaine with adrenaline for obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Le Polain, B; De Kock, M; Scholtes, J L; Van Lierde, M

    1993-11-01

    Clonidine produces analgesia via a non-opioid mechanism and it may be used as an interesting adjuvant to local anaesthetics and opioids in obstetric analgesia. To examine the effects of the addition of clonidine to bolus injections of bupivacaine, adrenaline and sufentanil, we enrolled 50 women receiving extradural analgesia for vaginal delivery into a double-blind study. They were allocated randomly to two groups: group A received a 10-ml extradural solution of bupivacaine 12.5 mg combined with adrenaline 25 micrograms and sufentanil 10 micrograms; group B received the same solution with clonidine 30 micrograms. Each patient was allowed two subsequent injections of the chosen solution. Subsequently, if still in the first stage of labour, analgesia was augmented with additional 10-ml injections of bupivacaine 12.5 mg with adrenaline 25 micrograms, without sufentanil or clonidine. The latter solution was used for perineal analgesia in group A; clonidine 30 micrograms was added in group B. During the first and second stages of labour, there was no difference between the two groups in duration of analgesia after the first injection (142 min in group A; 127 min in group B), number of injections (1.8 in group A; 1.9 in group B) and the total bupivacaine requirements (33.9 mg in group A; 34 mg in group B). The quality of analgesia was evaluated as very good in both groups (23/25 in group A; 24/25 in group B). The degree of motor block or the frequency of other side effects were not enhanced by clonidine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Combined spinal epidural (CSE) analgesia: technique, management, and outcome of 300 mothers.

    PubMed

    Collis, R E; Baxandall, M L; Srikantharajah, I D; Edge, G; Kadim, M Y; Morgan, B M

    1994-04-01

    Epidural analgesia in labour is commonly associated with some degree of lower limb weakness often severe enough to be described as paralysis by the mother. We aimed to produce rapid reliable analgesia with no motor block throughout labour. We report a pilot survey of 300 consecutive women requesting regional analgesia in labour who received a combined spinal epidural blockade (CSE). The initial dose was given into the subarachnoid space and analgesia maintained via an epidural catheter. A subarachnoid injection of 2.5 mg bupivacaine and 25 mug fentanyl was successfully given in 268 women (89.3%). Completely pain-free contractions within 3 min of this injection occurred in 195 women (65%) and in all 300 within 20 min and there was no associated motor block in 291 (97%). 141 women chose to stand, walk or sit in a rocking chair at some time during labour. Only 38 women (12.6%) were immobile during the first stage of labour. Analgesia was maintained via the epidural catheter with bolus doses of 10-15 ml of 0.1% bupivacaine and 0.0002% fentanyl. The mean bupivacaine requirement was 9.5 mg/h throughout the entire duration of analgesia. The incidence of post lumbar puncture headache was 2.3%. Transient hypotension occurred in 24 women (8%) and was treated with 6 mg intravenous boluses of ephedrine. Complete satisfaction with analgesia and mobility was reported 12-24 h post partum by 95% of mothers. The use of this analgesic technique caused no alteration in obstetric management or post partum care of the women.

  18. Topical versus caudal ketamine/bupivacaine combination for postoperative analgesia in children undergoing inguinal herniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Hala Saad; Moeen, Seham Mohamed; Moeen, Ahmed Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple studies claim that caudal administration of ketamine causes effective postoperative analgesia. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effectiveness of ketamine after caudal or topical administration in pediatric patients undergoing inguinal herniotomy. Patients and Methods: This randomized, comparative, double-blind study included eighty children (aged 6 months to 6 years) received either 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine/ketamine 0.5 mg/kg for caudal analgesia (caudal group) or 0.3 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine/ketamine 0.5 mg/kg sprayed by the surgeon around the spermatic cord and upon the ilioinguinal nerve before wound closure for topical analgesia (topical group). The duration of postoperative analgesia, pain scores, rescue analgesic consumption, sedation score, hemodynamic monitoring, and side-effects were evaluated 48 h postoperative. Results: Kaplan–Meier survival analysis of analgesia free time demonstrated a significant advantage of topical ketamine (TK) group over caudal ketamine (CK) group. The duration of postoperative analgesia was longer in TK group than in CK group (28.74 ± 2.88 vs. 21.43 ± 5.01 h, P = 0.000). Fewer children asked for oral analgesics in the topical group (24 of 36, 66.7%) than in the caudal one (28 of 32, 87.5%; P < 0.01). Postoperative pain scores at the 6th till 48th h were lower in topical group with comparable analgesic consumption between two groups. In the caudal group, four subjects suffered from retention of urine: Two presented with a residual motor block and two had photophobia. Conclusion: Wound instillation of bupivacaine/ketamine is a simple, noninvasive, and effective technique that could be a safe alternative to CK for postoperative analgesia in children undergoing inguinal hernia repair. PMID:28217052

  19. Epidural Volume Extension During Combined Spinal-Epidural Labor Analgesia Does Not Increase Sensory Block.

    PubMed

    Zaphiratos, Valerie; George, Ronald B; Macaulay, Bruce; Bolleddula, Prasad; McKeen, Dolores M

    2016-09-01

    Combined spinal-epidural (CSE) analgesia is widely used for delivering labor analgesia. Epidural volume extension (EVE) involves the injection of fluid into the epidural space compressing the dural sac, causing cephalad shift of the cerebral spinal fluid. Our hypothesis was that EVE with 10 mL normal saline during CSE would increase the sensory block height at 15 minutes after intrathecal injection. We expected EVE to decrease pain scores, decrease analgesia onset time, and decrease motor block compared with performing CSE without EVE (NEVE). We randomly assigned 60 healthy term laboring nulliparous parturients with cervical dilation <5 cm to receive CSE either with EVE of 10 mL normal saline through the Tuohy needle before catheter insertion or CSE NEVE. Intrathecal analgesia consisted of 2 mg plain bupivacaine and 10 μg fentanyl (1 mL total). A blinded researcher assessed sensory dermatome level, analgesia, and motor blockade at regular intervals for 30 minutes. The primary outcome measure was the median peak sensory dermatome level at 15 minutes. Fifty-four parturients were analyzed. There was no significant difference in peak sensory dermatome levels at 15 minutes (median difference, 1 dermatome level; 95% confidence interval of median difference, 0 to 2; P = 0.22) and 30 minutes (median difference, 0 dermatome level; 95% confidence interval, -2 to 2; P = 0.76). There was no difference in the time to peak dermatome, minimum pain score, or the time to minimum pain score between groups. We found no significant difference between groups with regard to sensory dermatome level or pain scores when using EVE compared with NEVE. Our study demonstrates that addition of EVE does not offer superior analgesia when using a CSE technique for parturients requesting labor analgesia.

  20. Epidural labor analgesia is associated with a decreased risk of postpartum depression: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Wang, Dong-Xin; Qu, Yuan; Chen, Qian; Zhu, Sai-Nan

    2014-08-01

    Postpartum depression is a common psychiatric disorder in parturients after delivery. The etiology remains unclear, and multiple factors may be involved. In this study, we investigated whether epidural labor analgesia was associated with a decreased risk of postpartum depression development. Two hundred fourteen parturients who were preparing for a vaginal delivery were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Epidural labor analgesia was performed in 107 of 214 patients on their request. Parturients' mental status was assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at 3 days and 6 weeks after delivery. A score of 10 or higher on the scale at 6 weeks was used as an indication of postpartum depression. Parturients' characteristics together with perinatal variables were collected. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess an association between the use of epidural analgesia and the occurrence of postpartum depression. Postpartum depression occurred in 14.0% (15 of 107) of parturients who received epidural labor analgesia and in 34.6% (37 of 107) of those who did not (P < 0.001). Use of epidural labor analgesia was associated with a decreased risk of postpartum depression (odds ratio [OR] 0.31, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12-0.82, P = 0.018). Attendance at childbirth classes during pregnancy (OR 0.30, 95% CI, 0.12-0.79, P = 0.015) and continued breast-feeding after delivery (OR 0.02, 95% CI, 0.00-0.07, P < 0.001) were also associated with decreased risks of postpartum depression. A high Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score at 3 days postpartum was associated with an increased risk of postpartum depression (OR 1.20, 95% CI, 1.05-1.37, P = 0.009). Epidural labor analgesia was associated with a decreased risk of postpartum depression. Further study with a large sample size is needed to evaluate the impact of epidural analgesia on the occurrence of postpartum depression.

  1. Focused analgesia in waking and hypnosis: effects on pain, memory, and somatosensory event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Cacace, Immacolata; Massicolle, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Somatosensory event-related potentials (SERPs) to painful electric standard stimuli under an odd-ball paradigm were analyzed in 12 high hypnotizable (HH), 12 medium hypnotizable (MH), and 12 low hypnotizable (LH) subjects during waking, hypnosis, and a cued eyes-open posthypnotic condition. In each of these conditions subjects were suggested to produce an obstructive imagery of stimulus perception as a treatment for pain reduction. A No-Analgesia treatment served as a control in waking and hypnosis conditions. The subjects were required to count the number of delivered target stimuli. HH subjects experienced significant pain and distress reductions during posthypnotic analgesia as compared to hypnotic analgesia and between these two analgesic conditions as compared to the two control conditions. Outside of hypnosis, these subjects remembered less pain and distress levels than they reported during hypnotic and posthypnotic analgesia treatments. In contrast, for waking-analgesia treatment, HH subjects remembered similar pain and distress levels to those they reported concurrently with the stimulation. HH subjects, during hypnotic and posthypnotic analgesia treatments, detected a smaller number of target stimuli and displayed a significant amplitude reduction of the midline frontal and central N140 and P200 SERP components. No significant SERP differences were observed for these subjects between treatments in waking condition and between hypnotic and posthypnotic analgesic treatments. For the MH and LH subjects no significant N140 and P200 amplitude changes were observed among analgesic conditions as compared to control conditions. These amplitude findings are seen as indicating that hypnotic analgesia can affect earlier and later stages of stimulus processing.

  2. Effects of subtle cognitive manipulations on placebo analgesia - An implicit priming study.

    PubMed

    Rosén, A; Yi, J; Kirsch, I; Kaptchuk, T J; Ingvar, M; Jensen, K B

    2017-04-01

    Expectancy is widely accepted as a key contributor to placebo effects. However, it is not known whether non-conscious expectancies achieved through semantic priming may contribute to placebo analgesia. In this study, we investigated if an implicit priming procedure, where participants were unaware of the intended priming influence, affected placebo analgesia. In a double-blind experiment, healthy participants (n = 36) were randomized to different implicit priming types; one aimed at increasing positive expectations and one neutral control condition. First, pain calibration (thermal) and a credibility demonstration of the placebo analgesic device were performed. In a second step, an independent experimenter administered the priming task; Scrambled Sentence Test. Then, pain sensitivity was assessed while telling participants that the analgesic device was either turned on (placebo) or turned off (baseline). Pain responses were recorded on a 0-100 Numeric Response Scale. Overall, there was a significant placebo effect (p < 0.001), however, the priming conditions (positive/neutral) did not lead to differences in placebo outcome. Prior experience of pain relief (during initial pain testing) correlated significantly with placebo analgesia (p < 0.001) and explained 34% of placebo variance. Trait neuroticism correlated positively with placebo analgesia (p < 0.05) and explained 21% of placebo variance. Priming is one of many ways to influence behaviour, and non-conscious activation of positive expectations could theoretically affect placebo analgesia. Yet, we found no SST priming effect on placebo analgesia. Instead, our data point to the significance of prior experience of pain relief, trait neuroticism and social interaction with the treating clinician. Our findings challenge the role of semantic priming as a behavioural modifier that may shape expectations of pain relief, and affect placebo analgesia. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John

  3. Differential effects of experimental central sensitization on the time-course and magnitude of offset analgesia.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Katherine T; Yelle, Marc D; Coghill, Robert C

    2012-02-01

    Pain perception is temporally altered during states of chronic pain and acute central sensitization; however, the mechanisms contributing to temporal processing of nociceptive information remain poorly understood. Offset analgesia is a phenomenon that reflects the presence of temporal contrast mechanisms for nociceptive information and can provide an end point to study temporal aspects of pain processing. In order to investigate whether offset analgesia is disrupted during sensitized states, 23 healthy volunteers provided real-time continuous visual analogue scale responses to noxious heat stimuli that evoke offset analgesia. Responses to these stimuli were evaluated during capsaicin-heat sensitization (45°C stimulus, capsaicin cream 0.1%) and heat-only sensitization (40°C stimulus, placebo cream). Capsaicin-heat sensitization produced significantly larger regions of secondary mechanical allodynia compared to heat-only sensitization. Although areas of mechanical allodynia were positively related to individual differences in heat pain sensitivity, this relationship was altered at later time points after capsaicin-heat sensitization. Heat hyperalgesia was observed in the secondary region following both capsaicin-heat and heat-only sensitization. Increased latencies to maximal offset analgesia and prolonged aftersensations were observed only in the primary regions directly treated by capsaicin-heat or heat alone. However, contrary to the hypothesis that offset analgesia would be reduced following capsaicin-heat sensitization, the magnitude of offset analgesia remained remarkably intact after both capsaicin-heat and heat-only sensitization in zones of both primary and secondary mechanical allodynia. These data indicate that offset analgesia is a robust phenomenon and engages mechanisms that interact minimally with those supporting acute central sensitization.

  4. Primary Spoken Language and Neuraxial Labor Analgesia Use Among Hispanic Medicaid Recipients.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Paloma; Eosakul, Stanley T; Grobman, William A; Feinglass, Joe; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Hispanic women are less likely than non-Hispanic Caucasian women to use neuraxial labor analgesia. It is unknown whether there is a disparity in anticipated or actual use of neuraxial labor analgesia among Hispanic women based on primary language (English versus Spanish). In this 3-year retrospective, single-institution, cross-sectional study, we extracted electronic medical record data on Hispanic nulliparous with vaginal deliveries who were insured by Medicaid. On admission, patients self-identified their primary language and anticipated analgesic use for labor. Extracted data included age, marital status, labor type, delivery provider (obstetrician or midwife), and anticipated and actual analgesic use. Household income was estimated from census data geocoded by zip code. Multivariable logistic regression models were estimated for anticipated and actual neuraxial analgesia use. Among 932 Hispanic women, 182 were self-identified as primary Spanish speakers. Spanish-speaking Hispanic women were less likely to anticipate and use neuraxial anesthesia than English-speaking women. After controlling for confounders, there was an association between primary language and anticipated neuraxial analgesia use (adjusted relative risk: Spanish- versus English-speaking women, 0.70; 97.5% confidence interval, 0.53-0.92). Similarly, there was an association between language and neuraxial analgesia use (adjusted relative risk: Spanish- versus English-speaking women 0.88; 97.5% confidence interval, 0.78-0.99). The use of a midwife compared with an obstetrician also decreased the likelihood of both anticipating and using neuraxial analgesia. A language-based disparity was found in neuraxial labor analgesia use. It is possible that there are communication barriers in knowledge or understanding of analgesic options. Further research is necessary to determine the cause of this association.

  5. The effects of low-dose ketamine on the analgesia nociception index (ANI) measured with the novel PhysioDoloris™ analgesia monitor: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bollag, Laurent; Ortner, Clemens M; Jelacic, Srdjan; Rivat, Cyril; Landau, Ruth; Richebé, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The PhysioDoloris™ analgesia monitor assesses nociception effects on the autonomic nervous system by analyzing changes in heart rate variability (HRV). This non-invasive device analyses ECG signals and determines the analgesia nociception index (ANI), allowing for quantitative assessment of the analgesia/nociception balance in anesthetized patients. Ketamine, an analgesic adjuvant with sympathomimetic properties, has been shown to improve perioperative pain management. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether low-dose ketamine, due to its intrinsic effect on the sino-atrial node, affects HRV and, therefore, interferes with ANI measurements. This pilot study included 20 women undergoing abdominal hysterectomies. Anesthesia and analgesia were maintained with sevoflurane and fentanyl respectively, in a standardized manner. Five minutes after intubation, 0.5 μg kg(-1) of intravenous (i.v.) ketamine was administered. ANI, bispectral index (BIS), heart rate and blood pressure were recorded from the induction of anesthesia until 5 min after skin incision. There was not any significant decrease in mean (±SD) ANI values after intubation (2.11±20.11, p=0.35) or i.v. ketamine administration (1.31±15.26, p=0.28). The mean (±SD) reduction in ANI values after skin incision was statistically significant (13.65±15.44, p=0.01), which is consistent with increased nociception. A single i.v. bolus of 0.5 μg kg(-1) ketamine did not influence the ANI values of 20 women under standardized general anesthesia conditions and absent noxious stimulation. These results suggest that the ANI derived from the PhysioDoloris™ analgesia monitor is feasible under such clinical conditions.

  6. Intravenous Remifentanil versus Epidural Ropivacaine with Sufentanil for Labour Analgesia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhendong; Su, Jing; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Remifentanil with appropriate pharmacological properties seems to be an ideal alternative to epidural analgesia during labour. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to assess the efficacy and safety of remifentanil intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) compared with epidural analgesia. Medical records of 370 primiparas who received remifentanil IVPCA or epidural analgesia were reviewed. Pain and sedation scores, overall satisfaction, the extent of pain control, maternal side effects and neonatal outcome as primary observational indicators were collected. There was a significant decline of pain scores in both groups. Pain reduction was greater in the epidural group throughout the whole study period (0∼180 min) (P<0.0001), and pain scores in the remifentanil group showed an increasing trend one hour later. The remifentanil group had a lower SpO2 (P<0.0001) and a higher sedation score (P<0.0001) within 30 min after treatment. The epidural group had a higher overall satisfaction score (3.8±0.4 vs. 3.7±0.6, P = 0.007) and pain relief score (2.9±0.3 vs. 2.8±0.4, P<0.0001) compared with the remifentanil group. There was no significant difference on side effects between the two groups, except that a higher rate of dizziness (1% vs. 21.8%, P<0.0001) was observed during remifentanil analgesia. And logistic regression analysis demonstrated that nausea, vomiting were associated with oxytocin usage and instrumental delivery, and dizziness was associated to the type and duration of analgesia. Neonatal outcomes such as Apgar scores and umbilical-cord blood gas analysis were within the normal range, but umbilical pH and base excess of neonatus in the remifentanil group were significantly lower. Remifentanil IVPCA provides poorer efficacy on labor analgesia than epidural analgesia, with more sedation on parturients and a trend of newborn acidosis. Despite these adverse effects, remifentanil IVPCA can still be an alternative option for labor analgesia

  7. An enkephalinase inhibitor, SCH 32615, augments analgesia induced by surgery in mice.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, A; Singh, P; Carp, H M

    1995-05-01

    Stress-induced analgesia is a well recognized phenomenon in animals and humans in which endogenous opioids have been implicated. However, analgesia induced by surgical stress has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgery evokes analgesia and to examine the effect of SCH 32615, an inhibitor of one of the enzymes (enkephalinase) responsible for the degradation of enkephalins, on this analgesia, in mice. Analgesia was tested using the hot-plate test. Animals were tested before any procedure was done and then at hourly intervals thereafter. Under halothane anesthesia, the anterior abdominal wall was incised, and the abdominal aorta was compressed against the vertebral column for 1 s. This was repeated for a total of three times at 5-s intervals. At the end of the procedure, the following drug(s) were administered subcutaneously to different groups of animals: (1) no drugs, only surgery (n = 15); (2) 5 mg/kg naloxone (n = 15); (3) 150 mg/kg SCH 32615 (n = 14); (4) 150 mg/kg SCH 32615 plus 5 mg/kg naloxone (n = 15); and (5) SCH 32615 vehicle (0.9% methylcellulose; n = 13). Two more groups of animals were included as controls and were anesthetized, but no surgical procedure was performed. One control group (n = 13) received 0.9% methylcellulose and the other 150 mg/kg SCH 32615 (n = 12). Hot-plate latency was significantly longer after surgery (hot-plate latency at 4 h after surgery 29.3 +/- 3.2 (SE) s and at 5 h 30.7 +/- 5 s versus baseline 15.8 +/- 7 s; P < 0.05). Naloxone (5 mg/kg) inhibited this analgesic effect of surgery. SCH 32615 significantly enhanced this analgesia (percentage of maximal possible effect (%MPE) at 4 h 33.7 +/- 8.7%, at 5 h 27.5 +/- 4.7%, and at 6 h 23.2 +/- 4.7%; P < 0.05 compared to all other groups), and naloxone antagonized its effect. Anesthesia without surgery did not evoke subsequent analgesia, and SCH 32615 was not analgesic in the absence of antecedent surgery. Surgery activated endogenous analgesia

  8. Quality of Labor Epidural Analgesia and Maternal Outcome With Levobupivacaine and Ropivacaine: A Double-Blinded Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, T. Senthil; Rani, P.; Hemanth Kumar, V. R.; Samal, Sunita; Parthasarathy, S.; Ravishankar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Quality of labor analgesia plays a vital role in the maternal outcome. Very few literature are available analyzing the quality of epidural labor analgesia. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 0.1% levobupivacaine and 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl as an adjuvant for epidural labor analgesia in terms of onset, duration, quality of analgesia, and degree of motor blockade. Methodology: Sixty nulliparous parturients, with singleton uncomplicated pregnancy, were recruited by continuous sampling. Parturients were randomized to receive either levobupivacaine 0.1% or ropivacaine 0.1% with 2 μg/ml fentanyl as an intermittent epidural bolus. The epidural analgesia was initiated with 12 ml of study drug solution in the active stage of labor (cervix 3 cm dilated). Demand bolus was given whenever the visual analog scale (VAS) score >3. Onset, duration, and quality of analgesia and degree of motor blockade were analyzed. Maternal outcome was evaluated in terms of mode of delivery, duration of labor, and assisted vaginal delivery. Statistical Analysis: All the data were recorded in Microsoft Office Excel. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 19.0 (IBM SPSS, USA) software with Regression Modules installed. Descriptive analyses were reported as mean and standard deviation of continuous variables. Results: The mean onset of analgesia was shorter in ropivacaine (21.43 ± 2 min) than in levobupivacaine group (23.57 ± 1.71 min) (P = 0.000). Duration of analgesia was shorter in ropivacaine (60 ± 14 min) than levobupivacaine (68 ± 11 min) (P = 0.027). Levobupivacaine produced a better quality of analgesia in terms of not perceiving pain and uterine contraction during labor analgesia but was associated with 37% incidence of instrumental delivery. Duration of labor and rate of cesarean section were comparable between the groups. Conclusion: Quality of analgesia in labor epidural was superior to levobupivacaine but was associated

  9. Analgesia Induced by Isolated Bovine Chromaffin Cells Implanted in Rat Spinal Cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagen, Jacqueline; Pappas, George D.; Pollard, Harvey B.

    1986-10-01

    Chromaffin cells synthesize and secrete several neuroactive substances, including catecholamines and opioid peptides, that, when injected into the spinal cord, induce analgesia. Moreover, the release of these substances from the cells can be stimulated by nicotine. Since chromaffin cells from one species have been shown to survive when transplanted to the central nervous system of another species, these cells are ideal candidates for transplantation to alter pain sensitivity. Bovine chromaffin cells were implanted into the subarachnoid space of the lumbar spinal region in adult rats. Pain sensitivity and response to nicotine stimulation was determined at various intervals following cell implantation. Low doses of nicotine were able to induce potent analgesia in implanted animals as early as one day following their introduction into the host spinal cord. This response could be elicited at least through the 4 months the animals were tested. The induction of analgesia by nicotine in implanted animals was dose related. This analgesia was blocked by the opiate antagonist naloxone and partially attenuated by the adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. These results suggest that the analgesia is due to the stimulated release of opioid peptides and catecholamines from the implanted bovine chromaffin cells and may provide a new therapeutic approach for the relief of pain.

  10. Baseline reward circuitry activity and trait reward responsiveness predict expression of opioid analgesia in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wanigasekera, Vishvarani; Lee, Michael C.; Rogers, Richard; Kong, Yazhuo; Leknes, Siri; Andersson, Jesper; Tracey, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Variability in opioid analgesia has been attributed to many factors. For example, genetic variability of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-encoding gene introduces variability in MOR function and endogenous opioid neurotransmission. Emerging evidence suggests that personality trait related to the experience of reward is linked to endogenous opioid neurotransmission. We hypothesized that opioid-induced behavioral analgesia would be predicted by the trait reward responsiveness (RWR) and the response of the brain reward circuitry to noxious stimuli at baseline before opioid administration. In healthy volunteers using functional magnetic resonance imaging and the μ-opioid agonist remifentanil, we found that the magnitude of behavioral opioid analgesia is positively correlated with the trait RWR and predicted by the neuronal response to painful noxious stimuli before infusion in key structures of the reward circuitry, such as the orbitofrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and the ventral tegmental area. These findings highlight the role of the brain reward circuitry in the expression of behavioral opioid analgesia. We also show a positive correlation between behavioral opioid analgesia and opioid-induced suppression of neuronal responses to noxious stimuli in key structures of the descending pain modulatory system (amygdala, periaqueductal gray, and rostral–ventromedial medulla), as well as the hippocampus. Further, these activity changes were predicted by the preinfusion period neuronal response to noxious stimuli within the ventral tegmentum. These results support the notion of future imaging-based subject-stratification paradigms that can guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:23045652

  11. Post-ictal analgesia: involvement of opioid, serotoninergic and cholinergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Nora, J E; Herrero, C F; Tedeschi-Filho, W; Garcia-Cairasco, N

    2001-01-12

    The neural mechanisms involved in post-ictal analgesia remain to be elucidated. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is used experimentally to induce seizure in animal subjects. This non-competitive antagonist blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significant increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), at least for 30 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naloxone (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg), atropine (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg), methysergide (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and ketanserine (1 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. However, while naloxone antagonized analgesia 15 and 25 min post convulsions, the other drugs caused a blockade of the post-ictal analgesia in a relatively greater period of time. These results indicate that endogenous opioids, serotonin and acetylcholine may be involved in post-ictal analgesia.

  12. Effects of Multimodal Analgesia on the Success of Mouse Embryo Transfer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Parker, John M.; Austin, Jamie; Wilkerson, James; Carbone, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Multimodal analgesia is promoted as the best practice pain management for invasive animal research procedures. Universal acceptance and incorporation of multimodal analgesia requires assessing potential effects on study outcome. The focus of this study was to assess effects on embryo survival after multimodal analgesia comprising an opioid and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) compared with opioid-only analgesia during embryo transfer procedures in transgenic mouse production. Mice were assigned to receive either carprofen (5 mg/kg) with buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg; CB) or vehicle with buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg; VB) in a prospective, double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial. Data were analyzed in surgical sets of 1 to 3 female mice receiving embryos chimeric for a shared targeted embryonic stem-cell clone and host blastocyst cells. A total of 99 surgical sets were analyzed, comprising 199 Crl:CD1 female mice and their 996 offspring. Neither yield (pups weaned per embryo implanted in the surgical set) nor birth rate (average number of pups weaned per dam in the set) differed significantly between the CB and VB conditions. Multimodal opioid–NSAID analgesia appears to have no significant positive or negative effect on the success of producing novel lines of transgenic mice by blastocyst transfer. PMID:21838973

  13. Attitudes of patients to obstetric analgesia at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olayemi, O; Aimakhu, C O; Udoh, E S

    2003-01-01

    Pain relief, for different reasons, is controversial worldwide. We designed this study to assess the level of awareness of antenatal patients to analgesia in labour and to evaluate the effect of age, parity and educational status on the awareness and acceptability of pain relief in labour. A structured questionnaire was administered to 1,000 antenatal patients between 1 June 2000 and 31 May 2001. Spearman's correlation coefficient was applied to estimate the correlation between the ranked dependent variable (awareness and acceptability) and age, parity and educational status (independent variables). Awareness of pain relief methods was seen in only 27.1%. The most common method known was the use of systemic opioids (80%); only 10% were aware of epidural analgesia and about 14% knew of inhalational analgesia. Acceptance of methods was, however, 57.6%. The most common reason for non-acceptance was that 'The pain of labour is natural' in 76.5%, 12% feared complications to the baby and 25% gave other reasons. Age, parity and educational status did not affect awareness. Educational status had positive correlation (rho = 0.13, P < 0.05) with acceptance while age had a negative correlation (rho = -0.124, P<0.05). Awareness of obstetric analgesia is still relatively low in this environment; however, a high proportion of patients would accept analgesia in labour if offered.

  14. Hospitalization for partial nephrectomy was not associated with intrathecal opioid analgesia: Retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Toby N; Del Mundo, Serena B; Yeoh, Tze Yeng; Scavonetto, Federica; Leibovich, Bradley C; Sprung, Juraj

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study is to test the hypothesis that the use of spinal analgesia shortens the length of hospital stay after partial nephrectomy. We reviewed all patients undergoing partial nephrectomy for malignancy through flank incision between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2011. We excluded patients who underwent tumor thrombectomy, used sustained-release opioids, or had general anesthesia supplemented by epidural analgesia. Patients were grouped into "spinal" (intrathecal opioid injection for postoperative analgesia) versus "general anesthetic" group, and "early" discharge group (within 3 postoperative days) versus "late" group. Association between demographics, patient physical status, anesthetic techniques, and surgical complexity and hospital stay were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Of 380 patients, 158 (41.6%) were discharged "early" and 151 (39.7%) were "spinal" cases. Both spinal and early discharge groups had better postoperative pain control and used less postoperative systemic opioids. Spinal analgesia was associated with early hospital discharge, odds ratio 1.52, (95% confidence interval 1.00-2.30), P = 0.05, but in adjusted analysis was no longer associated with early discharge, 1.16 (0.73-1.86), P = 0.52. Early discharge was associated with calendar year, with more recent years being associated with early discharge. Spinal analgesia combined with general anesthesia was associated with improved postoperative pain control during the 1(st) postoperative day, but not with shorter hospital stay following partial nephrectomy. Therefore, unaccounted practice changes that occurred during more recent times affected hospital stay.

  15. Postoperative analgesia with intravenous fentanyl PCA vs epidural block after thoracoscopic pectus excavatum repair in children.

    PubMed

    Butkovic, D; Kralik, S; Matolic, M; Kralik, M; Toljan, S; Radesic, L

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized trial was to compare analgesia, sedation, and cardiorespiratory function in children after thoracoscopic surgery for pectus excavatum repair, using two types of analgesia--epidural block with bupivacaine plus fentanyl vs patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with fentanyl. Twenty-eight patients scheduled for thoracoscopic pectus excavatum surgery were randomly assigned to receive either thoracic epidural block or i.v. PCA for postoperative analgesia. Pain was assessed using a visual-analogue scale (VAS). The Ramsay sedation score, arterial pressure, ventilatory frequency, and heart rate were also measured, and blood gas analysis was performed regularly during the first 48 h after surgery. A significant decrease in the VAS pain score, Ramsay sedation score, heart rate ventilatory frequency, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and PaCO2, and a significant increase in PaO2 and oxygen saturation were found over time. Patients in the PCA group had significantly higher PaCO2 values. In addition, a significantly slower decline of systolic blood pressure and heart rate, and faster recovery of PaCO2 were found in PCA patients than in patients with epidural block. I.V. fentanyl PCA is as effective as thoracic epidural for postoperative analgesia in children after thoracoscopic pectus excavatum repair. Bearing in mind the possible complications of epidural catheterization in children, the use of fentanyl PCA is recommended.

  16. Uterine artery, umbilical, and fetal cerebral Doppler velocities after epidural analgesia during labor.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Morgane; Ducarme, Guillaume; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Bougeois, Bernard; Luton, Dominique

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of epidural analgesia on uterine artery, umbilical, and fetal cerebral Doppler velocities during labor. In a prospective study at Beaujon Hospital, Paris, France, between September and December 2010, uterine artery, umbilical, and fetal cerebral Doppler flow velocities were measured in 12 pregnant women during spontaneous labor with epidural analgesia. The data were registered in a period of uterine relaxation before, and 20 and 60 minutes after the first administration of epidural analgesic drugs. The changes in Doppler velocimetry values and fetal heart rate after epidural analgesia were analyzed. Uterine artery velocities, but neither umbilical nor fetal cerebral Doppler velocities, were decreased significantly at 20 minutes and 1 hour after epidural analgesia (P<0.005). Women with the greatest decrease in uterine artery Doppler flow velocities delivered neonates with the lowest values of umbilical artery blood pH. The data suggest that the Doppler flow velocity of uterine arteries is affected by epidural analgesia during labor. Numerous Doppler flow studies of the effect of neuraxial blockade during labor on umbilical and uterine arteries have been published with incredibly variable and inconsistent results. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine on management of postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarvjeet; Saroa, Richa; Aggarwal, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Use of opioids for perioperative analgesia is associated with sedation, respiratory depression and postoperative nausea and vomiting. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist such as ketamine has both analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties. We studied the effect of intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine on postoperative analgesia and its management with opioids. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 patients scheduled for open cholecystectomy under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into two equal groups in a randomized double-blinded way. The general anesthetic technique was standardized in both groups. Group K patients (n = 40) received bolus of ketamine 0.2 mg/kg intravenously followed by an infusion of 0.1 mg/kg/h before skin incision, which was continued up to the end of surgery. Similar volume of saline was infused in Group C (n = 40). The pain score at different intervals and cumulative morphine consumption over 24 h was observed. Secondary outcomes such as hemodynamic parameters, patient satisfaction score and incidences of side effects were also recorded. Results: Intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine resulted in effective analgesia in first 6 h of the postoperative period, which was evident from reduced pain scores and reduced opioid requirements (P = 0.001). The incidence of side effects and patient satisfaction were similar in both groups. Conclusion: Intraoperative low-dose ketamine infusion provides good postoperative analgesia while reducing need of opioid analgesics, which must be considered for better management of postoperative analgesia. PMID:26283834

  18. Epidural analgesia in association with duration of labor and mode of delivery: a quantitative review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Klebanoff, M A; DerSimonian, R

    1999-04-01

    This study was undertaken to quantitatively summarize previous literature on the effects of epidural analgesia in labor on the duration of labor and mode of delivery. Original studies published in English from 1965 through December 1997 were reviewed and assigned a quality score independently by 2 of the authors. Studies that met the minimal requirements were evaluated further. Data syntheses were performed separately according to study design and outcome measurements, including cesarean delivery, instrumental delivery, oxytocin augmentation, and durations of the first and second stages of labor. Seven randomized clinical trials and 5 observational studies met the minimal requirements. Among them 4 studies of each sort were included in the data synthesis. Both types of studies showed that epidural analgesia increased risk of oxytocin augmentation 2-fold. Clinical trials suggested that epidural analgesia did not increase the risk of cesarean delivery either overall or for dystocia, nor did it significantly increase the risk of instrumental vaginal delivery; however, observational studies reported a more than 4-fold increased risk of cesarean and instrumental deliveries. Although most studies showed a longer labor among women with epidural analgesia than without it, especially during the second stage, most of the studies used inappropriate statistical analysis. Epidural analgesia with low-dose bupivacaine may increase the risk of oxytocin augmentation but not that of cesarean delivery.

  19. Cutaneous synergistic analgesia of bupivacaine in combination with dopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Wang, Jieh-Neng; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Yu-Wen; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2016-05-04

    The main goal of the study was to investigate the interaction between bupivacaine and dopamine on local analgesia. After the blockade of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex (CTMR) responses, which occurred following the drugs were subcutaneously injected in rats, the cutaneous analgesic effect of dopamine in a dosage-dependent fashion was compared to that of bupivacaine. Drug-drug interactions were evaluated by isobolographic methods. We showed the dose-dependent effects of dopamine on infiltrative cutaneous analgesia. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the rank of drug potency was bupivacaine (1.99 [1.92-2.09] μmol/kg) greater than dopamine (190 [181-203] μmol/kg) (P<0.01). At the equianalgesic doses (ED25, ED50, and ED75), dopamine elicited a similar duration of cutaneous analgesia compared with bupivacaine. The addition of dopamine to the bupivacaine solution exhibited a synergistic effect. Our pre-clinical data showed that dopamine produced a dose-dependent effect in producing cutaneous analgesia. When compared with bupivacaine, dopamine produced a lesser potency with a similar duration of cutaneous analgesia. Dopamine added to the bupivacaine preparation resulted in a synergistic analgesic effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Maternal satisfaction with the quality of epidural analgesia for pain relief in labor].

    PubMed

    Gredilla, E; Pérez Ferrer, A; Martínez, B; Alonso, E; Díez, J; Gilsanz, F

    2008-03-01

    To measure patient satisfaction with epidural analgesia in labor and to analyze the sociodemographic characteristics of the obstetric population treated in our hospital. We administered an anonymous questionnaire in July and December 2003 to all patients who received epidural analgesia during labor to obtain information on the intensity of pain before analgesia and the efficacy of this procedure. A total of 1067 questionnaires were returned. Of the patients who responded to the questionnaire, 91.3% were satisfied with the process of epidural anesthesia, 93.8% stated that they would recommend the technique used in our hospital, and 94% responded that they would request the technique again in our hospital. Spanish nationals accounted for 74.8% of the surveyed patients; the remaining 25.2% were from other countries-mainly from Central and South America (18% of the total). Before administration of epidural analgesia, 23.3% of Spanish primiparas defined labor pain as severe compared to 40.7% of foreign primiparas (P<.001). Of the multiparas, 212% of Spanish patients described the pain as severe compared to 40.4% of foreign women (P<.001). The overall level of satisfaction with the process of epidural analgesia is very high and was not influenced by sociodemographic factors. Labor pain is perceived as being more intense by non-Spanish women.

  1. [Intrapleural catheter analgesia in patients with multiple rib fractures].

    PubMed

    Wulf, H; Jeckström, W; Maier, C; Winckler, K

    1991-01-01

    Patients with multiple rib fractures often suffer from severe pain that impairs their respiratory performance. The effect of interpleural administration of bupivacaine (20 ml 0.25% every 4 h) for pain management was evaluated in ten patients. The initial interpleural injection resulted in significant pain relief and improvement of arterial oxygen tension. Two patients needed additional i.v. injections of opioids (piritramide 15-22.5 mg/24 h). In one patient a small asymptomatic pneumothorax was observed following placement of the catheter, which resolved spontaneously. No other complications were reported. In an intraindividual comparison, bupivacaine alone and bupivacaine plus epinephrine 1:200,000 were compared with regard to pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine, analgesic effect, side effects, and respiratory performance. The addition of epinephrine yielded only minor advantages from a pharmacokinetic point of view (median peak concentration of bupivacaine 1.8 micrograms/ml vs 2.0 micrograms/ml for bupivacaine alone). The quality and duration of analgesia and the effects on respiration were not influenced by epinephrine. The heart rate was significantly higher and the blood pressure significantly lower when epinephrine was added to the solution. Nevertheless, these differences were too small to be of clinical importance. Even though maximum total plasma concentrations of bupivacaine above 2 micrograms/ml were found in some patients, there were no signs of CNS toxicity, most probably because of the increased protein binding of bupivacaine following trauma. Accordingly, the maximum free plasma concentrations in all patients were below the threshold level of 0.24 micron/ml. We therefore conclude tht interpleural administration of bupivacaine could be a valuable means of pain relief in patients with multiple rib fractures, providing no severe pulmonary contusions or concomitant injuries are present.

  2. Sex-dependent effects of cannabis-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ziva D; Haney, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    Preclinical studies demonstrate that cannabinoid-mediated antinociceptive effects vary according to sex; it is unknown if these findings extend to humans. This retrospective analysis compared the analgesic, subjective and physiological effects of active cannabis (3.56-5.60% THC) and inactive cannabis (0.00% THC) in male (N=21) and female (N=21) cannabis smokers under double-blind, placebo-controlled conditions. Pain response was measured using the Cold-Pressor Test (CPT). Participants immersed their hand in cold water (4°C); times to report pain (pain sensitivity) and withdraw the hand (pain tolerance) were recorded. Subjective drug ratings were also measured. Among men, active cannabis significantly decreased pain sensitivity relative to inactive cannabis (p<0.01). In women, active cannabis failed to decrease pain sensitivity relative to inactive. Active cannabis increased pain tolerance in both men women immediately after smoking (p<0.001); a trend was observed for differences between men and women (p<0.10). Active cannabis also increased subjective ratings of cannabis associated with abuse liability ('Take again,' 'Liking,' 'Good drug effect'), drug strength, and 'High' relative to inactive in both men and women (p<0.01). These results indicate that in cannabis smokers, men exhibit greater cannabis-induced analgesia relative to women. These sex-dependent differences are independent of cannabis-elicited subjective effects associated with abuse-liability, which were consistent between men and women. As such, sex-dependent differences in cannabis's analgesic effects are an important consideration that warrants further investigation when considering the potential therapeutic effects of cannabinoids for pain relief. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thoracic epidural analgesia reduces gastric microcirculation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Rikard; Strandby, Rune B; Secher, Niels H; Rünitz, Kim; Svendsen, Morten B S; Petersen, Lonnie G; Achiam, Michael P; Svendsen, Lars B

    2016-10-06

    Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) is used for pain relief during and after abdominal surgery, but the effect of TEA on the splanchnic microcirculation remains debated. We evaluated whether TEA affects splanchnic microcirculation in the pig. Splanchnic microcirculation was assessed in nine pigs prior to and 15 and 30 min after induction of TEA. Regional blood flow was assessed by neutron activated microspheres and changes in microcirculation by laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). As assessed by LSCI 15 min following TEA, gastric arteriolar flow decreased by 22 % at the antrum (p = 0.020) and by 19 % at the corpus (p = 0.029) of the stomach. In parallel, the microcirculation decreased by 19 % at the antrum (p = 0.015) and by 20 % at the corpus (p = 0.028). Reduced arteriolar flow and microcirculation at the antrum was confirmed by a reduction in microsphere assessed regional blood flow 30 min following induction of TEA (p = 0.048). These manifestations took place along with a drop in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.030), but with no significant change in mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, or heart rate. The results indicate that TEA may have an adverse effect on gastric arteriolar blood flow and microcirculation. LSCI is a non-touch technique and displays changes in blood flow in real-time and may be important for further evaluation of the concern regarding the effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia on gastric microcirculation in humans. Not applicable, non-human study.

  4. Ethnic differences in the use of intrapartum epidural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obstetric epidural analgesia (EA) is widely applied, but studies have reported that its use may be less extensive among immigrant women or those from minority ethnic groups. Our aim was to examine whether this was the case in our geographic area, which contains an important immigrant population, and if so, to describe the different components of this phenomenon. Methods Cross-sectional observational study. Setting: general acute care hospital, located in Marbella, southern Spain. Analysis of computer records of deliveries performed from 2004 to 2010. Comparison of characteristics of deliveries according to the mothers’ geographic origins and of vaginal deliveries noting whether EA was received, using univariate and bivariate statistical analysis and multiple logistic regression (MLR). Results A total of 21,034 deliveries were recorded, and 37.4% of these corresponded to immigrant women. EA was provided to 61.1% of the Spanish women and to 51.5% of the immigrants, with important variations according to geographic origin: over 52% of women from other European countries and South America received EA, compared with around 45% of the African women and 37% of the Asian women. These differences persisted in the MLR model after adjusting for the mother's age, type of labor initiation, the weight of the neonate and for single or multiple gestation. With the Spanish patients as the reference category, all the other countries of origin presented lower probabilities of EA use. This was particularly apparent for the patients from Asia (OR 0.38; 95%CI 0.31-0.46), Morocco (OR 0.49; 95%CI 0.43-0.54) and other Africa (OR 0.55; 95%CI 0.37-0.81). Conclusions We observed a different use of EA in vaginal deliveries, according to the geographic origin of the women. The explanation for this involves a complex set of factors, depending both on the patient and on the healthcare staff. PMID:22818255

  5. Labor epidural analgesia is independent risk factor for neonatal pyrexia.

    PubMed

    Agakidis, Charalampos; Agakidou, Eleni; Philip Thomas, Sumesh; Murthy, Prashanth; John Lloyd, David

    2011-09-01

    To explore whether epidural analgesia (EA) in labor is independent risk factor for neonatal pyrexia after controlling for intrapartum pyrexia. Retrospective observational study of 480 consecutive term singleton infants born to mothers who received EA in labor (EA group) and 480 term infants delivered to mothers who did not receive EA (NEA group). Mothers in the EA group had significantly higher incidence of intrapartum pyrexia [54/480 (11%) vs. 4/480 (0.8%), OR = 15.1, p < 0.0001] and neonatal pyrexia [68/480 (14.2%) vs. 15/480 (3.1%), OR = 5.1, p < 0.0001]. Neonates in the EA group had a median duration of pyrexia of 1 h (maximum 5 h) with a peak temperature within 1 h. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that maternal EA was independent risk factor for neonatal pyrexia (>37.5°C) after controlling for intrapartum pyrexia (>37.9°C) and other confounders (OR = 3.44, CI = 1.9-6.3, p < 0.0001). Sepsis work-up was performed significantly more frequently in infants in the EA group [11.7% vs. 2.5%, OR= 5.2, CI = 2.7-9.7, p < 0.0001] with negative blood cultures. EA in labor is an independent risk factor for pyrexia in term neonates. It is unnecessary to investigate febrile offspring of mothers who have had epidurals unless pyrexia persists for longer than 5 h or other signs or risk factors for neonatal sepsis are present.

  6. Oxytocin mediates stress-induced analgesia in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, D A; Wei, F; Wang, G D; Li, P; Kim, S J; Vogt, S K; Muglia, L J; Zhuo, M

    2002-01-01

    As a neurohormone and as a neurotransmitter, oxytocin has been implicated in the stress response. Descending oxytocin-containing fibres project to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, an area important for processing nociceptive inputs. Here we tested the hypothesis that oxytocin plays a role in stress-induced analgesia and modulates spinal sensory transmission. Mice lacking oxytocin exhibited significantly reduced stress-induced antinociception following both cold-swim (10 °C, 3 min) and restraint stress (30 min). In contrast, the mice exhibited normal behavioural responses to thermal and mechanical noxious stimuli and morphine-induced antinociception. In wild-type mice, intrathecal injection of the oxytocin antagonist dOVT (200 μm in 5 μl) significantly attenuated antinociception induced by cold-swim. Immunocytochemical staining revealed that, in the mouse, oxytocin-containing neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus are activated by stress. Furthermore, oxytocin-containing fibres were present in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. To test whether descending oxytocin-containing fibres could alter nociceptive transmission, we performed intracellular recordings of dorsal horn neurones in spinal slices from adult mice. Bath application of oxytocin (1 and 10 μm) inhibited excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by dorsal root stimulation. This effect was reversed by the oxytocin antagonist dOVT (1 μm). Whole-cell recordings of dorsal horn neurones in postnatal rat slices revealed that the effect of oxytocin could be blocked by the addition of GTP-γ-S to the recording pipette, suggesting activation of postsynaptic oxytocin receptors. We conclude that oxytocin is important for both cold-swim and restraint stress-induced antinociception, acting by inhibiting glutamatergic spinal sensory transmission. PMID:11956346

  7. [Locally administered ropivacaine vs. standard analgesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Chavarría-Pérez, Teresa; Cabrera-Leal, Carlos Fernando; Ramírez-Vargas, Susana; Reynada, José Luis; Arce-Salinas, César Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: se desconoce qué modalidad analgésica brinda mejores resultados después de una colecistectomía laparoscópica. El objetivo de este estudio consistió en valuar la eficacia analgésica de la ropivacaína usada localmente contra la dipirona por vía intravenosa en colecistectomía laparoscópica. Métodos: ensayo clínico al azar, de no inferioridad, en 50 pacientes con colecistectomía laparoscópica para comparar el uso de ropivacaína al 0.75 % infiltrada en el lugar de inserción de los trócares y en la fosa vesicular frente a dipirona por vía intravenosa. El desenlace primario fue dolor evaluado mediante escala visual análoga (EVA) en las primeras 24 horas. Resultados: el promedio de las EVA de dolor al término de la cirugía fue de 3.8 frente a 3.56 en el grupo de ropivacaína o de dipirona, mientras que a las 6, 12 y 24 horas fueron 2.64 frente a 2.6, 1.92 frente a 1.88 y 1.28 frente a 1.2, respectivamente. No hubo efectos adversos en ningún grupo y la necesidad de rescates analgésicos con tramadol fue similar entre ambos grupos. Conclusiones: la ropivacaína al 0.75 % infiltrada en el lugar de inserción de los trócares y la fosa vesicular muestra una analgesia similar a la dipirona por vía intravenosa en las primeras 24 horas después de una colecistectomía laparoscópica, sin efectos adversos.

  8. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance has been noticed in both clinical observation and laboratory studies. Evidence shows that many molecular and cellular events that play essential roles in opioid analgesia and tolerance are actually age-dependent. For example, the expression and functions of endogenous opioid peptides, multiple types of opioid receptors, G protein subunits that couple to opioid receptors, and regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins) change with development and age. Other signaling systems that are critical to opioid tolerance development, such as N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, also undergo age-related changes. It is plausible that the age-dependent expression and functions of molecules within and related to the opioid signaling pathways, as well as age-dependent cellular activity such as agonist-induced opioid receptor internalization and desensitization, eventually lead to significant age-dependent changes in opioid analgesia and tolerance development. PMID:22612909

  9. An Update on Drugs Used for Lumbosacral Epidural Anesthesia and Analgesia in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Steagall, Paulo V. M.; Simon, Bradley T.; Teixeira Neto, Francisco J.; Luna, Stelio P. L.

    2017-01-01

    This review aims to report an update on drugs administered into the epidural space for anesthesia and analgesia in dogs, describing their potential advantages and disadvantages in the clinical setting. Databases searched include Pubmed, Google scholar, and CAB abstracts. Benefits of administering local anesthetics, opioids, and alpha2 agonists into the epidural space include the use of lower doses of general anesthetics (anesthetic “sparing” effect), perioperative analgesia, and reduced side effects associated with systemic administration of drugs. However, the potential for cardiorespiratory compromise, neurotoxicity, and other adverse effects should be considered when using the epidural route of administration. When these variables are considered, the epidural technique is useful as a complementary method of anesthesia for preventive and postoperative analgesia and/or as part of a balanced anesthesia technique. PMID:28553642

  10. Understanding Central Mechanisms of Acupuncture Analgesia Using Dynamic Quantitative Sensory Testing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jiang-Ti; Schnyer, Rosa N.; Johnson, Kevin A.; Mackey, Sean

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the emerging translational tools for the study of acupuncture analgesia with a focus on psychophysical methods. The gap between animal mechanistic studies and human clinical trials of acupuncture analgesia calls for effective translational tools that bridge neurophysiological data with meaningful clinical outcomes. Temporal summation (TS) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) are two promising tools yet to be widely utilized. These psychophysical measures capture the state of the ascending facilitation and the descending inhibition of nociceptive transmission, respectively. We review the basic concepts and current methodologies underlying these measures in clinical pain research, and illustrate their application to research on acupuncture analgesia. Finally, we highlight the strengths and limitations of these research methods and make recommendations on future directions. The appropriate addition of TS and CPM to our current research armamentarium will facilitate our efforts to elucidate the central analgesic mechanisms of acupuncture in clinical populations. PMID:23762107

  11. Obstetric analgesia: pharmacokinetics and its relation to neonatal behavioral and adaptive functions.

    PubMed

    Kanto, J; Erkkola, R

    1984-01-01

    The neonatal pharmacokinetic and neurobehavioral properties of certain agents used in obstetric analgesia are reviewed (local anesthetics, opiates, inhalation agents, benzodiazepines). Fetal and neonatal pharmacokinetic alterations partly explain the neurobehavioral differences observed between different drug groups and ways of drug administration. The most effective and safest method with fewest neonatal neurobehavioral effects appears to be regional epidural analgesia performed with plain bupivacaine. The use of epidural opiates remains problematic. Inhalation agents and parenteral pethidine (meperidine) are still clinically useful alternative compounds in circumstances where epidural analgesia is not possible. Pharmacokinetically and according to neurobehavioral assessments, inhalation agents appear to be more attractive than pethidine. Benzodiazepines, especially after high or repeated doses, may cause the so-called floppy-infant syndrome, at least partly, due to a slow neonatal drug elimination.

  12. [Obstetric analgesia for a patient with a history of 3 previous operations on the spine].

    PubMed

    Fernández Torres, B; Fontán Atalaya, I M; López Millán, J M; Alba Rivera, R; Senabre Carrera, J; de las Mulas Béjar, M

    2006-01-01

    A history of spinal surgery is not currently considered a contraindication for regional obstetric analgesia. However, there are highly complex cases in which choosing the best analgesic technique presents genuine problems. We report the case of a woman in labor at full-term with 4-cm dilatation of the cervix who had undergone 3 operations for scoliosis and a herniated disk treated by T5-L4 and L4-sacral arthrodesis, laminectomy, and diskectomy. No previous anesthetic plan was in place, so we chose intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for labor and vaginal delivery and spinal anesthesia for a cesarean delivery. However, general anesthesia became necessary because it was impossible to reach the dura mater. The literature was reviewed to assess alternative forms of obstetric analgesia for patients who have undergone scoliosis surgery.

  13. Post-operative pain management: transition from epidural to oral analgesia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Donna; O'Neill, Olga; Beck, Alexandra

    Although managing pain in the acute surgical setting is a priority, there is a dearth of evidence to guide clinicians on how best to approach the discontinuation and transition of patients from epidural analgesia to oral analgesia post-operatively. This article describes an audit at a regional trust which examined data on patients' observations charts, as well as patients' self-reports of pain. The authors found that reducing epidural opioid concentrations post-operatively is useful in analgesic transition, using bupivacaine only for weaning has limited value, and that the timing of oral analgesia administration is important. They conclude that comprehensive pain assessment and better documentation are necessary to improve pain management practices. While the results demonstrate the advantage of reducing epidural opioid concentrations, decisions should be based on the needs of individual patients and not form part of a routine task.

  14. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study1

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira; da Costa, José Madson Vidal; Cascudo, Marcelo Matos; Pinheiro, Ênio de Oliveira; Fernandes, Maria Angela Ferreira; de Araujo, Ivonete Batista

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47). The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious. PMID:26625989

  15. Conditioned placebo analgesia persists when subjects know they are receiving a placebo

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Scott M.; Colloca, Luana; Wager, Tor D.

    2015-01-01

    Belief in the effectiveness of a placebo treatment is widely thought to be critical for placebo analgesia. Many types of placebo responses—even those that depend on conditioning—appear to be mediated by expectations that are strengthened as treatment cues are reinforced with positive outcomes. However, placebo effects may occur even when participants are aware they are receiving placebo. To address the question of whether conditioned placebo analgesia can persist in the absence of expectations, we studied the effects of long (4 days) vs. short (1 day) conditioning to a placebo treatment. After an initial placebo test, a “reveal” manipulation convincingly demonstrated to participants that they had never received an active drug. Placebo analgesia persisted after the reveal in the long conditioning group only. These findings suggest that reinforcing treatment cues with positive outcomes can create placebo effects that are independent of reported expectations for pain relief. PMID:25617812

  16. Understanding central mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia using dynamic quantitative sensory testing: a review.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jiang-Ti; Schnyer, Rosa N; Johnson, Kevin A; Mackey, Sean

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the emerging translational tools for the study of acupuncture analgesia with a focus on psychophysical methods. The gap between animal mechanistic studies and human clinical trials of acupuncture analgesia calls for effective translational tools that bridge neurophysiological data with meaningful clinical outcomes. Temporal summation (TS) and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) are two promising tools yet to be widely utilized. These psychophysical measures capture the state of the ascending facilitation and the descending inhibition of nociceptive transmission, respectively. We review the basic concepts and current methodologies underlying these measures in clinical pain research, and illustrate their application to research on acupuncture analgesia. Finally, we highlight the strengths and limitations of these research methods and make recommendations on future directions. The appropriate addition of TS and CPM to our current research armamentarium will facilitate our efforts to elucidate the central analgesic mechanisms of acupuncture in clinical populations.

  17. Nurse-managed analgesia for renal colic pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kelly, A M

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective chart review was conducted of patients with acute renal colic for the years 1993 and 1997, in order to compare analgesia ordering and administration practices before and after implementation of a nurse-managed, titrated intravenous (i.v.) narcotic policy. The study demonstrated a significant and sustained change in analgesia administration practices away from the intramuscular (i.m.) route in favour of the i.v. route. For renal colic, in 1993, 76% of patients received i.m. narcotic analgesia compared to 3% in 1997. In contrast, i.v. narcotic (with or without adjuvant (NSAID) was used in 3% of the patients in 1993 compared to 95% in 1997.

  18. An Update on Drugs Used for Lumbosacral Epidural Anesthesia and Analgesia in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Simon, Bradley T; Teixeira Neto, Francisco J; Luna, Stelio P L

    2017-01-01

    This review aims to report an update on drugs administered into the epidural space for anesthesia and analgesia in dogs, describing their potential advantages and disadvantages in the clinical setting. Databases searched include Pubmed, Google scholar, and CAB abstracts. Benefits of administering local anesthetics, opioids, and alpha2 agonists into the epidural space include the use of lower doses of general anesthetics (anesthetic "sparing" effect), perioperative analgesia, and reduced side effects associated with systemic administration of drugs. However, the potential for cardiorespiratory compromise, neurotoxicity, and other adverse effects should be considered when using the epidural route of administration. When these variables are considered, the epidural technique is useful as a complementary method of anesthesia for preventive and postoperative analgesia and/or as part of a balanced anesthesia technique.

  19. A case of unilateral Horner's syndrome diagnosed in retrospect following epidural analgesia during labour and caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Niraj; Ansari, Tarek

    2010-06-01

    Horner's syndrome is a rare complication of epidural analgesia in labour. Although it is a sign of high sympathetic block, patients are usually haemodynamicaly stable. We report a case of undiagnosed Horner's syndrome complicating epidural analgesia in labour, where a standard dose of local anaesthetic was given for an emergency caesarean section without problems. This may confirm the benign nature of the syndrome.

  20. Effect of parecoxib combined with thoracic epidural analgesia on pain after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiao-Min; Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Ding, Ming; Liu, Qiu-A-Xue

    2016-01-01

    Background Thoracotomy results in severe postoperative pain potentially leading to chronic pain. We investigated the potential benefits of intravenous parecoxib on postoperative analgesia combined with thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA). Methods Eighty-six patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomized into two groups. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) was used until chest tubes were removed. Patients received parecoxib (group P) or placebo (group C) intravenously just 0.5 h before the operation and every 12 h after operation for 3 days. The intensity of pain was measured by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and recorded at 2, 4, 8, 24, 48, 72 h after operation. The valid number of PCA, the side effects and the overall satisfaction to analgesic therapy in 72 h were recorded. Venous blood samples were taken before operation, the 1st and 3rd day after operation for plasma cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α level. The occurrence of residual pain was recorded using telephone questionnaire 2 and 12 months after surgery. Results Postoperative pain scores at rest and on coughing were significantly lower with the less valid count of PCA and greater patient satisfaction in group P (P<0.01). Adverse effect and the days fit for discharge were comparable between two groups. The cortisol levels in placebo group were higher than parecoxib group at T2. The level of ACTH both decreased in two groups after operation but it was significantly lower in group P than that in group C. There were no changes in plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after analgesia at T1 and T2 (P>0.05). The occurrence of residual pain were 25% and 51.2% separately in group P and C 3 months postoperatively (P<0.05). Conclusions Intravenous parecoxib in multimodal analgesia improves postoperative analgesia provided by TEA, relieves stress response after thoracotomy, and may restrain the development of chronic pain. PMID:27162662

  1. Continuous physostigmine combined with morphine-based patient-controlled analgesia in the postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Beilin, B; Bessler, H; Papismedov, L; Weinstock, M; Shavit, Y

    2005-01-01

    Recently, new drugs and techniques for the treatment of postoperative pain were introduced, with the goal of enhancing opiates' analgesia while minimizing their side-effects. Cholinergic agents play an antinociceptive role, but their clinical use is quite limited, due to side-effects. Physostigmine is a cholinesterase inhibitor, which crosses the blood-brain barrier and elevates brain acetylcholine level. Physostigmine can produce analgesia by itself, and enhance opiate analgesia; but these effects are of short duration following bolus administration. We compared pain intensity and morphine consumption in two postoperative treatment groups: One group received continuous physostigmine infusion combined with morphine-based patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), and the other received PCA alone. Cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways have recently been described. We therefore also compared changes in proinflammatory cytokine production in the two pain management groups. Continuous infusion of physostigmine combined with morphine-based PCA in the postoperative period significantly reduced opiate consumption, and enhanced the analgesic response. Patients in the physostigmine group also exhibited reduced ex-vivo production of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1beta. At the same time, physostigmine increased nausea and vomiting, mostly in the first 2 h of the postoperative period. Physostigmine combined with morphine in the postoperative period reduced morphine consumption, enhanced analgesia, and attenuated production of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1beta. This latter finding may account for the decreased pain observed in this group; this cytokine is known to mediate basal pain sensitivity and induce hyperalgesia in inflammatory conditions. Taking into account the other potential beneficial effects of physostigmine, we suggest that a continuous infusion of physostigmine should be considered as a useful component in multimodal postoperative analgesia.

  2. Src family kinases involved in CXCL12-induced loss of acute morphine analgesia.

    PubMed

    Rivat, Cyril; Sebaihi, Soumia; Van Steenwinckel, Juliette; Fouquet, Stéphane; Kitabgi, Patrick; Pohl, Michel; Melik Parsadaniantz, Stéphane; Reaux-Le Goazigo, Annabelle

    2014-05-01

    Functional interactions between the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and opioid receptors have been reported in the brain, leading to a decreased morphine analgesic activity. However the cellular mechanisms responsible for this loss of opioid analgesia are largely unknown. Here we examined whether Src family-kinases (SFK)-linked mechanisms induced by CXCR4 contributed to the loss of acute morphine analgesia and could represent a new physiological anti-opioid signaling pathway. In this way, we showed by immunohistochemistry and western blot that CXCL12 rapidly activated SFK phosphorylation in vitro in primary cultured lumbar rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) but also in vivo in the DRG and the spinal cord. We showed that SFK activation occurred in a sub population of sensory neurons, in spinal microglia but also in spinal nerve terminals expressing mu-(MOR) and delta-opioid (DOR) receptor. In addition we described that CXCR4 is detected in MOR- and DOR-immunoreactive neurons in the DRG and spinal cord. In vivo, we demonstrated that an intrathecal administration of CXCL12 (1μg) significantly attenuated the subcutaneous morphine (4mg/kg) analgesia. Conversely, pretreatment with a potent CXCR4 antagonist (5μg) significantly enhanced morphine analgesia. Similar effects were obtained after an intrathecal injection of a specific SFK inhibitor, PP2 (10μg). Furthermore, PP2 abrogated CXCL12-induced decrease in morphine analgesia by suppressing SFK activation in the spinal cord. In conclusion, our data highlight that CXCL12-induced loss of acute morphine analgesia is linked to Src family kinases activation.

  3. The use of different doses of metamizol for post-operative analgesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Imagawa, Vivianne H; Fantoni, Denise T; Tatarunas, Angélica C; Mastrocinque, Sandra; Almeida, Tatiana F; Ferreira, Fernando; Posso, Irimar P

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the post-operative analgesic effect of metamizol (dipyrone) administered intravenously at three different doses (15 mg kg(-1), 25 mg kg(-1) and 35 mg kg(-1)) compared to placebo in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Prospective, comparative, randomized, blinded trial. Forty healthy bitches, aged 1-6 years, weighing 10-35 kg The animals were randomly divided into four groups and received their respective treatments immediately after surgery: placebo group (0.9% saline solution), D15 group (metamizol 15 mg kg(-1) IV), D25 group (metamizol 25 mg kg(-1) IV), D35 group (metamizol 35 mg kg(-1) IV). The following variables were measured: sedation, pulse rate (PR), respiratory rate (f(R)), arterial blood pressure (ABP), plasma catecholamines, serum cortisol, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine metabolites, albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), hemogram, platelet counts and level of analgesia which was assessed by visual analog (VAS), descriptive and behavioral scales. Patients were monitored for 48 hours after the administration of the analgesic agent. Rescue analgesia (tramadol, 2 mg kg(-1), intramuscularly) was provided for animals with pain scores ≥4, as determined by the VAS or descriptive scale. The D25 and D35 groups showed equivalent post-operative analgesia, as shown by decreased pain scores, according to the three different pain scales, and fewer animals that required rescue analgesia. Significantly lower serum cortisol concentrations were observed in the D25 and D35 groups when compared to the placebo and D15 groups. No hematologic, renal, hepatic or clinical adverse effects were observed during the treatment. Metamizol administered intravenously at 25 or 35 mg kg(-1) can provide adequate post-operative analgesia in bitches undergoing ovariohysterectomy. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary

  4. Effect of epidural analgesia on labor times and mode of delivery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Indraccolo, U; Ripanelli, A; Di Iorio, R; Indraccolo, S R

    2012-01-01

    To assess changes in labor times and delivery outcome in low-risk women requesting pain relief and undergoing epidural analgesia, according to the epidural analgesia schemes. Prospective observational study of 499 low-risk women with epidural analgesia. Speed of dilatation (SD) (centimeters of dilatation / hours), speed of lowering of the fetal head through maternal pelvis (SL) (centimeters in lowering / hours), time of active phase of labor (TA), cesarean section (CS), vacuum application (VA) were dependent variables in multivariable linear and logistic regressions. Dilution of ropivacain, fentanyl amount, and volume of the first dose of epidural analgesia did not seem to affect labor times. Epidural analgesia with schemes used in this study favored both the dilatation and the fetal head lowering through maternal pelvis. Every five minutes from the first dose of epidural to the last top-up, SD decreased by about 13% (p=0.002), SL decreased by about 14% (p<0.001), and TA increased by about 40% (p<0.001). Additionally, every five minutes from the first dose of epidural to the last top-up, the odds of an operative vaginal birth (vacuum) increased by 0.7% (p<0.001). Increasing of number of top-ups independently caused a reduction in odds of undergoing CS (odds ratio 0.434; C.I. 95% 0.219-0.859, p=0.017), without influencing labor times. Epidural analgesia in patients requesting pain relief favors normal course of labor if it is not discontinued or delayed.

  5. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jinlu; Yang, Ruimin; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate differences between continuous epidural infusion (CEI) and programmed intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) analgesia for the Chinese parturients undergoing spontaneous delivery and to approach their safety to parturients and neonates. Methods Two hundred healthy American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II, term (≥37 weeks’ gestation), nulliparous women who requested analgesia for labor were recruited. Epidural analgesia was initiated with a solution of 0.15% ropivacaine 10 mL and maintained with 0.1% ropivacaine mixed with sufentanil 0.3 μg/mL by CEI at a rate of 5 mL/h combined with a patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture or IEB of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture combined with a PCEA bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture. The lockout interval was 20 minutes in each arm between the CEI and the IEB group. After 20 minutes of first dosage, visual analog scale (VAS) score was obtained every 60 minutes. The maternal and fetal outcome and total consumption of analgesic solution were compared. Results There was no difference in demographic characteristics, duration of first and second stages, delivery methods, sensory block, fetal Apgar scores, and the maternal outcomes between the CEI and IEB groups. There was a significant difference in VAS scores and epidural ropivacaine total consumption between the two groups (IEB vs CEI: 51.27±9.61 vs 70.44±12.78 mg, P<0.01). Conclusion The use of programmed IEB mixed with PCEA improved labor analgesia compared to CEI mixed with PCEA, which could act as maintenance mode for epidural labor analgesia. PMID:27471390

  6. No association of labor epidural analgesia with cerebral palsy in children.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Graham, Jove H; Feng, Wen; Lewis, Meredith W; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Kirchner, H Lester

    2016-12-01

    Some pregnant women avoid labor epidural analgesia because of their concerns about risk of cerebral palsy in children. Although it is believed that labor epidural does not contribute to cerebral palsy, to our knowledge no study has been published to specifically address this concern. We carried out a retrospective case-control study to investigate whether labor epidural analgesia is associated with cerebral palsy in children. This study used data that were collected and entered into the Geisinger electronic health records between January 2004 and January 2013. During this period, 20,929 children were born at Geisinger hospitals. Among them, 50 children were diagnosed with cerebral palsy, and 20 of those were born vaginally. Each of these 20 cerebral palsy children was matched with up to 5 non-cerebral palsy children born at the same hospitals in the same timeframe using propensity scoring methods. Analgesia was classified as epidural (including epidural or combined spinal and epidural) or non-epidural. Conditional logistic regression was used to compare the percentages of deliveries with each analgesia type between the cerebral palsy and non-cerebral palsy groups. In the non-cerebral palsy group, the percentage of patients receiving labor epidural analgesia was 72 %, and in the cerebral palsy group the percentage was 45 %. There was no significant difference between non-cerebral palsy and cerebral palsy groups (odds ratio, 0.57; 95 % confidence interval, 0.14-2.24; p = 0.42). We found no association between the use of labor epidural analgesia and the occurrence of cerebral palsy in children.

  7. Continuous Spinal Analgesia for Labor and Delivery: An Observational Study with a 23-Gauge Spinal Catheter.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weike; Grant, Erica N; Craig, Margaret G; McIntire, Donald D; Leveno, Kenneth J

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess postdural puncture headache, pain relief, motor blockade, and success rate of conversion to cesarean delivery anesthesia of a 23-gauge spinal catheter (Wiley Spinal®) for labor analgesia. After insertion of the spinal catheter, intrathecal bupivacaine 2.5 mg was administered, followed by patient-controlled intrathecal analgesia (basal infusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2 μg/mL at a rate of 2 mL/h, demand bolus 1 mL, lockout interval 20 minutes). Bupivacaine 0.5%, up to 25 mg, was administered via the catheter along with fentanyl 20 μg for cesarean delivery anesthesia, if necessary. The catheter was removed after delivery or after 12 hours, whichever was longer. One hundred thirteen women were enrolled. In 12 women (11%), the catheter was not successfully inserted or maintained in position. Continuous spinal analgesia was used in 101 women. Three women (2.6%, 95% confidence interval, 0.7%-8.1%) developed postdural puncture headache. There were 83 spontaneous, 12 operative vaginal, and 18 cesarean deliveries. Of the 18 cesarean deliveries, 16 had continuous spinal analgesia when the decision was made to perform a cesarean delivery; conversion from labor analgesia to cesarean anesthesia was successful in 15 women (94%, 95% confidence interval, 67.7%-99.7%). The 23-gauge spinal catheter can be used for analgesia for labor. It can also be converted to surgical anesthesia for cesarean deliveries. Further studies are warranted to determine whether the spinal catheter will be a useful addition to the neuraxial techniques available for obstetric anesthesia care.

  8. Impact of first-stage ambulation on mode of delivery among women with epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christine L; Algert, Charles S; Olive, Emily

    2004-12-01

    New techniques for administering epidural analgesia allow increased mobility for labouring women with epidurals. To determine the effect of ambulation or upright positions in the first stage of labour among women with epidural analgesia on mode of delivery and other maternal and infant outcomes. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCT) of ambulation or upright positions versus recumbency in the first stage of labour among women with effective first-stage epidural analgesia in an uncomplicated pregnancy. Trials were identified by searching Medline, Embase and CINAHL databases and the Cochrane Trials Register to March 2004. Trial eligibility and outcomes were prespecified. Group tabular data were obtained for each trial and analysed using meta-analytic techniques. There were five eligible RCT, with a total of 1161 women. There was no statistically significant difference in the mode of delivery when women with an epidural ambulated in the first stage of labour compared with those who remained recumbent: instrumental delivery (relative risk (RR) = 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-1.44) and Caesarean section (RR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.70-1.19). There were no significant differences between the groups in use of oxytocin augmentation, the duration of labour, satisfaction with analgesia or Apgar scores. There were no apparent adverse effects of ambulation, but data were reported by only a few trials. Although ambulation in the first stage of labour for women with epidural analgesia provided no clear benefit to delivery outcomes or satisfaction with analgesia, neither were there are any obvious harms.

  9. Does epidural analgesia prolong labor and increase risk of cesarean delivery? A natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Yancey, M K; Klebanoff, M A; Schwarz, J; Schweitzer, D

    2001-07-01

    More than 50% of pregnant women in the United States are using epidural analgesia for labor pain. However, whether epidural analgesia prolongs labor and increases the risk of cesarean delivery remains controversial. We examined this question in a community-based, tertiary military medical center where the rate of continuous epidural analgesia in labor increased from 1% to 84% in a 1-year period while other conditions remained unchanged-a natural experiment. We systematically selected 507 and 581 singleton, nulliparous, term pregnancies with spontaneous onset of labor and vertex presentation from the respective times before and after the times that epidural analgesia was available on request during labor. We compared duration of labor, rate of cesarean delivery, instrumental delivery, and oxytocin use between these two groups. Despite a rapid and dramatic increase in epidural analgesia during labor (from 1% to 84% in 1 year), rates of cesarean delivery overall and for dystocia remained the same (for overall cesarean delivery: adjusted relative risk, 0.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-1.2; for dystocia: adjusted relative risk, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.7-1.6). Overall instrumental delivery did not increase (adjusted relative risk, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 0.8-1.4), nor did the duration of the first stage and the active phase of labor (multivariate analysis; P >.1). However, the second stage of labor was significantly longer by about 25 minutes (P <.001). Epidural analgesia during labor does not increase the risk of cesarean delivery, nor does it necessarily increase oxytocin use or instrumental delivery caused by dystocia. The duration of the active phase of labor appears unchanged, but the second stage of labor is likely prolonged. (Am J Obstet Gynecol 2001;185:128-34).

  10. Epidural analgesia, fetal monitoring and the condition of the baby at birth with breech presentation.

    PubMed

    Donnai, P; Nicholas, A D

    1975-05-01

    Between December 1970 and March 1973, 138 patients with a singleton fetus presenting by the breech after 36 weeks of pregnancy were deemed suitable for vaginal delivery under epidural analgesia; 130 were delivered vaginally, 10 of them by breech extraction. There was one stillbirth and no neonatal deaths. Epidural analgesia for vaginal breech delivery seemed beneficial. In 65 cases it was possible to compare the umbilical vein pH with the Apgar score at one minute. In 35 patients a continuous recording of the fetal heart rate was used to predict the Apgar score at one minute and the results are discussed.

  11. Sedation and Analgesia in Children with Developmental Disabilities and Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kilbaugh, Todd J.; Friess, Stuart H.; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Huh, Jimmy W.

    2010-01-01

    Sedation and analgesia performed by the pediatrician and pediatric subspecialists are becoming increasingly common for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in children with developmental disabilities and neurologic disorders (autism, epilepsy, stroke, obstructive hydrocephalus, traumatic brain injury, intracranial hemorrhage, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy). The overall objectives of this paper are (1) to provide an overview on recent studies that highlight the increased risk for respiratory complications following sedation and analgesia in children with developmental disabilities and neurologic disorders, (2) to provide a better understanding of sedatives and analgesic medications which are commonly used in children with developmental disabilities and neurologic disorders on the central nervous system. PMID:20706547

  12. [Effect of met- and leu-enkephalins and their synthetic analog on stimulation and acupunture analgesia].

    PubMed

    Ignatov, Iu D; Vasil'ev, Iu N; Kovalenko, V S; Titov, M I

    1981-08-01

    Experiments on unrestrained rats were carried out to study the effect of intraventricularly injected met- and leu-enkephalins and their synthetic analog Tyr-dAla-Cly-Phe-NH2 on analgesia induced by electrical stimulation of the central gray. It was shown that subanalgesic doses of enkephalins and their synthetic analog facilitated the appearance of analgesic action on subthreshold antinociceptive-brain stimulation and potentiated the analgesic effect of threshold central gray stimulation. Subanalgesic and low analgesic doses of the peptides increased antinociceptive effect of electroacupuncture. The data obtained are discussed from the standpoint of the implication of the peptidergic mechanisms in the realization of acupuncture and stimulation analgesia.

  13. Effect of maternal ambulation on labour with low-dose combined spinal-epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Collis, R E; Harding, S A; Morgan, B M

    1999-06-01

    Two hundred and twenty-nine nulliparous women who requested regional analgesia during labour were given a combined spinal-epidural block. They were randomly allocated to stay in bed or spend at least 20 min of every hour out of bed. There was no significant difference in duration of labour, analgesia requirements, mode of delivery or condition of the baby between the groups. Ambulation appeared to be safe for the mother and baby. Maternal satisfaction with the low-dose combined spinal-epidural was high in both groups.

  14. [The dispute and prospect of sedation and analgesia treatments in outpatient dental procedures].

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The topic of eliminating the fear or pain of patients during dental therapy is gaining increasing attention from dentists across the country. The field of painless dental therapeutics involves a wide range of subjects, including stomatology, anesthesiology, and hospital management. We summarized the characteristics of sedation and analgesia technology in outpatient oral therapy, reviewed the common sedative and analgesic treatments, and discussed the disputes on the use of sedation and analgesia in dental procedures. We also reviewed the trends and breakthroughs in this area on the basis of our own clinica experiences.

  15. Age-dependency of analgesia elicited by intraoral sucrose in acute and persistent pain models.

    PubMed

    Anseloni, Vanessa C Z; Weng, H-R; Terayama, R; Letizia, David; Davis, Barry J; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald; Ennis, Matthew

    2002-05-01

    Treatment of pain in newborns is associated with problematic drug side effects. Previous studies demonstrate that an intraoral infusion of sucrose and other sweet components of mother's milk are effective in alleviating pain in infant rats and humans. These findings are of considerable significance, as sweet tastants are used in pain and stress management in a number of clinical procedures performed in human infants. The ability of sweet stimuli to induce analgesia is absent in adult rats, suggesting that this is a developmentally transient phenomenon. However, the age range over which intraoral sucrose is capable of producing analgesia is not known. We investigated the effects of intraoral sucrose (7.5%) on nocifensive withdrawal responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli in naive and inflamed rats at postnatal days (P) P0-21. In some rats, Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected in a fore- or hindpaw to produce inflammation. In non-inflamed animals, for noxious thermal stimuli, sucrose-induced analgesia emerged at P3, peaked at P7-10, then progressively declined and was absent at P17. For mechanical forepaw stimuli, sucrose-induced analgesia emerged, and was maximal at approximately P10, then declined and was absent at P17. By contrast, maximal sucrose-induced analgesia for mechanical hindpaw stimuli was delayed (P13) compared to that for the forepaw, although it was also absent at P17. In inflamed animals, sucrose reduced hyperesthesia and hyperalgesia assessed with mechanical stimuli. Sucrose-induced analgesia in inflamed animals was initially present at P3 for the forepaw and P13 for the hindpaw, and was absent by P17 for both limbs. Intraoral sucrose produced significantly greater effects on responses in fore- and hindpaws in inflamed rats than in naive rats indicating that it reduces hyperalgesia and allodynia beyond its effects on responses in naive animals. These findings support the hypothesis that sucrose has a selective influence on analgesic

  16. Epidural catheter misplaced into the thoracic cavity: Utilized to provide interpleural analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Sundary, M. Thiriloga

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic epidural analgesia is one of the most effective and time-tested modalities of providing postthoracotomy pain relief. It improves postoperative pulmonary outcome. Nevertheless, being a blind procedure several complications have been associated with the technique. Pleural puncture is one rare complication that might occur following thoracic epidural catheterization. We have discussed a patient who underwent a right thoracotomy for excision of emphysematous bulla of lung under general anesthesia with thoracic epidural. The epidural catheter was misplaced in the pleural cavity and was detected intraoperatively after thoracotomy. The catheter was left in situ and was successfully utilized to provide postoperative analgesia via the interpleural route. PMID:25886437

  17. Produccion Gaseosa del Cometa Halley: Erupciones Y Fotodisociacion del Radical OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. M.; Mirabel, I. F.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN:En este trabajo informamos la detecci6n de 20 erupciones en la li'nea de =18cm (1667MHz) del radical OH en el Cometa Halley.Las observaciones incluyen todos los monitoreos existentes y se extienden desde 120 dias antes del perihelio hasta 90 dias despues.Se detectan bruscos crecimientos en el flujo medido,hasta un factor 1O,seguidos por decaimientos lentos asociados con la fotodisociaci6n del OH. Se obtuvieron valores para el tiempo de vida fotoquimico del OH y del H2O basandose en el modelo desarrollado previamente por Silva(1988). Esos tiempos de vida estan de acuerdo con predicciones teoricas y con las observaciones en el Ultravioleta, y los resultados, los que son fuertemente dependientes de la velocidad heliocentrica del Coineta (variando hasta un factor 6), han sido calculados para varios rangos de velocidad entre +28 y -28 km/seg. Key wo'L :

  18. Nalbuphine for obstetric analgesia. A comparison of nalbuphine with pethidine for pain relief in labour when administered by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA).

    PubMed

    Frank, M; McAteer, E J; Cattermole, R; Loughnan, B; Stafford, L B; Hitchcock, A M

    1987-07-01

    A double-blind, randomised study of 60 patients who received intravenous increments of nalbuphine 3 mg or pethidine 15 mg by patient-controlled analgesia during the first stage of labour, was carried out. Pain intensity, sedation, uterine contractions, maternal cardioventilatory variables and fetal heart rate were recorded as well as any side effects. Apgar scores, time to sustained respiration and resuscitative measures required for the neonate were noted at delivery. Modified neonatal neurobehavioural studies and a retrospective assessment of maternal analgesia, satisfaction and tolerance were also carried out. Group mean values of pain scores of nalbuphine-medicated primiparous women were statistically significantly lower than those of pethidine-medicated patients (p less than 0.01). Other assessments did not demonstrate a statistical significance between the two groups.

  19. Subarachnoid analgesia in advanced labor: a comparison of subarachnoid analgesia and pudendal block in advanced labor: analgesic quality and obstetric outcome.

    PubMed

    Pace, Maria Caterina; Aurilio, Caterina; Bulletti, Carlo; Iannotti, Mario; Passavanti, Maria Beatrice; Palagiano, Antonio

    2004-12-01

    Pain control during labor is a primary objective of antalgic therapy. The use of the peridural as an elective procedure for labor analgesia is now corroborated by the international scientific community. Sometimes a combined spinal-peridural procedure is used together with the intrathecal administration of opioids to also cover the first stage of labor. Unfortunately, patients and/or gynecologists often request analgesia in a late stage of labor. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possibility of using a subarachnoid block alone for labor analgesia when this is requested at a late stage, that is, in advanced labor with cervical dilation greater than 7 cm. After approval by our ethics committee and the written and informed consent of the patients, 111 women were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into two groups. The first group (Group S: 55 patients) received a subarachnoid block with 2.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine + 25 mug fentanyl + 1 mL 10% glucose. A pudendal nerve block with 7 mL 2% mepivacaine in each side was administered to the second group (Group P: 56 patients). In both groups, careful maternal-fetal monitoring was conducted, and pain was scored on a numerical scale from 0 to 4, 10 minutes after placement of the block (time [T] 0), at delivery (T1), and at episiorrhaphy (T2). In all patients, we recorded any side effects, the Apgar score at birth and after 5 minutes, the administration of other analgesic and/or sedative drugs, the degree of satisfaction, and the time of hospitalization after delivery. Evaluations were performed by anesthesiologists unaware of patients' treatment group. The duration of spinal analgesia was considered to be the time from injection of study drugs to the time of the patient's first request for additional analgesia. In no cases were there any side effects worthy of note, and hospitalization never exceeded 72 hours. The Apgar score was always between 7 and 10. All except one of the women in Group S were satisfied or

  20. Implications of opioid analgesia for medically complicated patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Howard; Bruckenthal, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    misdirection of prescribed opioids are of concern. Higher risk exists for patients with psychiatric illness, history of substance abuse, and identifiable substance abuse risk factors. Screening for abuse potential and vigilant patient monitoring should be routine. Opioids differ in their ability to produce euphoria, based on opioid receptor agonism, but substance abusers may be more influenced by availability, familiarity and cost factors. Consequently, opioid selection has limited influence on abuse potential but can facilitate ease of monitoring. This review provides an overview of opioid use in medically complicated patients and recommendations on how to optimize analgesia while avoiding adverse events and drug interactions in the clinical setting. Articles cited in this review were identified via a search of EMBASE and PubMed. Articles selected for inclusion discussed characteristics of specific opioids and general physiological aspects of opioid therapy in important patient populations.

  1. Women's Experiences with Neuraxial Labor Analgesia in the Listening to Mothers II Survey: A Content Analysis of Open-Ended Responses.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Laura; Kozhimannil, Katy B; Jou, Judy; McPherson, Marianne E; Camann, William

    2015-10-01

    Most women who give birth in United States hospitals receive neuraxial analgesia to manage pain during labor. In this analysis, we examined themes of the patient experience of neuraxial analgesia among a national sample of U.S. mothers. Data are from the Listening to Mothers II survey, conducted among a national sample of women who delivered a singleton baby in a U.S. hospital in 2005 (N = 1,573). Our study population consisted of women who experienced labor, did not deliver by planned cesarean, and who reported neuraxial analgesia use (n = 914). We analyzed open-ended responses about the best and worst parts of women's birth experiences for themes related to neuraxial analgesia using qualitative content analysis. Thirty-three percent of women (n = 300) mentioned neuraxial analgesia in their open-ended responses. We found that effective pain relief was frequently spontaneously mentioned as a key positive theme in women's experiences with neuraxial analgesia. However, some women perceived timing-related challenges with neuraxial analgesia, including waiting in pain for neuraxial analgesia, receiving neuraxial analgesia too late in labor, or feeling that the pain relief from neuraxial analgesia wore off too soon, as negative aspects. Other themes in women's experiences with neuraxial analgesia were information and consent, adverse effects of neuraxial analgesia, and plans and expectations. The findings from this analysis underscored the fact that women appreciate the effective pain relief that neuraxial analgesia provides during childbirth. Although pain control was 1 important facet of women's experiences with neuraxial analgesia, their experiences were also influenced by other factors. Anesthesiologists can work with obstetric clinicians, nurses, childbirth educators, and pregnant and laboring patients to help mitigate some of the challenges with timing, communication, neuraxial analgesia administration, or expectations that may have contributed to negative aspects

  2. Women’s Experiences with Neuraxial Labor Analgesia in the Listening to Mothers II Survey: A Content Analysis of Open-Ended Responses

    PubMed Central

    Attanasio, Laura; Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Jou, Judy; McPherson, Marianne E.; Camann, William

    2014-01-01

    Background Most women who give birth in United States (US) hospitals receive neuraxial analgesia to manage pain during labor. In this analysis we examined themes of the patient experience of neuraxial analgesia among a national sample of US mothers. Methods Data are from the Listening to Mothers II survey, conducted among a national sample of women who delivered a singleton baby in a US hospital in 2005 (N=1,573). Our study population consisted of women who experienced labor, did not deliver by planned cesarean, and who reported neuraxial analgesia use (n = 914). We analyzed open-ended responses about the best and worst parts of women’s birth experiences for themes related to neuraxial analgesia using qualitative content analysis. Results Thirty-three percent of women (n=300) mentioned neuraxial analgesia in their open-ended responses. We found that effective pain relief was frequently spontaneously mentioned as a key positive theme in women’s experiences with neuraxial analgesia. However, some women perceived timing-related challenges with neuraxial analgesia, including waiting in pain for neuraxial analgesia, receiving neuraxial analgesia too late in labor, or feeling that the pain relief from neuraxial analgesia wore off too soon, as negative aspects. Other themes in women’s experiences with neuraxial analgesia were information and consent, adverse effects of neuraxial analgesia, and plans and expectations. Conclusion Findings from this analysis underscored the fact that women appreciate the effective pain relief that neuraxial analgesia provides during childbirth. While pain control was one important facet of women’s experiences with neuraxial analgesia, their experiences were also influenced by other factors. Anesthesiologists can work with obstetric clinicians, nurses, childbirth educators, and with pregnant and laboring patients to help mitigate some of the challenges with timing, communication, neuraxial analgesia administration, or expectations

  3. Postoperative analgesia for Enhanced recovery in Joint replacement: Audit of a new electronic prescribing order set.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan; Cullinger, Benjamin; Bacarese-Hamilton, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced recovery in joint replacement has been shown to reduce length of inpatient stay, reduce re-admission rates, and can improve early functional recovery. Postoperative analgesia is an important component of the group of interventions required to form a holistic enhanced recovery protocol. The introduction of electronic prescribing provides the opportunity to introduce some standardisation, where clinically appropriate, in the prescription of an evidence based postoperative analgesia protocol. Enhanced recovery following joint replacement has been used at this institution since 2011. An order set for the postoperative analgesia protocol was introduced to the in house electronic prescribing system in August 2014 (JAC Medicines Management; JAC Computer Services Ltd., Basildon, UK). An audit was performed to follow the effect of the new system on compliance with the postoperative analgesia guidelines. Improvements were seen following introduction of the electronic prescribing protocol in all criteria of the guideline with a demonstrated improvement in overall compliance from 0% to 35% in the first loop, with subsequent audit showing further improvement to 59% compliance. Use of an embedded order set within an electronic prescribing system has demonstrated improved compliance with an enhanced recovery protocol. This ensures that the correct evidence based protocol is available to guide the junior clinician at the point of care, when the medication is being prescribed.

  4. The K+ channel GIRK2 is both necessary and sufficient for peripheral opioid-mediated analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Nockemann, Dinah; Rouault, Morgane; Labuz, Dominika; Hublitz, Philip; McKnelly, Kate; Reis, Fernanda C; Stein, Christoph; Heppenstall, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    The use of opioid agonists acting outside the central nervous system (CNS) is a promising therapeutic strategy for pain control that avoids deleterious central side effects such as apnea and addiction. In human clinical trials and rat models of inflammatory pain, peripherally restricted opioids have repeatedly shown powerful analgesic effects; in some mouse models however, their actions remain unclear. Here, we investigated opioid receptor coupling to K+ channels as a mechanism to explain such discrepancies. We found that GIRK channels, major effectors for opioid signalling in the CNS, are absent from mouse peripheral sensory neurons but present in human and rat. In vivo transgenic expression of GIRK channels in mouse nociceptors established peripheral opioid signalling and local analgesia. We further identified a regulatory element in the rat GIRK2 gene that accounts for differential expression in rodents. Thus, GIRK channels are indispensable for peripheral opioid analgesia, and their absence in mice has profound consequences for GPCR signalling in peripheral sensory neurons. GIRK channels are indispensable for peripheral opioid analgesia. The absence of GIRK channels from mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons questions the predictive validity of mice as a model organism for investigating peripheral GPCRmediated analgesia. PMID:23818182

  5. [The influence of patient-controlled epidural analgesia on labor progress and neonatal outcome].

    PubMed

    Rzepka, Rafał; Zukowski, Maciej; Michalczyk, Michał; Nikodemski, Tomasz; Torbé, Andrzej; Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Mikołajek-Bedner, Wioletta; Czajka, Ryszard

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the study was to check the influence of patient control epidural analgesia on labor progress and neonatal outcome. 144 parturients were included into the clinical trial. In 73 cases patient control epidural analgesia was used and in 71 cases pethidine (meperidine) solution was given intravenously. Apgar score, umbilical artery pH, pain intensity the time of the first, second and third stage of labor the rate of episiotomy and uterine postpartum abrasions and the rate of caesarean sections and vaginal operative delivery were compared. The time of the second stage of labor was significantly longer in the study group (40.99 vs 26.49 min, p- < 0.005), the neonatal outcome was comparable in both groups. There were no differences in the time of the first and the second stage of labor in primiparas and multiparas analyzed separately. Visual Analogue Score was lower in the study group (Ch(2)-12,48, p-0.25), especially in the subgroups of primiparas and multiparas. Patient control epidural analgesia does not affect the time of the first and second stage of labor, oxytocin augmentation of labor may be the reason of that. This method is a more effective way of relieving labor pain. An increase of operative delivery is not observed after patient control epidural analgesia on condition that low doses and concentrations of analgesic drugs are used.

  6. [Obstetric analgesia and anesthesia with remifentanyl in a patient with von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Novoa, L; Navarro Egea, M; Vieito Amor, M; Hernández Iniesta, J; Arxer, A; Villalonga, A

    2003-05-01

    A 30-year-old woman with von Willebrand's disease was admitted in labor. As epidural analgesia was ruled out due to risk of spinal hematoma, a pump for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was provided with boluses of remifentanil and set for intravenous infusion of 24 micrograms with a lockout time of 5 minutes. The patient reported analgesia to be satisfactory. Later, because of abnormal fetal positioning, an emergency cesarean was performed with the patient under general anesthesia with remifentanil, with propofol and succinylcholine for induction. A healthy girl was born free of respiratory depression. Von Willebrand's disease is a hemorrhagic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance due to a quantitative or functional factor VIII deficit. Various subtypes and degrees of severity of abnormal bleeding have been described. It is the most common genetic hemostatic disorder affecting obstetric procedures, and although epidural analgesia has been used with strict hematologic monitoring, that technique carries a risk of hematoma. PCA is useful in patients for whom regional techniques are contraindicated. With adequate fetal and maternal monitoring, remifentanil in PCA is safe and more effective than other opiates for labor pain.

  7. Spinal cord distribution of sup 3 H-morphine after intrathecal administration: Relationship to analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Y.; Sinatra, R.S.; Kitahata, L.M.; Collins, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The distribution of intrathecally administered {sup 3}H-morphine was examined by light microscopic autoradiography in rat spinal cord and temporal changes in silver grain localization were compared with results obtained from simultaneous measurements of analgesia. After tissue processing, radio-activity was found to have penetrated in superficial as well as in deeper layers (Rexed lamina V, VII, and X) of rat spinal cord within minutes after application. Silver grain density reached maximal values at 30 min in every region of cord studied. Radioactivity decreased rapidly between 30 min and 2 hr and then more slowly over the next 24 hr. In rats tested for responses to a thermal stimulus (tail flick test), intrathecal administration of morphine (5 and 15 micrograms) resulted in significant dose dependent analgesia that peaked at 30 min and lasted up to 5 hr (P less than 0.5). There was a close relationship between analgesia and spinal cord silver grain density during the first 4 hr of the study. It is postulated that the onset of spinal morphine analgesia depends on appearance of molecules at sites of action followed by the activation of anti-nociceptive mechanisms.

  8. Frequency of colonization and isolated bacteria from the tip of epidural catheter implanted for postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Stabille, Débora Miranda Diogo; Diogo Filho, Augusto; Mandim, Beatriz Lemos da Silva; de Araújo, Lúcio Borges; Mesquita, Priscila Miranda Diogo; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of epidural analgesia with catheter leads to the need to demonstrate the safety of this method and know the incidence of catheter colonization, inserted postoperatively for epidural analgesia, and the bacteria responsible for this colonization. From November 2011 to April 2012, patients electively operated and maintained under epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia were evaluated. The catheter tip was collected for semiquantitative and qualitative microbiological analysis. Of 68 cultured catheters, six tips (8.8%) had positive cultures. No patient had superficial or deep infection. The mean duration of catheter use was 43.45 h (18-118) (p=0.0894). The type of surgery (contaminated or uncontaminated), physical status of patients, and surgical time showed no relation with the colonization of catheters. Microorganisms isolated from the catheter tip were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Postoperative epidural catheter analgesia, under these study conditions, was found to be low risk for bacterial colonization in patients at surgical wards. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. A romifidine and morphine combination for epidural analgesia of the flank in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study reported here was to determine the onset, duration, and degree of analgesia achieved with a combination of romifidine (50 μg/kg body weight [BW]) and morphine (0.1 mg/kg BW) administered epidurally. Ten adult Holstein Friesen cows were assigned to either a treatment group receiving the romifidine and morphine combination or a control group receiving 0.9% saline in a randomized, blinded, crossover design. Cows were assessed for degree of flank analgesia and systemic sedation at various time intervals over a period of 24 hours. The romifidine and morphine combination, compared with saline, provided significant analgesia for at least 10 minutes (P = 0.016) and up to 12 hours (P = 0.004) after epidural administration. Treated cows were sedate between 10 minutes (P = 0.016) and 6 hours (P = 0.002) after epidural administration. These results provide evidence for a potential cost-effective intra- and postoperative method of analgesia; however, the sedation seen in this study could be detrimental to patients expected return to the farm shortly after surgery. Further research into withdrawal times, systemic effects, and potential adverse effects are needed before an opiod and α2-adrenergic agonist combination can be used safely in a clinical setting PMID:15600157

  10. Etoricoxib - preemptive and postoperative analgesia (EPPA) in patients with laparotomy or thoracotomy - design and protocols

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective Our objective was to report on the design and essentials of the Etoricoxib protocol- Preemptive and Postoperative Analgesia (EPPA) Trial, investigating whether preemptive analgesia with cox-2 inhibitors is more efficacious than placebo in patients who receive either laparotomy or thoracotomy. Design and Methods The study is a 2 × 2 factorial armed, double blinded, bicentric, randomised placebo-controlled trial comparing (a) etoricoxib and (b) placebo in a pre- and postoperative setting. The total observation period is 6 months. According to a power analysis, 120 patients scheduled for abdominal or thoracic surgery will randomly be allocated to either the preemptive or the postoperative treatment group. These two groups are each divided into two arms. Preemptive group patients receive etoricoxib prior to surgery and either etoricoxib again or placebo postoperatively. Postoperative group patients receive placebo prior to surgery and either placebo again or etoricoxib after surgery (2 × 2 factorial study design). The Main Outcome Measure is the cumulative use of morphine within the first 48 hours after surgery (measured by patient controlled analgesia PCA). Secondary outcome parameters include a broad range of tests including sensoric perception and genetic polymorphisms. Discussion The results of this study will provide information on the analgesic effectiveness of etoricoxib in preemptive analgesia and will give hints on possible preventive effects of persistent pain. Trial registration NCT00716833 PMID:20504378

  11. Analgesia Evaluation of 2 NSAID Drugs as Adjuvant in Management of Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kurita Varoli, Fernando; Sucena Pita, Murillo; Sato, Sandra; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; do Nascimento, Cássio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this triple-blind full-randomized clinical trial was to quantify analgesia in masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints after occlusal splint therapy associated with the adjuvant administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) isolated or associated with other therapeutic agents. Pain relief was also recorded. Eighteen volunteers who had been suffering from chronic pain in masticatory muscles due to temporomandibular disorders were selected after anamnesis and assessment using RDC/TMD translated to Portuguese. The 3 proposed treatments were NSAID (sodium diclofenac), panacea (sodium diclofenac + carisoprodol + acetaminophen + caffeine), and a placebo. The total treatment duration was 10 days, preceded and succeeded by patients' pain assessment. A washout interval of 11 days was established between each therapy. All participants received all treatments in different moments, in a full randomized crossover methodology. The assessment of drug therapies was performed using visual analogue scale for pain on palpation followed by 11-point numerical scale to quantify pain during treatment. Statistical analysis has shown that, after 10 days of treatment, all therapies were effective for pain relief. NSAID therapy promoted analgesia on the third day, while placebo only promoted analgesia in the eighth day. It has been concluded that sodium diclofenac used as splint adjuvant therapy, promotes significant analgesia in a shorter time. PMID:25874243

  12. A romifidine and morphine combination for epidural analgesia of the flank in cattle.

    PubMed

    Fierheller, Erin E; Caulkett, Nigel A; Bailey, Jeremy V

    2004-11-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to determine the onset, duration, and degree of analgesia achieved with a combination of romifidine (50 microg/kg body weight [BW]) and morphine (0.1 mg/kg BW) administered epidurally. Ten adult Holstein Friesen cows were assigned to either a treatment group receiving the romifidine and morphine combination or a control group receiving 0.9% saline in a randomized, blinded, crossover design. Cows were assessed for degree of flank analgesia and systemic sedation at various time intervals over a period of 24 hours. The romifidine and morphine combination, compared with saline, provided significant analgesia for at least 10 minutes (P = 0.016) and up to 12 hours (P = 0.004) after epidural administration. Treated cows were sedate between 10 minutes (P = 0.016) and 6 hours (P = 0.002) after epidural administration. These results provide evidence for a potential cost-effective intra- and postoperative method of analgesia; however, the sedation seen in this study could be detrimental to patients expected return to the farm shortly after surgery. Further research into withdrawal times, systemic effects, and potential adverse effects are needed before an opiod and alpha2-adrenergic agonist combination can be used safely in a clinical setting.

  13. [Epidural anesthesia and analgesia in the perioperative treatment of a patient with Kartagener syndrome].

    PubMed

    Errando, C L; Sifre, C; López-Alarcón, D

    1998-12-01

    Kartagener's syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by a triad of symptoms--bronchiectasis, situs inversus and sinusitis--and is classified as an immotile cilia syndrome. Patients may experience specific airway problems when undergoing anesthesia for surgical procedures. We report the case of a woman with Kartagener's syndrome who underwent surgery under epidural anesthesia with postoperative epidural analgesia, both techniques proving successful.

  14. Postoperative analgesia in children: A comparison of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine

    PubMed Central

    Baduni, Neha; Sanwal, Manoj Kumar; Vajifdar, Homay; Agarwala, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural block is the most commonly used neuraxial block in children. Morphine has been used as a caudal additive for more than three decades. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and duration of analgesia of three different doses of caudal epidural morphine (CEM), and to find out the incidence of side effects. Material and Methods: This study was conducted on 75 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists grades I and II, aged 2-12 years, undergoing lower abdominal and urogenital surgeries. Patients were randomly allocated to one of the three groups according to the dose of morphine. Group I received 30 μg/kg, group II 50 μg/kg, and group III 70 μg/kg. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram, pain score, sedation score, duration of analgesia, and side-effects were noted. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was 8.63 h in group I, 13.36 h in group II and 19.19 h in group III. Respiratory depression was noted in three patients in group III. One patient in group I had itching. One patient each in groups I, II, and III had nausea/vomiting. Conclusion: CEM significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia, though with a higher dose the risk of respiratory depression should always be kept in mind. PMID:27275053

  15. Eisenmenger's syndrome in pregnancy: Use of epidural anesthesia and analgesia for elective cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Lipi; Pani, Nibedita; Samantaray, Ramesh; Nayak, Kalyani

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a pregnant patient with a large ventricular septal defect (VSD) and pulmonary artery hypertension, presented to the hospital and underwent elective cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and postoperative analgesia. The procedure was uneventful till the patient was discharged on 10th day. PMID:25190960

  16. Comparison of a preincisional and postincisional small dose of ketamine for postoperative analgesia in children.

    PubMed

    Butkovic, D; Kralik, S; Matolic, M; Jakobovic, J; Zganjer, M; Radesic, L

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this randomized, double blind, placebo controlled prospective study was to investigate the preventive action of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine on postoperative analgesia by comparing its administration preincisionally, at the end of operation and placebo in the management of postoperative pain in children. 90 children ASA I or II, scheduled for hernia repairs, circumcisions and orchydopexy, aged 4.5-14 years were randomly assigned in three groups: first received low dose ketamine 0.3 mg/kg intravenously before the start of operation, second the same dose at the end of operation and the third group got placebo saline i.v. before the incision. The intensity of postoperative pain was measured by visual-analogue scale (VAS) at 2, 6, 12 and 24 h postoperatively. The rescue analgesic consumption, the time of the first request of postoperative analgesia and side effects were noted. There were not any significant differences in VAS, the time of the first request of analgesia and analgesics' consumption in postoperative period between the preincisional and postincisional ketamine and placebo group. The side effects as sleep disturbances, hallucinations, and nightmares were equal in both ketamine groups. No significant difference was found between analgesic effects of preincisional ketamine, ketamine administered at the end of operation and of control group in postoperative analgesia in children (Tab. 1, Fig. 1, Ref. 21). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  17. Side effects of spiramycin masquerading as local anesthetic toxicity during labor epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Julliac, B; Théophile, H; Begorre, M; Richez, B; Haramburu, F

    2010-07-01

    Significant fetal bradycardia occurred when a parturient receiving labor epidural analgesia experienced generalized numbness and tingling, a metallic taste and hot flushes. An emergent cesarean delivery under general anesthesia was performed with favorable outcomes for the mother and baby. The most likely source of the maternal symptoms was spiramycin, which was being administered for treatment of toxoplasmosis.

  18. Analgesic drug administration and attitudes about analgesia in cattle among bovine practitioners in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fajt, Virginia R; Wagner, Sarah A; Norby, Bo

    2011-03-15

    To determine current attitudes and practices related to pain and analgesia in cattle among US veterinarians in bovine practice and to identify factors associated with these attitudes and practices. Web-based survey. Sample-3,019 US members of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners (AABP) with e-mail addresses. Veterinarians were invited via e-mail to participate in a Web-based survey. Respondents replied to questions related to pain and analgesia and supplied personal, professional, and demographic information. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed, and associations among various factors were examined. 666 surveys (25.5% response rate) were analyzed. Among common procedures and medical conditions of cattle listed on the survey, castration of dairy calves < 6 months old was subjectively estimated as causing the least pain; abdominal surgery, toxic mastitis, and dehorning of calves > 6 months old were assessed as causing the greatest pain. Respondents reported not providing analgesic drugs to approximately 70% of calves castrated at < 6 months of age. The most commonly administered analgesics were NSAIDs, local anesthetics, and α(2)-adrenergic receptor agonists. Significant associations were detected among respondent characteristics and pain ratings, percentages of cattle treated, and opinions regarding analgesia. Results provide information on current attitudes and practices related to pain and analgesia in cattle among US veterinarians in bovine practice and can be considered in the development of policies and protocols for pain management in cattle. These data can be compared with those of future studies to examine changes over time.

  19. Dexamethasone added to mepivacaine prolongs the duration of analgesia after supraclavicular brachial plexus blockade.

    PubMed

    Parrington, Simon J; O'Donnell, Dermot; Chan, Vincent W S; Brown-Shreves, Danielle; Subramanyam, Rajeev; Qu, Melody; Brull, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Corticosteroids have been used successfully to prolong the duration of local anesthetic action after peripheral nerve and epidural blockade. We hypothesized that the addition of dexamethasone to mepivacaine would prolong the duration of analgesia after ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block for patients undergoing upper-limb surgery. After Federal Health Department and institutional review board approval, 45 adult patients undergoing elective hand or forearm surgery under supraclavicular brachial plexus blockade were randomized to receive either 30 mL mepivacaine 1.5% plus dexamethasone 8 mg (4 mg/mL), or 30 mL mepivacaine 1.5% plus 2 mL normal saline. The primary outcome measure was duration of analgesia. Secondary outcomes included onset times of sensory and motor blockade, pain and satisfaction scores, analgesic consumption, and block-related complications. Patient characteristics were similar between groups. The median duration of analgesia was significantly prolonged in the Dexamethasone group (332 mins; interquartile range, 225-448 mins) compared with the Normal Saline group (228 mins; interquartile range, 207-263 mins; P = 0.008). The onset times of sensory and motor block were similar between the groups. Complications were minor and transient and did not differ between groups at 2 weeks postoperatively. The addition of dexamethasone to mepivacaine prolongs the duration of analgesia but does not reduce the onset of sensory and motor blockade after ultrasound-guided supraclavicular block compared with mepivacaine alone.

  20. The Effect of Epidural Analgesia on the Delivery Outcome of Induced Labour: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether the use of epidural analgesia during induced labour was a risk factor for instrumental vaginal delivery and caesarean section (CS) delivery. Study Design. This was a retrospective case series of primigravidae women being induced at term for all indications with a normal body mass index (BMI) at booking and under the age of 40 years. Results. We identified 1,046 women who fulfilled the inclusion criteria of which 31.2% had an epidural analgesia. Those with an epidural analgesia had significantly greater maternal age, higher BMI, greater percentage of oxytocin usage, and a longer first and second stage of labour. Women with an epidural analgesia had a higher instrumental delivery (37.9% versus 16.4%; p < 0.001) and CS delivery rate (26% versus 10.1%; p < 0.001). Multivariable analysis indicated that the use of an epidural was not a risk factor for a CS delivery but was a risk factor for an instrument-assisted delivery (adjusted OR = 3.63; 95% CI: 2.51–5.24; p < 0.001). Conclusion. Our study supports the literature evidence that the use of an epidural increases the instrumental delivery rates. It has also added that there is no effect on CS delivery and the observed increase is due to the presence of confounding factors. PMID:27990163

  1. Failure to Extend Epidural Labor Analgesia for Cesarean Delivery Anesthesia: A Focused Review.

    PubMed

    Mankowitz, Suzanne K W; Gonzalez Fiol, Antonio; Smiley, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Extension of epidural labor analgesia for cesarean delivery anesthesia may fail. There are a number of factors associated with labor epidural catheter failure. This focused review discusses these associations and anesthetic options when faced with inadequate surgical epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery.

  2. [Effect of epidural analgesia on the duration of labor stages and delivery outcome].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanglan; Feng, Yan

    2012-08-01

    To assess the effect of epidural analgesia on the duration of labor stages and the delivery outcome. This prospective study was conducted in 328 nulliparous term parturients presenting for delivery in December 1 to 31, 2011. The parturients were assigned into epidural analgesia group (n=162) and control group (n=166) according to their request when no contraindications were present. The stage I, stage II, and total duration of labor, volume blood loss, oxytocin use, delivery mode, and neonatal outcomes were compared between the two groups. In epidural analgesia group, the duration of stage I and stage II labor and the total duration of labor was 497.9∓168.4 min, 54.3∓43.8 min, and 522.1∓178.9 min, respectively, significantly longer than those in the control group (404.2∓156.0 min, 31.5∓19.8 min, and 435.8∓159.2 min, respectively, P≤0.05). No significant difference was found between the two groups in the rates of oxytocin use, emergency cesarean section, instrumental delivery, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, and low Apgar scores (P≥0.05). Epidural analgesia prolongs the labor duration, especially the second stage of labor, but it does not increase the incidences of emergency cesarean section or instrumental delivery or cause adverse effect on the neonatal outcome, and is therefore safe for pain relief in labor.

  3. Implementation of Programmed Intermittent Epidural Bolus for the Maintenance of Labor Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brendan; George, Ronald B; Cobb, Benjamin; McKenzie, Christine; Riley, Edward T

    2016-10-01

    Programmed intermittent epidural bolus (PIEB) is an exciting new technology that has the potential to improve the maintenance of epidural labor analgesia. PIEB compared with a continuous epidural infusion (CEI) has the potential advantage of greater spread within the epidural space and therefore better sensory blockade. Studies have demonstrated a local anesthetic-sparing effect, fewer instrumental vaginal deliveries, less motor blockade, and improvements in maternal satisfaction with PIEB compared with CEI. However, the optimal PIEB regimen and pump settings remain unknown, and there are a number of logistical issues and practical considerations that should be considered when implementing PIEB. The PIEB bolus size and interval, PIEB start time delay period, and patient-controlled epidural analgesia bolus size and lockout time can influence the efficacy of PIEB used for epidural labor analgesia. Educating all members of the health care team is critical to the success of the technique. This review summarizes the role of PIEB for the maintenance of labor analgesia, outlines implementation strategies, suggests optimal settings, and presents potential limitations of the technique.

  4. Intermittent epidural TOP-UPS vs. patient control epidural analgesia during labor.

    PubMed

    Marijic, Vlatka; Bukovic, Damir; Mihaljevic, Slobodan; Oreskovic, Slavko; Persec, Jasminka; Zupic, Tomislav; Juras, Josip; Milinovic, Darko

    2013-12-01

    Pain during labor and delivery is often very unpleasant and stressful for the parturients. Patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been found to be both safe and effective, providing optimal pain relief and allowing women to participate in their own analgesia). Compared to other epidural techniques, intermittent epidural top-ups and continuous epidural analgesia (CEA), PCEA uses diluted local anesthetic solutions with less motor block and less unscheduled clinician interventions. The purpose of our study was to compare intermittent bolus epidural top-ups and PCEA in labor. Sixty ASA I patients who requested epidural analgesia for labor and had written consent were included in the study. 30 patients in the first group received intermittent bolus epidural top-ups, while patients in the second group received PCEA. We evaluated duration of labor, maternal sense of pain using VAS scale and maternal satisfaction during fetal descent in both groups. We found that the duration of labor was significantly shorter and maternal sense of pain was lower in the PCEA group than in the group receiving epidural bolus top-ups. There were no differences between groups in maternal satisfaction during fetal descent.

  5. PKC-mediated potentiation of morphine analgesia by St. John's Wort in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Farzad, Mersedeh; Bianchi, Enrica; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to combine the use of morphine with clinically available inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), finally potentiating morphine analgesia in humans. Thermal tests were performed in rodents and humans previously administered with acute or chronic morphine combined or not with increasing doses of the PKC-blocker St. John's Wort (SJW) or its main component hypericin. Phosphorylation of the γ subunit of PKC enzyme was assayed by western blotting in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG) from rodents co-administered with morphine and hypericin and was prevented in rodent PAG by SJW or hypericin co-administration with morphine, inducing a potentiation of morphine analgesia in thermal pain. The score of pain assessment in healthy volunteers were decreased by 40% when morphine was co-administered with SJW at a dose largely below those used to obtain an antidepressant or analgesic effect in both rodents and humans. The SJW/hypericin potentiating effect lasted in time and preserved morphine analgesia in tolerant mice. Our findings indicate that, in clinical practice, SJW could reduce the dose of morphine obtaining the same analgesic effect. Therefore, SJW and one of its main components, hypericin, appear ideal to potentiate morphine-induced analgesia.

  6. Effect of a sleep aid in analgesia after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Si-Wook; Lee, Young-Kuk; Shin, Hong-Kwan; Hwang, Ilseon

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects and safety of a sleep aid for postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Seventy-eight patients were prospectively assigned to either the zolpidem group (multimodal analgesia+zolpidem; 39 patients) or the control group (multimodal analgesia; 39 patients). Self-rated pain levels were assessed twice a day using a visual analog scale (VAS). The need for additional rescue analgesic, duration of functional recovery, and adverse effects were assessed for the first 5 days after surgery. The mean number of times that additional rescue analgesic was required during 5 days after surgery was 2.1±2.0 in the zolpidem group and 3.3±2.8 in the control group, a significant difference. There were no significant differences between the two groups in mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery, although the zolpidem group had lower VAS pain scores than the control group. Additionally, there were no significant differences in duration of functional recovery and adverse effects between the two groups. The use of zolpidem for analgesia after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair provided a significant reduction in the need for rescue analgesic without increasing adverse effects. Nevertheless, mean VAS pain scores during the first 5 days after surgery did not differ between the zolpidem group and the control group.

  7. Ventral tegmental analgesia in two strains of rats: effects of amphetamine, naloxone and parachlorophenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Moreau, J L; Cohen, E; Lieblich, I

    1984-05-21

    Pain sensitivity and analgesia induced by the stimulation of the ventral tegmentum (VT) were studied in 72 male rats of two lines, LC2-Hi and LC2-Lo, genetically selected for high and low rates of lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation, respectively. LC2-Lo rats were more sensitive to acute peripheral pain and developed a stronger analgesia than their LC2-Hi counterparts. In order to assess the pharmacological substrate of ventral tegmental stimulation-induced analgesia (VT-SIA), the effects of amphetamine (AMP, 21 animals), naloxone (NX, 24 animals) and parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 27 animals) injections were studied. VT-SIA was found to be clearly decreased by PCPA, slightly decreased by AMP and not significantly affected by NX. Ventral tegmental self-stimulation ( VTSS ) was increased by PCPA treatment. The comparison of VTSS and VT-SIA did not reveal any correlation between both phenomena. These data suggest that VT-SIA may be mediated by serotonin while catecholamines may have a modulatory role in this analgesia and that VTSS and VT-SIA seem to be governed by different neuronal systems.

  8. Postoperative Multimodal Analgesia Pain Management With Nonopioid Analgesics and Techniques: A Review.

    PubMed

    Wick, Elizabeth C; Grant, Michael C; Wu, Christopher L

    2017-07-01

    Amid the current opioid epidemic in the United States, the enhanced recovery after surgery pathway (ERAS) has emerged as one of the best strategies to improve the value and quality of surgical care and has been increasingly adopted for a broad range of complex surgical procedures. The goal of this article was to outline important components of opioid-sparing analgesic regimens. Regional analgesia, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, gabapentinoids, tramadol, lidocaine, and/or the N-methyl-d-aspartate class of glutamate receptor antagonists have been shown to be effective adjuncts to narcotic analgesia. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are not associated with an increase in postoperative bleeding. A meta-analysis of 27 randomized clinical trials found no difference in postoperative bleeding between the groups taking ketorolac tromethamine (33 of 1304 patients [2.5%]) and the control groups (21 of 1010 [2.1%]) (odds ratio [OR], 1.1; 95% CI, 0.61-2.06; P = .72). After adoption of the multimodal analgesia approach for a colorectal ERAS pathway, most patients used less opioids while in the hospital and many did not need opioids after hospital discharge, although approximately 50% of patients received some opioid during their stay. Multimodal analgesia is readily available and the evidence is strong to support its efficacy. Surgeons should use this effective approach for patients both using and not using the ERAS pathway to reduce opioid consumption.

  9. Epidural hydromorphone with and without epinephrine for post-operative analgesia after cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, T B; Baysinger, C L; Henenberger, J C; Gooding, D J

    1989-03-01

    The efficacy of epidural hydromorphone alone or in combination with epinephrine for postoperative analgesia was evaluated in 30 healthy women who underwent cesarean delivery with epidural anesthesia. They were assigned randomly to receive either 1.5 mg hydromorphone alone (N = 15) or 1.5 mg hydromorphone with 1/200,000 epinephrine (N = 15). Duration of analgesia (mean +/- SD) was 24.3 +/- 9.4 hours after the epidural injection of hydromorphone plus epinephrine. This was significantly greater (p less than 0.01) than the duration of 18.2 +/- 5.9 hours after the same dose of plain hydromorphone. Analgesia was more rapid in onset and significantly better at the 0.5, 1, 3, and 12 hours postoperatively in the hydromorphone-epinephrine group. Side effects including pruritus (73%), nausea (20%), and vomiting (15%) were of similar frequency with and without epinephrine. Although mean venous PCO2 (PvCO2) levels three and six hours after the hydromorphone-epinephrine dose were elevated significantly over the pre-drug PvCO2 levels, no respiratory depression was detected by an apnea monitor to which all patients were connected. The addition of epinephrine to epidural hydromorphone hastened onset and prolonged the duration of analgesia after cesarean section.

  10. Continuous spinal labor analgesia for two deliveries in a parturient with severe subvalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hyuga, Shunsuke; Okutomi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Rie; Hosokawa, Yuki

    2016-12-01

    Various degrees of left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction have been seen in patients with subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS). Regional analgesia during labor for parturients with SAS is relatively contraindicated because it has a potential risk for hemodynamic instability due to sympathetic blockade as a result of vasodilation by local anesthetics. We thought continuous spinal analgesia (CSA) using an opioid and minimal doses of local anesthetic could provide more stable hemodynamic status. We demonstrate the management of a 28-year-old pregnant patient with SAS who received CSA for her two deliveries. For her first delivery (peak pressure gradient (∆P) between LV and aorta was approximately 55 mmHg), intrathecal fentanyl was used as a basal infusion, but we needed a small amount of bupivacaine to provide supplemental intrathecal analgesia as labor progressed. Although there were mild fluctuations in hemodynamics, she was asymptomatic. For her second delivery (∆P between LV and aorta was approximately 90 mmHg), minimal doses of continuous bupivacaine were used as a basal infusion. For her additional analgesic requests, bolus co-administration of fentanyl was effective. There were no fluctuations in her hemodynamics. Although her SAS in her second pregnancy was more severe than in the first, her hemodynamics exhibited less fluctuation during the second delivery with this method. In conclusion, CSA using fentanyl combined with minimal doses of bupivacaine provided satisfactory analgesia and stable hemodynamics in parturient with severe SAS.

  11. High intensity social conflict in the Swiss albino mouse induces analgesia modulated by 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Canto de Souza, A; Nunes de Souza, R L; Péla, I R; Graeff, F G

    1997-03-01

    Social conflict between mice produces analgesia in the attacked mouse. Both the magnitude and type (opioid or nonopioid) of this analgesia have been related to attack intensity and strain of mouse. In the present study low intensity social conflict (7 bites) did not produce analgesia, whereas high intensity - 30 and 60 bites - interactions produced, respectively, short-lasting (5 min) and very short-lasting (1 min) analgesia in Swiss albino mice, when compared with nonaggressive interaction (0 bite). The 30 bites aggressive interaction induced analgesia (AIIA) was not affected by IP injection of either naloxone (5.0 and 7.5 mg/kg) or diazepam (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg). However, this attack-induced analgesia was reduced after IP administration of the 5-HT1A agonists, gepirone (0.3 and 3.0 mg/kg) and BAY R 1531 (0.01 mg/kg). These results indicate that the analgesia induced by 30 bites social conflict in Swiss albino mice does not involve opioid and GABA-benzodiazepine (GABA-BZD) mechanisms. In addition, they suggest that high-intensity social conflict activates serotonergic pain modulatory systems that act through 5-HT1A receptors.

  12. Involvement of spinal orexin A in the electroacupuncture analgesia in a rat model of post-laparotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Ming; Mi, Wen-Li; Xia, Fang; Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Jiang, Jian-Wei; Xiao, Sheng; Wang, Zhi-Fu; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wu, Gen-Cheng

    2012-11-22

    Orexin A (OXA, hypocretin/hcrt 1) is a newly discovered potential analgesic substance. However, whether OXA is involved in acupuncture analgesia remains unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the involvement of spinal OXA in electroacupuncture (EA) analgesia. A modified rat model of post-laparotomy pain was adopted and evaluated. Von Frey filaments were used to measure mechanical allodynia of the hind paw and abdomen. EA at 2/15 Hz or 2/100 Hz was performed once on the bilateral ST36 and SP6 for 30 min perioperatively. SB-334867, a selective orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) antagonist with a higher affinity for OXA than OXB, was intrathecally injected to observe its effect on EA analgesia. OXA at 0.3 nmol and EA at 2/15 Hz produced respective analgesic effects on the model (P<0.05). Pre-surgical intrathecal administered of SB-334867 30 nmol antagonized OXA analgesia and attenuated the analgesic effect of EA (P<0.05). However, SB-334867 did not block fentanyl-induced analgesia (P>0.05). In addition, naloxone, a selective opioid receptor antagonist, failed to antagonize OXA-induced analgesia (P>0.05). The results of the present study indicate the involvement of OXA in EA analgesia via OX1R in an opioid-independent way.

  13. The critical role of spinal 5-HT7 receptors in opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Seyrek, Melik; Tasdemir, Serdar; Kahraman, Serdar; Deveci, Mehmet Salih; Karakus, Emre; Halici, Zekai; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2015-09-05

    The opioid and non-opioid types of stress-induced analgesia have been well defined. One of the non-opioid type involve the endocannabinoid system. We previously reported that the spinal serotonin 7 receptor (5-HT7) blockers inhibit both morphine and cannabinoid-induced analgesia, thus we hypothesized that descending serotonergic pathways-spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop might contribute to stress-induced analgesia. Stress-induced analgesia was induced with warm (32°C) or cold (20°C) water swim stress in male Balb-C mice. The effects of intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB 269970, of the denervation of serotonergic neurons by intrathecal administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) and of lesions of the dorsolateral funiculus on opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia were evaluated with the tail-flick and hot plate tests. The expression of 5-HT7 receptors mRNA in the dorsal lumbar region of spinal cord were analyzed by RT-PCR following spinal serotonin depletion or dorsolateral funiculus lesion. The effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and AS 19 were tested on nociception. Intrathecal SB 269970 blocked both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. Dorsolateral funiculus lesion or denervation of the spinal serotonergic neurons resulted in a marked decrease in 5-HT7 receptor expression in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord, accompanied by inhibition of opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. However, the systemic or intrathecal LP 44 and AS 19 alone did not produce analgesia in unstressed mice. These results indicate that descending serotonergic pathways and the spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop play a crucial role in mediating both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

  14. Hypnotizability and Placebo Analgesia in Waking and Hypnosis as Modulators of Auditory Startle Responses in Healthy Women: An ERP Study.

    PubMed

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Scacchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of hypnotizability, pain expectation, placebo analgesia in waking and hypnosis on tonic pain relief. We also investigated how placebo analgesia affects somatic responses (eye blink) and N100 and P200 waves of event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by auditory startle probes. Although expectation plays an important role in placebo and hypnotic analgesia, the neural mechanisms underlying these treatments are still poorly understood. We used the cold cup test (CCT) to induce tonic pain in 53 healthy women. Placebo analgesia was initially produced by manipulation, in which the intensity of pain induced by the CCT was surreptitiously reduced after the administration of a sham analgesic cream. Participants were then tested in waking and hypnosis under three treatments: (1) resting (Baseline); (2) CCT-alone (Pain); and (3) CCT plus placebo cream for pain relief (Placebo). For each painful treatment, we assessed pain and distress ratings, eye blink responses, N100 and P200 amplitudes. We used LORETA analysis of N100 and P200 waves, as elicited by auditory startle, to identify cortical regions sensitive to pain reduction through placebo and hypnotic analgesia. Higher pain expectation was associated with higher pain reductions. In highly hypnotizable participants placebo treatment produced significant reductions of pain and distress perception in both waking and hypnosis condition. P200 wave, during placebo analgesia, was larger in the frontal left hemisphere while placebo analgesia, during hypnosis, involved the activity of the left hemisphere including the occipital region. These findings demonstrate that hypnosis and placebo analgesia are different processes of top-down regulation. Pain reduction was associated with larger EMG startle amplitudes, N100 and P200 responses, and enhanced activity within the frontal, parietal, and anterior and posterior cingulate gyres. LORETA results showed that placebo analgesia modulated pain-responsive areas

  15. Hypnotizability and Placebo Analgesia in Waking and Hypnosis as Modulators of Auditory Startle Responses in Healthy Women: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Scacchia, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of hypnotizability, pain expectation, placebo analgesia in waking and hypnosis on tonic pain relief. We also investigated how placebo analgesia affects somatic responses (eye blink) and N100 and P200 waves of event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by auditory startle probes. Although expectation plays an important role in placebo and hypnotic analgesia, the neural mechanisms underlying these treatments are still poorly understood. We used the cold cup test (CCT) to induce tonic pain in 53 healthy women. Placebo analgesia was initially produced by manipulation, in which the intensity of pain induced by the CCT was surreptitiously reduced after the administration of a sham analgesic cream. Participants were then tested in waking and hypnosis under three treatments: (1) resting (Baseline); (2) CCT-alone (Pain); and (3) CCT plus placebo cream for pain relief (Placebo). For each painful treatment, we assessed pain and distress ratings, eye blink responses, N100 and P200 amplitudes. We used LORETA analysis of N100 and P200 waves, as elicited by auditory startle, to identify cortical regions sensitive to pain reduction through placebo and hypnotic analgesia. Higher pain expectation was associated with higher pain reductions. In highly hypnotizable participants placebo treatment produced significant reductions of pain and distress perception in both waking and hypnosis condition. P200 wave, during placebo analgesia, was larger in the frontal left hemisphere while placebo analgesia, during hypnosis, involved the activity of the left hemisphere including the occipital region. These findings demonstrate that hypnosis and placebo analgesia are different processes of top-down regulation. Pain reduction was associated with larger EMG startle amplitudes, N100 and P200 responses, and enhanced activity within the frontal, parietal, and anterior and posterior cingulate gyres. LORETA results showed that placebo analgesia modulated pain-responsive areas

  16. A comprehensive analysis of continuous epidural analgesia's effect on labor and neonates in maternal hypertensive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Xu, Mingjun

    2017-01-01

    Maternal hypertensive disorder is one of the most common and severe medical complications during pregnancy. Epidural analgesia administration is widely used during labor process. To evaluate the potential advantage or disadvantage of continuous epidural analgesia's on labor and neonates for maternal hypertensive disorder patients comprehensively. We have retrospectively analyzed 232 patients who diagnosed as maternal hypertensive disorder in our hospital since 2015. Among which, 126 patients including 28 cases of severe preeclampsia were administrated with continuous epidural analgesia (Analgesia group), the other 106 patients were untreated (Control group). We have compared the maternal age, body weight, gestational weeks, period for the first and second labor stage; the incidence of eclampsia, natural labor, cesarean section, forceps delivery and postpartum hemorrhage between these two groups respectively; furthermore, we recorded patients who received oxytocin and antihypertensive treatment during the delivery progress as well as evaluated the neonate body weight, Apgar score and performed umbilical cord blood gas analysis. Continuous epidural analgesia does not affect the first and second labor stage period (p=0.36), However, there is a significantly higher demand for oxytocin treatment (36.5% Vs 19.8%, p<0.01) and a significantly lower requirement for antihypertensive treatment (22.2% Vs 81.1%, p<0.001) in analgesia group compared to control group. We also notice that the natural delivery ratio in analgesia group is higher than control group and most importantly, continuous epidural analgesia can increase 1min Apgar score and has no other effect on neonates' body weight, umbilical cord blood gas parameters, 5min and 10min Apgar score. Our result based on a large cohort comprehensive analysis indicates that continuous epidural analgesia can benefit both maternal hypertensive disorder patients and neonates without any side effect. Copyright © 2016 International

  17. Acupuncture for analgesia in the emergency department: a multicentre, randomised, equivalence and non-inferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marc M; Smit, De Villiers; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Ben-Meir, Michael; Taylor, David McD; Parker, Shefton J; Xue, Chalie C; Cameron, Peter A

    2017-06-19

    This study aimed to assess analgesia provided by acupuncture, alone or in combination with pharmacotherapy, to patients presenting to emergency departments with acute low back pain, migraine or ankle sprain. A pragmatic, multicentre, randomised, assessor-blinded, equivalence and non-inferiority trial of analgesia, comparing acupuncture alone, acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy, and pharmacotherapy alone for alleviating pain in the emergency department. Setting, participants: Patients presenting to emergency departments in one of four tertiary hospitals in Melbourne with acute low back pain, migraine, or ankle sprain, and with a pain score on a 10-point verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) of at least 4. The primary outcome measure was pain at one hour (T1). Clinically relevant pain relief was defined as achieving a VNRS score below 4, and statistically relevant pain relief as a reduction in VNRS score of greater than 2 units. 1964 patients were assessed between January 2010 and December 2011; 528 patients with acute low back pain (270 patients), migraine (92) or ankle sprain (166) were randomised to acupuncture alone (177 patients), acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy (178) or pharmacotherapy alone (173). Equivalence and non-inferiority of treatment groups was found overall and for the low back pain and ankle sprain groups in both intention-to-treat and per protocol (PP) analyses, except in the PP equivalence testing of the ankle sprain group. 15.6% of patients had clinically relevant pain relief and 36.9% had statistically relevant pain relief at T1; there were no between-group differences. The effectiveness of acupuncture in providing acute analgesia for patients with back pain and ankle sprain was comparable with that of pharmacotherapy. Acupuncture is a safe and acceptable form of analgesia, but none of the examined therapies provided optimal acute analgesia. More effective options are needed. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12609000989246.

  18. Utility of multimodal analgesia with fascia iliaca blockade for acute pain management following hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J; Baran, Sean; Kuzma, Scott A; Smith, Hugh M; Johnson, Rebecca L; Levy, Bruce A

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of multimodal analgesia with fascia iliaca blockade and for acute pain control in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Thirty consecutive patients undergoing primary hip arthroscopy were prospectively studied. All patients were treated preoperatively with ultrasound-guided single injection fascia iliaca blockade and multimodal analgesia. Data collected included post-operative nausea, numeric rating scale (NRS) pain scores during rest and activity, opioid consumption during the first five days (recorded as tablets of 5 mg hydrocodone/500 mg acetaminophen) and overall patient satisfaction with analgesia. This study included 23 female and 7 male patients with a median age of 35 years (range 14-58). No patient required medication for post-operative nausea. The overall NRS scores were an average of 3.9 on day 0, 3.6 on day 1, 3.4 on day 2, 2.9 on day 3, 3.0 on day 4 and 2.7 on day 5. The average tablets of opioid taken were 1.5 on day 0, 1.2 on day 1, 1.3 on day 2, 1.0 on day 3, 1.1 on day 4 and 0.9 on day 5. Overall, 20 patients rated their post-operative pain control as very satisfied (67 %), and 10 patients as satisfied (33 %). There were no complications or side effects from the fascia iliaca blockade. In this prospective study, multimodal analgesia with fascia iliaca blockade following hip arthroscopy was safe and effective. The quality of early post-operative analgesia provided by the fascia iliaca blockade was excellent and resulted in low opioid consumption, high quality of pain relief and high overall patient satisfaction.

  19. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia for labor pain: best timing of epidural infusion following spinal dose.

    PubMed

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki; Saito, Miwako; Mochizuki, Junko; Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2009-03-01

    The combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) technique for labor pain has attained wide spread popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The onset of analgesia is rapid and reliable, and maternal satisfaction is very high. However, the best timing of an epidural infusion following the spinal dose and its effect on the total local anesthetics consumption has not been well determined. A total of 144 consenting healthy nulliparous parturients whose labor was induced and who labored under regional analgesia were enrolled in this study. Following induction of the CSEA with intrathecal injection of bupivacaine, 2.5 mg and fentanyl, 25 microg, the patients were randomized into one of four groups to receive a subsequent continuous epidural infusion [E (3), E (30), E (60) and E (90)], depending on the timing of the initiation of epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine, 0.0002% fentanyl and 1:500,000 epinephrine at the rate of 10 ml/h. In study Groups E (3), E (30), E (60) and E (90), epidural infusion was initiated 3, 30, 60 and 90 min, respectively following spinal induction dose. Patients requesting additional labor analgesia were given an epidural bolus (8 ml) of ropivacaine, 0.2%. The number of parturients requesting additional boluses of ropivacaine and the total dose of ropivacaine required for labor analgesia were registered. The numbers of patients who required additional boluses of ropivacaine in Group E (3) and Group E (30) were significantly less than those in Group E (60) and Group E (90). The total dose of ropivacaine required for labor pain in Group E (3) and Group E (30) was insignificantly smaller than the total dose required in Group E (60) and Group E (90). Our results suggest that the best timing of epidural infusion following spinal dose was within 30 min of spinal induction dose.

  20. Comparison of efficacy of bupivacaine and fentanyl with bupivacaine and sufentanil for epidural labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sumit; Saraswat, Namita; Agnihotri, G. S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: A study to compare the efficacy between fentanyl and sufentanil combined with low concentration (0.0625%) of bupivacaine for epidural labor analgesia in laboring women Materials and Methods: Fifty full term parturients received an initial bolus dose of a 10 ml solution containing 0.125% bupivacaine. The patients were randomly divided into two: group F received 0.0625% bupivacaine with 2.5 mcg/ml fentanyl and group S received 0.0625% bupivacaine with 0.25 mcg/ml sufentanil. Verbal analogue pain scores, need of supplementary/rescue boluses dose of bupivacaine consumed, mode of delivery, maternal satisfaction, and neonatal Apgar scores were recorded. No significant difference was observed between both groups. Results: Both the groups provided equivalent labor analgesia and maternal satisfaction. The chances of cesarean delivery were also not increased in any group. No difference in the cephalad extent of sensory analgesia, motor block or neonatal Apgar score were observed. Although mean pain scores throughout the labor and delivery were similar in both groups, more patients in fentanyl group required supplementary boluses though not statistically significant. Conclusion: We conclude that both 0.0625% bupivacaine-fentanyl (2.5 μg/ml) and 0.0625% bupivacaine-sufentanil (0.25 μg/ml) were equally effective by continuous epidural infusion in providing labor analgesia with hemodynamic stability achieving equivalent maternal satisfaction without serious maternal or fetal side effects. We found that sufentanil was 10 times more potent than fentanyl as an analgesic for continuous epidural labor analgesia. PMID:21189856

  1. Femoral versus Multiple Nerve Blocks for Analgesia after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Sevi, Roger; Stav, Michael Yohay; Powell, Devorah; Dor, Yanai; Dudkiewicz, Mickey; Bayadse, Fuaz; Sternberg, Ahud; Soudry, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background The PROSPECT (Procedure-Specific Postoperative Pain Management) Group recommended a single injection femoral nerve block in 2008 as a guideline for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. Other authors have recommended the addition of sciatic and obturator nerve blocks. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is also involved in pain syndrome following total knee arthroplasty. We hypothesized that preoperative blocking of all four nerves would offer superior analgesia to femoral nerve block alone. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 107 patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a femoral nerve block group, a multiple nerve block group, and a control group. All patients were treated postoperatively using patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. Pain intensity at rest, during flexion and extension, and morphine consumption were compared between groups over three days. Results A total of 90 patients completed the study protocol. Patients who received multiple nerve blocks experienced superior analgesia and had reduced morphine consumption during the postoperative period compared to the other two groups. Pain intensity during flexion was significantly lower in the “blocks” groups versus the control group. Morphine consumption was significantly higher in the control group. Conclusions Pain relief after total knee arthroplasty immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day was significantly superior in patients who received multiple blocks preoperatively, with morphine consumption significantly lower during this period. A preoperative femoral nerve block alone produced partial and insufficient analgesia immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day. (Clinical trial registration number (NIH): NCT01303120) PMID:28178436

  2. Ellagic acid enhances morphine analgesia and attenuates the development of morphine tolerance and dependence in mice.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mohammad Taghi; Naghizadeh, Bahareh; Ghorbanzadeh, Behnam

    2014-10-15

    According to our previous study, ellagic acid has both dose-related central and peripheral antinociceptive effect through the opioidergic and l-arginine-NO-cGMP-ATP sensitive K(+) channel pathways. In the present study, the systemic antinociceptive effects of ellagic acid in animal models of pain, and functional interactions between ellagic acid and morphine in terms of analgesia, tolerance and dependence were investigated. Ellagic acid (1-30mg/kg; i.p.) showed significant and dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Intraperitoneal ellagic acid acutely interacted with morphine analgesia in a synergistic manner in this assay. Ellagic acid (1-10mg/kg; i.p.) also exerted analgesic activity in the hot-plate test. Pre-treatment with naloxone (1mg/kg; i.p.) significantly reversed ellagic acid, morphine as well as ellagic acid-morphine combination-induced antinociceptin in these two tests. More importantly, when co-administered with morphine, ellagic acid (1-10mg/kg) effectively blocked the development of tolerance to morphine analgesia in the hot-plate test. Likewise, ellagic acid dose-dependently prevented naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs including jumping and weight loss. Ellagic acid treatment (1-30mg/kg; i.p.) had no significant effect on the locomotion activity of animals using open-field task. Therefore, these results showed that ellagic acid has notable systemic antinociceptive activity for both tonic and phasic pain models. Altogether, ellagic acid might be used in pain relief alone or in combination with opioid drugs because of enhancing morphine analgesia and preventing morphine-induced tolerance to analgesia and dependence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of epidural lidocaine analgesia on labor and delivery: A randomized, prospective, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nafisi, Shahram

    2006-01-01

    Background Whether epidural analgesia for labor prolongs the active-first and second labor stages and increases the risk of vacuum-assisted delivery is a controversial topic. Our study was conducted to answer the question: does lumbar epidural analgesia with lidocaine affect the progress of labor in our obstetric population? Method 395 healthy, nulliparous women, at term, presented in spontaneous labor with a singleton vertex presentation. These patients were randomized to receive analgesia either, epidural with bolus doses of 1% lidocaine or intravenous, with meperidine 25 to 50 mg when their cervix was dilated to 4 centimeters. The duration of the active-first and second stages of labor and the neonatal apgar scores were recorded, in each patient. The total number of vacuum-assisted and cesarean deliveries were also measured. Results 197 women were randomized to the epidural group. 198 women were randomized to the single-dose intravenous meperidine group. There was no statistical difference in rates of vacuum-assisted delivery rate. Cesarean deliveries, as a consequence of fetal bradycardia or dystocia, did not differ significantly between the groups. Differences in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor were not statistically significant. The number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7, did not differ significantly between both analgesia groups. Conclusion Epidural analgesia with 1% lidocaine does not prolong the active-first and second stages of labor and does not increase vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rate. PMID:17176461

  4. Influence of preemptive analgesia on pulmonary function and complications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Şen, Meral; Özol, Duygu; Bozer, Mikdat

    2009-12-01

    Pain and diaphragmatic dysfunction are the major reasons for postoperative pulmonary complications after upper abdominal surgery. Preoperative administration of analgesics helps to reduce and prevent pain. The objective of this study was first to research the rate of pulmonary complications for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and then analyze the influence of preemptive analgesia on pulmonary functions and complications. Seventy patients scheduled for elective LC were included in our double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective study. Randomly, 35 patients received 1 g etofenamate (group 1) and 35 patients 0.9% saline (group 2) intramuscularly 1 h before surgery. All patients underwent physical examination, chest radiography, lung function tests, and pulse oxygen saturation measurements 2 h before surgery and postoperatively on day 2. Atelectasis was graded as micro, focal, segmental, or lobar. With preemptive analgesia, the need for postoperative analgesia decreased significantly in group 1. In both groups mean spirometric values were reduced significantly after the operation, but the difference and proportional change according to preoperative recordings were found to be similar [29.5 vs. 31.3% reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC) and 32.9 vs. 33.5% reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) for groups 1 and 2, respectively]. There was an insignificant drop in oxygen saturation rates for both groups. The overall incidence of atelectasia was similar for group 1 and 2 (30.2 vs. 29.2%). Although the degree of atelectesia was found to be more severe in the placebo group, the difference was not statistically significant. We concluded that although preemptive analgesia decreased the need for postoperative analgesia, this had no effect on pulmonary functions and pulmonary complications. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

  5. T Cell Mediation of Pregnancy Analgesia Affecting Chronic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sarah F; Ham, Boram; Drouin, Shannon; Boachie, Nadia; Chabot-Dore, Anne-Julie; Austin, Jean-Sebastien; Diatchenko, Luda; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2017-09-06

    It has been consistently reported that many female chronic pain sufferers have an attenuation of symptoms during pregnancy. Rats display increased pain tolerance during pregnancy, due to an increase in opioid receptors in the spinal cord. These past studies did not consider the role of non-neuronal cells, now appreciated to play an important role in chronic pain processing. Using an inflammatory (complete Freund's adjuvant) or neuropathic (spared nerve injury) model of persistent pain, we observe that young adult female mice in early pregnancy switch from a micgrolia-independent to a microglia-dependent pain hypersensitivity mechanism. During late pregnancy, female mice show no evidence of chronic pain whatsoever. This pregnancy-related analgesia is reversible by intrathecal administration of naloxone, suggesting an opioid-mediated mechanism; pharmacological and genetic data suggest the importance of δ-opioid receptors. We also observe that T-cell deficient (nude and Rag1 null mutant) pregnant mice do not exhibit pregnancy analgesia, which can be rescued with the adoptive transfer of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cells from late-pregnant wildtype mice. These results suggest that T cells are a mediator of the opioid analgesia exhibited during pregnancy.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTChronic pain symptoms often subside during pregnancy. This pregnancy-related analgesia has been demonstrated for acute pain in rats. Here we show that pregnancy analgesia can produce a complete cessation of chronic pain behaviors in mice. We show that the phenomenon is dependent on pregnancy hormones (estrogen and progesterone), δ-opioid receptors, and T cells of the adaptive immune system. These findings add to the recent but growing evidence of sex-specific T cell involvement in chronic pain processing. Copyright © 2017 the authors.

  6. Hospitalization for partial nephrectomy was not associated with intrathecal opioid analgesia: Retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weingarten, Toby N.; Del Mundo, Serena B.; Yeoh, Tze Yeng; Scavonetto, Federica; Leibovich, Bradley C.; Sprung, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this retrospective study is to test the hypothesis that the use of spinal analgesia shortens the length of hospital stay after partial nephrectomy. Materials and Methods: We reviewed all patients undergoing partial nephrectomy for malignancy through flank incision between January 1, 2008, and June 30, 2011. We excluded patients who underwent tumor thrombectomy, used sustained-release opioids, or had general anesthesia supplemented by epidural analgesia. Patients were grouped into “spinal” (intrathecal opioid injection for postoperative analgesia) versus “general anesthetic” group, and “early” discharge group (within 3 postoperative days) versus “late” group. Association between demographics, patient physical status, anesthetic techniques, and surgical complexity and hospital stay were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results: Of 380 patients, 158 (41.6%) were discharged “early” and 151 (39.7%) were “spinal” cases. Both spinal and early discharge groups had better postoperative pain control and used less postoperative systemic opioids. Spinal analgesia was associated with early hospital discharge, odds ratio 1.52, (95% confidence interval 1.00-2.30), P = 0.05, but in adjusted analysis was no longer associated with early discharge, 1.16 (0.73-1.86), P = 0.52. Early discharge was associated with calendar year, with more recent years being associated with early discharge. Conclusion: Spinal analgesia combined with general anesthesia was associated with improved postoperative pain control during the 1st postoperative day, but not with shorter hospital stay following partial nephrectomy. Therefore, unaccounted practice changes that occurred during more recent times affected hospital stay. PMID:25422611

  7. Neuraxial Labor Analgesia for Vaginal Delivery and Its Effects on Childhood Learning Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Randall P.; Lee, KunMoo; Hofer, Ryan E.; Beinborn, Charles W.; Hambel, Ellen M.; Klein, Melissa K.; Gunn, Paul W.; Wilder, Robert T.; Katusic, Slavica K.; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Warner, David O.; Sprung, Juraj

    2011-01-01

    Background In prior work, children born to mothers who received neuraxial anesthesia for cesarean delivery had a lower incidence of subsequent learning disabilities compared with vaginal delivery. The authors speculated that neuraxial anesthesia may reduce stress responses to delivery, which could affect subsequent neurodevelopmental outcomes. To further explore this possibility, we examined the association between the use of neuraxial labor analgesia and development of childhood learning disabilities in a population-based birth cohort of children delivered vaginally. Methods The educational and medical records of all children born to mothers residing in five townships of Olmsted County, MN from 1976-1982 and remaining in the community at age 5 years were reviewed to identify those with learning disabilities. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare the incidence of learning disabilities between children delivered vaginally with and without neuraxial labor analgesia, including analyses adjusted for factors of either potential clinical relevance or that differed between the two groups in univariate analysis. Results Of the study cohort, 4684 mothers delivered children vaginally, with 1495 receiving neuraxial labor analgesia. The presence of childhood learning disabilities in the cohort was not associated with use of labor neuraxial analgesia (adjusted hazard ratio 1.05, 95% C.I. 0.85 to 1.31, P = 0.63). Conclusion The use of neuraxial analgesia during labor and vaginal delivery was not independently associated with learning disabilities diagnosed before age 19 years. Future studies are needed to evaluate potential mechanisms of the previous finding indicating that the incidence of learning disabilities is lower in children born to mothers via cesarean delivery under neuraxial anesthesia compared to vaginal delivery. PMID:20736436

  8. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labour: its effects on delivery outcome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suneet Kaur Sra Charanjit; Yahya, Nurlia; Misiran, Karis; Masdar, Azlina; Nor, Nadia Md; Yee, Lee Choon

    2016-01-01

    Combined spinal-epidural (CSE) has become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional labour epidural due to its rapid onset and reliable analgesia provided. This was a prospective, convenient sampling study to determine the effects of CSE analgesia on labour outcome. One hundred and ten healthy primigravida parturients with a singleton pregnancy of ≥37 weeks gestation and in the active phase of labour were studied. They were enrolled to the CSE (n=55) or Non-CSE (n=55) group based on whether they consented to CSE analgesia. Non-CSE parturients were offered other methods of labour analgesia. The duration of the first and second stage of labour, rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and emergency cesarean section, and Apgar scores were compared. The mean duration of the first and second stage of labour was not significantly different between both groups. Instrumental delivery rates between the groups were not significantly different (CSE group, 11% versus Non-CSE group, 16%). The slightly higher incidence of cesarean section in the CSE group (16% versus 15% in the Non-CSE group) was not statistically significant. Neonatal outcome in terms of Apgar score of less than 7 at 1 and 5min was similar in both groups. There were no significant differences in the duration of labour, rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and emergency cesarean section, and neonatal outcome in parturients who received compared to those who did not receive CSE for labour analgesia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. [Combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labour: its effects on delivery outcome].

    PubMed

    Singh, Suneet Kaur Sra Charanjit; Yahya, Nurlia; Misiran, Karis; Masdar, Azlina; Nor, Nadia Md; Yee, Lee Choon

    2016-01-01

    Combined spinal-epidural (CSE) has become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional labour epidural due to its rapid onset and reliable analgesia provided. This was a prospective, convenient sampling study to determine the effects of CSE analgesia on labour outcome. One hundred and ten healthy primigravida parturients with a singleton pregnancy of ≥37 weeks gestation and in the active phase of labour were studied. They were enrolled to the CSE (n=55) or Non-CSE (n=55) group based on whether they consented to CSE analgesia. Non-CSE parturients were offered other methods of labour analgesia. The duration of the first and second stage of labour, rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and emergency cesarean section, and Apgar scores were compared. The mean duration of the first and second stage of labour was not significantly different between both groups. Instrumental delivery rates between the groups were not significantly different (CSE group, 11% versus Non-CSE group, 16%). The slightly higher incidence of cesarean section in the CSE group (16% versus 15% in the Non-CSE group) was not statistically significant. Neonatal outcome in terms of Apgar score of less than 7 at 1 and 5min was similar in both groups. There were no significant differences in the duration of labour, rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and emergency cesarean section, and neonatal outcome in parturients who received compared to those who did not receive CSE for labour analgesia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Low-dose dexamethasone with levobupivacaine improves analgesia after supraclavicular brachial plexus blockade.

    PubMed

    Persec, Jasminka; Persec, Zoran; Kopljar, Mario; Zupcic, Miroslav; Sakic, Livija; Zrinjscak, Iva Korecic; Marinic, Dragan Korolija

    2014-01-01

    We conducted ultrasound-guided single-shot supraclavicular blockade and investigated the analgesic effect of dexamethasone added to levobupivacaine. The aim of this study was to determine whether the addition of low-dose dexamethasone to levobupivacaine would prolong the duration of analgesia sufficiently to avoid additional intravenous analgesic use for the first 24 hours postoperatively. This randomised controlled study assessed 70 patients undergoing upper-extremity surgery. Patients were eligible if there 18 years or over with American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I, II or III. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 25 ml 0.5% levobupivacaine plus four milligrams dexamethasone (group 1) or 25 ml 0.5% levobupivacaine plus one millilitre saline (group 2). Pain scores, analgesic consumption and time estimation at which they perceived that sensory and motor blockade started and resolved were recorded. Duration of sensory (1,260 min. in group 1 vs 600 min. in group 2) and motor (1,200 min. in group 1 vs 700 min. in group 2) blockade were significantly longer in group 1 (P < 0.05). Postoperative pain levels in group 1 were significantly lower (P < 0.05) at all investigation times. Analgesia consumption was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in group 1; at six and 12 hours, no patient required additional analgesia, and at 24 hours, only two patients compared with 17 in the levobupivacaine group required additional analgesia. Using single-shot low-dose dexamethasone in a mixture with levobupivacaine results in prolonged analgesia duration and less analgesic use compared with levobupivacaine alone.

  11. Epidural versus intra-articular infusion analgesia following total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Kasture, Sarang; Saraf, Hrushikesh

    2015-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of epidural versus intra-articular infusion analgesia following total knee replacement (TKR). 25 men and 50 women aged 55 to 75 (mean, 67) years who underwent primary TKR by a single surgeon were randomised and consented to receive either epidural (n=35) or intra-articular (n=40) infusion analgesia for 48 hours at 5 ml/ hr. All patients also received intravenous aqueous diclofenac 50 mg twice a day. Patients were assessed 6 hourly for visual analogue score (VAS) for pain to determine the analgesic effect. Complications such as paraesthesia in the lower limbs, hypotension, urinary retention, and abdominal distension were recorded, as was the rehabilitation progress with respect to the time to stand, climb stairs, use of commode chair, and discharge. The epidural and intra-articular infusion groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, weight, and operating time, as was the analgesic efficacy within 48 hours of TKR. Patients with epidural infusion analgesia had a higher complication rate in terms of hypotension (51.4% vs. 22.5%, p=0.015) and troublesome paraesthesia in the lower limbs (45.7% vs. 12.5%, p=0.028), and a trend of higher abdominal distension rate (20% vs. 5%, p=0.073). Patients with intra-articular infusion analgesia were able to stand/ walk earlier (2.08 vs. 2.54 days, p<0.001). The 2 groups did not differ significantly in the time needed to climb stairs, use of commode chair, and discharge. The efficacy of epidural and intraarticular infusion analgesia was comparable. Intra-articular infusion was associated with fewer complications and earlier rehabilitation.

  12. Effects of ibudilast on oxycodone-induced analgesia and subjective effects in opioid-dependent volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Z D; Johnson, K W; Vosburg, S K; Sullivan, M A; Manubay, J; Martinez, D; Jones, J D; Saccone, P A; Comer, S D

    2017-09-01

    Opioid-induced glial activation is hypothesized to contribute to the development of tolerance to opioid-induced analgesia. This inpatient, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject and between-groups pilot study investigated the dose-dependent effects of ibudilast, a glial cell modulator, on oxycodone-induced analgesia. Opioid-dependent volunteers were maintained on morphine (30mg, PO, QID) for two weeks and received placebo ibudilast (0mg, PO, BID) during the 1st week (days 1-7). On day 8, participants (N=10/group) were randomized to receive ibudilast (20 or 40mg, PO, BID) or placebo for the remainder of the study. On days 4 (week 1) and 11 (week 2), the analgesic, subjective, and physiological effects of oxycodone (0, 25, 50mg/70kg, PO) were determined. Analgesia was measured using the cold pressor test; participants immersed their hand in cold water (4°C) and pain threshold and pain tolerability were recorded. Oxycodone decreased pain threshold and tolerability in all groups during week 1. During week 2, the placebo group exhibited a blunted analgesic response to oxycodone for pain threshold and subjective pain ratings, whereas the 40mg BID ibudilast group exhibited greater analgesia as measured by subjective pain ratings (p≤0.05). Oxycodone also increased subjective drug effect ratings associated with abuse liability in all groups during week 1 (p≤0.05); ibudilast did not consistently affect these ratings. These findings suggest that ibudilast may enhance opioid-induced analgesia. Investigating higher ibudilast doses may establish the utility of pharmacological modulation of glial activity to maximize the clinical use of opioids. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Neuraxial labor analgesia for vaginal delivery and its effects on childhood learning disabilities.