Science.gov

Sample records for analyse zum snr

  1. Analysis and improvement of SNR using time slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanam, Srikrishna; Singh, Amarjot; Kumar, Devinder; Choubey, Akash; Bacchuwar, Ketan

    2011-06-01

    Noise is a very important factor which in most cases, plays an antagonistic role in the vast field of image processing. Thus noise needs to be studied in great depth in order to improve the quality of images. The quantity of signal in an image, corrupted by noise is generally described by the term Signal-to-Noise ratio. Capturing multiple photos at different focus settings is a powerful approach for improving SNR. The paper analyses a frame work for optimally balancing the tradeoff's between defocus and sensor noise by experimenting on synthetic as well as real video sequences. The method is first applied to synthetic image where the improvement in SNR is studied by the ability of Hough transform to extract the number of lines with respect to the variation in SNR. The paper further experiments on real time video sequences while the improvement in SNR is analyzed using different edge operators like Sobel, Canny, Prewitt, Roberts and Laplacian. The result obtained is further analyzed using different edge operators. The main aim is to detect the edges at different values of SNR which will be a prominent measure of the signal strength as well as clarity of an image. The paper also explains in depth the modeling of noise leading to better understanding of SNR. The results obtain from both synthetic image and real time video sequences elaborate the increase in SNR with the increment in the total number of time slices in a fixed budget leading to clear pictures. This technique can be very effectively applied to capture high quality images from long distances.

  2. SNR characterization in distributed acoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabai, Haniel; Eyal, Avishay

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we study the SNR associated with acoustic detection in Rayleigh-based Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) systems. The study is focused on phase sensitive DAS due to its superiority in terms of linearity and sensitivity. Since DAS is based on coherent interference of backscattered light from multiple scatterers it is prone to signal fading. When left unresolved, the issue of signal fading renders the associated SNR randomly dependent on position and time. Hence, its proper measurement and characterization requires statistical tools. Here such tools are introduced and a methodology for finding the mean SNR and its distribution is implemented in both experiment and simulation. It is shown that the distribution of the DAS-SNR can be obtained from the distribution of backscattered power in OTDR and the mean DAS-SNR is proportional to the energy of the interrogation pulse.

  3. The influence of SNR on MTF measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muxin; Liu, Liying; Li, Ye; Huan, Kewei; Zheng, Feng; Shi, Xiaoguang

    2015-11-01

    The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) is a fundamental imaging system design specification and system quality metric often used in remote sensing. The MTF describes the attenuation of sinusoidal waveforms as a function of spatial frequency. Practically, MTF is a metric quantifying the sharpness of the reconstructed image. The Knife-Edge method is becoming widely applied for its advantage of simplified target and accurate computer calculation. Noise in CCD image system is inevitable, thus the SNR becomes a factor influencing the MTF measurement. In this paper, we build relationships between SNR, luminance and MTF. In conclusion, SNR is related with luminance levels linearly. SNR rises with increasing luminance. The higher SNR, the more curves conform to the theoretical MTF.

  4. X-ray spectrum of Kepler's SNR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; White, N. E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations made with the solid state spectrometer aboard the Einstein Observatory confirm Kepler's SNR as an X-ray source with an intensity between 1-3 KeV of 7.2 x 10 to the-11th power ergs/sq cm-s. The X-ray spectrum is similar to those of Cas A and Tycho, with strong line emission from the helium-like species of Si, S, and Ar. Direct comparisons to Tycho's SNR suggest a distance of Kepler's SNR of greater than or equal to 5 kpc.

  5. Image Reconstruction in SNR Units: A General Method for SNR Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    The method for phased array image reconstruction of uniform noise images may be used in conjunction with proper image scaling as a means of reconstructing images directly in SNR units. This facilitates accurate and precise SNR measurement on a per pixel basis. This method is applicable to root-sum-of-squares magnitude combining, B1-weighted combining, and parallel imaging such as SENSE. A procedure for image reconstruction and scaling is presented, and the method for SNR measurement is validated with phantom data. Alternative methods that rely on noise only regions are not appropriate for parallel imaging where the noise level is highly variable across the field-of-view. The purpose of this article is to provide a nuts and bolts procedure for calculating scale factors used for reconstructing images directly in SNR units. The procedure includes scaling for noise equivalent bandwidth of digital receivers, FFTs and associated window functions (raw data filters), and array combining. PMID:16261576

  6. Transfer With SNR High-Speed Transport Protocol.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    To validate SNR as a high speed transport protocol, efficient means of transferring large data files are required. The problem is that no file...transfer program is currently implemented for SNR . The SNR protocol was described in IEEE Transactions on Communications 91 Vol. 38 #11. The approach taken...was to modify the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) and use it with the SNR Receiver and Transmitter implementations in both the FDDI and Ethernet

  7. SNR-based queue observations at CFHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devost, Daniel; Moutou, Claire; Manset, Nadine; Mahoney, Billy; Burdullis, Todd; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Racine, René

    2016-07-01

    In an effort to optimize the night time utilizing the exquisite weather on Maunakea, CFHT has equipped its dome with vents and is now moving its Queued Scheduled Observing (QSO)1 based operations toward Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) observing. In this new mode, individual exposure times for a science program are estimated using a model that uses measurements of the weather conditions as input and the science program is considered completed when the depth required by the scientific requirements are reached. These changes allow CFHT to make better use of the excellent seeing conditions provided by Maunakea, allowing us to complete programs in a shorter time than allocated to the science programs.

  8. Altering the SNR by noise manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailov, Michael K.

    2000-12-01

    Irradiation of a photodetector by very short pulses is presented as the primary and perhaps the only remote technology for altering the SNR. Such noise manipulation will decrease the SNR value for certain types of common MIR and LWIR photodetectors. The effect is based on the differences between carrier lifetime, detector material heat transfer rate and altering pulse dwell time. When the pulse width is much less than photodetector rise time, most of the photons cannot generate free carriers, but only heat. Since the heat transfer rate in semiconductors is much slower than carrier's lifetime, high temperature will affect the detector much longer than common input signal correlation length or frame period. We describe thermal, radiometric and electronic circuit models developed to simulate the transfer of short pulses of time-dependent radiant and electrical signals through a photodetector during the alteration. The models are developed to provide an analysis tool for evaluating the time-dependent radiometric sensitivity for the remote gain control of IR photodetectors.

  9. SNR Degradation in Undersampled Phase Measurement Systems

    PubMed Central

    Salido-Monzú, David; Meca-Meca, Francisco J.; Martín-Gorostiza, Ernesto; Lázaro-Galilea, José L.

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of measuring applications rely on phase estimation on sinusoidal signals. These systems, where the estimation is mainly implemented in the digital domain, can generally benefit from the use of undersampling to reduce the digitizer and subsequent digital processing requirements. This may be crucial when the application characteristics necessarily imply a simple and inexpensive sensor. However, practical limitations related to the phase stability of the band-pass filter prior digitization establish restrictions to the reduction of noise bandwidth. Due to this, the undersampling intensity is practically defined by noise aliasing, taking into account the amount of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduction caused by it considering the application accuracy requirements. This work analyzes the relationship between undersampling frequency and SNR reduction, conditioned by the stability requirements of the filter that defines the noise bandwidth before digitization. The effect of undersampling is quantified in a practical situation where phase differences are measured by in-phase and quadrature (I/Q) demodulation for an infrared ranging application. PMID:27783033

  10. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF SNR 0540 - 697

    SciTech Connect

    Seward, F. D.; Williams, R. M.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Dickel, J. R.

    2010-07-15

    This paper describes a Chandra observation of SNR 0540 - 697 within the H II complex N159 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Scattering from the nearby bright source LMC X-1, which obscures the western edge of the remnant, has been removed. Larger than previously believed, the 2.'0 x 2.'8 remnant is defined by optical filaments and two lobes of X-ray emission. A band of intervening material absorbs X-rays from the central part of the remnant. The N Lobe of the remnant is relatively bright and well defined, while emission from the S Lobe is much weaker. There is structure within the N Lobe but no clear X-ray emission from an outer shell indicating a shock in the interstellar medium. The X-ray spectrum is thermal with emission lines from Fe, Mg, and Si. The observed temperature and luminosity of the hot gas are 0.6 keV and 6 x 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}, respectively. These are consistent with characteristics expected for older remnants. There is also diffuse thermal X-ray emission north of N159 extending into N160, evidence for a larger remnant or bubble.

  11. Impact of CCD camera SNR on polarimetric accuracy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenyue; Wang, Xia; Pacheco, Shaun; Liang, Rongguang

    2014-11-10

    A comprehensive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera noise model is employed to study the impact of CCD camera signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on polarimetric accuracy. The study shows that the standard deviations of the measured degree of linear polarization (DoLP) and angle of linear polarization (AoLP) are mainly dependent on the camera SNR. With increase in the camera SNR, both the measurement errors and the standard deviations caused by the CCD camera noise decrease. When the DoLP of the incident light is smaller than 0.1, the camera SNR should be at least 75 to achieve a measurement error of less than 0.01. When the input DoLP is larger than 0.5, a SNR of 15 is sufficient to achieve the same measurement accuracy. An experiment is carried out to verify the simulation results.

  12. Fe K and ejecta emission in SNR G15.9+0.2 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Pierre; Acero, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the Galactic supernova remnant SNR G15.9+0.2 with archival XMM-Newton observations. Using EPIC's collective power, we report for the first time the detection of Fe K line emission from SNR G15.9+0.2. We measure the line properties (e.g. centroid energy and width) and find evidence for spatial variations. We discuss how SNR G15.9+0.2 fits within the current sample of SNRs with detected Fe K emission and found that it is the core-collapse SNR with the lowest Fe K centroid energy. We also present some caveats to the use of Fe K line centroid energies as typing tools for SNRs. We analyse the emission-line rich X-ray spectra extracted from various regions. The abundances of Mg, Si, S, Ar, and Ca are super-solar and their ratios strongly suggests that the progenitor of SNR G15.9+0.2 was a massive star, strengthening the physical association to a candidate Central Compact Object detected with Chandra. Using the absorption column density and ambient medium density constrained by the X-ray spectral analysis, we revise the measurements of the age and distance to the SNR.

  13. Noise correlations and SNR in phased-array MRS.

    PubMed

    Martini, N; Santarelli, M F; Giovannetti, G; Milanesi, M; De Marchi, D; Positano, V; Landini, L

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) signals by multiple receiver coils can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or alternatively can reduce the scan time maintaining a reliable SNR. However, using phased array coils in MRS studies requires efficient data processing and data combination techniques in order to exploit the sensitivity improvement of the phased array coil acquisition method. This paper describes a novel method for the combination of MRS signals acquired by phased array coils, even in presence of correlated noise between the acquisition channels. In fact, although it has been shown that electric and magnetic coupling mechanisms produce correlated noise in the coils, previous algorithms developed for MRS data combination have ignored this effect. The proposed approach takes advantage of a noise decorrelation stage to maximize the SNR of the combined spectra. In particular Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was exploited to project the acquired spectra in a subspace where the noise vectors are orthogonal. In this subspace the SNR weighting method will provide the optimal overall SNR. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is carried out on simulated (1)H-MRS signals and experimental results are obtained on phantom (1)H-MR spectra using a commercially available 8-element phased array coil. Noise correlations between elements were generally low due to the optimal coil design, leading to a fair SNR gain (about 0.5%) in the center of the field of view (FOV). A greater SNR improvement was found in the peripheral FOV regions.

  14. A new high-latitude low-surface brightness SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, P.; Kothes, R.; Foster, T.; Reich, W.

    2016-06-01

    We have discovered a new SNR in the Galactic Anticentre at a Galactic latitude of about 10 degrees with the DRAO synthesis telescope at 21-cm. Here we report on follow-up Effelsberg observations at 6-cm. This shell-type SNR is almost circular with a diameter of about 1.5 degrees. Its radio surface brightness is extremely low and it is highly linearly polarized. High-velocity HI-gas from the anti-centre shell seems associated, which places the SNR at a distance between 0.5 kpc and 2.5 kpc.

  15. CGRO/OSSE Observations of the Cassiopeia A SNR (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    CGRO/OSSE observations of the Cassiopeia A SNR L.-S. The1, M. D. Leising1, J. D. Kurfess2, W. N. Johnson2, D. H. Hartmann1, N. Gehrels3, J. E. Grove2...objects: Cassiopeia A SNR { Nuclear reactions, nucleosyn- thesis, abundances 1. Introduction Gamma-ray observations of Cas A have generated some...CGRO/OSSE observations of the Cassiopeia A SNR 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  16. Expected Energy Method for Electro-Optical SNR Calculations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-02

    r’AD-Ri39 984 EXPECTED ENERGY METHOD FOR ELECTPO-OPTICRL SNR i/i CALCULRTIONS(U) MASSRCHUSETTS INST OF TECH LEXINGTON LINCOLN LAB G J MAYER 82 FEB 84...ENERGY METHOD FOR ELECTRO-OPTICAL SNR CALCULATIONS * Ci. MA YER Group 9 TECHNICAL REPORT 634 2 FEBRUARY 1984 Approved for public release; distribution...analysis of image and sensor element configuration. This method allows the optimal pixel size to be selected to maximize the expected SNR for any point

  17. SNR degradation in square-wave subcarrier downconversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.; Statman, J.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents a study of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) degradation in the process of square-wave subcarrier downconversion. The study shows three factors that contribute to the SNR degradation: the cutoff of the higher frequency components in the data, the approximation of a square wave with a finite number of harmonics, and nonideal filtering. Both analytical and simulation results are presented.

  18. BK Channels Reveal Novel Phosphate Sensitivity in SNr Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Juan Juan; Chen, Lianwan; Duan, Xuezhi; Song, Xueqin; Su, Wenting; Zhang, Peng; Li, Li; Bai, Shuyun; Sun, Yingchun; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    Whether large conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels are present in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) is a matter of debate. Using the patch-clamp technique, we examined the functional expression of BK channels in neurons of the SNr and showed that the channels were activated or inhibited by internal high-energy phosphates (IHEPs) at positive and negative membrane potentials, respectively. SNr neurons showed membrane potential hyperpolarization under glucose-deprivation conditions which was attenuated by paxilline, a specific BK channel blocker. In addition, Fluo-3 fluorescence recording detected an increase in the level of internal free calcium ([Ca2+]i) during ischemic hyperpolarization. These results confirm that BK channels are present in SNr neurons and indicate that their unique IHEP sensitivity is requisite in neuronal ischemic responses. Bearing in mind that the KATP channel blocker tolbutamide also attenuated the hyperpolarization, we suggest that BK channels may play a protective role in the basal ganglia by modulating the excitability of SNr neurons along with KATP channels under ischemic stresses. PMID:23284908

  19. Customer oriented SNR scalability scheme for scalable video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. G.; Rahardja, S.

    2005-07-01

    Let the whole region be the whole bit rate range that customers are interested in, and a sub-region be a specific bit rate range. The weighting factor of each sub-region is determined according to customers' interest. A new type of region of interest (ROI) is defined for the SNR scalability as the gap between the coding efficiency of SNR scalability scheme and that of the state-of-the-art single layer coding for a sub-region is a monotonically non-increasing function of its weighting factor. This type of ROI is used as a performance index to design a customer oriented SNR scalability scheme. Our scheme can be used to achieve an optimal customer oriented scalable tradeoff (COST). The profit can thus be maximized.

  20. Physik gestern und heute Von der Metallstange zum Hochenergielaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heering, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Im Mai 1752 wurde in Marly bei Paris auf Anregung des amerikanischen Forschers und Politikers Benjamin Franklin erstmals die elektrische Natur des Blitzes nachgewiesen. Damals beschrieb Franklin auch eine technische Vorrichtung, die als Schutz von Gebäuden vor Blitzschlägen dienen sollte: den Blitzableiter. Diese aus heutiger Sicht scheinbar triviale Vorrichtung wurde aber keineswegs unmittelbar akzeptiert. Und bis heute ist die Forschung zum Schutz von Einrichtungen vor Blitzschlägen nicht abgeschlossen.

  1. A priori SNR estimation and noise estimation for speech enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Zeng, ZeQing; Zhu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A priori signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation and noise estimation are important for speech enhancement. In this paper, a novel modified decision-directed (DD) a priori SNR estimation approach based on single-frequency entropy, named DDBSE, is proposed. DDBSE replaces the fixed weighting factor in the DD approach with an adaptive one calculated according to change of single-frequency entropy. Simultaneously, a new noise power estimation approach based on unbiased minimum mean square error (MMSE) and voice activity detection (VAD), named UMVAD, is proposed. UMVAD adopts different strategies to estimate noise in order to reduce over-estimation and under-estimation of noise. UMVAD improves the classical statistical model-based VAD by utilizing an adaptive threshold to replace the original fixed one and modifies the unbiased MMSE-based noise estimation approach using an adaptive a priori speech presence probability calculated by entropy instead of the original fixed one. Experimental results show that DDBSE can provide greater noise suppression than DD and UMVAD can improve the accuracy of noise estimation. Compared to existing approaches, speech enhancement based on UMVAD and DDBSE can obtain a better segment SNR score and composite measure covl score, especially in adverse environments such as non-stationary noise and low-SNR.

  2. A priori SNR estimation and noise estimation for speech enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Zeng, ZeQing; Zhu, Ping

    2016-12-01

    A priori signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation and noise estimation are important for speech enhancement. In this paper, a novel modified decision-directed (DD) a priori SNR estimation approach based on single-frequency entropy, named DDBSE, is proposed. DDBSE replaces the fixed weighting factor in the DD approach with an adaptive one calculated according to change of single-frequency entropy. Simultaneously, a new noise power estimation approach based on unbiased minimum mean square error (MMSE) and voice activity detection (VAD), named UMVAD, is proposed. UMVAD adopts different strategies to estimate noise in order to reduce over-estimation and under-estimation of noise. UMVAD improves the classical statistical model-based VAD by utilizing an adaptive threshold to replace the original fixed one and modifies the unbiased MMSE-based noise estimation approach using an adaptive a priori speech presence probability calculated by entropy instead of the original fixed one. Experimental results show that DDBSE can provide greater noise suppression than DD and UMVAD can improve the accuracy of noise estimation. Compared to existing approaches, speech enhancement based on UMVAD and DDBSE can obtain a better segment SNR score and composite measure c ovl score, especially in adverse environments such as non-stationary noise and low-SNR.

  3. SNR improvement for hyperspectral application using frame and pixel binning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Sami Ur; Kumar, Ankush; Banerjee, Arup

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging spectrometer systems are increasingly being used in the field of remote sensing for variety of civilian and military applications. The ability of such instruments in discriminating finer spectral features along with improved spatial and radiometric performance have made such instruments a powerful tool in the field of remote sensing. Design and development of spaceborne hyper spectral imaging spectrometers poses lot of technological challenges in terms of optics, dispersion element, detectors, electronics and mechanical systems. The main factors that define the type of detectors are the spectral region, SNR, dynamic range, pixel size, number of pixels, frame rate, operating temperature etc. Detectors with higher quantum efficiency and higher well depth are the preferred choice for such applications. CCD based Si detectors serves the requirement of high well depth for VNIR band spectrometers but suffers from smear. Smear can be controlled by using CMOS detectors. Si CMOS detectors with large format arrays are available. These detectors generally have smaller pitch and low well depth. Binning technique can be used with available CMOS detectors to meet the large swath, higher resolution and high SNR requirements. Availability of larger dwell time of satellite can be used to bin multiple frames to increase the signal collection even with lesser well depth detectors and ultimately increase the SNR. Lab measurements reveal that SNR improvement by frame binning is more in comparison to pixel binning. Effect of pixel binning as compared to the frame binning will be discussed and degradation of SNR as compared to theoretical value for pixel binning will be analyzed.

  4. Radiometric calibration and SNR calculation of a SWIR imaging telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Ozgur; Turk, Fethi; Selimoglu, Ozgur

    2012-09-06

    Radiometric calibration of an imaging telescope is usually made using a uniform illumination sphere in a laboratory. In this study, we used the open-sky images taken during bright day conditions to calibrate our telescope. We found a dark signal offset value and a linear response coefficient value for each pixel by using three different algorithms. Then we applied these coefficients to the taken images, and considerably lowered the image non-uniformity. Calibration can be repeated during the operation of telescope with an object that has better uniformity than open-sky. Also SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of each pixel was calculated from the open-sky images using the temporal mean and standard deviations. It is found that SNR is greater than 80 for all pixels even at low light levels.

  5. Stochastic acceleration and magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Alina; Telezhinsky, Igor; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Pohl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Tycho's Supernova remnant (SNR) is also known as historical Supernova SN 1572 of Type Ia. Having exploded in a relatively clean environment and with a known age, it represents an ideal astrophysical testbed for the study of cosmic-ray acceleration and related phenomena. A number of studies suggest that shock acceleration with very efficient magnetic-field amplification is needed to explain the rather soft radio spectrum and the narrow rims observed in X-rays. We show that the wideband spectrum of Tycho's SNR can be alternatively well explained when accounting for stochastic acceleration as a secondary process. The re-acceleration of particles in the turbulent region immediately downstream of the shock provided by the fast-mode waves is efficient enough to impact particle spectra over several decades in energy. Our self-consistent model contains hydrodynamic simulations of the SNR plasma flow. The particle spectra are obtained from the time-dependent transport equation and the background magnetic field is computed either from the induction equation or it follows analytic profiles depending on the considered model. Although not as efficient as standard diffusive shock acceleration, stochastic acceleration leaves its imprint on the particle spectra. This is especially notable in the emission at radio wavelengths and soft γ-rays. Excessively strong magnetic fields and the so-called Alfvénic drift are not required in this scenario. The narrow X-ray and radio rims arise from damping of the turbulent magnetic field. We find a lower limit for the downstream magnetic field strength, Bd = 173 µG and investigate the energy-dependence of the X-ray filament width. We conclude that stochastic re-acceleration is an important mechanism for modifying particle and emission spectra in SNR and that the magnetic-field damping should be taken into account to properly explain the synchrotron intensity profiles of Tycho.

  6. SNR-adaptive stream weighting for audio-MES ASR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Seung

    2008-08-01

    Myoelectric signals (MESs) from the speaker's mouth region have been successfully shown to improve the noise robustness of automatic speech recognizers (ASRs), thus promising to extend their usability in implementing noise-robust ASR. In the recognition system presented herein, extracted audio and facial MES features were integrated by a decision fusion method, where the likelihood score of the audio-MES observation vector was given by a linear combination of class-conditional observation log-likelihoods of two classifiers, using appropriate weights. We developed a weighting process adaptive to SNRs. The main objective of the paper involves determining the optimal SNR classification boundaries and constructing a set of optimum stream weights for each SNR class. These two parameters were determined by a method based on a maximum mutual information criterion. Acoustic and facial MES data were collected from five subjects, using a 60-word vocabulary. Four types of acoustic noise including babble, car, aircraft, and white noise were acoustically added to clean speech signals with SNR ranging from -14 to 31 dB. The classification accuracy of the audio ASR was as low as 25.5%. Whereas, the classification accuracy of the MES ASR was 85.2%. The classification accuracy could be further improved by employing the proposed audio-MES weighting method, which was as high as 89.4% in the case of babble noise. A similar result was also found for the other types of noise.

  7. A Kinship between Sgr A East and the EGRET SNR's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatuzzo, M.; Melia, F.

    2003-05-01

    Sgr A East appears to be a single, mixed-morphology 10,000-year-old supernova remnant (SNR) at the Galactic center. It also appears to belong to a class of remnants that have been observed and detected at 1720 MHz, the transition frequency of OH maser emission. However, if the EGRET source 3EG J1746-2852 coincident with the Galactic center is itself associated with this object, it would endow it with a γ -ray luminosity almost two orders of magnitude greater than that of the other EGRET-detected SNR's. We here reconsider the viability of a pion-production mechanism as the source of the broadband emission observed from Sgr A East, and show that what connects these objects---and ultimately also accounts for their different γ -ray emissivity---is the very important interaction between the expanding SNR shell and the surrounding molecular cloud environment. The singularly high γ -ray luminosity of Sgr A East, as well as its unusually steep radio spectral index, can thereby be attributed to the high-density (nH=103 cm-3), strong magnetized (B ˜ 0.18 mG) environment in which it is located.

  8. An Implementation of the SNR High Speed Network Communication Protocol (Receiver Part).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    This thesis work is to implement the receiver pan of the SNR high speed network transport protocol. The approach was to use the Systems of...the SCM specification itself. The result was a correctly functioning program which implemented the SNR protocol. The system was tested using different...part of the SNR high speed transport protocol; (2) testing and integration with the transmitter part of the SNR transport protocol on an FDDI data

  9. Material-specific transfer function model and SNR in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Kyprianou, Iacovos S.

    2013-10-01

    This study presents an analytical model for the edge spread function (ESF) of a clinical CT system that allows reliable fits of noisy ESF data. The model was used for the calculation of the material-specific transfer function TF and an estimation of the signal transfer and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in 2D. Images of the Catphan phantom were acquired with a clinical Siemens Somatom Sensation Cardiac 64 CT scanner combining four different x-ray tube outputs (40, 150, 250 and 350 mAs) with four different reconstruction filters, which covered the range from very smooth (B10s) to very sharp (B70s). The images of the high- and mid-contrast cylinders of the phantom’s ‘Geometry and Sensitometry’ module (air, Teflon, Delrin and PMP) were used to sample material-specific ESF curves. The ESF curves were fitted with the analytical model we developed based on a linear combination of Boltzmann and Gaussian functions. The analytical model of the ESF was used to obtain the Fourier-based material-specific transfer function TF, as well as the spatial-domain point spread function (PSF). TF was subsequently used to estimate the signal transfer, which was compared to the actual reconstructed image of a 3.0 mm diameter Teflon pin. The noise power spectrum (NPS) was calculated from images of a uniform water phantom under the same technique parameters. The task-specific SNR was calculated for all technique parameters from the model-based TF, the measured NPS and simulated 3 mm diameter disc signals modeling the aforementioned materials. Bootstrapping was performed to estimate the standard deviation of the TF and the SNR. The analytical model we developed accurately captured the features of the CT ESF data. The coefficient of determination R2, a metric that describes the goodness of the fit, had a median value of 0.9995, and decreased for low tube output, low contrast and the sharp reconstruction filter. Our analysis showed that ESF, PSF and TF depended not only on the

  10. The multipath and SNR Quality in civil code L2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polezel, W. G.; Souza, E. M.; Monico, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    The new generation of GPS satellites, with the addition of the new L2C civil code, may provide to the users better positioning capabilities. The new code in the L2 may increase the signal robustness, improve resistance to interference, reduce tracking noise and consequently, improve accuracy and provide better positioning inside buildings and in wooded areas. The second civil frequency code will eliminate the need of using fragile semi- codeless tracking techniques currently used in connection with L2. The L2C has a different structure that allows civil and military share the same code. L2C owns two codes of different length: moderate code (CM) and long code (CL). The CM was chosen to have 10.230 chips repeated to every 20 millisecond. The CL was chosen to have 767250 chips with period of 1.5 second. The main reasons for these choices were due to excellent correlation properties. Furthermore, L2C enhances performance by having no data modulation on CL code, which improves, among others, the threshold tracking performance. Comparing the L2C acquisition with the C/A, the CM code is ten times longer than the C/A and the two components have half the total power. This is an important feature for many low-power applications. Although this signal has several advantages, some investigations about its performance are necessary, mainly about the provided accuracy under some effects, for example, multipath. Thus, this paper aims to analyze the L2C signal, as well as its quality using some parameters, such as Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and multipath level (MP). The experiment was realized at Sao Paulo State University UNESP in Presidente Prudente, Brazil. The data were collected by two receivers of different brands, both able to collect the L2C signal, and connected to the same antenna, thought the use of a splitter. The results showed that the MP and SNR values were better for the modernized satellites. Furthermore, the SNR values of the two receivers were similar while the

  11. Impact of SNR and Gain-Function Over- and Under-estimation on Speech Intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Loizou, Philipos C

    2012-02-01

    Most noise reduction algorithms rely on obtaining reliable estimates of the SNR of each frequency bin. For that reason, much work has been done in analyzing the behavior and performance of SNR estimation algorithms in the context of improving speech quality and reducing speech distortions (e.g., musical noise). Comparatively little work has been reported, however, regarding the analysis and investigation of the effect of errors in SNR estimation on speech intelligibility. It is not known, for instance, whether it is the errors in SNR overestimation, errors in SNR underestimation, or both that are harmful to speech intelligibility. Errors in SNR estimation produce concomitant errors in the computation of the gain (suppression) function, and the impact of gain estimation errors on speech intelligibility is unclear. The present study assesses the effect of SNR estimation errors on gain function estimation via sensitivity analysis. Intelligibility listening studies were conducted to validate the sensitivity analysis. Results indicated that speech intelligibility is severely compromised when SNR and gain over-estimation errors are introduced in spectral components with negative SNR. A theoretical upper bound on the gain function is derived that can be used to constrain the values of the gain function so as to ensure that SNR overestimation errors are minimized. Speech enhancement algorithms that can limit the values of the gain function to fall within this upper bound can improve speech intelligibility.

  12. Recent developments on the SNR-CR connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Elena

    2016-06-01

    The last few years have been rich of progress both for the science of Supernova Remnants and for Cosmic Rays. We have learnt from X-ray observations of SNRs that they host multi-TeV electrons and amplified magnetic fields, likely hints of efficient CR acceleration. We have seen gamma-ray emission from SNRs and gathered direct evidence of the presence of relativistic hadrons at least in a couple of these sources. Finally we have learnt how to properly use optical emission lines as a diagnostic of efficient CR acceleration in SNRs. On the CR side, direct experiments have shown the first clear evidence of structure in the spectra of protons and He nuclei below the knee, and in the meantime very recent measurements cast doubt about the position of the protons' knee. After briefly reviewing these recent developments, I will discuss whether and how they fit within the current theoretical framework of the SNR-CR connection.

  13. SNR and Contrast Enhancement Techniques for the Photoacoustic Radar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents two methods for photoacoustic signal enhancement in biological tissues. One such method is based on the fact that temperature can affect the signals of the photoacoustic radar. Therefore, thermally assisted methods have been used for photoacoustic imaging contrast improvement. Another method is based on harmonic wavelength modulation which results in a differential PA radar signal to strengthen early cancer detection. Two chirped waveforms modulated out-of-phase between 680 nm and 800 nm can effectively suppress the background noise, greatly enhance the SNR and detect small variations in hemoglobin oxygenation levels, thereby distinguishing pre-malignant tumors. Experimental results demonstrate the accuracy of the frequency-modulated differential measurement with sheep blood at different hemoglobin oxygenation (S_tO2) levels.

  14. Three-Dimensional Rapidly Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimeter with Low SNR Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-30

    Three-Dimensional Rapidly Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimeter with Low SNR Signal Processing 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kevin A. Shinpaugh and Rog er L...curvature for concave mirror or lens surface s .................... object distance from lens s.. ................. image distance from lens SNR ...where the signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) of the PMT signal is 20 dB and signal processing is performed via the fast Fourier trasnform (FFT) with zero

  15. Tensor Invariant Processing for Munitions/Clutter Classifications Interim Report on SNR and Background Leveling Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    INTERIM REPORT Tensor Invariant Processing for Munitions/Clutter Classifications Interim Report on SNR and Background Leveling Requirements...00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tensor Invariant Processing for Munitions/Clutter Classifications Interim Report on SNR and...Camp Beale in 2011 and found no impact due to signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) and background leveling effects. However, the minimum polarizability

  16. Enhancement of Signal to Noise Ratio Using Bispectrum. A Quantitative Analysis for Very Low SNR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Enhancement of Signal to Noise Ratio Using Bispectrum A Quantitative Analysis for Very Low SNR Payam Yeganeh, Mohammad H. Moradi, Ali Reshad...Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, AMIR KABIR University of Technology Abstract- Bispectrum has been widely used to enhance the SNR . This is based...consider the use of Bispectrum techniques when repeated measurements are made of a deterministic signal embedded in random noise where SNR is in the

  17. Improved SNR of phased-array PERES coils via simulation study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alfredo O; Medina, Lucía

    2005-09-21

    A computational comparison of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was performed between a conventional phased array of two circular-shaped coils and a petal resonator surface array. The quasi-static model and phased-array optimum SNR were combined to derive an SNR formula for each array. Analysis of mutual inductance between coil petals was carried out to compute the optimal coil separation and optimum number of petal coils. Mutual interaction between coil arrays was not included in the model because this does not drastically affect coil performance. Phased arrays of PERES coils show a 114% improvement in SNR over that of the simplest circular configuration.

  18. A SECOND MOMENT EXPONENTIAL ERROR BOUND FOR PEAK LIMITED BINARY SYMMETRIC COHERENT CHANNELS AT LOW SNR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An exponential-type bound on error rate, Pe, for peak limited binary coherent channels operated at low SNR is presented. The bound depends...exponentially only on the first and second moments of the channel output and serves to justify, in part, the use of SNR calculations for error rate performance

  19. VLA observations of three extragalactic SNR at 20 and 6 cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickel, J. R.; Silverman, A.; Dodorico, S.

    1985-01-01

    A radio search has been conducted for optical SNR candidates in the external galaxies NGC 185, IC 1613, and NGC 6822. A faint, nonthermal radio source has been found at the expected position in IC 1613. Upper limits are placed on the objects in NGC 185 and NGC 6822. All three appear fainter than typical SNR of the same size in the Milky Way.

  20. Smoothed Particle Inference Analysis of SNR RCW 103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Kari A.; Burrows, David N.; Dwarkadas, Vikram

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of applying a novel analysis method, Smoothed Particle Inference (SPI), to an XMM-Newton observation of SNR RCW 103. SPI is a Bayesian modeling process that fits a population of gas blobs ("smoothed particles") such that their superposed emission reproduces the observed spatial and spectral distribution of photons. Emission-weighted distributions of plasma properties, such as abundances and temperatures, are then extracted from the properties of the individual blobs. This technique has important advantages over analysis techniques which implicitly assume that remnants are two-dimensional objects in which each line of sight encompasses a single plasma. By contrast, SPI allows superposition of as many blobs of plasma as are needed to match the spectrum observed in each direction, without the need to bin the data spatially. This RCW 103 analysis is part of a pilot study for the larger SPIES (Smoothed Particle Inference Exploration of SNRs) project, in which SPI will be applied to a sample of 12 bright SNRs.

  1. Chandra Observation of Galactic SNR G299.2-2.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangwook; Slane, P. O.; Hughes, J. P.; Mori, K.; Burrows, D. N.; Garmire, G. P.

    2006-09-01

    We report on the results from our Chandra observation of a Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G299.2-2.9. The high resolution Chandra images clearly reveal the shell-type morphology of the SNR. The circumferential regions of the SNR consist of complex emission features of bright shells, small knots, and faint diffuse emission extending beyond the shell. These features indicate that the SNR blast wave is propagating into highly inhomogeneous ambient medium. On the other hand, the central region of the SNR is a faint diffuse nebula that reveals strong enhancements in Si, S, and Fe ejecta. The presence of the overabundant Si-group elements, with no such enhancements in the O-group elemental abundances, may suggest a Type Ia origin for G299.2-2.9.

  2. Zum Stellenwert der Unterdruck-Instillationstherapie in der Dermatologie.

    PubMed

    Müller, Cornelia Sigrid Lissi; Burgard, Barbara; Zimmerman, Monika; Vogt, Thomas; Pföhler, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Die Methoden zur Behandlung akuter und chronischer Wunden unterliegen einer steten Weiterentwicklung, Reevaluierung und Anwendung innovativer Therapieformen. Die Vakuumtherapie zur Wundbehandlung gehört zu den etablierten Behandlungsmodalitäten. Ein innovatives Verfahren kombiniert die Vakuumtherapie mit der automatisierten, kontrollierten Zufuhr und Drainage wirkstoffhaltiger Lösungen zur topischen Wundbehandlung im Wundbett und auch wirkstofffrei durch Instillation physiologischer Kochsalzlösung (Unterdruck-Instillationstherapie). Hierdurch können die Effekte der konventionellen Vakuumtherapie mit denen der lokalen Antisepsis kombiniert werden. Hierdurch kommt es zu einer Reduktion der Wundfläche, einer Induktion von Granulationsgewebe sowie einer Reduktion der Keimbesiedelung der Wunden. Bisher publizierte Studien konzentrieren sich auf die Anwendung dieses Therapieverfahrens zur Behandlung orthopädisch-chirurgischer Krankheiten. Die Datenlage bezüglich der Vakuum-Instillationstherapie in der Dermatochirurgie beschränkt sich derzeit auf Fallberichte und Einzelfallerfahrungen. Randomisierte, prospektive Studien zum Vergleich der Vakuum-Instillationstherapie zur Behandlung dermatologischer Krankheitsbilder existieren bislang nicht. Ziele des vorliegenden Artikels sind die Vorstellung der Vakuumtherapie mit Instillation einschließlich ihres Wirkprinzips, deren mögliche Komplikationen, die Diskussion erdenklicher Kontraindikationen sowie eine Übersicht über die aktuell verfügbare Datenlage. Zusammenfassend scheint sich die Evidenz zu verdichten, dass mittels Unterdruck-Instillationstherapie sowohl einfache als auch komplizierte Wunden effizient behandelt werden können, was sich in einer deutlichen Beschleunigung der Wundgranulation mit konsekutiv früher möglichem Defektverschluss äußert.

  3. An octahedral shear strain-based measure of SNR for 3D MR elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarry, M. D. J.; Van Houten, E. E. W.; Perriñez, P. R.; Pattison, A. J.; Weaver, J. B.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2011-07-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measure based on the octahedral shear strain (the maximum shear strain in any plane for a 3D state of strain) is presented for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), where motion-based SNR measures are commonly used. The shear strain, γ, is directly related to the shear modulus, μ, through the definition of shear stress, τ = μγ. Therefore, noise in the strain is the important factor in determining the quality of motion data, rather than the noise in the motion. Motion and strain SNR measures were found to be correlated for MRE of gelatin phantoms and the human breast. Analysis of the stiffness distributions of phantoms reconstructed from the measured motion data revealed a threshold for both strain and motion SNR where MRE stiffness estimates match independent mechanical testing. MRE of the feline brain showed significantly less correlation between the two SNR measures. The strain SNR measure had a threshold above which the reconstructed stiffness values were consistent between cases, whereas the motion SNR measure did not provide a useful threshold, primarily due to rigid body motion effects.

  4. An Octahedral Shear Strain Based measure of SNR for 3D MR Elastography

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, MDJ; Van Houten, EEW; Perriñez, PR; Pattison, AJ; Weaver, JB; Paulsen, KD

    2011-01-01

    A signal to noise ratio (SNR) measure based on the octahedral shear strain (the maximum shear strain in any plane for a 3D state of strain) is presented for MR elastography, where motion-based SNR measures are commonly used. The shear strain, γ, is directly related to the shear modulus, μ, through the definition of shear stress, τ = μγ. Therefore, noise in the strain is the important factor in determining the quality of motion data, rather than the noise in the motion. Motion and strain SNR measures were found to be correlated for MRE of gelatin phantoms and human breast. Analysis of the stiffness distributions of phantoms reconstructed from the measured motion data revealed a threshold for both strain and motion SNR where MRE stiffness estimates match independent mechanical testing. MRE of the feline brain showed significantly less correlation between the two SNR measures. The strain SNR measure had a threshold above which the reconstructed stiffness values were consistent between cases, whereas the motion SNR measure did not provide a useful threshold, primarily due to rigid body motion effects. PMID:21654044

  5. An octahedral shear strain-based measure of SNR for 3D MR elastography.

    PubMed

    McGarry, M D J; Van Houten, E E W; Perriñez, P R; Pattison, A J; Weaver, J B; Paulsen, K D

    2011-07-07

    A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measure based on the octahedral shear strain (the maximum shear strain in any plane for a 3D state of strain) is presented for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), where motion-based SNR measures are commonly used. The shear strain, γ, is directly related to the shear modulus, μ, through the definition of shear stress, τ = μγ. Therefore, noise in the strain is the important factor in determining the quality of motion data, rather than the noise in the motion. Motion and strain SNR measures were found to be correlated for MRE of gelatin phantoms and the human breast. Analysis of the stiffness distributions of phantoms reconstructed from the measured motion data revealed a threshold for both strain and motion SNR where MRE stiffness estimates match independent mechanical testing. MRE of the feline brain showed significantly less correlation between the two SNR measures. The strain SNR measure had a threshold above which the reconstructed stiffness values were consistent between cases, whereas the motion SNR measure did not provide a useful threshold, primarily due to rigid body motion effects.

  6. HRI Observations of Balmer Dominated Filaments in the SNR RCW86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Knox S.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project was to use the ROSAT HRI to study the recently discovered optical Balmer-dominated filaments in the young SNR R-CW86. The observations provide complete high-resolution X-ray coverage of the shell of the SNR. These X-ray observations are combined with new optical observations (both imaging and spectroscopic), and new high resolution radio observations to provide a better overall understanding of the state of the remnant (Sedov or reverse shock), its history (as the possible SNR of SN 185 AD), and the physics of non-radiative shocks.

  7. Blind SNR estimation for QAM constellations based on the signal magnitude statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dris, Stefanos; Spatharakis, Christos; Bakopoulos, Paraskevas; Lazarou, Ioannis; Avramopoulos, Hercules

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel non-data-aided algorithm that uses only the magnitude of the received signal for accurate estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in M-QAM optical coherent digital receivers. The Koay inversion method that only works with constant-modulus signals, is extended through analytically exact expressions so as to allow application to any multi-level, complex modulation scheme. Performance is evaluated via simulation for formats up to 64-QAM and is shown to be superior than the decision-directed error vector magnitude (EVM) method at low SNR, while outperforming schemes based on the method of moments at high SNR.

  8. Shock chemistry in the molecular clouds associated with SNR IC 443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Snell, Ronald L.; Dickman, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    Observations of several interstellar molecules toward the highly perturbed B and G clouds associated with SNR IC 443 are reported. The results suggest that hot and dense material is present in the SNR, and that shocks are present in both regions. The HCO(+) abundance is shown to be a few times greater that found in cold quiescent gas, in contradiction with previous results. The SO, CS, CN, and NH3 abundances are similar to those found in cold dark clouds.

  9. SNR Limits to Achieving the Cramer-Rao Lower Bounds with PCID

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    TP-2010-1008 SNR LIMITS TO ACHIEVING THE CRAMER-RAO LOWER BOUNDS WITH PCID Chuck...To) Jan 7, 2007- Jan 1, 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In House DF701944 SNR Limits to Achieving the Cramer-Rao Lower Bounds...Purpose for the Research • To further understand the achievability of CRBs by MFBD algorithms (PCID is being used for these results) - At what SNRs

  10. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of the SNR IC443

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1998-01-01

    IC 443 is a supernova remnant of intermediate age, i.e. a few thousand years. It is especially interesting because part of its periphery is expanding into a molecular cloud while other sections are expanding into a typical interstellar medium of much lower density. Since the evolution of a supernova remnant through its various phases is affected by the density of the medium it expands into with the reasonable assumption that the supernova explosion was approximately symmetric we have an opportunity to observe a single object in two phases simultaneously. It was observed by ASCA in April, 1993 for a short period during the PV phase and more thoroughly in a 42 ksec exposure in March, 1994. The latter measurement provides most of the results that have been reported. Most of the analysis took place after the grant ended but is included here for completeness. The data was sent simultaneously to US and Japanese Pls. We worked independently. The software set of FTOOLs was used to construct images and spectra. They were judged to be rather unintuitive and not at all user friendly. I found I was using one FTOOL to read the header to obtain information that would only be provided to another FTOOL. The Japanese investigators were more successful. They analyzed the data and published results more rapidly. The scientific results summarized below are based primarily on their publications. Since IC 443 is an interesting example of a middle aged SNR in which a variety of processes are occurring it is one of a class. IC 443 exhibits shell-like emission in hard X-rays and extended soft X-rays with thin thermal spectra. It resembles SN 1006 in these respects. IC 443 contains hard X-rays in a semi-circular shell surrounding the thermal component. The total hard X-ray flux in the ASCA FOV is only a half of the Ginga hard component; which suggests that the hard X-rays are not confined only in the shell but some are extended larger than the ASCA FOV of eq 1 degree diameter. Japanese

  11. Spatially Resolved Spectroscopy of the SNR IC443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1998-07-01

    IC 443 is a supernova remnant of intermediate age, i.e. a few thousand years. It is especially interesting because part of its periphery is expanding into a molecular cloud while other sections are expanding into a typical interstellar medium of much lower density. Since the evolution of a supernova remnant through its various phases is affected by the density of the medium it expands into with the reasonable assumption that the supernova explosion was approximately symmetric we have an opportunity to observe a single object in two phases simultaneously. It was observed by ASCA in April, 1993 for a short period during the PV phase and more thoroughly in a 42 ksec exposure in March, 1994. The latter measurement provides most of the results that have been reported. Most of the analysis took place after the grant ended but is included here for completeness. The data was sent simultaneously to US and Japanese Pls. We worked independently. The software set of FTOOLs was used to construct images and spectra. They were judged to be rather unintuitive and not at all user friendly. I found I was using one FTOOL to read the header to obtain information that would only be provided to another FTOOL. The Japanese investigators were more successful. They analyzed the data and published results more rapidly. The scientific results summarized below are based primarily on their publications. Since IC 443 is an interesting example of a middle aged SNR in which a variety of processes are occurring it is one of a class. IC 443 exhibits shell-like emission in hard X-rays and extended soft X-rays with thin thermal spectra. It resembles SN 1006 in these respects. IC 443 contains hard X-rays in a semi-circular shell surrounding the thermal component. The total hard X-ray flux in the ASCA FOV is only a half of the Ginga hard component; which suggests that the hard X-rays are not confined only in the shell but some are extended larger than the ASCA FOV of eq 1 degree diameter. Japanese

  12. Radio perspectives on the Monoceros SNR G205.5+0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Zhu, M.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The Monoceros supernova remnant (SNR G205.5+0.5) is a large shell-type SNR located in the Rosette molecular complex and thought to be interacting with the Rosette Nebula. Aims: We aim to re-examine the radio spectral index and its spatial variation over the Monoceros SNR as well as study its properties of evolution within the complex interstellar medium. Methods: We extracted radio continuum data for the Monoceros complex region from the Effelsberg 21 cm and 11 cm surveys and the Urumqi 6 cm polarization survey. We used the new Arecibo GALFA-HI survey data with much higher resolution and sensitivity than that previously available to identify the HI shell related with the SNR. Multi-wavelengths data are included to investigate the properties of the SNR. Results: The spectral index α (Sν ∝ να) averaged over the SNR is -0.41 ± 0.16. The TT-plots and the distribution of α over the SNR show spatial variations that steepen toward the inner western filamentary shell. Polarized emission is prominent on the western filamentary shell region. The RM there is estimated to be about 30 ± 77n rad m-2, where the n = 1 solution is preferred, and the magnetic field has a strength of about 9.5 μG. From the HI channel maps, further evidence is provided for an interaction between the Monoceros SNR and the Rosette Nebula. We identify partial neutral hydrogen shell structures in the northwestern region at velocities of +15 km s-1 circumscribing the continuum emission. The HI shell has swept up a mass of about 4000 M⊙ for a distance of 1.6 kpc. The western HI shell, well associated with the dust emission, is found to lie outside of the radio shell. We suggest that the Monoceros SNR is evolving within a cavity blown out by the progenitor and has triggered part of the star formation in the Rosette Nebula. Conclusions: The Monoceros SNR is interacting with the ambient interstellar medium with ultra-high energy emission detected. Its interaction with the Rosette Nebula is

  13. Influence of range-gated intensifiers on underwater imaging system SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xia; Hu, Ling; Zhi, Qiang; Chen, Zhen-yue; Jin, Wei-qi

    2013-08-01

    Range-gated technology has been a hot research field in recent years due to its high effective back scattering eliminating. As a result, it can enhance the contrast between a target and its background and extent the working distance of the imaging system. The underwater imaging system is required to have the ability to image in low light level conditions, as well as the ability to eliminate the back scattering effect, which means that the receiver has to be high-speed external trigger function, high resolution, high sensitivity, low noise, higher gain dynamic range. When it comes to an intensifier, the noise characteristics directly restrict the observation effect and range of the imaging system. The background noise may decrease the image contrast and sharpness, even covering the signal making it impossible to recognize the target. So it is quite important to investigate the noise characteristics of intensifiers. SNR is an important parameter reflecting the noise features of a system. Through the use of underwater laser range-gated imaging prediction model, and according to the linear SNR system theory, the gated imaging noise performance of the present market adopted super second generation and generation Ⅲ intensifiers were theoretically analyzed. Based on the active laser underwater range-gated imaging model, the effect to the system by gated intensifiers and the relationship between the system SNR and MTF were studied. Through theoretical and simulation analysis to the image intensifier background noise and SNR, the different influence on system SNR by super second generation and generation Ⅲ ICCD was obtained. Range-gated system SNR formula was put forward, and compared the different effect influence on the system by using two kind of ICCDs was compared. According to the matlab simulation, a detailed analysis was carried out theoretically. All the work in this paper lays a theoretical foundation to further eliminating back scattering effect, improving

  14. Hot Gas in SMC SNR 0057-7226 and the Giant H 2 Region N66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danforth, C. W.; Hoopes, C. G.; Sankrit, R.; Chu, Y.-H.; Sembach, K. R.; Blair, W. P.

    2001-12-01

    The supernova remnant SNR 0057-7226 and the dense, young cluster NGC 346 lie within the giant H 2 region N66, the most active star formation site in the SMC. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary system HD 5980, which lies behind the SNR, show high velocity, O 6 and C 3 absorption associated with the far side of the remnant (Hoopes et al 2001, ApJ, 558, L35). Chandra ACIS-I and ROSAT HRI images of N66 show the diffuse X-ray emission associated with the SNR, but little or no diffuse emission around the core of the central cluster. We present high-dispersion, long-slit optical echelle observations of five positions within N66 including positions across the SNR 0057-7226 and NGC 346. These data show bright Hα emission at the SMC rest velocity (v ~155 km s-1). Where the spectrograph slits intersect the SNR, faint Hα emission at high (v ~300 km s-1) and low (v ~50 km s-1) velocities reveals clumps of material on the back and front sides of the SNR shell. Ten FUSE observations of sight lines toward stars in N66--including four toward NGC 346 cluster stars--provide sensitive absorption-line measurements of several ionic species including O 6 which traces hot (T ~3*E5 K), highly-ionized gas and Fe 2 which traces cooler (T ~104 K), ionized and neutral gas. We also present ground based optical narrowband images in Hα , [S 2], and [O 3] which show the morphology of the H 2 region. We use this data set to study the kinematics of the gas in this complex region and to model the properties of the SNR-ISM interaction. This work is supported by NASA Contract NAS5-32985 to the Johns Hopkins University.

  15. An imaging and spectroscopic study of the peculiar SNR 3C397 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi-Harb, Samar; Franzmann, Erica

    The SNR 3C 397 has a peculiar box-like morphology with a central X-ray `hot spot' and a sharp boundary in the west. Earlier X-ray spectroscopy with ASCA and Chandra showed that the central spot is thermal in nature, that the column density increases from east to west, and that the X-ray spectrum is dominated by thermal emission from (at least) two compo-nents: a low-temperature plasma characterized by a high ionization timescale, mixed with a high-temperature, ejecta-dominated plasma (mainly Fe-K), characterized by a low ionization timescale. This, together with millimeter observations of the environs of 3C 397, led to the suggestion that 3C 397 is a ˜5 kyr old SNR expanding in an inhomogeneous medium, en-countering a molecular cloud towards the west, and evolving into a mixed-morphology SNR. Most recently, new CO observations showed that the SNR is well confined in a cavity of molec-ular gas and embedded at the edge of a molecular cloud at VLSR ˜32 km/s. The 12 CO line broadening of the 32 km/s component provided direct evidence of interaction between the SNR and a molecular cloud at the western boundary of the remnant. To date, there is no evidence of a compact object or a pulsar wind nebula associated with this remnant. We here present an XMM-Newton imaging and spectroscopic analysis of 3C 397 targeted to 1) map the ejecta distribution (in particular of Mg, Si, S and Fe) across the SNR, 2) constrain the spectral and physical properties of the supernova and its progenitor star, and 3) address the absence of a neutron star or wind nebula associated with the SNR.

  16. [The analysis for improving the SNR of blood components noninvasive measurement with DS method].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-quan; Zhao, Zhe; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Bao-ju; Wu, Xiao-rong

    2012-08-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of blood components measurement and enhance the stability of prediction model, the quantitative signal-noise-ratio (SNR) analysis of measuring instruments based on dynamic spectrum (DS) and preprocessing method was conducted. The SNR of DS is increased after adding boxcar integrator, decreasing wavelength revolution, balancing the DS's SNR and excluding gross errors in preprocessing according to experiment results. Two volunteers were tested continuously for many times using the DS data acquiring system. The correlation coefficients of the each volunteer's DS data was increased from 0.934 and 0.953 to 0.991 and 0.987, respectively. Moreover, the gap between the correlation coefficient of the same volunteer's DS and different volunteers' DS is increased too, which shows that the SNR can be improved by these methods. The quantitative SNR analysis can guide the way of choosing preprocessing method efficiently, which will create the condition for clinical application of the blood components noninvasive measurement.

  17. Enhanced leavening ability of baker's yeast by overexpression of SNR84 with PGM2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-06-01

    Dough-leavening ability is one of the main aspects considered when selecting a baker's yeast strain for baking industry. Generally, modification of maltose metabolic pathway and known regulatory networks of maltose metabolism were used to increase maltose metabolism to improve leavening ability in lean dough. In this study, we focus on the effects of PGM2 (encoding for the phosphoglucomutase) and SNR84 (encoding for the H/ACA snoRNA) that are not directly related to both the maltose metabolic pathway and known regulatory networks of maltose metabolism on the leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough. The results show that the modifications on PGM2 and/or SNR84 are effective ways in improving leavening ability of baker's yeast in lean dough. Deletion of PGM2 decreased cellular glucose-1-phosphate and overexpression of SNR84 increased the maltose permease activity. These changes resulted in 11, 19 and 21% increases of the leavening ability for PGM2 deletion, SNR84 overexpression and SNR84 overexpression combining deleted PGM2, respectively.

  18. The SWI/SNF Complex Protein Snr1 Is a Tumor Suppressor in Drosophila Imaginal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Xie, Gengqiang; Chen, Hanqing; Jia, Dongyu; Shu, Zhiqiang; Palmer, William Hunt; Huang, Yi-Chun; Zeng, Xiankun; Hou, Steven X; Jiao, Renjie; Deng, Wu-Min

    2017-02-15

    Components of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex are among the most frequently mutated genes in various human cancers, yet only SMARCB1/hSNF5, a core member of the SWI/SNF complex, is mutated in malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRT). How SMARCB1/hSNF5 functions differently from other members of the SWI/SNF complex remains unclear. Here, we use Drosophila imaginal epithelial tissues to demonstrate that Snr1, the conserved homolog of human SMARCB1/hSNF5, prevents tumorigenesis by maintaining normal endosomal trafficking-mediated signaling cascades. Removal of Snr1 resulted in neoplastic tumorigenic overgrowth in imaginal epithelial tissues, whereas depletion of any other members of the SWI/SNF complex did not induce similar phenotypes. Unlike other components of the SWI/SNF complex that were detected only in the nucleus, Snr1 was observed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Aberrant regulation of multiple signaling pathways, including Notch, JNK, and JAK/STAT, was responsible for tumor progression upon snr1-depletion. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic Snr1 may play a tumor suppressive role in Drosophila imaginal tissues, offering a foundation for understanding the pivotal role of SMARCB1/hSNF5 in suppressing MRT during early childhood. Cancer Res; 77(4); 862-73. ©2017 AACR.

  19. Optimizing SNR for indoor visible light communication via selecting communicating LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lang; Wang, Chunyue; Chi, Xuefen; Zhao, Linlin; Dong, Xiaoli

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the layout of LED to optimize SNR by selecting communicating LEDs (C-LEDs) in indoor visible light communication (VLC) system. Due to the inter-symbol interference (ISI) caused by the different arrival time of different optical rays, the SNR for any user is not optimal if a simple layout is adopted. It is interesting to investigate the LEDs layout for achieving optimal SNR in indoor VLC system. For a single user, LED signal is divided into the positive and negative components, they provide the power of desired signal and the power of ISI respectively. We introduce the concept of valid ratio (VR) which refers to the value of positive component over the negative component. Then we propose a VR threshold-based LED selection scheme which chooses C-LEDs by their VRs. For downlink broadcast VLC with multiple users, the SNRs of all users are different in a layout of C-LEDs. It is difficult to find a proper layout of C-LEDs to guarantee the BER of all users. To solve this problem, we propose an evolutionary algorithm (EA)-based scheme to optimize the SNR. The simulation results show that it is an effective method to improve SNR by selecting C-LEDs.

  20. Research on testing field flaws of image intensifier based on spatio-temporal SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Liu, Bingqi; Wu, Dongsheng

    2010-10-01

    Image intensifier is the kernel of low-light-level device. The field flaw is one of the important index parameters of the image intensifier. Traditionally the statistic number of the image intensifier's field flaws is calculated through the people's eyes by the aid of an optical microscope, which main limitation is subjective and inefficient. With the broad application of the high-powered CCD and digital imaging processing method in testing performance of image intensifier, the method of appraising SNR based on spatio-temporal noise theory can accurately reflect the spatio-temporal heterogeneous of fluorescence's output image and fulfill the requirements of digital and automatic test. The limitation of the flaws' shape and position can be disregard and the accurate flaws' inspection can be realized rapidly by this method. In this paper, the main factors of forming the field flaws are analyzed and the mathematic model of spatio-temporal SNR is deduced. The hardware devices of the test system for image intensifier's spatio-temporal SNR are discussed. The spatio-temporal SNR of Gen image intensifier is tested by this test system and the test software based on Visual C++ and Matlab. The digital and automatic test of a factitious field flaw is realized by the theory of spatio-temporal SNR. The test precision can achieve pixel level. The experimental results show that this new method is rational, reliable and visualized.

  1. [Analysis and experimental verification of sensitivity and SNR of laser warning receiver].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Long; Wang, Ming; Tian, Er-Ming; Li, Xiao; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Yue

    2009-01-01

    In order to countermeasure increasingly serious threat from hostile laser in modern war, it is urgent to do research on laser warning technology and system, and the sensitivity and signal to noise ratio (SNR) are two important performance parameters in laser warning system. In the present paper, based on the signal statistical detection theory, a method for calculation of the sensitivity and SNR in coherent detection laser warning receiver (LWR) has been proposed. Firstly, the probabilities of the laser signal and receiver noise were analyzed. Secondly, based on the threshold detection theory and Neyman-Pearson criteria, the signal current equation was established by introducing detection probability factor and false alarm rate factor, then, the mathematical expressions of sensitivity and SNR were deduced. Finally, by using method, the sensitivity and SNR of the sinusoidal grating laser warning receiver developed by our group were analyzed, and the theoretic calculation and experimental results indicate that the SNR analysis method is feasible, and can be used in performance analysis of LWR.

  2. Towards optimum demodulation of bandwidth-limited and low SNR square-wave subcarrier signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.; Hurd, W.

    1995-01-01

    The optimum phase detector is presented for tracking square-wave subcarriers that have been bandwidth limited to a finite number of harmonics. The phase detector is optimum in the sense that the loop signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is maximized and, hence, the rms phase tracking error is minimized. The optimum phase detector is easy to implement and achieves substantial improvement. Also presented are the optimum weights to combine the signals demodulated from each of the harmonics. The optimum weighting provides SNR improvement of 0.1 to 0.15 dB when the subcarrier loop SNR is low (15 dB) and the number of harmonics is high (8 to 16).

  3. Nonuniform expansion and brightening of the youngest Galactic SNR G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz

    2014-09-01

    We propose a 400-ks observation of the youngest Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1.9+0.3, to study its nonuniform expansion and monitor increase in brightness. Expansion along the major axis of G1.9+0.3 has been found to decrease with radius. The longer time baseline should help in understanding these surprising variations in expansion. No other Galactic SNR is brightening. The X-rays are mainly produced as synchrotron radiation from 10 -- 100 TeV electrons, so the magnitude and spatial dependence of the brightening rate have important implications for the physics of particle acceleration and magnetic-field amplification in fast shock waves. G1.9+0.3 is a unique SNR whose continued monitoring should greatly advance our understanding of Type Ia supernovae and nonthermal shock physics.

  4. SNR Wall Effect Alleviation by Generalized Detector Employed in Cognitive Radio Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shbat, Modar Safir; Tuzlukov, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly used spectrum sensing techniques in cognitive radio (CR) networks, such as the energy detector (ED), matched filter (MF), and others, suffer from the noise uncertainty and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) wall phenomenon. These detectors cannot achieve the required signal detection performance regardless of the sensing time. In this paper, we explore a signal processing scheme, namely, the generalized detector (GD) constructed based on the generalized approach to signal processing (GASP) in noise, in spectrum sensing of CR network based on antenna array with the purpose to alleviate the SNR wall problem and improve the signal detection robustness under the low SNR. The simulation results confirm our theoretical issues and effectiveness of GD implementation in CR networks based on antenna array. PMID:26151216

  5. Sea level measurements from inverse modelling of GNSS SNR data - initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandberg, Joakim; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    The idea that sea level measurements could be done passively using available GNSS signals was proposed already over two decades ago. Since then several methods of using GNSS signals for measuring sea level have been proposed, using various degrees of specialized equipment. We present a new method to retrieve sea level from GNSS SNR data that relies upon inverse modelling of the detrended SNR data from a single off-the-shelf geodetic GNSS receiver. This method can simultaneously use SNR data from both GPS and GLONASS, and both L1 and L2 frequencies, in order to improve the performance with respect to prior studies. Results from the GNSS-R installation at the Onsala Space Observatory are presented and the retrieved sea level results are compared with data collected by a co-located pressure mareograph. The new method is found to give an RMS error of 1.8 cm. The results are also compared against previous implementations of GNSS tide gauges and found to have lower RMS than both the earlier SNR algorithm and also the dual receiver, phase delay method. This shows that inverse modelling for sea level retrieval has a potential to increase the precision of GNSS-R tide gauges, without the need for specialized equipment. Furthermore, since the method is based on SNR analysis, it can continue to operate during high winds and large sea roughness, in which the dual-receiver phase delay algorithm fails since the receiver connected to the nadir looking antenna does not succeed to lock on the satellites signals. This leads to a more stable and reliable operation. The ability to simultaneously use SNR data from different GNSS systems is also seen as a factor to increase the performance, further reducing the RMS. Therefore, in the future it is of interest to add further GNSS systems, such as Galileo and BeiDou.

  6. A Multiple Model SNR/RCS Likelihood Ratio Score for Radar-Based Feature-Aided Tracking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    A Multiple Model SNR /RCS Likelihood Ratio Score for Radar-Based Feature-Aided Tracking Benjamin J. Slocumb and Michael E. Klusman, III Numerica...based on statistical models for the signal-to-noise ( SNR ) and radar cross section (RCS) for use in narrowband radar tracking. The formulation requires...features ( SNR and RCS measurements from a narrowband radar) for augmenting the track score used in the data association problem. There are two main

  7. High Velocity Gas in the Line of Sight to the Vela SNR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    One of the best objects for study of the structure, kinematics, and evolutionary status of a middle-aged supernova remnant (SNR) is the VELA SNR, due to its proximity, extensive optical filamentary structure, and an abundance of hot background stars for absorption line research. The VELA remnant is 7.3 degrees in diameter, based on x-ray imagery with ROSAT, with the pulsar nearly centered in the remnant. The western region of the remnant has much lower x-ray surface brightness than the remainder of the remnant and in fact escaped earlier detection with previous instrumentation. The remnant is believed to be about 11,000 years old.

  8. Thermally enhanced signal strength and SNR improvement of photoacoustic radar module

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A thermally enhanced method for improving photoacoustic imaging depth and signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio is presented in this paper. Experimental results showed that the maximum imaging depth increased by 20% through raising the temperature of absorbing biotissues (ex-vivo beef muscle) uniformly from 37 to 43°C, and the SNR was increased by 8%. The parameters making up the Gruneisen constant were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The studies showed that the Gruneisen constant of biotissues increases with temperature, and the results were found to be consistent with the photoacousitc radar theory. PMID:25136501

  9. Capacity analysis of threshold-based SNR scheduler in LTE systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulyman, Ahmed Iyanda; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Hassanein, Hossam; Alshebeili, Saleh A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the capacity analysis of a threshold-based SNR scheduler in the long-term evolution (LTE) cellular systems. LTE standard has adopted multiuser OFDMA, and stipulates adjacent subcarrier groupings for mapping the physical OFDM subcarriers into resource blocks that form the basic unit of radio resource management (RRM) in LTE network. The standard however did not specify the details of the RRM algorithm to be employed, leaving this aspect for vendors to differentiate their products. Popular RRM algorithms such as round-robin (RR), proportional fairness (PF), and maximum SNR (MaxSNR), have been implemented recently as operator-selectable options on LTE base station (BS). In this paper, we present a threshold-based SNR scheduler that has the capability of modeling all of the above-mentioned algorithms and thus allows vendors to combine the separate implementations of these algorithms into one generalized scheduling algorithm, where the threshold level used at any time instant defines the scheduling discipline to be realized. We derive the capacity enhancement achievable using the proposed scheduling scheme, and also present system-level simulations to corroborate the analysis. Our analytical and simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm models the existing ones closely at different values of the threshold. The results also demonstrate the data rate enhancements, and the level of user fairness, achievable in the network for various levels of the threshold.

  10. GROND observations of GRB 160622A/SNR RCW 103/SGR 1617-5103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schady, P.; Kann, D. A.; Greiner, J.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the field of GRB 160622A/SNR RCW 103/SGR 1617-5103 (Swift trigger 700791; D'Ai et al., GCN #19547. ATel #9180) simultaneously in g'r'i'z'JHK with GROND (Greiner et al. 2008, PASP 120, 405) mounted at the 2.2 m MPG telescope at ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile).

  11. Approaching Ultimate Intrinsic SNR in a Uniform Spherical Sample with Finite Arrays of Loop Coils

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Manushka V.; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Lattanzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated to what degree and at what rate the ultimate intrinsic (UI) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) may be approached using finite radiofrequency detector arrays. We used full-wave electromagnetic field simulations based on dyadic Green’s functions to compare the SNR of arrays of loops surrounding a uniform sphere with the ultimate intrinsic SNR (UISNR), for increasing numbers of elements over a range of magnetic field strengths, voxel positions, sphere sizes, and acceleration factors. We evaluated the effect of coil conductor losses and the performance of a variety of distinct geometrical arrangements such as “helmet” and “open-pole” configurations in multiple imaging planes. Our results indicate that UISNR at the center is rapidly approached with encircling arrays and performance is substantially lower near the surface, where a quadrature detection configuration tailored to voxel position is optimal. Coil noise is negligible at high field, where sample noise dominates. Central SNR for practical array configurations such as the helmet is similar to that of close-packed arrangements. The observed trends can provide physical insights to improve coil design. PMID:26097442

  12. SNR analysis and Hadamard mask modification of DMD Hadamard Transform Near-Infrared spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia-lin; Liu, Hua; Lin, Chun-bo; Sun, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The noise of Hadamard Transform (HT) Near Infrared (NIR) spectrometer includes not only the detector circuit noise but also the illumination noise. Hadamard Transform reduces the detector noise while increases the illumination noise. If the relative power intensity is large, the noise of Hadamard method will be greater than that of scanning method. This will lose the significance of Hadamard Transform. In this paper the SNRs of the Hadamard method and scanning method are analyzed. The condition of boosting SNR of spectrometer by Hadamard transform is given. When the condition is not matched, a Hadamard mask of variable height stripes is proposed which the SNR of Hadamard method can be improved. In this paper a HT NIR spectrometer based on 0.45-inch DMD is designed with the spectrum range from 1350 nm to 2500 nm. Several experiments are done with the designed spectrometer. It is shown that with the Hadamard mask of variable height stripes the average SNR is improved by a factor of 2.2 at the short wavelength band and by a factor of 2.8 on the long wavelength band, and the minimum SNR on the whole wavelength band is improved by a factor of 2.3.

  13. Simulation of Cosmic Ray Acceleration, Propagation and Interaction in SNR Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Kamae, T.; Ellison, D. C.

    2007-07-01

    Recent studies of young supernova remnants (SNRs) with Chandra, XMM, Suzaku and HESS have revealed complex morphologies and spectral features of the emission sites. The critical question of the relative importance of the two competing gamma-ray emission mechanisms in SNRs; inverse-Compton scattering by high-energy electrons and pion production by energetic protons, may be resolved by GLAST-LAT. To keep pace with the improved observations, we are developing a 3D model of particle acceleration, diffusion, and interaction in a SNR where broad-band emission from radio to multi-TeV energies, produced by shock accelerated electrons and ions, can be simulated for a given topology of shock fronts, magnetic field, and ISM densities. The 3D model takes as input, the particle spectra predicted by a hydrodynamic simulation of SNR evolution where nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration is coupled to the remnant dynamics (e.g., Ellison, Decourchelle & Ballet; Ellison & Cassam-Chenai Ellison, Berezhko & Baring). We will present preliminary models of the Galactic Ridge SNR RX J1713-3946 for selected choices of SNR parameters, magnetic field topology, and ISM density distributions. When constrained by broad-band observations, our models should predict the extent of coupling between spectral shape and morphology and provide direct information on the acceleration efficiency of cosmic-ray electrons and ions in SNRs.

  14. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A 32-ELEMENT HEAD ARRAY WITH RESPECT TO THE ULTIMATE INTRINSIC SNR

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Grant, Aaron K.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Ohliger, Michael A.; Wiggins, Graham C.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2010-01-01

    The quality of an RF detector coil design is commonly judged on how it compares with other coil configurations. The aim of this article is to develop a tool for evaluating the absolute performance of RF coil arrays. An algorithm to calculate the ultimate intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was implemented for a spherical geometry. The same imaging tasks modeled in the calculations were reproduced experimentally using a 32-element head array. Coil performance maps were then generated based on the ratio of experimentally measured SNR to the ultimate intrinsic SNR, for different acceleration factors associated with different degrees of parallel imaging. The relative performance in all cases was highest near the center of the samples (where the absolute SNR was lowest). The highest performance was found in the unaccelerated case and a maximum of 85% was observed with a phantom whose electrical properties are consistent with values in the human brain. The performance remained almost constant for 2-fold acceleration, but deteriorated at higher acceleration factors, suggesting that larger arrays are needed for effective highly-accelerated parallel imaging. The method proposed here can serve as a tool for the evaluation of coil designs, as well as a tool to guide the development of original designs which may begin to approach the optimal performance. PMID:19904727

  15. Multi-GNSS and Multi-frequency SNR Multipath Reflectometry of Snow Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabibi, S.; Geremia-Nievinski, F.; van Dam, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System multipath reflectometry (GNSS-MR) uses ground-based signals of opportunity to retrieve snow depth at an intermediate space scale. This technique is based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the simultaneously received direct (line-of-sight) and coherently ground reflected signals. In this contribution, forward and inverse modeling of SNR observations is presented for GLONASS-MR, extending GPS-MR to multiple GNSS. The coupling of the surface and antenna responses from short-delay near-grazing incidence multipath from CDMA and FDMA satellite navigation systems are simulated using an electromagnetic forward model. The inverse model is used to estimate parameter corrections responsible for observation residuals to estimate snow depth. The correlation between snow depth retrievals using GPS L2C signal and GLONASS R2-C/A signal is excellent, with r2 value of 0.990. In a related approach, dual-frequency SNR-based GNSS-MR, which is based on linear combination of SNR observables, is used to estimate snow depth. This ionospheric delay free method synthesizes longer carrier wavelengths ("widelaning" or delta-k) to isolate the direct power contribution in environmental retrievals.

  16. Fractal dimension analysis for spike detection in low SNR extracellular signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmasi, Mehrdad; Büttner, Ulrich; Glasauer, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Many algorithms have been suggested for detection and sorting of spikes in extracellular recording. Nevertheless, it is still challenging to detect spikes in low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). We propose a spike detection algorithm that is based on the fractal properties of extracellular signals and can detect spikes in low SNR regimes. Semi-intact spikes are low-amplitude spikes whose shapes are almost preserved. The detection of these spikes can significantly enhance the performance of multi-electrode recording systems. Approach. Semi-intact spikes are simulated by adding three noise components to a spike train: thermal noise, inter-spike noise, and spike-level noise. We show that simulated signals have fractal properties which make them proper candidates for fractal analysis. Then we use fractal dimension as the main core of our spike detection algorithm and call it fractal detector. The performance of the fractal detector is compared with three frequently used spike detectors. Main results. We demonstrate that in low SNR, the fractal detector has the best performance and results in the highest detection probability. It is shown that, in contrast to the other three detectors, the performance of the fractal detector is independent of inter-spike noise power and that variations in spike shape do not alter its performance. Finally, we use the fractal detector for spike detection in experimental data and similar to simulations, it is shown that the fractal detector has the best performance in low SNR regimes. Significance. The detection of low-amplitude spikes provides more information about the neural activity in the vicinity of the recording electrodes. Our results suggest using the fractal detector as a reliable and robust method for detecting semi-intact spikes in low SNR extracellular signals.

  17. Task specific evaluation of clinical full field digital mammography systems using the Fourier definition of the Hotelling observer SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haimo; Badano, Aldo; Benevides, Luis; Chakrabarti, Kish; Kaczmarek, Richard V.; Kyprianou, Iacovos S.

    2010-04-01

    Pixel Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) is a commonly used clinical metric for evaluating mammography. However, we showed in this paper, the pixel SNR can produce misleading system detectability when image processing is utilized. We developed a simple, reliable and clinically applicable methodology to evaluate mammographic imaging systems using a task SNR that accounts for the imaging system performance in the presence of the patient. We used the Hotelling observer method in spatial frequency domain to calculate the task SNR of small disk test objects embedded in the breast tissue-equivalent series (BRTES) phantom for GE Senographe DS Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) system. The results were compared to the calculation of pixel SNR. We calculated the Hotelling observer SNR by estimating the generalized modulation transfer function (GMTF), generalized normalized noise power spectrum (GNNPS) and generalized noise equivalent quanta (GNEQ) in the presence of the breast phantom. The task SNR we calculated increased with the square root of the exposure as expected. Furthermore, we showed that the method is stable under image processing. The task SNR is a more reliable method for evaluating the performance of imaging systems especially under realistic clinical conditions where patient equivalent phantoms or image processing is used.

  18. Numerical MHD modelling of composite SNR: The effect of pulsar birth period on pulsar wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jager, Ocker

    The γ-ray flux Fγ of a pulsar wind nebula in the GLAST/LAT domain can be shown to depend 2 on the pulsar birth period P0 as Fγ ∝ 1/P0 . Furthermore, it is also known that the PWN size depends on P0 , with the PWN radius overtaking the SNR forward shock if P0 is in the few millisecond domain. Whereas this is an interesting field of study, longer birth periods lead to slower PWN expansion, in which case the reverse shock compresses the PWN, One can therefore follow the time history of adiabatic losses versus adiabatic heating, which is important for multiwavelength modelling. We model composite SNRs as the time evolution of a PWN with its associated SNR forward/reverse shock and reflection wave. The effect of magnetic field is included via Faraday's induction equation. A high resolution numerical simulation scheme is followed whereby the explosion of a SNR with total explosion energy Esnr , ejecta mass Mej , ISM density ρISM and PWN energy via its pulsar birth period P0 , are followed through the Euler equations, describing inviscid flow. They are solved giving ρi (density), vi (velocity) and Pi (the pressure) with time. These equations correspond to the Navier-Stokes equations with zero viscosity and heat conduction terms. They describe the balance of mass, momentum and energy of different fluids, e.g. i = 1, 2, 3, ... and the interaction between these fluids are described by a source term Q(t), which, in the case of the PWN, is described by the spindown of the pulsar. We consider a two fluid scenario with non-relativistic (SNR) and relativistic (PWN) speeds (i = 1, 2), i.e. adiabatic indices of 5/3 and 4/3 respectively. The compressed ISM magnetic field is calculated through Faraday's Law. Note however that this is not a full MHD treatment since no backreaction on the fluid is considered. For the SNR we only consider the field of the ISM which gets compressed as the ISM is swept-up by the forward shock of the SNR. The same induction equation is also used to

  19. Fabrication of intermediate heat exchangers, steam generators, and sodium pumps for SNR-300

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hoft, A.J.; DeJong, J.J.; Vroom, J.P.; Kupers, G.R.

    1987-09-01

    The sodium pumps, intermediate heat exchangers, and steam generators for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) SNR-300 were delivered by Neratoom and its industrial partners Royal Schelde and Stork Boilers. All main components were delivered to and erected in the plant between 1983 and 1085 after a long period of delay, caused mainly by continuously changing requirements with respect to the latest state-of-the-art construction and design. It is therefore concluded that to realize an effective manufacturing of breeder components an authorized and final specification is absolutely necessary. After the legal formalization of the licensing step Teilgenehmigung 7/5, it was hardly possible to further change the specification of the SNR-300 components.

  20. A Novel Speed Compensation Method for ISAR Imaging with Low SNR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongxiang; Zhang, Shuanghui; Zhu, Dekang; Li, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, two novel speed compensation algorithms for ISAR imaging under a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) condition have been proposed, which are based on the cubic phase function (CPF) and the integrated cubic phase function (ICPF), respectively. These two algorithms can estimate the speed of the target from the wideband radar echo directly, which breaks the limitation of speed measuring in a radar system. With the utilization of non-coherent accumulation, the ICPF-based speed compensation algorithm is robust to noise and can meet the requirement of speed compensation for ISAR imaging under a low SNR condition. Moreover, a fast searching implementation strategy, which consists of coarse search and precise search, has been introduced to decrease the computational burden of speed compensation based on CPF and ICPF. Experimental results based on radar data validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms. PMID:26225980

  1. A Novel Speed Compensation Method for ISAR Imaging with Low SNR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongxiang; Zhang, Shuanghui; Zhu, Dekang; Li, Xiang

    2015-07-28

    In this paper, two novel speed compensation algorithms for ISAR imaging under a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) condition have been proposed, which are based on the cubic phase function (CPF) and the integrated cubic phase function (ICPF), respectively. These two algorithms can estimate the speed of the target from the wideband radar echo directly, which breaks the limitation of speed measuring in a radar system. With the utilization of non-coherent accumulation, the ICPF-based speed compensation algorithm is robust to noise and can meet the requirement of speed compensation for ISAR imaging under a low SNR condition. Moreover, a fast searching implementation strategy, which consists of coarse search and precise search, has been introduced to decrease the computational burden of speed compensation based on CPF and ICPF. Experimental results based on radar data validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  2. Depolarization ratio, SNR estimation, and polarization sensitivity analysis for a commercial Raman depolarization lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdikos, George; Georgoussis, George

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we focus on the estimation of the Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio of a 3-channel commercial (Raymetics) volcanic ash detection system, (LR111-D300), already operating in UK, and also, we perform a basic lidar polarization sensitivity analysis. The results show that SNR values are higher than 10 for ranges up to 13 km for daytime conditions. This is a quite good result compared with other values presented in bibliography and prove that such system is able to detect volcanic ash detection over a range of 20 km. We also assess the lidar polarization sensitivity and then, we estimate the linear depolarization ratio. By careful choice of the optical components (emitting and receiving optics), it has been shown that uncertainties of polarization states at receiver (and thus too depolarization ratio estimation) can be much reduced.

  3. Rigorous comparison of the spectral SNR of FTIR and EC-QCL spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, David T. D.; Hogg, Richard A.; Groom, Kristian M.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Rehman, Ihtesham U.; Cockburn, John W.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    FTIR spectroscopy using a thermal light source has been the dominant method for obtaining infrared spectra since the 1950's. Unfortunately the limited surface brightness and low spatial coherence of black-body radiators limits the spectral SNR in microspectroscopy and stand-off detection. Two recent innovations are addressing this problem a) FTIR instruments illuminated by high-spatial coherence broad-band supercontinuum sources and b) high spatial coherence narrow-band EC-QCL's. Here we ask whether these two approaches offer equivalent sensitivity. By noting an analogy with near-infrared optical coherence tomography we rigorously show that the high temporal coherence of the EC-QCL brings an additional, very large SNR advantage over an FTIR instrument illuminated by a supercontinuum source under otherwise matched conditions. Specifically if a spectrum containing N points is recorded by both instruments using the same illumination intensity and the same detector noise level, then the EC-QCL can deliver a given spectral SNR in a time xN shorter than the FTIR instrument. This factor can reach x100, potentially even x1000, in realistic applications. We exploit the analogy with OCT further by developing a mid-infrared "swept laser", using commercially available components, in which the tuning rate is much higher than in commercial EC-QCL devices. We use this swept laser to demonstrate the SNR advantage experimentally, using a custom-made EC-QCL spectrometer and PDMS polymer samples. We explore the potential upper limits on spectral acquisition rates, both from the fundamental kinetics of gain build-up in the external cavity and from likely mechanical limits on cavity tuning rates.

  4. Increased SNR Efficiency in Velocity Selective Arterial Spin Labeling using Multiple Velocity Selective Saturation Modules (mm-VSASL)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Wong, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Velocity-selective arterial spin labeling (VSASL) is theoretically insensitive to transit delay (TD) effects. However, it uses saturation instead of inversion, resulting in compromised signal to noise ratio (SNR). In this study we explore the use of multiple velocity-selective saturation (VSS) modules in VSASL (mm-VSASL) to improve SNR. Methods Theoretical SNR efficiency improvement and optimized parameters were calculated from simulations for mm-VSASL. VSASL with two VSS modules (VSASL-2VSS) was implemented to measure cerebral blood flow in vivo, compared with conventional VSASL (VSASL-1VSS), Pulsed ASL and Pseudo-Continuous ASL. TDs and bolus durations (BDs) were measured to validate the simulations and to examine the TD sensitivity of these preparations. Results Compared with VSASL-1VSS, VSASL-2VSS achieved a significant improvement of SNR (22.1 ± 1.9%, P = 1.7 × 10−6) in vivo, consistent with a 22.7% improvement predicted from simulations. The SNR was comparable to or higher (in GM, P = 4.3 × 10−3) than that using PCASL. VSASL was experimentally verified to have minimal TD effects. Conclusion Utilizing multiple VSS modules can improve the SNR efficiency of VSASL. Mm-VSASL may result in an SNR that is comparable to or even higher than that of PCASL in applications where long PLDs are required. PMID:25251933

  5. GNSS-SNR-derived water surface heights based on Newton Interval Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinking, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The power of Global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals is commonly recorded as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by GNSS receivers. SNR mainly depends on the direct signal but also on the reflected signal. Hence the analysis of SNR data allows the computation of heights of the reflecting surfaces by means of interference pattern technique (IPT). In classical IPT the distance between the antenna and the reflector is derived from the multipath pattern using a Lomb-Scargle Periodogram (LSP) analysis which is calculated separately for every satellite involved. The final reflector height is later estimated combining all those results A more sophisticated approach uses a consistent computation of the reflector height from all observations of all satellites in a single estimation step. This is achieved by replacing LSP analysis by an appropriate common least squares adjustment for all satellites. The sum of squares of residuals from such an adjustment depends on the reflector height and is used as an objective function. The reflector height is than derived in a global optimization process based on interval analysis. This approach additionally reduces the computational efforts compared to LSP. For a constant or only slowly changing reflector height, the height could be treated at least as a quasi-static non-time-depending function for a particular time window. In this one-dimensional case the global optimization can be carried out based on the Interval Newton Method. The method is demonstrated using a data set obtain from a measurement on the Weser river, Germany.

  6. New Closed-Form of the Largest Eigenvalue PDF for Max-SNR MIMO System Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letessier, Jonathan; Vrigneau, Baptiste; Rostaing, Philippe; Burel, Gilles

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) maximum-SNR (max-SNR) system employs the maximum ratio combiner (MRC) at the receiver side and the maximum ratio transmitter (MRT) at the transmitter side. Its performances highly depend on MIMO channel characteristics, which vary according to both the number of antennas and their distribution between the transmitter and receiver sides. By using the decomposition of the ordered Wishart distribution in the uncorrelated Rayleigh case, we derived a closed-form expression of the largest eigenvalue probability density function (PDF). The final result yields to an expression form of the PDF where polynomials are multiplied by exponentials; it is worth underlining that, though this form had been previously observed for given couples of antennas, to date no formally-written closed-form was available in the literature for an arbitrary couple. Then, this new expression permits one to quickly and easily get the well known largest eigenvalue PDF and use it to determine the binary error probability (BEP) of the max-SNR.

  7. SNR enhancement for composite application using multiple Doppler vibrometers based laser ultrasonic propagation imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Thanh Chung; Lee, Jung Ryul

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the technology of using laser ultrasonic propagation imaging for damage visualization of composite structures were applied to real-world applications. Among many choices of sensor for the Ultrasonic Propagation Imager, the laser interferometry has several advantages: it is non-invasive, and portable, and with extraordinarily long-range measurement. However, the critical issue with interferometry sensing is its low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), where the background noise can mask the damage-induced waves and making it impossible to identify the damages, especially in composite structures. In this paper, we propose a hardware-based SNR enhancement technique using multiple Laser Doppler Vibrometers (LDVs). The out-of-plane mode of ultrasonic signals are measured by multiple LDVs at a common sensing point and then averaged in real time. We showed that the SNR enhancement in experiments was consistent with the theoretical prediction, and also the test results showed a clear improvement for damage visualization of structures using Ultrasonic Wave Propagation Imaging and Ultrasonic Wavenumber Imaging algorithms.

  8. MMSE precoding for multiuser MISO downlink transmission with non-homogeneous user SNR conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duy HN; Le-Ngoc, Tho

    2014-12-01

    This paper is concerned with linear precoding designs for multiuser downlink transmissions. We consider a multiple-input single-output (MISO) system with multiple single-antenna user equipment (UE) experiencing non-homogeneous average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions. The first part of this work examines different precoding schemes with perfect channel state information (CSI) and average SNR at the base-station (eNB). We then propose a weighted minimum mean squared error (WMMSE) precoder, which takes advantage of the non-homogeneous SNR conditions. Given in a closed-form solution, the proposed WMMSE precoder outperforms other well-known linear precoders, such as zero-forcing (ZF), regularized ZF (RZF), while achieving a close performance to the locally optimal iterative WMMSE (IWMMSE) precoder, in terms of the achievable network sum-rate. In the second part of this work, we consider the non-homogeneous multiuser system with limited and quantized channel quality indicator (CQI) and channel direction indicator (CDI) feedbacks. Based on the CQI and CDI feedback models proposed for the Long-Term Evolution Advanced standard, we then propose a robust WMMSE precoder in a closed-form solution which takes into account the quantization errors. Simulation shows a significant improvement in the achievable network sum-rate by the proposed robust WMMSE precoder, compared to non-robust linear precoder designs.

  9. Observations of SNR RX J1713.7-3946 with H.E.S.S

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, D.; Funk, S.; Hinton, J.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.

    2005-02-21

    The shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 (G347.3-0.5) was discovered with ROSAT in X-rays and later claimed as source of TeV {gamma}-rays. This object, together with several other southern hemisphere SNRs, is a prime target for observations with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), a new system of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes which was completed at the end of 2003 in Namibia and is now in full operation. Here we report on observations of the SNR RX J1713.7-3946 which have been performed during the construction and commissioning of the H.E.S.S. system (data originally published here). We confirm TeV emission from this source and present the first ever {gamma}-ray image of an astronomical object resolved on arc minute scales. This image shows shell morphology similar to that seen in X-rays, however at photon energies some nine orders of magnitude higher. The characteristics of the energy spectrum imply efficient acceleration of charged particles to energies beyond 100 TeV, consistent with current ideas of particle acceleration in young SNR shocks.

  10. Experimental Results: Detection and Tracking of Low SNR Sinusoids Using Real-Time LMS and RLS Lattice Adaptive Line Enhancers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    DETECTION AND TRACKING OF LOW SNR SINUSOIDS USING REAL-TIMNE LMS AND RI S LATTIICE, ADAPTIVE LINE PR: SSWh ENHANCRS RE: 0300000liN 6 AIJTHCRISI WVl: D68...RESULTS: DETECTION AND TRACKING OF LOW SNR SINUSOIDS USING REAL-TIME LMS AND RLS LATTICE ADAPTIVE LINE ENHANCERS i f. Terence R. Albert, Hana Abusalem...obtained from a real-time custom hardware SNR sinusoids and filter parameters such as system using 32-bit IEEE floating point filter length, and adaption

  11. Gain and offset calibration reduces variation in exposure-dependent SNR among systems with identical digital flat-panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, Charles E.; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Lofton, Brad K.; White, R. Allen

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The conditions under which vendor performance criteria for digital radiography systems are obtained do not adequately simulate the conditions of actual clinical imaging with respect to radiographic technique factors, scatter production, and scatter control. Therefore, the relationship between performance under ideal conditions and performance in clinical practice remains unclear. Using data from a large complement of systems in clinical use, the authors sought to develop a method to establish expected performance criteria for digital flat-panel radiography systems with respect to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) versus detector exposure under clinical conditions for thoracic imaging. Methods: The authors made radiographic exposures of a patient-equivalent chest phantom at 125 kVp and 180 cm source-to-image distance. The mAs value was modified to produce exposures above and below the mAs delivered by automatic exposure control. Exposures measured free-in-air were corrected to the imaging plane by the inverse square law, by the attenuation factor of the phantom, and by the Bucky factor of the grid for the phantom, geometry, and kilovolt peak. SNR was evaluated as the ratio of the mean to the standard deviation (SD) of a region of interest automatically selected in the center of each unprocessed image. Data were acquired from 18 systems, 14 of which were tested both before and after gain and offset calibration. SNR as a function of detector exposure was interpolated using a double logarithmic function to stratify the data into groups of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mR exposure (1.8, 4.5, 9.0, 18, and 45 {mu}Gy air KERMA) to the detector. Results: The mean SNR at each exposure interval after calibration exhibited linear dependence on the mean SNR before calibration (r{sup 2} = 0.9999). The dependence was greater than unity (m = 1.101 {+-} 0.006), and the difference from unity was statistically significant (p < 0.005). The SD of mean SNR after calibration also

  12. Tracking performance of the polarity-type costas loop at low SNR for UQPSK signal. [Unbalanced Quadri-PSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Y. H.

    1981-01-01

    Carrier tracking performance of the polarity type costas loop is analyzed for unbalanced quadriphase-shift-keyed (UQPSK) signals at low SNR. Squaring losses for various SNR, IF bandwidth, and data rate ratios are presented. The RMS phase jitter for a particular loop is computed for various I and Q channel power and data rate ratios. Experimental results using a breadboard costas loop are also included.

  13. Fe K and ejecta emission in SNR G15.9+0.2 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggi, Pierre; Acero, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We present a study of the Galactic supernova remnant SNR G15.9+0.2 with archival XMM-Newton observations. Methods: EPIC data are used to investigate the morphological and spectral properties of the remnant, searching in particular for supernova ejecta and Fe K line emission. By comparing the SNR's X-ray absorption column density with the atomic and molecular gas distribution along the line of sight, we attempt to constrain the distance to the SNR. Results: Prominent line features reveal the presence of ejecta. Abundance ratios of Mg, Si, S, Ar, and Ca strongly suggest that the progenitor of SNR G15.9+0.2 was a massive star with a main sequence mass likely in the range 20-25 M⊙, strengthening the physical association with a candidate central compact object detected with Chandra. Using EPIC's collective power, Fe K line emission from SNR G15.9+0.2 is detected for the first time. We measure the line properties and find evidence for spatial variations. We discuss how the source fits within the sample of SNRs with detected Fe K emission and find that it is the core-collapse SNR with the lowest Fe K centroid energy. We also present some caveats regarding the use of Fe K line centroid energy as a typing tool for SNRs. Only a lower limit of 5 kpc is placed on the distance to SNR G15.9+0.2, constraining its age to tSNR ≳ 2 kyr.

  14. Empirical Evaluation of a New Method for Calculating Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) for Microarray Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-03-06

    Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) thresholds for microarray data analysis were experimentally determined with an oligonucleotide array that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes based upon four genes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A new SNR calculation, called signal to both standard deviations ratio (SSDR) was developed, and evaluated along with other two methods, signal to standard deviation ratio (SSR), and signal to background ratio (SBR). At a low stringency, the thresholds of SSR, SBR, and SSDR were 2.5, 1.60 and 0.80 with oligonucleotide and PCR amplicon as target templates, and 2.0, 1.60 and 0.70 with genomic DNA as target templates. Slightly higher thresholds were obtained at the high stringency condition. The thresholds of SSR and SSDR decreased with an increase in the complexity of targets (e.g., target types), and the presence of background DNA, and a decrease in the composition of targets, while SBR remained unchanged under all situations. The lowest percentage of false positives (FP) and false negatives (FN) was observed with the SSDR calculation method, suggesting that it may be a better SNR calculation for more accurate determination of SNR thresholds. Positive spots identified by SNR thresholds were verified by the Student t-test, and consistent results were observed. This study provides general guidance for users to select appropriate SNR thresholds for different samples under different hybridization conditions.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The first Fermi LAT SNR catalog (1SC) (Acero+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Johannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Ka, Mae T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knodlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; Den Hartog P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have systematically characterized the Fermi/LAT 1-100GeV emission from 36 months (from 2008 August 4 to 2011 August 4) in 279 regions containing known radio SNRs, identifying sources emitting in the regions and then determining the likelihood that the source nearest the SNR is associated with it. We found 102 candidates, 30 of which have sufficient spatial overlap and significance with the alternative IEMs to suggest they are the GeV counterparts to their corresponding radio SNRs and an additional 14 candidates which may also be related to the SNRs. (3 data files).

  16. Quantization of Gaussian samples at very low SNR regime in continuous variable QKD applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshgaran, Fred; Mondin, Marina

    2016-09-01

    The main problem for information reconciliation in continuous variable Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) at low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) is quantization and assignment of labels to the samples of the Gaussian Random Variables (RVs) observed at Alice and Bob. Trouble is that most of the samples, assuming that the Gaussian variable is zero mean which is de-facto the case, tend to have small magnitudes and are easily disturbed by noise. Transmission over longer and longer distances increases the losses corresponding to a lower effective SNR exasperating the problem. This paper looks at the quantization problem of the Gaussian samples at very low SNR regime from an information theoretic point of view. We look at the problem of two bit per sample quantization of the Gaussian RVs at Alice and Bob and derive expressions for the mutual information between the bit strings as a result of this quantization. The quantization threshold for the Most Significant Bit (MSB) should be chosen based on the maximization of the mutual information between the quantized bit strings. Furthermore, while the LSB string at Alice and Bob are balanced in a sense that their entropy is close to maximum, this is not the case for the second most significant bit even under optimal threshold. We show that with two bit quantization at SNR of -3 dB we achieve 75.8% of maximal achievable mutual information between Alice and Bob, hence, as the number of quantization bits increases beyond 2-bits, the number of additional useful bits that can be extracted for secret key generation decreases rapidly. Furthermore, the error rates between the bit strings at Alice and Bob at the same significant bit level are rather high demanding very powerful error correcting codes. While our calculations and simulation shows that the mutual information between the LSB at Alice and Bob is 0.1044 bits, that at the MSB level is only 0.035 bits. Hence, it is only by looking at the bits jointly that we are able to achieve a

  17. XMM-Newton observation of SNR J0533-7202 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanagh, P. J.; Sasaki, M.; Whelan, E. T.; Maggi, P.; Haberl, F.; Bozzetto, L. M.; Filipović, M. D.; Crawford, E. J.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We present an X-ray study of the supernova remnant SNR J0533-7202 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and determine its physical characteristics based on its X-ray emission. Methods: We observed SNR J0533-7202 with XMM-Newton (background flare-filtered exposure times of 18 ks EPIC-pn and 31 ks EPIC-MOS1, EPIC-MOS2). We produced X-ray images of the supernova remnant, performed an X-ray spectral analysis, and compared the results to multi-wavelength studies. Results: The distribution of X-ray emission is highly non-uniform, with the south-west region much brighter than the north-east. The detected X-ray emission is correlated with the radio emission from the remnant. We determine that this morphology is most likely due to the supernova remnant expanding into a non-uniform ambient medium and not an absorption effect. We estimate the remnant size to be 53.9 (±3.4) × 43.6 (±3.4) pc, with the major axis rotated ~64° east of north. We find no spectral signatures of ejecta emission and infer that the X-ray plasma is dominated by swept up interstellar medium. Using the spectral fit results and the Sedov self-similar solution, we estimate the age of SNR J0533-7202 to be ~17-27 kyr, with an initial explosion energy of (0.09-0.83) × 1051 erg. We detected an X-ray source located near the centre of the remnant, namely XMMU J053348.2-720233. The source type could not be conclusively determined due to the lack of a multi-wavelength counterpart and low X-ray counts. We found that it is likely either a background active galactic nucleus or a low-mass X-ray binary in the LMC. Conclusions: We detected bright thermal X-ray emission from SNR J0533-7202 and determined that the remnant is in the Sedov phase of its evolution. The lack of ejecta emission prohibits us from typing the remnant with the X-ray data. Therefore, the likely Type Ia classification based on the local stellar population and star formation history reported in the literature cannot be improved upon. Based on

  18. First Results from a Principal Component Analysis of Tycho's SNR: Evidence for Cosmic Ray Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J. S.; Hughes, J. P.; Badenes, C.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR). PCA is a statistical technique we implemented to characterize X-ray spectra extracted from distinct spatial regions across the entire image of the remnant. We used the PCA to determine the location of the contact discontinuity (CD) in Tycho, which marks the boundary between shocked ejecta and shocked interstellar material, and found an azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of 241". For the average radius of the outer blast wave (BW) we found 251". Taking account of projection effects, the ratio of BW:CD is 1:0.93, which is inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamic models of SNR evolution. The BW:CD ratio can be explained if cosmic ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. Such a scenario is further supported by evidence from the morphology and spectral nature of the BW emission for the acceleration of cosmic ray electrons. We also present PCA results regarding the ranges in Si and Fe composition in Tycho, and a newly uncovered spectral variation in the form of a low energy excess that has not been previously noted.

  19. Improving GNSS-R sea level determination through inverse modeling of SNR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandberg, Joakim; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new method for retrieving sea surface heights from Global Navigation Satellite Systems reflectometry (GNSS-R) data by inverse modeling of SNR observations from a single geodetic receiver. The method relies on a B-spline representation of the temporal sea level variations in order to account for its continuity. The corresponding B-spline coefficients are determined through a nonlinear least squares fit to the SNR data, and a consistent choice of model parameters enables the combination of multiple GNSS in a single inversion process. This leads to a clear increase in precision of the sea level retrievals which can be attributed to a better spatial and temporal sampling of the reflecting surface. Tests with data from two different coastal GNSS sites and comparison with colocated tide gauges show a significant increase in precision when compared to previously used methods, reaching standard deviations of 1.4 cm at Onsala, Sweden, and 3.1 cm at Spring Bay, Tasmania.

  20. HESS J1640-465 - an exceptionally luminous TeV gamma-ray SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eger, Peter; Ohm, Stefan

    HESS J1640-465 is among the brightest Galactic TeV gamma-ray sources ever discovered by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.). Its likely association with the shell-type supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0 at a distance of ˜10 kpc makes it the most luminous Galactic source in the TeV regime. Our recent analysis of follow-up observations with H.E.S.S. reveal a significantly extended TeV morphology with a substantial overlap with the northern part of the SNR shell. Furthermore, the source features a seamless powerlaw spectrum over four orders of magnitude from GeV to TeV energies, with a spectral index of Gamma = 2.15± 0.10_mathrm{stat}± 0.10_mathrm{sys} and a cut-off energy of E_c = 7.3(+2.5}_{-1.8) TeV. These new spectral and morphological results suggest that a significant fraction of the TeV emission is likely of hadronic origin where the product of total proton energy and mean target density could be as high as W_p n_H ˜ 4 × 10(52}(d/10mathrm{kpc) )(2) erg cm(-3) . This would make HESS J1640-465 one of the most extreme and efficient Galactic particle accelerators.

  1. Digital test signal generation: An accurate SNR calibration approach for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, Benito O.

    1993-01-01

    In support of the on-going automation of the Deep Space Network (DSN) a new method of generating analog test signals with accurate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is described. High accuracy is obtained by simultaneous generation of digital noise and signal spectra at the desired bandwidth (base-band or bandpass). The digital synthesis provides a test signal embedded in noise with the statistical properties of a stationary random process. Accuracy is dependent on test integration time and limited only by the system quantization noise (0.02 dB). The monitor and control as well as signal-processing programs reside in a personal computer (PC). Commands are transmitted to properly configure the specially designed high-speed digital hardware. The prototype can generate either two data channels modulated or not on a subcarrier, or one QPSK channel, or a residual carrier with one biphase data channel. The analog spectrum generated is on the DC to 10 MHz frequency range. These spectra may be up-converted to any desired frequency without loss on the characteristics of the SNR provided. Test results are presented.

  2. [Equalization of whole-band signal's SNR in the blood components noninvasive measurement].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Hui-quan; Zhang, Hao; Lin, Ling; Wu, Xiao-rong; Zhang, Bao-ju

    2012-02-01

    To fully extend the category of blood components that can be noninvasively measured by dynamic spectrum (DS) method and to increase its measuring precision, an overall consideration of light source, tissue absorption and sensor's sensitivity was made. Compensating the light source and adding the telecentric lens not only expand the spectral effective detecting range, but also balance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the photoelectric pulse in the whole band equalization. The integral SNR of DS signal was increased and the measurement bandwidth was expanded. The effectiveness of this method was validated by the quality evaluation criterion of DS data: the effective detecting range of visible DS was widened from 600-1 000 nm to 500-1 135 nm; the effective detecting range of near-infrared DS was widened from 900-1 100 nm to 900-1 700 nm. The results show that the design can create the condition for detection of new blood components noninvasively, and enhance the prediction accuracy of the blood components, for which noninvasive measuring using DS method has been achieved.

  3. Ejecta in the Oxygen-Rich SNR G292.0+1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. F.; Long, K. S.

    2004-08-01

    New optical images of the young supernova remnant (SNR) G292.0+1.8, obtained from the 0.9-m telescope at CTIO, show a far more extensive network of filaments than previous data suggest. Images in [O III] show filaments distributed throughout much of the 8 arcmin diameter shell seen in X-ray and radio images. Most of the outer filaments have a radial, pencil-like morphology that is very suggestive of Rayleigh-Tayor fingers. Simulations of core-collapse supernovae predict the development of such fingers, but they have never before been so clearly observed in a young SNR. In addition to the extensive [O III] filaments, we have detected three small complexes of filaments that show [S II] emission along with the oxygen lines. None of the filaments, with or without [S II], show any evidence for hydrogen, so all must be composed of pure supernova ejecta. The [S II] filaments provide the first evidence for products of oxygen burning in the ejecta from the event that gave rise to G292.0+1.8. This research has been funded primarily by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0307613.

  4. Proper Motions in the SNR RCW86 and the Guest Star of 185AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamper, K. W.; van den Bergh, S.; Westerlund, B.

    1995-03-01

    The guest star, apparently in Centaurus, which was observed in China in the year 185AD has usually been identified with the SNR RCW86 (alias MSH 14-63). An alternative possibility (Thorsett, Nature 356, 690, 1992) is the pulsar PSR 1509-58 whose spin-down age of 1700 years is suggestively appropriate. On the other hand, the nebula, RCW89, which coincides with that pulsar shows no significant internal proper motion and so is unlikely to be a young object (van den Bergh and Kamper, ApJ 280, L51, 1984). We have now made a proper motion study of optically brightest region of the prime candidate RCW86 using plates from the Radcliff 1.9m taken in 1963 and the CTIO 4m taken in 1977 along with CCD frames from the UTSO 0.6m obtained in 1990 and 1993. The observed arc is some 1100 arc seconds from the center of symmetry of the radio source. If the nebula is in the Sedov adiabatic phase of expansion, the expected proper motion would be 0.24 arc sec yr(-1) . Our measured values are more than an order of magnitude smaller and thus contradict the hypothesis of youth for this SNR. Disappointingly, the 185AD object may indeed have been merely a comet (Chin and Huang, Nature 311, 29, 1994) unless it was indeed a supernova that produced a pulsar without producing a nebular remnant.

  5. High spatial resolution spectroscopy of Tycho’s SNR with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yun-Dong; Yang, Xue-Juan

    2017-02-01

    We present high spatial resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Tycho’s supernova remnant (SNR) using observational data from Chandra. The whole remnant was divided into 26 × 27 regions, with each of them covering 20\\prime\\prime × 20\\prime\\prime. We selected 536 pixels with enough events to generate spectra and fit them with an absorbed two component non-equilibrium ionization model. We obtained maps of absorbing column density, weight-averaged temperature, ionization age and abundances for O, Ne, Mg, Si, S and Fe, with emission used to determine the weight. The abundance maps and the finding that Fe abundance is not correlated with any other element suggest that Fe is located at a smaller radius than other elements, supporting the onion shell model with emission from more massive elements peaking more toward the center. A tight correlation between Si and S abundances support both Si and S coming from explosive O-burning and/or incomplete Si-burning. O and Ne abundances show no correlation with any other element. Considering that O, Ne and Mg are all synthesized in the same process (C/Ne-burning), we suggest that O/Ne/Mg might mix well with other elements during the explosion of the supernova and the expansion of the SNR.

  6. Multi-Reception Strategy with Improved SNR for Multichannel MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bing; Li, Ye; Wang, Chunsheng; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2012-01-01

    A multi-reception strategy with extended GRAPPA is proposed in this work to improve MR imaging performance at ultra-high field MR systems with limited receiver channels. In this method, coil elements are separated to two or more groups under appropriate grouping criteria. Those groups are enabled in sequence for imaging first, and then parallel acquisition is performed to compensate for the redundant scan time caused by the multiple receptions. To efficiently reconstruct the data acquired from elements of each group, a specific extended GRAPPA was developed. This approach was evaluated by using a 16-element head array on a 7 Tesla whole-body MRI scanner with 8 receive channels. The in-vivo experiments demonstrate that with the same scan time, the 16-element array with twice receptions and acceleration rate of 2 can achieve significant SNR gain in the periphery area of the brain and keep nearly the same SNR in the center area over an eight-element array, which indicates the proposed multi-reception strategy and extended GRAPPA are feasible to improve image quality for MRI systems with limited receive channels. This study also suggests that it is advantageous for a MR system with N receiver channels to utilize a coil array with more than N elements if an appropriate acquisition strategy is applied. PMID:22879921

  7. Simulation verification of SNR and parallel imaging improvements by ICE-decoupled loop array in MRI.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinqiang; Cao, Zhipeng; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2016-04-01

    Transmit/receive L/C loop arrays with the induced current elimination (ICE) or magnetic wall decoupling method has shown high signal-to-noise (SNR) and excellent parallel imaging ability for MR imaging at ultrahigh fields, e.g., 7 T. In this study, we aim to numerically analyze the performance of an eight-channel ICE-decoupled loop array at 7 T. Three dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic (EM) and radiofrequency (RF) circuit co-simulation approach was employed. The values of all capacitors were obtained by optimizing the S-parameters of all coil elements. The EM simulation accurately modeled the coil structure, the phantom and the excitation. All coil elements were well matched to 50 ohm and the isolation between any two coil elements was better -15 dB. The simulated S parameters were exactly similar with the experimental results, indicating the simulation results were reliable. Compared with the conventional capacitively decoupled array, the ICE-decoupled array had higher sensitivity at the peripheral areas of the image subjects due to the shielding effect of the decoupling loops. The increased receive sensitivity resulted in an improvement of signal intensity and SNR for the ICE-decoupled array.

  8. SKE/BKE task-based methodology for calculating Hotelling observer SNR in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haimo; Kyprianou, Iacovos S.; Badano, Aldo; Myers, Kyle J.; Jennings, Robert J.; Park, Subok; Kaczmarek, Richard V.; Chakrabarti, Kish

    2009-02-01

    A common method for evaluating projection mammography is Contrast-Detail (CD) curves derived from the CD phantom for Mammography (CDMAM). The CD curves are derived either by human observers, or by automated readings. Both methods have drawbacks which limit their reliability. The human based reading is significantly affected by reader variability, reduced precision and bias. On the other hand, the automated methods suffer from limited statistics. The purpose of this paper is to develop a simple and reliable methodology for the evaluation of mammographic imaging systems using the Signal Known Exactly/Background Known Exactly (SKE/BKE) detection task for signals relevant to mammography. In this paper, we used the spatial definition of the ideal, linear (Hotelling) observer to calculate the task-specific SNR for mammography and discussed the results. The noise covariance matrix as well as the detector response H matrix of the imaging system were estimated and used to calculate the SNRSKEBKE for the simulated discs of the CDMAM. The SNR as a function of exposure, disc diameter and thickness were calculated.

  9. Noise and signal detection in digital x-ray detectors using the spatial definition of SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyprianou, Iacovos S.; Badano, Aldo; Park, Subok; Liu, Haimo; Myers, Kyle J.

    2009-02-01

    For task specific evaluation of imaging systems it is necessary to obtain detailed descriptions of their noise and deterministic properties. In the past we have developed an experimental and theoretical methodology to estimate the deterministic detector response of a digital x-ray imaging system, also known as the H matrix. In this paper we have developed the experimental methodology for the evaluation of the quantum and electronic noise of digital radiographic detectors using the covariance matrix K. Using the H matrix we calculated the transfer of a simulated coronary artery constriction through an imaging system's detector, and with the covariance matrix we calculated the detectability (or Signal-to-Noise Ratio) and the detection probability. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the covariance matrix were presented and the electronic and quantum noise were analyzed. We found that the exposure at which the electronic noise equals the quantum noise at 90 kVp was 0.2 μR. We compared the ideal Hotelling observer with the Fourier definition of the SNR for a toroidal stenosis on a cylindrical vessel. Because of the shift-invariance and cyclo-stationarity assumptions, the Fourier SNR overestimates the performance of imaging systems. This methodology can be used for task specific evaluation and optimization of a digital x-ray imaging system.

  10. SNR Loss: A new objective measure for predicting speech intelligibility of noise-suppressed speech

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianfen; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2010-01-01

    Most of the existing intelligibility measures do not account for the distortions present in processed speech, such as those introduced by speech-enhancement algorithms. In the present study, we propose three new objective measures that can be used for prediction of intelligibility of processed (e.g., via an enhancement algorithm) speech in noisy conditions. All three measures use a critical-band spectral representation of the clean and noise-suppressed signals and are based on the measurement of the SNR loss incurred in each critical band after the corrupted signal goes through a speech enhancement algorithm. The proposed measures are flexible in that they can provide different weights to the two types of spectral distortions introduced by enhancement algorithms, namely spectral attenuation and spectral amplification distortions. The proposed measures were evaluated with intelligibility scores obtained by normal-hearing listeners in 72 noisy conditions involving noise-suppressed speech (consonants and sentences) corrupted by four different maskers (car, babble, train and street interferences). Highest correlation (r=−0.85) with sentence recognition scores was obtained using a variant of the SNR loss measure that only included vowel/consonant transitions and weak consonant information. High correlation was maintained for all noise types, with a maximum correlation (r=−0.88) achieved in street noise conditions. PMID:21503274

  11. Study of young stellar objects around SNR G18.8+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis Peña, M.; Paron, S.

    2016-08-01

    In recent works, through observations of molecular lines, we found that the supernova remnant (SNR) G18.8+0.3 is interacting with a molecular cloud towards its southern edge. Also it has been proven the presence of several neighboring H ii regions very likely located at the same distance as the remnant. The presence of dense molecular gas and the existence of shock fronts generated by the SNR and H ii regions make this region an interesting scenario to study the population of young stellar objects. Thus, using the most modern colour criteria applied to the emission in the mid-infrared bands obtained from IRAC and MIPS on board Spitzer, we characterized all the point sources lying in this region. We analyzed the spectral energy distributions of sources that show signs of being young stellar objects in order to confirm their nature and derive stellar parameters. Additionally, we present a map of the CO J=32 emission obtained with the ASTE telescope towards one of the H ii regions embedded in the molecular cloud. The molecular gas was studied with the aim to analyze whether the cloud is a potential site of star formation.

  12. TeV γ-ray source MGRO J2019+37 : PWN or SNR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Lab; Bhattacharjee, Pijushpani

    2014-01-01

    Milagro has recently reported an extended TeV γ-ray source MGRO J2019+37 in the Cygnus region. It is the second brightest TeV source after Crab nebula in their source catalogue. No confirmed counterparts of this source are known although possible associations with several known sources have been suggested. We study leptonic as well as hadronic models of TeV emission within the context of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) and Supernova Remnant (SNR) type sources, using constraints from multi-wavelength data from observations made on sources around MGRO J2019+37. These include radio upper limit given by GMRT, GeV observations by Fermi-LAT, EGRET and AGILE and very high energy data taken from Milagro. We find that, within the PWN scenario, while both leptonic as well as hadronic models can explain the TeV flux from this source, the GMRT upper limit imposes a stringent upper limit on the size of the emission region in the case of leptonic model. In the SNR scenario, on the other hand, a purely leptonic origin of TeV flux is inconsistent with the GMRT upper limit. At the same time, a dominantly hadronic origin of the TeV flux is consistent with all observations, and the required hadronic energy budget is comparable to that of typical supernovae explosions.

  13. Information content of SNR/resolution trade-offs in three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, S; Kale, S C; Feintuch, A; Tardif, C; Pike, G B; Henkelman, R M

    2009-04-01

    In MRI, a trade-off exists between resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, since different fractions of the available scan time can be used to acquire data at higher spatial frequencies and to perform signal averaging. By comparing a wide variety of 3D isotropic MR scans with different combinations of SNR, resolution, and scan duration, the impact of this trade-off on the image information content was assessed. The information content of mouse brain, mouse whole-body, and human brain images was evaluated using a simple numerical approach, which sums the information contribution of each individual k-space data point. Results show that, with a fixed receiver bandwidth and field of view, the information content of trade-off images is always maximized when the SNR is equal to about 16. The optimal imaging resolution is dependent on the scan duration, as well as certain MR system properties, such as field strength and coil sensitivity. These properties are, however, easily accounted for with the acquisition of a single scout MR image, and the optimal imaging resolution can then be calculated using a simple mathematical relationship. If the imaging task is approached with a predetermined resolution requirement, the same scout scan can be used to calculate the scan duration that will provide the maximum possible information. Using these relationships to maximize the image information content is an excellent technique for guiding the initial selection of imaging parameters.

  14. SNR approach for performance evaluation of time-stretching photonic analogue to digital converter system.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago M F; Cartaxo, Adolfo V T

    2011-01-17

    A semi-analytical simulation method (SASM) is proposed to evaluate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of time stretched signals at the output of photonic analogue-to-digital converter (Ph-ADC) system. Analytical expressions of the signal at Ph-ADC output considering generic electrical signals applied to the electro-optic modulators of the Ph-ADC are derived. The contribution to the total variance of the received signal from the noise introduced by the electrical transmitter and receiver, and by the optical amplifier are derived analytically taking into account the pulsed nature of the optical signal. The proposed SASM shows excellent agreement of SNR estimates with the estimates provided by Monte Carlo simulation. This result is confirmed for variance dominantly imposed by the noise introduced by the electrical transmitter, by the optical amplifier and by the electrical receiver. A simplified approach is also proposed and compared with previous work. It is shown that mean power estimates obtained from this simplified approach are valid while the modulator is operating in the linear region and the signal is not affected by the frequency response of the electrical receiver filter. Additionally, it is concluded that the estimates of the noise variance due to the electrical transmitter are acceptable when a small signal analysis of noise along the Ph-ADC is valid.

  15. SNR 1E0102.2-7219 in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amy, Shaun W.

    1994-04-01

    The source 1E0102.2-7219 was first identified as a possible supernova remnant (SNR) by Seward and Mitchell (1981, Astrophys. J., 243, 736) using the Einstein observatory, on the basis of its X-ray luminosity and spectral energy distribution. It is the second brightest X-ray source in the Small Magellanic Cloud. 1E0102.2-7219 was positively identified as a supernova remnant (SNR) by Dopita et al. (1981, Astrophys. J. Lett., 248, L105) who classified it as a member of the oxygen-rich class of SNRs. Narrow-band optical imaging with the Anglo-Australian Telescope revealed a large (O III)/H alpha ratio and a strong (O III) filamentary shell only 1.5 arcmin from the quoted X-ray position. Observations made with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 4790 MHz by Amy and Ball (1993, Astrophys. J., 411, 761) revealed an almost complete shell of radio emission and a compact central component which contributes about 14% of the total flux density. The angular diameter of the outer shell of radio emission is around 40 sec which is consistent with the angular diameter of the 'emission-hole' discussed by Dopita et al. (1981) and with the high-resolution X-ray data. Using the ATCA data along with previously published data at 408 MHz and 843 MHz we determined the radio spectral index to be alpha = -(0.7 +/- 0.1). The compact central component has an angular diameter of approximately 18 sec determined by taking cross-cuts through the ATCA image at various position angles. There are at least two possible interpretations of this compact component: (1) it may be a bright spot on the surface of the radio shell (front or back), in which case it probably corresponds to a region of enhanced acceleration and is of no special interest; or (2) it may be a central or core component inside the radio shell. Such core components are often referred to as 'plerions' and are thought to be associated with a remnant pulsar produced in the supernova explosion. If this is the case, then SNR 1E

  16. On the Equivalence of Maximum SNR and MMSE Estimation: Applications to Additive Non-Gaussian Channels and Quantized Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugini, Luca; Banelli, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    The minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) is one of the most popular criteria for Bayesian estimation. Conversely, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a typical performance criterion in communications, radar, and generally detection theory. In this paper we first formalize an SNR criterion to design an estimator, and then we prove that there exists an equivalence between MMSE and maximum-SNR estimators, for any statistics. We also extend this equivalence to specific classes of suboptimal estimators, which are expressed by a basis expansion model (BEM). Then, by exploiting an orthogonal BEM for the estimator, we derive the MMSE estimator constrained to a given quantization resolution of the noisy observations, and we prove that this suboptimal MMSE estimator tends to the optimal MMSE estimator that uses an infinite resolution of the observation. Besides, we derive closed-form expressions for the mean-squared error (MSE) and for the SNR of the proposed suboptimal estimators, and we show that these expressions constitute tight, asymptotically exact, bounds for the optimal MMSE and maximum SNR.

  17. Disentangling the hadronic from the leptonic emission in the composite SNR G326.3-1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devin, J.; Acero, F.; Schmid, J.; Ballet, J.

    2016-06-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs), pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) and pulsars are the usual suspects to accelerate the bulk of cosmic rays in our Galaxy.In those objects the gamma-ray emission allows us to probe the population of high-energy particles and in particular the population of accelerated hadrons radiating through the pion-decay mechanism. Those Galactic accelerators are most of the time studied as independent objects, even if, in the case of some core-collapse supernovae, the shell-like SNR, the PWN and the pulsar are in fact present in the same object.In the case of composite SNRs, both the SNR shell and the PWN are bright enough to be observed in the same source. Understanding the nature of the gamma-ray emission in such objects can be challenging for sources of small angular extension. Previous studies of the composite SNR G326.3-1.8 (radius=0.3 degrees) revealed bright and extended gamma-ray emission but its origin remained uncertain.With the recent Pass8 Fermi-LAT data that provide an increased acceptance and angular resolution, we investigate the detailed morphology of this composite SNR in order to distinguish the SNR from the PWN contribution. In particular, we take advantage of the new possibility to filter events based on their angular reconstruction quality (PSF types). Disentangling the different components is crucial to clearly model the spectral properties of the source and to understand its nature.

  18. Digital test signal generation: An accurate SNR calibration approach for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, B. O.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of generating analog test signals with accurate signal to noise ratios (SNRs) is described. High accuracy will be obtained by simultaneous generation of digital noise and signal spectra at a given baseband or bandpass limited bandwidth. The digital synthesis will provide a test signal embedded in noise with the statistical properties of a stationary random process. Accuracy will only be dependent on test integration time with a limit imposed by the system quantization noise (expected to be 0.02 dB). Setability will be approximately 0.1 dB. The first digital SNR generator to provide baseband test signals is being built and will be available in early 1991.

  19. Threshold-Based Bit Error Rate for Stopping Iterative Turbo Decoding in a Varying SNR Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Roslina; Harun, Harlisya; Mokhtar, Makhfudzah; Adnan, Wan Azizun Wan; Dimyati, Kaharudin

    2017-01-01

    Online bit error rate (BER) estimation (OBE) has been used as a stopping iterative turbo decoding criterion. However, the stopping criteria only work at high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and fail to have early termination at low SNRs, which contributes to an additional iteration number and an increase in computational complexity. The failure of the stopping criteria is caused by the unsuitable BER threshold, which is obtained by estimating the expected BER performance at high SNRs, and this threshold does not indicate the correct termination according to convergence and non-convergence outputs (CNCO). Hence, in this paper, the threshold computation based on the BER of CNCO is proposed for an OBE stopping criterion (OBEsc). From the results, OBEsc is capable of terminating early in a varying SNR environment. The optimum number of iterations achieved by the OBEsc allows huge savings in decoding iteration number and decreasing the delay of turbo iterative decoding.

  20. A Detailed Observation of a LMC SNR, DEM L241, with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Aya; Ueno, Masaru; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Koyama, Katsuji

    We report on an XMM-Newton observation of the supernova remnant (SNR) DEM L241 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. In the soft band image, the emission shows an elongated structure, like a killifish (Head and Tail), with a central point source, named as XMMU J053559.3-673509 (Eye). The Eye's spectrum is well reproduced with a power-law model. The source has neither significant coherent pulsations nor time variabilities. Its luminosity and spectrum remind us that the source might be a pulsar and/or pulsar wind nebula in DEM L241. The spectra of Head and Tail are well reproduced by a non-equilibrium ionization plasma model with over-abundant Ne and under-abundant Fe, suggesting that the progenitor of DEM L241 is a very massive star.

  1. Sociopolitical Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains four articles devoted to the topic of "Sociopolitical Analyses." In "An Interview with Peter L. McLaren," Mary Leach presented the views of Peter L. McLaren on topics of local and national discourses, values, and the politics of difference. Landon E.…

  2. Speech Envelope Normalization, a Method to Improve SNR and Suppress Noise in Present and Future Radio Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    2 2 2 SNRe = e (t)/n 2 (t) = 2av /an2 (69) 23 Stremler , F. G., Introduction To Communication Systems, Addison-Wesley, 1977. 74 this SNR is related to...Characteristics for Studying Intelligibility," The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 49, No. 6 (Part 2), 1971. * 23. Stremler , F. G., Introduction

  3. The Galactic plane region near ℓ = 93°. III. Multi-wavelength emission from SNR 3C 434.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.

    2005-10-01

    New Canadian Galactic Plane Survey radio continuum, ROSAT X-ray, and optical line observations of supernova remnant (SNR) 3C 434.1 (G94.0+1.0) are presented. A radio spectrum of index α=0.4 (where S∝ ν -α ) confirms this SNR's emission signature as predominantly synchrotron, and suggests the SNR is in the Sedov expansion phase. The morphology of the remnant is compared in X-ray, optical, and radio continuum, and the brightest emission in all three wavelength regimes is from the eastern hemisphere of 3C 434.1, which marks where the SNR shock is interacting with the inside wall of its stellar wind bubble (SWB) home. The system is determined to be 4.5 kpc distant, residing in the Perseus Arm Spiral shock. From a deep Hα mosaic of the region, λ 656 nm Hα line emission is observed that correlates well with radio synchrotron emission and anticorrelates with X-ray emission from the SNR. The origin of this optical emission is likely dense (ne=40 cm-3) cooling H II from the wall of the SWB, where the SNR shock has penetrated and become radiative (vs˜ 100 km s-1). The X-ray spectrum of this SNR between 0.5 and 2.4 keV is well modelled by a single-temperature thermal plasma (Te=4.5×106 K, ne=0.2 cm-3). The magnetic field of the bright radio synchrotron emission region is found (under the assumption of near equipartition) to be B˜ 15 μ G, a factor of 3 compression of the ambient ISM field (5 μ G). The westward extension of 3C 434.1 is the result of ongoing free expansion of the shock into the lower density interior of the SWB. I use multiwavelength observations to arrive at a unique solution for an interaction model of 3C 434.1 with the SWB, from which the age (t=25 000 yr) and mass ejected in the explosion (Mej=15.5 M⊙ ) are determined. I also find an initial blast-wave velocity of 1350 km s-1, typical of type 1b SNe.

  4. SNR and Standard Deviation of cGNSS-R and iGNSS-R Scatterometric Measurements.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Arroyo, Alberto; Querol, Jorge; Lopez-Martinez, Carlos; Zavorotny, Valery U; Park, Hyuk; Pascual, Daniel; Onrubia, Raul; Camps, Adriano

    2017-01-19

    This work addresses the accuracy of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) scatterometric measurements considering the presence of both coherent and incoherent scattered components, for both conventional GNSS-R (cGNSS-R) and interferometric GNSS-R (iGNSS-R) techniques. The coherent component is present for some type of surfaces, and it has been neglected until now because it vanishes for the sea surface scattering case. Taking into account the presence of both scattering components, the estimated Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for both techniques is computed based on the detectability criterion, as it is done in conventional GNSS applications. The non-coherent averaging operation is considered from a general point of view, taking into account that thermal noise contributions can be reduced by an extra factor of 0.88 dB when using partially overlapped or partially correlated samples. After the SNRs are derived, the received waveform's peak variability is computed, which determines the system's capability to measure geophysical parameters. This theoretical derivations are applied to the United Kingdom (UK) TechDemoSat-1 (UK TDS-1) and to the future GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry on board the International Space Station (ISS) (GEROS-ISS) scenarios, in order to estimate the expected scatterometric performance of both missions.

  5. SNR and Standard Deviation of cGNSS-R and iGNSS-R Scatterometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Arroyo, Alberto; Querol, Jorge; Lopez-Martinez, Carlos; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Park, Hyuk; Pascual, Daniel; Onrubia, Raul; Camps, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    This work addresses the accuracy of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) scatterometric measurements considering the presence of both coherent and incoherent scattered components, for both conventional GNSS-R (cGNSS-R) and interferometric GNSS-R (iGNSS-R) techniques. The coherent component is present for some type of surfaces, and it has been neglected until now because it vanishes for the sea surface scattering case. Taking into account the presence of both scattering components, the estimated Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for both techniques is computed based on the detectability criterion, as it is done in conventional GNSS applications. The non-coherent averaging operation is considered from a general point of view, taking into account that thermal noise contributions can be reduced by an extra factor of 0.88 dB when using partially overlapped or partially correlated samples. After the SNRs are derived, the received waveform’s peak variability is computed, which determines the system’s capability to measure geophysical parameters. This theoretical derivations are applied to the United Kingdom (UK) TechDemoSat-1 (UK TDS-1) and to the future GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry on board the International Space Station (ISS) (GEROS-ISS) scenarios, in order to estimate the expected scatterometric performance of both missions. PMID:28106825

  6. The First Fermi-LAT SNR Catalog: GeV Characteristics and Cosmic Ray Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, T. J.; Acero, F.; de Palma, F.; Hewitt, J.; Renaud, M.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (CR) sources, classically proposed to be Supernova Remnants (SNRs), must meet the energetic particle content required by direct measurements of high energy CRs. Indirect gamma-ray measurements of SNRs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) have now shown directly that at least three SNRs accelerate protons. With the first Fermi LAT SNR Catalog, we have systematically characterized the GeV gamma-rays emitted by 279 SNRs known primarily from radio surveys. We present these sources in a multiwavelength context, including studies of correlations between GeV and radio size, flux, and index, TeV index, and age and environment tracers, in order to better understand effects of evolution and environment on the GeV emission. We show that previously sufficient models of SNRs' GeV emission no longer adequately describe the data. To address the question of CR origins, we also examine the SNRs' maximal CR contribution assuming the GeV emission arises solely from proton interactions. Improved breadth and quality of multiwavelength data, including distances and local densities, and more, higher resolution gamma-ray data with correspondingly improved Galactic diffuse models will strengthen this constraint.

  7. Telemetry SNR improvement using the DSN Advanced Receiver with results for Pioneer 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Brown, D. H.; Vilnrotter, V. A.; Wiggins, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    A series of tracking tests was conducted in the spring of 1987 to demonstrate the reduced tracking threshold and the improved telemetry singal-to-noise-ratio performance of the DSN Advanced Receiver compared to current operational DSN systems. The Pioneer 10 spacecraft, which is now out of the solar system, was tracked on foud days. The Advanced Receiver achieved an improvement in telemetry SNR of 1 to 1.5 dB over the operational system. It was demonstrated that the spacecraft carrier signal is stable enough for tracking with a receiver carrier loop bandwidth of 0.5 Hz in the one-way mode and 0.1 Hz in the three-way mode, and that the Advanced Receiver is stable at 0.1 Hz. This reduces tracking threshold by 10 to 15 dB compared to current receivers, which have minimum loop bandwidths of 1 to 3 Hz. Thus, the Advanced Receiver will enable tracking of the Pioneer 10 spacecraft until its power source fails, circa 2000, which would not be possible with the current DSN system.

  8. The Monogem Ring: A Nearby SNR Similar to the Local Bubble ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, P. P.

    2009-08-01

    The ``Monogem Ring'' is a large (D~25.0°), old (t~1.0×105 yr) supernova remnant (SNR) located above the Galactic plane close to the anti-center direction. The Monogem Ring (MR) has a very soft X-ray spectrum and is one of the most prominent features in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey R1+R2 Band (100-284 eV) map. The MR has been associated with the pulsar PSR 0656+14, which has a well-constrained distance from parallax measurements. Adopting a distance of 300 pc, we have modeled the MR as the remnant of a single SNe with an explosion energy of Eo = 0.2×1051 ergs, an initial ambient density of 5.2×10-3 cm-3, and an age of 8.6×104 yr. Comparison to multiple-SNe models of the Local Bubble indicate that the MR is a younger, less energetic explosion which went off in a lower density medium. We also present the first Suzaku spectrum of the MR ring which is consistent with a low-temperature (kT = 0.20 keV) plasma close to ionization equilibrium with a sub-solar O abundance.

  9. Optimizing binary phase and amplitude filters for PCE, SNR, and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Binary phase-only filters (BPOFs) have generated much study because of their implementation on currently available spatial light modulator devices. On polarization-rotating devices such as the magneto-optic spatial light modulator (SLM), it is also possible to encode binary amplitude information into two SLM transmission states, in addition to the binary phase information. This is done by varying the rotation angle of the polarization analyzer following the SLM in the optical train. Through this parameter, a continuum of filters may be designed that span the space of binary phase and amplitude filters (BPAFs) between BPOFs and binary amplitude filters. In this study, we investigate the design of optimal BPAFs for the key correlation characteristics of peak sharpness (through the peak-to-correlation energy (PCE) metric), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and discrimination between in-class and out-of-class images. We present simulation results illustrating improvements obtained over conventional BPOFs, and trade-offs between the different performance criteria in terms of the filter design parameter.

  10. GPS Diffractive Reflectometry and Further Developments in SNR- and Phase-based GPS Multipath Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geremia-Nievinski, F.; Ferreira e Silva, M.; Boniface, K.; Galera Monico, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The validation of remote sensing environmental estimates requires knowledge of their spatial extent and resolution. Here we consider coherent radio reflections routinely observed in ground-based GPS reflectometry. Their footprint is often conceptualized in terms of the specular point (SP) and the first Fresnel zone (FFZ). Such infinitesimal point and finite zone can be generalized into a spatially continuous sensitivity kernel (SK). The SK represents a diffraction pattern, as the importance of each surface portion depends on its power and phase scattering. We measured the SK of a GPS radio reflection under bi-path reception conditions. The SK exhibited oscillations along the plane of incidence. The envelope of oscillations peaked near the SP and persisted in its decay well beyond the FFZ. Within the FFZ, sensitivity was skewed towards the antenna. This experiment suggests the feasibility of overcoming the diffraction limit and resolving features smaller than the FFZ via GPS diffractive reflectometry. We also report more recent developments in SNR- and carrier-phase-based GPS Multipath Reflectometry.

  11. Uncued Low SNR Detection with Likelihood from Image Multi Bernoulli Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, T.; Holzinger, M.

    2016-09-01

    Both SSA and SDA necessitate uncued, partially informed detection and orbit determination efforts for small space objects which often produce only low strength electro-optical signatures. General frame to frame detection and tracking of objects includes methods such as moving target indicator, multiple hypothesis testing, direct track-before-detect methods, and random finite set based multiobject tracking. This paper will apply the multi-Bernoilli filter to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uncued detection of space objects for space domain awareness applications. The primary novel innovation in this paper is a detailed analysis of the existing state-of-the-art likelihood functions and a likelihood function, based on a binary hypothesis, previously proposed by the authors. The algorithm is tested on electro-optical imagery obtained from a variety of sensors at Georgia Tech, including the GT-SORT 0.5m Raven-class telescope, and a twenty degree field of view high frame rate CMOS sensor. In particular, a data set of an extended pass of the Hitomi Astro-H satellite approximately 3 days after loss of communication and potential break up is examined.

  12. New VLA observations of the SNR Puppis A: the radio properties and the correlation with the X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletti, G.; Dubner, G.; Golap, K.; Goss, W. M.

    2006-11-01

    Context: .High-resolution, high-sensitivity multifrequency radio images of supernova remnants (SNRs) are essential in advancing the understanding of both the global SNR dynamics and particle acceleration mechanisms. Aims: .In this paper we report on a new study of the SNR Puppis A based on VLA observations at 1425 MHz; the improvement represents a factor of two in angular resolution and almost ten times in sensitivity compared to the best previous image of Puppis A. This new image is used to compare with re-processed 327 MHz data and ROSAT and Chandra images to investigate morphological and spectral characteristics. Methods: . The observations were carried out with the VLA in the DnC and CnB configurations in 2004. After combining with single-dish data from Parkes, an angular resolution of 34'' × 16'' and an rms noise of 0.5 mJy beam-1, were achieved. Archival VLA data at 327 MHz were also processed. The spectral index distribution was then determined by a direct comparison of the homogenized data at both 327 and 1425 MHz. In addition, to identify different spectral components, tomographic spectral analysis was performed. Results: .The new 1425 MHz radio image reveals a highly structured border encircling a diffuse, featureless interior. In particular, the northern half of Puppis A displays a complex structure along the periphery, consisting of short arcs resembling "wave-like" features. These are oriented essentially perpendicular to the shock front on the NE side, but are tangential to the shock on the NW side. A remarkable correspondence between such "wave-like" features and spectral changes is observed. On the other hand, the brightest radio features (located to the E of the SNR and also detected in X-rays) have no counterpart in the spectral index distribution. Based on a uniform compilation of integrated flux densities between 19 and 8400 MHz, a global spectral index α = -0.52 ± 0.03 (S ∝ ν^α) has been determined. The new 1425 MHz image of Puppis A was

  13. Optimized filtering of regional and teleseismic seismograms: results of maximizing SNR measurements from the wavelet transform and filter banks

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R.R.; Schultz, C.; Dowla, F.

    1997-07-15

    Development of a worldwide network to monitor seismic activity requires deployment of seismic sensors in areas which have not been well studied or may have from available recordings. Development and testing of detection and discrimination algorithms requires a robust representative set of calibrated seismic events for a given region. Utilizing events with poor signal-to-noise (SNR) can add significant numbers to usable data sets, but these events must first be adequately filtered. Source and path effects can make this a difficult task as filtering demands are highly varied as a function of distance, event magnitude, bearing, depth etc. For a given region, conventional methods of filter selection can be quite subjective and may require intensive analysis of many events. In addition, filter parameters are often overly generalized or contain complicated switching. We have developed a method to provide an optimized filter for any regional or teleseismically recorded event. Recorded seismic signals contain arrival energy which is localized in frequency and time. Localized temporal signals whose frequency content is different from the frequency content of the pre-arrival record are identified using rms power measurements. The method is based on the decomposition of a time series into a set of time series signals or scales. Each scale represents a time-frequency band with a constant Q. SNR is calculated for a pre-event noise window and for a window estimated to contain the arrival. Scales with high SNR are used to indicate the band pass limits for the optimized filter.The results offer a significant improvement in SNR particularly for low SNR events. Our method provides a straightforward, optimized filter which can be immediately applied to unknown regions as knowledge of the geophysical characteristics is not required. The filtered signals can be used to map the seismic frequency response of a region and may provide improvements in travel-time picking, bearing estimation

  14. An XMM Archival Study of the LMC SNR N132D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinsky, Paul

    We propose to study the X-ray brightest supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) N132D to determine the abundances of the high Z products of nucleosynthesis (Si, S, Ca, Ar,etc.) relative to Fe and compare those values to current models of nucleosynthetic yields. We will also characterize the evolutionary parameters of the SNR (age, initial explosion energy, average initial ambient density) to place this remnant in context with studies of other remnants at different evolutionary stages. We intend to take advantage of the unique opportunity presented by the existing ~900 ks of observations acquired by XMM-Newton over the past 10 years. N132D has been routinely observed as a calibration target but the full scientific potential of these data have yet to be realized. These archival data represent the equivalent of a ``Large Program'' which would be difficult or impossible to acquire under a Guest Observer program. N132D has been extensively studied at other wavelengths and has been classified as an 'O-rich' remnant based on the optical spectra. The abundances derived from the optical suggest the progenitor was a massive star, perhaps as massive as 35 or more solar masses. The detection of only C, O, Ne, Mg, and Si in the ejecta suggest the progenitor may have been a WO Wolf Rayet star with an O rich mantle which did not mix with the deeper layers. The spectra of the bright optical knots do not show any emission from elements with higher Z than Si, yet the nucleosynthesis models predict significant quantities of these higher Z elements. Our preliminary analysis of the deep XMM-Newton data clearly show emission lines from S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, with indications of other possible lines between Ca and Fe. It is clear that the X-ray emitting and optically-emitting gas are probing different regions of the ejecta. Only with a complete characterization of all of the ejecta can a meaningful comparison to nucleosynthesis models be made and conclusions drawn about

  15. X-ray, optical, and radio properties of the extensive SNR population in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, W.; Long, S. K.; Winkler, F.; Soria, R.; Kuntz, D. K.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Dopita, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The nearly face-on spiral galaxy M83 (d=4.6 Mpc) provides a significant opportunity for finding and studying a large and diverse sample of SNRs all at the same distance, given its active star formation, a starburst nuclear region, and at least six SNe since 1923. As the result of a concerted effort involving ground and spaced-based studies at radio (ATCA), optical and NIR (Magellan 6.5m and HST), and X-ray (Chandra) wavelengths, we have identified almost 300 SNRs in M83. Of these, at least 87 and 47 were detected in the X-ray and radio bands. Some 227 of the SNR candidates are within the regions observed in [Fe II] 1.64 microns with HST WFC3/IR, and we detect ∼100 of them, including ~8 in dusty regions where the [Fe II] emission was the primary means of identification. Follow-up ground-based spectroscopy of 99 of the 300 SNRs with Gemini-S and the GMOS instrument shows that essentially all of the SNRs identified in ground-based imaging have the [S II]/Halpha ratios expected of bona fide SNRs, and that most of the SNRs in the sample are “normal ISM-dominated” SNRs, in the sense that the line widths are narrow and the spectra look like radiative shocks. We have studied a number of interesting individual SNRs and historical SNe counterparts, as well as investigating the ensemble population of nearly 300 SNRs to better understand their properties as a group, their evolution, and their impact on their host galaxy. Of particular interest is a set of the smallest diameter (and hence presumably youngest) objects measured with HST, where the 0.04arcsec WFC3-UVIS pixels correspond to ~1 pc. One SNR has very broad emission lines and given its small size, was most likely a SN that occurred during the last century but was missed. A number of the other objects are comparable to the Crab Nebula or Cas A in size, but very few show the high velocities and spectral signatures of ejecta. Rather, their spectra show low velocities and “normal” ISM-dominated emissions, albeit

  16. New high resolution VLA mosaic at 1.4 GHz of the SNR Puppis A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletti, G.; Dubner, G. M.; Golap, K.; Goss, W. M.

    2006-06-01

    We present new observations at 1.4 GHz of the supernova remnant (SNR) Puppis A made with the VLA in the hybrid DnC and CnB configurations (in 2003 and 2004, respectively). We observed this extended remnant (about 55' diameter) applying a mosaicking technique to combine 39 different pointings. The data were reduced using the AIPS++ software package. The multiscale clean method was used to deconvolve the image. The interferometric image was combined with single dish data extracted from the Parkes Southern Galactic Plane Survey (McClure-Griffiths et al. 2001, AJ, 551, 394) following a feathering technique which involves Fourier transforming of both the single dish and interferometric data onto identical grids. The new image produced by uniformly weighted visibility data, has a final angular resolution of 34 arcsec × 16 arcsec and an rms noise level of 0.5 mJy beam^{-1}; the improvement represents a factor of two in angular resolution and almost ten times in sensitivity compared to the best previous image of Puppis A at 1515 MHz (Dubner et al. 1991, AJ, 101, 1466; HPBW 77 arcsec × 43arcsec, rms noise 3 mJy beam^{-1}). For the first time a highly structured border encircling a diffuse, almost featureless interior was revealed in Puppis A. In particular the northern half of Puppis A displays a wealth of structure along the periphery consisting of short arcs that appear to be oriented rather perpendicular to the shock front on the northeast quadrant, but tangential to it on the northweast side.

  17. Performance of a novel LED lamp arrangement to reduce SNR fluctuation for multi-user visible light communication systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixiong; Yu, Changyuan; Zhong, Wen-De; Chen, Jian; Chen, Wei

    2012-02-13

    This paper investigates the performance of our recently proposed LED lamp arrangement to reduce the SNR fluctuation from different locations in the room for multi-user visible light communications. The LED lamp arrangement consists of 4 LED lamps positioned in the corners and 12 LED lamps spread evenly on a circle. Our studies show that the SNR fluctuation under such a LED lamp arrangement is reduced from 14.5 dB to 0.9 dB, which guarantees that users can obtain almost identical communication quality, regardless of their locations. After time domain zero-forcing (ZF) equalization, the BER performances and channel capacities of 100-Mbit/s and 200-Mbit/s bipolar on-off-keying (OOK) signal with most significant inter-symbol interference (ISI) are very close to that of the channel without any ISI caused by this LED lamp arrangement.

  18. SNR enhancement of highly-accelerated real-time cardiac MRI acquisitions based on non-local means algorithm.

    PubMed

    Naegel, Benoît; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Tognolini, Maurizio; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2009-08-01

    Real-time cardiac MRI appears as a promising technique to evaluate the mechanical function of the heart. However, ultra-fast MRI acquisitions come with an important signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) penalty, which drastically reduces the image quality. Hence, a real-time denoising approach would be desirable for SNR amelioration. In the clinical context of cardiac dysfunction assessment, long acquisitions are required and for most patients the acquisition takes place with free breathing. Hence, it is necessary to compensate respiratory motion in real-time. In this article, a real-time and interactive method for sequential registration and denoising of real-time MR cardiac images is presented. The method has been experimented on 60 fast MRI acquisitions in five healthy volunteers and five patients. These experiments assessed the feasibility of the method in a real-time context.

  19. Clinical NECR in 18F-FDG PET scans: optimization of injected activity and variable acquisition time. Relationship with SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, T.; Ferrer, L.; Necib, H.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Rousseau, C.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.

    2014-10-01

    The injected activity and the acquisition time per bed position for 18F-FDG PET scans are usually optimized by using metrics obtained from phantom experiments. However, optimal activity and time duration can significantly vary from a phantom set-up and from patient to patient. An approach using a patient-specific noise equivalent count rate (NECR) modelling has been previously proposed for optimizing clinical scanning protocols. We propose using the clinical NECR on a large population as a function of the body mass index (BMI) for deriving the optimal injected activity and acquisition duration per bed position. The relationship between the NEC and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was assessed both in a phantom and in a clinical setting. 491 consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated and divided into 4 BMI subgroups. Two criteria were used to optimize the injected activity and the time per bed position was adjusted using the NECR value while keeping the total acquisition time constant. Finally, the relationship between NEC and SNR was investigated using an anthropomorphic phantom and a population of 507 other patients. While the first dose regimen suggested a unique injected activity (665 MBq) regardless of the BMI, the second dose regimen proposed a variable activity and a total acquisition time according to the BMI. The NEC improvement was around 35% as compared with the local current injection rule. Variable time per bed position was derived according to BMI and anatomical region. NEC and number of true events were found to be highly correlated with SNR for the phantom set-up and partially confirmed in the patient study for the BMI subgroup under 28 kg m-2 suggesting that for the scanner, the nonlinear reconstruction algorithm used in this study and BMI < 28 kg m-2, NEC, or the number of true events linearly correlated with SNR2.

  20. Star Forming Dense Cloud Cores in the TeV -ray SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, H.; Sato, J.; Yamamoto, H.; Hayakawa, T.; Torii, K.; Moribe, N.; Kawamura, A.; Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Inoue, T.; Inutsuka, S.; Tanaka, T.; Mizuno, A.; Ogawa, H.; Stutzki, J.; Bertoldi, F.; Anderl, S.; Bronfman, L.; Koo, B.C.

    2010-10-27

    RX J1713.7-3946 is one of the TeV {gamma}-ray supernova remnants (SNRs) emitting synchrotron X rays. The SNR is associated with molecular gas located at {approx}1 kpc. We made new molecular observations toward the dense cloud cores, peaks A, C and D, in the SNR in the {sup 12}CO(J=2-1) and {sup 13}CO(J=2-1) transitions at angular resolution of 90 degrees. The most intense core in {sup 13}CO, peak C, was also mapped in the {sup 12}CO(J=4-3) transition at angular resolution of 38 degrees. Peak C shows strong signs of active star formation including bipolar outflow and a far-infrared protostellar source and has a steep gradient with a r{sup -2.2 {+-} 0.4} variation in the average density within radius r. Peak C and the other dense cloud cores are rim-brightened in synchrotron X rays, suggesting that the dense cloud cores are embedded within or on the outer boundary of the SNR shell. This confirms the earlier suggestion that the X rays are physically associated with the molecular gas (Fukui et al. 2003). We present a scenario where the densest molecular core, peak C, survived against the blast wave and is now embedded within the SNR. Numerical simulations of the shock-cloud interaction indicate that a dense clump can indeed survive shock erosion, since shock propagation speed is stalled in the dense clump. Additionally, the shock-cloud interaction induces turbulence and magnetic field amplification around the dense clump that may facilitate particle acceleration in the lower-density inter-clump space leading to the enhanced synchrotron X rays around dense cores.

  1. High-speed and high-SNR photoacoustic microscopy based on a galvanometer mirror in non-conducting liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Park, Kyungjin; Han, Sangyeob; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-10-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), a promising microscopic imaging technique with high ultrasound resolution and superior optical sensitivity, can provide anatomical, functional, and molecular information at scales ranging from the microvasculature to single red blood cells. In particular, real-time OR-PAM imaging with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prerequisite for widespread use in preclinical and clinical applications. Although several technical approaches have been pursued to simultaneously improve the imaging speed and SNR of OR-PAM, they are bulky, complex, not sensitive, and/or not actually real-time. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple and novel OR-PAM technique which is based on a typical galvanometer immersed in non-conducting liquid. Using an opto-ultrasound combiner, this OR-PAM system achieves a high SNR and fast imaging speed. It takes only 2 seconds to acquire a volumetric image with a wide field of view (FOV) of 4 × 8 mm2 along the X and Y axes, respectively. The measured lateral and axial resolutions are 6.0 and 37.7 μm, respectively. Finally, as a demonstration of the system’s capability, we successfully imaged the microvasculature in a mouse ear in vivo. Our new method will contribute substantially to the popularization and commercialization of OR-PAM in various preclinical and clinical applications.

  2. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY EMITTING EJECTA IN TYCHO’S SNR: INDICATIONS OF SHOCKED TITANIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Miceli, M.; Sciortino, S.; Orlando, S.; Troja, E.

    2015-06-01

    Young supernova remnants (SNRs) show characteristic ejecta-dominated X-ray emission that allows us to probe the products of explosive nucleosynthesis processes and to ascertain important information about the physics of supernova explosions. Hard X-ray observations have recently revealed the presence of the radioactive decay lines of {sup 44}Ti at ∼67.9 and ∼78.4 keV in Tycho’s SNR. Here, we analyze a set of XMM-Newton archive observations of Tycho’s SNR. We produce equivalent width (EW) maps of the Fe K and Ca xix emission lines and find indications for a stratification of the abundances of these elements and significant anisotropies. We then perform spatially resolved spectral analysis by identifying five different regions characterized by high/low values of the Fe K EW. We find that the spatial distribution of the Fe K emission is correlated with that of Cr xxii. We also detect the Ti K line complex in the spectra extracted from the two regions with the highest values of Fe and Cr EWs. The Ti line emission remains undetected in regions where Fe and Cr EWs are low. Our results indicate that the post-shock Ti is spatially colocated with other iron-peak nuclei in Tycho’s SNR, in agreement with the predictions of multi-D models of SNe Ia.

  3. Automatic event detection in low SNR microseismic signals based on multi-scale permutation entropy and a support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Rui-Sheng; Sun, Hong-Mei; Peng, Yan-Jun; Liang, Yong-Quan; Lu, Xin-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Microseismic monitoring is an effective means for providing early warning of rock or coal dynamical disasters, and its first step is microseismic event detection, although low SNR microseismic signals often cannot effectively be detected by routine methods. To solve this problem, this paper presents permutation entropy and a support vector machine to detect low SNR microseismic events. First, an extraction method of signal features based on multi-scale permutation entropy is proposed by studying the influence of the scale factor on the signal permutation entropy. Second, the detection model of low SNR microseismic events based on the least squares support vector machine is built by performing a multi-scale permutation entropy calculation for the collected vibration signals, constructing a feature vector set of signals. Finally, a comparative analysis of the microseismic events and noise signals in the experiment proves that the different characteristics of the two can be fully expressed by using multi-scale permutation entropy. The detection model of microseismic events combined with the support vector machine, which has the features of high classification accuracy and fast real-time algorithms, can meet the requirements of online, real-time extractions of microseismic events.

  4. Real-time Signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR) Estimation for BPSK and QPSK Modulation Using the Active Communications Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and apparatus for estimating signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gamma of a composite input signal e(t) on a phase modulated (e.g., BPSK) communications link. A first demodulator receives the composite input signal and a stable carrier signal and outputs an in-phase output signal; a second demodulator receives the composite input signal and a phase-shifted version of the carrier signal and outputs a quadrature-phase output signal; and phase error theta(sub E)(t) contained within the composite input signal e(t) is calculated from the outputs of the first and second demodulators. A time series of statistically independent phase error measurements theta(sub E)(t(sub 1)), theta (sub E)(t(sub 2)),..., theta (sub E)(t(sub k)) is obtained from the composite input signal subtending a time interval delta t = t(sub k) - t(sub 1) whose value is small enough such that gamma(t) and sigma(t) can be taken to be constant in delta t. A biased estimate gamma(sup *) for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gamma if the composite input signal is calculated using maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques, and an unbiased estimate gamma(sup ^) for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gamma of the composite input signal is determined from the biased estimate gamma(sup *), such as by use of a look-up table.

  5. High-speed and high-SNR photoacoustic microscopy based on a galvanometer mirror in non-conducting liquid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Park, Kyungjin; Han, Sangyeob; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-10-06

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), a promising microscopic imaging technique with high ultrasound resolution and superior optical sensitivity, can provide anatomical, functional, and molecular information at scales ranging from the microvasculature to single red blood cells. In particular, real-time OR-PAM imaging with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prerequisite for widespread use in preclinical and clinical applications. Although several technical approaches have been pursued to simultaneously improve the imaging speed and SNR of OR-PAM, they are bulky, complex, not sensitive, and/or not actually real-time. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple and novel OR-PAM technique which is based on a typical galvanometer immersed in non-conducting liquid. Using an opto-ultrasound combiner, this OR-PAM system achieves a high SNR and fast imaging speed. It takes only 2 seconds to acquire a volumetric image with a wide field of view (FOV) of 4 × 8 mm(2) along the X and Y axes, respectively. The measured lateral and axial resolutions are 6.0 and 37.7 μm, respectively. Finally, as a demonstration of the system's capability, we successfully imaged the microvasculature in a mouse ear in vivo. Our new method will contribute substantially to the popularization and commercialization of OR-PAM in various preclinical and clinical applications.

  6. High-speed and high-SNR photoacoustic microscopy based on a galvanometer mirror in non-conducting liquid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Changho; Park, Kyungjin; Han, Sangyeob; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), a promising microscopic imaging technique with high ultrasound resolution and superior optical sensitivity, can provide anatomical, functional, and molecular information at scales ranging from the microvasculature to single red blood cells. In particular, real-time OR-PAM imaging with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prerequisite for widespread use in preclinical and clinical applications. Although several technical approaches have been pursued to simultaneously improve the imaging speed and SNR of OR-PAM, they are bulky, complex, not sensitive, and/or not actually real-time. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple and novel OR-PAM technique which is based on a typical galvanometer immersed in non-conducting liquid. Using an opto-ultrasound combiner, this OR-PAM system achieves a high SNR and fast imaging speed. It takes only 2 seconds to acquire a volumetric image with a wide field of view (FOV) of 4 × 8 mm2 along the X and Y axes, respectively. The measured lateral and axial resolutions are 6.0 and 37.7 μm, respectively. Finally, as a demonstration of the system’s capability, we successfully imaged the microvasculature in a mouse ear in vivo. Our new method will contribute substantially to the popularization and commercialization of OR-PAM in various preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:27708379

  7. Monitoring of the volcanic plume based on the post-fit phase residual of PPP analysis and SNR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Yusaku; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-04-01

    A volcanic explosion is one of the largest energy-release phenomena on earth. For example, vulcanian eruptions usually eject large amounts of rock mass, tephra, and volcanic ash. Ash fall from such events can seriously affect the structural integrity of buildings, in addition to disrupting land and air traffic. Therefore, the monitoring and prediction of ash fall is very important. In this study, using data from a dense GNSS network, we investigated the spatiotemporal development of the volcanic plume ejected by the vulcanian eruption in Sakurajima, southwestern Japan on July 24, 2012. We extracted the post-fit phase residuals (PPR) of ionosphere-free linear combinations for each satellite based on the precise point positioning approach. Temporal and spatial PPR anomalies clearly detected the movement of the volcanic plume. The maximum height of the crossing points of anomalous PPR paths was determined to be approximately 4000 m. We then compared the PPR with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) anomalies. Only the path passing just above the crater showed significant change in the SNR value, suggesting that the volcanic ash and the water vapor within the volcanic plume became separated after reaching a high altitude because of ash fall during the plume's lateral movement. In the presentation, we will introduce the eruption in Shin-dake (Kuchinoerabu island, southwestern Japan) on May 29, 2015 based on the SNR data.

  8. Automated SVD filtering of time-frequency distribution for enhancing the SNR of microseismic/microquake events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Naveed; Zerguine, Azzedine; Kaka, SanLinn; Al-Shuhail, Abdullatif

    2016-12-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in continuous passive recording of passive microseismic experiments during reservoir fluid-injection monitoring, hydraulic-fracture monitoring and fault-movement monitoring, to name a few. The ability to accurately detect and analyze microseismic events generated by these activities is valuable in monitoring them. However, microseismic events usually have very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), especially when monitoring sensors (receivers) are located at the surface where coherent and non-coherent noise sources are overwhelming. Therefore, enhancing the SNR of the microseismic event will improve the localization process over the reservoir. In this study, a new method of enhancing the microseismic event is presented which relies on one trace per receiver record unlike other methods. The proposed method relies on a time-frequency representation and noise eliminating process which uses the singular-value decomposition (SVD) technique. Furthermore, the SVD is applied on the matrix representing the time-frequency decomposition of a trace. More importantly, an automated SVD filtering is proposed, so the SVD filtering becomes observation-driven instead of user-defined. Finally, it is shown that the proposed technique gives promising results with very low SNR, making it suitable to locate passive microseismic events even if the sensors are located on the surface.

  9. The X-space formulation of the magnetic particle imaging process: 1-D signal, resolution, bandwidth, SNR, SAR, and magnetostimulation.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Conolly, Steven M

    2010-11-01

    The magnetic particle imaging (MPI) imaging process is a new method of medical imaging with great promise. In this paper we derive the 1-D MPI signal, resolution, bandwidth requirements, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), specific absorption rate, and slew rate limitations. We conclude with experimental data measuring the point spread function for commercially available SPIO nanoparticles and a demonstration of the principles behind 1-D imaging using a static offset field. Despite arising from the nonlinear temporal response of a magnetic nanoparticle to a changing magnetic field, the imaging process is linear in the magnetization distribution and can be described as a convolution. Reconstruction in one dimension is exact and has a well-behaved quasi-Lorentzian point spread function.The spatial resolution improves cubically with increasing diameter of the SPIO domain, inverse to absolute temperature, linearly with saturation magnetization, and inversely with gradient. The band width requirements approach a megahertz for reasonable imaging parameters and millimeter scale resolutions, and the SNR increases with the scanning rate. The limit to SNR as we scale MPI to human sizes will be patient heating. SAR and magnetostimulation limits give us surprising relations between optimal scanning speeds and scanning frequency for different types of scanners.

  10. Nature of the Diffuse Source and Its Central Point-like Source in SNR 0509–67.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litke, Katrina C.; Chu, You-Hua; Holmes, Abigail; Santucci, Robert; Blindauer, Terrence; Gruendl, Robert A.; Li, Chuan-Jui; Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Ricker, Paul M.; Weisz, Daniel R.

    2017-03-01

    We examine a diffuse emission region near the center of SNR 0509‑67.5 to determine its nature. Within this diffuse region we observe a point-like source that is bright in the near-IR, but is not visible in the B and V bands. We consider an emission line observed at 6766 Å and the possibilities that it is Lyα, Hα, and [O ii] λ3727. We examine the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the source, comprised of Hubble Space Telescope B, V, I, J, and H bands in addition to Spitzer/IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 μm bands. The peak of the SED is consistent with a background galaxy at z ≈ 0.8 ± 0.2 and a possible Balmer jump places the galaxy at z ≈ 0.9 ± 0.3. These SED considerations support the emission line’s identification as [O ii] λ3727. We conclude that the diffuse source in SNR 0509‑67.5 is a background galaxy at z ≈ 0.82. Furthermore, we identify the point-like source superposed near the center of the galaxy as its central bulge. Finally, we find no evidence for a surviving companion star, indicating a double-degenerate origin for SNR 0509‑67.5.

  11. Effects of Postdetection on SNR in Optical Communications. How Various Types of Postdetection Affect the Performance of the Direct-Detection Optical Receiver.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-11

    Afl-AIOG1 536 NAVAL OCEAN SYSTEMS CENTER SAN DIEGO CA F/G 17/2 EFFECTS OF POSTDETECTION ON SNR IN OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS. HOW --ETC(U) JUN 81 R R...JAMES UNCLASSIFIED NOSC/TR-699 N EiEEEEEEEEE[N z (40 Technical Report 699 EFFECTS OF POSTDETECTION ON * SNR IN OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS How various types...ERIOD COVERED EFFECTS OF POSTDETECTION ON SNR IN OPTICAL COMMUNI- Interim CATIONS . FY81 How various types of postdetection affect the performance of

  12. EPIC Study of Two Enigmatic Sources: The Mouse and SNR 359.1-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, George

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the original proposal was to observe the Mouse pulsar wind nebula (associated with PSR J1744-2958) and the nearby supernova remnant G359.1-0.5, where the pulsar was probably born, with the XMM-Newton observatory to study the properties of these objects. SNR G359.1-0.5 was accepted as a Category C target and has not been observed. The Mouse was observed on April 27,2003 for 52 ks. The image analysis has shown that the Mouse is extended in the East-West direction, possibly along the direction of the pulsar's proper motion. The spectrum of this pulsar wind nebula can be described as an absorbed power law with the photon index GAMMA = 1.9 plus or minus 0.1, effective hydrogen column density n(sub H) = (2.6 plus or minus 0.1) x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, and flux F = 1.8 x 10(exp -11) erg per square centimeter per second in the 1-10 keV energy range. Based on the n(sub H) value, the distance to the source is about 5 kpc, which results in the luminosity 3.7 x 10(exp 34) erg per second. We conclude that PSR J1744-2958 and the Mouse are not physically associated with G359.1-0.5, which lies at a larger distance. In addition to the Mouse, we also detected two Low-Mass X-ray Binaries, SLX 1744-299 and 1744-300, in the EPIC MOS and PN fields of view. The latter of these objects showed a Type I X-ray burst during our observation, with a rise time of 5 s and decay time of 60 s. A very strong pileup during the burst made the analysis of the burst properties unreliable. The spectral analysis of the persistent radiation from SLX 1744-299 and 1744-300 yields the hydrogen column densities of 3.2 plus or minus 0.1 and (3.6 plus or minus 0.2) x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter, respectively, which suggests that the sources are close to the Galactic center (d = 8-9 kpc). The spectra can be reasonably well fitted with a blackbody plus thin disk model, with the blackbody temperatures of 1.7 plus or minus 0.2 and 1.8 plus or minus 0.2 keV, respectively.

  13. The Galactic Plane region near ℓ = 93°. II. A stellar wind bubble surrounding SNR 3C 434.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Routledge, D.; Kothes, R.

    2004-04-01

    New Canadian Galactic Plane Survey λ 21 cm H I line observations towards supernova remnant (SNR) 3C 434.1 (G94.0+1.0) are presented. We find a fragmented and thin-walled atomic hydrogen shell inside which the SNR is seen to be contained at v≃ -80 km s-1, which we report to be a highly evolved stellar wind bubble (SWB) associated with the remnant. A dark area in the midst of otherwise bright line emission is also seen near -71 km s-1. An absorption profile to the extragalactic continuum source 4C 51.45 (superimposed on the shell's north face) allows us to probe the shell's optical depth, kinetic temperature and expansion velocity. The material in the dark area has the same properties as material in the fragmented shell, suggesting that the dark area is actually the far-side ``cap'' of the shell seen absorbing emission from warm background gas, the first instance of H I Self Absorption (HISA) seen in such a structure. We show that the kinematic distance of 10 kpc derived from a flat Galactic rotation model is highly improbable, and that this bubble/SNR system is most likely resident in the Perseus Spiral Arm, lying 5.2 kpc distant. We model the SWB shell in three dimensions as a homologously expanding ellipsoid. Physical and dynamical characteristics of the bubble are determined, showing its advanced evolutionary state. Finally, from a photometric search for one or more stars associated with the SWB, we determine that three B0V stars and one O4V star currently inhabit this bubble, and that the progenitor of 3C 434.1 was at latest also an O4 type star.

  14. Timing considerations for preclinical MRgRT: effects of ion diffusion, SNR and imaging times on FXG gel calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, M.; Foltz, W. D.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Sub-millimeter resolution images are required for gel dosimeters to be used in preclinical research, which is challenging for MR probed ferrous xylenol-orange (FXG) dosimeters due to ion diffusion and inadequate SNR. A preclinical 7 T MR, small animal irradiator and FXG dosimeters were used in all experiments. Ion diffusion was analyzed using high resolution (0.2 mm/pixel) T1 MR images collected every 5 minutes, post-irradiation, for an hour. Using Fick's second law, ion diffusion was approximated for the first hour post-irradiation. SNR, T1 map precision and calibration fit were determined for two MR protocols: (1) 10 minute acquisition, 0.35mm/pixel and 3mm slices, (2) 45 minute acquisition, 0. 25 mm/pixel and 2 mm slices. SNR and T1 map precision were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation. Calibration curves were determined by plotting R1 relaxation rates versus depth dose data, and fitting a linear trend line. Ion diffusion was estimated as 0.003mm2 in the first hour post-irradiation. For protocols (1) and (2) respectively, Monte Carlo simulation predicted T1 precisions of 3% and 5% within individual voxels using experimental SNRs; the corresponding measured T1 precisions were 8% and 12%. The linear trend lines reported slopes of 27 ± 3 Gy*s (R2: 0.80 ± 0.04) and 27 ± 4 Gy*s (R2: 0.90 ± 0.04). Ion diffusion is negligible within the first hour post-irradiation, and an accurate and reproducible calibration can be achieved in a preclinical setting with sub-millimeter resolution.

  15. Combining parallel detection of proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) measurements with a data-consistency constraint improves SNR.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Chu, Ying-Hua; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2015-12-01

    One major challenge of MRSI is the poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which can be improved by using a surface coil array. Here we propose to exploit the spatial sensitivity of different channels of a coil array to enforce the k-space data consistency (DC) in order to suppress noise and consequently to improve MRSI SNR. MRSI data were collected using a proton echo planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) sequence at 3 T using a 32-channel coil array and were averaged with one, two and eight measurements (avg-1, avg-2 and avg-8). The DC constraint was applied using a regularization parameter λ of 1, 2, 3, 5 or 10. Metabolite concentrations were quantified using LCModel. Our results show that the suppression of noise by applying the DC constraint to PEPSI reconstruction yields up to 32% and 27% SNR gain for avg-1 and avg-2 data with λ = 5, respectively. According to the reported Cramer-Rao lower bounds, the improvement in metabolic fitting was significant (p < 0.01) when the DC constraint was applied with λ ≥ 2. Using the DC constraint with λ = 3 or 5 can minimize both root-mean-square errors and spatial variation for all subjects using the avg-8 data set as reference values. Our results suggest that MRSI reconstructed with a DC constraint can save around 70% of scanning time to obtain images and spectra with similar SNRs using λ = 5.

  16. THE PROGENITOR OF THE TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA THAT CREATED SNR 0519-69.0 IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Zachary I.; Pagnotta, Ashley; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2012-03-10

    Models for the progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae can be divided into double-degenerate systems, which contain two white dwarfs, and single-degenerate systems, which contain one white dwarf plus one companion star (either a red giant, a subgiant, or a >1.16 M{sub Sun} main-sequence star). The white dwarf is destroyed in the supernova explosion, but any non-degenerate companion remains intact. We present the results of a search for an ex-companion star in SNR 0519-69.0, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope with a limiting magnitude of V = 26.05. SNR 0519-69.0 is confidently known to be from a Type Ia supernova based on its light echoes and X-ray spectra. The geometric center of the remnant (based on the H{alpha} and X-ray shell) is at 05:19:34.83, -69:02:06.92 (J2000). Accounting for the measurement uncertainties, the orbital velocity, and the kick velocity, any ex-companion star must be within 4.''7 of this position at the 99.73% confidence level. This circle contains 27 main-sequence stars brighter than V = 22.7, any one of which could be the ex-companion star left over from a supersoft source progenitor system. The circle contains no post-main-sequence stars, and this rules out the possibility of all other published single-degenerate progenitor classes (including symbiotic stars, recurrent novae, helium donors, and the spin-up/spin-down models) for this particular supernova. The only remaining possibility is that SNR 0519-69.0 was formed from either a supersoft source or a double-degenerate progenitor system.

  17. Late-Time Evolution of Composite Supernova Remnants: Deep Chandra Observations and Hydrodynamical Modeling of a Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in SNR G327.1-1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P.; Bucciantini, Niccolo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 ks Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology; a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock(RS) that can occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center of the remnant. We present hydrodynamical simulations of G327.1-1.1 that show that its morphology and evolution can be described by a approx. 17,000 yr old composite SNR that expanded into a density gradient with an orientation perpendicular to the pulsar's motion. We also show that the RSPWN interaction scenario can reproduce the broadband spectrum of the PWN from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The analysis and modeling presented in this work have important implications for our general understanding of the structure and evolution of composite SNRs.

  18. LATE-TIME EVOLUTION OF COMPOSITE SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS AND HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELING OF A CRUSHED PULSAR WIND NEBULA IN SNR G327.1-1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P.; Bucciantini, Niccoló

    2015-07-20

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology: a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for a mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock (RS), whichcan occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and/or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center of the remnant. We present hydrodynamical simulations of G327.1-1.1 that show that its morphology and evolution can be described by a ∼17,000-year-old composite SNR that expanded into a density gradient with an orientation perpendicular to the pulsar’s motion. We also show that the RS/PWN interaction scenario can reproduce the broadband spectrum of the PWN from radio to γ-ray wavelengths. The analysis and modeling presented in this work have important implications for our general understanding of the structure and evolution of composite SNRs.

  19. Correlation between audio-visual enhancement of speech in different noise environments and SNR: a combined behavioral and electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Lin, Y; Gao, X; Dang, J

    2013-09-05

    In the present study, we investigated the multisensory gain as the difference of speech recognition accuracies between the audio-visual (AV) and auditory-only (A) conditions, and the multisensory gain as the difference between the event-related potentials (ERPs) evoked under the AV condition and the sum of the ERPs evoked under the A and visual-only (V) conditions in different noise environments. Videos of a female speaker articulating the Chinese monosyllable words accompanied with different levels of pink noise were used as the stimulus materials. The selected signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were -16, -12, -8, -4 and 0 dB. Under the A, V and AV conditions the accuracy of the speech recognition was measured and the ERPs evoked under different conditions were analyzed, respectively. The behavioral results showed that the maximum gain as the difference of speech recognition accuracies between the AV and A conditions was at the -12 dB SNR. The ERP results showed that the multisensory gain as the difference between the ERPs evoked under the AV condition and the sum of ERPs evoked under the A and V conditions at the -12 dB SNR was significantly higher than those at the other SNRs in the time window of 130-200 ms in the area from frontal to central region. The multisensory gains in audio-visual speech recognition at different SNRs were not completely accordant with the principle of inverse effectiveness, but confirmed to cross-modal stochastic resonance.

  20. Space-borne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery noise eliminating based on CFFT self-adapted by optimal SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjie; Lin, Qizhong; Wang, Liming; Wang, Qinjun; Miao, Fengxian

    2010-09-01

    Space-borne hyperspectral remote sensing imagery, supplying both spatial and spectral information for quantitative remote sensing monitoring, is easily polluted by noises from atmosphere, terrain etc. Based on spectral continuum removing and recovering, traditional fast Fourier Transform (FFT) was extended to Continuum Fast Fourier Transform (CFFT) to separate noise from target information in frequency domain (FD). Thus, low-pass filter for reserving useful information was designed for eliminating noise, with its cut-off frequency selected self-adaptively by optimal signal-tonoise ratio (SNR). Hyperion hyperspectral imageries of Beijing and Xinjiang China were singled out for noise removing to validate the filtering ability of the Continuum Fast Fourier Transform self-adapted by Optimal Signal-noise Ratio(CFFTOSNR) method with qualitative description and quantificational indexs, including mean, variance, entropy, definition and SNR etc. Experiment result shows that CFFTOSNR does well in reducing the gauss white noises in spectral domain and stripe and band-subtracting noise in spatial domain respectively, while the quantificational indexs of filtered imagery are all improved, with entropy of post-processed image obviously increased by 5 db.

  1. Young Remnants of Type Ia Supernovae and Their Progenitors: A Study of SNR G1.9+0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Childs, Francesca; Soderberg, Alicia

    2016-03-01

    SNe Ia, with their remarkably homogeneous light curves and spectra, have been used as standardizable candles to measure the accelerating expansion of the universe. Yet, their progenitors remain elusive. Common explanations invoke a degenerate star (white dwarf) that explodes upon almost reaching the Chandrasekhar limit, by either steadily accreting mass from a companion star or violently merging with another degenerate star. We show that circumstellar interaction in young Galactic supernova remnants can be used to distinguish between these single and double degenerate (DD) progenitor scenarios. Here we propose a new diagnostic, the surface brightness index, which can be computed from theory and compared with Chandra and Very Large Array (VLA) observations. We use this method to demonstrate that a DD progenitor can explain the decades-long flux rise and size increase of the youngest known galactic supernova remnant (SNR), G1.9+0.3. We disfavor a single degenerate scenario for SNR G1.9+0.3. We attribute the observed properties to the interaction between a steep ejecta profile and a constant density environment. We suggest using the upgraded VLA, ASKAP, and MeerKAT to detect circumstellar interaction in the remnants of historical SNe Ia in the Local Group of galaxies. This may settle the long-standing debate over their progenitors.

  2. DISCOVERY OF VERY HIGH ENERGY {gamma}-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SNR G54.1+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Butt, Y.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.; Finnegan, G. E-mail: wakely@uchicago.ed

    2010-08-10

    We report the discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from the direction of the SNR G54.1+0.3 using the VERITAS ground-based gamma-ray observatory. The TeV signal has an overall significance of 6.8{sigma} and appears pointlike given the resolution of the instrument. The integral flux above 1 TeV is 2.5% of the Crab Nebula flux and significant emission is measured between 250 GeV and 4 TeV, well described by a power-law energy spectrum dN/dE {approx} E {sup -{Gamma}} with a photon index {Gamma} = 2.39 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.30{sub sys}. We find no evidence of time variability among observations spanning almost two years. Based on the location, the morphology, the measured spectrum, the lack of variability, and a comparison with similar systems previously detected in the TeV band, the most likely counterpart of this new VHE gamma-ray source is the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) in the SNR G54.1+0.3. The measured X-ray to VHE gamma-ray luminosity ratio is the lowest among all the nebulae supposedly driven by young rotation-powered pulsars, which could indicate a particle-dominated PWN.

  3. PSR J1833-1034, the Very Young Pulsar in SNR G21.5-0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo, Fernando; Gaensler, Bryan; Manchester, Dick; Ransom, Scott; Lorimer, Duncan Ross

    2007-04-01

    We have been timing the very young pulsar PSR J1833-1034, recently discovered near the center of the supernova remnant (SNR) G21.5-0.9 (Camilo et al. 2006). With 16 months of timing data in hand we have confirmed that the pulsar is coincident, to sub-arcsec precision, with the centrally-peaked X-ray source visible in Chandra data near the center of G21.5-0.9 and have therefore confirmed this pulsar-SNR association beyond any doubt. More unexpectedly, we have been able to measure this pulsar's braking index, n = 2.18, only the 6th such phase-coherent measurement done in over 1700 pulsars known. We now have a chance to measure the "second braking index" and place further constraints on the spin-down law obeyed by this pulsar. This has been done to date for only 2 pulsars. Finally, we wish to continue timing this pulsar because it will be one of the prime candidates for gamma-ray detection with the GLAST satellite to be launched in 2007, and in order to do so we must maintain its timing solution. For these reasons we request 24 hr for timing PSR J1833-1034 during the present semester.

  4. YOUNG REMNANTS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR PROGENITORS: A STUDY OF SNR G1.9+0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Childs, Francesca; Soderberg, Alicia

    2016-03-01

    SNe Ia, with their remarkably homogeneous light curves and spectra, have been used as standardizable candles to measure the accelerating expansion of the universe. Yet, their progenitors remain elusive. Common explanations invoke a degenerate star (white dwarf) that explodes upon almost reaching the Chandrasekhar limit, by either steadily accreting mass from a companion star or violently merging with another degenerate star. We show that circumstellar interaction in young Galactic supernova remnants can be used to distinguish between these single and double degenerate (DD) progenitor scenarios. Here we propose a new diagnostic, the surface brightness index, which can be computed from theory and compared with Chandra and Very Large Array (VLA) observations. We use this method to demonstrate that a DD progenitor can explain the decades-long flux rise and size increase of the youngest known galactic supernova remnant (SNR), G1.9+0.3. We disfavor a single degenerate scenario for SNR G1.9+0.3. We attribute the observed properties to the interaction between a steep ejecta profile and a constant density environment. We suggest using the upgraded VLA, ASKAP, and MeerKAT to detect circumstellar interaction in the remnants of historical SNe Ia in the Local Group of galaxies. This may settle the long-standing debate over their progenitors.

  5. Evaluation of Free Breathing Versus Breath Hold Diffusion Weighted Imaging in Terms Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) and Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) Values for Solid Abdominal Organs

    PubMed Central

    Herek, Duygu; Karabulut, Nevzat; Kocyıgıt, Ali; Yagcı, Ahmet Baki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Our aim was to compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of normal abdominal parenchymal organs and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements in the same patients with breath hold (BH) and free breathing (FB) diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Material/Methods Forty-eight patients underwent both BH and FB DWI. Spherical region of interest (ROI) was placed on the right hepatic lobe, spleen, pancreas, and renal cortices. ADC values were calculated for each organ on each sequence using an automated software. Image noise, defined as the standard deviation (SD) of the signal intensities in the most artifact-free area of the image background was measured by placing the largest possible ROI on either the left or the right side of the body outside the object in the recorded field of view. SNR was calculated using the formula: SNR=signal intensity (SI)(organ)/standard deviation (SD)(noise). Results There were no statistically significant differences in ADC values of the abdominal organs between BH and FB DWI sequences (p>0.05). There were statistically significant differences between SNR values of organs on BH and FB DWIs. SNRs were found to be better on FB DWI than BH DWI (p<0.001). Conclusions Free breathing DWI technique reduces image noise and increases SNR for abdominal examinations. Free breathing technique is therefore preferable to BH DWI in the evaluation of abdominal organs by DWI. PMID:27822326

  6. DISCOVERY OF TeV GAMMA-RAY EMISSION TOWARD SUPERNOVA REMNANT SNR G78.2+2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; and others

    2013-06-20

    We report the discovery of an unidentified, extended source of very-high-energy gamma-ray emission, VER J2019+407, within the radio shell of the supernova remnant SNR G78.2+2.1, using 21.4 hr of data taken by the VERITAS gamma-ray observatory in 2009. These data confirm the preliminary indications of gamma-ray emission previously seen in a two-year (2007-2009) blind survey of the Cygnus region by VERITAS. VER J2019+407, which is detected at a post-trials significance of 7.5 standard deviations in the 2009 data, is localized to the northwestern rim of the remnant in a region of enhanced radio and X-ray emission. It has an intrinsic extent of 0.23 Degree-Sign .23 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 03{sub stat-0 Degree-Sign .02sys}{sup +0 Degree-Sign .04} and its spectrum is well-characterized by a differential power law (dN/dE = N{sub 0} Multiplication-Sign (E/TeV){sup -{Gamma}}) with a photon index of {Gamma} = 2.37 {+-} 0.14{sub stat} {+-} 0.20{sub sys} and a flux normalization of N{sub 0} = 1.5 {+-} 0.2{sub stat} {+-} 0.4{sub sys} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} photon TeV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. This yields an integral flux of 5.2 {+-} 0.8{sub stat} {+-} 1.4{sub sys} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} above 320 GeV, corresponding to 3.7% of the Crab Nebula flux. We consider the relationship of the TeV gamma-ray emission with the GeV gamma-ray emission seen from SNR G78.2+2.1 as well as that seen from a nearby cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays. Multiple scenarios are considered as possible origins for the TeV gamma-ray emission, including hadronic particle acceleration at the SNR shock.

  7. Discovery of dominant and dormant genes from expression data using a novel generalization of SNR for multi-class problems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Lin, Chin-Teng; Tseng, George C; Chung, I-Fang; Pal, Nikhil Ranjan

    2008-01-01

    Background The Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) is often used for identification of biomarkers for two-class problems and no formal and useful generalization of SNR is available for multiclass problems. We propose innovative generalizations of SNR for multiclass cancer discrimination through introduction of two indices, Gene Dominant Index and Gene Dormant Index (GDIs). These two indices lead to the concepts of dominant and dormant genes with biological significance. We use these indices to develop methodologies for discovery of dominant and dormant biomarkers with interesting biological significance. The dominancy and dormancy of the identified biomarkers and their excellent discriminating power are also demonstrated pictorially using the scatterplot of individual gene and 2-D Sammon's projection of the selected set of genes. Using information from the literature we have shown that the GDI based method can identify dominant and dormant genes that play significant roles in cancer biology. These biomarkers are also used to design diagnostic prediction systems. Results and discussion To evaluate the effectiveness of the GDIs, we have used four multiclass cancer data sets (Small Round Blue Cell Tumors, Leukemia, Central Nervous System Tumors, and Lung Cancer). For each data set we demonstrate that the new indices can find biologically meaningful genes that can act as biomarkers. We then use six machine learning tools, Nearest Neighbor Classifier (NNC), Nearest Mean Classifier (NMC), Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier with linear kernel, and SVM classifier with Gaussian kernel, where both SVMs are used in conjunction with one-vs-all (OVA) and one-vs-one (OVO) strategies. We found GDIs to be very effective in identifying biomarkers with strong class specific signatures. With all six tools and for all data sets we could achieve better or comparable prediction accuracies usually with fewer marker genes than results reported in the literature using the same computational

  8. Detailed study of SNR G306.3-0.9 using XMM-Newton and Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, J. A.; García, F.; Suárez, A. E.; Luque-Escamilla, P. L.; Paron, S.; Miceli, M.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We aim to study the spatial distribution of the physical and chemical properties of the X-ray emitting plasma of the supernova remnant (SNR) G306.3-0.9 in detail to obtain constraints on its ionization stage, the progenitor supernova explosion, and the age of the remnant. Methods: We used combined data from XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories to study the X-ray morphology of G306.3-0.9 in detail. A spatially resolved spectral analysis was used to obtain physical and geometrical parameters of different regions of the remnant. Spitzer infrared observations, available in the archive, were also used to constrain the progenitor supernova and study the environment in which the remnant evolved. Results: The X-ray morphology of the remnant displays a non-uniform structure of semi-circular appearance, with a bright southwest region and very weak or almost negligible X-ray emission in its northern part. These results indicate that the remnant is propagating in a non-uniform environment as the shock fronts are encountering a high-density medium, where enhanced infrared emission is detected. The X-ray spectral analysis of the selected regions shows distinct emission-line features of several metal elements, confirming the thermal origin of the emission. The X-ray spectra are well represented by a combination of two absorbed thermal plasma models: one in equilibrium ionization (VAPEC) with a mean temperature of ~0.19 keV, and another out of equilibrium ionization (VNEI) at a higher temperature of ~1.1 or 1.6-1.9 keV. For regions located in the northeast, central, and southwest part of the SNR, we found elevated abundances of Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, typical of ejecta material. The outer regions located northwest and south show values of the abundances above solar but lower than to those found in the central regions. This suggests that the composition of the emitting outer parts of the SNR is a combination of ejecta and shocked material of the interstellar medium. The

  9. The x ray population in globular clusters and three crab-like SNR in the large Magellanic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This document is to serve as the requisite Final Technical Report on grant NAG5-1557 which was awarded under the NASA ROSAT Guest Investigator Program to Columbia University. In response to the NASA Research Anouncement describing the first round of Guest Investigations to be carried out under the U.S.-German ROSAT Program (AO-1), the PI submitted several proposals, three of which were accepted in part: (1) the x-ray population of globular clusters; (2) three crab-like SNR in the Large Magellanic Cloud; and (3) x rays from nearby radio pulsars. The status of these three programs as of 31 May 1993, the termination date of the grant, is reported.

  10. New Hubble Space Telescope Observations of High-Velocity Ly(alpha) and H(alpha) in SNR 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, Eli; McCray, Richard; Pun, C. S. J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz; Garnavich, Peter; Challis, Peter; Kirshner, Robert P.; Chevalier, Roger; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Panagia, Nino; Phillips, Mark; Schmidt, Brian; Suntzef, Nicholas

    1998-01-01

    We describe and model high-velocity (approximately 15,000 km S(exp -1)) Ly Alpha and H Alpha emission from the supernova remnant SNR 1987A seen in 1997 September and October with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. Part of this emission comes from a reverse shock located at approximately 75% of the radius of the inner boundary ofthe innercircumstellar ring and confined within + or - 30 degrees of the equatorial plane. Departure from axisymmetry in the Ly Alpha and H Alpha emission correlates with that seen in nonthermal radio emission and reveals an asymmetry in the circumstellar gas distribution. We also see diffuse high-velocity Ly-Alpha emission from supernova debris inside the reverse shock that may be due to excitation by nonthermal particles accelerated by the shock.

  11. X-RAY EMISSION FROM HESS J1731-347/SNR G353.6-0.7 AND CENTRAL COMPACT SOURCE XMMS J173203-344518

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, W. W.; Li, Z.; Leahy, D. A.; Yang, J.; Lu, D.; Yang, X. J.; Yamazaki, R. E-mail: wtian@ucalgary.c

    2010-04-01

    We present new results of the HESS J1731-347/SNR G353.6-0.7 system from XMM-Newton and Suzaku X-ray observations and Delinha CO observations. We discover extended hard X-rays coincident with the bright, extended TeV source HESS J1731-347 and the shell of the radio supernova remnant (SNR). We find that spatially resolved X-ray spectra can generally be characterized by an absorbed power-law model, with a photon index of {approx}2, typical of non-thermal emission. A bright X-ray compact source, XMMS J173203-344518, is also detected near the center of the SNR. We find no evidence of a radio counterpart or an extended X-ray morphology for this source, making it unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebular (PWN). The spectrum of the source can be well fitted by an absorbed blackbody with a temperature of {approx}0.5 keV plus a power-law tail with a photon index of {approx}5, reminiscent of the X-ray emission of a magnetar. CO observations toward the inner part of the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) source reveal a bright cloud component at -20 +- 4 km s{sup -1}, which is likely located at the same distance of {approx}3.2 kpc as the SNR. Based on the probable association between the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions and likely association between the CO cloud and the SNR, we argue that the extended TeV emission originates from the interaction between the SNR shock and the adjacent CO clouds rather than from a PWN.

  12. Far-Flung Filaments of Fast Ejecta in the Oxygen-Rich SNR G292.0+1.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. F.; Reith, C. N.; Long, K. S.

    2005-05-01

    New optical images of the young supernova remnant (SNR) G292.0+1.8, obtained from the 0.9-m telescope at CTIO, show a far more extensive network of filaments than previous data indicate. Images in [O III] show filaments distributed throughout much of the 8 arcmin diameter shell seen in X-ray and radio images. Many of the outer filaments have a radial, pencil-like morphology that is very suggestive of Rayleigh-Tayor fingers. Comparison of images from epochs 1986-2002 shows filamentary proper motions roughly in the direction of these fingers, consistent with expansion from a point near the central pulsar with a kinematic age of about 3000 yr. Simulations of core-collapse supernovae predict the development of such fingers, but they have never before been so clearly observed in a young SNR. In addition to the extensive [O III] filaments, we have detected three small complexes of filaments that show [S II] emission along with the oxygen lines. None of the fast filaments, with or without [S II], show any evidence for hydrogen; all must be composed of pure supernova ejecta. Limited spectra indicate differences of more than a factor of 5 in the relative strengths of S and O lines, which cannot be attributed to differences in excitation. The progenitor to G292.0+1.8 must have undergone at least some oxygen burning, the products of which have been mixed in variable amounts into at least a few filaments of ejecta. This research has been funded primarily by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0307613.

  13. A push-pull CORF model of a simple cell with antiphase inhibition improves SNR and contour detection.

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, George; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Antonio; Piater, Justus; Petkov, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    We propose a computational model of a simple cell with push-pull inhibition, a property that is observed in many real simple cells. It is based on an existing model called Combination of Receptive Fields or CORF for brevity. A CORF model uses as afferent inputs the responses of model LGN cells with appropriately aligned center-surround receptive fields, and combines their output with a weighted geometric mean. The output of the proposed model simple cell with push-pull inhibition, which we call push-pull CORF, is computed as the response of a CORF model cell that is selective for a stimulus with preferred orientation and preferred contrast minus a fraction of the response of a CORF model cell that responds to the same stimulus but of opposite contrast. We demonstrate that the proposed push-pull CORF model improves signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and achieves further properties that are observed in real simple cells, namely separability of spatial frequency and orientation as well as contrast-dependent changes in spatial frequency tuning. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed push-pull CORF model in contour detection, which is believed to be the primary biological role of simple cells. We use the RuG (40 images) and Berkeley (500 images) benchmark data sets of images with natural scenes and show that the proposed model outperforms, with very high statistical significance, the basic CORF model without inhibition, Gabor-based models with isotropic surround inhibition, and the Canny edge detector. The push-pull CORF model that we propose is a contribution to a better understanding of how visual information is processed in the brain as it provides the ability to reproduce a wider range of properties exhibited by real simple cells. As a result of push-pull inhibition a CORF model exhibits an improved SNR, which is the reason for a more effective contour detection.

  14. Detailed Investigation of the Gamma-Ray Emission in the Vicinity of SNR W28 with FERMI-LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanabata, Y.; Katagiri, H.; Hewitt, John William; Ballet, J.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fukui, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Strong, A. W.; Torres, D. F.; Yamazaki, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the Gamma-ray emission in the vicinity of the supernova remnant (SNR) W28 (G6.4-0.1) observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We detected significant ? -ray emission spatially coincident with TeV sources HESS J1800-240A, B, and C, located outside the radio boundary of the SNR. Their spectra in the 2-100 GeV band are consistent with the extrapolation of the power-law spectra of the TeV sources. We also identified a new source of GeV emission, dubbed Source W, which lies outside the boundary of TeV sources and coincides with radio emission from the western part of W28. All of the GeV Gamma-ray sources overlap with molecular clouds in the velocity range from 0 to 20 km s (exp-1). Under the assumption that the Gamma-ray emission toward HESS J1800-240A, B, and C comes from 3.14(exp0) decay due to the interaction between the molecular clouds and cosmic rays (CRs) escaping from W28, they can be naturally explained by a single model in which the CR diffusion coefficient is smaller than the theoretical expectation in the interstellar space. The total energy of the CRs escaping from W28 is constrained through the same modeling to be larger than is approximately 2 × 10(exp49) erg. The emission from Source W can also be explained with the same CR escape scenario.

  15. Detailed investigation of the gamma-ray emission in the vicinity of SNR W28 with Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Hanabata, Y.; Katagiri, H.; Hewitt, J.W.; Ballet, J.; Fukui, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Strong, A. W.; Yamazaki, R. E-mail: katagiri@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp

    2014-05-10

    We present a detailed investigation of the γ-ray emission in the vicinity of the supernova remnant (SNR) W28 (G6.4–0.1) observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We detected significant γ-ray emission spatially coincident with TeV sources HESS J1800–240A, B, and C, located outside the radio boundary of the SNR. Their spectra in the 2-100 GeV band are consistent with the extrapolation of the power-law spectra of the TeV sources. We also identified a new source of GeV emission, dubbed Source W, which lies outside the boundary of TeV sources and coincides with radio emission from the western part of W28. All of the GeV γ-ray sources overlap with molecular clouds in the velocity range from 0 to 20 km s{sup –1}. Under the assumption that the γ-ray emission toward HESS J1800–240A, B, and C comes from π{sup 0} decay due to the interaction between the molecular clouds and cosmic rays (CRs) escaping from W28, they can be naturally explained by a single model in which the CR diffusion coefficient is smaller than the theoretical expectation in the interstellar space. The total energy of the CRs escaping from W28 is constrained through the same modeling to be larger than ∼2 × 10{sup 49} erg. The emission from Source W can also be explained with the same CR escape scenario.

  16. Optimization of PET activation studies based on the SNR measured in the 3-D Hoffman brain phantom.

    PubMed

    Li, H H; Votaw, J R

    1998-08-01

    This work investigates the noise properties of O-15 water PET images in an attempt to increase the sensitivity of activation studies. A method for computing the amount of noise within a region of interest (ROI) from the uncertainty in the raw data was implemented for three-dimensional (3-D) positron emission tomography (PET). The method was used to study the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of regions-of-interest (ROI's) inside a 3-D Hoffman brain phantom. Saturation occurs at an activity concentration of 2.2 mCi/l which corresponds to a 75-mCi O-15 water injection into a normal person of average weight. This establishes the upper limit for injections for human brain studies using 3-D PET on the Siemens ECAT 921 EXACT scanner. Data from human brain activation studies on four normal volunteers using two-dimensional (2-D) PET were analyzed. The biological variation was found to be 5% in 1-ml ROI's. The variance for a complete activation study was calculated, for a variety of protocols, by combining the Poisson noise propagated from the raw data in the phantom experiments with the biological variation. A protocol that is predicted to maximize the SNR in dual-condition activation experiments while remaining below the radiation safety limit is: ten scans with 45 mCi per injection. The data should not be corrected for random or scatter events since they do not help in the identification of activation sites while they do add noise to the image. Due to the lower noise level of 3-D PET, the threshold for detecting a true change in activity concentration is 10%-20% lower than 2-D PET. Because of this, a 3-D activation experiment using the Siemens 921 scanner requires fewer subjects for equal statistical power.

  17. Evaluation of pixel-wise geometric constraint-based phase-unwrapping method for low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yatong; Liu, Ziping; Zhang, Song

    2016-12-01

    This paper evaluates the robustness of our recently proposed geometric constraint-based phase-unwrapping method to unwrap a low-signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) phase. Instead of capturing additional images for absolute phase unwrapping, the new phase-unwrapping algorithm uses geometric constraints of the digital fringe projection (DFP) system to create a virtual reference phase map to unwrap the phase pixel by pixel. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that this new phase-unwrapping method can even successfully unwrap low-SNR phase maps that bring difficulties for conventional multi-frequency phase-unwrapping methods.

  18. The Lighthouse nebula: a run-away pulsar, its PWN, jets and parent SNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, L.; Bordas, P.; Puhlhofer, G.; et al.

    2016-06-01

    Some 10-20 kyr ago a pulsar was born from a core collapse event, receiving right away a strong kick. Nowadays this pulsar is powering the Lighthouse Nebula (IGR J11014-6103): a complex system of outflows comprising the bow-shock PWN, and two well collimated jets extending perpendicularly to the pulsar's direction of motion. Whereas sharing some clear commonalities with the well known Guitar Nebula, the Lighthouse nebula is the only such system where the parent supernova remnant is well visible and bright in X-rays. I will describe the results from our recent Chandra X-ray campaign, and follow-up optical and radio observations, analyse the properties of the PWN, and possible interpretations on the nature of the long helicoidal jets and of the other outflows that we identified. I will also discuss the link between this system and its parent supernova remnant MSH 11-61A, which could help shedding a light on the processes that give birth to such peculiar systems.

  19. Uranus' Persistent Patterns and Features from High-SNR Imaging in 2012-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Patrick M.; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.; de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B.; Marcus, Phillip

    2015-11-01

    Since 2012, Uranus has been the subject of an observing campaign utilizing high signal-to-noise imaging techniques at Keck Observatory (Fry et al. 2012, Astron. J. 143, 150-161). High quality observing conditions on four observing runs of consecutive nights allowed longitudinally-complete coverage of the atmosphere over a period of two years (Sromovsky et al. 2015, Icarus 258, 192-223). Global mosaic maps made from images acquired on successive nights in August 2012, November 2012, August 2013, and August 2014, show persistent patterns, and six easily distinguished long-lived cloud features, which we were able to track for long periods that ranged from 5 months to over two years. Two at similar latitudes are associated with dark spots, and move with the atmospheric zonal flow close to the location of their associated dark spot instead of following the flow at the latitude of the bright features. These features retained their morphologies and drift rates in spite of several close interactions. A second pair of features at similar latitudes also survived several close approaches. Several of the long-lived features also exhibited equatorward drifts and latitudinal oscillations. Also persistent are a remarkable near-equatorial wave feature and global zonal band structure. We will present imagery, maps, and analyses of these phenomena.PMF and LAS acknowledge support from NASA Planetary Astronomy Program; PMF and LAS acknowledge funding and technical support from W. M. Keck Observatory. We thank those of Hawaiian ancestry on whose sacred mountain we are privileged to be guests. Without their generous hospitality none of our groundbased observations would have been possible.

  20. 325 and 610 MHz Radio Counterparts of SNR G353.6-0.7 a.k.a. HESS J1731-347

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayana, A. J.; Chandra, Poonam; Roy, Subhashis; Green, David A.; Acero, Fabio; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne; Marcowith, Alexandre; Ray, Alak K.; Renaud, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    HESS J1731-347 a.k.a. SNR G353.6-0.7 is one of the five known shell-type supernova remnants (SNRs) emitting in the very high energy (VHE, Energy > 0.1 TeV) γ-ray domain. We observed this TeV SNR with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in 1390, 610 and 325 MHz bands. In this paper, we report the discovery of 325 and 610 MHz radio counterparts of the SNR HESS J1731-347 with the GMRT. Various filaments of the SNR are clearly seen in the 325 and 610 MHz bands. However, the faintest feature in the radio bands corresponds to the peak in VHE emission. We explain this anti-correlation in terms of a possible leptonic origin of the observed VHE γ-ray emission. We determine the spectral indices of the bright individual filaments, which were detected in both the 610 and the 325 MHz bands. Our values range from -1.11 to -0.15, consistent with the non-thermal radio emission. We also report a possible radio counterpart of a nearby TeV source HESS J1729-345 from the 843 MHz Molonglo Galactic Plane Survey and the 1.4 GHz Southern Galactic Plane Survey maps. The positive radio spectral index of this possible counterpart suggests a thermal origin of the radio emission of this nearby TeV source.

  1. Improvement of stress tolerance and leavening ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions by overexpression of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Feng, Bing; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-03-16

    During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast cells are exposed to multiple baking-associated stresses, such as elevated high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. There is a high demand for baker's yeast strains that could withstand these stresses with high leavening ability. The SNR84 gene encodes H/ACA snoRNA (small nucleolar RNA), which is known to be involved in pseudouridylation of the large subunit rRNA. However, the function of the SNR84 gene in baker's yeast coping with baking-associated stresses remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effect of SNR84 overexpression on baker's yeast which was exposed to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses. These results suggest that overexpression of the SNR84 gene conferred tolerance of baker's yeast cells to high-temperature, high-sucrose and freeze-thaw stresses and enhanced their leavening ability in high-sucrose and freeze-thaw dough. These findings could provide a valuable insight for breeding of novel stress-resistant baker's yeast strains that are useful for baking.

  2. The chromatin remodeling and mRNA splicing functions of the Brahma (SWI/SNF) complex are mediated by the SNR1/SNF5 regulatory subunit.

    PubMed

    Zraly, Claudia B; Dingwall, Andrew K

    2012-07-01

    Nucleosome remodeling catalyzed by the ATP-dependent SWI/SNF complex is essential for regulated gene expression. Transcriptome profiling studies in flies and mammals identified cell cycle and hormone responsive genes as important targets of remodeling complex activities. Loss of chromatin remodeling function has been linked to developmental abnormalities and aggressive cancers. The Drosophila Brahma (Brm) SWI/SNF complex assists in reprogramming and coordinating gene expression in response to ecdysone hormone signaling at critical points during development. We used RNAi knockdown in cultured cells and transgenic flies, and conditional mutant alleles to identify unique and important functions of two conserved Brm complex core subunits, SNR1/SNF5 and BRM/SNF2-SWI2, on target gene regulation. Unexpectedly, we found that incorporation of a loss of function SNR1 subunit led to alterations in RNA polymerase elongation, pre-mRNA splicing regulation and chromatin accessibility of ecdysone hormone regulated genes, revealing that SNR1 functions to restrict BRM-dependent nucleosome remodeling activities downstream of the promoter region. Our results reveal critically important roles of the SNR1/SNF5 subunit and the Brm chromatin remodeling complex in transcription regulation during elongation by RNA Polymerase II and completion of pre-mRNA transcripts that are dependent on hormone signaling in late development.

  3. The high SNR rate in the Galactic Center: origin of the cosmic rays excess?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvin, L.; Lemière, A.; Terrier, R.

    2017-01-01

    The center of our Galaxy hosts a Super-Massive Black Hole (SMBH) of about 4 × 106 M⊙. Since it has been argued that the SMBH might accelerate particles up to very high energies, its current and past activity could contribute to the population of Galactic cosmic-rays (CRs). Additionally, the condition in the Galactic Center (GC) are often compared with the one of a starburst system. The high supernovae (SN) rate associated with the strong massive star formation in the region must create a sustained CR injection in the GC via the shocks produced at the time of their explosion. The presence of an excess of very high energy (VHE) cosmic rays in the inner 100 pc of the Galaxy in close correlation with the massive gas complex known as the central molecular zone (CMZ) has been revealed in 2006 by the H.E.S.S. collaboration. Recently, by analysing 10 years of H.E.S.S. data, the H.E.S.S. collaboration confirmed the presence of this extended VHE diffuse emission and deduced a CR density peaked toward the GC. The origin of the CR over-abundance in the GC still remains mysterious: Is it due to a single accelerator at the center or to multiple accelerators filling the region? In order to investigate the presence of these multiple CR accelerators, and in particular the impact of their spatial distribution on the VHE emission morphology, we build a 3D model of CR injection and diffusive propagation with a realistic 3D gas distribution. We discuss the CR injection in the region by a spectral and morphological comparison with H.E.S.S. data. We show that a peaked γ-ray profile towards the GC center is obtained using a realistic SN spatial distribution taking into account the central massive star clusters. The contribution of theses sources cannot be neglected in particular at high longitudes. In order to fit the very central excess observed with H.E.S.S., another central VHE component is probably necessary.

  4. Multi-session complex averaging for high resolution high SNR 3T MR visualization of ex vivo hippocampus and insula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Aymeric; Singh, Jolene M.; Scherrer, Benoit; Afacan, Onur; Warfield, Simon K.

    2015-03-01

    The hippocampus and the insula are responsible for episodic memory formation and retrieval. Hence, visualization of the cytoarchitecture of such structures is of primary importance to understand the underpinnings of conscious experience. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) offers an opportunity to non-invasively image these crucial structures. However, current clinical MR imaging operates at the millimeter scale while these anatomical landmarks are organized into sub-millimeter structures. For instance, the hippocampus contains several layers, including the CA3-dentate network responsible for encoding events and experiences. To investigate whether memory loss is a result of injury or degradation of CA3/dentate, spatial resolution must exceed one hundred micron, isotropic, voxel size. Going from one millimeter voxels to one hundred micron voxels results in a 1000× signal loss, making the measured signal close to or even way below the precision of the receiving coils. Consequently, the signal magnitude that forms the structural images will be biased and noisy, which results in inaccurate contrast and less than optimal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this paper, we propose a strategy to perform high spatial resolution MR imaging of the hippocampus and insula with 3T scanners that enables accurate contrast (no systematic bias) and arbitrarily high SNR. This requires the collection of additional repeated measurements of the same image and a proper averaging of the k-space data in the complex domain. This comes at the cost of additional scan time, but long single-session scan times are not practical for obvious reasons. Hence, we also develop an approach to combine k-space data from multiple sessions, which enables the total scan time to be split into arbitrarily short sessions, where the patient is allowed to move and rest in-between. For validation, we hereby illustrate our multi-session complex averaging strategy by providing high spatial resolution 3T MR visualization

  5. A CR-HYDRO-NEI MODEL OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH EMISSION FROM THE VELA JR. SUPERNOVA REMNANT (SNR RX J0852.0-4622)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Ellison, Donald C. E-mail: nagataki@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-04-10

    Based largely on energy budget considerations and the observed cosmic-ray (CR) ionic composition, supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves are the most likely sources of CR ions with energies at least up to the 'knee' near 10{sup 15} eV. Shocks in young shell-type TeV-bright SNRs are surely producing TeV particles, but the emission could be dominated by ions producing {pi}{sup 0}-decay emission or electrons producing inverse Compton gamma rays. Unambiguously identifying the GeV-TeV emission process in a particular SNR will not only help pin down the origin of CRs, it will also add significantly to our understanding of the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism and improve our understanding of supernovae and the impact SNRs have on the circumstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the Vela Jr. SNR, an example of TeV-bright non-thermal SNRs. We perform hydrodynamic simulations coupled with nonlinear DSA and non-equilibrium ionization near the forward shock to confront currently available multi-wavelength data. We find, with an analysis similar to that used earlier for SNR RX J1713.7-3946, that self-consistently modeling the thermal X-ray line emission with the non-thermal continuum in our one-dimensional model strongly constrains the fitting parameters, and this leads convincingly to a leptonic origin for the GeV-TeV emission for Vela Jr. This conclusion is further supported by applying additional constraints from observation, including the radial brightness profiles of the SNR shell in TeV gamma rays, and the spatial variation of the X-ray synchrotron spectral index. We will discuss implications of our models on future observations by the next-generation telescopes.

  6. Catalog of the H-alpha + N II forbidden-line emission features in the Kepler SNR

    SciTech Connect

    Dodorico, S.; Bandiera, R.; Danziger, J.; Focardi, P.

    1986-06-01

    A deep image of the Kepler SNR has been obtained in the light of H-alpha + N II forbidden-line with the faint object spectrograph and camera (EFOSC) and a CCD detector at the ESO 3.6 m telescope. The visibility of the optically emitting knots of ionized gas has been greatly enhanced by subtraction of the continuum radiation. Features as faint as 2 percent of the night-sky brightness have been identified and a half-shell of emission is clearly revealed. The total H-alpha luminosity of the ionized gas is estimated to be 8.3 x 10 to the 45th photons/s at a distance of 5 kpc implying a mass of ionized hydrogen of about 0.02 solar mass. An automatic searching program has been used to identify and list individual emission features in the continuum-subtracted image. A catalog with accurate celestial positions and approximate fluxes for 64 emission-line knots is given. 13 references.

  7. Wiener filtering of surface EMG with a priori SNR estimation toward myoelectric control for neurological injury patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Zhou, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary surface electromyogram (EMG) signals from neurological injury patients are often corrupted by involuntary background interference or spikes, imposing difficulties for myoelectric control. We present a novel framework to suppress involuntary background spikes during voluntary surface EMG recordings. The framework applies a Wiener filter to restore voluntary surface EMG signals based on tracking a priori signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using the decision-directed method. Semi-synthetic surface EMG signals contaminated by different levels of involuntary background spikes were constructed from a database of surface EMG recordings in a group of spinal cord injury subjects. After the processing, the onset detection of voluntary muscle activity was significantly improved against involuntary background spikes. The magnitude of voluntary surface EMG signals can also be reliably estimated for myoelectric control purpose. Compared with the previous sample entropy analysis for suppressing involuntary background spikes, the proposed framework is characterized by quick and simple implementation, making it more suitable for application in a myoelectric control system toward neurological injury rehabilitation.

  8. IDEAL CURRENT PATTERNS YIELDING OPTIMAL SNR AND SAR IN MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING: COMPUTATIONAL METHODS AND PHYSICAL INSIGHTS

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Sodickson, Daniel K.

    2011-01-01

    At high and ultra-high magnetic field strengths, understanding interactions between tissues and the electromagnetic fields generated by radiofrequency (RF) coils becomes crucial for safe and effective coil design, as well as for insight into limits of performance. In this work we present a rigorous electrodynamic modeling framework, using dyadic Green’s functions, to derive the electromagnetic field in homogeneous spherical and cylindrical samples resulting from arbitrary surface currents in the presence or absence of a surrounding RF shield. We show how to calculate ideal current patterns which result in the highest possible signal to noise ratio (“ultimate intrinsic signal to noise ratio (SNR)”) or the lowest possible RF power deposition (“ultimate intrinsic specific absorption rate (SAR)”) compatible with electrodynamic principles. We identify familiar coil designs within optimal current patterns at low to moderate field strength, thereby establishing and explaining graphically the near-optimality of traditional surface and volume quadrature designs. We also document the emergence of less familiar patterns, e.g. involving substantial electric as well as magnetic dipole contributions, at high field strength. Performance comparisons with particular coil array configurations demonstrate that optimal performance may be approached with finite arrays if ideal current patterns are used as a guide for coil design. PMID:22127735

  9. Smooth extraction of SVC fine-granular SNR scalable videos with a virtual-GOP-based rate-distortion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Gao, Wen; Zhao, Debin

    2008-01-01

    Fine-Granular SNR scalable (FGS) technologies in H.264/AVC-based scalable video coding (SVC) provide a flexible and effective foundation for scaling FGS enhancement layer (EL) to accommodate different and variable network capacities. To support smooth quality extraction of SVC FGS videos, it's important to obtain the Rate-Distortion (R-D) function of each picture or group of pictures (GOP). In this paper, firstly, we introduce the R-D analysis of SVC FGS coding in our prior work. Then, with the analysis and models, we present virtual GOP concept and a virtual-GOP-based packet scheduling algorithm is proposed to acquire the optimal packet scheduling sequence in a virtual GOP. Based on the packet scheduling algorithm and the R-D analysis of FGS EL, an effective and flexible D-R model is proposed to describe the D-R function of the virtual GOP. Then, with the R-D model of virtual GOPs, a practical non-search algorithm for smooth quality reconstruction is introduced. Compared to the quality layer method, the reconstructed video quality is improved not only objectively but also subjectively.

  10. Melker Meilensteine auf dem Weg in ein naturwissenschaftliches Zeitalter - Glanzlichter der Ausstellung zum Internationalen Astronomiejahr 2009 in der Melker Stiftsbibliothek.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Paul G.; Zotti, Georg

    2009-06-01

    Das Mittelalter wird weithin als die dunkle Epoche in der Geschichte der Europäischen Wissenschaften betrachtet, und insbesondere das Leben in den Klöstern galt lange Zeit als frei von jeglichem Interesse für Naturwissenschaften abseits der Medizin. Im Mittelalter galt die Astronomie bloß als Mittel zum Zweck, um religiöse und zivile Kalender erstellen zu können. Durch den Bestand der Handschriftenkammer der Melker Stiftsbibliothek eröffnet sich uns eine neue Sichtweise auf das gegen Ende des Mittelalters wachsende Interesse an den Naturwissenschaften. Dies wurde durch die starke Aufwertung der Klosterbibliothek im Rahmen der 'Melker Reform' im 15. Jahrhundert noch weiter verstärkt. Diese Epoche fällt mit der Frühphase der Universität Wien und der 'ersten Wiener Schule der Astronomie' zusammen. Dieser Artikel beleuchtet ausgewählte astronomischen Werke in der Melker Stiftsbibliothek zwischen dem frühen 9 und dem 18. Jahrhundert. Einen Schwerpunkt stellt das Wirken der Wiener Schule der Astronomie dar, wobei wir u.a. die Melker Abschrift von Peuerbachs Gutachten über den Kometen von 1456 sowie die im Stift Melk durchgeführte Beobachtung der Mondfinsternis von 1457 durch Regiomontanus und Peuerbach beleuchten. Dieser Beitrag ist der einführende Übersichtsartikel zum Ausstellungsprojekt in der Melker Stiftsbibliothek im Rahmen des Internationalen Jahres der Astronomie 2009. The medieval period is commonly seen as a dark epoch for science in Europe. Especially monasteries were seen as institutions without interest in natural sciences except for medicine. Astronomy was allegedly only a tool to construct religious and civil calendars. The inventory of the medieval manuscript collection of the library of the Abbey of Melk allows a new view on the growing interest in the exact sciences towards the end of the medieval ages. This interest was intensified through the increased importance of the monastery library due to the monastery reform

  11. An absence of ex-companion stars in the type Ia supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Bradley E; Pagnotta, Ashley

    2012-01-11

    A type Ia supernova is thought to begin with the explosion of a white dwarf star. The explosion could be triggered by the merger of two white dwarfs (a 'double-degenerate' origin), or by mass transfer from a companion star (the 'single-degenerate' path). The identity of the progenitor is still controversial; for example, a recent argument against the single-degenerate origin has been widely rejected. One way to distinguish between the double- and single-degenerate progenitors is to look at the centre of a known type Ia supernova remnant to see whether any former companion star is present. A likely ex-companion star for the progenitor of the supernova observed by Tycho Brahe has been identified, but that claim is still controversial. Here we report that the central region of the supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5 (the site of a type Ia supernova 400 ± 50 years ago, based on its light echo) in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains no ex-companion star to a visual magnitude limit of 26.9 (an absolute magnitude of M(V) = +8.4) within a region of radius 1.43 arcseconds. (This corresponds to the 3σ maximum distance to which a companion could have been 'kicked' by the explosion.) This lack of any ex-companion star to deep limits rules out all published single-degenerate models for this supernova. The only remaining possibility is that the progenitor of this particular type Ia supernova was a double-degenerate system.

  12. An absence of ex-companion stars in the type Ia supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Pagnotta, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    A type Ia supernova is thought to begin with the explosion of a white dwarf star. The explosion could be triggered by the merger of two white dwarfs (a `double-degenerate' origin), or by mass transfer from a companion star (the `single-degenerate' path). The identity of the progenitor is still controversial; for example, a recent argument against the single-degenerate origin has been widely rejected. One way to distinguish between the double- and single-degenerate progenitors is to look at the centre of a known type Ia supernova remnant to see whether any former companion star is present. A likely ex-companion star for the progenitor of the supernova observed by Tycho Brahe has been identified, but that claim is still controversial. Here we report that the central region of the supernova remnant SNR 0509-67.5 (the site of a type Ia supernova 400 +/- 50 years ago, based on its light echo) in the Large Magellanic Cloud contains no ex-companion star to a visual magnitude limit of 26.9 (an absolute magnitude of MV = +8.4) within a region of radius 1.43 arcseconds. (This corresponds to the 3σ maximum distance to which a companion could have been `kicked' by the explosion.) This lack of any ex-companion star to deep limits rules out all published single-degenerate models for this supernova. The only remaining possibility is that the progenitor of this particular type Ia supernova was a double-degenerate system.

  13. Detection of X-Ray Line Emission from the Shell of SNR B0540-69.3 with XMM-Newton RGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderHeyden, K. J.; Cottam, J.; Paerels, F.; Kaastra, J. S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present X-ray observations of PSR 0540-69.3 with the XMM-Newton observatory. The spectra obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer reveal, for the first time, emission from ionized species of O, Ne and Fe originating from the SNR shell. Analysis of the emission line spectrum allows us to derive estimates of the temperature, ionization timescale, abundances, location, and velocity of the emitting gas.

  14. Untersuchungen zum hydraulischen Grundbruch in Baugruben in homogenen Böden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltuk, Serdar; Fernandez-Steeger, Tomas M.; Azzam, Rafig

    2016-09-01

    In this study, two problems are discussed with respect to hydraulic heave. Firstly, the verification of safety against hydraulic heave according to DIN EN 1997-1 (2014-03) yields different results depending on the considered limit state conditions. It is demonstrated that this problem can be solved by using hydraulic gradients as a parameter for the limit state condition. Secondly, the form of a potential failure body appearing in three-dimensional groundwater models is unknown. Based on numerical analyses, it has been shown that an average hydraulic gradient that is determined by using an assumed three-dimensional failure body with the width suggested by Terzaghi for two-dimensional cases leads to a quicksand condition in an infinitesimal soil column directly adjacent to the wall, when its value is equal to the critical hydraulic gradient of the soil. The model tests show that Terzaghi's method or quicksand condition refers to certain deformations in an excavation base. The hydraulic gradient required for the first sign of a quicksand condition in loose sands may be lower than the theoretically required hydraulic gradient, whereas it is higher in dense sands.

  15. Extensive air showers generated by gamma-quanta from Geminga and Tycho's SNR at energy range 1 30 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.; Arsov, T. P.; Alaverdian, A. Y.; Borisov, S. S.; Musin, F. I.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Sinitsyna, V. Y.; Platonov, G. F.

    2006-01-01

    The gamma-quantum emitting objects in our Galaxy are supernova remnants and binary. The observed results of gamma-quantum sources Tycho Brahe and Geminga by the SHALON gamma-telescope are presented. The integral spectra of events from the source - k and background events, observing simultaneously with source's events - k, and the source image are presented. The energy spectra of Tycho's SNR and Geminga supernova remnant F(E>0.8TeV)˜E are harder than the Crab Nebula spectrum. Tycho's SNR has long been considered as a candidate cosmic ray source in Northern Hemisphere. A non-linear kinetic model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants was used for Tycho's SNR. The expected π°-decay gamma-quanta flux F˜Eγ-1 extends up to ˜30TeV, whereas the Inverse Compton gamma-ray flux has a cut-off above a few TeV. So, the detection of gamma-rays at energies of ˜10-30TeV by SHALON is evidence for hadron origin.

  16. Comparison of SNR and CNR for in vivo mouse brain imaging at 3 and 7 T using well matched scanner configurations.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, M W; Rasmussen, J M; Yuan, W; Pratt, R; Dunn, S; Dardzinski, B J; Holland, S K

    2008-09-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for magnetic resonance microimaging were measured using two nearly identical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners operating at field strengths of 3 and 7 T. Six mice were scanned using two imaging protocols commonly applied for in vivo imaging of small animal brain: RARE and FLASH. An accounting was made of the field dependence of relaxation times as well as a small number of hardware disparities between scanner systems. Standard methods for relaxometry were utilized to measure T1 and T2 for two white matter (WM) and two gray matter (GM) regions in the mouse brain. An average increase in T1 between 3 and 7 T of 28% was observed in the brain. T2 was found to decrease by 27% at 7 T in agreement with theoretical models. The SNR was found to be uniform throughout the mouse brain, increasing at higher field by a factor statistically indistinguishable from the ratio of Larmor frequencies when imaging with either method. The CNR between GM and WM structures was found to adhere to the expected field dependence for the RARE imaging sequence. Improvement in the CNR for the FLASH imaging sequence between 3 and 7 T was observed to be greater than the Larmor ratio, reflecting a greater susceptibility to partial volume effects at the lower SNR values at 3 T. Imaging at 7 T versus 3 T in small animals clearly provides advantages with respect to the CNR, even beyond the Larmor ratio, especially in lower SNR regimes. This careful multifaceted assessment of the benefits of higher static field is instructive for those newly embarking on small animal imaging. Currently the number of 7 T MRI scanners in use for research in human subjects is increasing at a rapid pace with approximately 30 systems deployed worldwide in 2008. The data presented in this article verify that if system performance and radio frequency uniformity is optimized at 7 T, it should be possible to realize the expected improvements in the CNR and SNR

  17. Interstellar protons in the TeV γ-ray SNR HESS J1731-347: Possible evidence for the coexistence of hadronic and leptonic γ-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, T.; Yoshiike, S.; Sano, H.; Torii, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Fukui, Y.; Acero, F.

    2014-06-10

    HESS J1731-347 (G353.6-0.7) is one of the TeV γ-ray supernova remnants (SNRs) that shows the shell-like morphology. We have made a new analysis of the interstellar protons toward the SNR by using both the {sup 12}CO(J = 1-0) and H I data sets. The results indicate that the TeV γ-ray shell shows significant spatial correlation with the interstellar protons at a velocity range from –90 km s{sup –1} to –75 km s{sup –1}. The total mass of the interstellar medium (ISM) protons is estimated to be 6.4 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}, 25% of which is atomic gas, and the distance corresponding to the velocity range is ∼5.2 kpc, a factor of 2 larger than the previous figure, 3 kpc. We have identified the cold H I gas observed as self-absorption which shows significant correspondence with the northeastern γ-ray peak. While the good correspondence between the ISM protons and TeV γ-rays in the north of the SNR lends support to the hadronic scenario for the TeV γ-rays, the southern part of the shell shows a break in the correspondence; in particular, the southwestern rim of the SNR shell shows a significant decrease of the interstellar protons by a factor of two. We argue that this discrepancy can be explained due to leptonic γ-rays because this region coincides well with the bright shell that emits non-thermal radio continuum emission and non-thermal X-rays, suggesting that the γ-rays of HESS J1713-347 consist of both the hadronic and leptonic components. The leptonic contribution corresponds to ∼20% of the total γ-rays.

  18. Zum Ursprung der Hominidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Winfried

    1981-08-01

    A fundamental problem of hominisation is the branching of the human lineage leading to the genus Homo from other hominoids. At present discussed hypotheses of a Miocene separation of the pongid and hominid lineage are described under consideration of numerous new fossils from Europe, Asia and Africa. Of special interest is the possibility of an adhominisation of the genus Australopithecus (including A. afarensis).

  19. Vom Erdmeridian zum Lichtzeitmeter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, F.

    The metric unit of length, the metre, has a long history which begins in the year 1791. At the beginning, the metre was defined as one tenmillionth of the quarter of the meridian of the earth. This definition was often changed corresponding to the increasing precision of length-measurements. In 1983, a new definition was found which is based on the value of velocity of light in vacuo: c = 299792458 m/s.

  20. Vom Urknall zum Durchknall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unzicker, Alexander

    Lautstarker Applaus erhob sich im Salon III/IV des Marriott-Hotels von Crystal City im amerikanischen Bundesstaat Virginia. In dem überfüllten Konferenzraum starrten alle wie gebannt auf die Leinwand, wo nicht mehr zu sehen war als ein nüchternes Diagramm aus zahlreichen Punkten und einer geschwungenen Kurve. Nureine eigenartige Personengruppe konnte sich davon zu Emotionen hinreißen lassen - Physiker auf der Jahrestagung der Astronomischen Gesellschaft, die ihren Begeisterungssturm noch minutenlang fortsetzten. Was war geschehen? Die im Diagramm aufgetragenen Daten bestätigten mit einer nie da gewesenen Genauigkeit ein fundamentales Naturgesetz zur Wärmeabstrahlung von heißen Körpern. 1900 von Max Planck entdeckt, leuchtete es nun in geradezu mathematischer Reinheit auf. Noch sensationeller war der Ursprung der Daten - Mikrowellensignale verschiedener Frequenzen, die nicht aus einem irdischen Labor stammten, sondern von einem heißen Urzustand des Universums! Ein Feuerball aus Wasserstoff und Helium, noch ohne jegliche Strukturen, die irgendwann Leben ermöglichen sollten, ließ damals seinem Licht freien Lauf. Mehr als zehn Milliarden Jahre war es bis zu den Detektoren des vom Menschen gebauten Satelliten COBE unterwegs, der wenige Tage zuvor die Daten übertragen hatte. Wenn ich das alles wie einen Film in meiner Vorstellung ablaufen lasse, bekomme ich immer eine Gänsehaut, als würde ich die inzwischen extrem abgekühlte Strahlung tatsächlich spüren. Ihre Gleichverteilung im Raum macht uns auch deutlich, dass wir uns nicht einbilden dürfen, an einem besonderen Ort im Universum zu leben - intelligente Aliens könnten sich seitdem überall entwickelt haben! Sollten sie - was nicht wahrscheinlich ist - uns wirklich von Zeit zu Zeit über die Schulter schauen, dann hätten sie an jenem Nachmittag des 13. Januar 1990, als der Vortrag stattfand, bestimmt anerkennend mit ihrem großen Kopf genickt.

  1. Spacelab Charcoal Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slivon, L. E.; Hernon-Kenny, L. A.; Katona, V. R.; Dejarme, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods and results obtained from chemical analysis of 31 charcoal samples in five sets. Each set was obtained from a single scrubber used to filter ambient air on board a Spacelab mission. Analysis of the charcoal samples was conducted by thermal desorption followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). All samples were analyzed using identical methods. The method used for these analyses was able to detect compounds independent of their polarity or volatility. In addition to the charcoal samples, analyses of three Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) water samples were conducted specifically for trimethylamine.

  2. Wavelet Analyses and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordeianu, Cristian C.; Landau, Rubin H.; Paez, Manuel J.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how a modern extension of Fourier analysis known as wavelet analysis is applied to signals containing multiscale information. First, a continuous wavelet transform is used to analyse the spectrum of a nonstationary signal (one whose form changes in time). The spectral analysis of such a signal gives the strength of the signal in each…

  3. Apollo 14 microbial analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Extensive microbiological analyses that were performed on the Apollo 14 prime and backup crewmembers and ancillary personnel are discussed. The crewmembers were subjected to four separate and quite different environments during the 137-day monitoring period. The relation between each of these environments and observed changes in the microflora of each astronaut are presented.

  4. Three-dimensional chemical mapping by EFTEM-TomoJ including improvement of SNR by PCA and ART reconstruction of volume by noise suppression.

    PubMed

    Messaoudi, Cédric; Aschman, Nicolas; Cunha, Marcel; Oikawa, Tetsuo; Sorzano, Carlos O Sanchez; Marco, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    Electron tomography is becoming one of the most used methods for structural analysis at nanometric scale in biological and materials sciences. Combined with chemical mapping, it provides qualitative and semiquantitative information on the distribution of chemical elements on a given sample. Due to the current difficulties in obtaining three-dimensional (3D) maps by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), the use of 3D chemical mapping has not been widely adopted by the electron microscopy community. The lack of specialized software further complicates the issue, especially in the case of data with a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Moreover, data interpretation is rendered difficult by the absence of efficient segmentation tools. Thus, specialized software for the computation of 3D maps by EFTEM needs to include optimized methods for image series alignment, algorithms to improve SNR, different background subtraction models, and methods to facilitate map segmentation. Here we present a software package (EFTEM-TomoJ, which can be downloaded from http://u759.curie.fr/fr/download/softwares/EFTEM-TomoJ), specifically dedicated to computation of EFTEM 3D chemical maps including noise filtering by image reconstitution based on multivariate statistical analysis. We also present an algorithm named BgART (for background removing algebraic reconstruction technique) allowing the discrimination between background and signal and improving the reconstructed volume in an iterative way.

  5. SNR analysis of high-frequency steady-state visual evoked potentials from the foveal and extrafoveal regions of human retina.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Cheng; Zao, John K; Tu, Kuan-Chung; Wang, Yijun; Huang, Yi-Pai; Chuang, Che-Wei; Kuo, Hen-Yuan; Chien, Yu-Yi; Chou, Ching-Chi; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2012-01-01

    With brain-computer interface (BCI) applications in mind, we analyzed the amplitudes and the signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) induced in the foveal and extra-foveal regions of human retina. Eight subjects (age 20-55) have been exposed to 2° circular and 16°-18° annular visual stimulation produced by white LED lights flickering between 5Hz and 65Hz in 5Hz increments. Their EEG signals were recorded using a 64-channel NeuroScan system and analyzed using non-parametric spectral and canonical convolution techniques. Subjects' perception of flickering and their levels of comfort towards the visual stimulation were also noted. Almost all subjects showed distinctively higher SNR in their foveal SSVEP responses between 25Hz and 45Hz. They also noticed less flickering and felt more comfortable with the visual stimulation between 30Hz and 45Hz. These empirical evidences suggest that lights flashing above the critical flicker fusion rates (CFF) of human vision may be used as effective and comfortable stimuli in SSVEP BCI applications.

  6. The diffuse source at the center of LMC SNR 0509–67.5 is a background galaxy at z = 0.031

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Walker, Emma S.; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2014-06-20

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are well-known for their use in the measurement of cosmological distances, but our continuing lack of concrete knowledge about their progenitor stars is both a matter of debate and a source of systematic error. In our attempts to answer this question, we presented unambiguous evidence that LMC SNR 0509–67.5, the remnant of an SN Ia that exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud 400 ± 50 yr ago, did not have any point sources (stars) near the site of the original supernova explosion, from which we concluded that this particular supernova must have had a progenitor system consisting of two white dwarfs. There is, however, evidence of nebulosity near the center of the remnant, which could have been left over detritus from the less massive WD, or could have been a background galaxy unrelated to the supernova explosion. We obtained long-slit spectra of the central nebulous region using GMOS on Gemini South to determine which of these two possibilities is correct. The spectra show Hα emission at a redshift of z = 0.031, which implies that the nebulosity in the center of LMC SNR 0509–67.5 is a background galaxy, unrelated to the supernova.

  7. New constraints on the TeV SNR shells RX J1713.7-3946 and HESS J1731-347

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puehlhofer, G.; Eger, P.; Doroshenko, V.; Cui, Y.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Resolved TeV-emitting supernova remnants remain a small and precious class of sources to study cosmic ray acceleration in SNRs. We present new multi-wavelength results of the two prominent objects RX J1713.7-3946 and HESS J1731-347. For RX J1713.7-3946, extensive new H.E.S.S. data have permitted to study the nature of the TeV-emitting CR particles through improved broadband spectral studies, as well as through detailed investigations of morphological differences between TeV gamma-rays and X-rays. Concerning HESS J1731-347, the TeV morphology of the object and its surroundings has been studied using cosmic ray acceleration simulations of the object. The SNR also hosts a luminous X-ray emitting central compact object (CCO). Investigations of the CCO in X-rays and in the infrared have permitted to set interesting constraints on the SNR and its progenitor.

  8. Atmospheric tether mission analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA is considering the use of tethered satellites to explore regions of the atmosphere inaccessible to spacecraft or high altitude research balloons. This report summarizes the Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA) effort for the engineering study team assessment of an Orbiter-based atmospheric tether mission. Lockheed Martin responsibilities included design recommendations for the deployer and tether, as well as tether dynamic analyses for the mission. Three tether configurations were studied including single line, multistrand (Hoytether) and tape designs.

  9. The environment of the γ-ray emitting SNR G338.3-0.0: a hadronic interpretation for HESS J1640-465

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supan, L.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Castelletti, G.

    2016-05-01

    The supernova remnant (SNR) G338.3-0.0 spatially correlates with HESS J1640-465, which is considered the most luminous γ-ray source associated with a SNR in our Galaxy. The X-ray pulsar PSR J1640-4631 has been recently discovered within the SNR shell, which could favor a leptonic origin for the detected very-high-energy (VHE) emission. In spite of this, the origin of the VHE radiation from HESS J1640-465 has not been unambiguously clarified so far. Indeed, a hadronic explanation cannot be ruled out by current observations. On the basis of atomic (HI) and molecular (12CO) archival data, we determine, for the first time, the total ambient density of protons in the region of the G338.3-0.0/HESS J1640-465 system, a critical parameter for understanding the emission mechanisms at very high energies. The value obtained is in the 100-130 cm-3 range. Besides this, we developed a new hadronic model to describe the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the HESS J1640-465 source, which includes the latest total γ-ray cross-section for proton-proton collisions available in the literature. By using the assessed ambient proton density, we found that the total energy in accelerated protons required to fit the data is 5.4+4.7-2.3 ×1049 erg and 1.6+1.4-0.7 ×1050 erg for a source distance of 8.5 and 13 kpc, respectively. The case where the source distance is 8.5 kpc agrees with the typical scenario in which the energy released is on the order of 1051 erg and ~10% of that energy is transferred to the accelerated protons, whereas the case corresponding to a source distance of 13 kpc requires either a higher value of the energy released in the explosion or a larger energy fraction to accelerate protons.

  10. LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Model calculations and analyses have been carried out to compare with several sets of data (dose, induced radioactivity in various experiment samples and spacecraft components, fission foil measurements, and LET spectra) from passive radiation dosimetry on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, which was recovered after almost six years in space. The calculations and data comparisons are used to estimate the accuracy of current models and methods for predicting the ionizing radiation environment in low earth orbit. The emphasis is on checking the accuracy of trapped proton flux and anisotropy models.

  11. Discovery of the VHE gamma-ray source HESS J1832-093 in the vicinity of SNR G22.7-0.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HESS Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Clapson, A.-C.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zabalza, V.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2015-01-01

    The region around the supernova remnant (SNR) W41 contains several TeV sources and has prompted the HESS Collaboration to perform deep observations of this field of view. This resulted in the discovery of the new very high energy (VHE) source HESS J1832-093, at the position {RA=18^h 32^m 50^s ± 3^s_{stat} ± 2^s_{syst}}, {Dec=-9*deg;22'36" ± 32"}_{stat} ± 20^' '}_{syst} (J2000)}, spatially coincident with a part of the radio shell of the neighbouring remnant G22.7-0.2. The photon spectrum is well described by a power law of index Γ = 2.6 ± 0.3stat ± 0.1syst and a normalization at 1 TeV of Φ _0=(4.8 ± 0.8_stat± 1.0_syst) × 10^{-13} cm ^{-2} s^{-1} TeV^{-1}. The location of the gamma-ray emission on the edge of the SNR rim first suggested a signature of escaping cosmic rays illuminating a nearby molecular cloud. Then a dedicated XMM-Newton observation led to the discovery of a new X-ray point source spatially coincident with the TeV excess. Two other scenarios were hence proposed to identify the nature of HESS J1832-093. Gamma-rays from inverse Compton radiation in the framework of a pulsar wind nebula scenario or the possibility of gamma-ray production within a binary system are therefore also considered. Deeper multiwavelength observations will help to shed new light on this intriguing VHE source.

  12. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  13. Network Class Superposition Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carl A. B.; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., for the yeast cell cycle process [1]), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix , which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for derived from Boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with . We show how to generate Derrida plots based on . We show that -based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on . We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology Boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for , for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  14. Network class superposition analyses.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Carl A B; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30) for the yeast cell cycle process), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses.

  15. NOAA's National Snow Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. R.; Cline, D. W.; Olheiser, C. M.; Rost, A. A.; Nilsson, A. O.; Fall, G. M.; Li, L.; Bovitz, C. T.

    2005-12-01

    NOAA's National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) routinely ingests all of the electronically available, real-time, ground-based, snow data; airborne snow water equivalent data; satellite areal extent of snow cover information; and numerical weather prediction (NWP) model forcings for the coterminous U.S. The NWP model forcings are physically downscaled from their native 13 km2 spatial resolution to a 1 km2 resolution for the CONUS. The downscaled NWP forcings drive an energy-and-mass-balance snow accumulation and ablation model at a 1 km2 spatial resolution and at a 1 hour temporal resolution for the country. The ground-based, airborne, and satellite snow observations are assimilated into the snow model's simulated state variables using a Newtonian nudging technique. The principle advantages of the assimilation technique are: (1) approximate balance is maintained in the snow model, (2) physical processes are easily accommodated in the model, and (3) asynoptic data are incorporated at the appropriate times. The snow model is reinitialized with the assimilated snow observations to generate a variety of snow products that combine to form NOAA's NOHRSC National Snow Analyses (NSA). The NOHRSC NSA incorporate all of the available information necessary and available to produce a "best estimate" of real-time snow cover conditions at 1 km2 spatial resolution and 1 hour temporal resolution for the country. The NOHRSC NSA consist of a variety of daily, operational, products that characterize real-time snowpack conditions including: snow water equivalent, snow depth, surface and internal snowpack temperatures, surface and blowing snow sublimation, and snowmelt for the CONUS. The products are generated and distributed in a variety of formats including: interactive maps, time-series, alphanumeric products (e.g., mean areal snow water equivalent on a hydrologic basin-by-basin basis), text and map discussions, map animations, and quantitative gridded products

  16. Design und Analyse elektrisch kleiner Antennen für den Einsatz in UHF RFID Transpondern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschmann, R.; Camp, M.; Eul, H.

    2006-09-01

    RFID Systeme werden seit Anfang der neunziger Jahre mit stetig zunehmender Verbreitung im Bereich der automatischen Produktidentifikation, der Diebstahlsicherung (EAS, Electronic Article Surveillance) und für automatische Zutrittskontrollsysteme eingesetzt. Objekte werden hierzu mit einem Transponder ausgestattet, der aus einer Antenne und einem Chip auf einem Trägermaterial besteht. Von großem Interesse ist die Entwicklung und Optimierung von passiven Transpondern für den Einsatz in UHF RFID Systemen. Diese Transponder beziehen die Energie zum Betrieb des Chips aus dem elektromagnetischen Feld einer Schreib-Leseeinheit. Hierfür ist neben der Anpassung der Eingangsimpedanz der Antenne an die Chipimpedanz auch eine möglichst hohe Bandbreite der Antennen wünschenswert, um die Funktion des Transponders bei Schwankungen der Chipimpedanz und variablen Umgebungsparametern zu gewährleisten. Der aus Platzgründen notwendige Einsatz elektrisch kleiner Antennen bedingt eine möglichst optimale Ausnutzung der zur Verfügung stehenden Fläche auf dem Trägermaterial zur Aufnahme der Antenne. Die vorliegende Arbeit beschreibt ein Verfahren zur Analyse und Synthese neuartiger Antennendesigns auf der Basis parametrisierter meandrierter, spiralförmiger und logarithmisch periodischer Dipole.

  17. Statistical Modeling of Low SNR Magnetic Resonance Images in Wavelet Domain Using Laplacian Prior and Two-Sided Rayleigh Noise for Visual Quality Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbani, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new wavelet-based image denoising algorithm using maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion. For this reason we propose Laplace distribution with local variance for clean image and two-sided Rayleigh model for noise in wavelet domain. The local Laplace probability density function (pdf) is able to simultaneously model the heavy-tailed nature of marginal distribution and intrascale dependency between spatial adjacent coefficients. Using local Laplace prior and two-sided Rayleigh noise, we derive a new shrinkage function for image denoising in the wavelet domain. We propose our new spatially adaptive wavelet-based image denoising algorithm for several low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) magnetic resonance (MR) images and compare the results with other methods. The simulation results show that this algorithm is able to truly improve the visual quality of noisy MR images with very low computational cost. In case the input MR image is blurred, a blind deconvolution (BD) algorithm is necessary for visual quality improvement. Since BD techniques are usually sensitive to noise, in this paper we also apply a BD algorithm to an appropriate subband in the wavelet domain to eliminate the effect of noise in the BD procedure and to further improve visual quality.

  18. White Light Heterodyne Interferometry SNR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-09

    INTRODUCTION The subject of heterodyne interferometry, most successfully demonstrated for astronomy in the long- wave infrared (LWIR) at the...zero sun -like star puts out 4 × 107 photons/s/m2/nm at the surface of the earth at this wavelength, which corresponds to a power per unit bandwidth...MID- WAVE AND LONG- WAVE INFRARED While there is a significant penalty to the heterodyne approach in the visible through short- wave infrared (SWIR

  19. Toward A Comprehensive Kinematic and Chemical Survey of the Young O-rich SNR 1E 0102-7219 in the SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan

    2013-10-01

    We propose the first comprehensive UV and optical imaging survey of the young, oxygen-rich, SMC supernova remnant 1E 0102-7219 {E0102}. These data will be coordinated with an optical spectroscopic survey of E0102 already in progress that has uncovered previously unknown high velocity S-rich ejecta and an elaborate bubble-like, large-scale ejecta structure having a velocity distribution that spans more than twice the currently accepted mean value.Combining the proposed WFC3 UV and optical imaging with our recent spectroscopic survey will allow: {1} the first complete mapping of E0102's high and low velocity metal-rich ejecta, {2} a first-of-its-kind map of UV emission in [Ne IV] 2425 and Mg II 2800 of an O-rich SNR, {3} identification of remnant regions exhibiting sulfur emission associated with the inner Si,S,Ca,Ar layer of the progenitor star, {4} investigation of an expected population of exceptionally high velocity, outer knots like those seen in Cas A, {5} calculation of an accurate mean expansion velocity and age via proper motions using archival HST data, and {6} creation of a high-resolution 3D kinematic and chemical reconstruction of E0102's UV and optically emitting ejecta.This data set will reveal E0102's full structure in extraordinary detail, and provide powerful insights on the dynamics and nucleosynthesis yields of high-mass progenitor core-collapse supernova explosion models. It will also set the stage for more expansive multi-wavelength studies that can incorporate the already rich data available in Chandra X-ray and Spitzer infrared observations.

  20. Literature Research on the Mechanical Properties of Fibre Composise Materials Analysis of the State of the Art. Volume I. (Schrifttumsrecherche zum Festigkeitsverhalten von Faserverbundwerkstoffen-Analyse des Standes der Technik-),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-11

    elastic up to immedi- ately before fracture, breaking elongation is generally slight. These two modes of behaviour must be regarded as border-line cases , in...cross-section in the rivet line lies below the tensile strength of the undisturbed cross-section in the case of fibre composites in contrast to metals...air. In addition to the media air with humidity and the extreme borderline cases of vacuum and water, fibre composite components of load bearing

  1. EEO Implications of Job Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacy, D. Patrick, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses job analyses as they relate to the requirements of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Argues that job analyses can establish the job-relatedness of entrance requirements and aid in defenses against charges of discrimination. Journal availability: see EA 511 615.

  2. Analysing the ventricular fibrillation waveform.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew J; Clegg, Gareth R; Robertson, Colin E

    2003-04-01

    The surface electrocardiogram associated with ventricular fibrillation has been of interest to researchers for some time. Over the last few decades, techniques have been developed to analyse this signal in an attempt to obtain more information about the state of the myocardium and the chances of successful defibrillation. This review looks at the implications of analysing the VF waveform and discusses the various techniques that have been used, including fast Fourier transform analysis, wavelet transform analysis and mathematical techniques such as chaos theory.

  3. PSR J2022 plus 3842: An Energetic Radio and X-Ray Pulsar Associated with SNR G76.9 plus 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Ransom, S. M.; Kothes, R.; Landecker, T. L.

    2010-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray Observatory, Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Radio Telescope (GBT), and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations directed toward the radio supernova remnant (SNR) G76.9+1.0. The Chandra investigation reveals a hard, unresolved X-ray source coincident with the midpoint of the double-lobed radio morphology and surrounded by faint, compact X-ray nebulosity. These features suggest that an energetic neutron star is powering a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) seen in synchrotron emission. Indeed, the spatial relationship of the X-ray and radio emissions is remarkably similar to the extended emission around the Vela pulsar. A follow-up pulsation search with the GBT uncovered a highly-dispersed (DM = 427 +/- 1 pc/cu cm) and highly-scattered pulsar with a period of 24 ms. Its subsequently measured spin-down rate implies a characteristic age T(sub c) = 8.9 kyr, making PSR J2022+3842 the most rapidly rotating young radio pulsar known. With a spin-down luminosity E = 1.2 x 10(exp 38) erg/s, it is the second-most energetic Galactic pulsar known, after the Crab pulsar. The 24-ms pulsations have also been detected in the RXTE observation; the combined Chandra and RXTE spectral fit suggests that the Chandra point-source emission is virtually 100% pulsed. The 2-16 keV spectrum of the narrow (0.06 cycles FWHM) pulse is well-fitted by an absorbed power-law model with column density N(sub H) = (1.7 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 22)/sq cm and photon index Gamma = 1.0 +/- 0.2, strongly suggestive of magnetospheric emission. For an assumed distance of 10 kpc, the 2-10 keV luminosity of L(sub X) = 6.9 x 10(exp 33) erg/s suggests one of the lowest known X-ray conversion efficiencies L(sub X)/ E = 5.8 x 10(exp -5), similar to that of the Vela pulsar. Finally, the PWN around PSR J2022+3842 revealed by Chandra is also underluminous, with F(sub PWN)/ F(sub PSR) < or approx.1 in the 2-10 keV band, a further surprise given the pulsar's high spin-down luminosity.

  4. Neural Spike-Train Analyses of the Speech-Based Envelope Power Spectrum Model

    PubMed Central

    Rallapalli, Varsha H.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating hearing impairment is challenging because people with similar degrees of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) often have different speech-recognition abilities. The speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) has demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRENV) from a modulation filter bank provides a robust speech-intelligibility measure across a wider range of degraded conditions than many long-standing models. In the sEPSM, noise (N) is assumed to: (a) reduce S + N envelope power by filling in dips within clean speech (S) and (b) introduce an envelope noise floor from intrinsic fluctuations in the noise itself. While the promise of SNRENV has been demonstrated for normal-hearing listeners, it has not been thoroughly extended to hearing-impaired listeners because of limited physiological knowledge of how SNHL affects speech-in-noise envelope coding relative to noise alone. Here, envelope coding to speech-in-noise stimuli was quantified from auditory-nerve model spike trains using shuffled correlograms, which were analyzed in the modulation-frequency domain to compute modulation-band estimates of neural SNRENV. Preliminary spike-train analyses show strong similarities to the sEPSM, demonstrating feasibility of neural SNRENV computations. Results suggest that individual differences can occur based on differential degrees of outer- and inner-hair-cell dysfunction in listeners currently diagnosed into the single audiological SNHL category. The predicted acoustic-SNR dependence in individual differences suggests that the SNR-dependent rate of susceptibility could be an important metric in diagnosing individual differences. Future measurements of the neural SNRENV in animal studies with various forms of SNHL will provide valuable insight for understanding individual differences in speech-in-noise intelligibility.

  5. EPOXI Trajectory and Maneuver Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Min-Kun J.; Bhaskaran, Shyamkumar; Chesley, Steven R.; Halsell, C. Allen; Helfrich, Clifford E.; Jefferson, David C.; McElrath, Timothy P.; Rush, Brian P.; Wang, Tseng-Chan M.; Yen, Chen-wan L.

    2011-01-01

    The EPOXI mission is a NASA Discovery Mission of Opportunity combining two separate investigations: Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization (EPOCh) and Deep Impact eXtended Investigation (DIXI). Both investigations reused the DI instruments and spacecraft that successfully flew by the comet Tempel-1 (4 July 2005). For EPOCh, the goal was to find exoplanets with the high resolution imager, while for DIXI it was to fly by the comet Hartley 2 (4 Nov 2010). This paper documents the navigation experience of the earlier ma-neuver analyses critical for the EPOXI mission including statistical ?V analyses and other useful analyses in designing maneuvers. It also recounts the trajectory design leading up to the final reference trajectory to Hartley 2.

  6. Feed analyses and their interpretation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compositional analysis is central to determining the nutritional value of feedstuffs. The utility of the values and how they should be used depends on how representative the feed subsample is, the nutritional relevance of the assays, analytical variability of the analyses, and whether a feed is suit...

  7. Analysing Children's Drawings: Applied Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Derek

    2012-01-01

    This article centres on a research project in which freehand drawings provided a richly creative and colourful data source of children's imagined, ideal learning environments. Issues concerning the analysis of the visual data are discussed, in particular, how imaginative content was analysed and how the analytical process was dependent on an…

  8. Data Filtering in Instrumental Analyses with Applications to Optical Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Most measurement techniques have some limitations imposed by a sensor's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Thus, in analytical chemistry, methods for enhancing the SNR are of crucial importance and can be ensured experimentally or established via pre-treatment of digitized data. In many analytical curricula, instrumental techniques are given preference…

  9. Workload analyse of assembling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2015-11-01

    The workload is the most important indicator for managers responsible of industrial technological processes no matter if these are automated, mechanized or simply manual in each case, machines or workers will be in the focus of workload measurements. The paper deals with workload analyses made to a most part manual assembling technology for roller bearings assembling process, executed in a big company, with integrated bearings manufacturing processes. In this analyses the delay sample technique have been used to identify and divide all bearing assemblers activities, to get information about time parts from 480 minutes day work time that workers allow to each activity. The developed study shows some ways to increase the process productivity without supplementary investments and also indicated the process automation could be the solution to gain maximum productivity.

  10. Nonlinear structural crash dynamics analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayduk, R. J.; Thomson, R. G.; Wittlin, G.; Kamat, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    Presented in this paper are the results of three nonlinear computer programs, KRASH, ACTION and DYCAST used to analyze the dynamic response of a twin-engine, low-wing airplane section subjected to a 8.38 m/s (27.5 ft/s) vertical impact velocity crash condition. This impact condition simulates the vertical sink rate in a shallow aircraft landing or takeoff accident. The three distinct analysis techniques for nonlinear dynamic response of aircraft structures are briefly examined and compared versus each other and the experimental data. The report contains brief descriptions of the three computer programs, the respective aircraft section mathematical models, pertinent data from the experimental test performed at NASA Langley, and a comparison of the analyses versus test results. Cost and accuracy comparisons between the three analyses are made to illustrate the possible uses of the different nonlinear programs and their future potential.

  11. Supplementary report on antilock analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Generic modulator analysis was performed to quantify the effects of dump and reapply pressure rates on antilock stability and performance. Analysis will include dump and reapply rates, and lumped modulator delay. Based on the results of the generic modulator analysis and earlier toggle optimization analysis (with Mitsubishi modulator), a recommended preliminary antilock design was synthesized and its response and performance simulated. The results of these analyses are documented.

  12. Analysing photonic structures in plants

    PubMed Central

    Vignolini, Silvia; Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J.; Steiner, Ullrich

    2013-01-01

    The outer layers of a range of plant tissues, including flower petals, leaves and fruits, exhibit an intriguing variation of microscopic structures. Some of these structures include ordered periodic multilayers and diffraction gratings that give rise to interesting optical appearances. The colour arising from such structures is generally brighter than pigment-based colour. Here, we describe the main types of photonic structures found in plants and discuss the experimental approaches that can be used to analyse them. These experimental approaches allow identification of the physical mechanisms producing structural colours with a high degree of confidence. PMID:23883949

  13. Laser power beaming system analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiders, Glenn W., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The successful demonstration of the PAMELA adaptive optics hardware and the fabrication of the BTOS truss structure were identified by the program office as the two most critical elements of the NASA power beaming program, so it was these that received attention during this program. Much of the effort was expended in direct program support at MSFC, but detailed technical analyses of the AMP deterministic control scheme and the BTOS truss structure (both the JPL design and a spherical one) were prepared and are attached, and recommendations are given.

  14. Summary of LDEF battery analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Chris; Thaller, Larry; Bittner, Harlin; Deligiannis, Frank; Tiller, Smith; Sullivan, David; Bene, James

    1992-01-01

    Tests and analyses of NiCd, LiSO2, and LiCf batteries flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) includes results from NASA, Aerospace, and commercial labs. The LiSO2 cells illustrate six-year degradation of internal components acceptable for space applications, with up to 85 percent battery capacity remaining on discharge of some returned cells. LiCf batteries completed their mission, but lost any remaining capacity due to internal degradation. Returned NiCd batteries tested an GSFC showed slight case distortion due to pressure build up, but were functioning as designed.

  15. Analysing photonic structures in plants.

    PubMed

    Vignolini, Silvia; Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J; Steiner, Ullrich

    2013-10-06

    The outer layers of a range of plant tissues, including flower petals, leaves and fruits, exhibit an intriguing variation of microscopic structures. Some of these structures include ordered periodic multilayers and diffraction gratings that give rise to interesting optical appearances. The colour arising from such structures is generally brighter than pigment-based colour. Here, we describe the main types of photonic structures found in plants and discuss the experimental approaches that can be used to analyse them. These experimental approaches allow identification of the physical mechanisms producing structural colours with a high degree of confidence.

  16. THOR Turbulence Electron Analyser: TEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazakerley, Andrew; Moore, Tom; Owen, Chris; Pollock, Craig; Wicks, Rob; Samara, Marilia; Rae, Jonny; Hancock, Barry; Kataria, Dhiren; Rust, Duncan

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Turbulence Electron Analyser (TEA) will measure the plasma electron populations in the mission's Regions of Interest. It will collect a 3D electron velocity distribution with cadences as short as 5 ms. The instrument will be capable of measuring energies up to 30 keV. TEA consists of multiple electrostatic analyser heads arranged so as to measure electrons arriving from look directions covering the full sky, i.e. 4 pi solid angle. The baseline concept is similar to the successful FPI-DES instrument currently operating on the MMS mission. TEA is intended to have a similar angular resolution, but a larger geometric factor. In comparison to earlier missions, TEA improves on the measurement cadence. For example, MMS FPI-DES routinely operates at 30 ms cadence. The objective of measuring distributions at rates as fast as 5 ms is driven by the mission's scientific requirements to resolve electron gyroscale size structures, where plasma heating and fluctuation dissipation is predicted to occur. TEA will therefore be capable of making measurements of the evolution of distribution functions across thin (a few km) current sheets travelling past the spacecraft at up to 600 km/s, of the Power Spectral Density of fluctuations of electron moments and of distributions fast enough to match frequencies with waves expected to be dissipating turbulence (e.g. with 100 Hz whistler waves).

  17. Perturbation analyses of intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Yohei M.; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Ueda, Hiroki R.

    2011-08-01

    Conformational fluctuations of a protein molecule are important to its function, and it is known that environmental molecules, such as water molecules, ions, and ligand molecules, significantly affect the function by changing the conformational fluctuations. However, it is difficult to systematically understand the role of environmental molecules because intermolecular interactions related to the conformational fluctuations are complicated. To identify important intermolecular interactions with regard to the conformational fluctuations, we develop herein (i) distance-independent and (ii) distance-dependent perturbation analyses of the intermolecular interactions. We show that these perturbation analyses can be realized by performing (i) a principal component analysis using conditional expectations of truncated and shifted intermolecular potential energy terms and (ii) a functional principal component analysis using products of intermolecular forces and conditional cumulative densities. We refer to these analyses as intermolecular perturbation analysis (IPA) and distance-dependent intermolecular perturbation analysis (DIPA), respectively. For comparison of the IPA and the DIPA, we apply them to the alanine dipeptide isomerization in explicit water. Although the first IPA principal components discriminate two states (the α state and PPII (polyproline II) + β states) for larger cutoff length, the separation between the PPII state and the β state is unclear in the second IPA principal components. On the other hand, in the large cutoff value, DIPA eigenvalues converge faster than that for IPA and the top two DIPA principal components clearly identify the three states. By using the DIPA biplot, the contributions of the dipeptide-water interactions to each state are analyzed systematically. Since the DIPA improves the state identification and the convergence rate with retaining distance information, we conclude that the DIPA is a more practical method compared with the

  18. Analyses to improve operational flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Trikouros, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    Operational flexibility is greatly enhanced if the technical bases for plant limits and design margins are fully understood, and the analyses necessary to evaluate the effect of plant modifications or changes in operating modes on these parameters can be performed as required. If a condition should arise that might jeopardize a plant limit or reduce operational flexibility, it would be necessary to understand the basis for the limit or the specific condition limiting operational flexibility and be capable of performing a reanalysis to either demonstrate that the limit will not be violated or to change the limit. This paper provides examples of GPU Nuclear efforts in this regard. Examples of Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island operating experiences are discussed.

  19. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

  20. Chemical analyses of provided samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Christopher H.

    1993-01-01

    Two batches of samples were received and chemical analysis was performed of the surface and near surface regions of the samples by the surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) method. The samples included four one-inch optics and several paint samples. The analyses emphasized surface contamination or modification. In these studies, pulsed sputtering by 7 keV Ar+ and primarily single-photon ionization (SPI) by coherent 118 nm radiation (at approximately 5 x 10(exp 5) W/cm(sup 2) were used. For two of the samples, also multiphoton ionization (MPI) at 266 nm (approximately 5 x 10(exp 11) W/cm(sup 2) was used. Most notable among the results was the silicone contamination on Mg2 mirror 28-92, and that the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) paint sample had been enriched in K and Na and depleted in Zn, Si, B, and organic compounds relative to the control paint.

  1. Geomorphic analyses from space imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morisawa, M.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most obvious applications of space imagery to geomorphological analyses is in the study of drainage patterns and channel networks. LANDSAT, high altitude photography and other types of remote sensing imagery are excellent for depicting stream networks on a regional scale because of their broad coverage in a single image. They offer a valuable tool for comparing and analyzing drainage patterns and channel networks all over the world. Three aspects considered in this geomorphological study are: (1) the origin, evolution and rates of development of drainage systems; (2) the topological studies of network and channel arrangements; and (3) the adjustment of streams to tectonic events and geologic structure (i.e., the mode and rate of adjustment).

  2. Genetic Analyses of Integrin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wickström, Sara A.; Radovanac, Korana; Fässler, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms, as well as maintenance of organ architecture and function, requires robust regulation of cell fates. This is in part achieved by conserved signaling pathways through which cells process extracellular information and translate this information into changes in proliferation, differentiation, migration, and cell shape. Gene deletion studies in higher eukaryotes have assigned critical roles for components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and their cellular receptors in a vast number of developmental processes, indicating that a large proportion of this signaling is regulated by cell-ECM interactions. In addition, genetic alterations in components of this signaling axis play causative roles in several human diseases. This review will discuss what genetic analyses in mice and lower organisms have taught us about adhesion signaling in development and disease. PMID:21421914

  3. Isotopic signatures by bulk analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.

    1997-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a series of measurement techniques for identification of nuclear signatures by analyzing bulk samples. Two specific applications for isotopic fingerprinting to identify the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in bulk samples are presented. The first example is the analyses of environmental samples collected in the US Arctic to determine the impact of dumping of radionuclides in this polar region. Analyses of sediment and biota samples indicate that for the areas sampled the anthropogenic radionuclide content of sediments was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. The anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. It can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected. The second example is isotopic fingerprinting of water and sediment samples from the Rocky Flats Facility (RFP). The largest source of anthropogenic radioactivity presently affecting surface-waters at RFP is the sediments that are currently residing in the holding ponds. One gram of sediment from a holding pond contains approximately 50 times more plutonium than 1 liter of water from the pond. Essentially 100% of the uranium in Ponds A-1 and A-2 originated as depleted uranium. The largest source of radioactivity in the terminal Ponds A-4, B-5 and C-2 was naturally occurring uranium and its decay product radium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.05% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public. All of the radioactivity observed in soil, sediment and water samples collected at RFP was naturally occurring, the result of processes at RFP or the result of global fallout. No extraneous anthropogenic alpha, beta or gamma activities were detected. The plutonium concentrations in Pond C-2 appear to vary seasonally.

  4. Genetic analyses of captive Alala (Corvus hawaiiensis) using AFLP analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, Susan I.; Bianchi, Kiara R.

    2006-01-01

    affected by the mutation rate at microsatellite loci, thus introducing a bias. Also, the number of loci that can be studied is frequently limited to fewer than 10. This theoretically represents a maximum of one marker for each of 10 chromosomes. Dominant markers like AFLP allow a larger fraction of the genome to be screened. Large numbers of loci can be screened by AFLP to resolve very small individual differences that can be used for identification of individuals, estimates of pairwise relatedness and, in some cases, for parentage analyses. Since AFLP is a dominant marker (can not distinguish between +/+ homozygote versus +/- heterozygote), it has limitations for parentage analyses. Only when both parents are homozygous for the absence of alleles (-/-) and offspring show a presence (+/+ or +/-) can the parents be excluded. In this case, microsatellites become preferable as they have the potential to exclude individual parents when the other parent is unknown. Another limitation of AFLP is that the loci are generally less polymorphic (only two alleles/locus) than microsatellite loci (often >10 alleles/locus). While generally fewer than 10 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci are enough to exclude and assign parentage, it might require up to 100 or more AFLP loci. While there are pros and cons to different methodologies, the total number of loci evaluated by AFLP generally offsets the limitations imposed due to the dominant nature of this approach and end results between methods are generally comparable. Overall objectives of this study were to evaluate the level of genetic diversity in the captive population of Alala, to compare genetic data with currently available pedigree information, and to determine the extent of relatedness of mating pairs and among founding individuals.

  5. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Uncertainty analyses. 436.24 Section 436.24 Energy... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or... by conducting additional analyses using any standard engineering economics method such as...

  6. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Uncertainty analyses. 436.24 Section 436.24 Energy... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or... by conducting additional analyses using any standard engineering economics method such as...

  7. Photovoltaics: Life-cycle Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis V. M.; Kim, H.C.

    2009-10-02

    Life-cycle analysis is an invaluable tool for investigating the environmental profile of a product or technology from cradle to grave. Such life-cycle analyses of energy technologies are essential, especially as material and energy flows are often interwoven, and divergent emissions into the environment may occur at different life-cycle-stages. This approach is well exemplified by our description of material and energy flows in four commercial PV technologies, i.e., mono-crystalline silicon, multi-crystalline silicon, ribbon-silicon, and cadmium telluride. The same life-cycle approach is applied to the balance of system that supports flat, fixed PV modules during operation. We also discuss the life-cycle environmental metrics for a concentration PV system with a tracker and lenses to capture more sunlight per cell area than the flat, fixed system but requires large auxiliary components. Select life-cycle risk indicators for PV, i.e., fatalities, injures, and maximum consequences are evaluated in a comparative context with other electricity-generation pathways.

  8. Comparison between Inbreeding Analyses Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Mireia; Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Sjøvold, Torstein; González-José, Rolando; Hernández, Miquel

    2015-12-01

    Surnames are widely used in inbreeding analysis, but the validity of results has often been questioned due to the failure to comply with the prerequisites of the method. Here we analyze inbreeding in Hallstatt (Austria) between the 17th and the 19th centuries both using genealogies and surnames. The high and significant correlation of the results obtained by both methods demonstrates the validity of the use of surnames in this kind of studies. On the other hand, the inbreeding values obtained (0.24 x 10⁻³ in the genealogies analysis and 2.66 x 10⁻³ in the surnames analysis) are lower than those observed in Europe for this period and for this kind of population, demonstrating the falseness of the apparent isolation of Hallstatt's population. The temporal trend of inbreeding in both analyses does not follow the European general pattern, but shows a maximum in 1850 with a later decrease along the second half of the 19th century. This is probably due to the high migration rate that is implied by the construction of transport infrastructures around the 1870's.

  9. Helicopter tail rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to interactions with the main rotor tip vortices, and with the fuselage separation mean wake. The tail rotor blade-main rotor tip vortex interaction is modelled as an airfoil of infinite span cutting through a moving vortex. The vortex and the geometry information required by the analyses are obtained through a free wake geometry analysis of the main rotor. The acoustic pressure-time histories for the tail rotor blade-vortex interactions are then calculated. These acoustic results are compared to tail rotor loading and thickness noise, and are found to be significant to the overall tail rotor noise generation. Under most helicopter operating conditions, large acoustic pressure fluctuations can be generated due to a series of skewed main rotor tip vortices passing through the tail rotor disk. The noise generation depends strongly upon the helicopter operating conditions and the location of the tail rotor relative to the main rotor.

  10. Proteins analysed as virtual knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Keith; Taylor, Alexander J.; Dennis, Mark R.

    2017-02-01

    Long, flexible physical filaments are naturally tangled and knotted, from macroscopic string down to long-chain molecules. The existence of knotting in a filament naturally affects its configuration and properties, and may be very stable or disappear rapidly under manipulation and interaction. Knotting has been previously identified in protein backbone chains, for which these mechanical constraints are of fundamental importance to their molecular functionality, despite their being open curves in which the knots are not mathematically well defined; knotting can only be identified by closing the termini of the chain somehow. We introduce a new method for resolving knotting in open curves using virtual knots, which are a wider class of topological objects that do not require a classical closure and so naturally capture the topological ambiguity inherent in open curves. We describe the results of analysing proteins in the Protein Data Bank by this new scheme, recovering and extending previous knotting results, and identifying topological interest in some new cases. The statistics of virtual knots in protein chains are compared with those of open random walks and Hamiltonian subchains on cubic lattices, identifying a regime of open curves in which the virtual knotting description is likely to be important.

  11. Network analyses in systems pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Seth I.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Systems pharmacology is an emerging area of pharmacology which utilizes network analysis of drug action as one of its approaches. By considering drug actions and side effects in the context of the regulatory networks within which the drug targets and disease gene products function, network analysis promises to greatly increase our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the multiple actions of drugs. Systems pharmacology can provide new approaches for drug discovery for complex diseases. The integrated approach used in systems pharmacology can allow for drug action to be considered in the context of the whole genome. Network-based studies are becoming an increasingly important tool in understanding the relationships between drug action and disease susceptibility genes. This review discusses how analysis of biological networks has contributed to the genesis of systems pharmacology and how these studies have improved global understanding of drug targets, suggested new targets and approaches for therapeutics, and provided a deeper understanding of the effects of drugs. Taken together, these types of analyses can lead to new therapeutic options while improving the safety and efficacy of existing medications. Contact: ravi.iyengar@mssm.edu PMID:19648136

  12. Proteins analysed as virtual knots

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Keith; Taylor, Alexander J.; Dennis, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    Long, flexible physical filaments are naturally tangled and knotted, from macroscopic string down to long-chain molecules. The existence of knotting in a filament naturally affects its configuration and properties, and may be very stable or disappear rapidly under manipulation and interaction. Knotting has been previously identified in protein backbone chains, for which these mechanical constraints are of fundamental importance to their molecular functionality, despite their being open curves in which the knots are not mathematically well defined; knotting can only be identified by closing the termini of the chain somehow. We introduce a new method for resolving knotting in open curves using virtual knots, which are a wider class of topological objects that do not require a classical closure and so naturally capture the topological ambiguity inherent in open curves. We describe the results of analysing proteins in the Protein Data Bank by this new scheme, recovering and extending previous knotting results, and identifying topological interest in some new cases. The statistics of virtual knots in protein chains are compared with those of open random walks and Hamiltonian subchains on cubic lattices, identifying a regime of open curves in which the virtual knotting description is likely to be important. PMID:28205562

  13. Magnesium-rich Ejecta in the SNR G284.3-1.8 Around the High-mass Gamma-Ray Binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brian J.; Rangelov, Blagoy; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George G.

    2015-07-01

    We present results from two Chandra observations of the 16.6 day X-ray/γ-ray high-mass binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856 located at the center of the supernova remnant (SNR) G284.3-1.8. The binary spectra, separated by 0.25 in binary phase, are fit with an absorbed power-law model with {{Γ }}≈ 1.7-1.8 for both observations (the flux during the second observation is a factor of 1.7 smaller). In the high-resolution ACIS-I image we found a hint of extended emission ≈ 2\\prime\\prime -3″ southeast of the binary, significant at the 3σ level. Binary evolution codes reproduce the system’s observed properties with two massive stars with an initial 18 day period, undergoing mass transfer and leaving behind a heavy ≈ 2 {M}⊙ neutron star. The initial mass of the progenitor star in this scenario is 27 ± 4 {M}⊙ . Chandra and XMM-Newton images of the remnant show it has a relatively low X-ray surface brightness. The two brightest regions of extended X-ray emission, with luminosities ˜ {10}33 erg s-1 for d = 5 kpc, lie in the northern and western portions and show significantly different spectra. The northern patch is consistent with shocked ISM, with a low temperature and long ionization timescale. However, the western patch is dominated by ejecta, and shows significantly enhanced Mg content relative to other ejecta products. The abundance ratios inferred resemble those from the Large Magellanic Cloud remnant N49B. To our knowledge, this is only the second case of such Mg-rich ejecta found in an SNR. Nucleosynthesis models for core-collapse supernovae predict Mg-rich ejecta from very massive progenitors of \\gt 25 {M}⊙ .

  14. Analyses of Transistor Punchthrough Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David P.

    1999-01-01

    The failure of two transistors in the Altitude Switch Assembly for the Solid Rocket Booster followed by two additional failures a year later presented a challenge to failure analysts. These devices had successfully worked for many years on numerous missions. There was no history of failures with this type of device. Extensive checks of the test procedures gave no indication for a source of the cause. The devices were manufactured more than twenty years ago and failure information on this lot date code was not readily available. External visual exam, radiography, PEID, and leak testing were performed with nominal results Electrical testing indicated nearly identical base-emitter and base-collector characteristics (both forward and reverse) with a low resistance short emitter to collector. These characteristics are indicative of a classic failure mechanism called punchthrough. In failure analysis punchthrough refers to an condition where a relatively low voltage pulse causes the device to conduct very hard producing localized areas of thermal runaway or "hot spots". At one or more of these hot spots, the excessive currents melt the silicon. Heavily doped emitter material diffuses through the base region to the collector forming a diffusion pipe shorting the emitter to base to collector. Upon cooling, an alloy junction forms between the pipe and the base region. Generally, the hot spot (punch-through site) is under the bond and no surface artifact is visible. The devices were delidded and the internal structures were examined microscopically. The gold emitter lead was melted on one device, but others had anomalies in the metallization around the in-tact emitter bonds. The SEM examination confirmed some anomalies to be cosmetic defects while other anomalies were artifacts of the punchthrough site. Subsequent to these analyses, the contractor determined that some irregular testing procedures occurred at the time of the failures heretofore unreported. These testing

  15. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-21

    Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor

  16. Amplituden der Kernphasen im Bereich der Kaustik B und Untersuchung der Struktur der Übergangszone zum inneren Erdkern mit spektralen Amplituden der diffraktierten Phase PKP(BC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Michael D. C.

    2002-04-01

    unterschiedliche Weise. Eine Deutung des Verhaltens erfordert die Berechnung von Abklingspektren. Dabei wird die Abschwächung des PKP(BC)diff Signals für acht Frequenzen zwischen 6.4 s und 1.25 Hz ermittelt und als Spektrum dargestellt. Die Form des Abklingspektrums ist charakteristisch für die Beschaffenheit der Geschwindigkeitsstruktur direkt oberhalb der Grenze zum inneren Erdkern (GIK). Die Beben, deren Kernphasen im Regionalnetz als diffraktierte Kernphasen BCdiff registriert werden, liegen in einem Entfernungsbereich jenseits von 150 °. In dieser Distanz befinden sich die Erdbebenherde der Tonga-Fidschi-Subduktionszone, deren Breitbandaufzeichnungen verwendet werden. Die Auswertung unkorrigierter Wellenformen ergibt Abklingspektren, die mit plausiblen Erdmodellen nicht in Einklang zu bringen sind. Aus diesem Grund werden die Daten einer spektralen Stationskorrektur unterzogen, die eigens zu diesem Zweck ermittelt wird. Am Beginn der Auswertung steht eine Prüfung bekannter Erdmodelle mit unterschiedlichen Geschwindigkeitsstrukturen oberhalb der GIK. Zu den untersuchten Modellen zählen PREM, IASP91, AK135Q, PREM2, SP6, OICM2 und eine Variante des PREM. Die Untersuchung ergibt, da Modelle, die einen verringerten Gradienten oberhalb der GIK aufweisen, eine bessere Übereinstimmung mit den gemessenen Daten zeigen als Modelle ohne diese Übergangszone. Zur Verifikation dieser These wird ein Erdmodell, das keinen verringerten Gradienten oberhalb der GIK besitzt (PREM), durch eine Reihe unterschiedlicher Geschwindigkeitsverläufe in diesem Bereich ergänzt und deren synthetische Seismogramme berechnet. Das Resultat der Untersuchung sind zwei Varianten des PREM, deren Frequenzanalyse eine gute Übereinstimmung mit den Daten zeigt. Das Abklingspektrum des Erdmodells PD47, das in einer 380 km mächtigen Schicht einen negativen Gradienten besitzt, zeigt eine groe Ähnlichkeit mit den gemessenen Spektren. Dennoch kann es nicht als realistisches Modell angesehen werden, da der Punkt

  17. MELCOR analyses for accident progression issues

    SciTech Connect

    Dingman, S.E.; Shaffer, C.J.; Payne, A.C.; Carmel, M.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Results of calculations performed with MELCOR and HECTR in support of the NUREG-1150 study are presented in this report. The analyses examined a wide range of issues. The analyses included integral calculations covering an entire accident sequence, as well as calculations that addressed specific issues that could affect several accident sequences. The results of the analyses for Grand Gulf, Peach Bottom, LaSalle, and Sequoyah are described, and the major conclusions are summarized. 23 refs., 69 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Electron/proton spectrometer certification documentation analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleeson, P.

    1972-01-01

    A compilation of analyses generated during the development of the electron-proton spectrometer for the Skylab program is presented. The data documents the analyses required by the electron-proton spectrometer verification plan. The verification plan was generated to satisfy the ancillary hardware requirements of the Apollo Applications program. The certification of the spectrometer requires that various tests, inspections, and analyses be documented, approved, and accepted by reliability and quality control personnel of the spectrometer development program.

  19. 7 CFR 94.102 - Analyses available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS... analyses for total ash, fat by acid hydrolysis, moisture, salt, protein, beta-carotene,...

  20. 7 CFR 94.102 - Analyses available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS... analyses for total ash, fat by acid hydrolysis, moisture, salt, protein, beta-carotene,...

  1. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a) For... identify and address relevant markets and issues, and provide additional information as requested by...

  2. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a) For... identify and address relevant markets and issues, and provide additional information as requested by...

  3. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Kostiuk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the analyses that may be incorporated into the Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant. The document will be used as a discussion tool to enable NASA and other integrated aviation system entities to evaluate, discuss, and prioritize analyses.

  4. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a)...

  5. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a)...

  6. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a)...

  7. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or... impact of uncertainty on the calculation of life cycle cost effectiveness or the assignment of rank order... and probabilistic analysis. If additional analysis casts substantial doubt on the life cycle...

  8. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or... impact of uncertainty on the calculation of life cycle cost effectiveness or the assignment of rank order... and probabilistic analysis. If additional analysis casts substantial doubt on the life cycle...

  9. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or... impact of uncertainty on the calculation of life cycle cost effectiveness or the assignment of rank order... and probabilistic analysis. If additional analysis casts substantial doubt on the life cycle...

  10. Operator-free flow injection analyser

    PubMed Central

    de Faria, Lourival C.

    1991-01-01

    A flow injection analyser has been constructed to allow an operator-free determination of up to 40 samples. Besides the usual FIA apparatus, the analyser includes a home-made sample introduction device made with three electromechanical three-way valves and an auto-sampler from Technicon which has been adapted to be commanded by an external digital signal. The analyser is controlled by a single board SDK-8085 microcomputer. The necessary interface to couple the analyser components to the microcomputer is also described. The analyser was evaluated for a Cr(VI)-FIA determination showing a very good performance with a relative standard deviation for 15 signals from the injection of 100 μl of a 1.0 mg.ml-1 standard Cr(VI) solution being equal to 0.5%. PMID:18924899

  11. Level II Ergonomic Analyses, Dover AFB, DE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    IERA-RS-BR-TR-1999-0002 UNITED STATES AIR FORCE IERA Level II Ergonomie Analyses, Dover AFB, DE Andrew Marcotte Marilyn Joyce The Joyce...Project (070401881, Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Level II Ergonomie Analyses, Dover...1.0 INTRODUCTION 1-1 1.1 Purpose Of The Level II Ergonomie Analyses : 1-1 1.2 Approach 1-1 1.2.1 Initial Shop Selection and Administration of the

  12. Interactive graphics for functional data analyses.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Julia; Park, So Young; Staicu, Ana Maria; Goldsmith, Jeff

    Although there are established graphics that accompany the most common functional data analyses, generating these graphics for each dataset and analysis can be cumbersome and time consuming. Often, the barriers to visualization inhibit useful exploratory data analyses and prevent the development of intuition for a method and its application to a particular dataset. The refund.shiny package was developed to address these issues for several of the most common functional data analyses. After conducting an analysis, the plot shiny() function is used to generate an interactive visualization environment that contains several distinct graphics, many of which are updated in response to user input. These visualizations reduce the burden of exploratory analyses and can serve as a useful tool for the communication of results to non-statisticians.

  13. Quality control considerations in performing washability analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.D.

    1984-10-01

    The author describes, in considerable detail, the procedures for carrying out washability analyses as laid down in ASTM Standard Test Method D4371. These include sampling, sample preparation, hydrometer standardisation, washability testing, and analysis of specific gravity fractions.

  14. SCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP Analyses

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    Forcing data, suitable for use with single column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs), have been derived from NWP analyses for the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites of Manus Island and Nauru.

  15. Anthocyanin analyses of Vaccinium fruit dietary supplements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccinium fruit ingredients within dietary supplements were identified by comparisons with anthocyanin analyses of known Vaccinium profiles (demonstration of anthocyanin fingerprinting). Available Vaccinium supplements were purchased and analyzed; their anthocyanin profiles (based on HPLC separation...

  16. Comparison with Russian analyses of meteor impact

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    The inversion model for meteor impacts is used to discuss Russian analyses and compare principal results. For common input parameters, the models produce consistent estimates of impactor parameters. Directions for future research are discussed and prioritized.

  17. 49 CFR 1572.107 - Other analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ASSESSMENTS Standards for Security Threat Assessments § 1572.107 Other analyses. (a) TSA may determine that an... the search conducted under this part reveals extensive foreign or domestic criminal convictions,...

  18. A History of Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    A history of the development of rotorcraft comprehensive analyses is presented. Comprehensive analyses are digital computer programs that calculate the aeromechanical behavior of the rotor and aircraft, bringing together the most advanced models of the geometry, structure, dynamics, and aerodynamics available in rotary wing technology. The development of the major codes of the last five decades from industry, government, and universities is described. A number of common themes observed in this history are discussed.

  19. Analyses and forecasts with LAWS winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Muyin; Paegle, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Horizontal fluxes of atmospheric water vapor are studied for summer months during 1989 and 1992 over North and South America based on analyses from European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts, US National Meteorological Center, and United Kingdom Meteorological Office. The calculations are performed over 20 deg by 20 deg box-shaped midlatitude domains located to the east of the Rocky Mountains in North America, and to the east of the Andes Mountains in South America. The fluxes are determined from operational center gridded analyses of wind and moisture. Differences in the monthly mean moisture flux divergence determined from these analyses are as large as 7 cm/month precipitable water equivalent over South America, and 3 cm/month over North America. Gridded analyses at higher spatial and temporal resolution exhibit better agreement in the moisture budget study. However, significant discrepancies of the moisture flux divergence computed from different gridded analyses still exist. The conclusion is more pessimistic than Rasmusson's estimate based on station data. Further analysis reveals that the most significant sources of error result from model surface elevation fields, gaps in the data archive, and uncertainties in the wind and specific humidity analyses. Uncertainties in the wind analyses are the most important problem. The low-level jets, in particular, are substantially different in the different data archives. Part of the reason for this may be due to the way the different analysis models parameterized physical processes affecting low-level jets. The results support the inference that the noise/signal ratio of the moisture budget may be improved more rapidly by providing better wind observations and analyses than by providing better moisture data.

  20. Prismatic analyser concept for neutron spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Birk, Jonas O.; Jacobsen, Johan; Hansen, Rasmus L.; Lefmann, Kim; Markó, Márton; Niedermayer, Christof; Freeman, Paul G.; Christensen, Niels B.; Månsson, Martin; Rønnow, Henrik M.

    2014-11-15

    Developments in modern neutron spectroscopy have led to typical sample sizes decreasing from few cm to several mm in diameter samples. We demonstrate how small samples together with the right choice of analyser and detector components makes distance collimation an important concept in crystal analyser spectrometers. We further show that this opens new possibilities where neutrons with different energies are reflected by the same analyser but counted in different detectors, thus improving both energy resolution and total count rate compared to conventional spectrometers. The technique can readily be combined with advanced focussing geometries and with multiplexing instrument designs. We present a combination of simulations and data showing three different energies simultaneously reflected from one analyser. Experiments were performed on a cold triple axis instrument and on a prototype inverse geometry Time-of-flight spectrometer installed at PSI, Switzerland, and shows excellent agreement with the predictions. Typical improvements will be 2.0 times finer resolution and a factor of 1.9 in flux gain compared to a focussing Rowland geometry, or of 3.3 times finer resolution and a factor of 2.4 in flux gain compared to a single flat analyser slab.

  1. Geomagnetic local and regional harmonic analyses.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alldredge, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    Procedures are developed for using rectangular and cylindrical harmonic analyses in local and regional areas. Both the linear least squares analysis, applicable when component data are available, and the nonlinear least squares analysis, applicable when only total field data are available, are treated. When component data are available, it is advantageous to work with residual fields obtained by subtracting components derived from a harmonic potential from the observed components. When only total field intensity data are available, they must be used directly. Residual values cannot be used. Cylindrical harmonic analyses are indicated when fields tend toward cylindrical symmetry; otherwise, rectangular harmonic analyses will be more advantageous. Examples illustrating each type of analysis are given.-Author

  2. NEUTRONICS ANALYSES FOR SNS TARGETS DEPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina I; Remec, Igor; Gallmeier, Franz X

    2016-01-01

    In order to deposit Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) spent facility components replaced due to end-of-life radiation-induced material damage or burn-up, or because of mechanical failure or design improvements, waste classification analyses are being performed. These analyses include an accurate estimate of the radionuclide inventory, on which base components are classified and an appropriate container for transport and storage is determined. After the choice for the container is made, transport calculations are performed for the facility component to be placed inside the container, ensuring compliance with waste management regulations. When necessary, additional shielding is added. Most of the effort is concentrated on the target deposition, which normally takes place once or twice per year. Additionally, the second target station (STS) is in a process of design and waste management analyses for the STS target are being developed to support a deposition plan

  3. Proteomic Analyses of the Vitreous Humour

    PubMed Central

    Angi, Martina; Kalirai, Helen; Coupland, Sarah E.; Damato, Bertil E.; Semeraro, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.

    2012-01-01

    The human vitreous humour (VH) is a transparent, highly hydrated gel, which occupies the posterior segment of the eye between the lens and the retina. Physiological and pathological conditions of the retina are reflected in the protein composition of the VH, which can be sampled as part of routine surgical procedures. Historically, many studies have investigated levels of individual proteins in VH from healthy and diseased eyes. In the last decade, proteomics analyses have been performed to characterise the proteome of the human VH and explore networks of functionally related proteins, providing insight into the aetiology of diabetic retinopathy and proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Recent proteomic studies on the VH from animal models of autoimmune uveitis have identified new signalling pathways associated to autoimmune triggers and intravitreal inflammation. This paper aims to guide biological scientists through the different proteomic techniques that have been used to analyse the VH and present future perspectives for the study of intravitreal inflammation using proteomic analyses. PMID:22973072

  4. A qualitative method for analysing multivoicedness

    PubMed Central

    Aveling, Emma-Louise; Gillespie, Alex; Cornish, Flora

    2015-01-01

    ‘Multivoicedness’ and the ‘multivoiced Self’ have become important theoretical concepts guiding research. Drawing on the tradition of dialogism, the Self is conceptualised as being constituted by a multiplicity of dynamic, interacting voices. Despite the growth in literature and empirical research, there remains a paucity of established methodological tools for analysing the multivoiced Self using qualitative data. In this article, we set out a systematic, practical ‘how-to’ guide for analysing multivoicedness. Using theoretically derived tools, our three-step method comprises: identifying the voices of I-positions within the Self’s talk (or text), identifying the voices of ‘inner-Others’, and examining the dialogue and relationships between the different voices. We elaborate each step and illustrate our method using examples from a published paper in which data were analysed using this method. We conclude by offering more general principles for the use of the method and discussing potential applications. PMID:26664292

  5. Advanced laser stratospheric monitoring systems analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the software support supplied by Systems and Applied Sciences Corporation for the study of Advanced Laser Stratospheric Monitoring Systems Analyses under contract No. NAS1-15806. This report discusses improvements to the Langley spectroscopic data base, development of LHS instrument control software and data analyses and validation software. The effect of diurnal variations on the retrieved concentrations of NO, NO2 and C L O from a space and balloon borne measurement platform are discussed along with the selection of optimum IF channels for sensing stratospheric species from space.

  6. Analysing particulate deposition to plant canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bache, D. H.

    Experimental measurements of the deposition of Lycopodium spores to a plant canopy were analysed to generate specific estimates of the relative significance of sedimentation, impaction and the effective foliage density fp. For the particular case analysed impaction appeared to be the dominating trapping mechanism and it was demonstrated that considerable aerodynamic shading was present. Using an estimate of fp. a consistant picture emerged in the behaviour of the canopy when both wet and dry and when tested against independent data on the trapping characteristics of individual elements. These conclusions differed significantly from those derived using a model in which impaction was neglected and lead to an apparent overestimate of fp.

  7. Automated Quality Assurance of Online NIR Analysers

    PubMed Central

    Aaljoki, Kari

    2005-01-01

    Modern NIR analysers produce valuable data for closed-loop process control and optimisation practically in real time. Thus it is highly important to keep them in the best possible shape. Quality assurance (QA) of NIR analysers is an interesting and complex issue because it is not only the instrument and sample handling that has to be monitored. At the same time, validity of prediction models has to be assured. A system for fully automated QA of NIR analysers is described. The system takes care of collecting and organising spectra from various instruments, relevant laboratory, and process management system (PMS) data. Validation of spectra is based on simple diagnostics values derived from the spectra. Predictions are validated against laboratory (LIMS) or other online analyser results (collected from PMS). The system features automated alarming, reporting, trending, and charting functions for major key variables for easy visual inspection. Various textual and graphical reports are sent to maintenance people through email. The software was written with Borland Delphi 7 Enterprise. Oracle and PMS ODBC interfaces were used for accessing LIMS and PMS data using appropriate SQL queries. It will be shown that it is possible to take actions even before the quality of predictions is seriously affected, thus maximising the overall uptime of the instrument. PMID:18924628

  8. Uncertainty quantification approaches for advanced reactor analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, L. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-24

    The original approach to nuclear reactor design or safety analyses was to make very conservative modeling assumptions so as to ensure meeting the required safety margins. Traditional regulation, as established by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission required conservatisms which have subsequently been shown to be excessive. The commission has therefore moved away from excessively conservative evaluations and has determined best-estimate calculations to be an acceptable alternative to conservative models, provided the best-estimate results are accompanied by an uncertainty evaluation which can demonstrate that, when a set of analysis cases which statistically account for uncertainties of all types are generated, there is a 95% probability that at least 95% of the cases meet the safety margins. To date, nearly all published work addressing uncertainty evaluations of nuclear power plant calculations has focused on light water reactors and on large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) analyses. However, there is nothing in the uncertainty evaluation methodologies that is limited to a specific type of reactor or to specific types of plant scenarios. These same methodologies can be equally well applied to analyses for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and to liquid metal reactors, and they can be applied to steady-state calculations, operational transients, or severe accident scenarios. This report reviews and compares both statistical and deterministic uncertainty evaluation approaches. Recommendations are given for selection of an uncertainty methodology and for considerations to be factored into the process of evaluating uncertainties for advanced reactor best-estimate analyses.

  9. Cosmetology: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    These task analyses are designed to be used in combination with the "Trade and Industrial Education Service Area Resource" in order to implement competency-based education in the cosmetology program in Virginia. The task analysis document contains the task inventory, suggested task sequence lists, and content outlines for the secondary…

  10. Amino acid analyses of Apollo 14 samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrke, C. W.; Zumwalt, R. W.; Kuo, K.; Aue, W. A.; Stalling, D. L.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Detection limits were between 300 pg and 1 ng for different amino acids, in an analysis by gas-liquid chromatography of water extracts from Apollo 14 lunar fines in which amino acids were converted to their N-trifluoro-acetyl-n-butyl esters. Initial analyses of water and HCl extracts of sample 14240 and 14298 samples showed no amino acids above background levels.

  11. The Economic Cost of Homosexuality: Multilevel Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumle, Amanda K.; Poston, Dudley, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This article builds on earlier studies that have examined "the economic cost of homosexuality," by using data from the 2000 U.S. Census and by employing multilevel analyses. Our findings indicate that partnered gay men experience a 12.5 percent earnings penalty compared to married heterosexual men, and a statistically insignificant earnings…

  12. Written Case Analyses and Critical Reflection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Helen L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The study investigated the use of case-based pedagogy to develop critical reflection in prospective teachers. Analysis of students written analyses of dilemma-based cases found patterns showing evidence of students open-mindedness, sense of professional responsibility, and wholeheartedness in approach to teaching. (DB)

  13. Chemical Analyses of Silicon Aerogel Samples

    SciTech Connect

    van der Werf, I.; Palmisano, F.; De Leo, Raffaele; Marrone, Stefano

    2008-04-01

    After five years of operating, two Aerogel counters: A1 and A2, taking data in Hall A at Jefferson Lab, suffered a loss of performance. In this note possible causes of degradation have been studied. In particular, various chemical and physical analyses have been carried out on several Aerogel tiles and on adhesive tape in order to reveal the presence of contaminants.

  14. Automated Quality Assurance of Online NIR Analysers.

    PubMed

    Aaljoki, Kari

    2005-01-01

    Modern NIR analysers produce valuable data for closed-loop process control and optimisation practically in real time. Thus it is highly important to keep them in the best possible shape. Quality assurance (QA) of NIR analysers is an interesting and complex issue because it is not only the instrument and sample handling that has to be monitored. At the same time, validity of prediction models has to be assured. A system for fully automated QA of NIR analysers is described. The system takes care of collecting and organising spectra from various instruments, relevant laboratory, and process management system (PMS) data. Validation of spectra is based on simple diagnostics values derived from the spectra. Predictions are validated against laboratory (LIMS) or other online analyser results (collected from PMS). The system features automated alarming, reporting, trending, and charting functions for major key variables for easy visual inspection. Various textual and graphical reports are sent to maintenance people through email. The software was written with Borland Delphi 7 Enterprise. Oracle and PMS ODBC interfaces were used for accessing LIMS and PMS data using appropriate SQL queries. It will be shown that it is possible to take actions even before the quality of predictions is seriously affected, thus maximising the overall uptime of the instrument.

  15. Analysing Simple Electric Motors in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Jeff; MacIsaac, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena and devices such as motors are typically unfamiliar to both teachers and students. To better visualize and illustrate the abstract concepts (such as magnetic fields) underlying electricity and magnetism, we suggest that students construct and analyse the operation of a simply constructed Johnson electric motor. In this…

  16. Correlation Functions Aid Analyses Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    New uses found for correlation functions in analyses of spectra. In approach combining elements of both pattern-recognition and traditional spectral-analysis techniques, spectral lines identified in data appear useless at first glance because they are dominated by noise. New approach particularly useful in measurement of concentrations of rare species of molecules in atmosphere.

  17. Functional Analyses and Treatment of Precursor Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najdowski, Adel C.; Wallace, Michele D.; Ellsworth, Carrie L.; MacAleese, Alicia N.; Cleveland, Jackie

    2008-01-01

    Functional analysis has been demonstrated to be an effective method to identify environmental variables that maintain problem behavior. However, there are cases when conducting functional analyses of severe problem behavior may be contraindicated. The current study applied functional analysis procedures to a class of behavior that preceded severe…

  18. A Call for Conducting Multivariate Mixed Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Several authors have written methodological works that provide an introductory- and/or intermediate-level guide to conducting mixed analyses. Although these works have been useful for beginning and emergent mixed researchers, with very few exceptions, works are lacking that describe and illustrate advanced-level mixed analysis approaches. Thus,…

  19. Quantitative Analyse und Visualisierung der Herzfunktionen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Anne; Schwarz, Tobias; Engel, Nicole; Seitel, Mathias; Kenngott, Hannes; Mohrhardt, Carsten; Loßnitzer, Dirk; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    Die computergestützte bildbasierte Analyse der Herzfunktionen ist mittlerweile Standard in der Kardiologie. Die verfügbaren Produkte erfordern meist ein hohes Maß an Benutzerinteraktion und somit einen erhöhten Zeitaufwand. In dieser Arbeit wird ein Ansatz vorgestellt, der dem Kardiologen eine größtenteils automatische Analyse der Herzfunktionen mittels MRT-Bilddaten ermöglicht und damit Zeitersparnis schafft. Hierbei werden alle relevanten herzphysiologsichen Parameter berechnet und mithilfe von Diagrammen und Graphen visualisiert. Diese Berechnungen werden evaluiert, indem die ermittelten Werte mit manuell vermessenen verglichen werden. Der hierbei berechnete mittlere Fehler liegt mit 2,85 mm für die Wanddicke und 1,61 mm für die Wanddickenzunahme immer noch im Bereich einer Pixelgrösse der verwendeten Bilder.

  20. Reliability of chemical analyses of water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Beardon, R.

    1989-11-01

    Ground-water quality investigations require reliable chemical analyses of water samples. Unfortunately, laboratory analytical results are often unreliable. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s solution to this problem was to establish a two phase quality assurance program for the analysis of water samples. In the first phase, eight laboratories analyzed three solutions of known composition. The analytical accuracy of each laboratory was ranked and three laboratories were awarded contracts. The second phase consists of on-going monitoring of the reliability of the selected laboratories. The following conclusions are based on two years experience with the UMTRA Project`s Quality Assurance Program. The reliability of laboratory analyses should not be taken for granted. Analytical reliability may be independent of the prices charged by laboratories. Quality assurance programs benefit both the customer and the laboratory.

  1. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  2. Center for Naval Analyses Annual Report 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    recipients, alike, was due mainly to temporary rather than permanent layoffs ; they were unemployed for about the same length of time, and their post- layoff ...equal to 70 percent of average weekly wages for 52 weeks in the two years following layoff ) apparently encouraged workers to remain unemployed longer...Institute for Defense Analyses. William A. Nierenberg, Director of the Scripps Institution of Oceanog- raphy. Member, NASA Advisory Council. Member

  3. [Resistance analyses for recirculated membrane bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Huang, Xia; Shang, Hai-Tao; Wen, Xiang-Hua; Qian, Yi

    2006-11-01

    The resistance analyses for recirculated membrane bioreactor by the resistance-in-series model and the modified gel-polarization model respectively were extended to the turbulent ultrafiltration system. The experiments are carried out by dye wastewater in a tubular membrane module, it is found that the permeate fluxes are predicted very well by these models for turbinate systems. And the resistance caused by the concentration polarization is studied; the gel layer resistance is the most important of all the resistances.

  4. [Clinical research=design*measurements*statistical analyses].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Toshiaki

    2012-06-01

    A clinical study must address true endpoints that matter for the patients and the doctors. A good clinical study starts with a good clinical question. Formulating a clinical question in the form of PECO can sharpen one's original question. In order to perform a good clinical study one must have a knowledge of study design, measurements and statistical analyses: The first is taught by epidemiology, the second by psychometrics and the third by biostatistics.

  5. Optimizing header strength utilizing finite element analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, S. N.

    Finite element techniques have been successfully applied as a design tool in the optimization of high strength headers for pyrotechnic-driven actuators. These techniques have been applied to three aspects of the design process of a high strength header. The design process was a joint effort of experts from several disciplines including design engineers, material scientists, test engineers, manufacturing engineers, and structural analysts. Following material selection, finite element techniques were applied to evaluate the residual stresses due to manufacturing which were developed in the high strength glass ceramic-to-metal seal headers. Results from these finite element analyses were used to identify header designs which were manufacturable and had a minimum residual stress state. Finite element techniques were than applied to obtain the response of the header due to pyrotechnic burn. The results provided realistic upper bounds on the pressure containment ability of various preliminary header designs and provided a quick and inexpensive method of strengthening and refining the designs. Since testing of the headers was difficult and sometimes destructive, results of the analyses were also used to interpret test results and identify failure modes. In this paper, details of the finite element element techniques including the models used, material properties, material failure models, and loading will be presented. Results from the analyses showing the header failure process will also be presented. This paper will show that significant gains in capability and understanding can result when finite element techniques are included as an integral part of the design process of complicated high strength headers.

  6. Evaluation of the Technicon Axon analyser.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Márquez, M; Cortés, M; Mercé, J; Rodriguez, J; González, F

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation of the Technicon Axon analyser was carried out following the guidelines of the 'Sociedad Española de Química Clínica' and the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards.A photometric study revealed acceptable results at both 340 nm and 404 nm. Inaccuracy and imprecision were lower at 404 nm than at 340 nm, although poor dispersion was found at both wavelengths, even at low absorbances. Drift was negligible, the imprecision of the sample pipette delivery system was greater for small sample volumes, the reagent pipette delivery system imprecision was acceptable and the sample diluting system study showed good precision and accuracy.Twelve analytes were studied for evaluation of the analyser under routine working conditions. Satisfactory results were obtained for within-run imprecision, while coefficients of variation for betweenrun imprecision were much greater than expected. Neither specimenrelated nor specimen-independent contamination was found in the carry-over study. For all analytes assayed, when comparing patient sample results with those obtained in a Hitachi 737 analyser, acceptable relative inaccuracy was observed.

  7. Department of Energy's team's analyses of Soviet designed VVERs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This document provides Appendices A thru K of this report. The topics discussed respectively are: radiation induced embrittlement and annealing of reactor pressure vessel steels; loss of coolant accident blowdown analyses; LOCA blowdown response analyses; non-seismic structural response analyses; seismic analyses; S'' seal integrity; reactor transient analyses; fire protection; aircraft impacts; and boric acid induced corrosion. (FI).

  8. Stable isotopic analyses in paleoclimatic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-09-01

    Most traditional paleoclimatic proxy data have inherent time lags between climatic input and system response that constrain their use in accurate reconstruction of paleoclimate chronology, scaling of its variability, and the elucidation of the processes that determine its impact on the biotic and abiotic environment. With the exception of dendroclimatology, and studies of short-lived organisms and pollen recovered from annually varved lacustrine sediments, significant periods of time ranging from years, to centuries, to millennia may intervene between climate change and its first manifestation in paleoclimatic proxy data records. Reconstruction of past climate through changes in plant community composition derived from pollen sequences and plant remains from ancient woodrat middens, wet environments and dry caves all suffer from these lags. However, stable isotopic analyses can provide more immediate indication of biotic response to climate change. Evidence of past physiological response of organisms to changes in effective precipitation as climate varies can be provided by analyses of the stable isotopic content of plant macrofossils from various contexts. These analyses consider variation in the stable isotopic (hydrogen, oxygen and carbon) content of plant tissues as it reflects (1) past global or local temperature through changes in meteoric (rainfall) water chemistry in the case of the first two isotopes, and (2) plant stress through changes in plant respiration/transpiration processes under differing water availability, and varying atmospheric CO, composition (which itself may actually be a net result of biotic response to climate change). Studies currently being conducted in the Intermountain West indicate both long- and short-term responses that when calibrated with modem analogue studies have the potential of revealing not only the timing of climate events, but their direction, magnitude and rapidity.

  9. Quality of reporting of dental survival analyses.

    PubMed

    Layton, D M; Clarke, M

    2014-12-01

    To explore the quality of reporting (writing and graphics) of articles that used time-to-event analyses to report dental treatment outcomes. A systematic search of the top 50 dental journals in 2008 produced the sample of articles for this analysis. Articles reporting treatment outcomes with (n = 95) and without (n = 91) time-to-event statistics were reviewed. Survival descriptive words used in the two groups were analysed (Pearson's chi-square). The quality of life tables, survival curves and time-to-event statistics were assessed (Kappa analysed agreement) and explored. Words describing dental outcomes 'over time' were more common in time-to-event compared with control articles (77%, 3%, P < 0.001). Non-specific use of 'rate' was common across both groups. Life tables and survival curves were used by 39% and 48% of the time-to-event articles, with at least one used by 82%. Construction quality was poor: 21% of life tables and 28% of survival curves achieved an acceptable standard. Time-to-event statistical reporting was poor: 3% achieved a high and 59% achieved an acceptable standard. The survival statistic, summary figure and standard error were reported in 76%, 95% and 20% of time-to-event articles. Individual statistical terms and graphic aids were common within and unique to time-to-event articles. Unfortunately, important details were regularly omitted from statistical descriptions and survival figures making the overall quality poor. It is likely this will mean such articles will be incorrectly indexed in databases, missed by searchers and unable to be understood completely if identified.

  10. Combustion Devices CFD Team Analyses Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin

    2008-01-01

    A variety of CFD simulations performed by the Combustion Devices CFD Team at Marshall Space Flight Center will be presented. These analyses were performed to support Space Shuttle operations and Ares-1 Crew Launch Vehicle design. Results from the analyses will be shown along with pertinent information on the CFD codes and computational resources used to obtain the results. Six analyses will be presented - two related to the Space Shuttle and four related to the Ares I-1 launch vehicle now under development at NASA. First, a CFD analysis of the flow fields around the Space Shuttle during the first six seconds of flight and potential debris trajectories within those flow fields will be discussed. Second, the combusting flows within the Space Shuttle Main Engine's main combustion chamber will be shown. For the Ares I-1, an analysis of the performance of the roll control thrusters during flight will be described. Several studies are discussed related to the J2-X engine to be used on the upper stage of the Ares I-1 vehicle. A parametric study of the propellant flow sequences and mixture ratios within the GOX/GH2 spark igniters on the J2-X is discussed. Transient simulations will be described that predict the asymmetric pressure loads that occur on the rocket nozzle during the engine start as the nozzle fills with combusting gases. Simulations of issues that affect temperature uniformity within the gas generator used to drive the J-2X turbines will described as well, both upstream of the chamber in the injector manifolds and within the combustion chamber itself.

  11. Method of performing computational aeroelastic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Computational aeroelastic analyses typically use a mathematical model for the structural modes of a flexible structure and a nonlinear aerodynamic model that can generate a plurality of unsteady aerodynamic responses based on the structural modes for conditions defining an aerodynamic condition of the flexible structure. In the present invention, a linear state-space model is generated using a single execution of the nonlinear aerodynamic model for all of the structural modes where a family of orthogonal functions is used as the inputs. Then, static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions are generated using computational interaction between the mathematical model and the linear state-space model for a plurality of periodic points in time.

  12. Thermal structure analyses for CSM testbed (COMET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, David Y.; Mei, Chuh

    1994-01-01

    This document is the final report for the project entitled 'Thermal Structure Analyses for CSM Testbed (COMET),' for the period of May 16, 1992 - August 15, 1994. The project was focused on the investigation and development of finite element analysis capability of the computational structural mechanics (CSM) testbed (COMET) software system in the field of thermal structural responses. The stages of this project consisted of investigating present capabilities, developing new functions, analysis demonstrations, and research topics. The appendices of this report list the detailed documents of major accomplishments and demonstration runstreams for future references.

  13. Further analyses of Rio Cuarto impact glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Bunch, T. E.; Koeberl, C.; Collins, W.

    1993-01-01

    Initial analyses of the geologic setting, petrology, and geochemistry of glasses recovered from within and around the elongate Rio Cuarto (RC) craters in Argentina focused on selected samples in order to document the general similarity with impactites around other terrestrial impact craters and to establish their origin. Continued analysis has surveyed the diversity in compositions for a range of samples, examined further evidence for temperature and pressure history, and compared the results with experimentally fused loess from oblique hypervelocity impacts. These new results not only firmly establish their impact origin but provide new insight on the impact process.

  14. Laser power beaming system analyses. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiders, G.W. Jr.

    1993-08-01

    The successful demonstration of the PAMELA adaptive optics hardware and the fabrication of the BTOS truss structure were identified by the program office as the two most critical elements of the NASA power beaming program, so it was these that received attention during this program. Much of the effort was expended in direct program support at MSFC, but detailed technical analyses of the AMP deterministic control scheme and the BTOS truss structure (both the JPL design and a spherical one) were prepared and are attached, and recommendations are given.

  15. Environmental monitoring final report: groundwater chemical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the results of analyses of groundwater qualtiy at the SRC-I Demonstration Plant site in Newman, Kentucky. Samples were obtained from a network of 23 groundwater observation wells installed during previous studies. The groundwater was well within US EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards for trace metals, radioactivity, and pesticides, but exceeded the standard for coliform bacteria. Several US EPA Secondary Drinking Water Standards were exceeded, namely, manganese, color, iron, and total dissolved solids. Based on the results, Dames and Moore recommend that all wells should be sterilized and those wells built in 1980 should be redeveloped. 1 figure, 6 tables.

  16. Fundamentals of fungal molecular population genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianping

    2006-07-01

    The last two decades have seen tremendous growth in the development and application of molecular methods in the analyses of fungal species and populations. In this paper, I provide an overview of the molecular techniques and the basic analytical tools used to address various fundamental population and evolutionary genetic questions in fungi. With increasing availability and decreasing cost, DNA sequencing is becoming a mainstream data acquisition method in fungal evolutionary genetic studies. However, other methods, especially those based on the polymerase chain reaction, remain powerful in addressing specific questions for certain groups of taxa. These developments are bringing fungal population and evolutionary genetics into mainstream ecology and evolutionary biology.

  17. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion damage to a nuclear power plant containment structure can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. For the low-carbon, low- strength steels used in containments, the effect of corrosion on material properties is discussed. Strain-to-failure tests, in uniaxial tension, have been performed on corroded material samples. Results were used to select strain-based failure criteria for corroded steel. Using the ABAQUS finite element analysis code, the capacity of a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment with corrosion damage has been studied. Multiple analyses were performed with the locations of the corrosion the containment, and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis.

  18. Nonindependence and sensitivity analyses in ecological and evolutionary meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Noble, Daniel W A; Lagisz, Malgorzata; O'dea, Rose E; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2017-01-30

    Meta-analysis is an important tool for synthesizing research on a variety of topics in ecology and evolution, including molecular ecology, but can be susceptible to nonindependence. Nonindependence can affect two major interrelated components of a meta-analysis: (i) the calculation of effect size statistics and (ii) the estimation of overall meta-analytic estimates and their uncertainty. While some solutions to nonindependence exist at the statistical analysis stages, there is little advice on what to do when complex analyses are not possible, or when studies with nonindependent experimental designs exist in the data. Here we argue that exploring the effects of procedural decisions in a meta-analysis (e.g. inclusion of different quality data, choice of effect size) and statistical assumptions (e.g. assuming no phylogenetic covariance) using sensitivity analyses are extremely important in assessing the impact of nonindependence. Sensitivity analyses can provide greater confidence in results and highlight important limitations of empirical work (e.g. impact of study design on overall effects). Despite their importance, sensitivity analyses are seldom applied to problems of nonindependence. To encourage better practice for dealing with nonindependence in meta-analytic studies, we present accessible examples demonstrating the impact that ignoring nonindependence can have on meta-analytic estimates. We also provide pragmatic solutions for dealing with nonindependent study designs, and for analysing dependent effect sizes. Additionally, we offer reporting guidelines that will facilitate disclosure of the sources of nonindependence in meta-analyses, leading to greater transparency and more robust conclusions.

  19. Fractal and multifractal analyses of bipartite networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jian; Yu, Zu-Guo; Xie, Xian-Hua

    2017-03-31

    Bipartite networks have attracted considerable interest in various fields. Fractality and multifractality of unipartite (classical) networks have been studied in recent years, but there is no work to study these properties of bipartite networks. In this paper, we try to unfold the self-similarity structure of bipartite networks by performing the fractal and multifractal analyses for a variety of real-world bipartite network data sets and models. First, we find the fractality in some bipartite networks, including the CiteULike, Netflix, MovieLens (ml-20m), Delicious data sets and (u, v)-flower model. Meanwhile, we observe the shifted power-law or exponential behavior in other several networks. We then focus on the multifractal properties of bipartite networks. Our results indicate that the multifractality exists in those bipartite networks possessing fractality. To capture the inherent attribute of bipartite network with two types different nodes, we give the different weights for the nodes of different classes, and show the existence of multifractality in these node-weighted bipartite networks. In addition, for the data sets with ratings, we modify the two existing algorithms for fractal and multifractal analyses of edge-weighted unipartite networks to study the self-similarity of the corresponding edge-weighted bipartite networks. The results show that our modified algorithms are feasible and can effectively uncover the self-similarity structure of these edge-weighted bipartite networks and their corresponding node-weighted versions.

  20. Waste Stream Analyses for Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    N. R. Soelberg

    2010-08-01

    A high-level study was performed in Fiscal Year 2009 for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) to provide information for a range of nuclear fuel cycle options (Wigeland 2009). At that time, some fuel cycle options could not be adequately evaluated since they were not well defined and lacked sufficient information. As a result, five families of these fuel cycle options are being studied during Fiscal Year 2010 by the Systems Analysis Campaign for the DOE NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. The quality and completeness of data available to date for the fuel cycle options is insufficient to perform quantitative radioactive waste analyses using recommended metrics. This study has been limited thus far to qualitative analyses of waste streams from the candidate fuel cycle options, because quantitative data for wastes from the front end, fuel fabrication, reactor core structure, and used fuel for these options is generally not yet available.

  1. Used Fuel Management System Interface Analyses - 13578

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Robert; Busch, Ingrid; Nutt, Mark; Morris, Edgar; Puig, Francesc; Carter, Joe; Delley, Alexcia; Rodwell, Phillip; Hardin, Ernest; Kalinina, Elena; Clark, Robert; Cotton, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary system-level analyses of the interfaces between at-reactor used fuel management, consolidated storage facilities, and disposal facilities, along with the development of supporting logistics simulation tools, have been initiated to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other stakeholders with information regarding the various alternatives for managing used nuclear fuel (UNF) generated by the current fleet of light water reactors operating in the United States. An important UNF management system interface consideration is the need for ultimate disposal of UNF assemblies contained in waste packages that are sized to be compatible with different geologic media. Thermal analyses indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration by the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded and being loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. The implications of where and when the packaging or repackaging of commercial UNF will occur are key questions being addressed in this evaluation. The analysis demonstrated that thermal considerations will have a major impact on the operation of the system and that acceptance priority, rates, and facility start dates have significant system implications. (authors)

  2. Computational analyses of multilevel discourse comprehension.

    PubMed

    Graesser, Arthur C; McNamara, Danielle S

    2011-04-01

    The proposed multilevel framework of discourse comprehension includes the surface code, the textbase, the situation model, the genre and rhetorical structure, and the pragmatic communication level. We describe these five levels when comprehension succeeds and also when there are communication misalignments and comprehension breakdowns. A computer tool has been developed, called Coh-Metrix, that scales discourse (oral or print) on dozens of measures associated with the first four discourse levels. The measurement of these levels with an automated tool helps researchers track and better understand multilevel discourse comprehension. Two sets of analyses illustrate the utility of Coh-Metrix in discourse theory and educational practice. First, Coh-Metrix was used to measure the cohesion of the text base and situation model, as well as potential extraneous variables, in a sample of published studies that manipulated text cohesion. This analysis helped us better understand what was precisely manipulated in these studies and the implications for discourse comprehension mechanisms. Second, Coh-Metrix analyses are reported for samples of narrative and science texts in order to advance the argument that traditional text difficulty measures are limited because they fail to accommodate most of the levels of the multilevel discourse comprehension framework.

  3. Fractal and multifractal analyses of bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jian; Yu, Zu-Guo; Xie, Xian-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Bipartite networks have attracted considerable interest in various fields. Fractality and multifractality of unipartite (classical) networks have been studied in recent years, but there is no work to study these properties of bipartite networks. In this paper, we try to unfold the self-similarity structure of bipartite networks by performing the fractal and multifractal analyses for a variety of real-world bipartite network data sets and models. First, we find the fractality in some bipartite networks, including the CiteULike, Netflix, MovieLens (ml-20m), Delicious data sets and (u, v)-flower model. Meanwhile, we observe the shifted power-law or exponential behavior in other several networks. We then focus on the multifractal properties of bipartite networks. Our results indicate that the multifractality exists in those bipartite networks possessing fractality. To capture the inherent attribute of bipartite network with two types different nodes, we give the different weights for the nodes of different classes, and show the existence of multifractality in these node-weighted bipartite networks. In addition, for the data sets with ratings, we modify the two existing algorithms for fractal and multifractal analyses of edge-weighted unipartite networks to study the self-similarity of the corresponding edge-weighted bipartite networks. The results show that our modified algorithms are feasible and can effectively uncover the self-similarity structure of these edge-weighted bipartite networks and their corresponding node-weighted versions. PMID:28361962

  4. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion damage that has been found in a number of nuclear power plant containment structures can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. This has prompted concerns regarding the capacity of corroded containments to withstand accident loadings. To address these concerns, finite element analyses have been performed for a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment structure. Using ABAQUS, the pressure capacity was calculated for a typical vessel with no corrosion damage. Multiple analyses were then performed with the location of the corrosion and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis. Using a strain-based failure criterion, a {open_quotes}lower bound{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}best estimate{close_quotes}, and {open_quotes}upper bound{close_quotes} failure level was predicted for each case. These limits were established by: determining the amount of variability that exists in material properties of typical containments, estimating the amount of uncertainty associated with the level of modeling detail and modeling assumptions, and estimating the effect of corrosion on the material properties.

  5. Integrated Genomic Analyses of Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project has analyzed mRNA expression, miRNA expression, promoter methylation, and DNA copy number in 489 high-grade serous ovarian adenocarcinomas (HGS-OvCa) and the DNA sequences of exons from coding genes in 316 of these tumors. These results show that HGS-OvCa is characterized by TP53 mutations in almost all tumors (96%); low prevalence but statistically recurrent somatic mutations in 9 additional genes including NF1, BRCA1, BRCA2, RB1, and CDK12; 113 significant focal DNA copy number aberrations; and promoter methylation events involving 168 genes. Analyses delineated four ovarian cancer transcriptional subtypes, three miRNA subtypes, four promoter methylation subtypes, a transcriptional signature associated with survival duration and shed new light on the impact on survival of tumors with BRCA1/2 and CCNE1 aberrations. Pathway analyses suggested that homologous recombination is defective in about half of tumors, and that Notch and FOXM1 signaling are involved in serous ovarian cancer pathophysiology. PMID:21720365

  6. Autisme et douleur – analyse bibliographique

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Amandine; Rattaz, Cécile; Pry, René; Baghdadli, Amaria

    2010-01-01

    La présente analyse bibliographique a pour objectif de réaliser un bilan des travaux publiés dans le champ de la douleur et de l’autisme. L’article aborde, dans un premier temps, les études publiées concernant les modes d’expression de la douleur observés dans cette population. Différentes hypothèses permettant d’expliquer les particularités expressives des personnes avec autisme sont ensuite passées en revue : excès d’endorphines, particularités dans le traitement sensoriel, déficit sociocommunicatif. Cette analyse bibliographique aborde, pour terminer, la question de l’évaluation et de la prise en compte de la douleur chez les personnes avec autisme. Les auteurs concluent à l’absence d’homogénéité des résultats des études publiées et au besoin de poursuivre les recherches afin de parvenir à des données consensuelles sur un domaine d’étude encore peu exploité au plan scientifique. Sur un plan clinique, l’approfondissement des connaissances dans ce domaine devrait permettre de mettre au point des outils d’évaluation de la douleur et d’ainsi en assurer une meilleure prise en charge au quotidien. PMID:20808970

  7. NEXT Ion Thruster Performance Dispersion Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The NEXT ion thruster is a low specific mass, high performance thruster with a nominal throttling range of 0.5 to 7 kW. Numerous engineering model and one prototype model thrusters have been manufactured and tested. Of significant importance to propulsion system performance is thruster-to-thruster performance dispersions. This type of information can provide a bandwidth of expected performance variations both on a thruster and a component level. Knowledge of these dispersions can be used to more conservatively predict thruster service life capability and thruster performance for mission planning, facilitate future thruster performance comparisons, and verify power processor capabilities are compatible with the thruster design. This study compiles the test results of five engineering model thrusters and one flight-like thruster to determine unit-to-unit dispersions in thruster performance. Component level performance dispersion analyses will include discharge chamber voltages, currents, and losses; accelerator currents, electron backstreaming limits, and perveance limits; and neutralizer keeper and coupling voltages and the spot-to-plume mode transition flow rates. Thruster level performance dispersion analyses will include thrust efficiency.

  8. Bioinformatics tools for analysing viral genomic data.

    PubMed

    Orton, R J; Gu, Q; Hughes, J; Maabar, M; Modha, S; Vattipally, S B; Wilkie, G S; Davison, A J

    2016-04-01

    The field of viral genomics and bioinformatics is experiencing a strong resurgence due to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, which enables the rapid and cost-effective sequencing and subsequent assembly of large numbers of viral genomes. In addition, the unprecedented power of HTS technologies has enabled the analysis of intra-host viral diversity and quasispecies dynamics in relation to important biological questions on viral transmission, vaccine resistance and host jumping. HTS also enables the rapid identification of both known and potentially new viruses from field and clinical samples, thus adding new tools to the fields of viral discovery and metagenomics. Bioinformatics has been central to the rise of HTS applications because new algorithms and software tools are continually needed to process and analyse the large, complex datasets generated in this rapidly evolving area. In this paper, the authors give a brief overview of the main bioinformatics tools available for viral genomic research, with a particular emphasis on HTS technologies and their main applications. They summarise the major steps in various HTS analyses, starting with quality control of raw reads and encompassing activities ranging from consensus and de novo genome assembly to variant calling and metagenomics, as well as RNA sequencing.

  9. Time series analyses of global change data.

    PubMed

    Lane, L J; Nichols, M H; Osborn, H B

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that statistical analyses of historical time series data can be used to separate the influences of natural variations from anthropogenic sources on global climate change is tested. Point, regional, national, and global temperature data are analyzed. Trend analyses for the period 1901-1987 suggest mean annual temperatures increased (in degrees C per century) globally at the rate of about 0.5, in the USA at about 0.3, in the south-western USA desert region at about 1.2, and at the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in south-eastern Arizona at about 0.8. However, the rates of temperature change are not constant but vary within the 87-year period. Serial correlation and spectral density analysis of the temperature time series showed weak periodicities at various frequencies. The only common periodicity among the temperature series is an apparent cycle of about 43 years. The temperature time series were correlated with the Wolf sunspot index, atmospheric CO(2) concentrations interpolated from the Siple ice core data, and atmospheric CO(2) concentration data from Mauna Loa measurements. Correlation analysis of temperature data with concurrent data on atmospheric CO(2) concentrations and the Wolf sunspot index support previously reported significant correlation over the 1901-1987 period. Correlation analysis between temperature, atmospheric CO(2) concentration, and the Wolf sunspot index for the shorter period, 1958-1987, when continuous Mauna Loa CO(2) data are available, suggest significant correlation between global warming and atmospheric CO(2) concentrations but no significant correlation between global warming and the Wolf sunspot index. This may be because the Wolf sunspot index apparently increased from 1901 until about 1960 and then decreased thereafter, while global warming apparently continued to increase through 1987. Correlation of sunspot activity with global warming may be spurious but additional analyses are required to test this hypothesis

  10. Precise Chemical Analyses of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kring, David; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Meyer, Charles; Trombka, Jacob; Freund, Friedemann; Economou, Thanasis; Yen, Albert; Kim, Soon Sam; Treiman, Allan H.; Blake, David; Lisse, Carey

    1996-01-01

    We identify the chemical elements and element ratios that should be analyzed to address many of the issues identified by the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration (COMPLEX). We determined that most of these issues require two sensitive instruments to analyze the necessary complement of elements. In addition, it is useful in many cases to use one instrument to analyze the outermost planetary surface (e.g. to determine weathering effects), while a second is used to analyze a subsurface volume of material (e.g., to determine the composition of unaltered planetary surface material). This dual approach to chemical analyses will also facilitate the calibration of orbital and/or Earth-based spectral observations of the planetary body. We determined that in many cases the scientific issues defined by COMPLEX can only be fully addressed with combined packages of instruments that would supplement the chemical data with mineralogic or visual information.

  11. FACS binding assay for analysing GDNF interactions.

    PubMed

    Quintino, Luís; Baudet, Aurélie; Larsson, Jonas; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2013-08-15

    Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a secreted protein with great therapeutic potential. However, in order to analyse the interactions between GDNF and its receptors, researchers have been mostly dependent of radioactive binding assays. We developed a FACS-based binding assay for GDNF as an alternative to current methods. We demonstrated that the FACS-based assay using TGW cells allowed readily detection of GDNF binding and displacement to endogenous receptors. The dissociation constant and half maximal inhibitory concentration obtained were comparable to other studies using standard binding assays. Overall, this FACS-based, simple to perform and adaptable to high throughput setup, provides a safer and reliable alternative to radioactive methods.

  12. Phylogenomic Analyses Support Traditional Relationships within Cnidaria.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Felipe; Goetz, Freya E; Smith, Stephen A; Howison, Mark; Siebert, Stefan; Church, Samuel H; Sanders, Steven M; Ames, Cheryl Lewis; McFadden, Catherine S; France, Scott C; Daly, Marymegan; Collins, Allen G; Haddock, Steven H D; Dunn, Casey W; Cartwright, Paulyn

    2015-01-01

    Cnidaria, the sister group to Bilateria, is a highly diverse group of animals in terms of morphology, lifecycles, ecology, and development. How this diversity originated and evolved is not well understood because phylogenetic relationships among major cnidarian lineages are unclear, and recent studies present contrasting phylogenetic hypotheses. Here, we use transcriptome data from 15 newly-sequenced species in combination with 26 publicly available genomes and transcriptomes to assess phylogenetic relationships among major cnidarian lineages. Phylogenetic analyses using different partition schemes and models of molecular evolution, as well as topology tests for alternative phylogenetic relationships, support the monophyly of Medusozoa, Anthozoa, Octocorallia, Hydrozoa, and a clade consisting of Staurozoa, Cubozoa, and Scyphozoa. Support for the monophyly of Hexacorallia is weak due to the equivocal position of Ceriantharia. Taken together, these results further resolve deep cnidarian relationships, largely support traditional phylogenetic views on relationships, and provide a historical framework for studying the evolutionary processes involved in one of the most ancient animal radiations.

  13. Determining Significant Endpoints for Ecological risk Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Thimas G.; Bedford, Joel

    1999-06-01

    Our interest is in obtaining a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks to populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, and radiation with concomitant exposure to chemicals. To do so, we believe that we must understand the extent to which molecular damage is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization. Ecological risk analyses based on molecular damage, without an understanding of the impacts to higher levels of biological organization, could cause cleanup strategies on DOE sites to be overly conservative and unnecessarily expensive. Our goal is to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and populations. We think that we can achieve this by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments, and by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables such as age-specific survivorship, reproductive output, age at maturity and longevity.

  14. [Use of pharmacoeconomics analyses to health protection].

    PubMed

    Drozd, Mariola

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacoeconomics makes possible a most favourable utilization of capital resources appropriated for the health protection. For the use of economic analysis health and effects of disease and its treatment are represented in absolute values having a common base--money. The economic analysis is usually carried out from a certain perspective. Something, what is an expense for someone can be a profit for someone else. This work is a review of available Polish literature describing main assumptions of the pharmoeconomics and its instruments--the pharmacoeconomic analyses. As a result of the review it has been ascertained that a modern medicine can not do without economics. At present the capital resources are constantly too small, profitability of an employed method of the therapy or drug must be assessed all the time.

  15. An introduction to modern missing data analyses.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Amanda N; Enders, Craig K

    2010-02-01

    A great deal of recent methodological research has focused on two modern missing data analysis methods: maximum likelihood and multiple imputation. These approaches are advantageous to traditional techniques (e.g. deletion and mean imputation techniques) because they require less stringent assumptions and mitigate the pitfalls of traditional techniques. This article explains the theoretical underpinnings of missing data analyses, gives an overview of traditional missing data techniques, and provides accessible descriptions of maximum likelihood and multiple imputation. In particular, this article focuses on maximum likelihood estimation and presents two analysis examples from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth data. One of these examples includes a description of the use of auxiliary variables. Finally, the paper illustrates ways that researchers can use intentional, or planned, missing data to enhance their research designs.

  16. Neutronic Analyses of the Trade Demonstration Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rubbia, C.

    2004-09-15

    The TRiga Accelerator-Driven Experiment (TRADE), to be performed in the TRIGA reactor of the ENEA-Casaccia Centre in Italy, consists of the coupling of an external proton accelerator to a target to be installed in the central channel of the reactor scrammed to subcriticality. This pilot experiment, aimed at a global demonstration of the accelerator-driven system concept, is based on an original idea of C. Rubbia. The present paper reports the results of some neutronic analyses focused on the feasibility of TRADE. Results show that all relevant experiments (at different power levels in a wide range of subcriticalities) can be carried out with relatively limited modifications to the present TRIGA reactor.

  17. Error analyses for a gravity gradiometer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.; Von Bun, F. O.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the usefulness of an orbiting gravity gradiometer as a sensor for mapping the fine structure of the earth gravity field. The exact knowledge of this field is essential for studies of the solid earth and the dynamics of the oceans. Although the earth gravity tensor, measured by a gradiometer assembly, has nine components, only five components are independent. This latter fact is as a consequence of the symmetry and conservative nature of the earth's gravity field. The most dominant component is the radial one. The error analyses considered here are therefore based only upon a single axis gradiometer sensing this radial component. The expected global gravity and geoid errors for a 50 x 50-km (1/2 x 1/2 deg) area utilizing a spaceborne gradiometer with a precision of 0.001 EU in a 160-km circular polar orbit are about 3 mGAL and 5 cm, respectively.

  18. TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSES OF URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D; Charles Shick, C

    2008-06-09

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed an analytical method to measure many trace elements in a variety of uranium materials at the high part-per-billion (ppb) to low part-per-million (ppm) levels using matrix removal and analysis by quadrapole ICP-MS. Over 35 elements were measured in uranium oxides, acetate, ore and metal. Replicate analyses of samples did provide precise results however none of the materials was certified for trace element content thus no measure of the accuracy could be made. The DOE New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) does provide a Certified Reference Material (CRM) that has provisional values for a series of trace elements. The NBL CRM were purchased and analyzed to determine the accuracy of the method for the analysis of trace elements in uranium oxide. These results are presented and discussed in the following paper.

  19. Project analysis and integration economic analyses summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macomber, H. L.

    1986-01-01

    An economic-analysis summary was presented for the manufacture of crystalline-silicon modules involving silicon ingot/sheet, growth, slicing, cell manufacture, and module assembly. Economic analyses provided: useful quantitative aspects for complex decision-making to the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project; yardsticks for design and performance to industry; and demonstration of how to evaluate and understand the worth of research and development both to JPL and other government agencies and programs. It was concluded that future research and development funds for photovoltaics must be provided by the Federal Government because the solar industry today does not reap enough profits from its present-day sales of photovoltaic equipment.

  20. Spatially explicit analyses unveil density dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Veldtman, Ruan; McGeoch, Melodie A.

    2004-01-01

    Density-dependent processes are fundamental in the understanding of species population dynamics. Whereas the benefits of considering the spatial dimension in population biology are widely acknowledged, the implications of doing so for the statistical detection of spatial density dependence have not been examined. The outcome of traditional tests may therefore differ from those that include ecologically relevant locational information on both the prey species and natural enemy. Here, we explicitly incorporate spatial information on individual counts when testing for density dependence between an insect herbivore and its parasitoids. The spatially explicit approach used identified significant density dependence more frequently and in different instances than traditional methods. The form of density dependence detected also differed between methods. These results demonstrate that the explicit consideration of patch location in density-dependence analyses is likely to significantly alter current understanding of the prevalence and form of spatial density dependence in natural populations. PMID:15590593

  1. Ensemble decadal predictions from analysed initial conditions.

    PubMed

    Troccoli, Alberto; Palmer, T N

    2007-08-15

    Sensitivity experiments using a coupled model initialized from analysed atmospheric and oceanic observations are used to investigate the potential for interannual-to-decadal predictability. The potential for extending seasonal predictions to longer time scales is explored using the same coupled model configuration and initialization procedure as used for seasonal prediction. It is found that, despite model drift, climatic signals on interannual-to-decadal time scales appear to be detectable. Two climatic states have been chosen: one starting in 1965, i.e. ahead of a period of global cooling, and the other in 1994, ahead of a period of global warming. The impact of initial conditions and of the different levels of greenhouse gases are isolated in order to gain insights into the source of predictability.

  2. Life cycle analyses and resource assessments.

    PubMed

    Fredga, Karl; Mäler, Karl-Göran

    2010-01-01

    Prof. Ulgiati stresses that we should always use an ecosystem view when transforming energy from one form to another. Sustainable growth and development of both environmental and human-dominated systems require optimum use of available resources for maximum power output. We have to adapt to the laws of nature because nature has to take care of all the waste products we produce. The presentation addresses a much needed shift away from linear production and consumption pattern, toward reorganization of economies and lifestyle that takes complexity--of resources, of the environment and of the economy--into proper account. The best way to reach maximum yield from the different kinds of biomass is to use biorefineries. Biorefinery is defined as the sustainable processing of biomass into a spectrum of marketable products like heat, power, fuels, chemicals, food, feed, and materials. However, biomass from agricultural land must be used for the production of food and not fuel. Prof. Voss focuses on the sustainability of energy supply chains and energy systems. Life cycle analyses (LCA) provides the conceptual framework for a comprehensive comparative evaluation of energy supply options with regard to their resource requirements as well as the health and environmental impact. Full scope LCA considers not only the emissions from plant operation, construction, and decommissioning but also the environmental burdens and resource requirements associated with the entire lifetime of all relevant upstream and downstream processes within the energy chain. This article describes the results of LCA analyses for state-of-the-art heating and electricity systems as well as of advanced future systems. Total costs are used as a measure for the overall resource consumption.

  3. Topological Analyses of Symmetric Eruptive Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, O.; Martin, S. F.

    Erupting prominences (filaments) that we have analyzed from Hα Doppler data at Helio Research and from SOHO/EIT 304 Å, show strong coherency between their chirality, the direction of the vertical and lateral motions of the top of the prominences, and the directions of twisting of their legs. These coherent properties in erupting prominences occur in two patterns of opposite helicity; they constitute a form of dynamic chirality called the ``roll effect." Viewed from the positive network side as they erupt, many symmetrically-erupting dextral prominences develop rolling motion toward the observer along with right-hand helicity in the left leg and left-hand helicity in the right leg. Many symmetricaly-erupting sinistral prominences, also viewed from the positive network field side, have the opposite pattern: rolling motion at the top away from the observer, left-hand helical twist in the left leg, and right-hand twist in the right leg. We have analysed the motions seen in the famous movie of the ``Grand Daddy" erupting prominence and found that it has all the motions that define the roll effect. From our analyses of this and other symmetric erupting prominences, we show that the roll effect is an alternative to the popular hypothetical configuration of an eruptive prominence as a twisted flux rope or flux tube. Instead we find that a simple flat ribbon can be bent such that it reproduces nearly all of the observed forms. The flat ribbon is the most logical beginning topology because observed prominence spines already have this topology prior to eruption and an initial long magnetic ribbon with parallel, non-twisted threads, as a basic form, can be bent into many more and different geometrical forms than a flux rope.

  4. Reporting guidelines for population pharmacokinetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Kevin; Mehrotra, Nitin; Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Kastrissios, Helen; Patel, Bela; Al-Huniti, Nidal; Jadhav, Pravin; Wang, Yaning; Byon, Wonkyung

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a consolidated set of guiding principles for reporting of population pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses based on input from a survey of practitioners as well as discussions between industry, consulting and regulatory scientists. The survey found that identification of population covariate effects on drug exposure and support for dose selection (where population PK frequently serves as preparatory analysis to exposure-response modeling) are the main areas of influence for population PK analysis. The proposed guidelines consider two main purposes of population PK reports (1) to present key analysis findings and their impact on drug development decisions, and (2) as documentation of the analysis methods for the dual purpose of enabling review of the analysis and facilitating future use of the models. This work also identified two main audiences for the reports: (1) a technically competent group responsible for in-depth review of the data, methodology, and results, and (2) a scientifically literate, but not technically adept group, whose main interest is in the implications of the analysis for the broader drug development program. We recommend a generalized question-based approach with six questions that need to be addressed throughout the report. We recommend eight sections (Synopsis, Introduction, Data, Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusions, Appendix) with suggestions for the target audience and level of detail for each section. A section providing general expectations regarding population PK reporting from a regulatory perspective is also included. We consider this an important step towards industrialization of the field of pharmacometrics such that non-technical audience also understands the role of pharmacometrics analyses in decision making. Population PK reports were chosen as representative reports to derive these recommendations; however, the guiding principles presented here are applicable for all pharmacometric reports

  5. Analyse de formes par moiré

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harthong, J.; Sahli, H.; Poinsignon, R.; Meyrueis, P.

    1991-01-01

    We present a mathematical analysis of moiré phenomena for shape recognition. The basic theoretical concept - and tool - will be the contour function. We show that the mathematical analysis is greatly simplified by the systematic recourse to this tool. The analysis presented permits a simultaneous treatment of two different modes of implementing the moiré technique : the direct mode (widely used and well-known), and the converse mode (scarcely used). The converse mode consists in computing and designing a grating especially for one model of object, in such a manner that if (and only if) the object is in conformity with the prescribed model, the resulting moiré fringes are parallel straight lines. We give explicit formulas and algorithms for such computations. Nous présentons une analyse mathématique du moiré permettant une reconnaissance des formes. Le concept théorique de base est celui de “ fonction de contour ”. Nous montrons que l'analyse mathématique est simplifiée en faisant appel à ces fonctions. De plus, la méthode proposée permet de traiter d'une manière unifiée les deux différents modes d'utilisation des techniques de moiré : le mode direct (le plus utilisé et le mieux connu), et le moiré inverse, qui consiste, pour un modèle d'objet donné, à calculer et réaliser un réseau spécifique, tel que si (et seulement si) un objet est conforme au modèle, les franges de moiré obtenues seront des lignes droites parallèles. Nous proposons des formules explicites et des algorithmes pour ces traitements.

  6. ANALYSES OF WOUND EXUDATES FOR CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Howard E.; Pritchard, William L.; Brinkley, Floyd B.; Mendelson, Janice A.

    1964-01-01

    Noyes, Howard E. (Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Washington, D.C.), William L. Pritchard, Floyd B. Brinkley, and Janice A. Mendelson. Analyses of wound exudates for clostridial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:623–629. 1964.—Earlier studies indicated that death of goats with traumatic wounds of the hindquarter could be related to the number of clostridia in the wounds, and that toxicity of wound exudates for mice and guinea pigs could be partially neutralized by commercial trivalent gas gangrene antitoxin. This report describes in vitro and in vivo analyses of wound exudates for known clostridial toxins. Wounds were produced by detonation of high-explosive pellets. Wound exudates were obtained by cold saline extraction of both necrotic tissues and gauze sponges used to cover the wounds. Exudates were sterilized by Seitz filtration in the cold. In vitro tests were used to measure alpha-, theta-, and mu-toxins of Clostridium perfringens and the epsilon-toxin of C. novyi. Mouse protection tests, employing commercial typing antisera, were used to analyze exudates for other clostridial toxins. Lethality of wound exudates for mice could be related to (i) the numbers of clostridia present in the wound, (ii) survival time of the goats, and (iii) positive lecithovitellin (LV) tests of the exudates. However, the LV tests could not be neutralized by antitoxin specific for C. perfringens alpha-toxin. Mice were not protected by typing antisera specific for types A, C, or D C. perfringens or C. septicum but were protected by antisera specific for type B C. perfringens and types A and B C. novyi. PMID:14127581

  7. Energy adjustment methods applied to alcohol analyses.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Ditte; Andersen, Per K; Overvad, Kim; Jensen, Gorm; Schnohr, Peter; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Grønbaek, Morten

    2003-01-01

    When alcohol consumption is related to outcome, associations between alcohol type and health outcomes may occur simply because of the ethanol in the beverage type. When one analyzes the consequences of consumption of beer, wine, and spirits, the total alcohol intake must therefore be taken into account. However, owing to the linear dependency between total alcohol intake and the alcohol content of each beverage type, the effects cannot be separated from each other or from the effect of ethanol. In nutritional epidemiology, similar problems regarding intake of macronutrients and total energy intake have been addressed, and four methods have been proposed to solve the problem: energy partition, standard, density, and residual. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the energy adjustment methods in alcohol analyses by using coronary heart disease as an example. Data obtained from the Copenhagen City Heart Study were used. The standard and energy partition methods yielded similar results for continuous, and almost similar results for categorical, alcohol variables. The results from the density method differed, but nevertheless were concordant with these. Beer and wine drinkers, in comparison with findings for nondrinkers, had lower risk of coronary heart disease. Except for the case of men drinking beer, the effect seemed to be associated with drinking one drink per week. The standard method derives influence of substituting alcohol types at constant total alcohol intake and complements the estimates of adding consumption of a particular alcohol type to the total intake. For most diseases, the effect of ethanol predominates over that of substances in the beverage type, which makes the density method less relevant in alcohol analyses.

  8. Database-Driven Analyses of Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cami, Jan

    2012-03-01

    Spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools to study the physical properties and chemical composition of very diverse astrophysical environments. In principle, each nuclide has a unique set of spectral features; thus, establishing the presence of a specific material at astronomical distances requires no more than finding a laboratory spectrum of the right material that perfectly matches the astronomical observations. Once the presence of a substance is established, a careful analysis of the observational characteristics (wavelengths or frequencies, intensities, and line profiles) allows one to determine many physical parameters of the environment in which the substance resides, such as temperature, density, velocity, and so on. Because of this great diagnostic potential, ground-based and space-borne astronomical observatories often include instruments to carry out spectroscopic analyses of various celestial objects and events. Of particular interest is molecular spectroscopy at infrared wavelengths. From the spectroscopic point of view, molecules differ from atoms in their ability to vibrate and rotate, and quantum physics inevitably causes those motions to be quantized. The energies required to excite vibrations or rotations are such that vibrational transitions generally occur at infrared wavelengths, whereas pure rotational transitions typically occur at sub-mm wavelengths. Molecular vibration and rotation are coupled though, and thus at infrared wavelengths, one commonly observes a multitude of ro-vibrational transitions (see Figure 13.1). At lower spectral resolution, all transitions blend into one broad ro-vibrational molecular band. The isotope. Molecular spectroscopy thus allows us to see a difference of one neutron in an atomic nucleus that is located at astronomical distances! Since the detection of the first interstellar molecules (the CH [21] and CN [14] radicals), more than 150 species have been detected in space, ranging in size from diatomic

  9. PCR und ELISA - Alternativen zum Maustest für die Analyse des Botulismus-Neurotoxin-C1 Giftbildungspotentiales in Umweltproben? [PCR and ELISA - in vitro alternatives to the mouse-bioassay for assessing the botulinum-neurotoxin-C1 production potential in environmental samples?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zechmeister, T.C.; Farnleitner, A.H.; Rocke, T.E.; Pittner, F.; Rosengarten, R.; Mach, R.L.; Herzig, A.; Kirschner, A.K.T.

    2002-01-01

    Botulism is one of the most important bird diseases world-wide and is caused by the intoxication with Botulinum-Neurotoxin-C1 (BoNt-C1), which is produced by toxigenic clostridia under appropriate conditions. Avian botulism leads regularly to large losses among the migrating bird populations breeding and resting at the saltwater pools of the Austrian national park Neusiedler See-Seewinkel. Despite of its ethical dubiousness and its high technical expense the mouse-bioassay is still used as the routine standard method for the detection of BoNt-C1. According to the 3R-concept, in vitro alternative methods for the qualitative detection of BoNt-C1 (immunostick-ELISA) and a corresponding BoNt-C1 gene fragment (nested-PCR) were established. In order to estimate the BoNt-C1 production potential the methods were tested with sediment samples from different saltwater pools subjected to cultivation conditions appropriate for in vitro BoNt-C1-production. With the mouse-bioassay, 52 out of 77 samples were found to have a positive toxin production potential. The immunostick-ELISA showed a similar sensitivity as the mouse-bioassay and exhibited a highly significant positive correlation (r=0.94; p<0.001) with the mouse-bioassay in detecting BoNt-C1. The nested-PCR approach revealed higher numbers of positive BoNt-C1 gene fragment detections as compared to the direct toxin analysis approaches. A weak correlation (r=0.21; p=0.07) with the mouse-bioassay was discernible, no correlation was found with the immunostick-ELISA (r=0.09; p=0.46). Obviously, the PCR approach detected the BoNt-C1 gene fragment in some of the samples where no toxin expression has occurred. Thus it is suggested that the qualitative immunostick-ELISA represents a potential in vitro alternative to the mouse-bioassay for assessing the BoNt-C1 production potential in environmental samples. In contrast, qualitative BoNt-C1 gene fragment detection via PCR led to an overestimation of the actual toxin production potential.

  10. Efficient ALL vs. ALL collision risk analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, D.; Paskowitz, M.; Agueda, A.; Garcia, G.; Molina, M.

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, the space debris has gained a lot of attention due to the increasing amount of uncontrolled man-made objects orbiting the Earth. This population poses a significant and constantly growing thread to operational satellites. In order to face this thread in an independent manner, ESA has launched an initiative for the development of a European SSA System where GMV is participating via several activities. Apart from those activities financed by ESA, GMV has developed closeap, a tool for efficient conjunction assessment and collision probability prediction. ESÁs NAPEOS has been selected as computational engine and numerical propagator to be used in the tool, which can be considered as an add-on to the standard NAPEOS package. closeap makes use of the same orbit computation, conjunction assessment and collision risk algorithms implemented in CRASS, but at the same time both systems are completely independent. Moreover, the implementation in closeap has been validated against CRASS with excellent results. This paper describes the performance improvements implemented in closeap at algorithm level to ensure that the most time demanding scenarios (e.g., all catalogued objects are analysed against each other - all vs. all scenarios -) can be analysed in a reasonable amount of time with commercial-off-the-shelf hardware. However, the amount of space debris increases steadily due to the human activities. Thus, the number of objects involved in a full collision assessment is expected to increase notably and, consequently, the computational cost, which scales as the square of the number of objects, will increase as well. Additionally, orbit propagation algorithms that are computationally expensive might be needed to predict more accurately the trajectories of the space debris. In order to cope with such computational needs, the next natural step in the development of collision assessment tools is the use of parallelization techniques. In this paper we investigate

  11. High perfomance liquid chromatography in pharmaceutical analyses.

    PubMed

    Nikolin, Branko; Imamović, Belma; Medanhodzić-Vuk, Saira; Sober, Miroslav

    2004-05-01

    In testing the pre-sale procedure the marketing of drugs and their control in the last ten years, high performance liquid chromatography replaced numerous spectroscopic methods and gas chromatography in the quantitative and qualitative analysis. In the first period of HPLC application it was thought that it would become a complementary method of gas chromatography, however, today it has nearly completely replaced gas chromatography in pharmaceutical analysis. The application of the liquid mobile phase with the possibility of transformation of mobilized polarity during chromatography and all other modifications of mobile phase depending upon the characteristics of substance which are being tested, is a great advantage in the process of separation in comparison to other methods. The greater choice of stationary phase is the next factor which enables realization of good separation. The separation line is connected to specific and sensitive detector systems, spectrafluorimeter, diode detector, electrochemical detector as other hyphernated systems HPLC-MS and HPLC-NMR, are the basic elements on which is based such wide and effective application of the HPLC method. The purpose high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of any drugs is to confirm the identity of a drug and provide quantitative results and also to monitor the progress of the therapy of a disease.1) Measuring presented on the Fig. 1. is chromatogram obtained for the plasma of depressed patients 12 h before oral administration of dexamethasone. It may also be used to further our understanding of the normal and disease process in the human body trough biomedical and therapeutically research during investigation before of the drugs registration. The analyses of drugs and metabolites in biological fluids, particularly plasma, serum or urine is one of the most demanding but one of the most common uses of high performance of liquid chromatography. Blood, plasma or serum contains numerous endogenous

  12. PRECLOSURE CONSEQUENCE ANALYSES FOR LICENSE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. Tsai

    2005-01-12

    Radiological consequence analyses are performed for potential releases from normal operations in surface and subsurface facilities and from Category 1 and Category 2 event sequences during the preclosure period. Surface releases from normal repository operations are primarily from radionuclides released from opening a transportation cask during dry transfer operations of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in Dry Transfer Facility 1 (DTF 1), Dry Transfer Facility 2 (DTF 2), the Canister Handling facility (CHF), or the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF). Subsurface releases from normal repository operations are from resuspension of waste package surface contamination and neutron activation of ventilated air and silica dust from host rock in the emplacement drifts. The purpose of this calculation is to demonstrate that the preclosure performance objectives, specified in 10 CFR 63.111(a) and 10 CFR 63.111(b), have been met for the proposed design and operations in the geologic repository operations area. Preclosure performance objectives are discussed in Section 6.2.3 and are summarized in Tables 1 and 2.

  13. Genomic analyses of the CAM plant pineapple.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jisen; Liu, Juan; Ming, Ray

    2014-07-01

    The innovation of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis in arid and/or low CO2 conditions is a remarkable case of adaptation in flowering plants. As the most important crop that utilizes CAM photosynthesis, the genetic and genomic resources of pineapple have been developed over many years. Genetic diversity studies using various types of DNA markers led to the reclassification of the two genera Ananas and Pseudananas and nine species into one genus Ananas and two species, A. comosus and A. macrodontes with five botanical varieties in A. comosus. Five genetic maps have been constructed using F1 or F2 populations, and high-density genetic maps generated by genotype sequencing are essential resources for sequencing and assembling the pineapple genome and for marker-assisted selection. There are abundant expression sequence tag resources but limited genomic sequences in pineapple. Genes involved in the CAM pathway has been analysed in several CAM plants but only a few of them are from pineapple. A reference genome of pineapple is being generated and will accelerate genetic and genomic research in this major CAM crop. This reference genome of pineapple provides the foundation for studying the origin and regulatory mechanism of CAM photosynthesis, and the opportunity to evaluate the classification of Ananas species and botanical cultivars.

  14. Social Media Analyses for Social Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Michael F.; Pasek, Josh; Guggenheim, Lauren; Lampe, Cliff; Conrad, Frederick G.

    2016-01-01

    Demonstrations that analyses of social media content can align with measurement from sample surveys have raised the question of whether survey research can be supplemented or even replaced with less costly and burdensome data mining of already-existing or “found” social media content. But just how trustworthy such measurement can be—say, to replace official statistics—is unknown. Survey researchers and data scientists approach key questions from starting assumptions and analytic traditions that differ on, for example, the need for representative samples drawn from frames that fully cover the population. New conversations between these scholarly communities are needed to understand the potential points of alignment and non-alignment. Across these approaches, there are major differences in (a) how participants (survey respondents and social media posters) understand the activity they are engaged in; (b) the nature of the data produced by survey responses and social media posts, and the inferences that are legitimate given the data; and (c) practical and ethical considerations surrounding the use of the data. Estimates are likely to align to differing degrees depending on the research topic and the populations under consideration, the particular features of the surveys and social media sites involved, and the analytic techniques for extracting opinions and experiences from social media. Traditional population coverage may not be required for social media content to effectively predict social phenomena to the extent that social media content distills or summarizes broader conversations that are also measured by surveys. PMID:27257310

  15. Characterization of branch complexity by fractal analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alados, C.L.; Escos, J.; Emlen, J.M.; Freeman, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    The comparison between complexity in the sense of space occupancy (box-counting fractal dimension D(c) and information dimension D1) and heterogeneity in the sense of space distribution (average evenness index f and evenness variation coefficient J(cv)) were investigated in mathematical fractal objects and natural branch structures. In general, increased fractal dimension was paired with low heterogeneity. Comparisons between branch architecture in Anthyllis cytisoides under different slope exposure and grazing impact revealed that branches were more complex and more homogeneously distributed for plants on northern exposures than southern, while grazing had no impact during a wet year. Developmental instability was also investigated by the statistical noise of the allometric relation between internode length and node order. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that fractal dimension of branch structure can be used to analyze the structural organization of plants, especially if we consider not only fractal dimension but also shoot distribution within the canopy (lacunarity). These indexes together with developmental instability analyses are good indicators of growth responses to the environment.

  16. Consumption patterns and perception analyses of hangwa.

    PubMed

    Kwock, Chang Geun; Lee, Min A; Park, So Hyun

    2012-03-01

    Hangwa is a traditional food, corresponding to the current consumption trend, in need of marketing strategies to extend its consumption. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze consumers' consumption patterns and perception of Hangwa to increase consumption in the market. A questionnaire was sent to 250 consumers by e-mail from Oct 8∼23, 2009 and the data from 231 persons were analyzed in this study. Statistical, descriptive, paired samples t-test, and importance-performance analyses were conducted using SPSS WIN 17.0. According to the results, Hangwa was purchased mainly 'for present' (39.8%) and the main reasons for buying it were 'traditional image' (33.3%) and 'taste' (22.5%). When importance and performance of attributes considered in purchasing Hangwa were evaluated, performance was assessed to be lower than importance for all attributes. The attributes in the first quadrant with a high importance and a high performance were 'a sanitary process', 'a rigorous quality mark' and 'taste', which were related with quality of the products. In addition, those with a high importance but a low performance were 'popularization through advertisement', 'promotion through mass media', 'conversion of thought on traditional foods', 'a reasonable price' and 'a wide range of price'. In conclusion, Hangwa manufacturers need to diversify products and extend the expiration date based on technologies to promote its consumption. In terms of price, Hangwa should become more available by lowering the price barrier for consumers who are sensitive to price.

  17. Reproducibility of neuroimaging analyses across operating systems.

    PubMed

    Glatard, Tristan; Lewis, Lindsay B; Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Adalat, Reza; Beck, Natacha; Lepage, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Sherif, Tarek; Deelman, Ewa; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Evans, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging pipelines are known to generate different results depending on the computing platform where they are compiled and executed. We quantify these differences for brain tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness (CT) extraction, using three of the main neuroimaging packages (FSL, Freesurfer and CIVET) and different versions of GNU/Linux. We also identify some causes of these differences using library and system call interception. We find that these packages use mathematical functions based on single-precision floating-point arithmetic whose implementations in operating systems continue to evolve. While these differences have little or no impact on simple analysis pipelines such as brain extraction and cortical tissue classification, their accumulation creates important differences in longer pipelines such as subcortical tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness extraction. With FSL, most Dice coefficients between subcortical classifications obtained on different operating systems remain above 0.9, but values as low as 0.59 are observed. Independent component analyses (ICA) of fMRI data differ between operating systems in one third of the tested subjects, due to differences in motion correction. With Freesurfer and CIVET, in some brain regions we find an effect of build or operating system on cortical thickness. A first step to correct these reproducibility issues would be to use more precise representations of floating-point numbers in the critical sections of the pipelines. The numerical stability of pipelines should also be reviewed.

  18. Statistical analyses of a screen cylinder wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Azmi, Azlin; Zhou, Tongming; Zhou, Yu; Cheng, Liang

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of a screen cylinder wake was studied by analysing its statistical properties over a streamwise range of x/d={10-60}. The screen cylinder was made of a stainless steel screen mesh of 67% porosity. The experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 7000 using an X-probe. The results were compared with those obtained in the wake generated by a solid cylinder. It was observed that the evolution of the statistics in the wake of the screen cylinder was different from that of a solid cylinder, reflecting the differences in the formation of the organized large-scale vortices in both wakes. The streamwise evolution of the Reynolds stresses, energy spectra and cross-correlation coefficients indicated that there exists a critical location that differentiates the screen cylinder wake into two regions over the measured streamwise range. The formation of the fully formed large-scale vortices was delayed until this critical location. Comparison with existing results for screen strips showed that although the near-wake characteristics and the vortex formation mechanism were similar between the two wake generators, variation in the Strouhal frequencies was observed and the self-preservation states were non-universal, reconfirming the dependence of a wake on its initial condition.

  19. Stereological analyses of the whole human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Ananta; Fowler, Jonas L.; Zielinski, Mark C.; Kilimnik, German; Hara, Manami

    2016-01-01

    The large size of human tissues requires a practical stereological approach to perform a comprehensive analysis of the whole organ. We have developed a method to quantitatively analyze the whole human pancreas, as one of the challenging organs to study, in which endocrine cells form various sizes of islets that are scattered unevenly throughout the exocrine pancreas. Furthermore, the human pancreas possesses intrinsic characteristics of intra-individual variability, i.e. regional differences in endocrine cell/islet distribution, and marked inter-individual heterogeneity regardless of age, sex and disease conditions including obesity and diabetes. The method is built based on large-scale image capture, computer-assisted unbiased image analysis and quantification, and further mathematical analyses, using widely-used software such as Fiji/ImageJ and MATLAB. The present study includes detailed protocols of every procedure as well as all the custom-written computer scripts, which can be modified according to specific experimental plans and specimens of interest. PMID:27658965

  20. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  1. Social Media Analyses for Social Measurement.

    PubMed

    Schober, Michael F; Pasek, Josh; Guggenheim, Lauren; Lampe, Cliff; Conrad, Frederick G

    2016-01-01

    Demonstrations that analyses of social media content can align with measurement from sample surveys have raised the question of whether survey research can be supplemented or even replaced with less costly and burdensome data mining of already-existing or "found" social media content. But just how trustworthy such measurement can be-say, to replace official statistics-is unknown. Survey researchers and data scientists approach key questions from starting assumptions and analytic traditions that differ on, for example, the need for representative samples drawn from frames that fully cover the population. New conversations between these scholarly communities are needed to understand the potential points of alignment and non-alignment. Across these approaches, there are major differences in (a) how participants (survey respondents and social media posters) understand the activity they are engaged in; (b) the nature of the data produced by survey responses and social media posts, and the inferences that are legitimate given the data; and (c) practical and ethical considerations surrounding the use of the data. Estimates are likely to align to differing degrees depending on the research topic and the populations under consideration, the particular features of the surveys and social media sites involved, and the analytic techniques for extracting opinions and experiences from social media. Traditional population coverage may not be required for social media content to effectively predict social phenomena to the extent that social media content distills or summarizes broader conversations that are also measured by surveys.

  2. Phylogenomic Analyses Support Traditional Relationships within Cnidaria

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Felipe; Goetz, Freya E.; Smith, Stephen A.; Howison, Mark; Siebert, Stefan; Church, Samuel H.; Sanders, Steven M.; Ames, Cheryl Lewis; McFadden, Catherine S.; France, Scott C.; Daly, Marymegan; Collins, Allen G.; Haddock, Steven H. D.; Dunn, Casey W.; Cartwright, Paulyn

    2015-01-01

    Cnidaria, the sister group to Bilateria, is a highly diverse group of animals in terms of morphology, lifecycles, ecology, and development. How this diversity originated and evolved is not well understood because phylogenetic relationships among major cnidarian lineages are unclear, and recent studies present contrasting phylogenetic hypotheses. Here, we use transcriptome data from 15 newly-sequenced species in combination with 26 publicly available genomes and transcriptomes to assess phylogenetic relationships among major cnidarian lineages. Phylogenetic analyses using different partition schemes and models of molecular evolution, as well as topology tests for alternative phylogenetic relationships, support the monophyly of Medusozoa, Anthozoa, Octocorallia, Hydrozoa, and a clade consisting of Staurozoa, Cubozoa, and Scyphozoa. Support for the monophyly of Hexacorallia is weak due to the equivocal position of Ceriantharia. Taken together, these results further resolve deep cnidarian relationships, largely support traditional phylogenetic views on relationships, and provide a historical framework for studying the evolutionary processes involved in one of the most ancient animal radiations. PMID:26465609

  3. Comparative sequence analyses of sixteen reptilian paramyxoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahne, W.; Batts, W.N.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Viral genomic RNA of Fer-de-Lance virus (FDLV), a paramyxovirus highly pathogenic for reptiles, was reverse transcribed and cloned. Plasmids with significant sequence similarities to the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and polymerase (L) genes of mammalian paramyxoviruses were identified by BLAST search. Partial sequences of the FDLV genes were used to design primers for amplification by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of 518-bp L gene and 352-bp HN gene fragments from a collection of 15 previously uncharacterized reptilian paramyxoviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the partial L and HN sequences produced similar trees in which there were two distinct subgroups of isolates that were supported with maximum bootstrap values, and several intermediate isolates. Within each subgroup the nucleotide divergence values were less than 2.5%, while the divergence between the two subgroups was 20-22%. This indicated that the two subgroups represent distinct virus species containing multiple virus strains. The five intermediate isolates had nucleotide divergence values of 11-20% and may represent additional distinct species. In addition to establishing diversity among reptilian paramyxoviruses, the phylogenetic groupings showed some correlation with geographic location, and clearly demonstrated a low level of host species-specificity within these viruses. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Recent Advances in Cellular Glycomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Fujitani, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2013-01-01

    A large variety of glycans is intricately located on the cell surface, and the overall profile (the glycome, given the entire repertoire of glycoconjugate-associated sugars in cells and tissues) is believed to be crucial for the diverse roles of glycans, which are mediated by specific interactions that control cell-cell adhesion, immune response, microbial pathogenesis and other cellular events. The glycomic profile also reflects cellular alterations, such as development, differentiation and cancerous change. A glycoconjugate-based approach would therefore be expected to streamline discovery of novel cellular biomarkers. Development of such an approach has proven challenging, due to the technical difficulties associated with the analysis of various types of cellular glycomes; however, recent progress in the development of analytical methodologies and strategies has begun to clarify the cellular glycomics of various classes of glycoconjugates. This review focuses on recent advances in the technical aspects of cellular glycomic analyses of major classes of glycoconjugates, including N- and O-linked glycans, derived from glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycosphingolipids. Articles that unveil the glycomics of various biologically important cells, including embryonic and somatic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and cancer cells, are discussed. PMID:24970165

  5. Informative prior distributions for ELISA analyses.

    PubMed

    Klauenberg, Katy; Walzel, Monika; Ebert, Bernd; Elster, Clemens

    2015-07-01

    Immunoassays are capable of measuring very small concentrations of substances in solutions and have an immense range of application. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests in particular can detect the presence of an infection, of drugs, or hormones (as in the home pregnancy test). Inference of an unknown concentration via ELISA usually involves a non-linear heteroscedastic regression and subsequent prediction, which can be carried out in a Bayesian framework. For such a Bayesian inference, we are developing informative prior distributions based on extensive historical ELISA tests as well as theoretical considerations. One consideration regards the quality of the immunoassay leading to two practical requirements for the applicability of the priors. Simulations show that the additional prior information can lead to inferences which are robust to reasonable perturbations of the model and changes in the design of the data. On real data, the applicability is demonstrated across different laboratories, for different analytes and laboratory equipment as well as for previous and current ELISAs with sigmoid regression function. Consistency checks on real data (similar to cross-validation) underpin the adequacy of the suggested priors. Altogether, the new priors may improve concentration estimation for ELISAs that fulfill certain design conditions, by extending the range of the analyses, decreasing the uncertainty, or giving more robust estimates. Future use of these priors is straightforward because explicit, closed-form expressions are provided. This work encourages development and application of informative, yet general, prior distributions for other types of immunoassays.

  6. Cyanide analyses for risk and treatability assessments

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, I.D.; Elseroad, H.J.; Pergrin, D.E.; Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-31

    Cyanide, an EPA priority pollutant and target analyte, is typically measured as total. However, cyanide complexation, information which is not acquired through total cyanide analysis, is often a driver of cyanide toxicity and treatability. A case study of a former manufacture gas plant (MGP) is used to demonstrate the usability of various cyanide analytical methods for risk and treatability assessments. Several analytical methods, including cyanide amenable to chlorination and weak acid dissociable cyanide help test the degree of cyanide complexation. Generally, free or uncomplexed cyanide is more biologically available, toxic, and reactive than complexed cyanide. Extensive site testing has shown that free and weakly dissociable cyanide composes only a small fraction of total cyanide as would be expected from the literature, and that risk assessment will be more realistic considering cyanide form. Likewise, aqueous treatment for cyanide can be properly tested if cyanide form is accounted for. Weak acid dissociable cyanide analyses proved to be the most reliable (and potentially acceptable) cyanide method, as well as represent the most toxic and reactive cyanide forms.

  7. Evaluation of the Hitachi 717 analyser.

    PubMed

    Biosca, C; Antoja, F; Sierra, C; Douezi, H; Macià, M; Alsina, M J; Galimany, R

    1989-01-01

    The selective multitest Boehringer Mannheim Hitachi 717 analyser was evaluated according to the guidelines of the Comisión de Instrumentación de la Sociedad Española de Química Clinica and the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The evaluation was performed in two steps: examination of the analytical units and evaluation in routine operation.THE EVALUATION OF THE ANALYTICAL UNITS INCLUDED A PHOTOMETRIC STUDY: the inaccuracy is acceptable for 340 and 405 nm; the imprecision ranges from 0.12 to 0.95% at 340 nm and from 0.30 to 0.73 at 405 nm, the linearity shows some dispersion at low absorbance for NADH at 340 nm, the drift is negligible, the imprecision of the pipette delivery system increases when the sample pipette operates with 3 mul, the reagent pipette imprecision is acceptable and the temperature control system is good.UNDER ROUTINE WORKING CONDITIONS, SEVEN DETERMINATIONS WERE STUDIED: glucose, creatinine, iron, total protein, AST, ALP and calcium. The within-run imprecision (CV) ranged from 0.6% for total protein and AST to 6.9% for iron. The between run imprecision ranged from 2.4% for glucose to 9.7% for iron. Some contamination was found in the carry-over study. The relative inaccuracy is good for all the constituents assayed.

  8. Evaluation of the Olympus AU-510 analyser.

    PubMed

    Farré, C; Velasco, J; Ramón, F

    1991-01-01

    The selective multitest Olympus AU-510 analyser was evaluated according to the recommendations of the Comision de Instrumentacion de la Sociedad Española de Quimica Clinica and the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The evaluation was carried out in two stages: an examination of the analytical units and then an evaluation in routine work conditions. The operational characteristics of the system were also studied.THE FIRST STAGE INCLUDED A PHOTOMETRIC STUDY: dependent on the absorbance, the inaccuracy varies between +0.5% to -0.6% at 405 nm and from -5.6% to 10.6% at 340 nm; the imprecision ranges between -0.22% and 0.56% at 405 nm and between 0.09% and 2.74% at 340 nm. Linearity was acceptable, apart from a very low absorbance for NADH at 340 nm; and the imprecision of the serum sample pipetter was satisfactory.TWELVE SERUM ANALYTES WERE STUDIED UNDER ROUTINE CONDITIONS: glucose, urea urate, cholesterol, triglycerides, total bilirubin, creatinine, phosphate, iron, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase.The within-run imprecision (CV%) ranged from 0.67% for phosphate to 2.89% for iron and the between-run imprecision from 0.97% for total bilirubin to 7.06% for iron. There was no carryover in a study of the serum sample pipetter. Carry-over studies with the reagent and sample pipetters shows some cross contamination in the iron assay.

  9. CFD analyses of coolant channel flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagley, Jennifer A.; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield characteristics in rocket engine coolant channels are analyzed by means of a numerical model. The channels are characterized by large length to diameter ratios, high Reynolds numbers, and asymmetrical heating. At representative flow conditions, the channel length is approximately twice the hydraulic entrance length so that fully developed conditions would be reached for a constant property fluid. For the supercritical hydrogen that is used as the coolant, the strong property variations create significant secondary flows in the cross-plane which have a major influence on the flow and the resulting heat transfer. Comparison of constant and variable property solutions show substantial differences. In addition, the property variations prevent fully developed flow. The density variation accelerates the fluid in the channels increasing the pressure drop without an accompanying increase in heat flux. Analyses of the inlet configuration suggest that side entry from a manifold can affect the development of the velocity profile because of vortices generated as the flow enters the channel. Current work is focused on studying the effects of channel bifurcation on the flow field and the heat transfer characteristics.

  10. Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analyses of a Deeply Embedded Model Reactor – SASSI Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Nie J.; Braverman J.; Costantino, M.

    2013-10-31

    This report summarizes the SASSI analyses of a deeply embedded reactor model performed by BNL and CJC and Associates, as part of the seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) simulation capability project for the NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) Program of the Department of Energy. The SASSI analyses included three cases: 0.2 g, 0.5 g, and 0.9g, all of which refer to nominal peak accelerations at the top of the bedrock. The analyses utilized the modified subtraction method (MSM) for performing the seismic SSI evaluations. Each case consisted of two analyses: input motion in one horizontal direction (X) and input motion in the vertical direction (Z), both of which utilized the same in-column input motion. Besides providing SASSI results for use in comparison with the time domain SSI results obtained using the DIABLO computer code, this study also leads to the recognition that the frequency-domain method should be modernized so that it can better serve its mission-critical role for analysis and design of nuclear power plants.

  11. Fracturing and brittleness index analyses of shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhoorn, Auke; Primarini, Mutia; Houben, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    The formation of a fracture network in rocks has a crucial control on the flow behaviour of fluids. In addition, an existing network of fractures , influences the propagation of new fractures during e.g. hydraulic fracturing or during a seismic event. Understanding of the type and characteristics of the fracture network that will be formed during e.g. hydraulic fracturing is thus crucial to better predict the outcome of a hydraulic fracturing job. For this, knowledge of the rock properties is crucial. The brittleness index is often used as a rock property that can be used to predict the fracturing behaviour of a rock for e.g. hydraulic fracturing of shales. Various terminologies of the brittleness index (BI1, BI2 and BI3) exist based on mineralogy, elastic constants and stress-strain behaviour (Jin et al., 2014, Jarvie et al., 2007 and Holt et al., 2011). A maximum brittleness index of 1 predicts very good and efficient fracturing behaviour while a minimum brittleness index of 0 predicts a much more ductile shale behaviour. Here, we have performed systematic petrophysical, acoustic and geomechanical analyses on a set of shale samples from Whitby (UK) and we have determined the three different brittleness indices on each sample by performing all the analyses on each of the samples. We show that each of the three brittleness indices are very different for the same sample and as such it can be concluded that the brittleness index is not a good predictor of the fracturing behaviour of shales. The brittleness index based on the acoustic data (BI1) all lie around values of 0.5, while the brittleness index based on the stress strain data (BI2) give an average brittleness index around 0.75, whereas the mineralogy brittleness index (BI3) predict values below 0.2. This shows that by using different estimates of the brittleness index different decisions can be made for hydraulic fracturing. If we would rely on the mineralogy (BI3), the Whitby mudstone is not a suitable

  12. Integrated Field Analyses of Thermal Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, K.; Young, B.; Ponce-Zepeda, M. M.; Rosove, S.

    2011-12-01

    A group of undergraduate researchers through the SURE internship offered by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) have examined thermal springs in southern Idaho, northern Utah as well as mud volcanoes in the Salton Sea, California. We used an integrated approach to estimate the setting and maximum temperature, including water chemistry, Ipad-based image and data-base management, microbiology, and gas analyses with a modified Giggenbach sampler.All springs were characterized using GISRoam (tmCogent3D). We are performing geothermometry calculations as well as comparisons with temperature gradient data on the results while also analyzing biological samples. Analyses include water temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, and TDS measured in the field. Each sample is sealed and chilled and delivered to a water lab within 12 hours.Temperatures are continuously monitored with the use of Solinst Levelogger Juniors. Through partnership with a local community college geology club, we receive results on a monthly basis and are able to process initial data earlier in order to evaluate data over a longer time span. The springs and mudpots contained microbial organisms which were analyzed using methods of single colony isolation, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing showing the impact of the organisms on the springs or vice versa. Soon we we will collect gas samples at sites that show signs of gas. This will be taken using a hybrid of the Giggenbach method and our own methods. Drawing gas samples has proven a challenge, however we devised a method to draw out gas samples utilizing the Giggenbach flask, transferring samples to glass blood sample tubes, replacing NaOH in the Giggenbach flask, and evacuating it in the field for multiple samples using a vacuum pump. We also use a floating platform devised to carry and lower a levelogger, to using an in-line fuel filter from a tractor in order to keep mud from contaminating the equipment.The use of raster

  13. Assessing the reproducibility of discriminant function analyses

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Rose L.; Albert, Arianne Y.K.; Renaut, Sebastien; Rennison, Diana J.; Bock, Dan G.

    2015-01-01

    Data are the foundation of empirical research, yet all too often the datasets underlying published papers are unavailable, incorrect, or poorly curated. This is a serious issue, because future researchers are then unable to validate published results or reuse data to explore new ideas and hypotheses. Even if data files are securely stored and accessible, they must also be accompanied by accurate labels and identifiers. To assess how often problems with metadata or data curation affect the reproducibility of published results, we attempted to reproduce Discriminant Function Analyses (DFAs) from the field of organismal biology. DFA is a commonly used statistical analysis that has changed little since its inception almost eight decades ago, and therefore provides an opportunity to test reproducibility among datasets of varying ages. Out of 100 papers we initially surveyed, fourteen were excluded because they did not present the common types of quantitative result from their DFA or gave insufficient details of their DFA. Of the remaining 86 datasets, there were 15 cases for which we were unable to confidently relate the dataset we received to the one used in the published analysis. The reasons ranged from incomprehensible or absent variable labels, the DFA being performed on an unspecified subset of the data, or the dataset we received being incomplete. We focused on reproducing three common summary statistics from DFAs: the percent variance explained, the percentage correctly assigned and the largest discriminant function coefficient. The reproducibility of the first two was fairly high (20 of 26, and 44 of 60 datasets, respectively), whereas our success rate with the discriminant function coefficients was lower (15 of 26 datasets). When considering all three summary statistics, we were able to completely reproduce 46 (65%) of 71 datasets. While our results show that a majority of studies are reproducible, they highlight the fact that many studies still are not the

  14. Analysing policy transfer: perspectives for operational research.

    PubMed

    Bissell, K; Lee, K; Freeman, R

    2011-09-01

    Policy transfer occurs regularly. In essence, a strategy developed elsewhere is taken up and applied in another policy context. Yet what precisely is policy transfer and, more importantly, under what conditions does it occur? This paper describes policy transfer and addresses three main questions, exploring what perspectives of policy transfer might contribute to operational research (OR) efforts. First, what facilitates the transfer of OR results into policy and practice? Second, what facilitates effective lesson-drawing about OR results and processes between and within countries? And third, what would increase the amount of OR being carried out by low- and middle-income countries and used to inform policy and practice at local and global levels? Mexico's adoption and adaptation of the DOTS strategy is used here as an example of policy transfer. Policy transfer is relevant to all countries, levels and arenas of people, institutions and organisations involved in health. With a more systematic analysis of learning and policy processes, OR policy and practice outcomes could be improved at all levels, from local to global. Policy transfer offers theory and concepts for analysing OR from a new perspective. The present paper proposes a model of the policy transfer process for qualitative research use. Comprehensive policy transfer research, given its length, complexity and need for qualitative researchers, should not be envisaged for all OR projects. All OR projects could, however, incorporate some concepts and practical tools inspired from this model. This should help to plan, evaluate and improve OR processes and the resulting changes in policy and practice.

  15. SEDS Tether M/OD Damage Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.; Hill, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    The Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) was designed to deploy an endmass at the end of a 20-km-long tether which acts as an upper stage rocket, and the threats from the meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) particle environments on SEDS components are important issues for the safety and success of any SEDS mission. However, the possibility of severing the tether due to M/OD particle impacts is an even more serious concern, since the SEDS tether has a relatively large exposed area to the M/OD environments although its diameter is quite small. The threats from the M/OD environments became a very important issue for the third SEDS mission, since the project office proposed using the shuttle orbiter as a launch platform instead of the second stage of a Delta II expendable rocket, which was used for the first two SEDS missions. A series of hyper-velocity impact tests were performed at the Johnson Space Center and Arnold Engineering Development Center to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The computer hydrodynamic code or hydrocode called CTH, developed by the Sandia National Laboratories, was also used to simulate the damage on the SEDS tether caused by both the orbital debris and test particle impacts. The CTH hydrocode simulation results provided the much needed information to help determine the critical particle sizes required to sever the tether. The M/OD particle sizes required to sever the tether were estimated to be less than 0.1 cm in diameter from these studies, and these size particles are more abundant in low-Earth orbit than larger size particles. Finally, the authors performed the M/OD damage analyses for the three SEDS missions; i.e., SEDS-1, -2, and -3 missions, by using the information obtained from the hypervelocity impact test and hydrocode simulations results.

  16. Differentiating tremor patients using spiral analyses.

    PubMed

    Koirala, N; Muthuraman, M; Anjum, T; Chaitanya, C V; Helmolt, V F; Mideksa, K G; Lange, K; Schmidt, G; Schneider, S; Deuschl, G

    2015-01-01

    Essential tremor follows an autosomal dominant type of inheritance in the majority of patients, yet its genetic basis has not been identified. The age of onset in this tremor is bimodal, one in young age and another when they are old. The old onset is referred to as senile tremor in this study. The precise pathology is still not completely understood for both these tremors. We wanted to develop an easy diagnostic tool to differentiate these two tremors clinically. In this study, the spirals were asked to be drawn by 30 patients, 15 from each group. The spirals were recorded digitally from each hand, with and without the spiral template, using a Wacom intuos version 4 tablets. The aim of the study was to look at the easy diagnostic measures from these spirals to distinguish the two cohorts of patients. The first measure was to use the well-known clinical scores like the number of complete circles without the template, width, height, axis, and degree of severity. The second measure was to estimate the peak frequency and the peak amplitude for the position, velocity, and acceleration data, in the frequency domain. The well-known clinical scores, most of them, did not show any significant difference between the two patient cohorts except the degree of severity which showed significant difference. The peak frequency and the peak amplitude in most of the data were not significantly different between the two cohorts of patients, only the peak amplitude from the acceleration data showed significant difference. Thus, we could use these two parameters to differentiate between the two tremors patient groups, which would be an easy clinical diagnostic tool without the need for any complicated analyses.

  17. Comparative mutational analyses of influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Peter Pak-Hang; Rogozin, Igor B.; Choy, Ka-Tim; Ng, Hoi Yee

    2015-01-01

    The error-prone RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) and external selective pressures are the driving forces for RNA viral diversity. When confounded by selective pressures, it is difficult to assess if influenza A viruses (IAV) that have a wide host range possess comparable or distinct spontaneous mutational frequency in their RdRPs. We used in-depth bioinformatics analyses to assess the spontaneous mutational frequencies of two RdRPs derived from human seasonal (A/Wuhan/359/95; Wuhan) and H5N1 (A/Vietnam/1203/04; VN1203) viruses using the mini-genome system with a common firefly luciferase reporter serving as the template. High-fidelity reverse transcriptase was applied to generate high-quality mutational spectra which allowed us to assess and compare the mutational frequencies and mutable motifs along a target sequence of the two RdRPs of two different subtypes. We observed correlated mutational spectra (τ correlation P < 0.0001), comparable mutational frequencies (H3N2:5.8 ± 0.9; H5N1:6.0 ± 0.5), and discovered a highly mutable motif “(A)AAG” for both Wuhan and VN1203 RdRPs. Results were then confirmed with two recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) viruses that possess RdRP derived from Wuhan or VN1203 (RG-PR8×WuhanPB2, PB1, PA, NP and RG-PR8×VN1203PB2, PB1, PA, NP). Applying novel bioinformatics analysis on influenza mutational spectra, we provide a platform for a comprehensive analysis of the spontaneous mutation spectra for an RNA virus. PMID:25404565

  18. Soil grain analyses at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weitz, C.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Bell, J.F.; Farrand, W. H.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Jolliff, B.L.; Morris, R.V.; Squyres, S. W.; Sullivan, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Grain-size analyses of the soils at Meridiani Planum have been used to identify rock souces for the grains and provide information about depositional processes under past and current conditions. Basaltic sand, dust, millimeter-size hematite-rich spherules interpreted as concretions, spherule fragments, coated partially buried spherules, basalt fragments, sedimentary outcrop fragments, and centimeter-size cobbles are concentrated on the upper surfaces of the soils as a lag deposit, while finer basaltic sands and dust dominate the underlying soils. There is a bimodal distribution of soil grain sizes with one population representing grains <125 ??m and the other falling between 1-4.5 mm. Soils within craters like Eagle and Endurance show a much greater diversity of grain morphologies compared to the plains. The spherules found in the plains soils are approximately 1-2 mm smaller in size than those seen embedded in the outcrop rocks of Eagle and Endurance craters. The average major axis for all unfractured spherules measured in the soils and outcrop rocks is 2.87 ?? 1.18 mm, with a trend toward decreasing spherule sizes in both the soils and outcrop rocks as the rover drove southward. Wind ripples seen across the plains of Meridiani are dominated by similar size (1.3-1.7 mm) hematite-rich grains, and they match in size the larger grains on plains ripples at Gusev Crater. Larger clasts and centimeter-size cobbles that are scattered on the soils have several spectral and compositional types, reflecting multiple origins. The cobbles tend to concentrate within ripple troughs along the plains and in association with outcrop exposures. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Finite Element analyses of soil bioengineered slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagnini, Roberto; Switala, Barbara Maria; Sudan Acharya, Madhu; Wu, Wei; Graf, Frank; Auer, Michael; te Kamp, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Soil Bioengineering methods are not only effective from an economical point of view, but they are also interesting as fully ecological solutions. The presented project is aimed to define a numerical model which includes the impact of vegetation on slope stability, considering both mechanical and hydrological effects. In this project, a constitutive model has been developed that accounts for the multi-phase nature of the soil, namely the partly saturated condition and it also includes the effects of a biological component. The constitutive equation is implemented in the Finite Element (FE) software Comes-Geo with an implicit integration scheme that accounts for the collapse of the soils structure due to wetting. The mathematical formulation of the constitutive equations is introduced by means of thermodynamics and it simulates the growth of the biological system during the time. The numerical code is then applied in the analysis of an ideal rainfall induced landslide. The slope is analyzed for vegetated and non-vegetated conditions. The final results allow to quantitatively assessing the impact of vegetation on slope stability. This allows drawing conclusions and choosing whenever it is worthful to use soil bioengineering methods in slope stabilization instead of traditional approaches. The application of the FE methods show some advantages with respect to the commonly used limit equilibrium analyses, because it can account for the real coupled strain-diffusion nature of the problem. The mechanical strength of roots is in fact influenced by the stress evolution into the slope. Moreover, FE method does not need a pre-definition of any failure surface. FE method can also be used in monitoring the progressive failure of the soil bio-engineered system as it calculates the amount of displacements and strains of the model slope. The preliminary study results show that the formulated equations can be useful for analysis and evaluation of different soil bio

  20. Trend analyses with river sediment rating curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment rating curves, which are fitted relationships between river discharge (Q) and suspended-sediment concentration (C), are commonly used to assess patterns and trends in river water quality. In many of these studies it is assumed that rating curves have a power-law form (i.e., C = aQb, where a and b are fitted parameters). Two fundamental questions about the utility of these techniques are assessed in this paper: (i) How well to the parameters, a and b, characterize trends in the data? (ii) Are trends in rating curves diagnostic of changes to river water or sediment discharge? As noted in previous research, the offset parameter, a, is not an independent variable for most rivers, but rather strongly dependent on b and Q. Here it is shown that a is a poor metric for trends in the vertical offset of a rating curve, and a new parameter, â, as determined by the discharge-normalized power function [C = â (Q/QGM)b], where QGM is the geometric mean of the Q values sampled, provides a better characterization of trends. However, these techniques must be applied carefully, because curvature in the relationship between log(Q) and log(C), which exists for many rivers, can produce false trends in â and b. Also, it is shown that trends in â and b are not uniquely diagnostic of river water or sediment supply conditions. For example, an increase in â can be caused by an increase in sediment supply, a decrease in water supply, or a combination of these conditions. Large changes in water and sediment supplies can occur without any change in the parameters, â and b. Thus, trend analyses using sediment rating curves must include additional assessments of the time-dependent rates and trends of river water, sediment concentrations, and sediment discharge.

  1. Computational Analyses of Pressurization in Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Lee, Chun P.; Field, Robert E.; Ryan, Harry

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical framework utilizing multi-element unstructured CFD and rigorous real fluid property routines has been developed to carry out analyses of propellant tank and delivery systems at NASA SSC. Traditionally CFD modeling of pressurization and mixing in cryogenic tanks has been difficult primarily because the fluids in the tank co-exist in different sub-critical and supercritical states with largely varying properties that have to be accurately accounted for in order to predict the correct mixing and phase change between the ullage and the propellant. For example, during tank pressurization under some circumstances, rapid mixing of relatively warm pressurant gas with cryogenic propellant can lead to rapid densification of the gas and loss of pressure in the tank. This phenomenon can cause serious problems during testing because of the resulting decrease in propellant flow rate. With proper physical models implemented, CFD can model the coupling between the propellant and pressurant including heat transfer and phase change effects and accurately capture the complex physics in the evolving flowfields. This holds the promise of allowing the specification of operational conditions and procedures that could minimize the undesirable mixing and heat transfer inherent in propellant tank operation. In our modeling framework, we incorporated two different approaches to real fluids modeling: (a) the first approach is based on the HBMS model developed by Hirschfelder, Beuler, McGee and Sutton and (b) the second approach is based on a cubic equation of state developed by Soave, Redlich and Kwong (SRK). Both approaches cover fluid properties and property variation spanning sub-critical gas and liquid states as well as the supercritical states. Both models were rigorously tested and properties for common fluids such as oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen etc were compared against NIST data in both the sub-critical as well as supercritical regimes.

  2. On study design in neuroimaging heritability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koran, Mary Ellen; Li, Bo; Jahanshad, Neda; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Glahn, David C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Blangero, John; Nichols, Thomas E.; Kochunov, Peter; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging genetics is an emerging methodology that combines genetic information with imaging-derived metrics to understand how genetic factors impact observable structural, functional, and quantitative phenotypes. Many of the most well-known genetic studies are based on Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), which use large populations of related or unrelated individuals to associate traits and disorders with individual genetic factors. Merging imaging and genetics may potentially lead to improved power of association in GWAS because imaging traits may be more sensitive phenotypes, being closer to underlying genetic mechanisms, and their quantitative nature inherently increases power. We are developing SOLAR-ECLIPSE (SE) imaging genetics software which is capable of performing genetic analyses with both large-scale quantitative trait data and family structures of variable complexity. This program can estimate the contribution of genetic commonality among related subjects to a given phenotype, and essentially answer the question of whether or not the phenotype is heritable. This central factor of interest, heritability, offers bounds on the direct genetic influence over observed phenotypes. In order for a trait to be a good phenotype for GWAS, it must be heritable: at least some proportion of its variance must be due to genetic influences. A variety of family structures are commonly used for estimating heritability, yet the variability and biases for each as a function of the sample size are unknown. Herein, we investigate the ability of SOLAR to accurately estimate heritability models based on imaging data simulated using Monte Carlo methods implemented in R. We characterize the bias and the variability of heritability estimates from SOLAR as a function of sample size and pedigree structure (including twins, nuclear families, and nuclear families with grandparents).

  3. Dermatoglyphic analyses in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Simsek, S; Taskiran, H; Karakaya, N; Fistik, T; Solak, M; Cakmak, E A

    1998-01-01

    This study was intended to elucidate the diagnostic values of dermatoglyphic features on the 45 cerebral palsy (CP) patients (28 boys and 17 girls). There were 50 healthy children in the control group. Dermatoglyphic samples were obtained from the both groups by using the paper and ink method and than analysed. The types of dermal patterns of fingertips, the counts of total ridges, the counts of a-b ridges, the values of atd angles, presence or absence of dermal patterns in the hypothenar, thenar/I, II, III, IV interdigital areas, presence of absence of the palmar flexion lines, were compared between the children with CP and control group. It was found that arch, radial loop, whorl prints have increased and ulnar print has decreased in boys investigated which was significant statistically (p < 0.001). No difference was found between investigation and control groups of girls (p > 0.05). The total ridge counts in boys and girls of the investigation group were found significantly decreasing according to the control group (p < 0.001). There was an important decrease in the counts of a-b ridges of investigation group as compared to controls. It was significant in boys (p < 0.01) but not in girls (p > 0.05). The values of atd angles of the investigation group have increased in the control group (p < 0.001 in girls and p < 0.01 in boys). The dermal prints in the hypothenar, thenar/I, II, III and IV interdigital areas showed important differences in the investigation group when compared with the control group (p < 0.01). No clear distinction occurred between the two groups from the viewpoint of palmar flexion lines (p > 0.05). In conclusion, remarkable differences in comparison to controls were found in the dermatoglyphic features of CP cases. In our opinion, by undertaking more studies on the subject and examining a higher number of cases it will be possible to obtain useful data in CP cases indicative of etiologically.

  4. Genome-Facilitated Analyses of Geomicrobial Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth H. Nealson

    2012-05-02

    that makes up chitin, virtually all of the strains were in fact capable. This led to the discovery of a great many new genes involved with chitin and NAG metabolism (7). In a similar vein, a detailed study of the sugar utilization pathway revealed a major new insight into the regulation of sugar metabolism in this genus (19). Systems Biology and Comparative Genomics of the shewanellae: Several publications were put together describing the use of comparative genomics for analyses of the group Shewanella, and these were a logical culmination of our genomic-driven research (10,15,18). Eight graduate students received their Ph.D. degrees doing part of the work described here, and four postdoctoral fellows were supported. In addition, approximately 20 undergraduates took part in projects during the grant period.

  5. Molecular Biomarker Analyses Using Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Punnoose, Elizabeth A.; Atwal, Siminder K.; Spoerke, Jill M.; Savage, Heidi; Pandita, Ajay; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Pirzkall, Andrea; Fine, Bernard M.; Amler, Lukas C.; Chen, Daniel S.; Lackner, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evaluation of cancer biomarkers from blood could significantly enable biomarker assessment by providing a relatively non-invasive source of representative tumor material. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) isolated from blood of metastatic cancer patients hold significant promise in this regard. Methodology/Principal Findings Using spiked tumor-cells we evaluated CTC capture on different CTC technology platforms, including CellSearch® and two biochip platforms, and used the isolated CTCs to develop and optimize assays for molecular characterization of CTCs. We report similar performance for the various platforms tested in capturing CTCs, and find that capture efficiency is dependent on the level of EpCAM expression. We demonstrate that captured CTCs are amenable to biomarker analyses such as HER2 status, qRT-PCR for breast cancer subtype markers, KRAS mutation detection, and EGFR staining by immunofluorescence (IF). We quantify cell surface expression of EGFR in metastatic lung cancer patient samples. In addition, we determined HER2 status by IF and FISH in CTCs from metastatic breast cancer patients. In the majority of patients (89%) we found concordance with HER2 status from patient tumor tissue, though in a subset of patients (11%), HER2 status in CTCs differed from that observed in the primary tumor. Surprisingly, we found CTC counts to be higher in ER+ patients in comparison to HER2+ and triple negative patients, which could be explained by low EpCAM expression and a more mesenchymal phenotype of tumors belonging to the basal-like molecular subtype of breast cancer. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggests that molecular characterization from captured CTCs is possible and can potentially provide real-time information on biomarker status. In this regard, CTCs hold significant promise as a source of tumor material to facilitate clinical biomarker evaluation. However, limitations exist from a purely EpCAM based capture system and addition of antibodies

  6. Static and dynamic analyses of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yoshitaka

    Tensegrity structures are a class of truss structures consisting of a continuous set of tension members (cables) and a discrete set of compression members (bars). Since tensegrity structures are light weight and can be compactly stowed and deployed, cylindrical tensegrity modules have been proposed for space structures. From a view point of structural dynamics, tensegrity structures pose a new set of problems, i.e., initial shape finding. Initial configurations of tensegrity structures must be computed by imposing a pre-stressability condition to initial equilibrium equations. There are ample qualitative statements regarding the initial geometry of cylindrical and spherical tensegrity modules. Quantitative initial shape anlyses have only been performed on one-stage and two-stage cylindrical modules. However, analytical expressions for important geometrical parameters such as twist angles and overlap ratios lack the definition of the initial shape of both cylindrical and spherical tensegrity modules. In response to the above needs, a set of static and dynamic characterization procedures for tensegrity modules was first developed. The procedures were subsequently applied to Buckminster Fuller's spherical tensegrity modules. Both the initial shape and the corresponding pre-stress mode were analytically obtained by using the graphs of the tetrahedral, octahedral (cubic), and icosahedral (dodecahedral) groups. For pre-stressed configurations, modal analyses were conducted to classify a large number of infinitesimal mechanism modes. The procedures also applied tocyclic cylindrical tensegrity modules with an arbitrary number of stages. It was found that both the Maxwell number and the number of infinitesimal mechanism modes are independent of the number of stages in the axial direction. A reduced set of equilibrium equations was derived by incorporating cyclic symmetry and the flip, or quasi-flip, symmetry of the cylindrical modules. For multi-stage modules with more than

  7. First Super-Earth Atmosphere Analysed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    The atmosphere around a super-Earth exoplanet has been analysed for the first time by an international team of astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope. The planet, which is known as GJ 1214b, was studied as it passed in front of its parent star and some of the starlight passed through the planet's atmosphere. We now know that the atmosphere is either mostly water in the form of steam or is dominated by thick clouds or hazes. The results will appear in the 2 December 2010 issue of the journal Nature. The planet GJ 1214b was confirmed in 2009 using the HARPS instrument on ESO's 3.6-metre telescope in Chile (eso0950) [1]. Initial findings suggested that this planet had an atmosphere, which has now been confirmed and studied in detail by an international team of astronomers, led by Jacob Bean (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope. "This is the first super-Earth to have its atmosphere analysed. We've reached a real milestone on the road toward characterising these worlds," said Bean. GJ 1214b has a radius of about 2.6 times that of the Earth and is about 6.5 times as massive, putting it squarely into the class of exoplanets known as super-Earths. Its host star lies about 40 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Ophiuchus (the Serpent Bearer). It is a faint star [2], but it is also small, which means that the size of the planet is large compared to the stellar disc, making it relatively easy to study [3]. The planet travels across the disc of its parent star once every 38 hours as it orbits at a distance of only two million kilometres: about seventy times closer than the Earth orbits the Sun. To study the atmosphere, the team observed the light coming from the star as the planet passed in front of it [4]. During these transits, some of the starlight passes through the planet's atmosphere and, depending on the chemical composition and weather on the planet, specific wavelengths of light are

  8. FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses, Volume 1: Scientific Bases and Analyses, Rev 00

    SciTech Connect

    David Dobson

    2001-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. A decision to recommend the site has not been made: the DOE has provided the S&ER and its supporting documents as an aid to the public in formulating comments on the possible recommendation. When the S&ER (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]) was released, the DOE acknowledged that technical and scientific analyses of the site were ongoing. Therefore, the DOE noted in the Federal Register Notice accompanying the report (66 FR 23 013 [DIRS 155009], p. 2) that additional technical information would be released before the dates, locations, and times for public hearings on the possible recommendation were announced. This information includes: (1) the results of additional technical studies of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, contained in this FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses; and FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 2, Performance Analyses (McNeish 2001 [DIRS 155023]) (collectively referred to as the SSPA) and (2) a preliminary evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site's preclosure and postclosure performance against the DOE's proposed site suitability guidelines (10 CFR Part 963 [64 FR 67054] [DIRS 124754]). By making the large amount of information developed on Yucca Mountain available in stages, the DOE intends to provide the public and interested parties with time to review the available materials and to formulate and submit

  9. Residual Strength Analyses of Monolithic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott (Technical Monitor); Ambur, Damodar R. (Technical Monitor); Seshadri, B. R.; Tiwari, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Finite-element fracture simulation methodology predicts the residual strength of damaged aircraft structures. The methodology uses the critical crack-tip-opening-angle (CTOA) fracture criterion to characterize the fracture behavior of the material. The CTOA fracture criterion assumes that stable crack growth occurs when the crack-tip angle reaches a constant critical value. The use of the CTOA criterion requires an elastic- plastic, finite-element analysis. The critical CTOA value is determined by simulating fracture behavior in laboratory specimens, such as a compact specimen, to obtain the angle that best fits the observed test behavior. The critical CTOA value appears to be independent of loading, crack length, and in-plane dimensions. However, it is a function of material thickness and local crack-front constraint. Modeling the local constraint requires either a three-dimensional analysis or a two-dimensional analysis with an approximation to account for the constraint effects. In recent times as the aircraft industry is leaning towards monolithic structures with the intention of reducing part count and manufacturing cost, there has been a consistent effort at NASA Langley to extend critical CTOA based numerical methodology in the analysis of integrally-stiffened panels.In this regard, a series of fracture tests were conducted on both flat and curved aluminum alloy integrally-stiffened panels. These flat panels were subjected to uniaxial tension and during the test, applied load-crack extension, out-of-plane displacements and local deformations around the crack tip region were measured. Compact and middle-crack tension specimens were tested to determine the critical angle (wc) using three-dimensional code (ZIP3D) and the plane-strain core height (hJ using two-dimensional code (STAGS). These values were then used in the STAGS analysis to predict the fracture behavior of the integrally-stiffened panels. The analyses modeled stable tearing, buckling, and crack

  10. Runtime and Pressurization Analyses of Propellant Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, Robert E.; Ryan, Harry M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Lee, Chung P.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-element unstructured CFD has been utilized at NASA SSC to carry out analyses of propellant tank systems in different modes of operation. The three regimes of interest at SSC include (a) tank chill down (b) tank pressurization and (c) runtime propellant draw-down and purge. While tank chill down is an important event that is best addressed with long time-scale heat transfer calculations, CFD can play a critical role in the tank pressurization and runtime modes of operation. In these situations, problems with contamination of the propellant by inclusion of the pressurant gas from the ullage causes a deterioration of the quality of the propellant delivered to the test article. CFD can be used to help quantify the mixing and propellant degradation. During tank pressurization under some circumstances, rapid mixing of relatively warm pressurant gas with cryogenic propellant can lead to rapid densification of the gas and loss of pressure in the tank. This phenomenon can cause serious problems during testing because of the resulting decrease in propellant flow rate. With proper physical models implemented, CFD can model the coupling between the propellant and pressurant including heat transfer and phase change effects and accurately capture the complex physics in the evolving flowfields. This holds the promise of allowing the specification of operational conditions and procedures that could minimize the undesirable mixing and heat transfer inherent in propellant tank operation. It should be noted that traditional CFD modeling is inadequate for such simulations because the fluids in the tank are in a range of different sub-critical and supercritical states and elaborate phase change and mixing rules have to be developed to accurately model the interaction between the ullage gas and the propellant. We show a typical run-time simulation of a spherical propellant tank, containing RP-1 in this case, being pressurized with room-temperature nitrogen at 540 R. Nitrogen

  11. Analyses of 1999 PM Data for the PM NAAQS Review

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These files document all analyses conducted in association with the EPA memorandum from Terence Fitz-Simons, Scott Mathias, and Mike Rizzo titled Analyses of 1999 PM Data for the PM NAAQS Review, November 17, 2000.

  12. Molekulare Methoden zum Nachweis, zur Quantifizierung und zum Monitoring der Mykotoxinbildung lebensmittelrelevanter Pilze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisen, Rolf

    Schimmelpilze kommen ubiquitär vor und spielen besonders bei pflanzlichen Lebensmitteln und Rohprodukten eine besondere Rolle als Verderbsorganismen. Es wird geschätzt, dass 20-25 % der jährlichen Produktion an pflanzlichen Produkten durch Schimmelpilze verdorben werden (Smith et al., 1994). Viele der lebensmittelrelevanten Schimmelpilze sind zudem in der Lage, Mykotoxine, toxische Sekundärmetabolite, zu bilden, was das Ausmaß des Problems deutlich macht. Die wichtigsten mykotoxinbildenden Spezies gehören zu den Fusarien (Trichothecene, Fumonisine, Zearalenon), Aspergillen (Aflatoxin, Ochratoxin, Cyclopiazonsäure) und Penicillien (Patulin, Ochratoxin). Für viele Mykotoxine, wie die Aflatoxine, Ochratoxin, Fumonisine und Trichothecene sind Grenzwerte erlassen worden, die die Verkehrsfähigkeit betroffener Produkte regeln. Die Einhaltung der Grenzwerte kann sehr genau durch offizielle chemisch-analytische Methoden, wie HPLC, GC-MS etc. kontrolliert werden. Diese analytischen Methoden sind aber für die Anwendung eines HACCP-Ansatzes zur Kontrolle der Mykotoxinbildung nur bedingt geeignet, da sie Endpunktkontrollen darstellen und nur das über eine längere Zeit gebildete Mykotoxin bestimmen. Sie sagen daher nichts über die biologischen Bedingungen zur Zeit der Bildung durch den Pilz aus.

  13. Statistical power analyses using G*Power 3.1: tests for correlation and regression analyses.

    PubMed

    Faul, Franz; Erdfelder, Edgar; Buchner, Axel; Lang, Albert-Georg

    2009-11-01

    G*Power is a free power analysis program for a variety of statistical tests. We present extensions and improvements of the version introduced by Faul, Erdfelder, Lang, and Buchner (2007) in the domain of correlation and regression analyses. In the new version, we have added procedures to analyze the power of tests based on (1) single-sample tetrachoric correlations, (2) comparisons of dependent correlations, (3) bivariate linear regression, (4) multiple linear regression based on the random predictor model, (5) logistic regression, and (6) Poisson regression. We describe these new features and provide a brief introduction to their scope and handling.

  14. Non-destructive infrared analyses: a method for provenance analyses of sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowitz, Jörg; Ehling, Angela

    2008-12-01

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR spectroscopy) is commonly applied in the laboratory for mineral analyses in addition to XRD. Because such technical efforts are time and cost consuming, we present an infrared-based mobile method for non-destructive mineral and provenance analyses of sandstones. IR spectroscopy is based on activating chemical bonds. By irradiating a mineral mixture, special bonds are activated to vibrate depending on the bond energy (resonance vibration). Accordingly, the energy of the IR spectrum will be reduced thereby generating an absorption spectrum. The positions of the absorption maxima within the spectral region indicate the type of the bonds and in many cases identify minerals containing these bonds. The non-destructive reflection spectroscopy operates in the near infrared region (NIR) and can detect all common clay minerals as well as sulfates, hydroxides and carbonates. The spectra produced have been interpreted by computer using digital mineral libraries that have been especially collected for sandstones. The comparison of all results with XRD, RFA and interpretations of thin sections demonstrates impressively the accuracy and reliability of this method. Not only are different minerals detectable, but also differently ordered kaolinites and varieties of illites can be identified by the shape and size of the absorption bands. Especially clay minerals and their varieties in combination with their relative contents form the characteristic spectra of sandstones. Other components such as limonite, hematite and amorphous silica also influence the spectra. Sandstones, similar in colour and texture, often can be identified by their characteristic reflectance spectra. Reference libraries with more than 60 spectra of important German sandstones have been created to enable entirely computerized interpretations and identifications of these dimension stones. The analysis of infrared spectroscopy results is demonstrated with examples of different sandstones

  15. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) Input Coal Analyses and Off-Gass Filter (OGF) Content Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Missimer, David M.; Guenther, Chris P.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; VanEssendelft, Dirk T.; Means, Nicholas C.

    2015-04-23

    in process piping and materials, in excessive off-gas absorbent loading, and in undesired process emissions. The ash content of the coal is important as the ash adds to the DMR and other vessel products which affect the final waste product mass and composition. The amount and composition of the ash also affects the reaction kinetics. Thus ash content and composition contributes to the mass balance. In addition, sodium, potassium, calcium, sulfur, and maybe silica and alumina in the ash may contribute to wall-scale formation. Sodium, potassium, and alumina in the ash will be overwhelmed by the sodium, potassium, and alumina from the feed but the impact from the other ash components needs to be quantified. A maximum coal particle size is specified so the feed system does not plug and a minimum particle size is specified to prevent excess elutriation from the DMR to the Process Gas Filter (PGF). A vendor specification was used to procure the calcined coal for IWTU processing. While the vendor supplied a composite analysis for the 22 tons of coal (Appendix A), this study compares independent analyses of the coal performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Three supersacks a were sampled at three different heights within the sack in order to determine within bag variability and between bag variability of the coal. These analyses were also compared to the vendor’s composite analyses and to the coal specification. These analyses were also compared to historic data on Bestac coal analyses that had been performed at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) between 2004-2011.

  16. The relationship among sea surface roughness variations, oceanographic analyses, and airborne remote sensing analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oertel, G. F.; Wade, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was studied to determine whether it could image large scale estuaries and oceanic features such as fronts and to explain the electromagnetic interaction between SAR and the individual surface front features. Fronts were observed to occur at the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. The airborne measurements consisted of data collection by SAR onboard an F-4 aircraft and real aperture side looking radar (SLAR) in Mohawk aircraft. A total of 89 transects were flown. Surface roughness and color as well as temperature and salinity were evaluated. Cross-frontal surveys were made. Frontal shear and convergence flow were obtained. Surface active organic materials, it was indicated, are present at the air-sea interface. In all, 2000 analyses were conducted to characterize the spatial and temporal variabilities associated with water mass boundaries.

  17. Analysing harmonic motions with an iPhone’s magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Ahmet; Kağan Temiz, Burak

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an experiment for analysing harmonic motion using an iPhone’s (or iPad’s) magnetometer. This experiment consists of the detection of magnetic field variations obtained from an iPhone’s magnetometer sensor. A graph of harmonic motion is directly displayed on the iPhone’s screen using the Sensor Kinetics application. Data from this application was analysed with Eureqa software to establish the equation of the harmonic motion. Analyses show that the use of an iPhone’s magnetometer to analyse harmonic motion is a practical and effective method for small oscillations and frequencies less than 15-20 Hz.

  18. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  19. 36 CFR 228.102 - Leasing analyses and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Leasing analyses and... AGRICULTURE MINERALS Oil and Gas Resources Leasing § 228.102 Leasing analyses and decisions. (a) Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. In analyzing lands for leasing, the...

  20. 36 CFR 228.102 - Leasing analyses and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Leasing analyses and... AGRICULTURE MINERALS Oil and Gas Resources Leasing § 228.102 Leasing analyses and decisions. (a) Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. In analyzing lands for leasing, the...

  1. A computer graphics program for general finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Sawyer, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Documentation for a computer graphics program for displays from general finite element analyses is presented. A general description of display options and detailed user instructions are given. Several plots made in structural, thermal and fluid finite element analyses are included to illustrate program options. Sample data files are given to illustrate use of the program.

  2. Tracing Success: Graphical Methods for Analysing Successful Collaborative Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joiner, Richard; Issroff, Kim

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the use of trace diagrams for analysing collaborative problem solving. The paper describes a study where trace diagrams were used to analyse joint navigation in a virtual environment. Ten pairs of undergraduates worked together on a distributed virtual task to collect five flowers using two bees with each…

  3. Descriptive Analyses of Pediatric Food Refusal and Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrero, Carrie S. W.; Woods, Julia N.; Borrero, John C.; Masler, Elizabeth A.; Lesser, Aaron D.

    2010-01-01

    Functional analyses of inappropriate mealtime behavior typically include conditions to determine if the contingent delivery of attention, tangible items, or escape reinforce food refusal. In the current investigation, descriptive analyses were conducted for 25 children who had been admitted to a program for the assessment and treatment of food…

  4. Analyses of Response-Stimulus Sequences in Descriptive Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samaha, Andrew L.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Borrero, Carrie; Sloman, Kimberly; Pipkin, Claire St. Peter; Bourret, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Descriptive observations were conducted to record problem behavior displayed by participants and to record antecedents and consequences delivered by caregivers. Next, functional analyses were conducted to identify reinforcers for problem behavior. Then, using data from the descriptive observations, lag-sequential analyses were conducted to examine…

  5. Treatment of Pica through Multiple Analyses of Its Reinforcing Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Cathleen C.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Hanley, Gregory P.; LeBlanc, Linda A.; Worsdell, April S.; And Others

    1998-01-01

    A study conducted functional analyses of the pica of three young children. The pica of one participant was maintained by automatic reinforcement; that of the other two was multiply-controlled by social and automatic reinforcement. Preference and treatment analyses were used to address the automatic function of the pica. (Author/CR)

  6. What can we do about exploratory analyses in clinical trials?

    PubMed

    Moyé, Lem

    2015-11-01

    The research community has alternatively embraced then repudiated exploratory analyses since the inception of clinical trials in the middle of the twentieth century. After a series of important but ultimately unreproducible findings, these non-prospectively declared evaluations were relegated to hypothesis generating. Since the majority of evaluations conducted in clinical trials with their rich data sets are exploratory, the absence of their persuasive power adds to the inefficiency of clinical trial analyses in an atmosphere of fiscal frugality. However, the principle argument against exploratory analyses is not based in statistical theory, but pragmatism and observation. The absence of any theoretical treatment of exploratory analyses postpones the day when their statistical weaknesses might be repaired. Here, we introduce examination of the characteristics of exploratory analyses from a probabilistic and statistical framework. Setting the obvious logistical concerns aside (i.e., the absence of planning produces poor precision), exploratory analyses do not appear to suffer from estimation theory weaknesses. The problem appears to be a difficulty in what is actually reported as the p-value. The use of Bayes Theorem provides p-values that are more in line with confirmatory analyses. This development may inaugurate a body of work that would lead to the readmission of exploratory analyses to a position of persuasive power in clinical trials.

  7. Integrated metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses of marine biofilm communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses were utilized to begin to understand the role varying environments play on the composition and function of complex air-water interface biofilms sampled from the hulls of two ships that were deployed in different geographic waters. Prokaryotic community analyses...

  8. Restricted versus Unrestricted Learning: Synthesis of Recent Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve

    2007-01-01

    Meta-analysis is a method of quantitatively summarizing the results of experimental research. This article summarizes four meta-analyses published since 2003 that compare the effect of DE and traditional education (TE) on student learning. Despite limitations, synthesis of these meta-analyses establish, at the very least, equivalent learning…

  9. 46 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Stress Analyses Definitions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stress Analyses Definitions B Appendix B to Part 154...—Stress Analyses Definitions The following are the standard definitions of stresses for the analysis of an independent tank type B: Normal stress means the component of stress normal to the plane of...

  10. 46 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Stress Analyses Definitions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stress Analyses Definitions B Appendix B to Part 154...—Stress Analyses Definitions The following are the standard definitions of stresses for the analysis of an independent tank type B: Normal stress means the component of stress normal to the plane of...

  11. 46 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Stress Analyses Definitions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stress Analyses Definitions B Appendix B to Part 154...—Stress Analyses Definitions The following are the standard definitions of stresses for the analysis of an independent tank type B: Normal stress means the component of stress normal to the plane of...

  12. 46 CFR Appendix B to Part 154 - Stress Analyses Definitions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stress Analyses Definitions B Appendix B to Part 154...—Stress Analyses Definitions The following are the standard definitions of stresses for the analysis of an independent tank type B: Normal stress means the component of stress normal to the plane of...

  13. ITEM RESPONSE ANALYSES OF THE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES SURVEY PRINCIPAL QUESTIONNAIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAYESKE, GEORGE W.; AND OTHERS

    THIS REPORT PRESENTS THE TABULATIONS AND ANALYSES OF RESPONSES TO EACH ITEM OF THE PRINCIPAL QUESTIONNAIRE THAT WAS ADMINISTERED AS PART OF THE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES SURVEY. THE ITEM ANALYSES OF THESE DATA WERE CONDUCTED (1) TO PRESENT THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS RESPONDING TO EACH ITEM ALTERNATIVE,…

  14. 41 CFR 101-27.208 - Inventory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Inventory analyses. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.2-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.208 Inventory analyses. (a) An inventory analysis shall...

  15. 41 CFR 101-27.208 - Inventory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Inventory analyses. 101... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.2-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.208 Inventory analyses. (a) An inventory analysis shall...

  16. 41 CFR 101-27.208 - Inventory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Inventory analyses. 101...-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.208 Inventory analyses. (a) An inventory analysis shall be... the established shelf-life period. If the analysis indicates there are quantities which will not...

  17. 43 CFR 46.130 - Mitigation measures in analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Mitigation measures in analyses. 46.130... Mitigation measures in analyses. (a) Bureau proposed action. The analysis of the proposed action and any alternatives must include an analysis of the effects of the proposed action or alternative as well as...

  18. 43 CFR 46.130 - Mitigation measures in analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mitigation measures in analyses. 46.130... Mitigation measures in analyses. (a) Bureau proposed action. The analysis of the proposed action and any alternatives must include an analysis of the effects of the proposed action or alternative as well as...

  19. 36 CFR 228.102 - Leasing analyses and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Leasing analyses and... AGRICULTURE MINERALS Oil and Gas Resources Leasing § 228.102 Leasing analyses and decisions. (a) Compliance... Forest Service Manual chapter 1950 and Forest Service Handbook 1909.15. (b) Scheduling analysis...

  20. 41 CFR 101-27.208 - Inventory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inventory analyses. 101...-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.208 Inventory analyses. (a) An inventory analysis shall be... the established shelf-life period. If the analysis indicates there are quantities which will not...

  1. 41 CFR 101-27.208 - Inventory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Inventory analyses. 101...-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.208 Inventory analyses. (a) An inventory analysis shall be... the established shelf-life period. If the analysis indicates there are quantities which will not...

  2. 44 CFR 1.9 - Regulatory impact analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regulatory impact analyses. 1... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL RULEMAKING; POLICY AND PROCEDURES General § 1.9 Regulatory impact analyses. (a) FEMA shall, in connection with any major rule, prepare and consider a Regulatory Impact Analysis....

  3. What Can We Do About Exploratory Analyses in Clinical Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Moyé, Lem

    2015-01-01

    The research community has alternatively embraced then repudiated exploratory analyses since the inception of clinical trials in the middle of the twentieth century. After a series of important but ultimately unreproducible findings, these non-prospectively declared evaluations were relegated to hypothesis generating. Since the majority of evaluations conducted in clinical trials with their rich data sets are exploratory, the absence of their persuasive power adds to the inefficiency of clinical trial analyses in an atmosphere of fiscal frugality. However, the principle argument against exploratory analyses is not based in statistical theory, but pragmatism and observation. The absence of any theoretical treatment of exploratory analyses postpones the day when their statistical weaknesses might be repaired. Here, we introduce examination of the characteristics of exploratory analyses from a probabilistic and statistical framework. Setting the obvious logistical concerns aside (i.e., the absence of planning produces poor precision), exploratory analyses do not appear to suffer from estimation theory weaknesses. The problem appears to be a difficulty in what is actually reported as the p-value. The use of Bayes Theorem provides p-values that are more in line with confirmatory analyses. This development may inaugurate a body of work that would lead to the readmission of exploratory analyses to a position of persuasive power in clinical trials. PMID:26390962

  4. 36 CFR 228.102 - Leasing analyses and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Leasing analyses and... AGRICULTURE MINERALS Oil and Gas Resources Leasing § 228.102 Leasing analyses and decisions. (a) Compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. In analyzing lands for leasing, the...

  5. Recent Trends in Conducting School-Based Experimental Functional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrations of school-based experimental functional analyses have received limited attention within the literature. School settings present unique practical and ethical concerns related to the implementation of experimental analyses which were originally developed within clinical settings. Recent examples have made definite contributions toward…

  6. Rational Analyses of Information Foraging on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirolli, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This article describes rational analyses and cognitive models of Web users developed within information foraging theory. This is done by following the rational analysis methodology of (a) characterizing the problems posed by the environment, (b) developing rational analyses of behavioral solutions to those problems, and (c) developing cognitive…

  7. Training Residential Staff to Conduct Trial-Based Functional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Joseph M.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Kunnavatana, S. Shanun; Collins, Shawnee D.; Clay, Casey J.

    2013-01-01

    We taught 6 supervisors of a residential service provider for adults with developmental disabilities to train 9 house managers to conduct trial-based functional analyses. Effects of the training were evaluated with a nonconcurrent multiple baseline. Results suggest that house managers can be trained to conduct trial-based functional analyses with…

  8. 25 CFR 162.521 - May a lessee incorporate its WEEL analyses into its WSR lease analyses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a lessee incorporate its WEEL analyses into its WSR lease analyses? 162.521 Section 162.521 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Weels § 162.521 May a...

  9. 25 CFR 162.521 - May a lessee incorporate its WEEL analyses into its WSR lease analyses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a lessee incorporate its WEEL analyses into its WSR lease analyses? 162.521 Section 162.521 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LEASES AND PERMITS Wind and Solar Resource Leases Weels § 162.521 May a...

  10. Toward the Unification of Molecular and Molar Analyses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Three categories of behavior analysis may be called molecular, molar, and unified. Molecular analyses focus on how manual shaping segments moment-to-moment behaving into new, unified, hierarchically organized patterns. Manual shaping is largely atheoretical, qualitative, and practical. Molar analyses aggregate behaviors and then compute a numerical average for the aggregate. Typical molar analyses involve average rate of, or average time allocated to, the aggregated behaviors. Some molar analyses have no known relation to any behavior stream. Molar analyses are usually quantitative and often theoretical. Unified analyses combine automated shaping of moment-to-moment behaving and molar aggregates of the shaped patterns. Unified controlling relations suggest that molar controlling relations like matching confound shaping and strengthening effects of reinforcement. If a molecular analysis is about how reinforcement organizes individual behavior moment by moment, and a molar analysis is about how reinforcement encourages more or less of an activity aggregated over time, then a unified analysis handles both kinds of analyses. Only theories engendered by computer simulation appear to be able to unify all three categories of behavior analysis. PMID:28018041

  11. NMC stratospheric analyses during the 1987 Antarctic expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelman, Melvyn E.; Newman, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    Stratospheric constant pressure analyses of geopotential height and temperature, produced as part of regular operations at the National Meteorological Center (NMC), were used by several participants of the Antarctic Ozone Expedition. A brief decription is given of the NMC stratospheric analyses and the data that are used to derive them. In addition, comparisons of the analysis values at the locations of radiosonde and aircraft data are presented to provide indications for assessing the representativeness of the NMC stratospheric analyses during the 1987 Antarctic winter-spring period.

  12. A vector matching method for analysing logic Petri nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, YuYue; Qi, Liang; Zhou, MengChu

    2011-11-01

    Batch processing function and passing value indeterminacy in cooperative systems can be described and analysed by logic Petri nets (LPNs). To directly analyse the properties of LPNs, the concept of transition enabling vector sets is presented and a vector matching method used to judge the enabling transitions is proposed in this article. The incidence matrix of LPNs is defined; an equation about marking change due to a transition's firing is given; and a reachable tree is constructed. The state space explosion is mitigated to a certain extent from directly analysing LPNs. Finally, the validity and reliability of the proposed method are illustrated by an example in electronic commerce.

  13. Shielding Analyses for VISION Beam Line at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz X

    2014-01-01

    Full-scale neutron and gamma transport analyses were performed to design shielding around the VISION beam line, instrument shielding enclosure, beam stop, secondary shutter including a temporary beam stop for the still closed neighboring beam line to meet requirement is to achieve dose rates below 0.25 mrem/h at 30 cm from the shielding surface. The beam stop and the temporary beam stop analyses were performed with the discrete ordinate code DORT additionally to Monte Carlo analyses with the MCNPX code. Comparison of the results is presented.

  14. Nonlinear shell analyses of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Gillian, Ronnie E.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1989-01-01

    A variety of structural analyses have been performed on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB's) to provide information that would contribute to the understanding of the failure which destroyed the Space Shuttle Challenger. This paper describes nonlinear shell analyses that were performed to characterize the behavior of an overall SRB structure and a segment of the SRB in the vicinity of the External Tank Attachment (ETA) ring. Shell finite element models were used that would accurately reflect the global load transfer in an SRB in a manner such that nonlinear shell collapse and ovalization could be assessed. The purpose of these analyses was to calculate the overall deflection and stress distributions for these SRB models when subjected to mechanical loads corresponding to critical times during the launch sequence. Static analyses of these SRB models were performed using a snapshot picture of the loads. Analytical results obtained using these models show no evidence of nonlinear shell collapse for the pre-liftoff loading cases considered.

  15. Complex Trait Analyses of the Collaborative Cross: Tools and Databases.

    PubMed

    Ram, Ramesh; Morahan, Grant

    2017-01-01

    The Collaborative cross (CC) is a powerful mouse resource for investigating complex genetic traits. Here we discuss various tools and techniques for gene mapping and identification using the CC. The data analyses procedures are illustrated with examples.

  16. Neutron diffractometer allows both magnetic and crystallographic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atoji, M.

    1967-01-01

    Automatic double-crystal neutron diffractometer performs both crystal and magnetic structural analyses. This shielded installation has a goniometric turntable and electronic controls, and auxiliary equipment including a goniometer, diffraction electromagnet, two cryogenic dewars, and two diffraction furnaces.

  17. Upcoming Studies and Other Analyses- September 2012 Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View presentations on on upcoming studies and other analyses of methane emissions, presented at the Stakeholder Workshop on Natural Gas in the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions and Sinks on Friday, September 14, 2012.

  18. Using Inequality Measures to Incorporate Environmental Justice into Regulatory Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Formally evaluating how specific policy measures influence environmental justice is challenging, especially in the context of regulatory analyses in which quantitative comparisons are the norm. However, there is a large literature on developing and applying quantitative...

  19. Incorporating cost-benefit analyses into software assurance planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.; Sigal, B.; Cornford, S. L.; Hutchinson, P.

    2001-01-01

    The objective is to use cost-benefit analyses to identify, for a given project, optimal sets of software assurance activities. Towards this end we have incorporated cost-benefit calculations into a risk management framework.

  20. Doubly Latent Multilevel Analyses of Classroom Climate: An Illustration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Nagengast, Benjamin; Scalas, L. Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Many classroom climate studies suffer from 2 critical problems: They (a) treat climate as a student-level (L1) variable in single-level analyses instead of a classroom-level (L2) construct in multilevel analyses; and (b) rely on manifest-variable models rather than on latent-variable models that control measurement error at L1 and L2, and sampling…

  1. EPA/ECLSS consumables analyses for the Spacelab 1 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steines, G. J.; Pipher, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    The results of electrical power system (EPS) and environmental control/life support system (ECLSS) consumables analyses of the Spacelab 1 mission are presented. The analyses were performed to assess the capability of the orbiter systems to support the proposed mission and to establish the various non propulsive consumables requirements. The EPS analysis was performed using the shuttle electrical power system (SEPS) analysis computer program. The ECLSS analysis was performed using the shuttle environmental consumables requirements evaluation tool (SECRET) program.

  2. Biostratigraphy and Paleoenvironmental Analyses of Pleistocene NJ Shelf Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-29

    C.W., 1981, Ecologic Atlas of benthic foraminifera of the Gulf of Mexico : Stroudsburg PA, Hutchinson Ross Publishing Co., 174 p. Poag, C.W...area of the NJ margin. Paleoenvironmental reconstructions of the study area were developed using benthic foraminifera and sediment texture analyses...foraminiferal faunal analyses and include supporting data such as grain frosting, macrofauna, and floral data. Benthic foraminifera have affinities for

  3. Economic analyses of rubella and rubella vaccines: a global review.

    PubMed Central

    Hinman, Alan R.; Irons, Beryl; Lewis, Merle; Kandola, Kami

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the incorporation of rubella vaccine into immunization programmes in developing countries is economically justified. METHODS: A MEDLINE search was conducted for articles published between 1970 and 2000 that dealt with economic analyses of rubella and rubella-containing vaccines. The Eastern Mediterranean, South-East Asia, and Africa regional Index Medicus databases and the LILACS database for Latin America and the Caribbean were also searched. FINDINGS: For developed countries, five cost- benefit analyses of rubella vaccine and five of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine as well as two cost-effectiveness analyses were found. For developing countries, five cost analyses and five cost-benefit analyses were found. All the cost-benefit analyses had a benefit:cost ratio greater than 1 and the cost-effectiveness studies indicated that rubella immunization was a cost-effective means of reducing the impact of congenital rubella syndrome. However, the methodologies were not standardized. CONCLUSION: The data support the inclusion of rubella vaccine in the immunization programmes of both developing and developed countries and indicate economic benefits comparable to those associated with hepatitis B vaccine and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine. More studies should be carried out on costs for care and immunization using standardized methodologies and locally obtained information. PMID:12075361

  4. A comparison of subgroup analyses in grant applications and publications.

    PubMed

    Boonacker, Chantal W B; Hoes, Arno W; van Liere-Visser, Karen; Schilder, Anne G M; Rovers, Maroeska M

    2011-07-15

    In this paper, the authors compare subgroup analyses as outlined in grant applications and their related publications. Grants awarded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) from 2001 onward that were finalized before March 1, 2010, were studied. Of the 79 grant proposals, 50 (63%) were intervention studies, 18 (23%) were diagnostic studies, and 6 (8%) were prognostic studies. Subgroups were mentioned in 49 (62%) grant applications and in 53 (67%) publications. In 20 of the 79 projects (25%), the publications were completely in agreement with the grant proposal; that is, subgroups that were prespecified in the grant proposal were reported and no new subgroup analyses were introduced in the publications. Of the 149 prespecified subgroups, 46 (31%) were reported in the final report or scientific publications, and 143 of the 189 (76%) reported subgroups were based on post-hoc findings. For 77% of the subgroup analyses in the publications, there was no mention of whether these were prespecified or post hoc. Justification for subgroup analysis and methods to study subgroups were rarely reported. The authors conclude that there is a large discrepancy between grant applications and final publications regarding subgroup analyses. Both nonreporting prespecified subgroup analyses and reporting post-hoc subgroup analyses are common. More guidance is clearly needed.

  5. Comparison of retrospective analyses of the global ocean heat content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurin, Gennady A.; Carton, James A.

    1999-07-01

    In this study, we compare seven retrospective analyses of basin- to global-scale upper ocean temperature. The analyses span a minimum of 10 years during the 50-year period since World War II. Three of the analyses (WOA-94, WHITE, BMRC) are based on objective analysis and thus, do not rely on a numerical forecast model. The remaining four (NCEP, WAJSOWICZ, ROSATI, SODA) are based on data assimilation in which the numerical forecast is provided by some form of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Modular Ocean Model driven by historical winds. The comparison presented here is limited to heat content in the upper 250 m, information that is available for all analyses. The results are presented in three frequency bands: seasonal, interannual (periods of 1-5 years), and decadal (periods of 5-25 years). At seasonal frequencies, all of the analyses are quite similar. Otherwise, the differences among analyses are limited to the regions of the western boundary currents, and some regions in the Southern Hemisphere. At interannual frequencies, significant differences appear between the objective analyses and the data assimilation analyses. Along the equator in the Pacific, where variability is dominated by El Niño, the objective analyses have somewhat noisier fields, as well as reduced variance prior to 1980 due to lack of observations. Still, the correlation among analyses generally exceeds 80% in this region. Along the equator in the Atlantic, the correlation is lower (30-60%) although inspection of the time series shows that the same biennial progression of warm and cool events appears in all analyses since 1980. In the midlatitude Pacific agreement among objective analyses and data assimilation analyses is good. The analysis of Rosati et al. [Rosati, A., Gudgel, R., Miyakoda, K., 1995. Decadal analysis produced from an ocean assimilation system. Mon. Weather Rev., 123, 2, 206.] differs somewhat from the others apparently because in this analysis, the forecast model

  6. The ASSET intercomparison of ozone analyses: method and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, A. J.; Lahoz, W. A.; Bekki, S.; Bormann, N.; Errera, Q.; Eskes, H. J.; Fonteyn, D.; Jackson, D. R.; Juckes, M. N.; Massart, S.; Peuch, V.-H.; Rharmili, S.; Segers, A.

    2006-06-01

    This paper examines 11 sets of ozone analyses from 7 different data assimilation systems. Two are numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems based on general circulation models (GCMs); the other five use chemistry transport models (CTMs). These systems contain either linearised or detailed ozone chemistry, or no chemistry at all. In most analyses, MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) ozone data are assimilated. Two examples assimilate SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) observations. The analyses are compared to independent ozone observations covering the troposphere, stratosphere and lower mesosphere during the period July to November 2003. Through most of the stratosphere (50 hPa to 1 hPa), biases are usually within ±10% and standard deviations less than 10% compared to ozonesondes and HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). Biases and standard deviations are larger in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere, in the troposphere, the mesosphere, and the Antarctic ozone hole region. In these regions, some analyses do substantially better than others, and this is mostly due to differences in the models. At the tropical tropopause, many analyses show positive biases and excessive structure in the ozone fields, likely due to known deficiencies in assimilated tropical wind fields and a degradation in MIPAS data at these levels. In the southern hemisphere ozone hole, only the analyses which correctly model heterogeneous ozone depletion are able to reproduce the near-complete ozone destruction over the pole. In the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere (above 5 hPa), some ozone photochemistry schemes caused large but easily remedied biases. The diurnal cycle of ozone in the mesosphere is not captured, except by the one system that includes a detailed treatment of mesospheric chemistry. In general, similarly good results are obtained no matter what the assimilation method (Kalman filter, three or

  7. Analysing generator matrices G of similar state but varying minimum determinants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, H.; Razali, M. F.; Rahman, N. A. Abdul

    2016-10-01

    Since Tarokh discovered Space-Time Trellis Code (STTC) in 1998, a considerable effort has been done to improve the performance of the original STTC. One way of achieving enhancement is by focusing on the generator matrix G, which represents the encoder structure for STTC. Until now, researchers have only concentrated on STTCs of different states in analyzing the performance of generator matrix G. No effort has been made on different generator matrices G of similar state. The reason being, it is difficult to produce a wide variety of generator matrices G with diverse minimum determinants. In this paper a number of generator matrices G with minimum determinant of four (4), eight (8) and sixteen (16) of the same state (i.e., 4-PSK) have been successfully produced. The performance of different generator matrices G in term of their bit error rate and signal-to-noise ratio for a Rayleigh fading environment are compared and evaluated. It is found from the MATLAB simulation that at low SNR (<8), the BER of generator matrices G with smaller minimum determinant is comparatively lower than those of higher minimum determinant. However, at high SNR (>14) there is no significant difference between the BER of these generator matrices G.

  8. Accelerated safety analyses - structural analyses Phase I - structural sensitivity evaluation of single- and double-shell waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1994-11-01

    Accelerated Safety Analyses - Phase I (ASA-Phase I) have been conducted to assess the appropriateness of existing tank farm operational controls and/or limits as now stipulated in the Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs) and Operating Specification Documents, and to establish a technical basis for the waste tank operating safety envelope. Structural sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the response of the different waste tank configurations to variations in loading conditions, uncertainties in loading parameters, and uncertainties in material characteristics. Extensive documentation of the sensitivity analyses conducted and results obtained are provided in the detailed ASA-Phase I report, Structural Sensitivity Evaluation of Single- and Double-Shell Waste Tanks for Accelerated Safety Analysis - Phase I. This document provides a summary of the accelerated safety analyses sensitivity evaluations and the resulting findings.

  9. The ASSET intercomparison of ozone analyses: method and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, A. J.; Lahoz, W. A.; Bekki, S.; Bormann, N.; Errera, Q.; Eskes, H. J.; Fonteyn, D.; Jackson, D. R.; Juckes, M. N.; Massart, S.; Peuch, V.-H.; Rharmili, S.; Segers, A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper aims to summarise the current performance of ozone data assimilation (DA) systems, to show where they can be improved, and to quantify their errors. It examines 11 sets of ozone analyses from 7 different DA systems. Two are numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems based on general circulation models (GCMs); the other five use chemistry transport models (CTMs). The systems examined contain either linearised or detailed ozone chemistry, or no chemistry at all. In most analyses, MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) ozone data are assimilated; two assimilate SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) observations instead. Analyses are compared to independent ozone observations covering the troposphere, stratosphere and lower mesosphere during the period July to November 2003. Biases and standard deviations are largest, and show the largest divergence between systems, in the troposphere, in the upper-troposphere/lower-stratosphere, in the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere, and the Antarctic ozone hole region. However, in any particular area, apart from the troposphere, at least one system can be found that agrees well with independent data. In general, none of the differences can be linked to the assimilation technique (Kalman filter, three or four dimensional variational methods, direct inversion) or the system (CTM or NWP system). Where results diverge, a main explanation is the way ozone is modelled. It is important to correctly model transport at the tropical tropopause, to avoid positive biases and excessive structure in the ozone field. In the southern hemisphere ozone hole, only the analyses which correctly model heterogeneous ozone depletion are able to reproduce the near-complete ozone destruction over the pole. In the upper-stratosphere and mesosphere (above 5 hPa), some ozone photochemistry schemes caused large but easily remedied biases. The diurnal cycle of ozone in the

  10. Summary of dynamic analyses of selected NSS buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    This report covers the collapse analyses of floor-over-basement areas. The floors were separated into floor systems and were analyzed 'as built' and for various upgrading configurations through an examination of individual elements. The purpose of the report is two-fold: first, to increase the data base of analyzed 'as built' NSS building floors; and second, to determine the expedient upgrading potentials of NSS building floors. This report summarizes the results of the collapse analyses of the 11 NSS buildings examined in this study. The results of the 'as built' analyses are then grouped with the collapse analyses of 36 NSS buildings to provide a population of 46 buildings (one building was reexamined). The predicted collapse overpressures, examined previously by Wiehle (1974), of the weakest floor element by building and by floor system are presented in the form of histograms and cumulative frequency distributions. The effect of frame type on the collapse strength of the floor elements was examined as in the previous report (Wiehle, 1974). This report also summarizes, for the 11 buildings analyzed herein, the upgrading potentials of floor elements grouped by individual element, floor system and building. Preliminary indications of these collapse analyses indicate that the best way to assess which building and/or element is most upgradable is to look for elements, especially slabs or pan-joist systems, having the greatest span.

  11. Subgroup analyses of clinical effectiveness to support health technology assessments.

    PubMed

    Paget, Marie-Ange; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Fletcher, Christine; Reid, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Subgroup analysis is an integral part of access and reimbursement dossiers, in particular health technology assessment (HTA), and their HTA recommendations are often limited to subpopulations. HTA recommendations for subpopulations are not always clear and without controversies. In this paper, we review several HTA guidelines regarding subgroup analyses. We describe good statistical principles for subgroup analyses of clinical effectiveness to support HTAs and include case examples where HTA recommendations were given to subpopulations only. Unlike regulatory submissions, pharmaceutical statisticians in most companies have had limited involvement in the planning, design and preparation of HTA/payers submissions. We hope to change this by highlighting how pharmaceutical statisticians should contribute to payers' submissions. This includes early engagement in reimbursement strategy discussions to influence the design, analysis and interpretation of phase III randomized clinical trials as well as meta-analyses/network meta-analyses. The focus on this paper is on subgroup analyses relating to clinical effectiveness as we believe this is the first key step of statistical involvement and influence in the preparation of HTA and reimbursement submissions.

  12. Residual Strength Analyses of Riveted Lap-Splice Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to analyze the crack-linkup behavior in riveted-stiffened lap-splice joint panels with small multiple-site damage (MSD) cracks at several adjacent rivet holes. Analyses are based on the STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) code with the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. To account for high constraint around a crack front, the "plane strain core" option in STAGS was used. The importance of modeling rivet flexibility with fastener elements that accurately model load transfer across the joint is discussed. Fastener holes are not modeled but rivet connectivity is accounted for by attaching rivets to the sheet on one side of the cracks that simulated both the rivet diameter and MSD cracks. Residual strength analyses made on 2024-T3 alloy (1.6-mm thick) riveted-lap-splice joints with a lead crack and various size MSD cracks were compared with test data from Boeing Airplane Company. Analyses were conducted for both restrained and unrestrained buckling conditions. Comparison of results from these analyses and results from lap-splice-joint test panels, which were partially restrained against buckling indicate that the test results were bounded by the failure loads predicted by the analyses with restrained and unrestrained conditions.

  13. HLA region excluded by linkage analyses of early onset periodontitis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.; Wang, S.; Lopez, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that HLA genes may influence susceptibility to early-onset periodontitis (EOP). Segregation analyses indicate that EOP may be due to a single major gene. We conducted linkage analyses to assess possible HLA effects on EOP. Fifty families with two or more close relatives affected by EOP were ascertained in Virginia and Chile. A microsatellite polymorphism within the HLA region (at the tumor necrosis factor beta locus) was typed using PCR. Linkage analyses used a donimant model most strongly supported by previous studies. Assuming locus homogeneity, our results exclude a susceptibility gene within 10 cM on either side of our marker locus. This encompasses all of the HLA region. Analyses assuming alternative models gave qualitatively similar results. Allowing for locus heterogeneity, our data still provide no support for HLA-region involvement. However, our data do not statistically exclude (LOD <-2.0) hypotheses of disease-locus heterogeneity, including models where up to half of our families could contain an EOP disease gene located in the HLA region. This is due to the limited power of even our relatively large collection of families and the inherent difficulties of mapping genes for disorders that have complex and heterogeneous etiologies. Additional statistical analyses, recruitment of families, and typing of flanking DNA markers are planned to more conclusively address these issues with respect to the HLA region and other candidate locations in the human genome. Additional results for markers covering most of the human genome will also be presented.

  14. Designing forgiveness interventions: guidance from five meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Recine, Ann C

    2015-06-01

    The Nursing Interventions Classification system includes forgiveness facilitation as part of the research-based taxonomy of nursing interventions. Nurses need practical guidance in finding the type of intervention that works best in the nursing realm. Five meta-analyses of forgiveness interventions were reviewed to illuminate best practice. The only studies included were meta-analyses of forgiveness interventions in which the authors calculated effect size. Forgiveness interventions were shown to be helpful in addressing mental/emotional health. Components of effective interventions include recalling the offense, empathizing with the offender, committing to forgive, and overcoming feelings of unforgiveness. The meta-analyses showed that people receiving forgiveness interventions reported more forgiveness than those who had no intervention. Forgiveness interventions resulted in more hope and less depression and anxiety than no treatment. A process-based intervention is more effective than a shorter cognitive decision-based model. Limitations of the meta-analyses included inconsistency of measures and a lack of consensus on a definition of forgiveness. Notwithstanding these limitations, the meta-analyses offer strong evidence of what contributes to the effectiveness of forgiveness interventions. The implications of the studies are useful for designing evidence-based clinical forgiveness interventions to enhance nursing practice.

  15. Finite element analyses of a linear-accelerator electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, M. E-mail: muniqbal@ihep.ac.cn; Wasy, A.; Islam, G. U.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-02-15

    Thermo-structural analyses of the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPCII) linear-accelerator, electron gun, were performed for the gun operating with the cathode at 1000 °C. The gun was modeled in computer aided three-dimensional interactive application for finite element analyses through ANSYS workbench. This was followed by simulations using the SLAC electron beam trajectory program EGUN for beam optics analyses. The simulations were compared with experimental results of the assembly to verify its beam parameters under the same boundary conditions. Simulation and test results were found to be in good agreement and hence confirmed the design parameters under the defined operating temperature. The gun is operating continuously since commissioning without any thermal induced failures for the BEPCII linear accelerator.

  16. Thermo-Elastic Finite Element Analyses of Annular Nuclear Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Y. D.; Kwon, S. B.; Rho, K. T.; Kim, M. S.; Song, H. J.

    In this study, we tried to examine the pros and cons of the annular type of fuel concerning mainly with the temperatures and stresses of pellet and cladding. The inner and outer gaps between pellet and cladding may play an important role on the temperature distribution and stress distribution of fuel system. Thus, we tested several inner and outer gap cases, and we evaluated the effect of gaps on fuel systems. We conducted thermo-elastic-plastic-creep analyses using an in-house thermo-elastic-plastic-creep finite element program that adopted the 'effective-stress-function' algorithm. Most analyses were conducted until the gaps disappeared; however, certain analyses lasted for 1582 days, after which the fuels were replaced. Further study on the optimal gaps sizes for annular nuclear fuel systems is still required.

  17. Hair analyses: worthless for vitamins, limited for minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hambridge, K.M.

    1982-11-01

    Despite many major and minor problems with interpretation of analytical data, chemical analyses of human hair have some potential value. Extensive research will be necessary to define this value, including correlation of hair concentrations of specific elements with those in other tissues and metabolic pools and definition of normal physiological concentration ranges. Many factors that may compromise the correct interpretation of analytical data require detailed evaluation for each specific element. Meanwhile, hair analyses are of some value in the comparison of different populations and, for example, in public health community surveys of environmental exposure to heavy metals. On an individual basis, their established usefulness is much more restricted and the limitations are especially notable for evaluation of mineral nutritional status. There is a wide gulf between the limited and mainly tentative scientific justification for their use on an individual basis and the current exploitation of multielement chemical analyses of human hair.

  18. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Transformation of Modern Environmental Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Lucy; Yan, Fangzhi; Bach, Stephen; Pihakari, Katianna; Klein, David

    2016-01-01

    Unknown compounds in environmental samples are difficult to identify using standard mass spectrometric methods. Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) has revolutionized how environmental analyses are performed. With its unsurpassed mass accuracy, high resolution and sensitivity, researchers now have a tool for difficult and complex environmental analyses. Two features of FTMS are responsible for changing the face of how complex analyses are accomplished. First is the ability to quickly and with high mass accuracy determine the presence of unknown chemical residues in samples. For years, the field has been limited by mass spectrometric methods that were based on knowing what compounds of interest were. Secondly, by utilizing the high resolution capabilities coupled with the low detection limits of FTMS, analysts also could dilute the sample sufficiently to minimize the ionization changes from varied matrices. PMID:26784175

  19. Role of optimization in interdisciplinary analyses of naval structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, S. K.; Hurwitz, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The need for numerical design optimization of naval structures is discussed. The complexity of problems that arise due to the significant roles played by three major disciplines, i.e., structural mechanics, acoustics, and hydrodynamics are discussed. A major computer software effort that has recently begun at the David W. Taylor Naval Ship R&D Center to accommodate large multidisciplinary analyses is also described. In addition to primarily facilitating, via the use of data bases, interdisciplinary analyses for predicting the response of the Navy's ships and related structures, this software effort is expected to provide the analyst with a convenient numerical workbench for performing large numbers of analyses that may be necessary for optimizing the design performance. Finally, an example is included that investigates several aspects of optimizing a typical naval structure from the viewpoints of strength, hydrodynamic form, and acoustic characteristics.

  20. Scenario evolution: Interaction between event tree construction and numerical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, G.E.; Barnard, R.W.; Dockery, H.A.; Dunn, E.; MacIntyre, A.T.

    1990-12-31

    Construction of well-posed scenarios for the range of conditions possible at any proposed repository site is a critical first step to assessing total system performance. Event tree construction is the method that is being used to develop potential failure scenarios for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. An event tree begins with an initial event or condition. Subsequent events are listed in a sequence, leading eventually to release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. Ensuring the validity of the scenarios requires iteration between problems constructed using scenarios contained in the event tree sequence, experimental results, and numerical analyses. Details not adequately captured within the tree initially may become more apparent as a result of analyses. To illustrate this process, the authors discuss the iterations used to develop numerical analyses for PACE-90 (Performance Assessment Calculational Exercises) using basaltic igneous activity and human-intrusion event trees.

  1. Hair analyses: worthless for vitamins, limited for minerals.

    PubMed

    Hambidge, K M

    1982-11-01

    Despite many major and minor problems with interpretation of analytical data, chemical analyses of human hair have some potential value. Extensive research will be necessary to define this value, including correlation of hair concentrations of specific elements with those in other tissues and metabolic pools and definition of normal physiological concentration ranges. Many factors that may compromise the correct interpretation of analytical data require detailed evaluation for each specific element. Meanwhile, hair analyses are of some value in the comparison of different populations and, for example, in public health community surveys of environmental exposure to heavy metals. On an individual basis, their established usefulness is much more restricted and the limitations are especially notable for evaluation of mineral nutritional status. There is a wide gulf between the limited and mainly tentative scientific justification for their use on an individual basis and the current exploitation of multielement chemical analyses of human hair.

  2. DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSES OF PEDIATRIC FOOD REFUSAL AND ACCEPTANCE

    PubMed Central

    Borrero, Carrie S.W; Woods, Julia N; Borrero, John C; Masler, Elizabeth A; Lesser, Aaron D

    2010-01-01

    Functional analyses of inappropriate mealtime behavior typically include conditions to determine if the contingent delivery of attention, tangible items, or escape reinforce food refusal. In the current investigation, descriptive analyses were conducted for 25 children who had been admitted to a program for the assessment and treatment of food refusal to determine if the consequences commonly delivered during functional analyses were observed during parent-conducted meals. The conditional probabilities for the delivery of attention, tangible items, and escape following food refusal and acceptance were compared to the unconditional probabilities of each event. Results showed that attention and escape most frequently followed refusal and differed depending on the topography of refusal. Implications for further evaluations of food refusal using similar methods are discussed. PMID:20808496

  3. A Review of Graphical Approaches to Common Statistical Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Coman, Emil N.; Suggs, L. Suzanne; Coman, Maria A.; Iordache, Eugen; Fifield, Judith

    2015-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive review of simple and advanced statistical analyses using an intuitive visual approach explicitly modeling Latent Variables (LV). This method can better illuminate what is assumed in each analytical method and what is actually estimated, by translating the causal relationships embedded in the graphical models in equation form. We recommend the graphical display rooted in the century old path analysis, that details all parameters of each statistical model, and suggest labeling that clarifies what is given vs. what is estimated. We link in the process classical and modern analyses under the encompassing broader umbrella of Generalized Latent Variable Modeling, and demonstrate that LVs are omnipresent in all statistical approaches, yet until directly ‘seeing’ them in visual graphical displays, they are unnecessarily overlooked. The advantages of directly modeling LVs are shown with examples of analyses from the ActiveS intervention designed to increase physical activity. PMID:26688834

  4. Statistical analyses in the physiology of exercise and kinanthropometry.

    PubMed

    Winter, E M; Eston, R G; Lamb, K L

    2001-10-01

    Research into the physiology of exercise and kinanthropometry is intended to improve our understanding of how the body responds and adapts to exercise. If such studies are to be meaningful, they have to be well designed and analysed. Advances in personal computing have made available statistical analyses that were previously the preserve of elaborate mainframe systems and have increased opportunities for investigation. However, the ease with which analyses can be performed can mask underlying philosophical and epistemological shortcomings. The aim of this review is to examine the use of four techniques that are especially relevant to physiological studies: (1) bivariate correlation and linear and non-linear regression, (2) multiple regression, (3) repeated-measures analysis of variance and (4) multi-level modelling. The importance of adhering to underlying statistical assumptions is emphasized and ways to accommodate violations of these assumptions are identified.

  5. Application of nonlinear tyre models to analyse shimmy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Shenhai; Besselink, I. J. M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on the application of different tyre models to analyse the shimmy phenomenon. Tyre models with the Magic Formula and a non-constant relaxation length are introduced. The energy flow method is applied to compare these tyre models. A trailing wheel suspension is used to analyse shimmy stability and to evaluate the differences between tyre models. Linearisation and nonlinear techniques, including bifurcation analysis, are applied to analyse this system. Extending the suspension model with lateral flexibility and structural damping reveals more information on shimmy stability. Although the nonlinear tyre models do not change the stability of equilibria, they determine the magnitude of the oscillation. It is concluded that the non-constant relaxation length should be included in the shimmy analysis for more accurate results at large amplitude.

  6. Life assessment of structural components using inelastic finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    1993-01-01

    The need for enhanced and improved performance of structural components subject to severe cyclic thermal/mechanical loadings, such as in the aerospace industry, requires development of appropriate solution technologies involving time-dependent inelastic analyses. Such analyses are mandatory to predict local stress-strain response and to assess more accurately the cyclic life time of structural components. The NASA-Lewis Research Center is cognizant of this need. As a result of concerted efforts at Lewis during the last few years, several such finite element solution technologies (in conjunction with the finite element program MARC) were developed and successfully applied to numerous uniaxial and multiaxial problems. These solution technologies, although developed for use with MARC program, are general in nature and can easily be extended for adaptation with other finite element programs such as ABAQUS, ANSYS, etc. The description and results obtained from two such inelastic finite element solution technologies are presented. The first employs a classical (non-unified) creep-plasticity model. An application of this technology is presented for a hypersonic inlet cowl-lip problem. The second of these technologies uses a unified creep-plasticity model put forth by Freed. The structural component for which this finite element solution technology is illustrated, is a cylindrical rocket engine thrust chamber. The advantages of employing a viscoplastic model for nonlinear time-dependent structural analyses are demonstrated. The life analyses for cowl-lip and cylindrical thrust chambers are presented. These analyses are conducted by using the stress-strain response of these components obtained from the corresponding finite element analyses.

  7. Life assessment of structural components using inelastic finite element analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    1993-10-01

    The need for enhanced and improved performance of structural components subject to severe cyclic thermal/mechanical loadings, such as in the aerospace industry, requires development of appropriate solution technologies involving time-dependent inelastic analyses. Such analyses are mandatory to predict local stress-strain response and to assess more accurately the cyclic life time of structural components. The NASA-Lewis Research Center is cognizant of this need. As a result of concerted efforts at Lewis during the last few years, several such finite element solution technologies (in conjunction with the finite element program MARC) were developed and successfully applied to numerous uniaxial and multiaxial problems. These solution technologies, although developed for use with MARC program, are general in nature and can easily be extended for adaptation with other finite element programs such as ABAQUS, ANSYS, etc. The description and results obtained from two such inelastic finite element solution technologies are presented. The first employs a classical (non-unified) creep-plasticity model. An application of this technology is presented for a hypersonic inlet cowl-lip problem. The second of these technologies uses a unified creep-plasticity model put forth by Freed. The structural component for which this finite element solution technology is illustrated, is a cylindrical rocket engine thrust chamber. The advantages of employing a viscoplastic model for nonlinear time-dependent structural analyses are demonstrated. The life analyses for cowl-lip and cylindrical thrust chambers are presented. These analyses are conducted by using the stress-strain response of these components obtained from the corresponding finite element analyses.

  8. Iterative deconvolution of x ray and optical SNR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nisenson, Peter; Standley, Clive; Hughes, John

    1992-01-01

    Blind Iterative Deconvolution (BID) is a technique which was originally developed to correct the degrading effects of atmospheric turbulence on astronomical images from single short exposure, high signal-to-noise-ratio frames. At the Center for Astro physics, we have implemented a version of BID following the general approach of Ayers and Dainty (1988), but extending the technique to use Wiener filtering, and developed it for application to high energy images from Einstein and ROSAT. In the optical, the point spread function (PSF) that degrades the images is due to a combination of telescope and atmospheric aberrations. At high energies, the degrading function is the instrument response function, which is known to be time and energy level unstable. In both cases, the PSF is poorly known, so BID can be used to extract the PSF from the image and then deconvolve the blurred image to produce a sharpened image. Other aspects of this technique are discussed.

  9. Bayesian Localization and Mapping Using GNSS SNR Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    2013. [7] ——, “Shadow matching: Improving smartphone GNSS positioning in urban environments,” in Proc. of the China Satellite Navigation Conference...signals are blocked by buildings, the remaining unblocked GNSS satellites are typically in a poor geometry for localization (nearly collinear along the...localization. The second approach which may be more suitable for smartphone applications assumes that network connectivity is available and thus a

  10. The X-ray evolution of SNR 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, David N.; Frank, Kari A.; Park, Sangwook; McCray, Richard; Zhekov, Svetozar

    2016-06-01

    Due to its age and close proximity, the remnant of SN 1987A is the only supernova remnant in which we can study the early developmental stages in detail, providing insight into stellar evolution, the mechanisms of the supernova explosion, and the transition from supernova to supernova remnant as the debris begins to interact with the surrounding circumstellar medium (CSM). We present the latest results from 16 years of Chandra ACIS observations of SN 1987A, now covering 4600-10600 days after the supernova. At approximately day 7500, the east-west asymmetry of the ring began to reverse, while the soft X-ray light curve switched from an exponential increase to a linear brightening. Since day 9700 the soft X-ray light curve has flattened and remained approximately constant at about 8×10^(12) ergs/cm^2/s, evidence that the blast wave has now left the dense material of the known equatorial ring and is beginning to probe the unknown territory beyond.

  11. Iterative categorization (IC): a systematic technique for analysing qualitative data.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    The processes of analysing qualitative data, particularly the stage between coding and publication, are often vague and/or poorly explained within addiction science and research more broadly. A simple but rigorous and transparent technique for analysing qualitative textual data, developed within the field of addiction, is described. The technique, iterative categorization (IC), is suitable for use with inductive and deductive codes and can support a range of common analytical approaches, e.g. thematic analysis, Framework, constant comparison, analytical induction, content analysis, conversational analysis, discourse analysis, interpretative phenomenological analysis and narrative analysis. Once the data have been coded, the only software required is a standard word processing package. Worked examples are provided.

  12. SORA: computer storage or retrieval of radionuclide analyses data

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, D. D.

    1981-02-01

    The need for information on the fate and transport of radionuclides placed in shallow-land disposal sites emphasizes the necessity for an orderly, objective means for storing and retrieving results of radiochemical analyses of samples collected on or near such locations. A computer program (SORA) was developed to aid in organizing such results and to ensure their availability for computer processing. The program documentation provides a format that specifies how results from radiochemical analyses of environmental samples may be recorded. It is also a guide to the listing of results generated by the program.

  13. Covariate selection in pharmacometric analyses: a review of methods

    PubMed Central

    Hutmacher, Matthew M; Kowalski, Kenneth G

    2015-01-01

    Covariate selection is an activity routinely performed during pharmacometric analysis. Many are familiar with the stepwise procedures, but perhaps not as many are familiar with some of the issues associated with such methods. Recently, attention has focused on selection procedures that do not suffer from these issues and maintain good predictive properties. In this review, we endeavour to put the main variable selection procedures into a framework that facilitates comparison. We highlight some issues that are unique to pharmacometric analyses and provide some thoughts and strategies for pharmacometricians to consider when planning future analyses. PMID:24962797

  14. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q.; Cizek, J.

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  15. Applications of Stochastic Analyses for Collaborative Learning and Cognitive Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-3421 Log: H 07-000947 April 2007 Applications of Stochastic Analyses for...Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22311-1882 • (703) 845-2000. This material may be reproduced by or for the U.S. Government. I N S T I T U T E F O R D... E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-3421 Applications of Stochastic Analyses for Collaborative Learning and Cognitive Assessment Amy Soller

  16. Using Microsoft Office Excel 2007 to conduct generalized matching analyses.

    PubMed

    Reed, Derek D

    2009-01-01

    The generalized matching equation is a robust and empirically supported means of analyzing relations between reinforcement and behavior. Unfortunately, no simple task analysis is available to behavior analysts interested in using the matching equation to evaluate data in clinical or applied settings. This technical article presents a task analysis for the use of Microsoft Excel to analyze and plot the generalized matching equation. Using a data-based case example and a step-by-step guide for completing the analysis, these instructions are intended to promote the use of quantitative analyses by researchers with little to no experience in quantitative analyses or the matching law.

  17. Models Extracted from Text for System-Software Safety Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation describes extraction and integration of requirements information and safety information in visualizations to support early review of completeness, correctness, and consistency of lengthy and diverse system safety analyses. Software tools have been developed and extended to perform the following tasks: 1) extract model parts and safety information from text in interface requirements documents, failure modes and effects analyses and hazard reports; 2) map and integrate the information to develop system architecture models and visualizations for safety analysts; and 3) provide model output to support virtual system integration testing. This presentation illustrates the methods and products with a rocket motor initiation case.

  18. Publication bias in dermatology systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Atakpo, Paul; Vassar, Matt

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in dermatology provide high-level evidence for clinicians and policy makers that influence clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. One methodological problem with systematic reviews is the under representation of unpublished studies. This problem is due in part to publication bias. Omission of statistically non-significant data from meta-analyses may result in overestimation of treatment effect sizes which may lead to clinical consequences. Our goal was to assess whether systematic reviewers in dermatology evaluate and report publication bias. Further, we wanted to conduct our own evaluation of publication bias on meta-analyses that failed to do so. Our study considered systematic reviews and meta-analyses from ten dermatology journals from 2006 to 2016. A PubMed search was conducted, and all full-text articles that met our inclusion criteria were retrieved and coded by the primary author. 293 articles were included in our analysis. Additionally, we formally evaluated publication bias in meta-analyses that failed to do so using trim and fill and cumulative meta-analysis by precision methods. Publication bias was mentioned in 107 articles (36.5%) and was formally evaluated in 64 articles (21.8%). Visual inspection of a funnel plot was the most common method of evaluating publication bias. Publication bias was present in 45 articles (15.3%), not present in 57 articles (19.5%) and not determined in 191 articles (65.2%). Using the trim and fill method, 7 meta-analyses (33.33%) showed evidence of publication bias. Although the trim and fill method only found evidence of publication bias in 7 meta-analyses, the cumulative meta-analysis by precision method found evidence of publication bias in 15 meta-analyses (71.4%). Many of the reviews in our study did not mention or evaluate publication bias. Further, of the 42 articles that stated following PRISMA reporting guidelines, 19 (45.2%) evaluated for publication bias. In

  19. Computational Aeroelastic Analyses of a Low-Boom Supersonic Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Connolly, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Commercial Supersonic Technology (CST) Aeroservoelasticity (ASE) element is provided with a focus on recent computational aeroelastic analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed-Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. The overview includes details of the computational models developed to date including a linear finite element model (FEM), linear unsteady aerodynamic models, unstructured CFD grids, and CFD-based aeroelastic analyses. In addition, a summary of the work involving the development of aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) and the development of an aero-propulso-servo-elastic (APSE) model is provided.

  20. [The maintenance of automatic analysers and associated documentation].

    PubMed

    Adjidé, V; Fournier, P; Vassault, A

    2010-12-01

    The maintenance of automatic analysers and associated documentation taking part in the requirements of the ISO 15189 Standard and the French regulation as well have to be defined in the laboratory policy. The management of the periodic maintenance and documentation shall be implemented and fulfilled. The organisation of corrective maintenance has to be managed to avoid interruption of the task of the laboratory. The different recommendations concern the identification of materials including automatic analysers, the environmental conditions to take into account, the documentation provided by the manufacturer and documents prepared by the laboratory including procedures for maintenance.

  1. Analysing Collisions Using Minkowski Diagrams in Momentum Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokor, Nandor

    2011-01-01

    Momentum space and Minkowski diagrams are powerful tools for interpreting and analysing relativistic collisions in one or two spatial dimensions. All relevant quantities that characterize a collision, including the mass, velocity, momentum and energy of the interacting particles, both before and after collision, can be directly seen from a single…

  2. Analysing Harmonic Motions with an iPhone's Magnetometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavuz, Ahmet; Temiz, Burak Kagan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an experiment for analysing harmonic motion using an iPhone's (or iPad's) magnetometer. This experiment consists of the detection of magnetic field variations obtained from an iPhone's magnetometer sensor. A graph of harmonic motion is directly displayed on the iPhone's screen using the "Sensor Kinetics"…

  3. Consumer Brand Choice: Individual and Group Analyses of Demand Elasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira-Castro, Jorge M.; Foxall, Gordon R.; Schrezenmaier, Teresa C.

    2006-01-01

    Following the behavior-analytic tradition of analyzing individual behavior, the present research investigated demand elasticity of individual consumers purchasing supermarket products, and compared individual and group analyses of elasticity. Panel data from 80 UK consumers purchasing 9 product categories (i.e., baked beans, biscuits, breakfast…

  4. Expertise of Team Leaders in Analysing Team Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupprecht, Maria; Strasser, Josef; Gruber, Hans; Harteis, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Team leaders are expected to adequately analyse team conflicts. Both content and analytical depth of cognitive processes determine team leaders' performance and are assumed to differ with level of expertise. A study is reported in which team leaders at four different levels of expertise (novices, semi-experts, experts, mediators) were compared in…

  5. Matrix Summaries Improve Research Reports: Secondary Analyses Using Published Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zientek, Linda Reichwein; Thompson, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Correlation matrices and standard deviations are the building blocks of many of the commonly conducted analyses in published research, and AERA and APA reporting standards recommend their inclusion when reporting research results. The authors argue that the inclusion of correlation/covariance matrices, standard deviations, and means can enhance…

  6. A Method to Improve Learning Analysing Communication in Team Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermejo, Miren; Sanchez, Ana; Gutierrez, Julian; Perez, Tomas A.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years learning how to work in teams has become a common subject in higher education. Communication between student team members can be monitored using a bulletin board system, and hence, analyse individual and group role development. The composition and distribution of roles in a team are relevant characteristics that will considerably…

  7. 76 FR 63913 - Commercial Building Workforce Job/Task Analyses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Commercial Building Workforce Job/Task Analyses AGENCY... and utility ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs and private sector commercial building... INFORMATION CONTACT: Sonal Kemkar, Building Technologies Program, Mailstop EE-2J, Office of Energy...

  8. Confounded Statistical Analyses Hinder Interpretation of the NELP Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Scott G.; Luo, Serena Wenshu

    2010-01-01

    The National Early Literacy Panel (2008) report identified early predictors of reading achievement as good targets for instruction, and many of those skills are related to decoding. In this article, the authors suggest that the developmental trajectories of rapidly developing skills pose problems for traditional statistical analyses. Rapidly…

  9. DEMOGRAPHY AND VIABILITY ANALYSES OF A DIAMONDBACK TERRAPIN POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diamondback terrapin Malaclemys terrapin is a long-lived species with special management requirements, but quantitative analyses to support management are lacking. I analyzed mark-recapture data and constructed an age-classified matrix population model to determine the status...

  10. Rainbow: A Framework for Analysing Computer-Mediated Pedagogical Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; Andriessen, Jerry; Lund, Kristine; van Amelsvoort, Marie; Quignard, Matthieu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework for analysing when and how students engage in a specific form of interactive knowledge elaboration in CSCL environments: broadening and deepening understanding of a space of debate. The framework is termed "Rainbow," as it comprises seven principal analytical categories, to each of which a colour is assigned,…

  11. Advantages of an Improved Rhesus Macaque Genome for Evolutionary Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Gradnigo, Julien S.; Majumdar, Abhishek; Norgren, Robert B.; Moriyama, Etsuko N.

    2016-01-01

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is widely used in molecular evolutionary analyses, particularly to identify genes under adaptive or unique evolution in the human lineage. For such studies, it is necessary to align nucleotide sequences of homologous protein-coding genes among multiple species. The validity of these analyses is dependent on high quality genomic data. However, for most mammalian species (other than humans and mice), only draft genomes are available. There has been concern that some results obtained from evolutionary analyses using draft genomes may not be correct. The rhesus macaque provides a unique opportunity to determine whether an improved genome (MacaM) yields better results than a draft genome (rheMac2) for evolutionary studies. We compared protein-coding genes annotated in the rheMac2 and MacaM genomes with their human orthologs. We found many genes annotated in rheMac2 had apparently spurious sequences not present in genes derived from MacaM. The rheMac2 annotations also appeared to inflate a frequently used evolutionary index, ω (the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates). Genes with these spurious sequences must be filtered out from evolutionary analyses to obtain correct results. With the MacaM genome, improved sequence information means many more genes can be examined for indications of selection. These results indicate how upgrading genomes from draft status to a higher level of quality can improve interpretation of evolutionary patterns. PMID:27911958

  12. Analyser-based phase contrast image reconstruction using geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, M J; Pavlov, K M; Siu, K K W; Menk, R H; Tromba, G; Lewis, R A

    2007-07-21

    Analyser-based phase contrast imaging can provide radiographs of exceptional contrast at high resolution (<100 microm), whilst quantitative phase and attenuation information can be extracted using just two images when the approximations of geometrical optics are satisfied. Analytical phase retrieval can be performed by fitting the analyser rocking curve with a symmetric Pearson type VII function. The Pearson VII function provided at least a 10% better fit to experimentally measured rocking curves than linear or Gaussian functions. A test phantom, a hollow nylon cylinder, was imaged at 20 keV using a Si(1 1 1) analyser at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility. Our phase retrieval method yielded a more accurate object reconstruction than methods based on a linear fit to the rocking curve. Where reconstructions failed to map expected values, calculations of the Takagi number permitted distinction between the violation of the geometrical optics conditions and the failure of curve fitting procedures. The need for synchronized object/detector translation stages was removed by using a large, divergent beam and imaging the object in segments. Our image acquisition and reconstruction procedure enables quantitative phase retrieval for systems with a divergent source and accounts for imperfections in the analyser.

  13. Astronomy sortie mission definition study. Addendum: Follow-on analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Results of design analyses, trade studies, and planning data of the Astronomy Sortie Mission Definition Study are presented. An in-depth analysis of UV instruments, nondeployed solar payload, and on-orbit access is presented. Planning data are considered, including the cost and schedules associated with the astronomy instruments and/or support hardware. Costs are presented in a parametric fashion.

  14. 36 CFR 228.102 - Leasing analyses and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE MINERALS Oil and Gas Resources Leasing § 228.102 Leasing analyses and decisions. (a) Compliance...) Lands designated by statute as wilderness study areas, unless oil and gas leasing is specifically... conditions of the standard oil and gas lease form (including an explanation of the typical standards...

  15. "Analysing Genre: Language Use in Professional Settings." A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Helen

    1995-01-01

    "Analysing Genre," by Vijay K. Bhatia, is a timely addition to the literature on genre analysis in English for specific purposes. It is divided into three parts: the first provides theoretical background; the second explains how genre analysis works in different academic and professional settings; and the third exemplifies the…

  16. How to Critically Read Ecological Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lortie, Christopher J.; Stewart, Gavin; Rothstein, Hannah; Lau, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analysis offers ecologists a powerful tool for knowledge synthesis. Albeit a form of review, it also shares many similarities with primary empirical research. Consequently, critical reading of meta-analyses incorporates criteria from both sets of approaches particularly because ecology is a discipline that embraces heterogeneity and broad…

  17. Developing Critical Thinking about Reporting of Bayesian Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullenayegum, Eleanor M.; Guo, Qing; Hopkins, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Graduate students in the health sciences who hope to become independent researchers must be able to write up their results at a standard suitable for submission to peer-reviewed journals. Bayesian analyses are still rare in the medical literature, and students are often unclear on what should be included in a manuscript. Whilst there are published…

  18. Progressing from Initially Ambiguous Functional Analyses: Three Case Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Toussaint, Karen A.; Kodak, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    Most often functional analyses are initiated using a standard set of test conditions, similar to those described by Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, and Richman [Iwata, B. A., Dorsey, M. F., Slifer, K. J., Bauman, K. E., & Richman, G. S. (1994). "Toward a functional analysis of self-injury." "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 27", 197-209…

  19. Note on the chromatographic analyses of marine polyunsaturated fatty acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, D.M.; Quinn, J.G.

    1977-01-01

    Gas-liquid chromatography was used to study the effects of saponification/methylation and thin-layer chromatographic isolation on the analyses of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using selected procedures, the qualitative and quantitative distribution of these acids in marine organisms can be determined with a high degree of accuracy. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Exploration of Heterogeneity in Distributed Research Network Drug Safety Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Richard A.; Zeng, Peng; Ryan, Patrick; Gao, Juan; Sonawane, Kalyani; Teeter, Benjamin; Westrich, Kimberly; Dubois, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Distributed data networks representing large diverse populations are an expanding focus of drug safety research. However, interpreting results is difficult when treatment effect estimates vary across datasets (i.e., heterogeneity). In a previous study, risk estimates were generated for selected drugs and potential adverse outcomes. Analyses were…