Science.gov

Sample records for analysis acceptance criteria

  1. Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1990-01-30

    The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

  2. LANL measurements verification acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of SNM diversion/theft is a major concern to organizations charged with control of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Verification measurements are used to aid in the detection of SNM losses. The acceptance/rejection criteria for verification measurements are dependent on the facility-specific processes, the knowledge of the measured item, and the measurement technique applied. This paper will discuss some of the LANL measurement control steps and criteria applied for the acceptance of a verification measurement. The process involves interaction among the facility operations personnel, the subject matter experts of a specific instrument/technique, the process knowledge on the matrix of the measured item, and the measurement-specific precision and accuracy values. By providing an introduction to a site-specific application of measurement verification acceptance criteria, safeguards, material custodians, and SNM measurement professionals are assisted in understanding the acceptance/rejection process for measurements and their contribution of the process to the detection of SNM diversion.

  3. Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ellefson, M.D.

    1998-07-01

    Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

  4. Characterization of Tank 23H Supernate Per Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria Analysis Requirements-2005

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L

    2005-06-01

    Variable depth Tank 23H samples (22-inch sample [HTF-014] and 185-inch sample [HTF-013]) were pulled from Tank 23H in February, 2005 for characterization. The characterization of the Tank 23H low activity waste is part of the overall liquid waste processing activities. This characterization examined the species identified in the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the transfer of waste into the Salt-Feed Tank (SFT). The samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and analyzed. Apart from radium-226 with an average measured detection limit of < 2.64E+03 pCi/mL, which is about the same order of magnitude as the WAC limit (< 8.73E+03 pCi/mL), none of the species analyzed was found to approach the limits provided in the Saltstone WAC. The concentration of most of the species analyzed for the Tank 23H samples were 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits. The achievable detection limits for a number of the analytes were several orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits, but one or two orders of magnitude higher than the requested detection limits. Analytes which fell into this category included plutonium-241, europium-154/155, antimony-125, tin-126, ruthenium/rhodium-106, selenium-79, nickel-59/63, ammonium ion, copper, total nickel, manganese and total organic carbon.

  5. Characterization of Tank 23H Supernate Per Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria Analysis Requirements -2005

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L

    2005-05-05

    Variable depth Tank 23H samples (22-inch sample [HTF-014] and 185-inch sample [HTF-013]) were pulled from Tank 23H in February, 2005 for characterization. The characterization of the Tank 23H low activity waste is part of the overall liquid waste processing activities. This characterization examined the species identified in the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the transfer of waste into the Salt-Feed Tank (SFT). The samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and analyzed. Apart from radium-226 with an average measured detection limit of < 2.64E+03 pCi/mL, which is about the same order of magnitude as the WAC limit (< 8.73E+03 pCi/mL), none of the species analyzed was found to approach the limits provided in the Saltstone WAC. The concentration of most of the species analyzed for the Tank 23H samples were 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits. The achievable detection limits for a number of the analytes were several orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits, but one or two orders of magnitude higher than the requested detection limits. Analytes which fell into this category included plutonium-241, europium-154/155, antimony-125, tin-126, ruthenium/rhodium-106, selenium-79, nickel-59/63, ammonium ion, copper, total nickel, manganese and total organic carbon.

  6. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.

    1999-12-16

    This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements.

  7. Hanford Site liquid waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    LUECK, K.J.

    1999-09-11

    This document provides the waste acceptance criteria for liquid waste managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH). These waste acceptance criteria address the various requirements to operate a facility in compliance with applicable environmental, safety, and operational requirements. This document also addresses the sitewide miscellaneous streams program.

  8. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  9. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  10. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-17

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

  11. Acceptance criteria for method equivalency assessments.

    PubMed

    Chatfield, Marion J; Borman, Phil J

    2009-12-15

    Quality by design (ICH-Topic Q8) requires that process control strategy requirements are met and maintained. The challenging task of setting appropriate acceptance criteria for assessment of method equivalence is a critical component of satisfying these requirements. The use of these criteria will support changes made to methods across the product lifecycle. A method equivalence assessment is required when a change is made to a method which may pose a risk to its ability to monitor the quality of the process. Establishing appropriate acceptance criteria are a vital, but not clearly understood, prerequisite to deciding the appropriate design/sample size of the equivalency study. A number of approaches are proposed in the literature for setting acceptance criteria for equivalence which address different purposes. This perspective discusses those purposes and then provides more details on setting acceptance criteria based on patient and producer risk, e.g., tolerance interval approach and the consideration of method or process capability. Applying these to a drug substance assay method for batch release illustrates that, for the equivalence assessment to be meaningful, a clear understanding and appraisal of the control requirements of the method is needed. Rather than a single exact algorithm, the analyst's judgment on a number of aspects is required in deciding the appropriate acceptance criteria.

  12. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  13. Reactor tank UT acceptance criteria. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1990-01-30

    The SRS reactor tanks are constructed of type 304 stainless steel, with 0.5 inch thick walls. An ultrasonic (UT) in-service inspection program has been developed for examination of these tanks, in accordance with the ISI Plan for the Savannah River Production Reactors Process Water System (DPSTM-88-100-1). Prior to initiation of these inspections, criteria for the disposition of any indications that might be found are required. A working group has been formed to review available information on the SRS reactor tanks and develop acceptance criteria. This working group includes nationally recognized experts in the nuclear industry. The working group has met three times and produced three documents describing the proposed acceptance criteria, the technical basis for the criteria and a proposed initial sampling plan. This report transmits these three documents, which were prepared in accordance with the technical task plan and quality assurance plan for this task, task 88-001-A- 1. In addition, this report summarizes the acceptance criteria and proposed sampling plan, and provides further interpretation of the intent of these three documents where necessary.

  14. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-09-03

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  15. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  16. Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenitis, J M

    2006-12-12

    The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

  17. STOL ride quality criteria - Passenger acceptance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Kuhlthau, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    The ability to mathematically model human reaction to variables involved in transportation systems offers a very desirable tool both for the prediction of passenger acceptance of proposed systems, and for establishing acceptance criteria for the system designer. As a first step in the development of a general model for STOL systems, a mathematical formulation is presented which accepts as inputs nine variables felt to be important in flight under STOL-type conditions and presents an index of human response as the output. The variables used are three linear motions, three angular motions, pressure, temperature and noise level. The results are used to establish specifications for stability augmentation systems to improve the ride quality of existing STOL aircraft.

  18. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-28

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  19. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: • DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste • DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) • DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) • U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  20. Acceptance criteria for urban dispersion model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Steven; Chang, Joseph

    2012-05-01

    The authors suggested acceptance criteria for rural dispersion models' performance measures in this journal in 2004. The current paper suggests modified values of acceptance criteria for urban applications and tests them with tracer data from four urban field experiments. For the arc-maximum concentrations, the fractional bias should have a magnitude <0.67 (i.e., the relative mean bias is less than a factor of 2); the normalized mean-square error should be <6 (i.e., the random scatter is less than about 2.4 times the mean); and the fraction of predictions that are within a factor of two of the observations (FAC2) should be >0.3. For all data paired in space, for which a threshold concentration must always be defined, the normalized absolute difference should be <0.50, when the threshold is three times the instrument's limit of quantification (LOQ). An overall criterion is then applied that the total set of acceptance criteria should be satisfied in at least half of the field experiments. These acceptance criteria are applied to evaluations of the US Department of Defense's Joint Effects Model (JEM) with tracer data from US urban field experiments in Salt Lake City (U2000), Oklahoma City (JU2003), and Manhattan (MSG05 and MID05). JEM includes the SCIPUFF dispersion model with the urban canopy option and the urban dispersion model (UDM) option. In each set of evaluations, three or four likely options are tested for meteorological inputs (e.g., a local building top wind speed, the closest National Weather Service airport observations, or outputs from numerical weather prediction models). It is found that, due to large natural variability in the urban data, there is not a large difference between the performance measures for the two model options and the three or four meteorological input options. The more detailed UDM and the state-of-the-art numerical weather models do provide a slight improvement over the other options. The proposed urban dispersion model acceptance

  1. Natural hazard losses and acceptable risk criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleghy Rad, M.; Evans, S. G.; Nadim, F.; Lacasse, S.

    2009-12-01

    The criteria for the definition of acceptable risk to the lives of members of a society (commonly called societal risk) resulting from exposure to natural hazards are based in most countries on the frequency and characteristics of industrial accidents, e.g., nuclear power plants. However, historical records indicate that the frequency of natural hazard events is much higher than those involved in industrial hazards and their consequences are far greater. We find that the risk from natural hazards is unacceptable in the current risk criteria framework, i.e., they are an unacceptable risk with respect to the acceptable risk criteria based on the frequency and consequences of industrial accidents. According to a definition of risk, there are two main components; first, the probability of occurrence of the hazard and second, the consequence of the hazard. The occurrence of industrial accident events (hazard) can be controlled to a large extent in contrast to that of natural hazards. However, we can control natural hazard risk, in some cases by engineering solutions to control hazard and by reducing the consequences of the events by mitigating, risk management, warning and monitoring techniques. With reference to natural hazards reducing risk is mainly effected by reducing consequences. The FN-curve is a tool commonly used in societal risk assessment. It is built on a series of frequency-loss data associated with a particular process in a given period of time. It is also used to set acceptable risk criteria for countries or sub-national jurisdictions, by defining slopes and intercepts for plots of a particular (or group of) processes. The intercept of the acceptable risk curve is usually arbitrarily defined in the order of 10-7-10-1 deaths per year, and the slope criteria is based on an adopted aversion factor of the society to accident and disaster losses.The imposed slope criteria is usually between -1 and -2 whereas the slope of FN-curves based on real natural

  2. Development of quantitative risk acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmeyer, J. M.; Okrent, D.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the major considerations for effective management of risk are discussed, with particular emphasis on risks due to nuclear power plant operations. Although there are impacts associated with the rest of the fuel cycle, they are not addressed here. Several previously published proposals for quantitative risk criteria are reviewed. They range from a simple acceptance criterion on individual risk of death to a quantitative risk management framework. The final section discussed some of the problems in the establishment of a framework for the quantitative management of risk.

  3. Steam generator tube integrity flaw acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cochet, B.

    1997-02-01

    The author discusses the establishment of a flaw acceptance criteria with respect to flaws in steam generator tubing. The problem is complicated because different countries take different approaches to the problem. The objectives in general are grouped in three broad areas: to avoid the unscheduled shutdown of the reactor during normal operation; to avoid tube bursts; to avoid excessive leak rates in the event of an accidental overpressure event. For each degradation mechanism in the tubes it is necessary to know answers to an array of questions, including: how well does NDT testing perform against this problem; how rapidly does such degradation develop; how well is this degradation mechanism understood. Based on the above information it is then possible to come up with a policy to look at flaw acceptance. Part of this criteria is a schedule for the frequency of in-service inspection and also a policy for when to plug flawed tubes. The author goes into a broad discussion of each of these points in his paper.

  4. 44 CFR 362.3 - Criteria for determining acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... acceptance. 362.3 Section 362.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS CRITERIA FOR ACCEPTANCE OF GIFTS, BEQUESTS, OR SERVICES § 362.3 Criteria for determining acceptance. The following criteria shall be applied whenever a gift of property...

  5. Anticipating Potential Waste Acceptance Criteria for Defense Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rechard, R.P.; Lord, M.E.; Stockman, C.T.; McCurley, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and disposal of DOE owned defense spent nuclear fuel and high level waste (DSNF/DHLW). A desirable option, direct disposal of the waste in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, depends on the final waste acceptance criteria, which will be set by DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). However, evolving regulations make it difficult to determine what the final acceptance criteria will be. A method of anticipating waste acceptance criteria is to gain an understanding of the DOE owned waste types and their behavior in a disposal system through a performance assessment and contrast such behavior with characteristics of commercial spent fuel. Preliminary results from such an analysis indicate that releases of 99Tc and 237Np from commercial spent fuel exceed those of the DSNF/DHLW; thus, if commercial spent fuel can meet the waste acceptance criteria, then DSNF can also meet the criteria. In large part, these results are caused by the small percentage of total activity of the DSNF in the repository (1.5%) and regulatory mass (4%), and also because commercial fuel cladding was assumed to provide no protection.

  6. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria, December 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    This document establishes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office waste acceptance criteria. The waste acceptance criteria provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed waste for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites for storage or disposal.

  7. Acceptance Criteria for Aerospace Structural Adhesives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ADHESIVES, *AIRFRAMES, PRIMERS, STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION , DATA ACQUISITION , PARTICLE SIZE, ACCEPTANCE TESTS, ELASTOMERS, BONDING, QUALITY CONTROL, .

  8. Heat exchanger, head and shell acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    Instability of postulated flaws in the head component of the heat exchanger could not produce a large break, equivalent to a DEGB in the PWS piping, due to the configuration of the head and restraint provided by the staybolts. Rather, leakage from throughwall flaws in the head would increase with flaw length with finite leakage areas that are bounded by a post-instability flaw configuration. Postulated flaws at instability in the shell of the heat exchanger or in the cooling water nozzles could produce a large break in the Cooling Water System (CWS) pressure boundary. An initial analysis of flaw stability for postulated flaws in the heat exchanger head was performed in January 1992. This present report updates that analysis and, additionally, provides acceptable flaw configurations to maintain defined structural or safety margins against flaw instability of the external pressure boundary components of the heat exchanger, namely the head, shell, and cooling water nozzles. Structural and flaw stability analyses of the heat exchanger tubes, the internal pressure boundary of the heat exchangers or interface boundary between the PWS and CWS, were previously completed in February 1992 as part of the heat exchanger restart evaluation and are not covered in this report.

  9. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Waste Acceptance Criteria

    1999-05-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the Nevada Test Site.

  10. Editorial: acceptance criteria and editorial procedures for Optics Letters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Andersen, Peter E; Justus, Brian L; Galtarossa, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Optics Letters Editors strive to provide timely reviews and decisions for authors while bringing top quality papers to the optics community. The purpose of this editorial is to explain Optics Letters' acceptance criteria and editorial procedures. Our hope is that greater transparency concerning the decision-making process will increase understanding as well as acceptance of our criteria and procedures.

  11. Acceptance Criteria for Corrosion Resistance of Medical Devices: Statistical Analysis of Nitinol Pitting in In Vivo Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselstein, Lawrence E.; Steffey, Duane; Nissan, Andrew; Corlett, Nigel; Dugnani, Roberto; Kus, Esra; Stewart, Sarah G.

    2009-08-01

    ASTM F 2129 test method nor the FDA provides any guidance as to what constitutes an acceptance criterion for the corrosion resistance of implantable medical devices. Neither provide any guidance on how many samples to test or how to handle censored data, i.e. datasets where there are only a few tests that breakdown. The development of both a statistically valid acceptance criterion for corrosion resistance and a method of evaluation would be of significant benefit to the medical device community. This study of 420 nitinol cyclic polarization tests, which builds on previous research that was presented at SMST 2007, investigates the effect of long-term exposure to simulated in vivo environments with differing degrees of aeration. This was accomplished by pre-exposing electropolished (EP) nitinol to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37 °C that had been sparged with either ultra high purity nitrogen or laboratory air. Immersion times ranged from 1 h up to 30 days. A total of 290 EP samples were tested in order to obtain a reasonable number of samples with breakdown, i.e. pitted. In addition, a total of 130 mechanical polished (MP) samples were also analyzed. This data allow us to test our statistical model that was presented at SMST 2007. This model takes into account the probability of breakdown per unit of exposed surface area and, if breakdown occurs, predicts the probability that E b - E r is greater than some threshold value. Aerated PBS environments were found to have a large influence on the margin of safety against pitting in vivo. Statistical methods for treating highly right censored pitting data are presented.

  12. Nevada test site waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  13. Acceptance criteria considerations for miscellaneous wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Irvine, A.R.; Forsberg, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    EPA standards set forth limitations regarding releases to the accessible environment adjacent to a geologic repository. The NRC criteria pertaining to waste form and engineered barrier performance place certain restrictions on the physical and chemical nature of the waste form and require substantially complete confinement of radioactivity until the high-heat-production period is past. After this period, the annual release of radionuclides from the waste package is normally limited to 1 part in 100,000 of the amounts calculated to be present at 1000-y decay. The regulation permits deviation from these criteria in exceptional circumstances. One such circumstance might be the absence of a significant perturbation in temperature around the stored waste. The lack of significant heat release will eliminate the hydrologic driving force for dispersal of radionuclides. Exceptional circumstances which potentially could justify a less stringent long-term release criterion are: small quantity of radioactivity, the nature of the radioactive species, and the nature of the geology in which the waste is to be emplaced. Because the MW after a suitable decay period have low heat release rates per unit volume, they apparently could be so emplaced in a repository that there would be no compelling need, according to the reasoning presented in 10 CFR 60, for a 1000-y container. Regarding attainment of the specified long-term release rate criterion, neither the solubility limits for the various waste forms nor the conductance of potential migration barriers are currently adequately characterized. The relatively small total heat generation rate for the MW in combination with the usual low volumetric heat generation rate apparently will allow application of migration barriers in a low temperature environment where barrier performance would be expected to be unchanged with time.

  14. Sampling and Analysis Plan for Old Solvent Tanks S1-S22 to Address Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Filpus-Luyckx, P.E.

    1997-10-02

    The Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) assumed custody of the Old Solvent Tanks (Tanks S1-S22) in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG, 643-E) from Waste Management in January 1991. The purpose of this Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is to collect and analyze samples of the sludge solids, organic and aqueous phases to determine the level of radioactivity, the isotopic constituents, the specific gravity, and other physical parameters. These data must be obtained to evaluate the process safety of remediating the tanks, to determine the disposal path for the material in the tanks, and to determine the most viable closure technology for the tanks.

  15. Implementation of acceptability criteria for dental radiology in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Clarijs, Tom

    2013-02-01

    The implementation of routine quality control (QC) tests in dental radiology in Belgium has been neglected for many years. In 2008, the (Belgian) Federal Agency for Nuclear Control determined acceptability criteria for X-ray equipment used for dentomaxillofacial imaging. An overview of the development of the criteria, together with implementation and the first results of dental QC in Belgium, is discussed.

  16. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    W. Mahlon Heileson

    2006-10-01

    The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

  17. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2006-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  18. Waste-acceptance criteria for radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, T.L.; Meshkov, N.K.

    1987-02-01

    A method has been developed for establishing waste-acceptance criteria based on quantitative performance factors that characterize the confinement capabilities of a disposal facility for radioactive waste. The method starts from the objective of protecting public health and safety by assuring that disposal of the waste will not result in a radiation dose of any member of the general public, in either the short or long term, in excess of an established basic dose limit. A key aspect of the method is the introduction of a confinement factor that characterizes the overall confinement capability of a particular disposal facility and can be used for quantitative performance assessments as well as for establishing facility-specific waste-acceptance criteria. Confinement factors enable direct and simple conversion of a basic dose limit into waste-acceptance criteria, specified as concentration limits on rationuclides in the waste streams. Waste-acceptance criteria can be represented visually as activity/time plots for various waste streams. These plots show the concentrations of radionuclides in a waste stream as a function of time and permit a visual, quantitative assessment of long-term performance, relative risks from different radionuclides in the waste stream, and contributions from ingrowth. Application of the method to generic facility designs provides a radional basis for a waste classification system. 14 refs.

  19. Use of risk aversion in risk acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmeyer, J. M.; Simpson, M.; Okrent, D.

    1980-06-01

    Quantitative risk acceptance criteria for technological systems must be both justifiable, based upon societal values and objectives, and workable in the sense that compliance is possible and can be demonstrated in a straightforward manner. Societal values have frequently been assessed using recorded accident statistics on a wide range of human activities assuming that the statistics in some way reflect societal preferences, or by psychometric surveys concerning perceptions and evaluations of risk. Both methods indicate a societal aversion to risk e.g., many small accidents killing a total of 100 people are preferred over one large accident in which 100 lives are lost. Some of the implications of incorporating risk aversion in acceptance criteria are discussed. Calculated risks of various technological systems are converted to expected social costs using various risk aversion factors. The uncertainties in these assessments are also discussed.

  20. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-05-11

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

  1. Waste-acceptance criteria for greater-confinement disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, T.L.; Meshkov, N.K.

    1986-01-01

    A methodology for establishing waste-acceptance criteria based on quantitative performance factors that characterize the confinement capabilities of a waste-disposal site and facility has been developed. The methodology starts from the basic objective of protecting public health and safety by providing assurance that dispsoal of the waste will not result in a radiation dose to any member of the general public, in either the short or long term, in excess of an established basic dose limit. The method is based on an explicit, straightforward, and quantitative relationship among individual risk, confinement capabilities, and waste characteristics. A key aspect of the methodology is the introduction of a confinement factor that characterizes the overall confinement capability of a particular facility and can be used for quantitative assessments of the performance of different disposal sites and facilities, as well as for establishing site-specific waste-acceptance criteria. Confinement factors are derived by means of site-specific pathway analyses. They make possible a direct and simple conversion of a basic dose limit into waste-acceptance criteria, specified as concentration limits on radionuclides in the waste streams and expressed in quantitative form as a function of parameters that characterize the site, facility design, waste containers, and waste form. Waste-acceptance criteria can be represented visually as activity/time plots for various waste streams. These plots show the concentrations of radionuclides in a waste stream as a function of time and permit a visual, quantitative assessment of long-term performance, relative risks from different radionuclides in the waste stream, and contributions from ingrowth. 13 refs.

  2. Establishing seismic design criteria to achieve an acceptable seismic margin

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    In order to develop a risk based seismic design criteria the following four issues must be addressed: (1) What target annual probability of seismic induced unacceptable performance is acceptable? (2). What minimum seismic margin is acceptable? (3) Given the decisions made under Issues 1 and 2, at what annual frequency of exceedance should the Safe Shutdown Earthquake ground motion be defined? (4) What seismic design criteria should be established to reasonably achieve the seismic margin defined under Issue 2? The first issue is purely a policy decision and is not addressed in this paper. Each of the other three issues are addressed. Issues 2 and 3 are integrally tied together so that a very large number of possible combinations of responses to these two issues can be used to achieve the target goal defined under Issue 1. Section 2 lays out a combined approach to these two issues and presents three potentially attractive combined resolutions of these two issues which reasonably achieves the target goal. The remainder of the paper discusses an approach which can be used to develop seismic design criteria aimed at achieving the desired seismic margin defined in resolution of Issue 2. Suggestions for revising existing seismic design criteria to more consistently achieve the desired seismic margin are presented.

  3. Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria - 12043

    SciTech Connect

    Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Duncan, Garth; Johnston, Jill C.; Lane, Thomas A.; Matis, George; Olson, John W.; Banning, Davey L.; Greer, Daniel A.; Seidel, Cary M.; Thien, Michael G.

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is under construction for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (contract no. DE-AC27-01RV14136). The plant when completed will be the world's largest nuclear waste treatment facility. Bechtel and URS are tasked with designing, constructing, commissioning, and transitioning the plant to the long term operating contractor to process the legacy wastes that are stored in underground tanks (from nuclear weapons production between the 1940's and the 1980's). Approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is currently stored in these tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. There are three major WTP facilities being constructed for processing the tank waste feed. The Pretreatment (PT) facility receives feed where it is separated into a low activity waste (LAW) fraction and a high level waste (HLW) fraction. These fractions are transferred to the appropriate (HLW or LAW) facility, combined with glass former material, and sent to high temperature melters for formation of the glass product. In addition to PT, HLW and LAW, other facilities in WTP include the Laboratory (LAB) for analytical services and the Balance of Facilities (BOF) for plant maintenance, support and utility services. The transfer of staged feed from the waste storage tanks and acceptance in WTP receipt vessels require data for waste acceptance criteria (WAC) parameters from analysis of feed samples. The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) development was a joint team effort between WTP and Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) representatives. The focus of this DQO effort was to review WAC parameters and develop data quality requirements, the results of which will determine whether or not the staged feed can be transferred from the TOC to WTP receipt vessels. The approach involved systematic planning for data collection consistent with EPA guidance for the seven-step DQO process

  4. Establishment of noise acceptance criteria for wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise criteria for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used in design specifications for future machines. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower-wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of noise acceptance criteria are described.

  5. Establishment of noise acceptance criteria for wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, D. G.; Shepherd, K. P.; Grosveld, F.

    1981-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop noise criteria for wind turbines which minimize annoyance and which can be used in design specifications for future machines. The approach consists of presenting wind turbine noise stimuli to test subjects in a laboratory listening chamber. The responses of the subjects are recorded for a range of stimuli which encompass the designs, operating conditions, and ambient noise levels of current and future installations. Results to date have established the threshold of detectability for a range of impulsive stimuli of the type associated with blade/tower-wake interactions. The status of the ongoing psychoacoustic tests, the subjective data, and the approach to the development of noise acceptance criteria are described.

  6. Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) V2.0 logistics module PBI acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Weidert, R.S.

    1995-02-28

    This document defines the acceptance criteria for the Automated Transportation Management System V2.0 Logistics Module Performance Based Incentive (PBI). This acceptance criteria will be the primary basis for the generation of acceptance test procedures. The purpose of this document is to define the minimum criteria that must be fulfilled to guarantee acceptance of the Logistics Module.

  7. Sample acceptance time criteria, electronic issue and alloimmunisation in thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Trompeter, S; Baxter, L; McBrearty, M; Zatkya, E; Porter, J

    2015-12-01

    To determine the safety of a 1-week acceptance criteria of sample receipt in laboratory to transfusion commencement in transfusion dependent thalassaemia with respect to alloimmunisation. To determine the safety of electronic issue of blood components in such a setting. Retrospective audit of alloimmunisation (1999-2012) and blood exposure in registered thalassaemia patients at a central London thalassaemia centre where the acceptance criteria for the group and save sample from arrival in the laboratory to the time of issue of blood for transfusion for someone who has been transfused in the last 28 days was 1 week, and there was electronic issue protocol for patients who have always had a negative antibody screen (other than temporary positivity in pregnant women receiving prophylactic anti-D or anti Le-a, Anti Le-b and Anti P1 that are no longer detectable). There were 133 patients with thalassemia variants regularly attending UCLH for review. A total of 105 patients had transfusion dependent thalassaemia (TDT) (7 E-beta thalassaemia, 98 beta thalassaemia major). Ten of the 84 patients who received their transfusions at UCLH were alloimmunised. Seven of them had been alloimmunised prior to arrival at UCLH. Only two patients developed antibodies at UCLH during this period. The prevalence of alloantibody formation of 2% in UCLH transfused patients, with presumptive incidence of 0.01 alloantibodies per 100 units or 0·001 immunisations per person per year compares favourably with other reported series and suggests that 1 week interval with appropriate electronic issue is acceptable practice. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  8. Community acceptance of helicopter noise: Criteria and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munch, C. L.; King, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to define those criteria necessary for civil helicopter operations to be acoustically acceptable to the communities from which they operate and over which they fly. The study involved surveying existing domestic and foreign Federal regulations and guidelines, state and local noise ordinances, results of community noise annoyance studies, and results of individual aircraft noise annoyance studies, and results of individual aircraft noise annoyance studies in order to establish the criteria. The final criteria selection are based on the Day-Night Level, L sub DN, a measure of total noise exposure. The basic rating unit is the A weighted sound pressure level (dbA) which has accuracy comparable to other units currently used for aircraft. An L sub DN of 60 is recommended as a criterion for areas where the ambient noise is below 58 dbA. An L sub DN value 2 dbA above the local ambient is recommended for areas where the ambient is above 58 dbA.

  9. 78 FR 53483 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... COMMISSION Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and..., tests, and analyses have been successfully completed, and that the specified acceptance criteria are...

  10. 78 FR 53484 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... COMMISSION Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and..., tests, and analyses have been successfully completed, and that the specified acceptance criteria are...

  11. 78 FR 38411 - Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4; Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... acceptance criteria are met for Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria (ITAAC) E.2.5.04.05.05... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 4; Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Determination of inspections, tests, analyses, and...

  12. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This Revision 4 of the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), WIPP-DOE-069, identifies and consolidates existing criteria and requirements which regulate the safe handling and preparation of Transuranic (TRU) waste packages for transportation to and emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This consolidation does not invalidate any existing certification of TRU waste to the WIPP Operations and Safety Criteria (Revision 3 of WIPP-DOE--069) and/or Transportation: Waste Package Requirements (TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging [SARP]). Those documents being consolidated, including Revision 3 of the WAC, currently support the Test Phase.

  13. Diagnostic Mammography: Identifying Minimally Acceptable Interpretive Performance Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Jay; Sickles, Edward A.; Feig, Stephen A.; Monsees, Barbara; Bassett, Lawrence W.; Smith, Robert A.; Rosenberg, Robert; Ichikawa, Laura; Wallace, James; Tran, Khai; Miglioretti, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop criteria to identify thresholds for the minimally acceptable performance of physicians interpreting diagnostic mammography studies. Materials and Methods: In an institutional review board–approved HIPAA–compliant study, an Angoff approach was used to set criteria for identifying minimally acceptable interpretive performance for both workup after abnormal screening examinations and workup of a breast lump. Normative data from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) was used to help the expert radiologist identify the impact of cut points. Simulations, also using data from the BCSC, were used to estimate the expected clinical impact from the recommended performance thresholds. Results: Final cut points for workup of abnormal screening examinations were as follows: sensitivity, less than 80%; specificity, less than 80% or greater than 95%; abnormal interpretation rate, less than 8% or greater than 25%; positive predictive value (PPV) of biopsy recommendation (PPV2), less than 15% or greater than 40%; PPV of biopsy performed (PPV3), less than 20% or greater than 45%; and cancer diagnosis rate, less than 20 per 1000 interpretations. Final cut points for workup of a breast lump were as follows: sensitivity, less than 85%; specificity, less than 83% or greater than 95%; abnormal interpretation rate, less than 10% or greater than 25%; PPV2, less than 25% or greater than 50%; PPV3, less than 30% or greater than 55%; and cancer diagnosis rate, less than 40 per 1000 interpretations. If underperforming physicians moved into the acceptable range after remedial training, the expected result would be (a) diagnosis of an additional 86 cancers per 100 000 women undergoing workup after screening examinations, with a reduction in the number of false-positive examinations by 1067 per 100 000 women undergoing this workup, and (b) diagnosis of an additional 335 cancers per 100 000 women undergoing workup of a breast lump, with a reduction in the number

  14. Radioactive waste acceptance team and generator interface yields successful implementation of waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, J.G.; Griffin, W.A.; Rast, D.M.

    1996-02-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project has developed a successful Low Level Waste Shipping Program in compliance with the Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements, NVO-325, Revision 1. This shipping program is responsible for the successful disposal of more than 4 million cubic feet of Low Level Waste over the past decade. The success of the Fernald Low Level Waste Shipping Program is due to the generator program staff working closely with the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program Team to achieve win/win situations. The teamwork is the direct result of dedicated, proactive professionals working together toward a common objective: the safe disposition of low level radioactive waste. The growth and development of this program has many lessons learned to share with the low level waste generating community. The recognition of reciprocal interests enables consistently high annual volumes of Fernald waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site without incident. The large volumes successfully disposed serve testimony to the success of the program which is equally important to all Nevada Test Site and Fernald stakeholders. The Fernald approach to success is currently being shared with other low-level waste generators through DOE-NV sponsored outreach programs. This paper introduces examples of Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation contributions to the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program outreach initiatives. These practices are applicable to other low level waste disposal programs whether federal, commercial, domestic or international.

  15. How to pass a sensor acceptance test: using the gap between acceptance criteria and operational performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet

    2016-10-01

    When acquiring a new imaging system and operational task performance is a critical factor for success, it is necessary to specify minimum acceptance requirements that need to be met using a sensor performance model and/or performance tests. Currently, there exist a variety of models and test from different origin (defense, security, road safety, optometry) and they all do different predictions. This study reviews a number of frequently used methods and shows the effects that small changes in procedure or threshold criteria can have on the outcome of a test. For example, a system may meet the acceptance requirements but not satisfy the needs for the operational task, or the choice of test may determine the rank order of candidate sensors. The goal of the paper is to make people aware of the pitfalls associated with the acquisition process, by i) illustrating potential tricks to have a system accepted that is actually not suited for the operational task, and ii) providing tips to avoid this unwanted situation.

  16. 7 CFR 42.107 - Lot acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and class of defects enumerated on the worksheet to the acceptance and rejection numbers shown in §§ 42.109 through 42.111 for the respective sample size and Acceptable Quality Level (AQL). (b) Unless otherwise specified, use the following AQL's for the respective class of defects: Defect class AQL at...

  17. 24 CFR 203.202 - Plan acceptability and acceptance renewal criteria-general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUD acceptance of such change or modification, except that changes mandated by other applicable laws... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plan acceptability and acceptance... Underwriting Procedures Insured Ten-Year Protection Plans (plan) § 203.202 Plan acceptability and...

  18. Human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria for the safety parameter display

    SciTech Connect

    McGevna, V.; Peterson, L.R.

    1981-10-02

    This report contains human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria developed by the Human Factors Engineering Branch (HFEB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to use in evaluating designs of the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). These criteria were developed in response to the functional design criteria for the SPDS defined in NUREG-0696, Functional Criteria for Emergency Response Facilities. The purpose of this report is to identify design review acceptance criteria for the SPDS installed in the control room of a nuclear power plant. Use of computer driven cathode ray tube (CRT) displays is anticipated. General acceptance criteria for displays of plant safety status information by the SPDS are developed. In addition, specific SPDS review criteria corresponding to the SPDS functional criteria specified in NUREG-0696 are established.

  19. 46 CFR 164.019-5 - Standard components; acceptance criteria and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard components; acceptance criteria and procedures...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Personal Flotation Device Components § 164.019-5 Standard components; acceptance criteria and procedures. (a) General. Standard...

  20. 46 CFR 28.275 - Acceptance criteria for instructors and course curricula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance criteria for instructors and course curricula... the Aleutian Trade § 28.275 Acceptance criteria for instructors and course curricula. (a) A Fishing Vessel Safety Instructor shall submit a detailed course curriculum that relates directly to...

  1. 78 FR 65007 - Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria; Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has determined that the inspections, tests, and analyses have been successfully completed, and that the specified acceptance criteria are met for Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria (ITAAC), 2.1.03.11 for the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Unit 3.

  2. 46 CFR 28.275 - Acceptance criteria for instructors and course curricula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acceptance criteria for instructors and course curricula... the Aleutian Trade § 28.275 Acceptance criteria for instructors and course curricula. (a) A Fishing Vessel Safety Instructor shall submit a detailed course curriculum that relates directly to the...

  3. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  4. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  5. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  6. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  7. 46 CFR 54.05-17 - Weld toughness test acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. 54.05-17 Section 54.05-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-17 Weld toughness test acceptance criteria. (a) For Charpy V-notch...

  8. Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Solonick

    2003-04-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  9. Nevada Test Site waste acceptance criteria [Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    Revision one updates the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal; and transuranic and transuranic mixed waste for interim storage at the NTS. Review each section of this document. This document is not intended to include all of the requirements; rather, it is meant as a guide toward meeting the regulations. All references in this document should be observed to avoid omission of requirements on which acceptance or rejection of waste will be based. The Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document.

  10. Criteria for phonological process analysis.

    PubMed

    McReynolds, L V; Elbert, M

    1981-05-01

    Investigators have proposed that children with functional articulation disorders should be relabelled phonologically disordered. To support this proposal, evidence has been presented in the literature demonstrating that children's error patterns reflect the operation of phonological processes. No quantitative or qualitative criteria have been offered to differentiate these processes from surface error patterns. The purpose of the present descriptive study was to determine if differences would be found when two kinds of process analyses were employed: a nonquantitative criteria analysis as conducted in the studies reported in the literature, and a quantitative criteria analysis. Speech samples were obtained from 13 children with functional articulation problems. Their errors were submitted to the two analysis procedures. Results indicated that the number of identified processes were reduced when minimum quantitative criteria were used from the number identified when no quantitative criteria were imposed. The decrease occurred in individual children's patterns as well as across the patterns of the 13 children. It is suggested that there is a need to establish reasonable quantitative and qualitative criteria for phonological process identification.

  11. Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.

    2010-08-01

    This document provides an example procedure for establishing acceptance-range criteria to assess results from software undergoing BESTEST-EX. This example method for BESTEST-EX is a modified version of the method described in HERS BESTEST.

  12. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND...

  13. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND...

  14. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND...

  15. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND...

  16. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND...

  17. Accident analysis and DOE criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, J.M.; Elder, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    In analyzing the radiological consequences of major accidents at DOE facilities one finds that many facilities fall so far below the limits of DOE Order 6430 that compliance is easily demonstrated by simple analysis. For those cases where the amount of radioactive material and the dispersive energy available are enough for accident consequences to approach the limits, the models and assumptions used become critical. In some cases the models themselves are the difference between meeting the criteria or not meeting them. Further, in one case, we found that not only did the selection of models determine compliance but the selection of applicable criteria from different chapters of Order 6430 also made the difference. DOE has recognized the problem of different criteria in different chapters applying to one facility, and has proceeded to make changes for the sake of consistency. We have proposed to outline the specific steps needed in an accident analysis and suggest appropriate models, parameters, and assumptions. As a result we feed DOE siting and design criteria will be more fairly and consistently applied.

  18. Criteria for Identifying Radiologists with Acceptable Screening Mammography Interpretive Performance based on Multiple Performance Measures

    PubMed Central

    Miglioretti, Diana L.; Ichikawa, Laura; Smith, Robert A.; Bassett, Lawrence W.; Feig, Stephen A.; Monsees, Barbara; Parikh, Jay R.; Rosenberg, Robert D.; Sickles, Edward A.; Carney, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Using a combination of performance measures, we updated previously proposed criteria for identifying physicians whose performance interpreting screening mammograms may indicate suboptimal interpretation skills. Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study, six expert breast imagers used a method based on the Angoff approach to update criteria for acceptable mammography performance on the basis of combined performance measures: (Group 1) sensitivity and specificity, for facilities with complete capture of false-negative cancers; and (Group 2) cancer detection rate (CDR), recall rate, and positive predictive value of a recall (PPV1), for facilities that cannot capture false negatives, but have reliable cancer follow-up information for positive mammograms. Decisions were informed by normative data from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC). Results Updated, combined ranges for acceptable sensitivity and specificity of screening mammography are: (1) sensitivity ≥80% and specificity ≥85% or (2) sensitivity 75–79% and specificity 88–97%. Updated ranges for CDR, recall rate, and PPV1 are: (1) CDR ≥6/1000, recall rate 3–20%, and any PPV1; (2) CDR 4–6/1000, recall rate 3–15%, and PPV1 ≥3%; or (3) CDR 2.5–4/1000, recall rate 5–12%, and PPV1 3–8%. Using the original criteria, 51% of BCSC radiologists had acceptable sensitivity and specificity; 40% had acceptable CDR, recall rate, and PPV1. Using the combined criteria, 69% had acceptable sensitivity and specificity and 62% had acceptable CDR, recall rate, and PPV1. Conclusion The combined criteria improve previous criteria by considering the inter-relationships of multiple performance measures and broaden the acceptable performance ranges compared to previous criteria based on individual measures. PMID:25794100

  19. Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant pumps and valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.; Miller, R.F.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1993-05-01

    Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors contains one reactor coolant pump, one PUMP suction side motor operated valve, and other smaller valves. The pumps me double suction, double volute, and radially split type pumps. The valves are different size shutoff and control valves rated from ANSI B16.5 construction class 150 to class 300. The reactor coolant system components, also known as the process water system (PWS), are classified as nuclear Safety Class I components. These components were constructed in the 1950`s in accordance with the then prevailing industry practices. No uniform construction codes were used for design and analysis of these components. However, no pressure boundary failures or bolting failures have ever been recorded throughout their operating history. Over the years, the in-service inspection (ISI) was limited to visual inspection of the pressure boundaries, and surface and volumetric examination of the pressure retaining bolts. Efforts are now underway to implement ISI requirements similar to the ASME Section XI requirements for pumps and valves. This report discusses the new ISI requirements which also call for volumetric examination of the pump casing and valve body welds.

  20. A comparison and cross-reference of commercial low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, T.A.

    1997-04-01

    This document, prepared by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, is a comparison and cross-reference of commercial low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria. Many of these are draft or preliminary criteria as well as implemented criteria at operating low-level radioactive waste management facilities. Waste acceptance criteria from the following entities are included: US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, South Carolina, Washington, Utah, Nevada, California, illinois, Texas, North Carolina, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, New York, and the Midwest Compact Region. Criteria in the matrix include the following: physical form, chemical form, liquid limits, void space in packages, concentration averaging, types of packaging, chelating agents, solidification media, stability requirements, sorptive media, gas, oil, biological waste, pyrophorics, source material, special nuclear material, package dimensions, incinerator ash, dewatered resin, transuranics, and mixed waste. Each criterion in the matrix is cross-referenced to its source document so that exact requirements can be determined.

  1. Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-29

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 50 SLURRY FOR SALTSTONE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, APRIL 2007 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2007-12-07

    This report summarizes the results from the characterization of the second quarter April 2007 sampling of Tank 50H for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Six one liter samples were taken in polyethylene bottles to analyze for the WAC contaminants and a 200 mL sample was taken in a steel container for analysis of volatile organic compounds. The information from this characterization will be given to Waste Solidification Engineering personnel to qualify the transfer of aqueous waste to the Saltstone Facility. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) All six of the one liter samples taken in April 2007 from the mixed slurry in Tank 50 have the same compositions within the experimental uncertainty of the analyses. (2) Of the ninety-one process, chemical, and radioactive WAC target or limit contaminants listed in Revision 7 of the 'Waste Acceptance Criteria for Aqueous Waste sent to the Z-Area Saltstone Production Facility', eighty-nine had concentrations that were unequivocally less than the WAC limit or target. (3) The two contaminants whose concentrations could not be shown to be less than their WAC targets were methanol and radioactive Nb-93m. Currently the AD Section of SRNL does not have a method for measuring methanol in caustic solutions. For Nb-93m the results are ambiguous due to possible interferences in the ICP-MS analysis from Zr-93 or Mo-93. (4) Of the six additional chemical and radioactive contaminants requested in the TTR for Saltstone qualification, five were measured or calculated. These were Sb, Be, Tl, along with total beta and gamma. The AD Section does not have a method to measure the 6th contaminant which was the cyanide ion.

  3. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-05-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  4. Industry Application Emergency Core Cooling System Cladding Acceptance Criteria Early Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Szilard, Ronaldo H.; Youngblood, Robert W.; Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Bayless, Paul D.; Rabiti, Cristian; Alfonsi, Andrea; Smith, Curtis L.; Frepoli, Cesare; Yurko, Joseph P.; Swindlehurst, Gregg; Zoino, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    The U. S. NRC is currently proposing rulemaking designated as “10 CFR 50.46c” to revise the loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA)/emergency core cooling system (ECCS) acceptance criteria to include the effects of higher burnup on cladding performance as well as to address other technical issues. The NRC is also currently resolving the public comments with the final rule expected to be issued in April 2016. The impact of the final 50.46c rule on the industry may involve updating of fuel vendor LOCA evaluation models, NRC review and approval, and licensee submittal of new LOCA evaluations or re-analyses and associated technical specification revisions for NRC review and approval. The rule implementation process, both industry and NRC activities, is expected to take 4-6 years following the rule effective date. As motivated by the new rule, the need to use advanced cladding designs may be a result. A loss of operational margin may result due to the more restrictive cladding embrittlement criteria. Initial and future compliance with the rule may significantly increase vendor workload and licensee cost as a spectrum of fuel rod initial burnup states may need to be analyzed to demonstrate compliance. Consequently, there will be an increased focus on licensee decision making related to LOCA analysis to minimize cost and impact, and to manage margin. The proposed rule would apply to a light water reactor and to all cladding types.

  5. Testing the validity and acceptability of the diagnostic criteria for Hoarding Disorder: a DSM-5 survey.

    PubMed

    Mataix-Cols, D; Fernández de la Cruz, L; Nakao, T; Pertusa, A

    2011-12-01

    The DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Sub-Workgroup is recommending the creation of a new diagnostic category named Hoarding Disorder (HD). The validity and acceptability of the proposed diagnostic criteria have yet to be formally tested. Obsessive-compulsive disorder/hoarding experts and random members of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) were shown eight brief clinical vignettes (four cases meeting criteria for HD, three with hoarding behaviour secondary to other mental disorders, and one with subclinical hoarding behaviour) and asked to decide the most appropriate diagnosis in each case. Participants were also asked about the perceived acceptability of the criteria and whether they supported the inclusion of HD in the main manual. Altogether, 211 experts and 48 APA members completed the survey (30% and 10% response rates, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of the HD diagnosis and the individual criteria were high (80-90%) across various types of professionals, irrespective of their experience with hoarding cases. About 90% of participants in both samples thought the criteria would be very/somewhat acceptable for professionals and sufferers. Most experts (70%) supported the inclusion of HD in the main manual, whereas only 50% of the APA members did. The proposed criteria for HD have high sensitivity and specificity. The criteria are also deemed acceptable for professionals and sufferers alike. Training of professionals and the development and validation of semi-structured diagnostic instruments should improve diagnostic accuracy even further. A field trial is now needed to confirm these encouraging findings with real patients in real clinical settings.

  6. 46 CFR 164.019-7 - Non-standard components; acceptance criteria and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the particular component. The list must contain specific identification and quantity of all materials... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Non-standard components; acceptance criteria and...) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL MATERIALS Personal Flotation Device...

  7. 48 CFR 15.607 - Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. 15.607 Section 15.607 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Unsolicited Proposals 15.607 Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. (a) A...

  8. 48 CFR 15.607 - Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. 15.607 Section 15.607 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Unsolicited Proposals 15.607 Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. (a) A...

  9. 48 CFR 15.607 - Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. 15.607 Section 15.607 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Unsolicited Proposals 15.607 Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. (a) A...

  10. 48 CFR 15.607 - Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. 15.607 Section 15.607 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Unsolicited Proposals 15.607 Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. (a) A...

  11. 48 CFR 915.607 - Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. 915.607 Section 915.607 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Unsolicited Proposals 915.607 Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. (c) DOE's cost...

  12. 48 CFR 15.607 - Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. 15.607 Section 15.607 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Unsolicited Proposals 15.607 Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. (a) A...

  13. 48 CFR 915.607 - Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. 915.607 Section 915.607 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION...

  14. 48 CFR 915.607 - Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. 915.607 Section 915.607 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION...

  15. 48 CFR 915.607 - Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criteria for acceptance and negotiation of an unsolicited proposal. 915.607 Section 915.607 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION...

  16. Parents' "Hard" Knowledge of Admission Criteria and Acceptance in Philadelphia's High School Choice Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haxton, Clarisse L.; Neild, Ruth Curran

    2012-01-01

    We examine parents' knowledge of discrete, verifiable facts--what we call "hard knowledge"--in a high school application process. Using parent survey data (n = 658) from the School District of Philadelphia, this study examines whether parents knew the admission criteria and acceptance rate at the high school they most wanted their child…

  17. Parents' "Hard" Knowledge of Admission Criteria and Acceptance in Philadelphia's High School Choice Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haxton, Clarisse L.; Neild, Ruth Curran

    2012-01-01

    We examine parents' knowledge of discrete, verifiable facts--what we call "hard knowledge"--in a high school application process. Using parent survey data (n = 658) from the School District of Philadelphia, this study examines whether parents knew the admission criteria and acceptance rate at the high school they most wanted their child…

  18. La composition academique: les limites de l'acceptabilite (Composition for Academic Purposes: Criteria for Acceptability).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenall, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the pedagogical approaches and problems attendant to the development of English writing programs for foreign students. Discusses the skills necessary to handle course work, such as essay tests, term papers and reports, theses and dissertations, and focuses particularly on diagnostic problems and acceptability criteria. Societe Nouvelle…

  19. La composition academique: les limites de l'acceptabilite (Composition for Academic Purposes: Criteria for Acceptability).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenall, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the pedagogical approaches and problems attendant to the development of English writing programs for foreign students. Discusses the skills necessary to handle course work, such as essay tests, term papers and reports, theses and dissertations, and focuses particularly on diagnostic problems and acceptability criteria. Societe Nouvelle…

  20. Technical Basis For Radiological Acceptance Criteria For Uranium At The Y-12 National Security Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2009-07-22

    The purpose of this report is to establish radiological acceptance criteria for uranium. Other factors for acceptance not considered include criticality safety concerns, contaminants to the process stream, and impacts to the Safety Basis for the affected facilities. Three types of criteria were developed in this report. They include limits on external penetrating and non-penetrating radiation and on the internal hazard associated with inhalation of the material. These criteria are intended to alleviate the need for any special controls beyond what are normally utilized for worker protection from uranium hazards. Any proposed exceptions would require case-by-case evaluations to determine cost impacts and feasibility. Since Y-12 has set rigorous ALARA goals for worker doses, the external limits are based on assumptions of work time involved in the movement of accepted material plus the desire that external doses normally received are not exceeded, and set so that no special personnel monitoring would be required. Internal hazard controls were established so that dose contributions from non-uranium nuclides would not exceed 10% of that expected from the uranium component. This was performed using a Hazard Index (HI) previously established for work in areas contaminated with non-uranium nuclides. The radiological acceptance criteria for uranium are summarized in Table 1. Note that these limits are based on the assumption that radioactive daughter products have reached equilibrium.

  1. Adherence to acceptability and repeatability criteria for spirometry in complex lung function laboratories.

    PubMed

    Borg, Brigitte M; Hartley, M Faizel; Bailey, Michael J; Thompson, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    Few published data exist for adherence rates to spirometry acceptability and repeatability criteria in clinical respiratory laboratories. This study quantified adherence levels in this setting and observed changes in adherence levels as a result of feedback and ongoing training. Two tertiary hospital-based, lung function laboratories (L1 and L2) participated. Approximately 100 consecutive, FVC spirometry sessions were reviewed for each year from 2004 to 2008 at L1 and for years 2004 and 2008 at L2. Each spirometric effort and session was interrogated for adherence to the acceptability and repeatability criteria of international spirometry standards of the time. Feedback of audit results and refresher training were provided at L1 throughout the study; in addition, a quality rating scale was implemented in 2006. No formal feedback or follow-up training was provided at L2. We reviewed 707 test sessions over the 5 years. There was no difference in adherence rates to acceptability and repeatability criteria between sites in 2004 (L1 61%, L2 59%, P = .89). There was, however, a significant difference between sites in 2008 (L1 92%, L2 65%, P < .001). No difference was seen at L2 between 2004 and 2008 (P = .26), while L1 experienced a significant increase in adherence levels between 2004 and 2008 (61% to 92% P < .001). Clinical respiratory laboratories met published spirometry acceptability and repeatability criteria only 60% of the time in the first audit period. This improved with regular review, feedback, and implementation of a rating scale. Auditing of spirometry quality, feedback, and implementation of test rating scales need to be incorporated as an integral component of laboratory quality assurance programs to improve adherence to international acceptability and repeatability criteria.

  2. TRU waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This document is intended to delineate the criteria by which unclassified waste will be accepted for emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico and describe the bases upon which these criteria were established. These criteria are not intended to be specifications but rather limits that will allow waste generating and shipping sites to develop their own procedures and specifications for preparation of TRU waste for shipment to the WIPP. These criteria will also allow waste generating sites to plan future facilities for waste preparation that will produce TRU waste forms compatible with WIPP waste emplacement and isolation requirements. These criteria only apply to contract-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste forms and are not intended to apply to beta-gamma wastes, spent fuel, high-level waste (HLW), low-level waste (LLW), low specific activity (LSA) waste, or forms of radioactive waste for experimental purposes. Specifications for receipt of experimental waste forms will be prepared by the responsible projects in conjunction with the staff of the WIPP project at a later date. In addition, these criteria only apply to waste emplaced in bedded rock salt. Technical bases for these criteria may differ significantly from those for other host rocks. 25 refs. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. LANL Waste acceptance criteria, Chapter 3, radioactive liquid waste treatment facility

    SciTech Connect

    McClenahan, Robert L.

    2006-08-01

    The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) receives and treats aqueous radioactive wastewater generated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to meet he discharge criteria specified in a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. The majority of this wastewater is received at the RLWTF through a network of buried pipelines, known as the Radioactive Liquid Waste Collection System (RLWCS). Other wastewater is transported to the RLWTF by truck. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) outlined in this Chapter are applicable to all radioactive wastewaters which are conveyed to the Technical Area 50(T A-50), RL WTF by the RLWCS or by truck.

  4. Addressing patient safety through the use of 'criteria of acceptability' for medical radiation equipment.

    PubMed

    Gilley, Debbie Bray; Holmberg, Ola

    2013-02-01

    Patient safety should be considered in the use of ionising radiation equipment in medicine. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) establishes standards of safety and provides for the application of these standards, also in the area of medical use of radiation. Equipment acceptability, as it relates to radiation in medicine, is the need to satisfy the requirements or standards prior to the use of the device in patient imaging or treatment. Through IAEA activities in establishing and developing Safety Standards, Safety Reports and recommendations to regulatory authorities and end-users, it encourages the adoption of acceptability criteria that are relevant to the medical equipment and its use.

  5. Development of Waste Acceptance Criteria at 221-U Building: Initial Flow and Transport Scoping Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhang, Z. F.; Keller, Jason M.; Chen, Yousu

    2007-05-30

    This report documents numerical flow and transport simulations performed that establish initial waste acceptance criteria for the potential waste streams that may be safely sequestered in the 221-U Building and similar canyon structures. Specifically, simulations were executed to identify the maximum loading of contaminant mass (without respect to volume) that can be emplaced within the 221-U Building with no more than 1 pCi/m2 of contaminant migrating outside the structure within a 1,000 year time period. The initial scoping simulations were executed in one dimension to assess important processes, and then two dimensions to establish waste acceptance criteria. Two monolithic conditions were assessed: (1) a grouted canyon monolith; and (2) a canyon monolith filled with sand, both assuming no cracks or fissures were present to cause preferential transport. A three-staged approach was taken to account for different processes that may impact the amount of contaminant that can be safely sequestered in canyon structure. In the first stage, flow and transport simulations established waste acceptance criteria based on a linear (Kd) isotherm approach. In the second stage, impacts on thermal loading were examined and the differences in waste acceptance criteria quantified. In the third stage of modeling, precipitation/dissolution reactions were considered on the release and transport of the contaminants, and the subsequent impact on the maximum contaminant loading. The reactive transport modeling is considered a demonstration of the reactive transport capability, and shows the importance of its use for future performance predictions once site-specific data have been obtained.

  6. Corrosion control acceptance criteria for sacrificial anode type, cathodic protection systems (user guide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Vincent F.; Noble, Michael; McLeod, Malcolm E.

    1994-07-01

    The Army currently operates and maintains more than 20,000 underground storage tanks and over 3000 miles of underground gas pipelines, all of which require some form of corrosion control. Cathodic protection is one method of corrosion control used to prevent corrosion-induced leaks when a steel structure is exposed to an aggressive soil. The corrosion control acceptance criteria for sacrificial anode type CP systems provides guidelines for the DEH/DPW cathodic protection installation inspectors whose responsibilities are to ensure that the materials and equipment specified are delivered to the job site and subsequently installed in accordance with the engineering drawings and specifications. The sacrificial anode CP acceptance criteria includes all components for the sacrificial anode system such as insulated conductors, anodes, anode backfills, and auxiliary equipment. The sacrificial anode CP acceptance criteria is composed of a checklist that lists each component and that contains a space for the inspector to either check 'yes' or 'no' to indicate whether the component complies with the job specifications. In some cases, the inspector must measure and record physical dimensions or electrical output and compare the measurements to standards shown in attached tables.

  7. Variation transmission model for setting acceptance criteria in a multi-staged pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Montes, Richard O

    2012-03-01

    Pharmaceutical manufacturing processes consist of a series of stages (e.g., reaction, workup, isolation) to generate the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Outputs at intermediate stages (in-process control) and API need to be controlled within acceptance criteria to assure final drug product quality. In this paper, two methods based on tolerance interval to derive such acceptance criteria will be evaluated. The first method is serial worst case (SWC), an industry risk minimization strategy, wherein input materials and process parameters of a stage are fixed at their worst-case settings to calculate the maximum level expected from the stage. This maximum output then becomes input to the next stage wherein process parameters are again fixed at worst-case setting. The procedure is serially repeated throughout the process until the final stage. The calculated limits using SWC can be artificially high and may not reflect the actual process performance. The second method is the variation transmission (VT) using autoregressive model, wherein variation transmitted up to a stage is estimated by accounting for the recursive structure of the errors at each stage. Computer simulations at varying extent of variation transmission and process stage variability are performed. For the scenarios tested, VT method is demonstrated to better maintain the simulated confidence level and more precisely estimate the true proportion parameter than SWC. Real data examples are also presented that corroborate the findings from the simulation. Overall, VT is recommended for setting acceptance criteria in a multi-staged pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

  8. Determination of acceptance criteria and sample sizes for accelerated stability comparability studies for biologics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binbing; Zeng, Lingmin; Yang, Harry

    2017-07-22

    Changes of manufacturing processes are common. It is required by the regulatory agencies that manufacturers establish adequate and appropriate comparability between pre-change and post-change products. The goals of comparability assessments are to demonstrate the comparability and consistency of product quality before and after change and to demonstrate that the changes do not have an adverse effect on safety and efficacy of the drug products. Accelerated or stressed stability studies may shed light on drug quality under stressed environmental conditions and on product differences in the degradation pathways. Comparability of accelerated stability data may provide further evidence on the impact of process change. Equivalence test has been recommended to demonstrate the comparability of stability profiles for accelerated stability studies. Selection of appropriate acceptance criteria for determining comparability is one of the most challenging steps in the comparability studies. Because of the inherent heterogeneity of biologics, the stability profiles may vary considerably from batch to batch. It is more challenging to set the acceptance criteria for comparing the accelerated stability data for biologics. In this article, we present an approach for determining the acceptance criteria and necessary sample sizes for accelerated comparability studies for biologics. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 10 CFR 50.60 - Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for lightwater nuclear power reactors for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for... of Licenses and Construction Permits § 50.60 Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for... certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) have been submitted, must meet the fracture toughness and material...

  10. 10 CFR 50.60 - Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for lightwater nuclear power reactors for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for... of Licenses and Construction Permits § 50.60 Acceptance criteria for fracture prevention measures for... certifications required under § 50.82(a)(1) have been submitted, must meet the fracture toughness and material...

  11. 10 CFR 51.108 - Public hearings on Commission findings that inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria of combined licenses are met. 51.108 Section 51.108 Energy...) Production and Utilization Facilities § 51.108 Public hearings on Commission findings that inspections, tests, analyses, and acceptance criteria of combined licenses are met. In any public hearing requested under...

  12. 32 CFR 37.530 - What criteria do I use in deciding whether to accept a recipient's cost sharing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What criteria do I use in deciding whether to accept a recipient's cost sharing? 37.530 Section 37.530 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF...-Award Business Evaluation Cost Sharing § 37.530 What criteria do I use in deciding whether to accept a...

  13. Tissue dissociation enzymes for isolating human islets for transplantation: factors to consider in setting enzyme acceptance criteria.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Robert C; Breite, Andrew G; Green, Michael L; Dwulet, Francis E

    2011-01-27

    Tissue dissociation enzymes are critical reagents that affect the yield and quality of human pancreatic islets required for islet transplantation. The United States Food and Drug Administration's oversight of this procedure recommends laboratories to set acceptance criteria for enzymes used in the manufacture of islet products for transplantation. Currently, many laboratories base this selection on personal experience because biochemical analysis is not predictive of success of the islet isolation procedure. This review identifies the challenges of correlating results from enzyme biochemical analysis to their effectiveness in human islet isolation and suggests a path forward to address these challenges to improve control of the islet manufacturing process.

  14. Tissue dissociation enzymes for isolating human islets for transplantation: factors to consider in setting enzyme acceptance criteria

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Robert C.; Breite, Andrew G.; Green, Michael L.; Dwulet, Francis E.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue dissociation enzymes are critical reagents that affect the yield and quality of human pancreatic islets required for islet transplantation. The FDA’s oversight of this procedure recommends laboratories set acceptance criteria for enzymes used in the manufacture of islet products for transplantation. Presently, many laboratories base this selection on personal experience since biochemical analysis is not predictive of success of the islet isolation procedure. This review identifies the challenges of correlating results from enzyme biochemical analysis to their effectiveness in human islet isolation and suggests a path forward to address these challenges to improve control of the islet manufacturing process. PMID:21116222

  15. 40 CFR 86.610-98 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for Selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. 86.610-98 Section 86.610-98... and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. (a) The prescribed acceptable... procedures pursuant to § 86.608-98(a). (c)(1) Pass/fail criteria. The manufacturer shall test vehicles...

  16. Repository operational criteria comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the ``Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies`` (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations considering the interfaces among the components of the regulations and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The ROC task addresses regulatory criteria and uncertainties related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. Those parts of 10 CFR Part 60 that require routine guidance or minor changes to the rule were addressed in Hageman and Chowdhury, 1992. The ROC task shows a possible need for further regulatory clarity, by major changes to the rule, related to the design bases and siting of a geologic repository operations area and radiological emergency planning in order to assure defense-in-depth. The analyses, presented in this report, resulted in the development and refinement of regulatory concepts and their supporting rationale for recommendations for potential major changes to 10 CFR Pan 0 regulations.

  17. Data Acceptance Criteria for Standardized Human-Associated Fecal Source Identification Quantitative Real-Time PCR Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kelty, Catherine A.; Oshiro, Robin; Haugland, Richard A.; Madi, Tania; Brooks, Lauren; Field, Katharine G.; Sivaganesan, Mano

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality management. The transition from a research tool to a standardized protocol requires a high degree of confidence in data quality across laboratories. Data quality is typically determined through a series of specifications that ensure good experimental practice and the absence of bias in the results due to DNA isolation and amplification interferences. However, there is currently a lack of consensus on how best to evaluate and interpret human fecal source identification qPCR experiments. This is, in part, due to the lack of standardized protocols and information on interlaboratory variability under conditions for data acceptance. The aim of this study is to provide users and reviewers with a complete series of conditions for data acceptance derived from a multiple laboratory data set using standardized procedures. To establish these benchmarks, data from HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 human-associated qPCR methods were generated across 14 laboratories. Each laboratory followed a standardized protocol utilizing the same lot of reference DNA materials, DNA isolation kits, amplification reagents, and test samples to generate comparable data. After removal of outliers, a nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to establish proficiency metrics that include lab-to-lab, replicate testing within a lab, and random error for amplification inhibition and sample processing controls. Other data acceptance measurements included extraneous DNA contamination assessments (no-template and extraction blank controls) and calibration model performance (correlation coefficient, amplification efficiency, and lower limit of quantification). To demonstrate the implementation of the proposed standardized protocols and data acceptance criteria, comparable data from two additional laboratories were reviewed. The data acceptance criteria

  18. Data Acceptance Criteria for Standardized Human-Associated Fecal Source Identification Quantitative Real-Time PCR Methods.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Orin C; Kelty, Catherine A; Oshiro, Robin; Haugland, Richard A; Madi, Tania; Brooks, Lauren; Field, Katharine G; Sivaganesan, Mano

    2016-05-01

    There is growing interest in the application of human-associated fecal source identification quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technologies for water quality management. The transition from a research tool to a standardized protocol requires a high degree of confidence in data quality across laboratories. Data quality is typically determined through a series of specifications that ensure good experimental practice and the absence of bias in the results due to DNA isolation and amplification interferences. However, there is currently a lack of consensus on how best to evaluate and interpret human fecal source identification qPCR experiments. This is, in part, due to the lack of standardized protocols and information on interlaboratory variability under conditions for data acceptance. The aim of this study is to provide users and reviewers with a complete series of conditions for data acceptance derived from a multiple laboratory data set using standardized procedures. To establish these benchmarks, data from HF183/BacR287 and HumM2 human-associated qPCR methods were generated across 14 laboratories. Each laboratory followed a standardized protocol utilizing the same lot of reference DNA materials, DNA isolation kits, amplification reagents, and test samples to generate comparable data. After removal of outliers, a nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to establish proficiency metrics that include lab-to-lab, replicate testing within a lab, and random error for amplification inhibition and sample processing controls. Other data acceptance measurements included extraneous DNA contamination assessments (no-template and extraction blank controls) and calibration model performance (correlation coefficient, amplification efficiency, and lower limit of quantification). To demonstrate the implementation of the proposed standardized protocols and data acceptance criteria, comparable data from two additional laboratories were reviewed. The data acceptance criteria

  19. ENVIROCARE OF UTAH: EXPANDING WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA TO PROVIDE LOW-LEVEL AND MIXED WASTE DISPOSAL OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, B.; Loveland, K.

    2003-02-27

    Envirocare of Utah operates a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility 80 miles west of Salt Lake City in Clive, Utah. Accepted waste types includes NORM, 11e2 byproduct material, Class A low-level waste, and mixed waste. Since 1988, Envirocare has offered disposal options for environmental restoration waste for both government and commercial remediation projects. Annual waste receipts exceed 12 million cubic feet. The waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the Envirocare facility have significantly expanded to accommodate the changing needs of restoration projects and waste generators since its inception, including acceptable physical waste forms, radiological acceptance criteria, RCRA requirements and treatment capabilities, PCB acceptance, and liquids acceptance. Additionally, there are many packaging, transportation, and waste management options for waste streams acceptable at Envirocare. Many subcontracting vehicles are also available to waste generators for both government and commercial activities.

  20. Preliminary Mark-18A (Mk-18A) Target Material Recovery Program Product Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sharon M.; Patton, Bradley D.

    2016-09-01

    The Mk-18A Target Material Recovery Program (MTMRP) was established in 2015 to preserve the unique materials, e.g. 244Pu, in 65 previously irradiated Mk-18A targets for future use. This program utilizes existing capabilities at SRS and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to process targets, recover materials from them, and to package the recovered materials for shipping to ORNL. It also utilizes existing capabilities at ORNL to receive and store the recovered materials, and to provide any additional processing of the recovered materials or residuals required to prepare them for future beneficial use. The MTMRP is presently preparing for the processing of these valuable targets which is expected to begin in ~2019. As part of the preparations for operations, this report documents the preliminary acceptance criteria for the plutonium and heavy curium materials to be recovered from the Mk-18A targets at SRNL for transport and storage at ORNL. These acceptance criteria were developed based on preliminary concepts developed for processing, transporting, and storing the recovered Mk-18A materials. They will need to be refined as these concepts are developed in more detail.

  1. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

  2. Survey of compliance with European acceptability criteria for HVL and AEC.

    PubMed

    Kepler, K; Vladimirov, A

    2013-02-01

    Half value layer (HVL) was measured for 226 general radiographic X-ray tube assemblies at 80 kV and for 53 dental X-ray tube assemblies at 70 kV, and evaluated by the previous (1997) and the new draft of European acceptability criteria (2009) for HVL as adopted from the IEC collateral standards. Fourteen per cent of the tested general radiography X-ray tube assemblies were subject to readjustment by the new criteria. In routine quality control tests, receptor entrance dose was estimated for 54 AEC systems by using post-exposure mAs values, taking into account the measured tube output at different tube potentials, HVL and estimated scattering for 10, 15 and 21 cm PMMA phantom. Receptor dose (third quartile) varied from 6.4 μGy at 60 kV to 3.8 μGy at 125 kV. The results correspond well to the draft criteria for maximum receptor dose of 10 μGy and for the patient thickness compensation.

  3. Initial Acceptance Criteria Concepts and Data for Assessing Longevity of Low-Voltage Cable Insulations and Jackets

    SciTech Connect

    Gary toman

    2005-03-30

    This report establishes a basis for acceptance criteria, provides a method for estimating remaining low-voltage cable life, and provides aging profiles under various thermal and radiation conditions for available cable polymer condition-monitoring techniques. This report is not meant to be the final comprehensive source of acceptance criteria, but rather is intended for trial usage so that it can be further refined for easier reference in the future.

  4. Objective criteria for acceptability and constancy tests of digital subtraction angiography.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, Hugo; Torres, Ricardo; Fernández-Soto, José Miguel; Vañó, Eliseo

    2016-01-01

    Demonstrate an objective procedure to quantify image quality in digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and suggest thresholds for acceptability and constancy tests. Series of images were obtained in a DSA system simulating a small (paediatric) and a large patient using the dynamic phantom described in the IEC and DIN standards for acceptance tests of DSA equipment. Image quality was quantified using measurements of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Overall scores combining the CNR of 10-100 mg/ml Iodine at a vascular diameter of 1-4 mm in a homogeneous background were defined. Phantom entrance surface air kerma (Ka,e) was measured with an ionisation chamber. The visibility of a low-contrast vessel in DSA images has been identified with a CNR value of 0.50 ± 0.03. Despite using 14 times more Ka,e (8.85 vs 0.63 mGy/image), the protocol for large patients showed a decrease in the overall score CNRsum of 67% (4.21 ± 0.06 vs 2.10 ± 0.05). The uncertainty in the results of the objective method was below 5%. Objective evaluation of DSA images using CNR is feasible with dedicated phantom measurements. An objective methodology has been suggested for acceptance tests compliant with the IEC/DIN standards. The defined overall scores can serve to fix a reproducible baseline for constancy tests, as well as to study the device stability within one acquisition series and compare different imaging protocols. This work provides aspects that have not been included in the recent European guidelines on Criteria for Acceptability of Medical Radiological Equipment. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 40 CFR 90.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 90.510 Section 90.510....510 Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for...

  6. 40 CFR 89.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 89.510 Section 89.510... Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for...

  7. 40 CFR 91.608 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 91.608 Section 91.608... with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. (a... manufacturer must test engines comprising the test sample until a pass decision is reached for HC+NOX or a...

  8. 40 CFR 90.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 90.510 Section 90.510....510 Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for one...

  9. 40 CFR 89.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 89.510 Section 89.510... Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for one...

  10. 40 CFR 90.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 90.510 Section 90.510....510 Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for one...

  11. 40 CFR 91.608 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 91.608 Section 91.608... with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. (a... manufacturer must test engines comprising the test sample until a pass decision is reached for HC+NOX or a fail...

  12. 40 CFR 89.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 89.510 Section 89.510... Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for one...

  13. 40 CFR 89.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 89.510 Section 89.510... Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for one...

  14. 40 CFR 91.608 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 91.608 Section 91.608... with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. (a... manufacturer must test engines comprising the test sample until a pass decision is reached for HC+NOX or a fail...

  15. 40 CFR 91.608 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 91.608 Section 91.608... with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. (a... manufacturer must test engines comprising the test sample until a pass decision is reached for HC+NOX or a fail...

  16. 40 CFR 91.608 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 91.608 Section 91.608... with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. (a... manufacturer must test engines comprising the test sample until a pass decision is reached for HC+NOX or a fail...

  17. 40 CFR 89.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 89.510 Section 89.510... Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for one...

  18. 40 CFR 90.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 90.510 Section 90.510....510 Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for one...

  19. 40 CFR 90.510 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for selective enforcement audits. 90.510 Section 90.510....510 Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for selective... test sample until a pass decision is reached for all pollutants or a fail decision is reached for one...

  20. Modeling carbon turnover in five terrestrial ecosystems in the boreal zone using multiple criteria of acceptance.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Louise; Gustafsson, David; Jansson, Per-Erik

    2006-12-01

    Estimates of carbon fluxes and turnover in ecosystems are key elements in the understanding of climate change and in predicting the accumulation of trace elements in the biosphere. In this paper we present estimates of carbon fluxes and turnover times for five terrestrial ecosystems using a modeling approach. Multiple criteria of acceptance were used to parameterize the model, thus incorporating large amounts of multi-faceted empirical data in the simulations in a standardized manner. Mean turnover times of carbon were found to be rather similar between systems with a few exceptions, even though the size of both the pools and the fluxes varied substantially. Depending on the route of the carbon through the ecosystem, turnover times varied from less than one year to more than one hundred, which may be of importance when considering trace element transport and retention. The parameterization method was useful both in the estimation of unknown parameters, and to identify variability in carbon turnover in the selected ecosystems.

  1. Proposed GTA welding specification and acceptance criteria for the MC4163

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiatkowski, J.J.

    1991-04-12

    This specification documents the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process and production weld acceptance criteria requirements for the MC4163. This document is written specifically to apply to the welds on the MC4163 and is not to be used as a general gas tungsten arc welding specification. All sections of this specification must be complied with unless specifically exempted in writing. There are a total of five welds with three different joint designs required to fabricate the MC4163. In the order of fabrication they are (1) initiator closure disc, (2) nozzle to case girth welds, two and, (3) nozzle closure disc welds, two. This specification will only address the nozzle to case girth welds and the nozzle closure disc welds.

  2. Heat exchanger staybolt acceptance criteria. Task number: 90-058-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.; Barnes, D.M.

    1992-02-01

    The structural integrity demonstration of the primary coolant piping system includes evaluating the structural capacity of each component against a large break or equivalent Double-Ended Guillotine Break. A large break at the inlet or outlet heads of the heat exchangers would occur if the restraint members of the heads become inactive. The structural integrity of the heads is demonstrated by showing the redundant capacity of the staybolts to restrain the head at design conditions and under seismic loadings. The Savannah River Site heat exchanger head is attached to the tubesheet by 84 staybolts. Access to the staybolts is limited due to a welded seal cap over the staybolts. An ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection technique to provide an in-situ examination of the staybolts has recently been developed at SRS. Examination of the staybolts will be performed to ensure their service condition and configuration is within acceptance limits. An acceptance criteria methodology has been developed to disposition flaws reported in the staybolt inspections while ensuring adequate restraint capacity of the staybolts to maintain integrity of the heat exchanger heads against collapse. The methodology includes an approach for the baseline and periodic inspections of the staybolts. The heat exchanger head is analyzed with a three-dimensional finite element model. The restraint provided by the staybolts is evaluated for several postulated cases of inactive or missing staybolts. Evaluation of specific, inactive staybolt configurations based on the UT results can be performed with the finite element model and fracture methodology in this report.

  3. 105 K East isolation barrier acceptance analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, K.J.; Irwin, J.J.

    1995-05-31

    The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KE/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan (McCracken 1995c) and acceptance test procedure (McCracken 1995a). The test report (McCracken 1995b) contains the test data. This document compares the test data (McCracken 1995b) against the criteria (McCracken 1995a, c). A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization (Irwin 1995) describes how the flow characteristics and the flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report (McCracken 1995b). The barriers must adequately control the leakage from the main basin to the discharge chute to less than the 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) Safety Analysis Report (SAR 1994) limit.

  4. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multiple-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic In-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  5. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multi-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Poh -Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic in-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  6. Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, A.

    2010-05-05

    The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

  7. 21 CFR 212.70 - What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products? 212.70 Section 212.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE...

  8. 21 CFR 212.70 - What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products? 212.70 Section 212.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE...

  9. 21 CFR 212.70 - What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products? 212.70 Section 212.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE...

  10. 21 CFR 212.70 - What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products? 212.70 Section 212.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE...

  11. 21 CFR 212.70 - What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What controls and acceptance criteria must I have for my finished PET drug products? 212.70 Section 212.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE...

  12. 32 CFR 37.530 - What criteria do I use in deciding whether to accept a recipient's cost sharing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and development (IR&D) costs, as described at 32 CFR 34.13(a)(5)(ii), that meet all of the criteria in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section. IR&D is acceptable as cost sharing, even though it may be... procurement contracts is recovered as IR&D) through prices charged to their customers. Thus, the...

  13. 32 CFR 37.530 - What criteria do I use in deciding whether to accept a recipient's cost sharing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and development (IR&D) costs, as described at 32 CFR 34.13(a)(5)(ii), that meet all of the criteria in paragraphs (a) through (e) of this section. IR&D is acceptable as cost sharing, even though it may be... procurement contracts is recovered as IR&D) through prices charged to their customers. Thus, the...

  14. Acceptance Probability (P a) Analysis for Process Validation Lifecycle Stages.

    PubMed

    Alsmeyer, Daniel; Pazhayattil, Ajay; Chen, Shu; Munaretto, Francesco; Hye, Maksuda; Sanghvi, Pradeep

    2016-04-01

    This paper introduces an innovative statistical approach towards understanding how variation impacts the acceptance criteria of quality attributes. Because of more complex stage-wise acceptance criteria, traditional process capability measures are inadequate for general application in the pharmaceutical industry. The probability of acceptance concept provides a clear measure, derived from specific acceptance criteria for each quality attribute. In line with the 2011 FDA Guidance, this approach systematically evaluates data and scientifically establishes evidence that a process is capable of consistently delivering quality product. The probability of acceptance provides a direct and readily understandable indication of product risk. As with traditional capability indices, the acceptance probability approach assumes that underlying data distributions are normal. The computational solutions for dosage uniformity and dissolution acceptance criteria are readily applicable. For dosage uniformity, the expected AV range may be determined using the s lo and s hi values along with the worst case estimates of the mean. This approach permits a risk-based assessment of future batch performance of the critical quality attributes. The concept is also readily applicable to sterile/non sterile liquid dose products. Quality attributes such as deliverable volume and assay per spray have stage-wise acceptance that can be converted into an acceptance probability. Accepted statistical guidelines indicate processes with C pk > 1.33 as performing well within statistical control and those with C pk < 1.0 as "incapable" (1). A C pk > 1.33 is associated with a centered process that will statistically produce less than 63 defective units per million. This is equivalent to an acceptance probability of >99.99%.

  15. Structural acceptance criteria for the evaulation of existing double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Julyk, L.J.; Day, A.D.; Dyrness, A.D.; Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Scott, M.A.; Shrivastava, H.P.; Sholman, J.S.; Watts, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    The structural acceptance criteria contained herein for the evaluation of existing underground double-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site is part of the Life Management/Aging Management Program of the Tank Waste Remediation System. The purpose of the overall life management program is to ensure that confinement of the waste is maintained over the required service life of the tanks. Characterization of the present condition of the tanks, understanding and characterization of potential degradation mechanisms, and development of tank structural acceptance criteria based on previous service and projected use are prerequisites to assessing tank integrity, to projecting the length of tank service, and to developing and applying prudent fixes or repairs. The criteria provided herein summarize the requirements for the analysis and structural qualification of the existing double-shell tanks for continued operation. Code reconciliation issues and material degradation under aging conditions are addressed. Although the criteria were developed for double-shell tanks, many of the provisions are equally applicable to single-shell tanks. However, the criteria do not apply to the evaluation of tank appurtenances and buried piping.

  16. Acceptance: what's in a name? A content analysis of acceptance instruments in individuals with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Lauwerier, Emelien; Caes, Line; Van Damme, Stefaan; Goubert, Liesbet; Rosseel, Yves; Crombez, Geert

    2015-04-01

    Instruments to assess chronic pain acceptance have been developed and used. However, whether and to what extent the content of the items reflects acceptance remain uninvestigated. A content analysis of 13 instruments that aim to measure acceptance of chronic pain was performed. A coding scheme was used that consisted of 3 categories representing the key components of acceptance, that is, disengagement from pain control, pain willingness, and engagement in activities other than pain control. The coding scheme consisted of 5 additional categories in order to code items that do not represent acceptance, that is, controlling pain, pain costs, pain benefits, unclear, and no fit. Two coders rated to what extent the items of acceptance instruments belonged to one or more of these categories. Results indicated that acceptance categories were not equally represented in the acceptance instruments. Of note, some instruments had many items in the category controlling pain. Further analyses revealed that the meaning of acceptance differs among different instruments and among different versions of the same instrument. This study illustrates the importance of content validity when developing and evaluating self-report instruments. This article investigated the content validity of questionnaires designed to measure acceptance in individuals with chronic pain. Knowledge about the content of the instruments will provide further insight into the features of acceptance and how to measure them. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acceptance criteria for ultrasonic flaw indications in the inner liner of double-shell waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, F.A.; Graves, R.E.; Johnson, K.I.

    1995-07-01

    Radioactive defense waste, resulting from the chemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, has been stored in double-shell tanks (DSTS) at the Hanford Site since 1970. As part of the program to assure that the DSTs maintain their structural integrity, an inspection plan is being developed and implemented. This report provides recommendations and technical bases for acceptance criteria for flaw indications detected during ultrasonic inspection of inner liners of the DSTS. The types of indications addressed are crack-like flaws, wall thinning, and pitting. In establishing acceptable flaw sizes, the evaluations have taken into consideration the potential for crack growth by the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking. Consideration was given to technical approaches used in ASME Codes, for reactor tanks at the Department of Energy Savannah River facilities, and in recommendations by the Tank Structural Integrity Panel. The goal was to ensure that indications discovered during inspections are not large enough to ever cause a leak or rupture of the tank inner liner. The acceptance criteria are intended to be simple to apply using a set of tables giving acceptable flaw sizes. These tables are sufficiently conservative to be applicable to all double-shell tanks. In those cases that a flaw exceeds the size permitted by the tables, it is proposed that additional criteria permit more detailed and less conservative evaluations to address specific conditions of stress levels, operating temperature, flaw location, and material properties.

  18. Coastal zone management with stochastic multi-criteria analysis.

    PubMed

    Félix, A; Baquerizo, A; Santiago, J M; Losada, M A

    2012-12-15

    The methodology for coastal management proposed in this study takes into account the physical processes of the coastal system and the stochastic nature of forcing agents. Simulation techniques are used to assess the uncertainty in the performance of a set of predefined management strategies based on different criteria representing the main concerns of interest groups. This statistical information as well as the distribution function that characterizes the uncertainty regarding the preferences of the decision makers is fed into a stochastic multi-criteria acceptability analysis that provides the probability of alternatives obtaining certain ranks and also calculates the preferences of a typical decision maker who supports an alternative. This methodology was applied as a management solution for Playa Granada in the Guadalfeo River Delta (Granada, Spain), where the construction of a dam in the river basin is causing severe erosion. The analysis of shoreline evolution took into account the coupled action of atmosphere, ocean, and land agents and their intrinsic stochastic character. This study considered five different management strategies. The criteria selected for the analysis were the economic benefits for three interest groups: (i) indirect beneficiaries of tourist activities; (ii) beach homeowners; and (iii) the administration. The strategies were ranked according to their effectiveness, and the relative importance given to each criterion was obtained.

  19. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Strategy for Revising the RIA Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, Paul M.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued interim criteria and guidance for the reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) within the latest revision to NUREG-0800, 'Standard Review Plan' (SRP), Section 4.2, 'Fuel System Design', Appendix B (Revision 03, March 2007). The purpose of this paper is as follows: 1. present a change in regulatory staff position regarding the requirements of 10 CFR 50, Appendix A, General Design Criteria 28 (GDC28) and changes in regulatory guidance provided in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.77, RG 1.195, RG 1.183, and previous versions of NUREG-0800 SRP; 2. describe the implementation strategy and schedule for both new reactors and the existing fleet; and 3. encourage licensees and nuclear fuel vendors to (1) develop improved core physics analytical methods to allow a more deliberate transition to the new fuel cladding failure criteria and (2) develop the technical basis to address the new core coolability criteria. (authors)

  20. Acceptance of dying: a discourse analysis of palliative care literature.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Camilla

    2012-07-01

    The subject of death denial in the West has been examined extensively in the sociological literature. However, there has not been a similar examination of its "opposite", the acceptance of death. In this study, I use the qualitative method of discourse analysis to examine the use of the term "acceptance" of dying in the palliative care literature from 1970 to 2001. A Medline search was performed by combining the text words "accept or acceptance" with the subject headings "terminal care or palliative care or hospice care", and restricting the search to English language articles in clinical journals discussing acceptance of death in adults. The 40 articles were coded and analysed using a critical discourse analysis method. This paper focuses on the theme of acceptance as integral to palliative care, which had subthemes of acceptance as a goal of care, personal acceptance of healthcare workers, and acceptance as a facilitator of care. For patients and families, death acceptance is a goal that they can be helped to attain; for palliative care staff, acceptance of dying is a personal quality that is a precondition for effective practice. Acceptance not only facilitates the dying process for the patient and family, but also renders care easier. The analysis investigates the intertextuality of these themes with each other and with previous texts. From a Foucauldian perspective, I suggest that the discourse on acceptance of dying represents a productive power, which disciplines patients through apparent psychological and spiritual gratification, and encourages participation in a certain way to die.

  1. R&D Plan for RISMC Industry Application #1: ECCS/LOCA Cladding Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques; Zhang, Hongbin; Epiney, Aaron Simon; Tu, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is finalizing a rulemaking change that would revise the requirements in 10 CFR 50.46. In the proposed new rulemaking, designated as 10 CFR 50.46c, the NRC proposes a fuel performance-based equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) criterion as a function of cladding hydrogen content before the accident (pre-transient) in order to include the effects of higher burnup on cladding performance as well as to address other technical issues. A loss of operational margin may result due to the more restrictive cladding embrittlement criteria. Initial and future compliance with the rule may significantly increase vendor workload and licensee costs as a spectrum of fuel rod initial burnup states may need to be analyzed to demonstrate compliance. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a project, as part of the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), to develop analytical capabilities to support the industry in the transition to the new rule. This project is called the Industry Application 1 (IA1) within the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway of LWRS. The general idea behind the initiative is the development of an Integrated Evaluation Model (IEM). The motivation is to develop a multiphysics framework to analyze how uncertainties are propagated across the stream of physical disciplines and data involved, as well as how risks are evaluated in a LOCA safety analysis as regulated under 10 CFR 50.46c. This IEM is called LOTUS which stands for LOCA Toolkit for US, and it represents the LWRS Program’s response to the proposed new rule making. The focus of this report is to complete an R&D plan to describe the demonstration of the LOCA/ECCS RISMC Industry Application # 1 using the advanced RISMC Toolkit and methodologies. This report includes the description and development plan for a RISMC LOCA tool that fully couples advanced MOOSE tools already in development in order to characterize and optimize

  2. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  3. Preliminary waste acceptance criteria for the ICPP spent fuel and waste management technology development program

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify requirements to be met by the Producer/Shipper of Spent Nuclear Fuel/High-LeveL Waste SNF/HLW in order for DOE to be able to accept the packaged materials. This includes defining both standard and nonstandard waste forms.

  4. 77 FR 51880 - Requirements for Maintenance of Inspections, Tests, Analyses, and Acceptance Criteria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 2 and 52 RIN 3150-AI77 Requirements for Maintenance of Inspections, Tests, Analyses... the finding under 10 CFR 52.103(g), as the ITAAC maintenance period. Most recently, the NRC held two... maintenance programs to ensure that structures, systems, and components continue to meet the ITAAC acceptance...

  5. Vestibular migraine: comparative analysis between diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Salmito, Márcio Cavalcante; Morganti, Lígia Oliveira Gonçalves; Nakao, Bruno Higa; Simões, Juliana Caminha; Duarte, Juliana Antoniolli; Ganança, Fernando Freitas

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong association between vertigo and migraine. Vestibular migraine (VM) was described in 1999, and diagnostic criteria were proposed in 2001 and revised in 2012. To compare the diagnostic criteria for VM proposed in 2001 with 2012 criteria with respect to their diagnostic power and therapeutic effect of VM prophylaxis. Clinical chart review of patients attended to in a VM clinic. The 2012 criteria made the diagnosis more specific, restricting the diagnosis of VM to a smaller number of patients, such that 87.7% of patients met 2001 criteria and 77.8% met 2012 criteria. Prophylaxis for VM was effective both for patients diagnosed by either set of criteria and for those who did not meet any of the criteria. The 2012 diagnostic criteria for VM limited the diagnosis of the disease to a smaller number of patients, mainly because of the type, intensity, and duration of dizziness. Patients diagnosed with migraine and associated dizziness demonstrated improvement after prophylactic treatment of VM, even when they did not meet diagnostic criteria. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Compliance with the Nevada Test Site`s waste acceptance criteria for vitrified cesium-loaded crystalline silicotitanates

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.R.; Andrews, M.K.

    1997-06-01

    As part of a joint project between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), Cs-137 loaded crystalline silicotitanate (CST) sorbent will be vitrified in a joule-heated melter. Glass formulation development for this CST sorbent is discussed in an accompanying abstract for this conference. One of the objectives for this project was to ensure that the vitrified waste form could be disposed of at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). To accomplish this objective, the waste form must meet the NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). This paper presents SRTC`s efforts at ensuring that the glass waste form produced as a result of vitrification of CST will meet all of the criteria of the WAC. The producer must demonstrate that the waste is neither TRU nor mixed, and that the glass has a radionuclide content which is less than the Class C limit of 4,600 Ci/m{sup 3}. The impact of this requirement on the CST loading in the glass is discussed along with the benefits to the producer which result if greater than Class C waste is accepted by NTS since this limit may be relaxed in the near future. This paper demonstrates that vitrification leads to a waste form which meets all of the criteria of the NTS WAC.

  7. HNS-I small-scale gap-test acceptance-criteria investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Demerson, E.L.

    1982-12-01

    HNS-I small scale gap tests were conducted at three densities to determine the effect of density on gap sensitivity and the reproducibility of the gap test. Density was found to have a lower effect on sensitivity than the existing HNS-I acceptance region indicates. The reproducibility of the gap test was determined to be +- 0.21 db at a 95% confidence level.

  8. Improve Quality of Life - additional criteria for health and social care information technology acceptance in an ageing world.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Reversing the rising cost of health and social systems is needed in ageing developed and developing countries. A new model of ageing is advocated by the World Health Organization. This new model asks for more personal health accountability and a more integrated approach on care and preventive cure. Information systems and technologies can play an important role in supporting the changes needed in order to have better and more sustainable health and social care systems. Using value and results for patients as criteria by which systems are accepted by users and by organizations can contribute to a value based competition in health and social care systems. The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology is presented, and the pertinence of adding an extension to the theory in order capture Quality of Life improvements expectations is explored.

  9. How do the Properties of Allan Hills 84001 Compare With Accepted Criteria for Evidence of Ancient Life?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Westall, F.; Romanek, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    Criteria for Past Life: To be confident that any sample contains evidence of past life or biogenic activity, one must determine beyond a shadow of a doubt that certain well-established features or biomarker signatures are present in the sample. In the case of martian samples, the criteria for past life have not been established because if life existed on the planet, we have no way of knowing its detailed characteristics. Lacking independent evidence about the nature of possible past life on Mars, the scientific community must use, for the time being, the criteria established for ancient samples from the Earth: (1) Do we know the geologic context of the sample? Is it compatible with past life? (2) Do we know the age of the sample and its stratigraphic location? Are they understood enough to relate possible life to geologic history? (3) Does the sample contain evidence of cellular morphology? (4) What structural remains of colonies or communities exist within the samples? (5) Is there any evidence of biominerals showing chemical or mineral disequilibria? (6) Is there any evidence of stable isotope patterns unique to biology? (7) Are there any organic biomarkers present? (8) Are the features indigenous to the sample? For acceptance of past life in a geologic sample, essentially all of these criteria must he met.

  10. How do the Properties of Allan Hills 84001 Compare With Accepted Criteria for Evidence of Ancient Life?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Westall, F.; Romanek, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    Criteria for Past Life: To be confident that any sample contains evidence of past life or biogenic activity, one must determine beyond a shadow of a doubt that certain well-established features or biomarker signatures are present in the sample. In the case of martian samples, the criteria for past life have not been established because if life existed on the planet, we have no way of knowing its detailed characteristics. Lacking independent evidence about the nature of possible past life on Mars, the scientific community must use, for the time being, the criteria established for ancient samples from the Earth: (1) Do we know the geologic context of the sample? Is it compatible with past life? (2) Do we know the age of the sample and its stratigraphic location? Are they understood enough to relate possible life to geologic history? (3) Does the sample contain evidence of cellular morphology? (4) What structural remains of colonies or communities exist within the samples? (5) Is there any evidence of biominerals showing chemical or mineral disequilibria? (6) Is there any evidence of stable isotope patterns unique to biology? (7) Are there any organic biomarkers present? (8) Are the features indigenous to the sample? For acceptance of past life in a geologic sample, essentially all of these criteria must he met.

  11. SU-E-T-60: A Plan Quality Index in IMRT QA That Is Independent of the Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D; Kang, S; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In IMRT QA, plan quality evaluation is made based on pass rate under preset acceptance criteria, mostly using gamma-values. This method is convenient but, its Result highly depends on what the acceptance criteria are and suffers from the lack of sensitivity in judging how good the plan is. In this study, we introduced a simple but effective plan quality index of IMRT QA based on dose difference only to supplement such shortcomings, and investigated its validity. Methods: The proposed index is a single value which is calculated mainly based on point-by-point comparison between planned and measured dose distributions, and it becomes “1” in an ideal case. A systematic evaluation was performed with one-dimensional test dose distributions. For 3 hypothetical dose profiles, various displacements (in both dose and space) were introduced, the proposed index was calculated for each case, and the behavior of obtained indices was analyzed and compared with that of gamma evaluation. In addition, the feasibility of the index was assessed with clinical IMRT/VMAT/SBRT QA cases for different sites (prostate, head & neck, liver, lung, spine, and abdomen). Results: The proposed index showed more robust correlation with the amount of induced displacement compared to the gamma evaluation method. No matter what the acceptance criteria are (e.g., whether 3%/3mm or 2%/2mm), it was possible to clearly rank every case with the proposed index while it was difficult to do with the gamma evaluation method. Conclusion: IMRT plan quality can be evaluated quantitatively by the proposed index. It is considered that the proposed index would provide useful information for better judging the level of goodness of each plan and its Result is independent of the acceptance criteria. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the

  12. A FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP FLAW ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPURPOSE CANISTERS FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.; Duncan, A.; Adams, T.

    2014-04-07

    A multipurpose canister (MPC) made of austenitic stainless steel is loaded with used nuclear fuel assemblies and is part of the transfer cask system to move the fuel from the spent fuel pool to prepare for storage, and is part of the storage cask system for on-site dry storage. This weld-sealed canister is also expected to be part of the transportation package following storage. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation especially if exposed to aggressive environments during possible very long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone because the construction of MPC does not require heat treatment for stress relief. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic Inservice Inspection. The external loading cases include thermal accident scenarios and cask drop conditions with the contribution from the welding residual stresses. The determination of acceptable flaw size is based on the procedure to evaluate flaw stability provided by American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service (Second Edition). The material mechanical and fracture properties for base and weld metals and the stress analysis results are obtained from the open literature such as NUREG-1864. Subcritical crack growth from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and its impact on inspection intervals and acceptance criteria, is not addressed.

  13. Prototype Training Materials for Acceptance Criteria of Maintenance ASAP Events Occurring Within Social Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    The aviation maintenance community is at a crossroads with respect to implementing the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP). While there is considerable interest, several key issues have emerged that cast doubt on how to assure a successful implementation, including buy-in from all levels of the company and training for key participants. There are two objectives for the present report. The first is to provide an examination of limits (or more properly, examples) of the degree of acceptability of more problematic events for risk-based decisions within the current ASAP guidelines. The second objective is to apply these limits of community standards to a set of further refined ASAP training scenarios.

  14. Radioactive waste management: review on clearance levels and acceptance criteria legislation, requirements and standards.

    PubMed

    Maringer, F J; Suráň, J; Kovář, P; Chauvenet, B; Peyres, V; García-Toraño, E; Cozzella, M L; De Felice, P; Vodenik, B; Hult, M; Rosengård, U; Merimaa, M; Szücs, L; Jeffery, C; Dean, J C J; Tymiński, Z; Arnold, D; Hinca, R; Mirescu, G

    2013-11-01

    In 2011 the joint research project Metrology for Radioactive Waste Management (MetroRWM)(1) of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) started with a total duration of three years. Within this project, new metrological resources for the assessment of radioactive waste, including their calibration with new reference materials traceable to national standards will be developed. This paper gives a review on national, European and international strategies as basis for science-based metrological requirements in clearance and acceptance of radioactive waste. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stakeholder acceptance analysis ResonantSonic drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning ResonantSonic Drilling (Sonic Drilling), derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. Sonic Drilling is an innovative method to reach contamination in soil and groundwater. The resonant sonic drill rig uses counter-rotating weights to generate energy, which causes the drill pipe to vibrate elastically along its entire length. In the resonant condition, forces of up to 200,000 pounds are transmitted to the drill bit face to create a cutting action. The resonant energy causes subsurface materials to move back into the adjacent formation, permitting the drill pipe to advance. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of sonic drilling to the remediation problems they face.

  16. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States.

  17. Air Force use of civil airworthiness criteria for testing and acceptance of military derivative transport aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, R.I.; Chapman, D.M.; Langley, M.J.; Fouts, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of commercial aircraft programs and the use of FAA certification criteria in the acquisition of off-the-shelf transport aircraft by the USAF to fulfill its airlift requirements is presented. In addition, major differences between military and commercial test programs and acquisition are cited to illustrate the principal benefits to the Air Force of this method. Significantly reduced acquisition time, and reduced ground and flight testing and development costs are shown as benefits of this process. The unique aspects of certification of military derivatives, recent initiatives to codify the processes, and the impacts on changes required in the manner in which the USAF currently contracts for aircraft are discussed. 20 refs.

  18. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  19. Analysis of the impact of safeguards criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, M.F.; Reardon, P.T.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked to assist in developing and demonstrating a model for assessing the impact of setting criteria for the application of IAEA safeguards. This report presents the results of PNL's work on the task. The report is in three parts. The first explains the technical approach and methodology. The second contains an example application of the methodology. The third presents the conclusions of the study. PNL used the model and computer programs developed as part of Task C.5 (Estimation of Inspection Efforts) of the Program of Technical Assistance. The example application of the methodology involves low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication facilities. The effects of variations in seven parameters are considered: false alarm probability, goal probability of detection, detection goal quantity, the plant operator's measurement capability, the inspector's variables measurement capability, the inspector's attributes measurement capability, and annual plant throughput. Among the key results and conclusions of the analysis are the following: the variables with the greatest impact on the probability of detection are the inspector's measurement capability, the goal quantity, and the throughput; the variables with the greatest impact on inspection costs are the throughput, the goal quantity, and the goal probability of detection; there are important interactions between variables. That is, the effects of a given variable often depends on the level or value of some other variable. With the methodology used in this study, these interactions can be quantitatively analyzed; reasonably good approximate prediction equations can be developed using the methodology described here.

  20. [Preanalytical phase and accreditation: acceptance criteria for samples of multisite laboratory].

    PubMed

    Dialma, Pascale; Piaulenne, Stéphane; Baty, Sonia; Zeitoun, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Performing high quality analyses in order to help physicians in their diagnoses and to ensure better patient care: this represents our routine mission for clinical lab. To achieve this goal, all steps from sampling to the final data transfer must be controlled. The preanalytical phase is one of the most crucial, but also one of the most complicated, especially in the context of a consolidated laboratory network. Transport conditions, delays, temperature, regulatory constraints are all criteria that we need to take into consideration in order to comply to ISO 15189, section 5.4. In this context, our laboratory would like to address the following issues: to control the transport conditions in order to guarantee optimal preservation of the samples, and to define an internal process and identify non-conforming situations linked to delay in sample delivery. An original study dealing with the stability in whole blood of common clinical chemistry and immunochemistry tests in defined transport conditions (delays, temperature, tube position) was performed on a panel of 100 patients' samples. This panel is intended to be a good reflection of the patients usually seen in multi-site laboratory. We observed that most of the analytes (35 of 41) were stable in whole blood; however, some of them demonstrated instability over time. All these results were integrated into our collection manual.

  1. Alternative acceptance criteria of girth weld defects in cross country pipelines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, R.M.; Lefevre, T.

    1997-06-01

    The failure behaviour of defective girth welds in large diameter pipe lines was assessed using radiographic and mechanised ultrasonic inspection, small scale (tensile, hardness, Charpy and CTOD) and wide plate tests. The specimens were taken from girth welds in API 5LX70 pipe of 1219 mm (48 inches) in diameter by 8,0 mm (0,323 inch) and 13,3 mm (0,524 inch) wall. The test welds were made with the SMAW (8 welds) and GMAW (9 welds) welding processes. Upon completion of the non-destructive tests, 96 curved wide plate specimens were tested to destruction under tensile load. Testing was performed at low temperature (-50{degrees}C/-58{degrees}F). Defect type, defect position and size were determined from photographs of the fracture face and macro sections (defect characterisation and sizing). In total, 290 typical surface breaking and embedded defects in SMAW or GMAW girth welds have been evaluated. The vast majority of these defects were grossly out of tolerance with respect to current weld quality (workmanship) acceptance levels. To allow the defect tolerance to be determined, the failure strains and stresses were correlated with a defect length determined for an equivalent 3 mm (0, 118 inch) deep defect. This target depth was chosen to represent the average height of one weld pass. The results of this approach have been compared to wall thickness, current workmanship and the EPRG Tier 2 defect limit for planar defects. The defect lengths were derived for rectangular, parabolic and elliptical defect representations.

  2. EU landfill waste acceptance criteria and EU Hazardous Waste Directive compliance testing of incinerated sewage sludge ash.

    PubMed

    Donatello, S; Tyrer, M; Cheeseman, C R

    2010-01-01

    A hazardous waste assessment has been completed on ash samples obtained from seven sewage sludge incinerators operating in the UK, using the methods recommended in the EU Hazardous Waste Directive. Using these methods, the assumed speciation of zinc (Zn) ultimately determines if the samples are hazardous due to ecotoxicity hazard. Leaching test results showed that two of the seven sewage sludge ash samples would require disposal in a hazardous waste landfill because they exceed EU landfill waste acceptance criteria for stabilised non-reactive hazardous waste cells for soluble selenium (Se). Because Zn cannot be proven to exist predominantly as a phosphate or oxide in the ashes, it is recommended they be considered as non-hazardous waste. However leaching test results demonstrate that these ashes cannot be considered as inert waste, and this has significant implications for the management, disposal and re-use of sewage sludge ash.

  3. Acceptance criteria for flattening filter-free photon beam from standard medical electron linear accelerator: AERB task group recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Sahani, G.; Sharma, S. D.; Sharma, P. K. Dash; Deshpande, D. D.; Negi, P. S.; Sathianarayanan, V. K.; Rath, G. K.

    2014-01-01

    Medical electron linear accelerators with the capability of generating unflat photon (flattening filter-free, FFF) beams are also available commercially for clinical applications in radiotherapy. However, the beam characteristics evaluation criteria and parameters are not yet available for such photon beams. Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) of India constituted a Task Group comprising experts from regulatory agency, advisory body/research and technical institutions, and clinical radiotherapy centers in the country to evolve and recommend the acceptance criteria for the flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams. The Task Group thoroughly reviewed the literature and inputs of the manufactures/suppliers of the FFF linac and recommended a set of dosimetry parameters for evaluating the characteristics of the unflat photon beam. The recommendations included the evaluation of quality index, degree of unflatness, difference in percentage surface dose between flat and unflat photon beams, percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth, off-axis-ratios and radiation beam penumbra. The recommended parameters were evaluated for FFF photon beams generated by three different models of the linac, and it was observed that recommended evaluation methods are simple and easy to be implemented with the existing dosimetry and quality assurance infrastructure of the linac facilities of the radiotherapy departments. Recommendations were also made for periodic quality control check of the unflat photon beams and constancy evaluation in the beam characteristics. PMID:25525307

  4. Modernizing Water Quality Criteria in the United States: A Need to Expand the Definition of Acceptable Data.

    PubMed

    Buchwalter, David B; Clements, William H; Luoma, Samuel N

    2017-02-01

    The development of water quality criteria (WQC) for the protection of aquatic life is a fundamental component of the Clean Water Act-the primary US legislation responsible for protecting aquatic ecosystems from pollution. Water quality criteria define acceptable levels of contamination in the environment and thus play an important role in society. Rules for how science is used to develop WQC were created in 1985. Most rely on only data and knowledge obtained through a single methodology, the single-species laboratory toxicity test. Since 1985, understanding of the fate and effects of environmental contaminants has advanced markedly from multiple perspectives and disciplines. However, many of these advances are routinely discarded in WQC development because they do not adhere to data limits imposed by the 1985 guidelines. The present Focus article outlines how multiple lines of inquiry have played important roles in improving understanding of the ecological implications of environmental contaminants. The authors focus on gains in understanding that would not have been possible through traditional toxicity bioassays alone and argue that more robust scientific understanding can be used to modernize WQC development. In particular, the present article highlights ways to increase the relevance of toxicity testing (at different spatiotemporal scales) and incorporate all relevant lines of evidence into WQC modernization. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:285-291. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  5. Analytical method transfer using equivalence tests with reasonable acceptance criteria and appropriate effort: extension of the ISPE concept.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, L; Schepers, U; Wätzig, H

    2010-12-15

    A method development process is commonly finalized by a method transfer from the developing to the routine laboratory. Statistical tests are performed in order to survey if a transfer succeeded or failed. However, using the classic two-sample t-test can lead to misjudgments and unsatisfying transfer results due to its test characteristics. Therefore the International Society of Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE) employed a fixed method transfer design using equivalence tests in their Guide for Technology Transfer. Although it was well received by analytical laboratories worldwide this fixed design can easily bring about high beta-errors (rejection of successful transfers) or high workload (many analysts employed during transfer) if sigma(AN) (error due to different analysts) exceeds 0.6%. Hence this work introduces an extended concept which will help to circumvent this disadvantage by providing guidance to select a personalized and more appropriate experimental design. First of all it demonstrates that former t-test related acceptance criteria can be scaled by a factor of 1.15, which allows for a broader tolerance without a loss of decision certainty. Furthermore a decision guidance to choose the proper number of analysts or series at given percentage acceptance limits (%AL) is presented.

  6. Microneedle characterisation: the need for universal acceptance criteria and GMP specifications when moving towards commercialisation.

    PubMed

    Lutton, Rebecca E M; Moore, Jessica; Larrañeta, Eneko; Ligett, Stephen; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2015-08-01

    With interest in microneedles as a novel drug transdermal delivery system increasing rapidly since the late 1990s (Margetts and Sawyer Contin Educ Anaesthesia Crit Care Pain. 7(5):171-76, 2007), a diverse range of microneedle systems have been fabricated with varying designs and dimensions. However, there are still very few commercially available microneedle products. One major issue regarding microneedle manufacture on an industrial scale is the lack of specific quality standards for this novel dosage form in the context of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). A range of mechanical characterisation tests and microneedle insertion analysis techniques are used by researchers working on microneedle systems to assess the safety and performance profiles of their various designs. The lack of standardised tests and equipment used to demonstrate microneedle mechanical properties and insertion capability makes it difficult to directly compare the in use performance of candidate systems. This review highlights the mechanical tests and insertion analytical techniques used by various groups to characterise microneedles. This in turn exposes the urgent need for consistency across the range of microneedle systems in order to promote innovation and the successful commercialisation of microneedle products.

  7. Compliance with the Nevada Test Site`s waste acceptance criteria for vitrified cesium-loaded crystalline silicotitanate (CST)

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J.R.; Andrews, M.K.

    1997-12-31

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are involved in a joint project for immobilization of radionuclides from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge (OR). The supernate from Tank W-29 of the MVST will be treated by passage through a crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange medium. The CST was designed to sorb cesium, the primary radio nuclide (Cs-137) in the supernate of MVST`s. A smaller amount of strontium (Sr-90) will also be sorbed. This demonstration will be performed by ORNL. One column volume of cesium-loaded CST ({approximately}10 gallons or 38 liters) will then be shipped to SRTC where it will be mixed with glass formers and fed as an aqueous slurry to a joule-heated melter within the SRTC Shielded Cells. A borosilicate glass formulation which will incorporate the CST has been developed as part oft SRTC`s role in this project. The molten glass ({approximately}1150{degrees}C) will be poured into 500 ml stainless steel beakers which in turn will be placed in 30 gallon drums for disposal. An import&f part of this project is to demonstrate that the glass waste form produced will meet the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). If vitrification of the cesium-loaded CST is implemented as the immobilization method for all of the MVST supernate, then it is essential to demonstrate that the waste can be disposed of at an acceptable disposal facility. NTS accepts low-level radioactive waste as long as it is not TRU and not hazardous. This paper documents the efforts in the development stage of this work to integrate the requirements of NTS into the formulation and processing efforts. This work is funded by the Tank Focus Area with additional funding for ORNL provided by EM-30 at OR.

  8. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.; Carter, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack.

  9. Assessing acceptance of violence toward women: a factor analysis of Burt's Acceptance of Interpersonal Violence Scale.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Richard L; Noel, Nora E; Maisto, Stephen A

    2009-07-01

    The Acceptance of Interpersonal Violence Scale (AIV) is a self-report inventory assessing beliefs about violence toward women. This study's purpose was to test the multidimensionality of the AIV. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on half a sample of 772 male participants and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the other half. EFA indicated a two-factor solution. Factors were labeled Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence. The CFA showed this model provided a good fit and was superior to the original one-factor model. Potential problems when using the single sum score and the applicability of the derived factor structure to violence research are discussed.

  10. Compiler Acceptance Criteria Guidebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    rrograms generated by a compiler coupled with the expected life of the compiled program (number of times to be used) can often make ? 1 -6 : ! this aspect...concern are! " CPU time per statement or program * core usaae " 1 /0 access time " wait or dead ti-e " disk storage • tape drive mounts In large...left to the specification agency discretion. A prime example is the OS 370 P1eP system. 1 1 -7 0 Level of Expertise Another often neglected cost item is

  11. An Analysis of Stopping Criteria in Artificial Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    I’AD-A278 491(1 AN ANALYSIS OF STOPPING CRITERIA IN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS THESIS Bruce Kostal Captain, USAF AFIT/GST/ENS/94M 07 D I ELECTE APR...ANALYSIS OF STOPPING CRITERIA IN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS THESIS Bruce Kostal Captain, USAF AFIT/GST/ENS/94M-07 ETIC ELECTE 94-12275 APR2 1994 U Approved...for public release; distributi6 unlimited D94󈧮i •6 AFIT/GST/ENS/94M-07 AN ANALYSIS OF STOPPING CRITERIA IN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS THESIS

  12. On Model Selection Criteria in Multimodel Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, P. D.; Ye, M.; Neuman, S. P.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrologic systems are open and complex, rendering them prone to multiple conceptualizations and mathematical descriptions. There has been a growing tendency to postulate several alternative hydrologic models for a site and use model selection criteria to (a) rank these models, (b) eliminate some of them and/or (c) weigh and average predictions and statistics generated by multiple models. This has led to some debate among hydrogeologists about the merits and demerits of common model selection (also known as model discrimination or information) criteria such as AIC, AICc, BIC, and KIC and some lack of clarity about the proper interpretation and mathematical representation of each criterion. In particular, whereas we [Neuman, 2003; Ye et al., 2004, 2005; Meyer et al., 2007] have based our approach to multimodel hydrologic ranking and inference on the Bayesian criterion KIC (which reduces asymptotically to BIC), Poeter and Anderson [2005] have voiced a strong preference for the information-theoretic criterion AICc (which reduces asymptotically to AIC). Their preference stems in part from a perception that KIC and BIC require a "true" or "quasi-true" model to be in the set of alternatives while AIC and AICc are free of such an unreasonable requirement. We examine the model selection literature to find that (a) all published rigorous derivations of AIC and AICc require that the (true) model having generated the observational data be in the set of candidate models; (b) though BIC and KIC were originally derived by assuming that such a model is in the set, BIC has been rederived by Cavanaugh and Neath [1999] without the need for such an assumption; (c) KIC reduces to BIC as the number of observations becomes large relative to the number of adjustable model parameters, implying that it likewise does not require the existence of a true model in the set of alternatives; (d) if a true model is in the set, BIC and KIC select with probability one the true model as sample size

  13. Multi-criteria analysis of site selection for groundwater recharge with treated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Mahdavirad, Hadi; Bakhtiari, Bahram

    2017-08-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing techniques are used as a decision support system to identify potential soil aquifer treatment (SAT) sites for groundwater recharge of Kerman aquifer, which is located in the southeast of Iran. These sites are identified using a single-objective multi-criteria analysis. To ensure technical feasibility, environmental sustainability, social acceptability and economical viability a number of criteria are considered for the site selection. The criteria selected for the different variables and acceptable ranges are based on standards published in national and international guidelines and technical documents. Multi-criteria evaluation was performed combining all produced thematic maps by means of the weighted index overlay method in order to select sites meeting all the criteria. The resulting map of this analysis shows potential sites are located in the north, southwest and southeast of the study area. Considering field observations, a potential site, which is located in the southwest of the study area, is proposed as the most suitable site for SAT. The result indicates that the study area has sufficient required suitable space for groundwater recharge with treated wastewater.

  14. A new tool for analysis of cleanup criteria decisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Klemic, G. A.; Bailey, P.; Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment; USDOE

    2003-08-01

    Radionuclides and other hazardous materials resulting from processes used in nuclear weapons production contaminate soil, groundwater, and buildings around the United States. Cleanup criteria for environmental contaminants are agreed on prior to remediation and underpin the scope and legacy of the cleanup process. Analysis of cleanup criteria can be relevant for future agreements and may also provide insight into a complex decision making process where science and policy issues converge. An Internet accessible database has been established to summarize cleanup criteria and related factors involved in U.S. Department of Energy remediation decisions. This paper reports on a new user interface for the database that is designed to integrate related information into graphic displays and tables with interactive features that allow exploratory data analysis of cleanup criteria. Analysis of 137Cs in surface soil is presented as an example.

  15. 40 CFR 86.610-98 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for Selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. 86.610-98 Section 86.610-98... quality level and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. (a) The prescribed... test procedures pursuant to § 86.608-98(a). (c)(1) Pass/fail criteria. The manufacturer shall...

  16. 40 CFR 86.610-98 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for Selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. 86.610-98 Section 86.610-98... quality level and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. (a) The prescribed... test procedures pursuant to § 86.608-98(a). (c)(1) Pass/fail criteria. The manufacturer shall test...

  17. 40 CFR 86.610-98 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for Selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. 86.610-98 Section 86.610-98... quality level and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. (a) The prescribed... test procedures pursuant to § 86.608-98(a). (c)(1) Pass/fail criteria. The manufacturer shall test...

  18. 40 CFR 86.610-98 - Compliance with acceptable quality level and passing and failing criteria for Selective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... level and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. 86.610-98 Section 86.610-98... quality level and passing and failing criteria for Selective Enforcement Audits. (a) The prescribed... test procedures pursuant to § 86.608-98(a). (c)(1) Pass/fail criteria. The manufacturer shall test...

  19. Priority setting of health interventions: the need for multi-criteria decision analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baltussen, Rob; Niessen, Louis

    2006-01-01

    Priority setting of health interventions is often ad-hoc and resources are not used to an optimal extent. Underlying problem is that multiple criteria play a role and decisions are complex. Interventions may be chosen to maximize general population health, to reduce health inequalities of disadvantaged or vulnerable groups, ad/or to respond to life-threatening situations, all with respect to practical and budgetary constraints. This is the type of problem that policy makers are typically bad at solving rationally, unaided. They tend to use heuristic or intuitive approaches to simplify complexity, and in the process, important information is ignored. Next, policy makers may select interventions for only political motives. This indicates the need for rational and transparent approaches to priority setting. Over the past decades, a number of approaches have been developed, including evidence-based medicine, burden of disease analyses, cost-effectiveness analyses, and equity analyses. However, these approaches concentrate on single criteria only, whereas in reality, policy makers need to make choices taking into account multiple criteria simultaneously. Moreover, they do not cover all criteria that are relevant to policy makers. Therefore, the development of a multi-criteria approach to priority setting is necessary, and this has indeed recently been identified as one of the most important issues in health system research. In other scientific disciplines, multi-criteria decision analysis is well developed, has gained widespread acceptance and is routinely used. This paper presents the main principles of multi-criteria decision analysis. There are only a very few applications to guide resource allocation decisions in health. We call for a shift away from present priority setting tools in health – that tend to focus on single criteria – towards transparent and systematic approaches that take into account all relevant criteria simultaneously. PMID:16923181

  20. Evaluation of Dairy Effluent Management Options Using Multiple Criteria Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajkowicz, Stefan A.; Wheeler, Sarah A.

    2008-04-01

    This article describes how options for managing dairy effluent on the Lower Murray River in South Australia were evaluated using multiple criteria analysis (MCA). Multiple criteria analysis is a framework for combining multiple environmental, social, and economic objectives in policy decisions. At the time of the study, dairy irrigation in the region was based on flood irrigation which involved returning effluent to the river. The returned water contained nutrients, salts, and microbial contaminants leading to environmental, human health, and tourism impacts. In this study MCA was used to evaluate 11 options against 6 criteria for managing dairy effluent problems. Of the 11 options, the MCA model selected partial rehabilitation of dairy paddocks with the conversion of remaining land to other agriculture. Soon after, the South Australian Government adopted this course of action and is now providing incentives for dairy farmers in the region to upgrade irrigation infrastructure and/or enter alternative industries.

  1. Evaluation of dairy effluent management options using multiple criteria analysis.

    PubMed

    Hajkowicz, Stefan A; Wheeler, Sarah A

    2008-04-01

    This article describes how options for managing dairy effluent on the Lower Murray River in South Australia were evaluated using multiple criteria analysis (MCA). Multiple criteria analysis is a framework for combining multiple environmental, social, and economic objectives in policy decisions. At the time of the study, dairy irrigation in the region was based on flood irrigation which involved returning effluent to the river. The returned water contained nutrients, salts, and microbial contaminants leading to environmental, human health, and tourism impacts. In this study MCA was used to evaluate 11 options against 6 criteria for managing dairy effluent problems. Of the 11 options, the MCA model selected partial rehabilitation of dairy paddocks with the conversion of remaining land to other agriculture. Soon after, the South Australian Government adopted this course of action and is now providing incentives for dairy farmers in the region to upgrade irrigation infrastructure and/or enter alternative industries.

  2. 10 CFR 434.607 - Life cycle cost analysis criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Life cycle cost analysis criteria. 434.607 Section 434.607 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.607 Life cycle cost...

  3. 10 CFR 434.607 - Life cycle cost analysis criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Life cycle cost analysis criteria. 434.607 Section 434.607 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.607 Life cycle cost...

  4. 10 CFR 434.607 - Life cycle cost analysis criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Life cycle cost analysis criteria. 434.607 Section 434.607 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.607 Life cycle cost...

  5. 10 CFR 434.607 - Life cycle cost analysis criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Life cycle cost analysis criteria. 434.607 Section 434.607 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.607 Life cycle cost...

  6. 10 CFR 434.607 - Life cycle cost analysis criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Life cycle cost analysis criteria. 434.607 Section 434.607 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.607 Life cycle cost...

  7. Selecting the Acceptance Criteria of Medicines in the Reimbursement List of Public Health Insurance of Iran, Using the “Borda” Method: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Viyanchi, Amir; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Rajabzadeh Ghatari, Ali; SafiKhani, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making for medicines to be accepted in Iran’s public health insurance reimbursement list is a complex process and involves factors, which should be considered in applying a coverage for medicine costs. These processes and factors are not wholly assessed, while assessment of these factors is an essential need for getting a transparent and evidence-based approach toward medicine reimbursement in Iran. This paper aims to show an evidence-based approach toward medicine selection criteria to inform the medical reimbursement decision makers in Iranian health insurance organizations. To explore an adaptable decision-making framework while incorporating a method called “Borda” in medicine reimbursement assessment, we used the help of an expert group including decision makers and clinical researchers who are also policy makers to appraise the five chief criteria that have three sub criteria (Precision, Interpretability, and Cost). Also software “Math-lab”7, “SPSS” 17 and Excel 2007 were used in this study. “Borda” estimates the amount of perceived values from different criteria and creates a range from one to five while providing a comprehensive measurement of a large spectrum of criteria. Participants reported that the framework provided an efficient approach to systematic consideration in a pragmatic format consisting of many parts to guide decision-makings, including criteria and value (a model with the core of Borda) and evidences (medicine reimbursement based on criteria). The most important criterion for medicine acceptance in health insurance companies, in Iran, is the "life-threatening" factor and "evidence quality" is accounted as the fifth important factor. This pilot study showed the usefulness of incorporating Borda in medicine reimbursement decisions to support a transparent and systematic appraisal of health insurance companies' deeds. Further research is needed to advance Borda-based approaches that are effective on health insurance

  8. Improving diagnostic criteria for Propionibacterium acnes osteomyelitis: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Asseray, Nathalie; Papin, Christophe; Touchais, Sophie; Bemer, Pascale; Lambert, Chantal; Boutoille, David; Tequi, Brigitte; Gouin, François; Raffi, François; Passuti, Norbert; Potel, Gilles

    2010-07-01

    The identification of Propionibacterium acnes in cultures of bone and joint samples is always difficult to interpret because of the ubiquity of this microorganism. The aim of this study was to propose a diagnostic strategy to distinguish infections from contaminations. This was a retrospective analysis of all patient charts of those patients with >or=1 deep samples culture-positive for P. acnes. Every criterion was tested for sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio, and then the diagnostic probability of combinations of criteria was calculated. Among 65 patients, 52 (80%) were considered truly infected with P. acnes, a diagnosis based on a multidisciplinary process. The most valuable diagnostic criteria were: >or=2 positive deep samples, peri-operative findings (necrosis, hardware loosening, etc.), and >or=2 surgical procedures. However, no single criterion was sufficient to ascertain the diagnosis. The following combinations of criteria had a diagnostic probability of >90%: >or=2 positive cultures + 1 criterion among: peri-operative findings, local signs of infection, >or=2 previous operations, orthopaedic devices; 1 positive culture + 3 criteria among: peri-operative findings, local signs of infection, >or=2 previous surgical operations, orthopaedic devices, inflammatory syndrome. The diagnosis of P. acnes osteomyelitis was greatly improved by combining different criteria, allowing differentiation between infection and contamination.

  9. Acceptance of lean redesigns in primary care: A contextual analysis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Dorothy; Gray, Caroline; Martinez, Meghan; Schmittdiel, Julie; Harrison, Michael I

    Lean is a leading change strategy used in health care to achieve short-term efficiency and quality improvement while promising longer-term system transformation. Most research examines Lean intervention to address isolated problems, rather than to achieve broader systemic changes to care delivery. Moreover, no studies examine contextual influences on system-wide Lean implementation efforts in primary care. The aim of this study was to identify contextual factors most critical to implementing and scaling Lean redesigns across all primary care clinics in a large, ambulatory care delivery system. Over 100 interviews and focus groups were conducted with frontline physicians, clinical staff, and operational leaders. Data analysis was guided by a modified Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), a popular implementation science framework. On the basis of expert recommendations, the modified framework targets factors influencing the implementation of process redesigns. This modified framework, the CFIR-PR, informed our identification of contextual factors that most impacted Lean acceptance among frontline physicians and staff. Several domains identified by the CFIR-PR were critical to acceptance of Lean redesigns. Regarding the implementation process acceptance was influenced by time and intensity of exposure to changes, "top-down" versus "bottom-up" implementation styles, and degrees of employee engagement in developing new workflows. Important factors in the inner setting were the clinic's culture and style of leadership, along with availability of information about Lean's effectiveness. Last, implementation efforts were impacted by individual and team characteristics regarding changed work roles and related issues of professional identity, authority, and autonomy. This study underscores the need for change leaders to consider the contextual factors that surround efforts to implement Lean in primary care. As Lean redesigns are scaled across a system

  10. A Comparative Investigation of Rotation Criteria Within Exploratory Factor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sass, Daniel A; Schmitt, Thomas A

    2010-01-29

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is a commonly used statistical technique for examining the relationships between variables (e.g., items) and the factors (e.g., latent traits) they depict. There are several decisions that must be made when using EFA, with one of the more important being choice of the rotation criterion. This selection can be arduous given the numerous rotation criteria available and the lack of research/literature that compares their function and utility. Historically, researchers have chosen rotation criteria based on whether or not factors are correlated and have failed to consider other important aspects of their data. This study reviews several rotation criteria, demonstrates how they may perform with different factor pattern structures, and highlights for researchers subtle but important differences between each rotation criterion. The choice of rotation criterion is critical to ensure researchers make informed decisions as to when different rotation criteria may or may not be appropriate. The results suggest that depending on the rotation criterion selected and the complexity of the factor pattern matrix, the interpretation of the interfactor correlations and factor pattern loadings can vary substantially. Implications and future directions are discussed.

  11. Establishment of design criteria for acceptable failure modes and fail safe considerations for the space shuttle structural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westrup, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The application of general design approaches for preventing failures due to repeated load cycles is briefly discussed. Program objective, mission requirements, and structural design criteria are summarized. Discrete structural elements and associated sections were selected for detailed strength, fatigue, and fracture mechanics investigations.

  12. Assessing the social acceptability of the functional analysis of problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although the clinical utility of the functional analysis is well established, its social acceptability has received minimal attention. The current study assessed the social acceptability of functional analysis procedures among 10 parents and 3 teachers of children who had recently received functional analyses. Participants completed a 9-item questionnaire, and results suggested that functional analysis procedures were socially acceptable.

  13. Release criteria and pathway analysis for radiological remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Subbaraman, G.; Tuttle, R.J.; Oliver, B.M. . Rocketdyne Div.); Devgun, J.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Site-specific activity concentrations were derived for soils contaminated with mixed fission products (MFP), or uranium-processing residues, using the Department of Energy (DOE) pathway analysis computer code RESRAD at four different sites. The concentrations and other radiological parameters, such as limits on background-subtracted gamma exposure rate were used as the basis to arrive at release criteria for two of the sites. Valid statistical parameters, calculated for the distribution of radiological data obtained from site surveys, were then compared with the criteria to determine releasability or need for further decontamination. For the other two sites, RESRAD has been used as a preremediation planning tool to derive residual material guidelines for uranium. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The importance of sample size, log-mean ratios, and intrasubject variability in the acceptance criteria of 108 bioequivalence studies.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, E; Guerra, P; Laosa, O; Duque, B; Tabares, B; Lei, S H; Carcas, A J; Frias, J

    2008-08-01

    Fulfilling bioequivalence criteria with highly variable drugs is difficult. The aim of this study was to compare the importance of sample size, intrasubject variability, and the point estimate of test and reference formulations with regard to meeting bioequivalence (BE) criteria [maximum observed plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)]. We compared 137 pairs of data from BE studies with a conventional number of subjects, approximately 31-32 volunteers, developed in the last 10 years. The third part of the studies failed to demonstrate BE, in part due to an unacceptable difference between the mean ratios (T/R) (18) but also due to high variability with small differences between formulations (17). Increasing the number of subjects is hard to justify, and expanding the confidence interval (CI) was insufficient for the most highly variable drugs. Therefore, for low-variable drugs, the difference between formulations was the cornerstone of the fulfillment of BE criteria, but for highly variable drugs, the intrasubject coefficient of variability (ICV) was decisive. Our proposal is that for highly variable drugs that fall outside BE 90% CI limits could result in BE in the absence of formulation effect and maximal differences between formulations below 20%.

  15. Quality of laboratory studies assessing effects of Bt-proteins on non-target organisms: minimal criteria for acceptability.

    PubMed

    De Schrijver, Adinda; Devos, Yann; De Clercq, Patrick; Gathmann, Achim; Romeis, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    The potential risks that genetically modified plants may pose to non-target organisms and the ecosystem services they contribute to are assessed as part of pre-market risk assessments. This paper reviews the early tier studies testing the hypothesis whether exposure to plant-produced Cry34/35Ab1 proteins as a result of cultivation of maize 59122 is harmful to valued non-target organisms, in particular Arthropoda and Annelida. The available studies were assessed for their scientific quality by considering a set of criteria determining their relevance and reliability. As a case-study, this exercise revealed that when not all quality criteria are met, weighing the robustness of the study and its relevance for risk assessment is not obvious. Applying a worst-case expected environmental concentration of bioactive toxins equivalent to that present in the transgenic crop, confirming exposure of the test species to the test substance, and the use of a negative control were identified as minimum criteria to be met to guarantee sufficiently reliable data. This exercise stresses the importance of conducting studies meeting certain quality standards as this minimises the probability of erroneous or inconclusive results and increases confidence in the results and adds certainty to the conclusions drawn.

  16. General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) Acceptance Test Plan [Draft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dove, Edwin; Hughes, Steve

    2007-01-01

    The information presented in this Acceptance Test Plan document shows the current status of the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). GMAT is a software system developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in collaboration with the private sector. The GMAT development team continuously performs acceptance tests in order to verify that the software continues to operate properly after updates are made. The GMAT Development team consists of NASA/GSFC Code 583 software developers, NASA/GSFC Code 595 analysts, and contractors of varying professions. GMAT was developed to provide a development approach that maintains involvement from the private sector and academia, encourages collaborative funding from multiple government agencies and the private sector, and promotes the transfer of technology from government funded research to the private sector. GMAT contains many capabilities, such as integrated formation flying modeling and MATLAB compatibility. The propagation capabilities in GMAT allow for fully coupled dynamics modeling of multiple spacecraft, in any flight regime. Other capabilities in GMAT inclucle: user definable coordinate systems, 3-D graphics in any coordinate system GMAT can calculate, 2-D plots, branch commands, solvers, optimizers, GMAT functions, planetary ephemeris sources including DE405, DE200, SLP and analytic models, script events, impulsive and finite maneuver models, and many more. GMAT runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms. Both the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the GMAT engine were built and tested on all of the mentioned platforms. GMAT was designed for intuitive use from both the GUI and with an importable script language similar to that of MATLAB.

  17. [Semen analysis: spermiogram according to WHO 2010 criteria].

    PubMed

    Gottardo, F; Kliesch, S

    2011-01-01

    Semen analysis plays a key role in the diagnostics of male infertility. Semen analysis has to be performed according to World Health Organisation (WHO) criteria. The updated version of the WHO manual was completed at the end of 2009 and published in 2010. Standard procedures in semen analysis include evaluation of sperm concentration, motility, morphology and vitality. In this new version particular attention has been paid to internal and external quality control, helping to identify and correct incidental and systematic errors both in routine analysis as well as in the field of research. The new manual describes all laboratory solutions, procedures and calculation formulas, and focuses on the definition of cryptozoospermia or azoospermia. A chapter concerning cryopreservation of spermatozoa has been newly integrated. The following overview presents the most important aspects of the updated WHO manual.

  18. AMERICAN JOINT COMMITTEE ON CANCER ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR INCLUSION OF RISK MODELS FOR INDIVIDUALIZED PROGNOSIS IN THE PRACTICE OF PRECISION MEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Kattan, Michael W.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Amin, Mahul; Lu, Ying; Moons, Karel G; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Guinney, Justin; Halabi, Susan; Lazar, Alexander J.; Mahar, Alyson L.; Patel, Tushar; Sargent, Daniel J.; Weiser, Martin R.; Compton, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) has increasingly recognized the need for more personalized probabilistic predictions than those delivered by ordinal staging systems, particularly through the use of accurate risk models or calculators. However, judging the quality and acceptability of a risk model is complex. The AJCC Precision Medicine Core conducted a two-day meeting to discuss characteristics necessary for a quality risk model in cancer patients. More specifically, the committee established inclusion and exclusion criteria necessary for a risk model to potentially be endorsed by the AJCC. This committee reviewed and discussed relevant literature before creating a checklist unique to this need of AJCC risk model endorsement. The committee identified 13 inclusion and 3 exclusion criteria for AJCC risk model endorsement in cancer. The emphasis centered on performance metrics, implementation clarity, and clinical relevance. The facilitation of personalized probabilistic predictions for cancer patients holds tremendous promise, and these criteria will hopefully greatly accelerate this process. Moreover, these criteria might be useful for a general audience when trying to judge the potential applicability of a published risk model in any clinical domain. PMID:26784705

  19. Development of acceptance criteria for batches of silane primer for external tank thermal protection system bonding applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikes, F.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is currently the best technique for observing hydrolytic changes in DC 1200 silane the primers caused by moisture in the atmosphere. To further prove that FTIR can be used as a criterion test for acceptance of silane primer lots, intensities of the FTIR OH- band are being compared with primer adhesive bond strength using a mechanical test suggested by NASA. Results of tests for shear strength and Oh-absorption are tabulated and compared with FTIR absorption intensities in the OH-region.

  20. Systemic Sclerosis Classification Criteria: Developing methods for multi-criteria decision analysis with 1000Minds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sindhu R.; Naden, Raymond P.; Fransen, Jaap; van den Hoogen, Frank; Pope, Janet E.; Baron, Murray; Tyndall, Alan; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Denton, Christopher P.; Distler, Oliver; Gabrielli, Armando; van Laar, Jacob M.; Mayes, Maureen; Steen, Virginia; Seibold, James R.; Clements, Phillip; Medsger, Thomas A.; Carreira, Patricia E.; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Chung, Lorinda; Fessler, Barri J.; Merkel, Peter A.; Silver, Richard; Varga, John; Allanore, Yannick; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf; Vonk, Madelon C.; Walker, Ulrich A.; Cappelli, Susanna; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective Classification criteria for systemic sclerosis (SSc) are being developed. The objectives were to: develop an instrument for collating case-data and evaluate its sensibility; use forced-choice methods to reduce and weight criteria; and explore agreement between experts on the probability that cases were classified as SSc. Study Design and Setting A standardized instrument was tested for sensibility. The instrument was applied to 20 cases covering a range of probabilities that each had SSc. Experts rank-ordered cases from highest to lowest probability; reduced and weighted the criteria using forced-choice methods; and re-ranked the cases. Consistency in rankings was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Results Experts endorsed clarity (83%), comprehensibility (100%), face and content validity (100%). Criteria were weighted (points): finger skin thickening (14–22), finger-tip lesions (9–21), friction rubs (21), finger flexion contractures (16), pulmonary fibrosis (14), SSc-related antibodies (15), Raynaud’s phenomenon (13), calcinosis (12), pulmonary hypertension (11), renal crisis (11), telangiectasia (10), abnormal nailfold capillaries (10), esophageal dilation (7) and puffy fingers (5). The ICC across experts was 0.73 (95%CI 0.58,0.86) and improved to 0.80 (95%CI 0.68,0.90). Conclusions Using a sensible instrument and forced-choice methods, the number of criteria were reduced by 39% (23 to 14) and weighted. Our methods reflect the rigors of measurement science, and serves as a template for developing classification criteria. PMID:24721558

  1. Data Quality Objectives and Criteria for Basic Information, Acceptable Uncertainty, and Quality-Assurance and Quality-Control Documentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.; Bank, Fred G.; Cazenas, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The Federal Highway Administration and State transportation agencies have the responsibility of determining and minimizing the effects of highway runoff on water quality; therefore, they have been conducting an extensive program of water-quality monitoring and research during the last 25 years. The objectives and monitoring goals of highway runoff studies have been diverse, because the highway community must address many different questions about the characteristics and impacts of highway runoff. The Federal Highway Administration must establish that available data and procedures that are used to assess and predict pollutant loadings and impacts from highway stormwater runoff are valid, current, and technically supportable. This report examines criteria for evaluating water-quality data and resultant interpretations. The criteria used to determine if data are valid (useful for intended purposes), current, and technically supportable are derived from published materials from the Federal Highway Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality, the U.S. Geological Survey and from technical experts throughout the U.S. Geological Survey. Water-quality data that are documented to be meaningful, representative, complete, precise, accurate, comparable, and admissible as legal evidence will meet the scientific, engineering, and regulatory needs of highway agencies. Documentation of basic information, such as compatible monitoring objectives and program design features; metadata (when, where, and how data were collected as well as who collected and analyzed the data); ancillary information (explanatory variables and study-site characteristics); and legal requirements are needed to evaluate data. Documentation of sufficient quality-assurance and quality-control information to establish the quality and uncertainty in the data and interpretations also are needed to determine the comparability and utility of

  2. Establishment of design criteria for acceptable failure modes and fail safe considerations for the space shuttle structural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westrup, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations of fatigue life, and safe-life and fail-safe design concepts as applied to space shuttle structure are summarized. The results are evaluated to select recommended structural design criteria to provide assurance that premature failure due to propagation of undetected crack-like defects will not occur during shuttle operational service. The space shuttle booster, GDC configuration B-9U, is selected as the reference vehicle. Structural elements used as basis of detail analyses include wing spar caps, vertical stabilizer skins, crew compartment skin, orbiter support frame, and propellant tank shell structure. Fatigue life analyses of structural elements are performed to define potential problem areas and establish upper limits of operating stresses. Flaw growth analyses are summarized in parametric form over a range of initial flaw types and sizes, operating stresses and service life requirements. Service life of 100 to 500 missions is considered.

  3. Acceptance of new criteria for diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and related conditions by the Canadian Diabetes Association.

    PubMed

    1982-03-01

    The National Diabetes Data Group (NDDG) of the National Institutes of Health in the United States has recently issued a report setting guidelines for the classification and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and other forms of glucose intolerance. The report, intended to provide a uniform basis from which clinical and epidemiologic studies could be planned, and to serve as a guide for clinicians, is committed to the concept of avoiding overdiagnosis of diabetes and consequently expands the proportion of patients classified as having impaired glucose tolerance. The clinical and scientific section of the Canadian Diabetes Association has accepted the report in principle, anticipating that it may need to be modified in the light of future clinical experience and research findings. It is recommended that the NDDG and the expert committee of the World Health Organization be informed of this position and that the Canadian Diabetes Association offer to contribute to what will likely be periodic revision of the classification.

  4. Acceptance of new criteria for diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and related conditions by the Canadian Diabetes Association.

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The National Diabetes Data Group (NDDG) of the National Institutes of Health in the United States has recently issued a report setting guidelines for the classification and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and other forms of glucose intolerance. The report, intended to provide a uniform basis from which clinical and epidemiologic studies could be planned, and to serve as a guide for clinicians, is committed to the concept of avoiding overdiagnosis of diabetes and consequently expands the proportion of patients classified as having impaired glucose tolerance. The clinical and scientific section of the Canadian Diabetes Association has accepted the report in principle, anticipating that it may need to be modified in the light of future clinical experience and research findings. It is recommended that the NDDG and the expert committee of the World Health Organization be informed of this position and that the Canadian Diabetes Association offer to contribute to what will likely be periodic revision of the classification. PMID:7066803

  5. Methods and criteria for safety analysis (FIN L2535)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    In response to the NRC request for a proposal dated October 20, 1992, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) submit this proposal to provide contractural assistance for FIN L2535, ``Methods and Criteria for Safety Analysis,`` as specified in the Statement of Work attached to the request for proposal. The Statement of Work involves development of safety analysis guidance for NRC licensees, arranging a workshop on this guidance, and revising NRC Regulatory Guide 3.52. This response to the request for proposal offers for consideration the following advantages of WSRC in performing this work: Experience, Qualification of Personnel and Resource Commitment, Technical and Organizational Approach, Mobilization Plan, Key Personnel and Resumes. In addition, attached are the following items required by the NRC: Schedule II, Savannah River Site - Job Cost Estimate, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 1, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 2, Project Description.

  6. Multi-criteria decision analysis: Limitations, pitfalls, and practical difficulties

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, Edouard

    2003-02-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics women's figure skating competition is used as a case study to illustrate some of the limitations, pitfalls, and practical difficulties of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA). The paper compares several widely used models for synthesizing the multiple attributes into a single aggregate value. The various MCDA models can provide conflicting rankings of the alternatives for a common set of information even under states of certainty. Analysts involved in MCDA need to deal with the following challenging tasks: (1) selecting an appropriate analysis method, and (2) properly interpreting the results. An additional trap is the availability of software tools that implement specific MCDA models that can beguile the user with quantitative scores. These conclusions are independent of the decision domain and they should help foster better MCDA practices in many fields including systems engineering trade studies.

  7. Validation and optimization of criteria for manual smear review following automated blood cell analysis in a large university hospital.

    PubMed

    Pratumvinit, Busadee; Wongkrajang, Preechaya; Reesukumal, Kanit; Klinbua, Cherdsak; Niamjoy, Patama

    2013-03-01

    Each laboratory should have criteria for manual smear review that limit workload without affecting patient care. The International Consensus Group for Hematology Review established guidelines for action after automated blood cell analysis in 2005. To compare the consensus group criteria with our laboratory criteria and optimize them for better efficiency. A total of 2114 first-time samples were collected consecutively from daily workload and were used to compare 2 criteria as well as establish the optimized criteria. Another set of 891 samples was used to validate the optimized criteria. All samples were run on either Sysmex XE-5000 or Coulter LH750 hematology analyzers and were investigated by manual smear review. The efficiency of each set of criteria was compared and optimized to obtain better efficiency, an acceptable review rate, and a low false-negative rate. From 2114 samples, 368 (17.40%) had positive smear results. Compared with that of our laboratory criteria, the efficiency of the consensus group criteria was higher (83.63% versus 78.86%, P < .001), the review rate was higher (29.33% versus 22.37%, P < .001), and the false-negative rate was lower (2.22% versus 8.09%, P < .001). After optimizing the rules, we obtained an efficiency of 87.13%, a review rate of 24.22%, and a false-negative rate of 2.98%. We validated the optimized criteria with another set of samples, and the efficiency, review rate, and false-negative rate were 87.32%, 25.25%, and 1.12%, respectively. Each laboratory should verify the criteria for smear review, based on the International Consensus Group for Hematology Review, and optimize them to maximize efficiency.

  8. Effectiveness and acceptability of a computerized decision support system using modified Wells criteria for evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Frank S; Chandrika, Sharad; Weir, Ian D; Weintraub, Jeffrey T; Berman, Lewis; Lee, Ronald; Van Buskirk, Patricia D; Wang, Yun; Adewunmi, Adeshola; Fine, Jonathan M

    2011-06-01

    Ready availability of computed tomography (CT) angiography for evaluation of pulmonary embolism in emergency departments (EDs) is associated with a dramatic increase in the number of CT angiography tests. The aims of this study are to determine whether a validated prediction algorithm embedded in a computerized decision support system improves the positive yield rate of CT angiography for pulmonary embolism and is acceptable to emergency physicians. This study was conducted as a prospective interventional study with a retrospective preinterventional comparison group. The implementation of the computerized physician order entry-based computerized decision support system was associated with an overall increase in the positivity rate of from 8.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.9% to 12.9%) preintervention to 12.7% (95% CI 8.6% to 17.7%) postintervention, with a difference of 4.4% (95% CI -1.4% to 10.1%). A total of 404 patients were eligible for inclusion. Physician nonadherence to the computerized decision support system occurred in 105 (26.7%) cases. Fifteen patients underwent CT angiography despite low Wells score and negative D-dimer result, all of whose results were negative for pulmonary embolism. Emergency physicians did not order CT angiography for 44 patients despite high pretest probability, with one receiving a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism on a subsequent visit and another, of DVT. When emergency physicians adhered to the computerized decision support system for the evaluation of suspected pulmonary embolism, a higher yield of CT angiography for pulmonary embolism occurred, with 28 positive results of 168 CT angiography tests (16.7%; 95% CI 11.4% to 23.2%) and a difference compared with preintervention of 8.4% (95% CI 1.7% to 15.4%). Physicians cited the time required to apply the computerized decision support system and a preference for intuitive judgment as reasons for not adhering to the computerized decision support system. Use of an evidence

  9. Assessing Interventions to Manage West Nile Virus Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis with Risk Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Hongoh, Valerie; Campagna, Céline; Panic, Mirna; Samuel, Onil; Gosselin, Pierre; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Ravel, André; Samoura, Karim; Michel, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America highlights vulnerability to climate sensitive diseases and stresses the importance of preventive efforts to reduce their public health impact. Effective prevention involves reducing environmental risk of exposure and increasing adoption of preventive behaviours, both of which depend on knowledge and acceptance of such measures. When making operational decisions about disease prevention and control, public health must take into account a wide range of operational, environmental, social and economic considerations in addition to intervention effectiveness. The current study aimed to identify, assess and rank possible risk reduction measures taking into account a broad set of criteria and perspectives applicable to the management of WNV in Quebec under increasing transmission risk scenarios, some of which may be related to ongoing warming in higher-latitude regions. A participatory approach was used to collect information on categories of concern to relevant stakeholders with respect to WNV prevention and control. Multi-criteria decision analysis was applied to examine stakeholder perspectives and their effect on strategy rankings under increasing transmission risk scenarios. Twenty-three preventive interventions were retained for evaluation using eighteen criteria identified by stakeholders. Combined evaluations revealed that, at an individual-level, inspecting window screen integrity, wearing light colored, long clothing, eliminating peridomestic larval sites and reducing outdoor activities at peak times were top interventions under six WNV transmission scenarios. At a regional-level, the use of larvicides was a preferred strategy in five out of six scenarios, while use of adulticides and dissemination of sterile male mosquitoes were found to be among the least favoured interventions in almost all scenarios. Our findings suggest that continued public health efforts aimed at reinforcing individual

  10. Assessing Interventions to Manage West Nile Virus Using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis with Risk Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Hongoh, Valerie; Campagna, Céline; Panic, Mirna; Samuel, Onil; Gosselin, Pierre; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Ravel, André; Samoura, Karim; Michel, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The recent emergence of West Nile virus (WNV) in North America highlights vulnerability to climate sensitive diseases and stresses the importance of preventive efforts to reduce their public health impact. Effective prevention involves reducing environmental risk of exposure and increasing adoption of preventive behaviours, both of which depend on knowledge and acceptance of such measures. When making operational decisions about disease prevention and control, public health must take into account a wide range of operational, environmental, social and economic considerations in addition to intervention effectiveness. The current study aimed to identify, assess and rank possible risk reduction measures taking into account a broad set of criteria and perspectives applicable to the management of WNV in Quebec under increasing transmission risk scenarios, some of which may be related to ongoing warming in higher-latitude regions. A participatory approach was used to collect information on categories of concern to relevant stakeholders with respect to WNV prevention and control. Multi-criteria decision analysis was applied to examine stakeholder perspectives and their effect on strategy rankings under increasing transmission risk scenarios. Twenty-three preventive interventions were retained for evaluation using eighteen criteria identified by stakeholders. Combined evaluations revealed that, at an individual-level, inspecting window screen integrity, wearing light colored, long clothing, eliminating peridomestic larval sites and reducing outdoor activities at peak times were top interventions under six WNV transmission scenarios. At a regional-level, the use of larvicides was a preferred strategy in five out of six scenarios, while use of adulticides and dissemination of sterile male mosquitoes were found to be among the least favoured interventions in almost all scenarios. Our findings suggest that continued public health efforts aimed at reinforcing individual

  11. A Speedy Cardiovascular Diseases Classifier Using Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wah Ching; Hung, Faan Hei; Tsang, Kim Fung; Tung, Hoi Ching; Lau, Wing Hong; Rakocevic, Veselin; Lai, Loi Lei

    2015-01-01

    Each year, some 30 percent of global deaths are caused by cardiovascular diseases. This figure is worsening due to both the increasing elderly population and severe shortages of medical personnel. The development of a cardiovascular diseases classifier (CDC) for auto-diagnosis will help address solve the problem. Former CDCs did not achieve quick evaluation of cardiovascular diseases. In this letter, a new CDC to achieve speedy detection is investigated. This investigation incorporates the analytic hierarchy process (AHP)-based multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to develop feature vectors using a Support Vector Machine. The MCDA facilitates the efficient assignment of appropriate weightings to potential patients, thus scaling down the number of features. Since the new CDC will only adopt the most meaningful features for discrimination between healthy persons versus cardiovascular disease patients, a speedy detection of cardiovascular diseases has been successfully implemented. PMID:25587978

  12. Gender Incongruence of Adolescence and Adulthood: Acceptability and Clinical Utility of the World Health Organization's Proposed ICD-11 Criteria.

    PubMed

    Beek, Titia F; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Bouman, Walter P; de Vries, Annelou L C; Steensma, Thomas D; Witcomb, Gemma L; Arcelus, Jon; Richards, Christina; Elaut, Els; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is currently updating the tenth version of their diagnostic tool, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD, WHO, 1992). Changes have been proposed for the diagnosis of Transsexualism (ICD-10) with regard to terminology, placement and content. The aim of this study was to gather the opinions of transgender individuals (and their relatives/partners) and clinicians in the Netherlands, Flanders (Belgium) and the United Kingdom regarding the proposed changes and the clinical applicability and utility of the ICD-11 criteria of 'Gender Incongruence of Adolescence and Adulthood' (GIAA). A total of 628 participants were included in the study: 284 from the Netherlands (45.2%), 8 from Flanders (Belgium) (1.3%), and 336 (53.5%) from the UK. Most participants were transgender people (or their partners/relatives) (n = 522), 89 participants were healthcare providers (HCPs) and 17 were both healthcare providers and (partners/relatives of) transgender people. Participants completed an online survey developed for this study. Most participants were in favor of the proposed diagnostic term of 'Gender Incongruence' and thought that this was an improvement on the ICD-10 diagnostic term of 'Transsexualism'. Placement in a separate chapter dealing with Sexual- and Gender-related Health or as a Z-code was preferred by many and only a small number of participants stated that this diagnosis should be excluded from the ICD-11. In the UK, most transgender participants thought there should be a diagnosis related to being trans. However, if it were to be removed from the chapter on "psychiatric disorders", many transgender respondents indicated that they would prefer it to be removed from the ICD in its entirety. There were no large differences between the responses of the transgender participants (or their partners and relatives) and HCPs. HCPs were generally positive about the GIAA diagnosis; most thought the diagnosis was clearly defined and easy

  13. Religion and suicide acceptability: a cross-national analysis.

    PubMed

    Stack, Steven; Kposowa, Augustine J

    2011-01-01

    Four perspectives (moral community thesis, religious integration, religious commitment, and social networks) guide the selection of variables in this study. Data are from the combined World Values/European Values Surveys for 2000 (50,547 individuals nested in 56 nations). The results of a multivariate hierarchical linear model support all four perspectives. Persons residing in nations with relatively high levels of religiosity, who are affiliated with one of four major faiths, are religiously committed, and are engaged with a religious network are found to be lower in suicide acceptability. The religious integration perspective, in particular, is empirically supported; affiliation with Islam is associated with low suicide acceptability. The findings provide strong support for an integrated model and demonstrate the usefulness of the moral community thesis in understanding suicide acceptability.

  14. A Procedure for Determination of Degradation Acceptance Criteria for Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y-S.; Hahm, D.; Choi, I-K.

    2012-01-30

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory since 2007 to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This collaboration program aims at providing technical support to a five-year KAERI research project, which includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment: (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. The understanding and assessment of age-related degradations of structures, systems, and components and their impact on plant safety is the major goal of this KAERI-BNL collaboration. Four annual reports have been published before this report as a result of the collaboration research.

  15. Performance of data acceptance criteria over 50 months from an automatic real-time environmental radiation surveillance network.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, R; Morant, J J; López, M; Hernández-Girón, I; Batalla, E; Salvadó, M

    2011-08-01

    The automatic real-time environmental radiation surveillance network of Catalonia (Spain) comprises two subnetworks; one with 9 aerosol monitors and the other with 8 Geiger monitors together with 2 water monitors located in the Ebre river. Since September 2006, several improvements were implemented in order to get better quality and quantity of data, allowing a more accurate data analysis. However, several causes (natural causes, equipment failure, artificial external causes and incidents in nuclear power plants) may produce radiological measured values mismatched with the own station background, whether spurious without significance or true radiological values. Thus, data analysis for a 50-month period was made and allowed to establish an easily implementable statistical criterion to find those values that require special attention. This criterion proved a very useful tool for creating a properly debugged database and to give a quick response to equipment failures or possible radiological incidents. This paper presents the results obtained from the criterion application, including the figures for the expected, raw and debugged data, percentages of missing data grouped by causes and radiological measurements from the networks. Finally, based on the discussed information, recommendations for the improvement of the network are identified to obtain better radiological information and analysis capabilities.

  16. Predicting Peer Acceptance in Dutch Youth: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubbers, Miranda; Van Der Werf, Margaretha; Kuyper, Hans; Offringa, G.

    2006-01-01

    This article uses an ecological approach to predict students' peer acceptance within junior high school classes. The authors investigate whether various characteristics (self-perception of physical attractiveness and athletic competence, cognitive ability, agreeableness, extraversion, age, parents education, number of siblings, siblings at same…

  17. Analysis of eligibility criteria from ClinicalTrials.gov.

    PubMed

    Doods, Justin; Dugas, Martin; Fritz, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health care records are being used more and more for patient documentation. This electronic data can be used for secondary purposes, for example through systems that support clinical research. Eligibility criteria have to be processable for such systems to work, but criteria published on ClinicalTrials.gov have been shown to be complex, making them challenging to re-use. We analysed the eligibility criteria on ClinicalTrials.gov using automatic methods to determine whether the criteria definition and number changed over time. From 1998 to 2012 the average number of words used to describe eligibility criteria per year increased by 46%, while the average number of lines used per year only slightly increases until 2000 and stabilizes afterwards. Whether the increase of words resulted in increased criteria complexity or whether more data elements are used to describe eligibility needs further investigation.

  18. Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD): Development of Image Analysis Criteria and Examiner Reliability for Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mansur; Hollender, Lars; Odont; Anderson, Quentin; Kartha, Krishnan; Ohrbach, Richard K.; Truelove, Edmond L.; John, Mike T.; Schiffman, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction As a part of a multi-site RDC/TMD Validation Project, comprehensive TMJ diagnostic criteria were developed for image analysis using panoramic radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography (CT). Methods Inter-examiner reliability was estimated using the kappa (k) statistic, and agreement between rater pairs was characterized by overall, positive, and negative percent agreement. CT was the reference standard for assessing validity of other imaging modalities for detecting osteoarthritis (OA). Results For the radiological diagnosis of OA, reliability of the three examiners was poor for panoramic radiography (k = 0.16), fair for MRI (k = 0.46), and close to the threshold for excellent for CT (k = 0.71). Using MRI, reliability was excellent for diagnosing disc displacements (DD) with reduction (k = 0.78) and for DD without reduction (k = 0.94), and was good for effusion (k = 0.64). Overall percent agreement for pair-wise ratings was ≥ 82% for all conditions. Positive percent agreement for diagnosing OA was 19% for panoramic radiography, 59% for MRI, and 84% for CT. Using MRI, positive percent agreement for diagnoses of any DD was 95% and for effusion was 81%. Negative percent agreement was ≥ 88% for all conditions. Compared to CT, panoramic radiography and MRI had poor to marginal sensitivity, respectively, but excellent specificity, in detecting OA. Conclusion Comprehensive image analysis criteria for RDC/TMD Validation Project were developed, which can reliably be employed for assessing OA using CT, and for disc position and effusion using MRI. PMID:19464658

  19. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.S.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) derived from a three-year program of stakeholder involvement. PSVE takes advantage of the naturally occurring tendency of soil vapor to leave the subsurface during periods of low barometric pressure. PSVE seeks to expedite the release of volatile contaminants through the use of boreholes and technological enhancements. This report is for technology developers and those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment to make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of PSVE to the remediation problems they face. The report provides: stakeholders` final evaluation of the acceptability of PSVE in light of the technology`s field test; stakeholders` principal comments concerning PSVE; requirements that stakeholders have of any remediation technology. Technology decision makers should take these conclusions into account in evaluating the effectiveness and acceptability of any remedial method proposed for their site. In addition, the report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on PSVE from stakeholders from Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  20. The criteria for establishing an acceptable range of chemical, physical and biological indicators for the purpose of ecological standards developing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evdokimova, Maria; Glazunov, Gennady; Yakovlev, Aleksandr

    2017-04-01

    The basis for development of standards for soil quality is based on the assessment of their resistance to external influences. The main criterion for assessing the environmental sustainability of soils and lands is the ability to perform their ecological functions (Nkonya et al, 2011, 2013; Costanza et al, 2014, Dobrovolsky and Nikitin, 1990; Yakovlev, Evdokimova, 2011). The limiting value of indicators of the state of the environment (physical, chemical, biological and other) corresponds to the value at which stability of environmental components is preserved (the ability to heal itself). Tht threshold for effect of stressor should be identified by the methods of bioindication and biotesting. The analysis obtained by these methods aimed to identify the highest indicator values of physical or chemical (concentration or dose of the stressor) effects, which have not yet fairly established negative changes in the organism, population of organisms or community. Using a theoretical model (Yakovlev et al, 2009, Gendugov., 2013) the problem of finding the threshold concentration is reduced to the finding of the singular points characterizing macroscopic "kinetics" of response in the phase space of dependence of the response rate upon the impact indicator. Singular points are determined by the analysis of derivatives. The theoretical model allows to calculate the singular points of the model (six of them), one of which, the maximum point corresponds to the highest concentration of the stressor at which it had no adverse effects on the test organisms. This point corresponds to the lowest concentration of the stressor at which it has no longer a stimulatory (hormesis) effect. Six singular points divide the whole range of stressors values (concentration) on seven bands with a unique range for each set of values of "macrokinetic" indicators of the living cells response to the impact of the stressor (concentration). Thus, the use of theoretical equations allowed us 1) to

  1. Criteria for High Quality Biology Teaching: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasci, Guntay

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the process under which biology lessons are taught in terms of teaching quality criteria (TQC). Teaching quality is defined as the properties of efficient teaching and is considered to be the criteria used to measure teaching quality both in general and specific to a field. The data were collected through classroom…

  2. Assessing the Social Acceptability of the Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although the clinical utility of the functional analysis is well established, its social acceptability has received minimal attention. The current study assessed the social acceptability of functional analysis procedures among 10 parents and 3 teachers of children who had recently received functional analyses. Participants completed a 9-item…

  3. Multiple criteria decision analysis for health technology assessment.

    PubMed

    Thokala, Praveen; Duenas, Alejandra

    2012-12-01

    Multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) has been suggested by some researchers as a method to capture the benefits beyond quality adjusted life-years in a transparent and consistent manner. The objectives of this article were to analyze the possible application of MCDA approaches in health technology assessment and to describe their relative advantages and disadvantages. This article begins with an introduction to the most common types of MCDA models and a critical review of state-of-the-art methods for incorporating multiple criteria in health technology assessment. An overview of MCDA is provided and is compared against the current UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence health technology appraisal process. A generic MCDA modeling approach is described, and the different MCDA modeling approaches are applied to a hypothetical case study. A comparison of the different MCDA approaches is provided, and the generic issues that need consideration before the application of MCDA in health technology assessment are examined. There are general practical issues that might arise from using an MCDA approach, and it is suggested that appropriate care be taken to ensure the success of MCDA techniques in the appraisal process. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficiency of model selection criteria in flood frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calenda, G.; Volpi, E.

    2009-04-01

    The estimation of high flood quantiles requires the extrapolation of the probability distributions far beyond the usual sample length, involving high estimation uncertainties. The choice of the probability law, traditionally based on the hypothesis testing, is critical to this point. In this study the efficiency of different model selection criteria, seldom applied in flood frequency analysis, is investigated. The efficiency of each criterion in identifying the probability distribution of the hydrological extremes is evaluated by numerical simulations for different parent distributions, coefficients of variation and skewness, and sample sizes. The compared model selection procedures are the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC), the Anderson Darling Criterion (ADC) recently discussed by Di Baldassarre et al. (2008) and Sample Quantile Criterion (SQC), recently proposed by the authors (Calenda et al., 2009). The SQC is based on the principle of maximising the probability density of the elements of the sample that are considered relevant to the problem, and takes into account both the accuracy and the uncertainty of the estimate. Since the stress is mainly on extreme events, the SQC involves upper-tail probabilities, where the effect of the model assumption is more critical. The proposed index is equal to the sum of logarithms of the inverse of the sample probability density of the observed quantiles. The definition of this index is based on the principle that the more centred is the sample value in respect to its density distribution (accuracy of the estimate) and the less spread is this distribution (uncertainty of the estimate), the greater is the probability density of the sample quantile. Thus, lower values of the index indicate a better performance of the distribution law. This criterion can operate the selection of the optimum distribution among competing probability models that are estimated using different samples. The

  5. Rasch analysis of alcohol abuse and dependence diagnostic criteria in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Reslan, S; Kalpakjian, C Z; Hanks, R A; Millis, S R; Bombardier, C H

    2017-05-01

    Cross-sectional. The objective of the study is to examine whether alcohol use disorders should be conceptualized categorically as abuse and dependence as in the 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders' 4th edition or on a single continuum with mild to severe category ratings as in the 'Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders' 5th edition in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). United States of America. Data from 379 individuals who sustained SCI either traumatically or non-traumatically after the age of 18 and were at least 1 year post injury. Rasch analyses used the alcohol abuse and dependence modules of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders Non-patient Edition (SCID-I/NP). Fifty-seven percent (n=166) of the entire sample endorsed criteria for alcohol abuse, and 25% (n=65) endorsed criteria for alcohol dependence. Fit values were generally acceptable except for one item (for example, alcohol abuse criterion 2), suggesting that the items fit the expectation of unidimensionality. Examination of the principal components analysis did not provide support for unidimensionality. The item-person map illustrates poor targeting of items. Alcohol abuse and dependence criterion appear to reflect a unidimensional construct, a finding that supports a single latent construct or factor consistent with the DSM-5 diagnostic model.

  6. Spatially explicit multi-criteria decision analysis for managing vector-borne diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The complex epidemiology of vector-borne diseases creates significant challenges in the design and delivery of prevention and control strategies, especially in light of rapid social and environmental changes. Spatial models for predicting disease risk based on environmental factors such as climate and landscape have been developed for a number of important vector-borne diseases. The resulting risk maps have proven value for highlighting areas for targeting public health programs. However, these methods generally only offer technical information on the spatial distribution of disease risk itself, which may be incomplete for making decisions in a complex situation. In prioritizing surveillance and intervention strategies, decision-makers often also need to consider spatially explicit information on other important dimensions, such as the regional specificity of public acceptance, population vulnerability, resource availability, intervention effectiveness, and land use. There is a need for a unified strategy for supporting public health decision making that integrates available data for assessing spatially explicit disease risk, with other criteria, to implement effective prevention and control strategies. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a decision support tool that allows for the consideration of diverse quantitative and qualitative criteria using both data-driven and qualitative indicators for evaluating alternative strategies with transparency and stakeholder participation. Here we propose a MCDA-based approach to the development of geospatial models and spatially explicit decision support tools for the management of vector-borne diseases. We describe the conceptual framework that MCDA offers as well as technical considerations, approaches to implementation and expected outcomes. We conclude that MCDA is a powerful tool that offers tremendous potential for use in public health decision-making in general and vector-borne disease management in particular

  7. Spatially explicit multi-criteria decision analysis for managing vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Hongoh, Valerie; Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Aenishaenslin, Cécile; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Bélanger, Denise; Michel, Pascal

    2011-12-29

    The complex epidemiology of vector-borne diseases creates significant challenges in the design and delivery of prevention and control strategies, especially in light of rapid social and environmental changes. Spatial models for predicting disease risk based on environmental factors such as climate and landscape have been developed for a number of important vector-borne diseases. The resulting risk maps have proven value for highlighting areas for targeting public health programs. However, these methods generally only offer technical information on the spatial distribution of disease risk itself, which may be incomplete for making decisions in a complex situation. In prioritizing surveillance and intervention strategies, decision-makers often also need to consider spatially explicit information on other important dimensions, such as the regional specificity of public acceptance, population vulnerability, resource availability, intervention effectiveness, and land use. There is a need for a unified strategy for supporting public health decision making that integrates available data for assessing spatially explicit disease risk, with other criteria, to implement effective prevention and control strategies. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a decision support tool that allows for the consideration of diverse quantitative and qualitative criteria using both data-driven and qualitative indicators for evaluating alternative strategies with transparency and stakeholder participation. Here we propose a MCDA-based approach to the development of geospatial models and spatially explicit decision support tools for the management of vector-borne diseases. We describe the conceptual framework that MCDA offers as well as technical considerations, approaches to implementation and expected outcomes. We conclude that MCDA is a powerful tool that offers tremendous potential for use in public health decision-making in general and vector-borne disease management in particular.

  8. A Multivariate Analysis of the Relationship between Androgyny and Self-Esteem, Self-Acceptance and Acceptance of Others.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eman, Virginia A.; Morse, Benjamin W.

    Androgynous persons accept both their masculine and feminine characteristics rather than adhere to traditional sex-role stereotypes. This study tested whether the multidimensional approach and psychological freedom of androgynous persons would give them greater self-esteem, self-acceptance, and acceptance of others, according to their own…

  9. Regional Analysis of Self-Reported Personality Disorder Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Turkheimer, Eric; Ford, Derek C.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Building on the theoretical work of Louis Guttman, we propose that the core problem facing research into the multidimensional structure of the personality disorders is not the identification of factorial simple structure but rather detailed characterization of the multivariate configuration of the diagnostic criteria. Dimensions rotated to orthogonal or oblique simple structure are but one way out of many to characterize a multivariate map, and their current near universal application represents a choice for a very particular set of interpretive advantages and disadvantages. We use multidimensional scaling and regional interpretation to investigate the structure of 78 self-reported personality disorder criteria from a large sample of military recruits and college students. Results suggest that the criteria have a three-dimensional radex structure that conforms only loosely to the 10 existing personality disorder (PD) categories. Regional interpretation in three dimensions elucidates several important aspects of PDs and their interrelationships. PMID:19012659

  10. Analysis of proposed criteria for human response to vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janeway, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    The development of criteria for human vibration response is reviewed, including the evolution of the ISO standard 2631. The document is analyzed to show why its application to vehicle ride evaluation is strongly opposed. Alternative vertical horizontal limits for comfort are recommended in the ground vehicle ride frequency range above 1 Hz. These values are derived by correlating the absorbed power findings of Pradko and Lee with other established criteria. Special emphasis is placed on working limits in the frequency range of 1 to 10 Hz since this is the most significant area in ground vehicle ride evaluation.

  11. Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.K. |; Gillette, J.; Jackson, J.

    1994-12-01

    Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ``Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities`` (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning.

  12. Air Pollution Monitoring Site Selection by Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria air pollutants (particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, and carbon monoxide) as well as toxic air pollutants are a global concern. A particular scenario that is receiving increased attention in the research is the exposure to t...

  13. A multivariate analysis of choice criteria for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Heischmidt, K A; Hekmat, F; Gordon, P

    1993-01-01

    This study determines the choice criteria used by consumers in selecting a hospital and provides information useful to hospital administrators in planning and implementing marketing efforts directed toward potential consumers. The findings suggest that physical plot, previous experience with the hospital, location of hospital, overall cost, and reputation of the hospital were important factors in selecting a hospital.

  14. Air Pollution Monitoring Site Selection by Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Criteria air pollutants (particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, and carbon monoxide) as well as toxic air pollutants are a global concern. A particular scenario that is receiving increased attention in the research is the exposure to t...

  15. Pathogen inactivation of whole blood and red cell components: an overview of concept, design, developments, criteria of acceptability and storage lesion.

    PubMed

    Seghatchian, Jerard; Putter, Jeffrey S

    2013-10-01

    Multilayer preventative strategies have been instituted to enhance transfusion safety for patients in need of critical blood components. Presently blood safety is at its highest levels, with the implementation of precautionary/preventative measures against vCJD, bacterial and viral contamination of the blood supply. The implementation of these strategies together with advances in automation and computerization led to significant improvements in standardisation for transfusion practices. These include validation, verification, adherence to GLP and GMP and other regulatory requirements. In most European countries, universal prestorage leukodepletion is routine practice. In France proactive pathogen inactivation treatments [PITs] have been implemented emphasizing patient safety. This at least conceptually reduces the risk of transfusing viable WBCs, emerging bacteria and viruses, all with potential transfusion complications. In the UK, prion removal filters for red cell products are used selectively for special groups of patients. Some research establishments are exploring the potential impact of pathogen inactivation of whole blood or red cell components, using the new generation of S-303 PIT and the prion removal filters in combination. It needs to be determined whether such a combined strategy, applied synergistically, enhances red cell transfusion safety without compromising the overall criteria of acceptability. It is necessary to critically examine the impact of a new generation of PIT technologies, which may exacerbate the red cell storage lesion and cause the development of undesirable antibodies in the recipient. The development of innovative laboratory tools is vital to study impacts of these measures on the quality of stored blood and their clinical outcome. The ultimate aim of red cell transfusion is to provide oxygen enriched red blood cells to the microcirculations and tissues. Definitive studies are needed to establish the potential unforeseen negative

  16. Appendage modal coordinate truncation criteria in hybrid coordinate dynamic analysis. [for spacecraft attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P.; Ohkami, Y.; Wong, C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines the validity of the assumption that certain appendage-distributed (modal) coordinates can be truncated from a system model without unacceptable degradation of fidelity in hybrid coordinate dynamic analysis for attitude control of spacecraft with flexible appendages. Alternative truncation criteria are proposed and their interrelationships defined. Particular attention is given to truncation criteria based on eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and controllability and observability. No definitive resolution of the problem is advanced, and exhaustive study is required to obtain ultimate truncation criteria.

  17. A simple way to unify multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) and stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis (SMAA) using a Dirichlet distribution in benefit-risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Saint-Hilary, Gaelle; Cadour, Stephanie; Robert, Veronique; Gasparini, Mauro

    2017-02-10

    Quantitative methodologies have been proposed to support decision making in drug development and monitoring. In particular, multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) and stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis (SMAA) are useful tools to assess the benefit-risk ratio of medicines according to the performances of the treatments on several criteria, accounting for the preferences of the decision makers regarding the relative importance of these criteria. However, even in its probabilistic form, MCDA requires the exact elicitations of the weights of the criteria by the decision makers, which may be difficult to achieve in practice. SMAA allows for more flexibility and can be used with unknown or partially known preferences, but it is less popular due to its increased complexity and the high degree of uncertainty in its results. In this paper, we propose a simple model as a generalization of MCDA and SMAA, by applying a Dirichlet distribution to the weights of the criteria and by making its parameters vary. This unique model permits to fit both MCDA and SMAA, and allows for a more extended exploration of the benefit-risk assessment of treatments. The precision of its results depends on the precision parameter of the Dirichlet distribution, which could be naturally interpreted as the strength of confidence of the decision makers in their elicitation of preferences.

  18. Applying Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis to Comparative Benefit-Risk Assessment: Choosing among Statins in Primary Prevention.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, Tommi; Naci, Huseyin; van Valkenhoef, Gert; Ades, Anthony E; Angelis, Aris; Hillege, Hans L; Postmus, Douwe

    2015-10-01

    Decision makers in different health care settings need to weigh the benefits and harms of alternative treatment strategies. Such health care decisions include marketing authorization by regulatory agencies, practice guideline formulation by clinical groups, and treatment selection by prescribers and patients in clinical practice. Multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a family of formal methods that help make explicit the tradeoffs that decision makers accept between the benefit and risk outcomes of different treatment options. Despite the recent interest in MCDA, certain methodological aspects are poorly understood. This paper presents 7 guidelines for applying MCDA in benefit-risk assessment and illustrates their use in the selection of a statin drug for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. We provide guidance on the key methodological issues of how to define the decision problem, how to select a set of nonoverlapping evaluation criteria, how to synthesize and summarize the evidence, how to translate relative measures to absolute ones that permit comparisons between the criteria, how to define suitable scale ranges, how to elicit partial preference information from the decision makers, and how to incorporate uncertainty in the analysis. Our example on statins indicates that fluvastatin is likely to be the most preferred drug by our decision maker and that this result is insensitive to the amount of preference information incorporated in the analysis.

  19. 75 FR 69140 - NUREG-1953, Confirmatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis To Support Specific Success Criteria in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-1953, Confirmatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis To Support Specific Success Criteria in the...- Hydraulic Analysis to Support Specific Success Criteria in the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk Models...-Hydraulic Analysis to Support Specific Success Criteria in the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk...

  20. Contract Source Selection: An Analysis of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable and Tradeoff Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-15

    Contract Source Selection: an Analysis of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable and Tradeoff Strategies 15 June 2016 LCDR Jamal M. Osman, USN...selection strategy is key to minimizing risk and ensuring best value for all stakeholders. On the basis of thorough market research, acquisition...professionals must decide at an early stage which source selection strategy (lowest price technically acceptable or tradeoff) to utilize in order to achieve a

  1. Criteria for Comparing Domain Analysis Approaches Version 01.00.00

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    all domain analysis approaches. "* Section 4 presents the comparison criteria. 4 1. Introducion " Section 5 applies these criteria to the six...Library Science KAPTUR Prieto-Diaz 1987 Arango . Prieto-Diaz Mhodeyn Developmented0 Software Productivity Solutions TheryShrnfivasP Algebra ,.- Ada FODA

  2. Using soil function evaluation in multi-criteria decision analysis for sustainability appraisal of remediation alternatives.

    PubMed

    Volchko, Yevheniya; Norrman, Jenny; Rosén, Lars; Bergknut, Magnus; Josefsson, Sarah; Söderqvist, Tore; Norberg, Tommy; Wiberg, Karin; Tysklind, Mats

    2014-07-01

    Soil contamination is one of the major threats constraining proper functioning of the soil and thus provision of ecosystem services. Remedial actions typically only address the chemical soil quality by reducing total contaminant concentrations to acceptable levels guided by land use. However, emerging regulatory requirements on soil protection demand a holistic view on soil assessment in remediation projects thus accounting for a variety of soil functions. Such a view would require not only that the contamination concentrations are assessed and attended to, but also that other aspects are taking into account, thus addressing also physical and biological as well as other chemical soil quality indicators (SQIs). This study outlines how soil function assessment can be a part of a holistic sustainability appraisal of remediation alternatives using multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA). The paper presents a method for practitioners for evaluating the effects of remediation alternatives on selected ecological soil functions using a suggested minimum data set (MDS) containing physical, biological and chemical SQIs. The measured SQIs are transformed into sub-scores by the use of scoring curves, which allows interpretation and the integration of soil quality data into the MCDA framework. The method is demonstrated at a study site (Marieberg, Sweden) and the results give an example of how soil analyses using the suggested MDS can be used for soil function assessment and subsequent input to the MCDA framework.

  3. Multiple-criteria decision analysis reveals high stakeholder preference to remove pharmaceuticals from hospital wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lienert, Judit; Koller, Mirjam; Konrad, Jonas; McArdell, Christa S; Schuwirth, Nele

    2011-05-01

    Point-source measures have been suggested to decrease pharmaceuticals in water bodies. We analyzed 68 and 50 alternatives, respectively, for a typical Swiss general and psychiatric hospital to decrease pharmaceutical discharge. Technical alternatives included reverse osmosis, ozonation, and activated carbon; organizational alternatives included urine separation. To handle this complex decision, we used Multiple-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) and combined expert predictions (e.g., costs, pharmaceutical mass flows, ecotoxicological risk, pathogen removal) with subjective preference-valuations from 26 stakeholders (authorities, hospital-internal actors, experts). The general hospital contributed ca. 38% to the total pharmaceutical load at the wastewater treatment plant, the psychiatry contributed 5%. For the general hospital, alternatives removing all pharmaceuticals (especially reverse osmosis, or vacuum-toilets and incineration), performed systematically better than the status quo or urine separation, despite higher costs. They now require closer scrutiny. To remove X-ray contrast agents, introducing roadbags is promising. For the psychiatry with a lower pharmaceutical load, costs were more critical. Stakeholder feedback concerning MCDA was very positive, especially because the results were robust across different stakeholder-types. Our MCDA results provide insight into an important water protection issue: implementing measures to decrease pharmaceuticals will likely meet acceptance. Hospital point-sources merit consideration if the trade-off between costs and pharmaceutical removal is reasonable.

  4. Decerns: A framework for multi-criteria decision analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Yatsalo, Boris; Didenko, Vladimir; Gritsyuk, Sergey; ...

    2015-02-27

    A new framework, Decerns, for multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) of a wide range of practical problems on risk management is introduced. Decerns framework contains a library of modules that are the basis for two scalable systems: DecernsMCDA for analysis of multicriteria problems, and DecernsSDSS for multicriteria analysis of spatial options. DecernsMCDA includes well known MCDA methods and original methods for uncertainty treatment based on probabilistic approaches and fuzzy numbers. As a result, these MCDA methods are described along with a case study on analysis of multicriteria location problem.

  5. Comparison of the EORTC criteria and PERCIST in solid tumors: a pooled analysis and review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Han

    2016-01-01

    Two sets of response criteria using PET are currently available to monitor metabolic changes in solid tumors: the criteria developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC criteria) and the PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST). We conducted this pooled study to investigate the strength of agreement between the EORTC criteria and PERCIST in the assessment of tumor response. We surveyed MEDLINE, EMBASE and PUBMED for articles with terms of the EORTC criteria and PERCIST between 2009 and January 2016. We searched for all the references of relevant articles and reviews using the ‘related articles’ feature in the PUBMED. There were six articles with the data on the comparison of the EORTC criteria and PERCIST. A total of 348 patients were collected; 190 (54.6%) with breast cancer, 81 with colorectal cancer, 45 with lung cancer, 14 with basal cell carcinoma in the skin, 12 with stomach cancer, and 6 with head and neck cancer. The agreement of tumor response between the EORTC criteria and PERCIST was excellent (k = 0.946). Of 348 patients, only 12 (3.4%) showed disagreement between the two criteria in the assessment of tumor response. The shift of tumor response between the EORTC criteria and PERCIST occurred mostly in patients with PMR and SMD. The estimated overall response rates were not significantly different between the two criteria (72.7% by EORTC vs. 73.6% by PERCIST). In conclusion, this pooled analysis demonstrates that the EORTC criteria and PERCIST showed almost perfect agreement in the assessment of tumor response. PMID:27517621

  6. Comparison of the EORTC criteria and PERCIST in solid tumors: a pooled analysis and review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Han

    2016-09-06

    Two sets of response criteria using PET are currently available to monitor metabolic changes in solid tumors: the criteria developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC criteria) and the PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST). We conducted this pooled study to investigate the strength of agreement between the EORTC criteria and PERCIST in the assessment of tumor response. We surveyed MEDLINE, EMBASE and PUBMED for articles with terms of the EORTC criteria and PERCIST between 2009 and January 2016. We searched for all the references of relevant articles and reviews using the 'related articles' feature in the PUBMED. There were six articles with the data on the comparison of the EORTC criteria and PERCIST. A total of 348 patients were collected; 190 (54.6%) with breast cancer, 81 with colorectal cancer, 45 with lung cancer, 14 with basal cell carcinoma in the skin, 12 with stomach cancer, and 6 with head and neck cancer. The agreement of tumor response between the EORTC criteria and PERCIST was excellent (k = 0.946). Of 348 patients, only 12 (3.4%) showed disagreement between the two criteria in the assessment of tumor response. The shift of tumor response between the EORTC criteria and PERCIST occurred mostly in patients with PMR and SMD. The estimated overall response rates were not significantly different between the two criteria (72.7% by EORTC vs. 73.6% by PERCIST). In conclusion, this pooled analysis demonstrates that the EORTC criteria and PERCIST showed almost perfect agreement in the assessment of tumor response.

  7. Distributed multi-criteria model evaluation and spatial association analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Laura; Pfister, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Model performance, if evaluated, is often communicated by a single indicator and at an aggregated level; however, it does not embrace the trade-offs between different indicators and the inherent spatial heterogeneity of model efficiency. In this study, we simulated the water balance of the Mississippi watershed using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The model was calibrated against monthly river discharge at 131 measurement stations. Its time series were bisected to allow for subsequent validation at the same gauges. Furthermore, the model was validated against evapotranspiration which was available as a continuous raster based on remote sensing. The model performance was evaluated for each of the 451 sub-watersheds using four different criteria: 1) Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), 2) percent bias (PBIAS), 3) root mean square error (RMSE) normalized to standard deviation (RSR), as well as 4) a combined indicator of the squared correlation coefficient and the linear regression slope (bR2). Conditions that might lead to a poor model performance include aridity, a very flat and steep relief, snowfall and dams, as indicated by previous research. In an attempt to explain spatial differences in model efficiency, the goodness of the model was spatially compared to these four phenomena by means of a bivariate spatial association measure which combines Pearson's correlation coefficient and Moran's index for spatial autocorrelation. In order to assess the model performance of the Mississippi watershed as a whole, three different averages of the sub-watershed results were computed by 1) applying equal weights, 2) weighting by the mean observed river discharge, 3) weighting by the upstream catchment area and the square root of the time series length. Ratings of model performance differed significantly in space and according to efficiency criterion. The model performed much better in the humid Eastern region than in the arid Western region which was confirmed by the

  8. Can mindfulness and acceptance be learnt by self-help?: a systematic review and meta-analysis of mindfulness and acceptance-based self-help interventions.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Kate; Strauss, Clara; Forder, Lewis; Jones, Fergal

    2014-03-01

    There is growing evidence that mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions have positive consequences for psychological and physical health. The most well-established of these interventions typically involve relatively large resource commitments, in terms of both the provider and participant. A number of recent studies have begun to explore whether the benefits of such interventions can be generalised to less intensive methods. Methods include pure and guided self-help utilising resources such as books and workbooks, computer programmes and applications and audio-visual materials. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that have evaluated the effectiveness and acceptability of low-intensity interventions including mindfulness and acceptance-based components. Fifteen RCTs (7 ACT-based, 4 mindfulness-based and 4 multi-component interventions including elements of mindfulness and/or acceptance) were identified and reviewed. Interventions that included mindfulness and/or acceptance-based components produced significant benefits in comparison to control conditions on measures of mindfulness/acceptance, depression and anxiety with small to medium effect sizes. Engagement with the self-help interventions varied but on average two-thirds of participants completed post-intervention measures. Emerging research into low-intensity mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions is hopeful. Recommendations for research and practice are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Searching for consensus through multi-criteria decision analysis. Assessment of screening strategies for hemoglobinopathies in southeastern France.

    PubMed

    Le Gales, C; Moatti, J P

    1990-01-01

    Until now, no systematic strategy for the prevention of major hemoglobinopathies has been implemented in southeastern France, in spite of frequencies of beta-thalassemia trait and HbS trait as high as 2.5-8% in some ethnic populations. The purpose of the study was to help a group of experts, brought together by the Regional Center for Disease Control, to reach a consensus about screening for carriers of heterozygote hemoglobinopathies. A multicriteria decision-analysis model was used to take into account not only the costs and effectiveness of potential screening strategies, but also five other qualitative criteria: technical and practical feasibilities, ethical acceptability, information follow-up in time, and global impact on health education. Conclusions differ significantly from those of a pure cost-effectiveness analysis, but a multicriteria approach seems best suited to medical experts' preferences.

  10. Anthropogenic effects on the biota: towards a new system of principles and criteria for analysis of ecological hazards.

    PubMed

    Ostroumov, Sergei A

    2003-01-01

    The currently accepted system of criteria for evaluating environmental and ecological hazards of man-made chemicals (pollutants) is vulnerable to criticism. In this paper, a new concept of the system of approaches towards criteria for evaluating the ecological hazard from man-made impact is proposed. It is suggested to assess the man-made impacts (including effects of pollutants and xenobiotics) on the biota according to the following four levels of disturbance in biological and ecological systems: (1) the level of individual responses; (2) the level of aggregated responses of groups of organisms; (3) the level of stability and integrity of the ecosystem; (4) the level of contributions of the ecosystem to biospheric processes. On the basis of the author's experimental studies, an example is given of how to apply the proposed approach and the system of criteria to the analysis of concrete experimental data. To exemplify the efficiency of the proposed approach, it is shown how to use it to analyze new data on effects of a synthetic surfactant on water filtering by bivalves. It is concluded that the proposed approach will be helpful in better assessing environmental and ecological hazards from anthropogenic effects on biota, including effects of man-made chemicals polluting ecosystems.

  11. Performance criteria for emergency medicine residents: a job analysis.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Danielle; Dagnone, Jeffrey Damon

    2008-11-01

    A major role of admission interviews is to assess a candidate's suitability for a residency program. Structured interviews have greater reliability and validity than do unstructured ones. The development of content for a structured interview is typically based on the dimensions of performance that are perceived as important to succeed in a particular line of work. A formal job analysis is normally conducted to determine these dimensions. The dimensions essential to succeed as an emergency medicine (EM) resident have not yet been studied. We aimed to analyze the work of EM residents to determine these essential dimensions. The "critical incident technique" was used to generate scenarios of poor and excellent resident performance. Two reviewers independently read each scenario and labelled the performance dimensions that were reflected in each. All labels assigned to a particular scenario were pooled and reviewed again until a consensus was reached. Five faculty members (25% of our total faculty) comprised the subject experts. Fifty-one incidents were generated and 50 different labels were applied. Eleven dimensions of performance applied to at least 5 incidents. "Professionalism" was the most valued performance dimension, represented in 56% of the incidents, followed by "self-confidence" (22%), "experience" (20%) and "knowledge" (20%). "Professionalism," "self-confidence," "experience" and "knowledge" were identified as the performance dimensions essential to succeed as an EM resident based on our formal job analysis using the critical incident technique. Performing a formal job analysis may assist training program directors with developing admission interviews.

  12. 18 CFR 5.22 - Notice of acceptance and ready for environmental analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of acceptance and ready for environmental analysis. 5.22 Section 5.22 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... specified in §§ 5.18 and 5.19, the approved studies have been completed, any deficiencies in the...

  13. 18 CFR 5.22 - Notice of acceptance and ready for environmental analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Notice of acceptance and ready for environmental analysis. 5.22 Section 5.22 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... specified in §§ 5.18 and 5.19, the approved studies have been completed, any deficiencies in the...

  14. 18 CFR 5.22 - Notice of acceptance and ready for environmental analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Notice of acceptance and ready for environmental analysis. 5.22 Section 5.22 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... specified in §§ 5.18 and 5.19, the approved studies have been completed, any deficiencies in the...

  15. 18 CFR 5.22 - Notice of acceptance and ready for environmental analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Notice of acceptance and ready for environmental analysis. 5.22 Section 5.22 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... specified in §§ 5.18 and 5.19, the approved studies have been completed, any deficiencies in the...

  16. GIS Based Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis For Cement Plant Site Selection For Cuddalore District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, A.

    2015-12-01

    India's cement industry is a vital part of its economy, providing employment to more than a million people. On the back of growing demands, due to increased construction and infrastructural activities cement market in India is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.96 percent during the period 2014-2019. In this study, GIS-based spatial Multi Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) is used to determine the optimum and alternative sites to setup a cement plant. This technique contains a set of evaluation criteria which are quantifiable indicators of the extent to which decision objectives are realized. In intersection with available GIS (Geographical Information System) and local ancillary data, the outputs of image analysis serves as input for the multi-criteria decision making system. Moreover, the following steps were performed so as to represent the criteria in GIS layers, which underwent the GIS analysis in order to get several potential sites. Satellite imagery from LANDSAT 8 and ASTER DEM were used for the analysis. Cuddalore District in Tamil Nadu was selected as the study site as limestone mining is already being carried out in that region which meets the criteria of raw material for cement production. Several other criteria considered were land use land cover (LULC) classification (built-up area, river, forest cover, wet land, barren land, harvest land and agriculture land), slope, proximity to road, railway and drainage networks.

  17. Multi-criteria analysis for PM10 planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisoni, Enrico; Carnevale, Claudio; Volta, Marialuisa

    To implement sound air quality policies, Regulatory Agencies require tools to evaluate outcomes and costs associated to different emission reduction strategies. These tools are even more useful when considering atmospheric PM10 concentrations due to the complex nonlinear processes that affect production and accumulation of the secondary fraction of this pollutant. The approaches presented in the literature (Integrated Assessment Modeling) are mainly cost-benefit and cost-effective analysis. In this work, the formulation of a multi-objective problem to control particulate matter is proposed. The methodology defines: (a) the control objectives (the air quality indicator and the emission reduction cost functions); (b) the decision variables (precursor emission reductions); (c) the problem constraints (maximum feasible technology reductions). The cause-effect relations between air quality indicators and decision variables are identified tuning nonlinear source-receptor models. The multi-objective problem solution provides to the decision maker a set of not-dominated scenarios representing the efficient trade-off between the air quality benefit and the internal costs (emission reduction technology costs). The methodology has been implemented for Northern Italy, often affected by high long-term exposure to PM10. The source-receptor models used in the multi-objective analysis are identified processing long-term simulations of GAMES multiphase modeling system, performed in the framework of CAFE-Citydelta project.

  18. Difference image analysis: automatic kernel design using information criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramich, D. M.; Horne, Keith; Alsubai, K. A.; Bachelet, E.; Mislis, D.; Parley, N.

    2016-03-01

    We present a selection of methods for automatically constructing an optimal kernel model for difference image analysis which require very few external parameters to control the kernel design. Each method consists of two components; namely, a kernel design algorithm to generate a set of candidate kernel models, and a model selection criterion to select the simplest kernel model from the candidate models that provides a sufficiently good fit to the target image. We restricted our attention to the case of solving for a spatially invariant convolution kernel composed of delta basis functions, and we considered 19 different kernel solution methods including six employing kernel regularization. We tested these kernel solution methods by performing a comprehensive set of image simulations and investigating how their performance in terms of model error, fit quality, and photometric accuracy depends on the properties of the reference and target images. We find that the irregular kernel design algorithm employing unregularized delta basis functions, combined with either the Akaike or Takeuchi information criterion, is the best kernel solution method in terms of photometric accuracy. Our results are validated by tests performed on two independent sets of real data. Finally, we provide some important recommendations for software implementations of difference image analysis.

  19. What Should Be the Cut Point for Classification Criteria of Studies in Gout? A Conjoint Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Jaap; Kievit, Wietske; Neogi, Tuhina; Schumacher, Ralph; Jansen, Tim; Dalbeth, Nicola; Taylor, William J

    2016-11-01

    To determine the acceptable level of positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for classification criteria for gout, given the type of study. We conducted an international web-based survey with 91 general practitioners and rheumatologists experienced in gout. Conjoint analysis was used as the framework for designing and analyzing pairs of 2 profiles, each describing a study type, a PPV, and an NPV. There were 5 study types presented: a phase III randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug versus prednisone for acute gout flares, a phase III RCT of a biologic agent for acute gout flares, a phase II RCT of a novel uricosuric drug of unknown efficacy and limited toxicity data, a case-control, genome-wide association study of gout, and a cohort study examining long-term outcomes of gout. PPV and NPV both had 5 levels ranging from 60-99%. The panelists in majority were male (65%) rheumatologists (93%) with an average of 19 years of practice, seeing 5 to 60 gout patients monthly. PPV was most highly weighted in decision making: the relative importance was 59% for PPV, 29% for NPV, and 13% for study type. The preferred PPV was 90% or 80%, with an accompanying NPV of 70% or 80%, dependent on study type. Preferred PPVs and NPVs range between 70% and 90% and differ by study type. A single cut point can be a reasonable approach for all study types if a PPV of 90% and NPV of 80% is approximated. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Family-based association analysis of alcohol dependence criteria and severity

    PubMed Central

    Wetherill, Leah; Kapoor, Manav; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen; Koller, Daniel; Bertelsen, Sarah E.; Le, Nhung; Wang, Jen-Chyong; Almasy, Laura; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Nurnberger, John I.; Schuckit, Marc; Tischfield, Jay A.; Xuei, Xiaoling; Porjesz, Bernice; Edenberg, Howard J.; Goate, Alison M.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the high heritability of alcohol dependence (AD), the genes found to be associated with it account for only a small proportion of its total variability. The goal of this study was to identify and analyze phenotypes based on homogeneous classes of individuals to increase the power to detect genetic risk factors contributing to the risk of AD. Methods The 7 individual DSM-IV criteria for AD were analyzed using latent class analysis (LCA) to identify classes defined by the pattern of endorsement of the criteria. A genome-wide association study was performed in 118 extended European American families (n = 2,322 individuals) densely affected with AD to identify genes associated with AD, with each of the seven DSM-IV criteria, and with the probability of belonging to two of three latent classes. Results Heritability for DSM-IV AD was 61%, and ranged from 17-60% for the other phenotypes. A SNP in the olfactory receptor OR51L1 was significantly associated (7.3 × 10−8) with the DSM-IV criterion of persistent desire to, or inability to, cut down on drinking. LCA revealed a three-class model: the “low risk” class (50%) rarely endorsed any criteria, and none met criteria for AD; the “moderate risk” class (33) endorsed primarily 4 DSM-IV criteria, and 48% met criteria for AD; the “high risk” class (17%) manifested high endorsement probabilities for most criteria and nearly all (99%) met criteria for AD One single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a sodium leak channel NALCN demonstrated genome-wide significance with the high risk class (p=4.1 × 10−8). Analyses in an independent sample did not replicate these associations. Conclusion We explored the genetic contribution to several phenotypes derived from the DSM-IV alcohol dependence criteria. The strongest evidence of association was with SNPs in NALCN and OR51L1. PMID:24015780

  1. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  2. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  3. New methods for the analysis of invasion processes: multi-criteria evaluation of the invasion of Hydrilla verticillata in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Monterroso, I; Binimelis, R; Rodríguez-Labajos, B

    2011-03-01

    The study described in this article incorporates stakeholders' views on aquatic invasion processes and combines expert analysis with information from field work into an evaluation exercise. Management scenarios are designed based on available technical data and stakeholders' perceptions. These scenarios are evaluated using the Social Multi-Criteria Evaluation framework employing the NAIADE model. Two evaluations are carried out, technical and social. Social acceptance of different management scenarios, distribution of costs and benefits, and attribution of responsibility are discussed. The case study was carried out on Lake Izabal, a body of water connected to the Caribbean Sea in Northeastern Guatemala. In 2000, local fishermen reported the presence of an alien species in the lake, the macrophyte Hydrilla verticillata. Two years later, this alien species was established around the entire lakeshore, damaging the ecosystem, endangering native species and the subsistence of local inhabitants through impacts on transportation, fishing practices, and tourism.

  4. A comparative analysis of the D-criteria used to determine genetic links of small bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, M. G.; Kondratyeva, E. D.; Nefedyev, Y. A.

    2013-10-01

    In this article the D-criteria, which can be used to determine the genetic relationships of small bodies with their parent bodies in the solar system, are estimated. Drummond (1981), Southworth and Hawkins (1963), Jopek (1993), dynamic (Kalinin and Kulikova, 2007; Holshevnikov and Titov, 2007) D-criteria were analysed. It was found that the Drummond criterion is less sensitive to errors of observations and its upper limit does not exceed 0.2. The Southworth-Hawkins and Jopek D-criteria are more stable and have good convergence. Limiting values, which vary in the range of 0.3-0.6 (except for the Lyrids), were determined on the basis of the analysis of six meteor showers for the Southworth-Hawkins and Jopek criteria.

  5. An analysis of the qualification criteria for small radioactive material shipping packages

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    The RAM package design certification process has two important elements, testing and acceptance. These terms sound very similar but they have specific meanings. Qualification testing in the context of this study is the imposition of simulated accident test conditions upon the candidate package design. (Normal transportation environments may also be included.) Following qualification testing, the acceptance criteria provide the performance levels which, if demonstrated, indicate the ability of the RAM package to sustain the severity of the qualification testing sequence and yet maintain specified levels of package integrity. This study has used Severities of Transportation Accidents as a data base to examine the regulatory test criteria which are required to be met by small packages containing Type B quantities of radioactive material (RAM). The basic findings indicate that the present regulatory test standards provide significantly higher levels of protection for the surface transportation modes (truck, rail) than for RAM packages shipped by aircraft. It should also be noted that various risk assessment studies have shown that the risk to the public due to severe transport accidents by surface and air transport modes is very low. A key element in this study was the quantification of the severity of the transportation accident environment and the severity of the present qualification test standards (called qualification test standards in this document) so that a direct comparison could be made between them to assess the effectiveness of the existing qualification test standards. The manner in which this was accomplished is described.

  6. Analysis of Handling Qualities Design Criteria for Active Inceptor Force-Feel Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malpica, Carlos A.; Lusardi, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    ratio. While these two studies produced boundaries for acceptable/unacceptable stick dynamics for rotorcraft, they were not able to provide guidance on how variations of the stick dynamics in the acceptable region impact handling qualities. More recently, a ground based simulation study [5] suggested little benefit was to be obtained from variations of the damping ratio for a side-stick controller exhibiting high natural frequencies (greater than 17 rad/s) and damping ratios (greater than 2.0). A flight test campaign was conducted concurrently on the RASCAL JUH-60A in-flight simulator and the ACT/FHS EC-135 in flight simulator [6]. Upon detailed analysis of the pilot evaluations the study identified a clear preference for a high damping ratio and natural frequency of the center stick inceptors. Side stick controllers were found to be less sensitive to the damping. While these studies have compiled a substantial amount of data, in the form of qualitative and quantitative pilot opinion, a fundamental analysis of the effect of the inceptor force-feel system on flight control is found to be lacking. The study of Ref. [6] specifically concluded that a systematic analysis was necessary, since discrepancies with the assigned handling qualities showed that proposed analytical design metrics, or criteria, were not suitable. The overall goal of the present study is to develop a clearer fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms associated with the inceptor dynamics that govern the handling qualities using a manageable analytical methodology.

  7. A Monte Carlo evaluation of masked visual analysis in response-guided versus fixed-criteria multiple-baseline designs.

    PubMed

    Ferron, John M; Joo, Seang-Hwane; Levin, Joel R

    2017-09-09

    We developed masked visual analysis (MVA) as a structured complement to traditional visual analysis. The purpose of the present investigation was to compare the effects of computer-simulated MVA of a four-case multiple-baseline (MB) design in which the phase lengths are determined by an ongoing visual analysis (i.e., response-guided) versus those in which the phase lengths are established a priori (i.e., fixed criteria). We observed an acceptably low probability (less than .05) of false detection of treatment effects. The probability of correctly detecting a true effect frequently exceeded .80 and was higher when: (a) the masked visual analyst extended phases based on an ongoing visual analysis, (b) the effects were larger, (c) the effects were more immediate and abrupt, and (d) the effects of random and extraneous error factors were simpler. Our findings indicate that MVA is a valuable combined methodological and data-analysis tool for single-case intervention researchers. © 2017 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  8. A fourier analysis on the maximum acceptable grid size for discrete proton beam dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Haisen S; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2006-09-01

    We developed an analytical method for determining the maximum acceptable grid size for discrete dose calculation in proton therapy treatment plan optimization, so that the accuracy of the optimized dose distribution is guaranteed in the phase of dose sampling and the superfluous computational work is avoided. The accuracy of dose sampling was judged by the criterion that the continuous dose distribution could be reconstructed from the discrete dose within a 2% error limit. To keep the error caused by the discrete dose sampling under a 2% limit, the dose grid size cannot exceed a maximum acceptable value. The method was based on Fourier analysis and the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem as an extension of our previous analysis for photon beam intensity modulated radiation therapy [J. F. Dempsey, H. E. Romeijn, J. G. Li, D. A. Low, and J. R. Palta, Med. Phys. 32, 380-388 (2005)]. The proton beam model used for the analysis was a near monoenergetic (of width about 1% the incident energy) and monodirectional infinitesimal (nonintegrated) pencil beam in water medium. By monodirection, we mean that the proton particles are in the same direction before entering the water medium and the various scattering prior to entrance to water is not taken into account. In intensity modulated proton therapy, the elementary intensity modulation entity for proton therapy is either an infinitesimal or finite sized beamlet. Since a finite sized beamlet is the superposition of infinitesimal pencil beams, the result of the maximum acceptable grid size obtained with infinitesimal pencil beam also applies to finite sized beamlet. The analytic Bragg curve function proposed by Bortfeld [T. Bortfeld, Med. Phys. 24, 2024-2033 (1997)] was employed. The lateral profile was approximated by a depth dependent Gaussian distribution. The model included the spreads of the Bragg peak and the lateral profiles due to multiple Coulomb scattering. The dependence of the maximum acceptable dose grid size on the

  9. Establishing Certification/Design Criteria for Advanced Supersonic Aircraft Utilizing Acceptance, Interference, and Annoyance Response to Simulated Sonic Booms by Persons in Their Homes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-03-01

    acceptability for commercial air- craft sonic boc r.a noise which has high validity requires exposing *persons to boom noises during their usual or daily...function goes to zero, giving a second series of maxima and sharp minima modulated onto the envelope of the cos (7rfD)/(ifD) function. Since the maxima of...vaveform generator wva constructed which provided for the introduction of sounds represented by four different waveforms into a box 21 inches square

  10. Passion fruit juice with different sweeteners: sensory profile by descriptive analysis and acceptance.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Izabela Furtado de Oliveira; Bolini, Helena Maria André

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different sweeteners on the sensory profile, acceptance, and drivers of preference of passion fruit juice samples sweetened with sucrose, aspartame, sucralose, stevia, cyclamate/saccharin blend 2:1, and neotame. Sensory profiling was performed by 12 trained assessors using quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA). Acceptance tests (appearance, aroma, flavor, texture and overall impression) were performed with 124 consumers of tropical fruit juice. Samples with sucrose, aspartame and sucralose showed similar sensory profile (P < 0.05), without bitter taste, bitter aftertaste, and metallic taste, and samples with sucrose and sucralose did not differ from each other for the attribute sweet aftertaste. Passion fruit flavor affected positively and sweet aftertaste affected negatively the acceptance of the samples. Samples sweetened with aspartame, sucralose, and sucrose presented higher acceptance scores for the attributes flavor, texture, and overall impression, with no significant (P < 0.05) differences between them. Aspartame and sucralose can be good substitutes for sucrose in passion fruit juice.

  11. HS-GC-MS-O analysis and sensory acceptance of passion fruit during maturation.

    PubMed

    Janzantti, Natália S; Monteiro, Magali

    2017-07-01

    The odor-active compounds of the conventional yellow passion fruit influence the aroma during ripeness and the acceptance of the juice. HS-GC-MS and GC-OSME analysis and sensory acceptance of the conventional passion fruit from different stages of ripeness were studied to characterize the aroma of the fruit and, aroma and flavor of the juice. Ethyl butanoate, ethyl hexanoate and propyl acetate showed high odoriferous importance in the passion fruit from the 1/3 yellow skin color. Cis-3-hexen-1-ol and diethyl carbonate plus the odor-active compounds from the 1/3 yellow skin color showed high odoriferous importance in the 2/3 yellow skin color, and butyl acetate and alpha-terpineol plus the same odor-active compounds from 2/3 were the most important for the 3/3 yellow skin color. There was difference in the aroma and flavor of the juices, with higher acceptance means for the passion fruit from the 3/3 yellow skin color. The passion fruit volatile compounds peak area, odoriferous intensity and sensory acceptance of the juices increased during ripeness, indicating that the conventional passion fruit characteristic aroma is completely expressed when the fruit reaches the whole maturation, at the 3/3 yellow skin color.

  12. Passion fruit juice with different sweeteners: sensory profile by descriptive analysis and acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Izabela Furtado de Oliveira; Bolini, Helena Maria André

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different sweeteners on the sensory profile, acceptance, and drivers of preference of passion fruit juice samples sweetened with sucrose, aspartame, sucralose, stevia, cyclamate/saccharin blend 2:1, and neotame. Sensory profiling was performed by 12 trained assessors using quantitative descriptive analysis (QDA). Acceptance tests (appearance, aroma, flavor, texture and overall impression) were performed with 124 consumers of tropical fruit juice. Samples with sucrose, aspartame and sucralose showed similar sensory profile (P < 0.05), without bitter taste, bitter aftertaste, and metallic taste, and samples with sucrose and sucralose did not differ from each other for the attribute sweet aftertaste. Passion fruit flavor affected positively and sweet aftertaste affected negatively the acceptance of the samples. Samples sweetened with aspartame, sucralose, and sucrose presented higher acceptance scores for the attributes flavor, texture, and overall impression, with no significant (P < 0.05) differences between them. Aspartame and sucralose can be good substitutes for sucrose in passion fruit juice. PMID:25838891

  13. Acceptable Risk Analysis for Abrupt Environmental Pollution Accidents in Zhangjiakou City, China.

    PubMed

    Du, Xi; Zhang, Zhijiao; Dong, Lei; Liu, Jing; Borthwick, Alistair G L; Liu, Renzhi

    2017-04-20

    Abrupt environmental pollution accidents cause considerable damage worldwide to the ecological environment, human health, and property. The concept of acceptable risk aims to answer whether or not a given environmental pollution risk exceeds a societally determined criterion. This paper presents a case study on acceptable environmental pollution risk conducted through a questionnaire survey carried out between August and October 2014 in five representative districts and two counties of Zhangjiakou City, Hebei Province, China. Here, environmental risk primarily arises from accidental water pollution, accidental air pollution, and tailings dam failure. Based on 870 valid questionnaires, demographic and regional differences in public attitudes towards abrupt environmental pollution risks were analyzed, and risk acceptance impact factors determined. The results showed females, people between 21-40 years of age, people with higher levels of education, public servants, and people with higher income had lower risk tolerance. People with lower perceived risk, low-level risk knowledge, high-level familiarity and satisfaction with environmental management, and without experience of environmental accidents had higher risk tolerance. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that public satisfaction with environmental management was the most significant factor in risk acceptance, followed by perceived risk of abrupt air pollution, occupation, perceived risk of tailings dam failure, and sex. These findings should be helpful to local decision-makers concerned with environmental risk management (e.g., selecting target groups for effective risk communication) in the context of abrupt environmental accidents.

  14. Acceptable Risk Analysis for Abrupt Environmental Pollution Accidents in Zhangjiakou City, China

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xi; Zhang, Zhijiao; Dong, Lei; Liu, Jing; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Liu, Renzhi

    2017-01-01

    Abrupt environmental pollution accidents cause considerable damage worldwide to the ecological environment, human health, and property. The concept of acceptable risk aims to answer whether or not a given environmental pollution risk exceeds a societally determined criterion. This paper presents a case study on acceptable environmental pollution risk conducted through a questionnaire survey carried out between August and October 2014 in five representative districts and two counties of Zhangjiakou City, Hebei Province, China. Here, environmental risk primarily arises from accidental water pollution, accidental air pollution, and tailings dam failure. Based on 870 valid questionnaires, demographic and regional differences in public attitudes towards abrupt environmental pollution risks were analyzed, and risk acceptance impact factors determined. The results showed females, people between 21–40 years of age, people with higher levels of education, public servants, and people with higher income had lower risk tolerance. People with lower perceived risk, low-level risk knowledge, high-level familiarity and satisfaction with environmental management, and without experience of environmental accidents had higher risk tolerance. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that public satisfaction with environmental management was the most significant factor in risk acceptance, followed by perceived risk of abrupt air pollution, occupation, perceived risk of tailings dam failure, and sex. These findings should be helpful to local decision-makers concerned with environmental risk management (e.g., selecting target groups for effective risk communication) in the context of abrupt environmental accidents. PMID:28425956

  15. Minimizing impacts of land use change on ecosystem services using multi-criteria heuristic analysis.

    PubMed

    Keller, Arturo A; Fournier, Eric; Fox, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    Development of natural landscapes to support human activities impacts the capacity of the landscape to provide ecosystem services. Typically, several ecosystem services are impacted at a single development site and various footprint scenarios are possible, thus a multi-criteria analysis is needed. Restoration potential should also be considered for the area surrounding the permanent impact site. The primary objective of this research was to develop a heuristic approach to analyze multiple criteria (e.g. impacts to various ecosystem services) in a spatial configuration with many potential development sites. The approach was to: (1) quantify the magnitude of terrestrial ecosystem service (biodiversity, carbon sequestration, nutrient and sediment retention, and pollination) impacts associated with a suite of land use change scenarios using the InVEST model; (2) normalize results across categories of ecosystem services to allow cross-service comparison; (3) apply the multi-criteria heuristic algorithm to select sites with the least impact to ecosystem services, including a spatial criterion (separation between sites). As a case study, the multi-criteria impact minimization algorithm was applied to InVEST output to select 25 potential development sites out of 204 possible locations (selected by other criteria) within a 24,000 ha property. This study advanced a generally applicable spatial multi-criteria approach for 1) considering many land use footprint scenarios, 2) balancing impact decisions across a suite of ecosystem services, and 3) determining the restoration potential of ecosystem services after impacts.

  16. A Survey of Enterprise Architecture Analysis Using Multi Criteria Decision Making Models (MCDM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Mehmooda Jabeen; Azam, Farooque; Allauddin, Maria

    System design becomes really important for software production due to continuous increase in size and complexity of software systems. It is a complex design activity to build architecture for the systems like large enterprises. Thus it is a critical issue to select the correct architecture in software engineering domain. Moreover, in enterprise architecture selection different goals and objectives must be taken into consideration as it is a multi-criteria decision making problem. Generally this field of enterprise architecture analysis has progressed from the application of linear weighting, through integer programming and linear programming to multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) models. In this paper we survey two multi-criteria decision making models (AHP, ANP) to determine that to what extent they have been used in making powerful decisions in complex enterprise architecture analysis. We have found that by using ANP model, decision makers of an enterprise can make more precise and suitable decisions in selection of enterprise architecture styles.

  17. 75 FR 80544 - NUREG-1953, Confirmatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis To Support Specific Success Criteria in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... COMMISSION NUREG-1953, Confirmatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis To Support Specific Success Criteria in the..., ``Confirmatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis to Support Specific Success Criteria in the Standardized Plant Analysis... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: NUREG-1953, ``Confirmatory Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis to Support Specific...

  18. Do choosing wisely tools meet criteria for patient decision aids? A descriptive analysis of patient materials.

    PubMed

    Légaré, France; Hébert, Jessica; Goh, Larissa; Lewis, Krystina B; Leiva Portocarrero, Maria Ester; Robitaille, Hubert; Stacey, Dawn

    2016-08-26

    Choosing Wisely is a remarkable physician-led campaign to reduce unnecessary or harmful health services. Some of the literature identifies Choosing Wisely as a shared decision-making approach. We evaluated the patient materials developed by Choosing Wisely Canada to determine whether they meet the criteria for shared decision-making tools known as patient decision aids. Descriptive analysis of all Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials. In May 2015, we selected all Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials from its official website. Four team members independently extracted characteristics of the English materials using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) modified 16-item minimum criteria for qualifying and certifying patient decision aids. The research team discussed discrepancies between data extractors and reached a consensus. Descriptive analysis was conducted. Of the 24 patient materials assessed, 12 were about treatments, 11 were about screening and 1 was about prevention. The median score for patient materials using IPDAS criteria was 10/16 (range: 8-11) for screening topics and 6/12 (range: 6-9) for prevention and treatment topics. Commonly missed criteria were stating the decision (21/24 did not), providing balanced information on option benefits/harms (24/24 did not), citing evidence (24/24 did not) and updating policy (24/24 did not). Out of 24 patient materials, only 2 met the 6 IPDAS criteria to qualify as patient decision aids, and neither of these 2 met the 6 certifying criteria. Patient materials developed by Choosing Wisely Canada do not meet the IPDAS minimal qualifying or certifying criteria for patient decision aids. Modifications to the Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials would help to ensure that they qualify as patient decision aids and thus as more effective shared decision-making tools. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  19. Do choosing wisely tools meet criteria for patient decision aids? A descriptive analysis of patient materials

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Hébert, Jessica; Goh, Larissa; Lewis, Krystina B; Leiva Portocarrero, Maria Ester; Robitaille, Hubert; Stacey, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Choosing Wisely is a remarkable physician-led campaign to reduce unnecessary or harmful health services. Some of the literature identifies Choosing Wisely as a shared decision-making approach. We evaluated the patient materials developed by Choosing Wisely Canada to determine whether they meet the criteria for shared decision-making tools known as patient decision aids. Design Descriptive analysis of all Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials. Data source In May 2015, we selected all Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials from its official website. Main outcomes and measures Four team members independently extracted characteristics of the English materials using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) modified 16-item minimum criteria for qualifying and certifying patient decision aids. The research team discussed discrepancies between data extractors and reached a consensus. Descriptive analysis was conducted. Results Of the 24 patient materials assessed, 12 were about treatments, 11 were about screening and 1 was about prevention. The median score for patient materials using IPDAS criteria was 10/16 (range: 8–11) for screening topics and 6/12 (range: 6–9) for prevention and treatment topics. Commonly missed criteria were stating the decision (21/24 did not), providing balanced information on option benefits/harms (24/24 did not), citing evidence (24/24 did not) and updating policy (24/24 did not). Out of 24 patient materials, only 2 met the 6 IPDAS criteria to qualify as patient decision aids, and neither of these 2 met the 6 certifying criteria. Conclusions Patient materials developed by Choosing Wisely Canada do not meet the IPDAS minimal qualifying or certifying criteria for patient decision aids. Modifications to the Choosing Wisely Canada patient materials would help to ensure that they qualify as patient decision aids and thus as more effective shared decision-making tools. PMID:27566638

  20. Development of parallel line analysis criteria for recombinant adenovirus potency assay and definition of a unit of potency.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yasushi; Fawaz, Farah; Reyes, Candice; Lai, Julie; Pungor, Erno

    2007-01-01

    Parameter settings of a parallel line analysis procedure were defined by applying statistical analysis procedures to the absorbance data from a cell-based potency bioassay for a recombinant adenovirus, Adenovirus 5 Fibroblast Growth Factor-4 (Ad5FGF-4). The parallel line analysis was performed with a commercially available software, PLA 1.2. The software performs Dixon outlier test on replicates of the absorbance data, performs linear regression analysis to define linear region of the absorbance data, and tests parallelism between the linear regions of standard and sample. Width of Fiducial limit, expressed as a percent of the measured potency, was developed as a criterion for rejection of the assay data and to significantly improve the reliability of the assay results. With the linear range-finding criteria of the software set to a minimum of 5 consecutive dilutions and best statistical outcome, and in combination with the Fiducial limit width acceptance criterion of <135%, 13% of the assay results were rejected. With these criteria applied, the assay was found to be linear over the range of 0.25 to 4 relative potency units, defined as the potency of the sample normalized to the potency of Ad5FGF-4 standard containing 6 x 10(6) adenovirus particles/mL. The overall precision of the assay was estimated to be 52%. Without the application of Fiducial limit width criterion, the assay results were not linear over the range, and an overall precision of 76% was calculated from the data. An absolute unit of potency for the assay was defined by using the parallel line analysis procedure as the amount of Ad5FGF-4 that results in an absorbance value that is 121% of the average absorbance readings of the wells containing cells not infected with the adenovirus.

  1. Efficacy and acceptability of acute treatments for persistent depressive disorder: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kriston, Levente; von Wolff, Alessa; Westphal, Annika; Hölzel, Lars P; Härter, Martin

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to synthesize the available evidence on the relative efficacy and acceptability of specific treatments for persistent depressive disorder. We searched several databases up to January 2013 and included randomized controlled trials that compared acute pharmacological, psychotherapeutic, and combined interventions with each other or placebo. The outcome measures were the proportion of patients who responded to (efficacy) or dropped out from (acceptability) the allocated treatment. Data synthesis was performed with network meta-analysis. A network of 45 trials that tested 28 drugs included data from 5,806 and 5,348 patients concerning efficacy and acceptability, respectively. A second network of 15 trials that tested five psychotherapeutic and five combined interventions included data from 2,657 and 2,719 patients concerning efficacy and acceptability, respectively. Among sufficiently tested treatments, fluoxetine (odds ratio (OR) 2.94), paroxetine (3.79), sertraline (4.47), moclobemide (6.98), imipramine (4.53), ritanserin (2.35), amisulpride (5.63), and acetyl-l-carnitine (5.67) were significantly more effective than placebo. Pairwise comparisons showed advantages of moclobemide (2.38) and amisulpride (1.92) over fluoxetine. Sertraline (0.57) and amisulpride (0.53) showed a lower dropout rate than imipramine. Interpersonal psychotherapy with medication outperformed medication alone in chronic major depression but not in dysthymia. Evidence on cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy plus medication was partly inconclusive. Interpersonal psychotherapy was less effective than medication (0.48) and cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (0.45). Several other treatments were tested in single studies. Several evidence-based acute pharmacological, psychotherapeutic, and combined treatments for persistent depressive disorder are available with significant differences between them. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The use of multi-criteria decision analysis to tackle waste management problems: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Achillas, Charisios; Moussiopoulos, Nicolas; Karagiannidis, Avraam; Banias, Georgias; Perkoulidis, George

    2013-02-01

    Problems in waste management have become more and more complex during recent decades. The increasing volumes of waste produced and social environmental consciousness present prominent drivers for environmental managers towards the achievement of a sustainable waste management scheme. However, in practice, there are many factors and influences - often mutually conflicting - criteria for finding solutions in real-life applications. This paper presents a review of the literature on multi-criteria decision aiding in waste management problems for all reported waste streams. Despite limitations, which are clearly stated, most of the work published in this field is reviewed. The present review aims to provide environmental managers and decision-makers with a thorough list of practical applications of the multi-criteria decision analysis techniques that are used to solve real-life waste management problems, as well as the criteria that are mostly employed in such applications according to the nature of the problem under study. Moreover, the paper explores the advantages and disadvantages of using multi-criteria decision analysis techniques in waste management problems in comparison to other available alternatives.

  3. Analysis of the factors motivating HCV-infected patients to accept interferon therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to analyze factors motivating the acceptance of interferon (IFN) therapy and to clarify the prevalence of oral mucosal diseases in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected Japanese patients treated with IFN. Findings A total of 94 HCV-infected patients who were admitted to our hospital for IFN therapy were asked questions regarding their motivation to accept IFN therapy and were investigated for the presence of oral lichen planus (OLP) before and during IFN treatment. Recommendation and encouragement from other people were the most common factors motivating the acceptance of IFN therapy (49/94, 52.13%). The other motivators were independent decision (30.85%), economic reasons (5.32%), and others. According to multivariate analysis, three factors – sex (male), retreatment after previous IFN therapy, and independent decision to accept IFN therapy - were associated with patients after curative treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The adjusted odds ratios for these three factors were 26.06, 14.17, and 8.72, respectively. The most common oral mucosal lesions included OLP in 11 cases (11.70%). One patient with OLP had postoperative squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. The rate of sustained virological response (SVR) was 45.45% in cases with OLP and 54.55% in cases without OLP. There were no patients who discontinued IFN therapy because of side effects such as oral mucosal diseases. Conclusions We should give full explanation and recommend a course of treatment for a patient to accept IFN therapy. The system to support liver disease as well as oral diseases is also necessary for patient treated for IFN therapy. PMID:22932002

  4. Validity of Criteria-Based Content Analysis (CBCA) at Trial in Free-Narrative Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roma, Paolo; San Martini, Pietro; Sabatello, Ugo; Tatarelli, Roberto; Ferracuti, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The reliability of child witness testimony in sexual abuse cases is often controversial, and few tools are available. Criteria-Based Content Analysis (CBCA) is a widely used instrument for evaluating psychological credibility in cases of suspected child sexual abuse. Only few studies have evaluated CBCA scores in children suspected of…

  5. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; economic uses fact sheet 06: selection criteria analysis

    Treesearch

    Rocky Mountain Research Station USDA Forest Service

    2004-01-01

    Confidence in decisionmaking can often come from knowing if others in similar circumstances would choose the same management strategy. Researchers at the USDA FS Pacific Northwest Research Station and the University of Saskatchewan have developed a Selection Criteria Analysis for answering this very question. This fact sheet discusses factors affecting the choice of...

  6. Using multi-criteria analysis of simulation models to understand complex biological systems

    Treesearch

    Maureen C. Kennedy; E. David. Ford

    2011-01-01

    Scientists frequently use computer-simulation models to help solve complex biological problems. Typically, such models are highly integrated, they produce multiple outputs, and standard methods of model analysis are ill suited for evaluating them. We show how multi-criteria optimization with Pareto optimality allows for model outputs to be compared to multiple system...

  7. Logical Criteria Applied in Writing and in Editing by Text Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandersloot, Wim G. B.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that technical communication editing is most effective if it deals with structure first, and that structure deficiencies can be detected by applying a range of logical analysis criteria to each text part. Concludes that lists, headings, classifications, and organograms must comply with the laws of categorization and relevant logical…

  8. Simultaneous analysis of consumer variables, acceptability and sensory characteristics of dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masahiro; Obiya, Shinichi; Kaneko, Miku; Enomoto, Ayame; Honma, Mayu; Wakayama, Masataka; Tomita, Masaru

    2016-11-01

    We conducted a consumer acceptability analysis of dry-cured ham based on sensory evaluation. Consumer acceptability data are rendered heterogeneous by the diverse backgrounds and assessment abilities of the participants, requiring versatile analytical methods for their interpretation. Totally, 9 sensory attributes of 12 kinds of dry-cured ham samples collected from Japan (n=9), Italy (n=1), Spain (n=1), and Germany (n=1) were tasted by 117 Japanese consumers who showed acceptable evaluation abilities during blind sampling. Common techniques, such as hierarchical clustering, principal component analysis, and external preference mapping, were simultaneously utilized to analyze each characteristics scored in modified hedonic scale. These analyses revealed the relationships between the features and preferences of the assessors. For example, consumers aged 20-30 with smoking and drinking habits preferred sweetness and saltiness, and gave high ratings to Spanish Jómon serrano and Italian prosciutto. Our approach could assist ham marketers to identify potential purchasers and the preferred characteristics of their products.

  9. The economics of project analysis: Optimal investment criteria and methods of study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scriven, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    Insight is provided toward the development of an optimal program for investment analysis of project proposals offering commercial potential and its components. This involves a critique of economic investment criteria viewed in relation to requirements of engineering economy analysis. An outline for a systems approach to project analysis is given Application of the Leontief input-output methodology to analysis of projects involving multiple processes and products is investigated. Effective application of elements of neoclassical economic theory to investment analysis of project components is demonstrated. Patterns of both static and dynamic activity levels are incorporated.

  10. [Permanent essential defacement--remarks on the possibilities of verification of the accepted criteria in medico-legal certification in criminal and civil law proceedings].

    PubMed

    Chowaniec, Czesław; Nowak, Agnieszka; Jabłoński, Christian; Neniczka, Stanisława

    2007-01-01

    Despite the fact that some criteria of medico-legal certification in criminal and civil proceedings have been established, there are still some topics which are controversial and thus require modification. This is also true of the notion of "permanent essential defacement". In the opinion of the authors, changes in social conventions that are occurring nowadays, as well as a highly diversified, subjective perception of esthetic values indicate the need for discussing a possible modification of the presently obligatory criteria. Apart from the assessment of posttraumatic changes, an important problem is posed by defining the notion of "a part of the body customarily open to the view ". Additionally, the authors bring up for discussion the issue of experts taking into consideration the age and sex of the victims while assessing damages. A separate problem lies in difficulties in assessing the degree of detriment to health because of defacement due to the fact that official tables for evaluating permanent or long-term detriment to health do not include relevant information.

  11. Estimation Criteria for Rock Brittleness Based on Energy Analysis During the Rupturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Chi; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yu-wei; Zeng, Jia; Yang, Xin-liang; Wang, Ji-gang

    2016-12-01

    Brittleness is one of the most important mechanical properties of rock: it plays a significant role in evaluating the risk of rock bursts and in analysis of borehole-wall stability during shale gas development. Brittleness is also a critical parameter in the design of hydraulic fracturing. However, there is still no widely accepted definition of the concept of brittleness in rock mechanics. Although many criteria have been proposed to characterize rock brittleness, their applicability and reliability have yet to be verified. In this paper, the brittleness of rock under compression is defined as the ability of a rock to accumulate elastic energy during the pre-peak stage and to self-sustain fracture propagation in the post-peak stage. This ability is related to three types of energy: fracture energy, post-peak released energy and pre-peak dissipation energy. New brittleness evaluation indices B 1 and B 2 are proposed based on the stress-strain curve from the viewpoint of energy. The new indices can describe the entire transition of rock from absolute plasticity to absolute brittleness. In addition, the brittle characteristics reflected by other brittleness indices can be described, and the calculation results of B 1 and B 2 are continuous and monotonic. Triaxial compression tests on different types of rock were carried out under different confining pressures. Based on B 1 and B 2, the brittleness of different rocks shows different trends with rising confining pressure. The brittleness of red sandstone decreases with increasing confining pressure, whereas for black shale it initially increases and then decreases in a certain range of confining pressure. Granite displays a constant increasing trend. The brittleness anisotropy of black shale is discussed. The smaller the angle between the loading direction and the bedding plane, the greater the brittleness. The calculation B 1 and B 2 requires experimental data, and the values of these two indices represent only

  12. Validity of criteria-based content analysis (CBCA) at trial in free-narrative interviews.

    PubMed

    Roma, Paolo; Martini, Pietro San; Sabatello, Ugo; Tatarelli, Roberto; Ferracuti, Stefano

    2011-08-01

    The reliability of child witness testimony in sexual abuse cases is often controversial, and few tools are available. Criteria-Based Content Analysis (CBCA) is a widely used instrument for evaluating psychological credibility in cases of suspected child sexual abuse. Only few studies have evaluated CBCA scores in children suspected of being sexually abused. We designed this study to investigate the reliability of CBCA in discriminating allegations of child sexual abuse during court hearings, by comparing CBCA results with the court's final, unappealable sentence. We then investigated whether CBCA scores correlated with age, and whether some criteria were better than others in distinguishing cases of confirmed and unconfirmed abuse. From a pool of 487 child sexual abuse cases, confirmed and unconfirmed cases were selected using various criteria including child IQ≥70, agreement between the final trial outcome and the opinion of 3 experts, presence of at least 1 independent validating informative component in cases of confirmed abuse, and absence of suggestive questions during the child's testimonies. This screening yielded a study sample of 60 confirmed and 49 unconfirmed cases. The 14 item version of CBCA was applied to child witness testimony by 2 expert raters. Of the 14 criteria tested, 12 achieved satisfactory inter-rater agreement (Maxwell's Random Error). Analyses of covariance, with case group (confirmed vs. unconfirmed) and gender as independent variables and age as a covariate, showed no main effect of gender. Analyses of the interaction showed that the simple effects of abuse were significant in both sex. Nine CBCA criteria were satisfied more often among confirmed than unconfirmed cases; seven criteria increased with age. CBCA scores distinguish between confirmed and unconfirmed cases. The criteria that distinguish best between the 2 groups are Quantity of Details, Interactions, and Subjective Experience. CBCA scores correlate positively with age, and

  13. Trade-offs in traditional criteria vs environmental acceptability in product development: an example of the drilling fluids industry's response to environmental regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.; Collins, C.; Havis, D.

    1980-01-01

    The coevolution of increased energy needs and a heightened environmental awareness within the past decade has been fraught with direct conflicts. Often, these conflicts were necessary to solidify boad policy acts or challenge nebulous or unclear regulations. The drilling fluids industry, a vital part of petroleum exploration and production, has recognized the need for avoiding future conflicts and for insuring the conservation of our environment. This recognition is best witnessed by the production of new products or the alteration of established products to eliminate or minimize environmental impact. As an example, biocides used by the industry to preserve drilling fluids and control microbiological problems have been under close scrutinization by the Environmental Protection Agency, the United States Geological Service, and the National Marine Fisheries Service. The need to develop new products in this area or substitute the active ingredients of established products is evident. Data are presented on 19 active ingredients under consideration by IMCO Services. Of the 19, three failed performance tests. An additional seven were dismissed because of environmental concerns even though all passed performace testing. Of the nine remaining, four were selected because of their optimal combination of performance and environmental acceptability. The final choice appeared acceptable in both categories and was economically competitive. By careful consideration of applicable regulations, it is intended that future conflicts over use and disposal of this product will be minimzed.

  14. Can medical criteria settle priority-setting debates? The need for ethical analysis.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, D L

    1999-01-01

    Medical criteria rooted in evidence-based medicine are often seen as a value-neutral 'trump card' which puts paid to any further debate about setting priorities for treatment. On this argument, doctors should stop providing treatment at the point when it becomes medically futile, and that is also the threshold at which the health purchaser should stop purchasing. This paper offers three kinds of ethical criteria as a counterweight to analysis based solely on medical criteria. The first set of arguments concerns futility, probability and utility; the second, justice and fairness; the third, consent and competence. The argument is illustrated by two recent case studies about futility and priority-setting: the U.S. example of 'Baby Ryan' and the U.K. case of 'Child B'.

  15. An analysis of the criteria used to diagnose children with Nonverbal Learning Disability (NLD).

    PubMed

    Mammarella, Irene C; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Based on a review of the literature, the diagnostic criteria used for children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) were identified as follows: (a) low visuospatial intelligence; (b) discrepancy between verbal and visuospatial intelligence; (c) visuoconstructive and fine-motor coordination skills; (d) visuospatial memory tasks; (e) reading better than mathematical achievement; and (f) socioemotional skills. An analysis of the effect size was used to investigate the strength of criteria for diagnosing NLD considering 35 empirical studies published from January 1980 to February 2011. Overall, our results showed that the most important criteria for distinguishing children with NLD from controls were as follows: a low visuospatial intelligence with a relatively good verbal intelligence, visuoconstructive and fine-motor coordination impairments, good reading decoding together with low math performance. Deficits in visuospatial memory and social skills were also present. A preliminary set of criteria for diagnosing NLD was developed on these grounds. It was concluded, however, that-although some consensus is emerging-further research is needed to definitively establish shared diagnostic criteria for children with NLD.

  16. Natural Hazard Susceptibility Assessment for Road Planning Using Spatial Multi-Criteria Analysis.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Caroline S J; Kalantari, Zahra; Mörtberg, Ulla; Olofsson, Bo; Lyon, Steve W

    2017-08-18

    Inadequate infrastructural networks can be detrimental to society if transport between locations becomes hindered or delayed, especially due to natural hazards which are difficult to control. Thus determining natural hazard susceptible areas and incorporating them in the initial planning process, may reduce infrastructural damages in the long run. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of expert judgments for assessing natural hazard susceptibility through a spatial multi-criteria analysis approach using hydrological, geological, and land use factors. To utilize spatial multi-criteria analysis for decision support, an analytic hierarchy process was adopted where expert judgments were evaluated individually and in an aggregated manner. The estimates of susceptible areas were then compared with the methods weighted linear combination using equal weights and factor interaction method. Results showed that inundation received the highest susceptibility. Using expert judgment showed to perform almost the same as equal weighting where the difference in susceptibility between the two for inundation was around 4%. The results also showed that downscaling could negatively affect the susceptibility assessment and be highly misleading. Susceptibility assessment through spatial multi-criteria analysis is useful for decision support in early road planning despite its limitation to the selection and use of decision rules and criteria. A natural hazard spatial multi-criteria analysis could be used to indicate areas where more investigations need to be undertaken from a natural hazard point of view, and to identify areas thought to have higher susceptibility along existing roads where mitigation measures could be targeted after in-situ investigations.

  17. Acceptability of microneedle-patch vaccines: A qualitative analysis of the opinions of parents.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S; Fleming, A; Moore, A C; Sahm, L J

    2017-09-05

    Vaccines incorporated into microneedle-based patch platforms offer advantages over conventional hypodermic injections. However, the success and clinical utility of these platforms will depend on its acceptance among stakeholders. Minimal focus has been placed on determining parents' acceptability of microneedle-patch vaccines intended for paediatric use. This qualitative study probes the perceived acceptability of microneedle technology for paediatric vaccination in a parent population. Focus groups (n=6) were convened through purposive sampling of Cork city primary schools. Discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, anonymised, independently verified and analysed by thematic analysis, with constant comparison method applied throughout. The opinions of 32 parents were included. All participants declared that their children were fully vaccinated. Five core themes were identified and defined as: (i) concern, (ii) suitability for paediatric use, (iii) potential for parental administration, (iv) the role of the healthcare professional and (v) special populations. Drivers for acceptance include; concerns with current vaccines and vaccination programmes; attributes of microneedle-patch (reduced pain, bleeding, fear and increased convenience) and endorsement by a healthcare professional. Barriers to acceptance include; lack of familiarity, concerns regarding feasibility and suitability in paediatrics, allergic potential, inability to confirm delivery and potential reduction in vaccine coverage. This is the first study to explore parental acceptance of microneedle-patch vaccines. Capturing the opinions of parents, the ultimate decision makers in paediatric vaccination, is crucial in the understanding of the eventual uptake of microneedle technology and therefore adds to literature currently available. This study has revealed that even "vaccine-acceptors"; parents who agree with, or do not question vaccination, will question the safety and efficacy of this novel

  18. Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

    1980-02-01

    This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

  19. Descriptive analysis and early-stage consumer acceptance of yogurts fermented with carrot juice.

    PubMed

    Cliff, M A; Fan, L; Sanford, K; Stanich, K; Doucette, C; Raymond, N

    2013-07-01

    This research explored the sensory characteristics and consumer acceptance of novel probiotic unsweetened yogurts. Yogurts were made with 4 carrot juice levels (8, 16, 24, and 32%), 2 firmness levels (regular, 45g/L milk solids; firm, 90g/L milk solids), and 2 starter cultures (C1, C2). The sensory profile characterized the color intensity (before and after stirring), carrot flavor, sourness, and 7 texture/mouth-feel attributes (astringency, chalkiness, mouth-coating, thickness, smoothness, creaminess, and graininess). The influence of carrot juice level and firmness level were evaluated using ANOVA, polynomial contrasts, and principal component analysis. Mean scores and standard errors were calculated. Consumer acceptance panels in Wolfville, Nova Scotia (n=56), and in Vancouver, British Columbia (Asian n=72, non-Asian n=72), evaluated the hedonic responses to the C1 and C2 formulations, respectively. We observed increases in color intensity, carrot flavor, creaminess, mouth-coating, and chalkiness with increasing carrot juice levels, as well as increases in color intensity, carrot flavor, creaminess, mouth-coating, thickness, and astringency with increasing milk solids concentrations of the C1 and C2 yogurts. Mean hedonic scores for color, appearance, and texture/mouth-feel were greater than hedonic scores for aroma, flavor/taste, and overall liking. This research identified the sensory qualities that need further development and demonstrated the importance of early-stage consumer acceptance research for directing new product development.

  20. Internet-based psychoeducation for bipolar disorder: a qualitative analysis of feasibility, acceptability and impact.

    PubMed

    Poole, Ria; Simpson, Sharon A; Smith, Daniel J

    2012-09-13

    In a recent exploratory randomised trial we found that a novel, internet-based psychoeducation programme for bipolar disorder (Beating Bipolar) was relatively easy to deliver and had a modest effect on psychological quality of life. We sought to explore the experiences of participants with respect to feasibility, acceptability and impact of Beating Bipolar. Participants were invited to take part in a semi-structured interview. Thematic analysis techniques were employed; to explore and describe participants' experiences, the data were analysed for emerging themes which were identified and coded. The programme was feasible to deliver and acceptable to participants where they felt comfortable using a computer. It was found to impact upon insight into illness, health behaviour, personal routines and positive attitudes towards medication. Many participants regarded the programme as likely to be most beneficial for those recently diagnosed. An online psychoeducation package for bipolar disorder, such as Beating Bipolar, is feasible and acceptable to patients, has a positive impact on self-management behaviours and may be particularly suited to early intervention. Alternative (non-internet) formats should also be made available to patients.

  1. Internet-based psychoeducation for bipolar disorder: a qualitative analysis of feasibility, acceptability and impact

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In a recent exploratory randomised trial we found that a novel, internet-based psychoeducation programme for bipolar disorder (Beating Bipolar) was relatively easy to deliver and had a modest effect on psychological quality of life. We sought to explore the experiences of participants with respect to feasibility, acceptability and impact of Beating Bipolar. Methods Participants were invited to take part in a semi-structured interview. Thematic analysis techniques were employed; to explore and describe participants’ experiences, the data were analysed for emerging themes which were identified and coded. Results The programme was feasible to deliver and acceptable to participants where they felt comfortable using a computer. It was found to impact upon insight into illness, health behaviour, personal routines and positive attitudes towards medication. Many participants regarded the programme as likely to be most beneficial for those recently diagnosed. Conclusions An online psychoeducation package for bipolar disorder, such as Beating Bipolar, is feasible and acceptable to patients, has a positive impact on self-management behaviours and may be particularly suited to early intervention. Alternative (non-internet) formats should also be made available to patients. PMID:22971042

  2. A critical assessment of the performance criteria in confirmatory analysis for veterinary drug residue analysis using mass spectrometric detection in selected reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Bjorn J A; Meijer, Thijs; Wegh, Robin; Mol, Hans G J; Smyth, Wesley G; Armstrong Hewitt, S; van Ginkel, Leen; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-05-01

    Besides the identification point system to assure adequate set-up of instrumentation, European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC includes performance criteria regarding relative ion abundances in mass spectrometry and chromatographic retention time. In confirmatory analysis, the relative abundance of two product ions, acquired in selected reaction monitoring mode, the ion ratio should be within certain ranges for confirmation of the identity of a substance. The acceptable tolerance of the ion ratio varies with the relative abundance of the two product ions and for retention time, CD 2002/657/EC allows a tolerance of 5%. Because of rapid technical advances in analytical instruments and new approaches applied in the field of contaminant testing in food products (multi-compound and multi-class methods) a critical assessment of these criteria is justified. In this study a large number of representative, though challenging sample extracts were prepared, including muscle, urine, milk and liver, spiked with 100 registered and banned veterinary drugs at levels ranging from 0.5 to 100 µg/kg. These extracts were analysed using SRM mode using different chromatographic conditions and mass spectrometers from different vendors. In the initial study, robust data was collected using four different instrumental set-ups. Based on a unique and highly relevant data set, consisting of over 39 000 data points, the ion ratio and retention time criteria for applicability in confirmatory analysis were assessed. The outcomes were verified based on a collaborative trial including laboratories from all over the world. It was concluded that the ion ratio deviation is not related to the value of the ion ratio, but rather to the intensity of the lowest product ion. Therefore a fixed ion ratio deviation tolerance of 50% (relative) is proposed, which also is applicable for compounds present at sub-ppb levels or having poor ionisation efficiency. Furthermore, it was observed that retention time

  3. Pharmacists' acceptable levels of compensation for MTM services: a conjoint analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junling; Hong, Song Hee; Meng, Songmei; Brown, Lawrence M

    2011-12-01

    The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 requires prescription drug plans to provide medication therapy management (MTM) services to Medicare beneficiaries who are at high risk for inappropriate use of medications. However, inadequate compensation has been a barrier for MTM expansion among pharmacists. The objective of this study was to determine pharmacists' acceptable levels of compensation for MTM services. A preference-based fractional factorial design of conjoint analysis was used by surveying 1524 active pharmacists in Tennessee. Pharmacists were asked to select between packages (scenarios) of MTM services that represented combinations of MTM attributes (characteristics). The MTM attributes included type of patient (new or returning), patient's number of chronic conditions (1, 3, or 6), patient's number of medications (4, 8, or 16), patient's annual drug costs ($2000, $3000, or $4000), service duration (15 minutes, 30 minutes, or 45 minutes), and price of MTM services ($30, $60, or $120). A survival analysis model was used to predict pharmacists' willingness to select 1 versus another MTM service package. Pharmacists' acceptable level of compensation was estimated as the marginal rate of substitution between the parameter estimates of an attribute and the price attribute of MTM. The parameter estimates were -0.0303 (P<.0001) for service duration and 0.0210 (P<.0001) for price of MTM services, respectively, so pharmacists were willing to accept $1.44/min (0.0303/0.0210), or $86.4/h, for MTM services. Pharmacists' characteristics were associated significantly with their acceptable levels of compensation: years of practice was associated with a higher need for compensation, pharmacy ownership (vs nonowner) associated with a lower need, and having provided MTM previously (vs having not provided MTM) was associated with a higher need. Pharmacists' acceptable level of compensation is in the higher part of current ranges from $30 to $100/h. To increase participation

  4. A water quality monitoring network design using fuzzy theory and multiple criteria analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ling; Lin, You-Tze

    2014-10-01

    A proper water quality monitoring design is required in a watershed, particularly in a water resource protected area. As numerous factors can influence the water quality monitoring design, this study applies multiple criteria analysis to evaluate the suitability of the water quality monitoring design in the Taipei Water Resource Domain (TWRD) in northern Taiwan. Seven criteria, which comprise percentage of farmland area, percentage of built-up area, amount of non-point source pollution, green cover ratio, landslide area ratio, ratio of over-utilization on hillsides, and density of water quality monitoring stations, are selected in the multiple criteria analysis. The criteria are normalized and weighted. The weighted method is applied to score the subbasins. The density of water quality stations needs to be increased in priority in the subbasins with a higher score. The fuzzy theory is utilized to prioritize the need for a higher density of water quality monitoring stations. The results show that the need for more water quality stations in subbasin 2 in the Bei-Shih Creek Basin is much higher than those in the other subbasins. Furthermore, the existing water quality station in subbasin 2 requires maintenance. It is recommended that new water quality stations be built in subbasin 2.

  5. Pages from a Sociometric Notebook: An Analysis of Nomination and Rating Scale Measures of Acceptance, Rejection, and Social Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowski, William M.; Sippola, Lorrie; Hoza, Betsy; Newcomb, Andrew F.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a conceptual and empirical analysis of the associations between the fundamental sociometric dimensions of acceptance, rejection, and social preference. Examines whether nomination and rating scale measures index the same constructs. Notes that sociometric ratings measure social preference, but can also yield indicators of acceptance and…

  6. Pages from a Sociometric Notebook: An Analysis of Nomination and Rating Scale Measures of Acceptance, Rejection, and Social Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowski, William M.; Sippola, Lorrie; Hoza, Betsy; Newcomb, Andrew F.

    2000-01-01

    Provides a conceptual and empirical analysis of the associations between the fundamental sociometric dimensions of acceptance, rejection, and social preference. Examines whether nomination and rating scale measures index the same constructs. Notes that sociometric ratings measure social preference, but can also yield indicators of acceptance and…

  7. Chain of custody; recommendations for acceptance and analysis of evidentiary geochemical samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Christine M.; Briggs, Paul H.; Adrian, Betty M.; Wilson, Steve A.; Hageman, Phil L.; Theodorakos, Pete M.

    1997-01-01

    Personnel from the Analytical Chemistry Services Group (ACSG), Mineral Resource Survey Program, formed a team to determine the policies for acceptance and analysis of geochemical samples. This team contacted law enforcement agencies that handle litigious samples, laboratories that work with samples of special nature, and the Solicitor General, Department of the Interior. Using the knowledge from these agencies as well as the expertise of ACSG personnel, sample control routine procedures, sample control evidentiary procedures, personnel policy governing chain-of-custody samples, and the general polices governing physical security of chain-of custody samples have been enacted.

  8. Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Lee J.; Daniel Deng, Z.; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

    2014-01-01

    Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6 m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

  9. Standard format and content acceptance criteria for the Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) Reform Amendment: 10 CFR Part 74, Subpart E. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In 1987 the NRC revised the material control and accounting requirements for NRC licensees authorized to possess and use a formula quantity (i.e., 5 formula kilograms or more) of strategic special nuclear material. Those revisions issued as 10 CFR 74.51-59 require timely monitoring of in-process inventory and discrete items to detect anomalies potentially indicative of material losses. Timely detection and enhanced loss localization capabilities are beneficial to alarm resolution and also for material recovery in the event of an actual loss. NUREG-1280 was issued in 1987 to present criteria that could be used by applicants, licensees, and NRC license reviewers in the initial preparation and subsequent review of fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plans submitted in response to the Reform Amendment. This document is also intended for both licensees and license reviewers with respect to FNMC plan revisions. General performance objectives, system capabilities, process monitoring, item monitoring, alarm resolution, quality assurance, and accounting are addressed. This revision to NUREG-1280 is an expansion of the initial edition, which clarifies and expands upon several topics and addresses issues identified under Reform Amendment implementation experience.

  10. Using multi-criteria decision analysis to assess the vulnerability of drinking water utilities.

    PubMed

    Joerin, Florent; Cool, Geneviève; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Gignac, Marc; Bouchard, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Outbreaks of microbiological waterborne disease have increased governmental concern regarding the importance of drinking water safety. Considering the multi-barrier approach to safe drinking water may improve management decisions to reduce contamination risks. However, the application of this approach must consider numerous and diverse kinds of information simultaneously. This makes it difficult for authorities to apply the approach to decision making. For this reason, multi-criteria decision analysis can be helpful in applying the multi-barrier approach to vulnerability assessment. The goal of this study is to propose an approach based on a multi-criteria analysis method in order to rank drinking water systems (DWUs) based on their vulnerability to microbiological contamination. This approach is illustrated with an application carried out on 28 DWUs supplied by groundwater in the Province of Québec, Canada. The multi-criteria analysis method chosen is measuring attractiveness by a categorical based evaluation technique methodology allowing the assessment of a microbiological vulnerability indicator (MVI) for each DWU. Results are presented on a scale ranking DWUs from less vulnerable to most vulnerable to contamination. MVI results are tested using a sensitivity analysis on barrier weights and they are also compared with historical data on contamination at the utilities. The investigation demonstrates that MVI provides a good representation of the vulnerability of DWUs to microbiological contamination.

  11. Multi-criteria decision analysis in conservation planning: Designing conservation area networks in San Diego County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Garrick Richard

    applicable to the research project, however, it did exhibit a few limitations. Both the advantages and disadvantages of ConsNet should be considered before using ConsNet for future conservation planning projects. The research project is an example of a large data scenario undertaken with a multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) approach.

  12. Surgical treatment of acromegaly according to the 2010 remission criteria: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Starnoni, Daniele; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Marino, Laura; Pitteloud, Nelly; Levivier, Marc; Messerer, Mahmoud

    2016-11-01

    In 2010, the Acromegaly Consensus Group revised the criteria for cure of acromegaly and thus rates of surgical remission need to be revised in light of these new thresholds. Two subgroups consisted of patients with discordant GH and IGF-1 levels and patients in remission according to the 2000 criteria, but not to the 2010 criteria, have been reported after adenomectomy and for these subgroups the precise incidence and management has not been established. The objective of the study was to update rates of surgical remission and complications and to evaluate the incidence, management, and long-term outcome of the two previously described subgroups of patients. Systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical series that defined remission according to the 2010 biochemical criteria. We included 13 studies (1105 patients). The pooled rate of overall surgical remission was 54.8 % (95 % CI 44.4-65.2 %), and 72.2 % with previous criteria. Remission was achieved in 77.9 % (95 % CI 68.1-87.6 %) of microadenomas; 52.7 % (95 % CI 41-64.4 %) of macroadenomas; 29 % (95 % CI 20.1-37.8 %) of invasive and 68.8 % (95 % CI 60-77.6 %) of non-invasive adenomas. Complication rates were 1.2 % (95 % CI 0.6-1.9 %) for CSF leak, 1.3 % (95 % CI 0.6-2.1 %) for permanent diabetes insipidus, 8.7 % (95 % CI 4.8-12.5 %) for new anterior pituitary dysfunction and 0.6 % (95 % CI 0.1-1.1 %) for severe intraoperative hemorrhage. We identified an intermediate group of patients, defined as: (1) Remission according to one, but not the other biochemical criteria (GH or IGF-1) or 2010 criteria (14.3 % and 47.1 % cases), (2) Remission according to 2000, but not 2010 criteria (13.2-58.8 % cases). Two studies reported a remission rate of 56.5 % and 100 %, in the two subgroups respectively, in a long-term outcome without adjuvant therapy. Overall remission with transsphenoidal surgery is achieved in ∼55 % of patients. For the intermediate group of patients

  13. Efficacy and Acceptability of Pharmacological Treatments for Depressive Disorders in Primary Care: Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Klaus; Kriston, Levente; Rücker, Gerta; Jamil, Susanne; Schumann, Isabelle; Meissner, Karin; Sigterman, Kirsten; Schneider, Antonius

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate whether antidepressants are more effective than placebo in the primary care setting, and whether there are differences between substance classes regarding efficacy and acceptability. METHODS We conducted literature searches in MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PsycINFO up to December 2013. Randomized trials in depressed adults treated by primary care physicians were included in the review. We performed both conventional pairwise meta-analysis and network meta-analysis combining direct and indirect evidence. Main outcome measures were response and study discontinuation due to adverse effects. RESULTS A total of 66 studies with 15,161 patients met the inclusion criteria. In network meta-analysis, tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants (TCAs), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI; venlafaxine), a low-dose serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitor (SARI; trazodone) and hypericum extracts were found to be significantly superior to placebo, with estimated odds ratios between 1.69 and 2.03. There were no statistically significant differences between these drug classes. Reversible inhibitors of monoaminoxidase A (rMAO-As) and hypericum extracts were associated with significantly fewer dropouts because of adverse effects compared with TCAs, SSRIs, the SNRI, a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NRI), and noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant agents (NaSSAs). CONCLUSIONS Compared with other drugs, TCAs and SSRIs have the most solid evidence base for being effective in the primary care setting, but the effect size compared with placebo is relatively small. Further agents (hypericum, rMAO-As, SNRI, NRI, NaSSAs, SARI) showed some positive results, but limitations of the currently available evidence makes a clear recommendation on their place in clinical practice difficult. PMID:25583895

  14. Comparative analysis of buckling criteria for engineering structures. Single-degree-of-freedom systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupishin, L.

    2017-05-01

    The criteria of the buckling of engineering structures in terms of the systems with lumped parameters are discussed in the article. The examples of setting buckling problems and their solutions using Timoshenko and Bryan criteria’s, and the criterion of the critical levels of energy are given. The analysis of the compared approaches, their strengths and shortcomings in terms of the single-degree-of-freedom systems are presented.

  15. Broader economic evaluation of disease management programs using multi-criteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a methodological framework to facilitate the application of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) for a comprehensive economic evaluation of disease management programs (DMPs). We studied previously developed frameworks for the evaluation of DMPs and different methods of MCDA and we used practical field experience in the economic evaluation of DMPs and personal discussions with stakeholders in chronic care. The framework includes different objectives and criteria that are relevant for the evaluation of DMPs, indicators that can be used to measure how DMPs perform on these criteria, and distinguishes between the development and implementation phase of DMPs. The objectives of DMPs are categorised into a) changes in the process of care delivery, b) changes in patient lifestyle and self-management behaviour, c) changes in biomedical, physiological and clinical health outcomes, d) changes in health-related quality of life, and e) changes in final health outcomes. All relevant costs of DMPs are also included in the framework. Based on this framework we conducted a MCDA of a hypothetical DMP versus usual care. We call for a comprehensive economic evaluation of DMPs that is not just based on a single criterion but takes into account multiple relevant criteria simultaneously. The framework we presented here is a step towards standardising such an evaluation.

  16. Enclosure fire hazard analysis using relative energy release criteria. [burning rate and combustion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    A method for predicting the probable course of fire development in an enclosure is presented. This fire modeling approach uses a graphic plot of five fire development constraints, the relative energy release criteria (RERC), to bound the heat release rates in an enclosure as a function of time. The five RERC are flame spread rate, fuel surface area, ventilation, enclosure volume, and total fuel load. They may be calculated versus time based on the specified or empirical conditions describing the specific enclosure, the fuel type and load, and the ventilation. The calculation of these five criteria, using the common basis of energy release rates versus time, provides a unifying framework for the utilization of available experimental data from all phases of fire development. The plot of these criteria reveals the probable fire development envelope and indicates which fire constraint will be controlling during a criteria time period. Examples of RERC application to fire characterization and control and to hazard analysis are presented along with recommendations for the further development of the concept.

  17. Hepatopulmonary syndrome: which blood gas analysis criteria and position should we use for diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Grilo, Israel; Pascasio, Juan Manuel; López-Pardo, Francisco-Jesús; Ortega-Ruiz, Francisco; Tirado, Juan Luis; Sousa, José Manuel; Rodríguez-Puras, María José; Ferrer, María Teresa; Gómez-Bravo, Miguel Ángel; Grilo, Antonio

    2017-10-03

    Different blood gas criteria have been used in the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS). Arterial blood gases were prospectively evaluated in 194 cirrhotic candidates for liver transplantation (LT) in the supine and seated position. Three blood gas criteria were analyzed: classic (partial pressure of oxygen [PaO2] < 70 mmHg and/or alveolar-arterial gradient of oxygen [A-a PO2] ≥ 20 mmHg), modern (A-a PO2 ≥ 15 mmHg or ≥ 20 mmHg in patients over 64) and the A-a PO2 ≥ threshold value adjusted for age. The prevalence of HPS in the supine and seated position was 27.8% and 23.2% (classic), 34% and 25.3% (modern) and 22.2% and 19% (adjusted for age), respectively. The proportion of severe and very severe cases increased in a seated position (11/49 [22.4%] vs 5/66 [7.6%], p = 0.02). No difference was observed in the pre-LT, post-LT and overall mortality in patients with HPS, regardless of the criteria used. Obtaining blood gas measurements in the supine position and the use of modern criteria are more sensitive for the diagnosis of HPS. Blood gas analysis with the patient seated detects a greater number of severe and very severe cases. The presence of HPS was not associated with an increase in mortality regardless of blood gas criterion used.

  18. The minimum risk principle that underlies the criteria of bounded component analysis.

    PubMed

    Cruces, Sergio; Durán-Díaz, Iván

    2015-05-01

    This paper studies the problem of the blind extraction of a subset of bounded component signals from the observations of a linear mixture. In the first part of this paper, we analyze the geometric assumptions of the observations that characterize the problem, and their implications on the mixing matrix and latent sources. In the second part, we solve the problem by adopting the principle of minimizing the risk, which refers to the encoding complexity of the observations in the worst admissible situation. This principle provides an underlying justification of several bounded component analysis (BCA) criteria, including the minimum normalized volume criterion of the estimated sources or the maximum negentropy-likelihood criterion with a uniform reference model for the estimated sources. This unifying framework can explain the differences between the criteria in accordance with their considered hypotheses for the model of the observations. This paper is first presented for the case of the extraction of a complex and multidimensional source, and later is particularized for the case of the extraction of subsets of 1-D complex sources. The results also hold true in the case of real signals, where the obtained criteria for the extraction of a set of 1-D sources usually coincide with the existing BCA criteria.

  19. Item response theory analysis of DSM-IV criteria for inhalant-use disorders in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Perron, Brian E; Vaughn, Michael G; Howard, Matthew O; Bohnert, Amy; Guerrero, Erick

    2010-07-01

    Inhalants are a serious public health concern and a dangerous form of substance use. An important unresolved issue in the inhalant literature concerns the validity of inhalant-use diagnoses and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, distinction between inhalant abuse and inhalant dependence. To address these limitations and provide the foundation for helping build stronger diagnostic and assessment tools related to inhalant problems, this study examined the dimensionality of the criteria set and the abuse-dependence distinction using item response theory (IRT) analysis. This study used data from a survey of the population of Missouri Division of Youth Services' residents of the residential treatment system. The current study focused on adolescents and young adults who reported a lifetime history of inhalant use (N = 279). The results from the IRT analysis showed no consistent hierarchical ordering of abuse and dependence criteria, providing strong evidence against the abuse-dependence distinction. The abuse criterion of legal problems associated with use represented the item with the highest level of inhalant severity. The dependence criterion that was related to giving up important social, occupational, or recreational activities provided the most accurate discrimination between individuals at different levels of severity. Inhalant-use disorders are best represented using a dimensional versus a categorical approach. IRT analysis provides guidance for selecting criteria that can be useful for brief assessments of inhalant-use problems.

  20. Item Response Theory Analysis of DSM-IV Criteria for Inhalant-Use Disorders in Adolescents*

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Brian E.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Howard, Matthew O.; Bohnert, Amy; Guerrero, Erick

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Inhalants are a serious public health concern and a dangerous form of substance use. An important unresolved issue in the inhalant literature concerns the validity of inhalant-use diagnoses and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, distinction between inhalant abuse and inhalant dependence. To address these limitations and provide the foundation for helping build stronger diagnostic and assessment tools related to inhalant problems, this study examined the dimensionality of the criteria set and the abuse—dependence distinction using item response theory (IRT) analysis. Method: This study used data from a survey of the population of Missouri Division of Youth Services' residents of the residential treatment system. The current study focused on adolescents and young adults who reported a lifetime history of inhalant use (N = 279). Results: The results from the IRT analysis showed no consistent hierarchical ordering of abuse and dependence criteria, providing strong evidence against the abuse—dependence distinction. The abuse criterion of legal problems associated with use represented the item with the highest level of inhalant severity. The dependence criterion that was related to giving up important social, occupational, or recreational activities provided the most accurate discrimination between individuals at different levels of severity. Conclusions: Inhalant-use disorders are best represented using a dimensional versus a categorical approach. IRT analysis provides guidance for selecting criteria that can be useful for brief assessments of inhalant-use problems. PMID:20553671

  1. Gender Incongruence of Adolescence and Adulthood: Acceptability and Clinical Utility of the World Health Organization’s Proposed ICD-11 Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Beek, Titia F.; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T.; Bouman, Walter P.; de Vries, Annelou L. C.; Steensma, Thomas D.; Witcomb, Gemma L.; Arcelus, Jon; Richards, Christina; Elaut, Els; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P. C.

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is currently updating the tenth version of their diagnostic tool, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD, WHO, 1992). Changes have been proposed for the diagnosis of Transsexualism (ICD-10) with regard to terminology, placement and content. The aim of this study was to gather the opinions of transgender individuals (and their relatives/partners) and clinicians in the Netherlands, Flanders (Belgium) and the United Kingdom regarding the proposed changes and the clinical applicability and utility of the ICD-11 criteria of ‘Gender Incongruence of Adolescence and Adulthood’ (GIAA). A total of 628 participants were included in the study: 284 from the Netherlands (45.2%), 8 from Flanders (Belgium) (1.3%), and 336 (53.5%) from the UK. Most participants were transgender people (or their partners/relatives) (n = 522), 89 participants were healthcare providers (HCPs) and 17 were both healthcare providers and (partners/relatives of) transgender people. Participants completed an online survey developed for this study. Most participants were in favor of the proposed diagnostic term of ‘Gender Incongruence’ and thought that this was an improvement on the ICD-10 diagnostic term of ‘Transsexualism’. Placement in a separate chapter dealing with Sexual- and Gender-related Health or as a Z-code was preferred by many and only a small number of participants stated that this diagnosis should be excluded from the ICD-11. In the UK, most transgender participants thought there should be a diagnosis related to being trans. However, if it were to be removed from the chapter on “psychiatric disorders”, many transgender respondents indicated that they would prefer it to be removed from the ICD in its entirety. There were no large differences between the responses of the transgender participants (or their partners and relatives) and HCPs. HCPs were generally positive about the GIAA diagnosis; most thought the diagnosis was clearly

  2. Evaluating community investments in the mining sector using multi-criteria decision analysis to integrate SIA with business planning

    SciTech Connect

    Esteves, A.M.

    2008-05-15

    Gaining senior management's commitment to long-term social development projects, which are characterised by uncertainty and complexity, is made easier if projects are shown to benefit the site's strategic goals. However, even though the business case for community investment may have been accepted at a general level, as a strategy for competitive differentiation, risk mitigation and a desire to deliver - and to be seen to deliver - a 'net benefit' to affected communities, mining operations are still faced with implementation challenges. Case study research on mining companies, including interviews with social investment decision-makers, has assisted in developing the Social Investment Decision Analysis Tool (SIDAT), a decision model for evaluating social projects in order to create value for both the company and the community. Multi-criteria decision analysis techniques integrating business planning processes with social impact assessment have proved useful in assisting mining companies think beyond the traditional drivers (i.e. seeking access to required lands and peaceful relations with neighbours), to broader issues of how they can meet their business goals and contribute to sustainable development in the regions in which they operate.

  3. Use of multi-criteria decision analysis in regulatory alternatives analysis: a case study of lead free solder.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Timothy F; Sinsheimer, Peter J; Blake, Ann; Linkov, Igor

    2013-10-01

    Regulators are implementing new programs that require manufacturers of products containing certain chemicals of concern to identify, evaluate, and adopt viable, safer alternatives. Such programs raise the difficult question for policymakers and regulated businesses of which alternatives are "viable" and "safer." To address that question, these programs use "alternatives analysis," an emerging methodology that integrates issues of human health and environmental effects with technical feasibility and economic impact. Despite the central role that alternatives analysis plays in these programs, the methodology itself is neither well-developed nor tailored to application in regulatory settings. This study uses the case of Pb-based bar solder and its non-Pb-based alternatives to examine the application of 2 multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods to alternatives analysis: multi-attribute utility analysis and outranking. The article develops and evaluates an alternatives analysis methodology and supporting decision-analysis software for use in a regulatory context, using weighting of the relevant decision criteria generated from a stakeholder elicitation process. The analysis produced complete rankings of the alternatives, including identification of the relative contribution to the ranking of each of the highest level decision criteria such as human health impacts, technical feasibility, and economic feasibility. It also examined the effect of variation in data conventions, weighting, and decision frameworks on the outcome. The results indicate that MCDA can play a critical role in emerging prevention-based regulatory programs. Multi-criteria decision analysis methods offer a means for transparent, objective, and rigorous analysis of products and processes, providing regulators and stakeholders with a common baseline understanding of the relative performance of alternatives and the trade-offs they present. © 2013 SETAC.

  4. Adaptation and Evaluation of a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Model for Lyme Disease Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Aenishaenslin, Cécile; Gern, Lise; Michel, Pascal; Ravel, André; Hongoh, Valérie; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Milord, François; Bélanger, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Designing preventive programs relevant to vector-borne diseases such as Lyme disease (LD) can be complex given the need to include multiple issues and perspectives into prioritizing public health actions. A multi-criteria decision aid (MCDA) model was previously used to rank interventions for LD prevention in Quebec, Canada, where the disease is emerging. The aim of the current study was to adapt and evaluate the decision model constructed in Quebec under a different epidemiological context, in Switzerland, where LD has been endemic for the last thirty years. The model adaptation was undertaken with a group of Swiss stakeholders using a participatory approach. The PROMETHEE method was used for multi-criteria analysis. Key elements and results of the MCDA model are described and contrasted with the Quebec model. All criteria and most interventions of the MCDA model developed for LD prevention in Quebec were directly transferable to the Swiss context. Four new decision criteria were added, and the list of proposed interventions was modified. Based on the overall group ranking, interventions targeting human populations were prioritized in the Swiss model, with the top ranked action being the implementation of a large communication campaign. The addition of criteria did not significantly alter the intervention rankings, but increased the capacity of the model to discriminate between highest and lowest ranked interventions. The current study suggests that beyond the specificity of the MCDA models developed for Quebec and Switzerland, their general structure captures the fundamental and common issues that characterize the complexity of vector-borne disease prevention. These results should encourage public health organizations to adapt, use and share MCDA models as an effective and functional approach to enable the integration of multiple perspectives and considerations in the prevention and control of complex public health issues such as Lyme disease or other vector

  5. Adaptation and Evaluation of a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Model for Lyme Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Aenishaenslin, Cécile; Gern, Lise; Michel, Pascal; Ravel, André; Hongoh, Valérie; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Milord, François; Bélanger, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Designing preventive programs relevant to vector-borne diseases such as Lyme disease (LD) can be complex given the need to include multiple issues and perspectives into prioritizing public health actions. A multi-criteria decision aid (MCDA) model was previously used to rank interventions for LD prevention in Quebec, Canada, where the disease is emerging. The aim of the current study was to adapt and evaluate the decision model constructed in Quebec under a different epidemiological context, in Switzerland, where LD has been endemic for the last thirty years. The model adaptation was undertaken with a group of Swiss stakeholders using a participatory approach. The PROMETHEE method was used for multi-criteria analysis. Key elements and results of the MCDA model are described and contrasted with the Quebec model. All criteria and most interventions of the MCDA model developed for LD prevention in Quebec were directly transferable to the Swiss context. Four new decision criteria were added, and the list of proposed interventions was modified. Based on the overall group ranking, interventions targeting human populations were prioritized in the Swiss model, with the top ranked action being the implementation of a large communication campaign. The addition of criteria did not significantly alter the intervention rankings, but increased the capacity of the model to discriminate between highest and lowest ranked interventions. The current study suggests that beyond the specificity of the MCDA models developed for Quebec and Switzerland, their general structure captures the fundamental and common issues that characterize the complexity of vector-borne disease prevention. These results should encourage public health organizations to adapt, use and share MCDA models as an effective and functional approach to enable the integration of multiple perspectives and considerations in the prevention and control of complex public health issues such as Lyme disease or other vector

  6. Latent Class Analysis of DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder Criteria among Heavy-Drinking College Students

    PubMed Central

    Neighbors, Clayton

    2015-01-01

    The DSM-5 has created significant changes in the definition of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Limited work has considered the impact of these changes in specific populations, such as heavy-drinking college students. Latent class analysis (LCA) is a person-centered approach that divides a population into mutually exclusive and exhaustive latent classes, based on observable indicator variables. The present research was designed to examine whether there were distinct classes of heavy-drinking college students who met DSM-5 criteria for an AUD and whether gender, perceived social norms, use of protective behavioral strategies (PBS), drinking refusal self-efficacy (DRSE), self-perceptions of drinking identity, psychological distress, and membership in a fraternity/sorority would be associated with class membership. Three-hundred and ninety-four college students who met DSM-5 criteria for an AUD were recruited from three different universities. Two distinct classes emerged: Less Severe (86%), the majority of whom endorsed both drinking more than intended and tolerance, as well as met criteria for a mild AUD; and More Severe (14%), the majority of whom endorsed at least half of the DSM-5 AUD criteria and met criteria for a severe AUD. Relative to the Less Severe class, membership in the More Severe class was negatively associated with DRSE and positively associated with self-identification as a drinker. There is a distinct class of heavy-drinking college students with a more severe AUD and for whom intervention content needs to be more focused and tailored. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:26051027

  7. Latent Class Analysis of DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder Criteria Among Heavy-Drinking College Students.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Dipali Venkataraman; Neighbors, Clayton

    2015-10-01

    The DSM-5 has created significant changes in the definition of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Limited work has considered the impact of these changes in specific populations, such as heavy-drinking college students. Latent class analysis (LCA) is a person-centered approach that divides a population into mutually exclusive and exhaustive latent classes, based on observable indicator variables. The present research was designed to examine whether there were distinct classes of heavy-drinking college students who met DSM-5 criteria for an AUD and whether gender, perceived social norms, use of protective behavioral strategies (PBS), drinking refusal self-efficacy (DRSE), self-perceptions of drinking identity, psychological distress, and membership in a fraternity/sorority would be associated with class membership. Three-hundred and ninety-four college students who met DSM-5 criteria for an AUD were recruited from three different universities. Two distinct classes emerged: Less Severe (86%), the majority of whom endorsed both drinking more than intended and tolerance, as well as met criteria for a mild AUD; and More Severe (14%), the majority of whom endorsed at least half of the DSM-5 AUD criteria and met criteria for a severe AUD. Relative to the Less Severe class, membership in the More Severe class was negatively associated with DRSE and positively associated with self-identification as a drinker. There is a distinct class of heavy-drinking college students with a more severe AUD and for whom intervention content needs to be more focused and tailored. Clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk analysis for new nuclear waste sites: Will it generate public acceptance?

    SciTech Connect

    Inhaber, H.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses public acceptance of radioactive waste facilities and what seems to be increasingly militant stances against such facilities. The role of risk assessment in possibly enhancing public acceptance is investigated.

  9. Multiple criteria analysis of remotely piloted aircraft systems for monitoring the crops vegetation status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, L.; Luculescu, M. C.; Zamfira, S. C.; Boer, A. L.; Pop, S.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents an analysis of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) used for monitoring the crops vegetation status. The study focuses on two types of RPAS, namely the flying wing and the multi-copter. The following criteria were taken into account: technical characteristics, power consumption, flight autonomy, flight conditions, costs, data acquisition systems used for monitoring, crops area and so on. Based on this analysis, advantages and disadvantages are emphasized offering a useful tool for choosing the proper solution according to the specific application conditions.

  10. CERISE, a French radioprotection code, to assess the radiological impact and acceptance criteria of installations for material handling, and recycling or disposal of very low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Santucci, P.; Guetat, P.

    1993-12-31

    This document describes the code CERISE, Code d`Evaluations Radiologiques Individuelles pour des Situations en Enterprise et dans l`Environnement. This code has been developed in the frame of European studies to establish acceptance criteria of very low-level radioactive waste and materials. This code is written in Fortran and runs on PC. It calculates doses received by the different pathways: external exposure, ingestion, inhalation and skin contamination. Twenty basic scenarios are already elaborated, which have been determined from previous studies. Calculations establish the relation between surface, specific and/or total activities, and doses. Results can be expressed as doses for an average activity unit, or as average activity limits for a set of reference doses (defined for each scenario analyzed). In this last case, the minimal activity values and the corresponding limiting scenarios, are selected and summarized in a final table.

  11. Acceptability of participatory social network analysis for problem-solving in Australian Aboriginal health service partnerships

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While participatory social network analysis can help health service partnerships to solve problems, little is known about its acceptability in cross-cultural settings. We conducted two case studies of chronic illness service partnerships in 2007 and 2008 to determine whether participatory research incorporating social network analysis is acceptable for problem-solving in Australian Aboriginal health service delivery. Methods Local research groups comprising 13–19 partnership staff, policy officers and community members were established at each of two sites to guide the research and to reflect and act on the findings. Network and work practice surveys were conducted with 42 staff, and the results were fed back to the research groups. At the end of the project, 19 informants at the two sites were interviewed, and the researchers conducted critical reflection. The effectiveness and acceptability of the participatory social network method were determined quantitatively and qualitatively. Results Participants in both local research groups considered that the network survey had accurately described the links between workers related to the exchange of clinical and cultural information, team care relationships, involvement in service management and planning and involvement in policy development. This revealed the function of the teams and the roles of workers in each partnership. Aboriginal workers had a high number of direct links in the exchange of cultural information, illustrating their role as the cultural resource, whereas they had fewer direct links with other network members on clinical information exchange and team care. The problem of their current and future roles was discussed inside and outside the local research groups. According to the interview informants the participatory network analysis had opened the way for problem-solving by “putting issues on the table”. While there were confronting and ethically challenging aspects, these informants

  12. Photoneutron reaction cross sections from various experiments - analysis and evaluation using physical criteria of data reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, Vladimir; Ishkhanov, Boris; Orlin, Vadim; Peskov, Nikolai; Stepanov, Mikhail

    2017-09-01

    The majority of photonuclear reaction cross sections important for many fields of science and technology and various data files (EXFOR, RIPL, ENDF, etc.) supported by the IAEA were obtained in experiments using quasimonoenergetic annihilation photons. There are well-known systematic discrepancies between the partial photoneutron reactions (γ, 1n), (γ, 2n), (γ, 3n). For analysis of the data reliability the objective physical criteria were proposed. It was found out that the experimental data for many nuclei are not reliable because of large systematic uncertainties of the neutron multiplicity sorting method used. The experimentally-theoretical method was proposed for evaluating the reaction cross sections data satisfying the reliability criteria. The partial and total reaction cross sections were evaluated for many nuclei. In many cases evaluated data differ noticeably from both the experimental data and the data evaluated before for the IAEA Photonuclear Data Library. Therefore it became evident that the IAEA Library needs to be revised and updated.

  13. [THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF INFORMATION VALUE OF MAIN CLINICAL CRITERIA USED TO DIAGNOSE OF BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, A V; Murtazina, Z A; Markusheva, T V; Mavzutov, A R

    2015-05-01

    The bacterial vaginosis is one of the most frequent causes of women visiting gynecologist. The diagnostics of bacterial vaginosis is predominantly based on Amsel criteria (1983). Nowadays, the objectivity of these criteria is disputed more often. The analysis of excretion of mucous membranes of posterolateral fornix of vagina was applied to 640 women with clinical diagnosis bacterial vaginosis. The application of light microscopy to mounts of excretion confirmed in laboratory way the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis in 100 (15.63%) women. The complaints of burning and unpleasant smell and the Amsel criterion of detection of "key cells" against the background of pH > 4.5 were established as statistically significant for bacterial vaginosis. According study data, the occurrence of excretions has no statistical reliable obligation for differentiation of bacterial vaginosis form other inflammatory pathological conditions of female reproductive sphere. At the same time, detection of "key cells" in mount reliably correlated with bacterial vaginosis.

  14. Using modified visual-inspection criteria to interpret functional analysis outcomes.

    PubMed

    Roane, Henry S; Fisher, Wayne W; Kelley, Michael E; Mevers, Joanna L; Bouxsein, Kelly J

    2013-01-01

    The development of functional analysis (FA) methodologies allows the identification of the reinforcers that maintain problem behavior and improved intervention efficacy in the form of function-based treatments. Despite the profound impact of FA on clinical practice and research, questions still remain about the methods by which clinicians and researchers interpret FA graphs. In the current study, 141 FA data sets were evaluated using the structured visual-inspection criteria developed by Hagopian et al. (1997). However, the criteria were modified for FAs of varying lengths. Interobserver agreement assessments revealed high agreement coefficients across expert judges, postdoctoral reviewers, master's-level reviewers, and postbaccalaureate reviewers. Once the validity of the modified visual-inspection procedures was established, the utility of those procedures was examined by using them to categorize the maintaining reinforcement contingency related to problem behavior for all 141 data sets and for the 101 participants who contributed to the 141 data sets.

  15. A multi-criteria decision analysis assessment of waste paper management options.

    PubMed

    Hanan, Deirdre; Burnley, Stephen; Cooke, David

    2013-03-01

    The use of Multi-criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) was investigated in an exercise using a panel of local residents and stakeholders to assess the options for managing waste paper on the Isle of Wight. Seven recycling, recovery and disposal options were considered by the panel who evaluated each option against seven environmental, financial and social criteria. The panel preferred options where the waste was managed on the island with gasification and recycling achieving the highest scores. Exporting the waste to the English mainland for incineration or landfill proved to be the least preferred options. This research has demonstrated that MCDA is an effective way of involving community groups in waste management decision making. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of using different criteria for caries removal: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, Falk; Paris, Sebastian; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, caries excavation is performed until only hard dentine remains, while more selective and reliable criteria might be available. We aimed at systematically comparing the effects of using different excavation criteria via network meta-analysis. Electronic databases were searched for randomised or non-randomised clinical trials (RCTs/NRCTs) evaluating excavation of cavitated lesions. Criteria were divided into six groups: Excavation until pulpo-proximal dentine on the cavity floor was (1) either hard on probing, (2) slightly softened on probing, (3) not stainable by caries-detector-dye, or until (4) self-limiting polymer burs, (5) fluorescence-assisted devices or (6) chemo-mechanical gels indicated termination of the excavation. Evaluation of risk of complications, risk of pain/discomfort, excavation time, and number of remaining bacteria were then undertaken using Bayesian network meta-analysis. 28 studies (19 RCTs, 9 NRCTs) with 1782 patients (2555 lesions), most of them investigating primary teeth, were included. Risk of complications was highest when excavating until only non-stainable dentine remained, and lowest when not attempting to remove all softened dentine. Risk of pain significantly decreased if self-limiting chemo-mechanical excavation or fluorescence-assisted lasers were used instead of excavating until all dentine was hard. When not attempting to remove all softened dentine, the time required for excavation was shortest, whilst the greatest number bacteria remained. Not attempting to remove all softened or stainable dentine might reduce the risk of complications. Data regarding self-limiting excavation is insufficient for definitive conclusions. Excavation criteria should be validated against clinically relevant outcomes. Given current evidence, dentists might not need to attempt excavation until only hard dentin remains in proximity to the pulp. Instead, their choice of excavation criterion or method should be guided by clinical

  17. MetaQC: objective quality control and inclusion/exclusion criteria for genomic meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwan D; Sibille, Etienne; Kaminski, Naftali; Tseng, George C

    2012-01-01

    Genomic meta-analysis to combine relevant and homogeneous studies has been widely applied, but the quality control (QC) and objective inclusion/exclusion criteria have been largely overlooked. Currently, the inclusion/exclusion criteria mostly depend on ad-hoc expert opinion or naïve threshold by sample size or platform. There are pressing needs to develop a systematic QC methodology as the decision of study inclusion greatly impacts the final meta-analysis outcome. In this article, we propose six quantitative quality control measures, covering internal homogeneity of coexpression structure among studies, external consistency of coexpression pattern with pathway database, and accuracy and consistency of differentially expressed gene detection or enriched pathway identification. Each quality control index is defined as the minus log transformed P values from formal hypothesis testing. Principal component analysis biplots and a standardized mean rank are applied to assist visualization and decision. We applied the proposed method to 4 large-scale examples, combining 7 brain cancer, 9 prostate cancer, 8 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and 17 major depressive disorder studies, respectively. The identified problematic studies were further scrutinized for potential technical or biological causes of their lower quality to determine their exclusion from meta-analysis. The application and simulation results concluded a systematic quality assessment framework for genomic meta-analysis.

  18. An initial meta-analysis of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for treating substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric B; An, Woolee; Levin, Michael E; Twohig, Michael P

    2015-10-01

    In the past decade, multiple studies have examined the effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for substance use disorders relative to other active treatments. The current meta-analysis examined the aggregate effect size when comparing ACT to other treatments (e.g., CBT, pharmacotherapy, 12-step, treatment as usual) specifically on substance use outcomes. A total of 10 randomized controlled trials were identified through systematic searches. A significant small to medium effect size was found favoring ACT relative to active treatment comparisons following treatment. Effect sizes were comparable across studies for smoking cessation (k=5) and for other drug use disorders (k=5). Based on these findings, ACT appears to be a promising intervention for substance use disorders. Limitations and future directions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-criteria decision analysis of breast cancer control in low- and middle- income countries: development of a rating tool for policy makers.

    PubMed

    Venhorst, Kristie; Zelle, Sten G; Tromp, Noor; Lauer, Jeremy A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rating tool for policy makers to prioritize breast cancer interventions in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs), based on a simple multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) approach. The definition and identification of criteria play a key role in MCDA, and our rating tool could be used as part of a broader priority setting exercise in a local setting. This tool may contribute to a more transparent priority-setting process and fairer decision-making in future breast cancer policy development. First, an expert panel (n = 5) discussed key considerations for tool development. A literature review followed to inventory all relevant criteria and construct an initial set of criteria. A Delphi study was then performed and questionnaires used to discuss a final list of criteria with clear definitions and potential scoring scales. For this Delphi study, multiple breast cancer policy and priority-setting experts from different LMICs were selected and invited by the World Health Organization. Fifteen international experts participated in all three Delphi rounds to assess and evaluate each criterion. This study resulted in a preliminary rating tool for assessing breast cancer interventions in LMICs. The tool consists of 10 carefully crafted criteria (effectiveness, quality of the evidence, magnitude of individual health impact, acceptability, cost-effectiveness, technical complexity, affordability, safety, geographical coverage, and accessibility), with clear definitions and potential scoring scales. This study describes the development of a rating tool to assess breast cancer interventions in LMICs. Our tool can offer supporting knowledge for the use or development of rating tools as part of a broader (MCDA based) priority setting exercise in local settings. Further steps for improving the tool are proposed and should lead to its useful adoption in LMICs.

  20. Drivers of Vaginal Drug Delivery System Acceptability from Internet-Based Conjoint Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Primrose, Rachel J.; Zaveri, Toral; Bakke, Alyssa J.; Ziegler, Gregory R.; Moskowitz, Howard R.; Hayes, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal microbicides potentially empower women to protect themselves from HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), especially when culture, religion, or social status may prevent them from negotiating condom use. The open literature contains minimal information on factors that drive user acceptability of women’s health products or vaginal drug delivery systems. By understanding what women find to be most important with regard to sensory properties and product functionality, developers can iteratively formulate a more desirable product. Conjoint analysis is a technique widely used in market research to determine what combination of elements influence a consumer’s willingness to try or use a product. We applied conjoint analysis here to better understand what sexually-active woman want in a microbicide, toward our goal of formulating a product that is highly acceptable to women. Both sensory and non-sensory attributes were tested, including shape, color, wait time, partner awareness, messiness/leakage, duration of protection, and functionality. Heterosexually active women between 18 and 35 years of age in the United States (n = 302) completed an anonymous online conjoint survey using IdeaMap software. Attributes (product elements) were systematically presented in various combinations; women rated these combinations of a 9-point willingness-to-try scale. By coupling systematic combinations and regression modeling, we can estimate the unique appeal of each element. In this population, a multifunctional product (i.e., broad spectrum STI protection, coupled with conception) is far more desirable than a microbicide targeted solely for HIV protection; we also found partner awareness and leakage are potentially strong barriers to use. PMID:26999009

  1. Using Multi Criteria Decision Making in Analysis of Alternatives for Selection of Enabling Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Daniel

    Prior to Milestone A, the Department of Defense (DoD) requires that service sponsors conduct an Analysis of Alternatives (AoA), an analytical comparison of multiple alternatives, to be completed prior to committing and investing costly resources to one project or decision. Despite this requirement, sponsors will circumvent or dilute the process in an effort to save money or schedule, and specific requirements are proposed that can effectively eliminate all but the preselected alternatives. This research focuses on identifying decision aiding methods which can lead to the selection of specific criteria that are key performance drivers thus enabling an informed selection of the enabling technology. This work defines the enabling technology as the sub-system which presents the most risk within the system design. After a thorough literature review of available Multi Criteria Decision Making methods, a case study example is presented demonstrating the selection of the enabling technology of a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system. Using subjective criteria in the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) is shown to successfully account for tacit knowledge of expert practitioners.

  2. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE.

  3. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D.

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

  4. Optimal management of adults with pharyngitis – a multi-criteria decision analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sonal; Dolan, James G; Centor, Robert M

    2006-01-01

    Background Current practice guidelines offer different management recommendations for adults presenting with a sore throat. The key issue is the extent to which the clinical likelihood of a Group A streptococcal infection should affect patient management decisions. To help resolve this issue, we conducted a multi-criteria decision analysis using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Methods We defined optimal patient management using four criteria: 1) reduce symptom duration; 2) prevent infectious complications, local and systemic; 3) minimize antibiotic side effects, minor and anaphylaxis; and 4) achieve prudent use of antibiotics, avoiding both over-use and under-use. In our baseline analysis we assumed that all criteria and sub-criteria were equally important except minimizing anaphylactic side effects, which was judged very strongly more important than minimizing minor side effects. Management strategies included: a) No test, No treatment; b) Perform a rapid strep test and treat if positive; c) Perform a throat culture and treat if positive; d) Perform a rapid strep test and treat if positive; if negative obtain a throat culture and treat if positive; and e) treat without further tests. We defined four scenarios based on the likelihood of group A streptococcal infection using the Centor score, a well-validated clinical index. Published data were used to estimate the likelihoods of clinical outcomes and the test operating characteristics of the rapid strep test and throat culture for identifying group A streptococcal infections. Results Using the baseline assumptions, no testing and no treatment is preferred for patients with Centor scores of 1; two strategies – culture and treat if positive and rapid strep with culture of negative results – are equally preferable for patients with Centor scores of 2; and rapid strep with culture of negative results is the best management strategy for patients with Centor scores 3 or 4. These results are sensitive to the

  5. The challenge of obtaining information necessary for multi-criteria decision analysis implementation: the case of physiotherapy services in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As fiscal constraints dominate health policy discussions across Canada and globally, priority-setting exercises are becoming more common to guide the difficult choices that must be made. In this context, it becomes highly desirable to have accurate estimates of the value of specific health care interventions. Economic evaluation is a well-accepted method to estimate the value of health care interventions. However, economic evaluation has significant limitations, which have lead to an increase in the use of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA). One key concern with MCDA is the availability of the information necessary for implementation. In the Fall 2011, the Canadian Physiotherapy Association embarked on a project aimed at providing a valuation of physiotherapy services that is both evidence-based and relevant to resource allocation decisions. The framework selected for this project was MCDA. We report on how we addressed the challenge of obtaining some of the information necessary for MCDA implementation. Methods MCDA criteria were selected and areas of physiotherapy practices were identified. The building up of the necessary information base was a three step process. First, there was a literature review for each practice area, on each criterion. The next step was to conduct interviews with experts in each of the practice areas to critique the results of the literature review and to fill in gaps where there was no or insufficient literature. Finally, the results of the individual interviews were validated by a national committee to ensure consistency across all practice areas and that a national level perspective is applied. Results Despite a lack of research evidence on many of the considerations relevant to the estimation of the value of physiotherapy services (the criteria), sufficient information was obtained to facilitate MCDA implementation at the local level. Conclusions The results of this research project serve two purposes: 1) a method to

  6. Multi-criteria analysis on how to select solar radiation hydrogen production system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, G.; Naghiu, G. S.; Felseghi, R.-A.; Rǎboacǎ, S.; Aşchilean, I.; Giurca, I.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a method of selecting hydrogen-production systems using the electric power obtained in photovoltaic systems, and as a selecting method, we suggest the use of the Advanced Multi-Criteria Analysis based on the FRISCO formula. According to the case study on how to select the solar radiation hydrogen production system, the most convenient alternative is the alternative A4, namely the technical solution involving a hydrogen production system based on the electrolysis of water vapor obtained with concentrated solar thermal systems and electrical power obtained using concentrating photovoltaic systems.

  7. Multi-criteria analysis on how to select solar radiation hydrogen production system

    SciTech Connect

    Badea, G.; Naghiu, G. S. Felseghi, R.-A.; Giurca, I.; Răboacă, S.; Aşchilean, I.

    2015-12-23

    The purpose of this article is to present a method of selecting hydrogen-production systems using the electric power obtained in photovoltaic systems, and as a selecting method, we suggest the use of the Advanced Multi-Criteria Analysis based on the FRISCO formula. According to the case study on how to select the solar radiation hydrogen production system, the most convenient alternative is the alternative A4, namely the technical solution involving a hydrogen production system based on the electrolysis of water vapor obtained with concentrated solar thermal systems and electrical power obtained using concentrating photovoltaic systems.

  8. Multiple Criteria and Multiple Periods Performance Analysis: The Comparison of North African Railways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri, Karim; Colson, Gérard E.; Mbangala, Augustin M.

    2008-10-01

    Multi-period differences of technical and financial performances are analysed by comparing five North African railways over the period (1990-2004). A first approach is based on the Malmquist DEA TFP index for measuring the total factors productivity change, decomposed into technical efficiency change and technological changes. A multiple criteria analysis is also performed using the PROMETHEE II method and the software ARGOS. These methods provide complementary detailed information, especially by discriminating the technological and management progresses by Malmquist and the two dimensions of performance by Promethee: that are the service to the community and the enterprises performances, often in conflict.

  9. Application of multi-criteria decision analysis in selecting of sustainable investments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozik, Renata

    2017-07-01

    Investors of construction projects, especially financed with public money, quite slowly adapt environmentally friendly solutions, e.g. passive buildings. Practice shows that the use of green public procurement among the public investors is negligible. Energy-saving technologies and equipment are expensive at the construction phase and investors less or not at all take into account the future operating costs. The aim of this article is to apply the method of multi-criteria analysis ELECTRE to select the best investment in terms of cost of implementation, operation, as well as the impact on the environment.

  10. ALARA Analysis of Radiological Control Criteria Associated with Alternatives for Disposal of Hazardous Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Bilyard, Gordon R.; Branch, Kristi M.; Lavender, Jay C.; Miller, Peter L.

    2002-05-15

    This ALARA analysis of Radiological Control Criteria (RCC) considers alternatives to continued storage of certain DOE mixed wastes. It also considers the option of treating hazardous wastes generated by DOE facilities, which have a very low concentration of radionuclide contaminants, as purely hazardous waste. Alternative allowable contaminant levels examined correspond to doses to an individual ranging from 0.01 mrem/yr to 10 to 20 mrem/yr. Generic waste inventory data and radionuclide source terms are used in the assessment. Economic issues, potential health and safety issues, and qualitative factors relating to the use of RCCs are considered.

  11. Framework for the analysis of nanotechnologies' impacts and ethical acceptability: basis of an interdisciplinary approach to assessing novel technologies.

    PubMed

    Patenaude, Johane; Legault, Georges-Auguste; Beauvais, Jacques; Bernier, Louise; Béland, Jean-Pierre; Boissy, Patrick; Chenel, Vanessa; Daniel, Charles-Étienne; Genest, Jonathan; Poirier, Marie-Sol; Tapin, Danielle

    2015-04-01

    The genetically manipulated organism (GMO) crisis demonstrated that technological development based solely on the law of the marketplace and State protection against serious risks to health and safety is no longer a warrant of ethical acceptability. In the first part of our paper, we critique the implicitly individualist social-acceptance model for State regulation of technology and recommend an interdisciplinary approach for comprehensive analysis of the impacts and ethical acceptability of technologies. In the second part, we present a framework for the analysis of impacts and acceptability, devised-with the goal of supporting the development of specific nanotechnological applications-by a team of researchers from various disciplines. At the conceptual level, this analytic framework is intended to make explicit those various operations required in preparing a judgement about the acceptability of technologies that have been implicit in the classical analysis of toxicological risk. On a practical level, we present a reflective tool that makes it possible to take into account all the dimensions involved and understand the reasons invoked in determining impacts, assessing them, and arriving at a judgement about acceptability.

  12. Multi-attribute criteria applied to electric generation energy system analysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuswa, Glenn W.; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Drennen, Thomas E.; Zuffranieri, Jason V.; Paananen, Orman Henrie; Jones, Scott A.; Ortner, Juergen G.; Brewer, Jeffrey D.; Valdez, Maximo M.

    2005-10-01

    This report began with a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve Sandia National Laboratories multidisciplinary capabilities in energy systems analysis. The aim is to understand how various electricity generating options can best serve needs in the United States. The initial product is documented in a series of white papers that span a broad range of topics, including the successes and failures of past modeling studies, sustainability, oil dependence, energy security, and nuclear power. Summaries of these projects are included here. These projects have provided a background and discussion framework for the Energy Systems Analysis LDRD team to carry out an inter-comparison of many of the commonly available electric power sources in present use, comparisons of those options, and efforts needed to realize progress towards those options. A computer aid has been developed to compare various options based on cost and other attributes such as technological, social, and policy constraints. The Energy Systems Analysis team has developed a multi-criteria framework that will allow comparison of energy options with a set of metrics that can be used across all technologies. This report discusses several evaluation techniques and introduces the set of criteria developed for this LDRD.

  13. Multi-criteria decision analysis for the optimal management of nitrate contamination of aquifers.

    PubMed

    Almasri, Mohammad N; Kaluarachchi, Jagath J

    2005-03-01

    We present an integrated methodology for the optimal management of nitrate contamination of ground water combining environmental assessment and economic cost evaluation through multi-criteria decision analysis. The proposed methodology incorporates an integrated physical modeling framework accounting for on-ground nitrogen loading and losses, soil nitrogen dynamics, and fate and transport of nitrate in ground water to compute the sustainable on-ground nitrogen loading such that the maximum contaminant level is not violated. A number of protection alternatives to stipulate the predicted sustainable on-ground nitrogen loading are evaluated using the decision analysis that employs the importance order of criteria approach for ranking and selection of the protection alternatives. The methodology was successfully demonstrated for the Sumas-Blaine aquifer in Washington State. The results showed the importance of using this integrated approach which predicts the sustainable on-ground nitrogen loadings and provides an insight into the economic consequences generated in satisfying the environmental constraints. The results also show that the proposed decision analysis framework, within certain limitations, is effective when selecting alternatives with competing demands.

  14. Trust increases euthanasia acceptance: a multilevel analysis using the European Values Study.

    PubMed

    Köneke, Vanessa

    2014-12-20

    This study tests how various kinds of trust impact attitudes toward euthanasia among the general public. The indication that trust might have an impact on euthanasia attitudes is based on the slippery slope argument, which asserts that allowing euthanasia might lead to abuses and involuntary deaths. Adopting this argument usually leads to less positive attitudes towards euthanasia. Tying in with this, it is assumed here that greater trust diminishes such slippery slope fears, and thereby increases euthanasia acceptance. The effects of various trust indicators on euthanasia acceptance were tested using multilevel analysis, and data from the European Values Study 2008 (N = 49,114, 44 countries). More precisely, the influence of people's general levels of trust in other people, and their confidence in the health care system, were measured--both at the individual and at the country level. Confidence in the state and the press were accounted for as well, since both institutions might monitor and safeguard euthanasia practices. It was shown that the level of trust in a country was strongly positively linked to euthanasia attitudes, both for general trust and for confidence in health care. In addition, within countries, people who perceived their fellow citizens as trustworthy, and who had confidence in the press, were more supportive of euthanasia than their less trusting counterparts. The pattern was, however, not true for confidence in the state and for confidence in the health care system at the individual level. Notably, all confirmative effects held, even when other variables such as religiosity, education, and values regarding autonomy were controlled for. Trust seems to be a noteworthy construct to explain differences in attitudes towards euthanasia, especially when drawing cross-country comparisons. Therefore, it should be added to the existing literature on correlates of euthanasia attitudes.

  15. Gap Acceptance During Lane Changes by Large-Truck Drivers-An Image-Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Kazutoshi; Bao, Shan; LeBlanc, David J; Zhao, Ding; Peng, Huei; Pan, Christopher S

    2015-10-13

    This paper presents an analysis of rearward gap acceptance characteristics of drivers of large trucks in highway lane change scenarios. The range between the vehicles was inferred from camera images using the estimated lane width obtained from the lane tracking camera as the reference. Six-hundred lane change events were acquired from a large-scale naturalistic driving data set. The kinematic variables from the image-based gap analysis were filtered by the weighted linear least squares in order to extrapolate them at the lane change time. In addition, the time-to-collision and required deceleration were computed, and potential safety threshold values are provided. The resulting range and range rate distributions showed directional discrepancies, i.e., in left lane changes, large trucks are often slower than other vehicles in the target lane, whereas they are usually faster in right lane changes. Video observations have confirmed that major motivations for changing lanes are different depending on the direction of move, i.e., moving to the left (faster) lane occurs due to a slower vehicle ahead or a merging vehicle on the right-hand side, whereas right lane changes are frequently made to return to the original lane after passing.

  16. The efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ost, Lars-Göran

    2014-10-01

    Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT) has attracted a lot of interest during the last 10-15 years with a strong increase of the number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The present review and meta-analysis includes 60 RCTs (4234 participants) on psychiatric disorders, somatic disorders, and stress at work. The mean effect size across all comparisons was small (0.42). Compared to the Öst (2008) meta-analysis there was no significant improvement in methodological quality and deterioration in effect size (from 0.68). When ACT was compared to various forms of cognitive or behavioral treatments a small and non-significant effect size of 0.16 was obtained. An evidence-base evaluation showed that ACT is not yet well-established for any disorder. It is probably efficacious for chronic pain and tinnitus, possibly efficacious for depression, psychotic symptoms, OCD, mixed anxiety, drug abuse, and stress at work, and experimental for the remaining disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Gap Acceptance During Lane Changes by Large-Truck Drivers—An Image-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nobukawa, Kazutoshi; Bao, Shan; LeBlanc, David J.; Zhao, Ding; Peng, Huei; Pan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of rearward gap acceptance characteristics of drivers of large trucks in highway lane change scenarios. The range between the vehicles was inferred from camera images using the estimated lane width obtained from the lane tracking camera as the reference. Six-hundred lane change events were acquired from a large-scale naturalistic driving data set. The kinematic variables from the image-based gap analysis were filtered by the weighted linear least squares in order to extrapolate them at the lane change time. In addition, the time-to-collision and required deceleration were computed, and potential safety threshold values are provided. The resulting range and range rate distributions showed directional discrepancies, i.e., in left lane changes, large trucks are often slower than other vehicles in the target lane, whereas they are usually faster in right lane changes. Video observations have confirmed that major motivations for changing lanes are different depending on the direction of move, i.e., moving to the left (faster) lane occurs due to a slower vehicle ahead or a merging vehicle on the right-hand side, whereas right lane changes are frequently made to return to the original lane after passing. PMID:26924947

  18. Physiological Acceptance Criteria for Cold Weather Clothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    subjective feelings of thermal comfort and temperature sensation were examined. Under many conditions that Navy cold weather clothing items are worn, it...is not practical to expect that the optimal level of thermal comfort can be obtained. Allowing for a moderate level of cold sensation and thermal

  19. WIPP waste acceptance criteria and transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.F.; Ward, T.R.; Gregory, P.C.

    1991-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, USA, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility designed as a permanent repository for transuranic wastes in the center of a 2,000-foot-thick salt bed situated 2,150 feet underground. Construction of the facility started in 1975, under a congressional act of site selection. In 1979, demonstration of safe disposal at the WIPP was authorized by Public Law 96-164. The operational philosophy and practice at the facility are: (1) start clean -- stay clean, (2) meet or exceed regulatory requirements, and (3) control radiation exposure levels to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Strict safety measures must be taken in the areas of waste preparation, transportation, and facility operation.

  20. Mapping tropical dry forest succession using multiple criteria spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Sen; Yu, Qiuyan; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo; Feng, Jilu; Rivard, Benoit; Gu, Zhujun

    2015-11-01

    Tropical dry forests (TDFs) in the Americas are considered the first frontier of economic development with less than 1% of their total original coverage under protection. Accordingly, accurate estimates of their spatial extent, fragmentation, and degree of regeneration are critical in evaluating the success of current conservation policies. This study focused on a well-protected secondary TDF in Santa Rosa National Park (SRNP) Environmental Monitoring Super Site, Guanacaste, Costa Rica. We used spectral signature analysis of TDF ecosystem succession (early, intermediate, and late successional stages), and its intrinsic variability, to propose a new multiple criteria spectral mixture analysis (MCSMA) method on the shortwave infrared (SWIR) of HyMap image. Unlike most existing iterative mixture analysis (IMA) techniques, MCSMA tries to extract and make use of representative endmembers with spectral and spatial information. MCSMA then considers three criteria that influence the comparative importance of different endmember combinations (endmember models): root mean square error (RMSE); spatial distance (SD); and fraction consistency (FC), to create an evaluation framework to select a best-fit model. The spectral analysis demonstrated that TDFs have a high spectral variability as a result of biomass variability. By adopting two search strategies, the unmixing results showed that our new MCSMA approach had a better performance in root mean square error (early: 0.160/0.159; intermediate: 0.322/0.321; and late: 0.239/0.235); mean absolute error (early: 0.132/0.128; intermediate: 0.254/0.251; and late: 0.191/0.188); and systematic error (early: 0.045/0.055; intermediate: -0.211/-0.214; and late: 0.161/0.160), compared to the multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA). This study highlights the importance of SWIR in differentiating successional stages in TDFs. The proposed MCSMA provides a more flexible and generalized means for the best-fit model determination

  1. Coastal flooding as a parameter in multi-criteria analysis for industrial site selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christina, C.; Memos, C.; Diakoulaki, D.

    2014-12-01

    Natural hazards can trigger major industrial accidents, which apart from affecting industrial installations may cause a series of accidents with serious impacts on human health and the environment far beyond the site boundary. Such accidents, also called Na-Tech (natural - technical) accidents, deserve particular attention since they can cause release of hazardous substances possibly resulting in severe environmental pollution, explosions and/or fires. There are different kinds of natural events or, in general terms, of natural causes of industrial accidents, such as landslides, hurricanes, high winds, tsunamis, lightning, cold/hot temperature, floods, heavy rains etc that have caused accidents. The scope of this paper is to examine the coastal flooding as a parameter in causing an industrial accident, such as the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan, and the critical role of this parameter in industrial site selection. Land use planning is a complex procedure that requires multi-criteria decision analysis involving economic, environmental and social parameters. In this context the parameter of a natural hazard occurrence, such as coastal flooding, for industrial site selection should be set by the decision makers. In this paper it is evaluated the influence that has in the outcome of a multi-criteria decision analysis for industrial spatial planning the parameter of an accident risk triggered by coastal flooding. The latter is analyzed in the context of both sea-and-inland induced flooding.

  2. An Item Response Theory Analysis of DSM–IV Personality Disorder Criteria Across Younger and Older Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Balsis, Steve; Gleason, Marci E. J.; Woods, Carol M.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Many of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM–IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) personality disorder (PD) diagnostic criteria focus on a younger social and occupational context. The absence of age-appropriate criteria for older adults forces researchers and clinicians to draw conclusions based on existing criteria, which are likely inadequate. To explore which DSM–IV PD criteria contain age group measurement bias, the authors report 2 analyses of data on nearly 37,000 participants, ages 18–98 years, taken from a public data set that includes 7 of the 10 PDs (antisocial, avoidant, dependent, histrionic, obsessive–compulsive, paranoid, and schizoid). The 1st analysis revealed that older age groups tend to endorse fewer PD criteria than younger age groups. The 2nd analysis revealed that 29% of the criteria contain measurement bias. Although the latent variable structure for each PD was quite similar across younger and older age groups, some individual criteria were differentially endorsed by younger and older adults with equivalent PD pathology. The presence of measurement bias for these criteria raises questions concerning the assessment of PDs in older adults and the interpretation of existing data. PMID:17385993

  3. Integrating multi-criteria decision analysis for a GIS-based hazardous waste landfill sitting in Kurdistan Province, western Iran.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Mozafar; Hadidi, Mosslem; Vessali, Elahe; Mosstafakhani, Parasto; Taheri, Kamal; Shahoie, Saber; Khodamoradpour, Mehran

    2009-10-01

    The evaluation of a hazardous waste disposal site is a complicated process because it requires data from diverse social and environmental fields. These data often involve processing of a significant amount of spatial information which can be used by GIS as an important tool for land use suitability analysis. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis alongside with a geospatial analysis for the selection of hazardous waste landfill sites in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. The study employs a two-stage analysis to provide a spatial decision support system for hazardous waste management in a typically under developed region. The purpose of GIS was to perform an initial screening process to eliminate unsuitable land followed by utilization of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify the most suitable sites using the information provided by the regional experts with reference to new chosen criteria. Using 21 exclusionary criteria, as input layers, masked maps were prepared. Creating various intermediate or analysis map layers a final overlay map was obtained representing areas for hazardous waste landfill sites. In order to evaluate different landfill sites produced by the overlaying a landfill suitability index system was developed representing cumulative effects of relative importance (weights) and suitability values of 14 non-exclusionary criteria including several criteria resulting from field observation. Using this suitability index 15 different sites were visited and based on the numerical evaluation provided by MCDA most suitable sites were determined.

  4. Integrating multi-criteria decision analysis for a GIS-based hazardous waste landfill sitting in Kurdistan Province, western Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Sharifi, Mozafar Hadidi, Mosslem Vessali, Elahe Mosstafakhani, Parasto Taheri, Kamal Shahoie, Saber Khodamoradpour, Mehran

    2009-10-15

    The evaluation of a hazardous waste disposal site is a complicated process because it requires data from diverse social and environmental fields. These data often involve processing of a significant amount of spatial information which can be used by GIS as an important tool for land use suitability analysis. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis alongside with a geospatial analysis for the selection of hazardous waste landfill sites in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. The study employs a two-stage analysis to provide a spatial decision support system for hazardous waste management in a typically under developed region. The purpose of GIS was to perform an initial screening process to eliminate unsuitable land followed by utilization of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify the most suitable sites using the information provided by the regional experts with reference to new chosen criteria. Using 21 exclusionary criteria, as input layers, masked maps were prepared. Creating various intermediate or analysis map layers a final overlay map was obtained representing areas for hazardous waste landfill sites. In order to evaluate different landfill sites produced by the overlaying a landfill suitability index system was developed representing cumulative effects of relative importance (weights) and suitability values of 14 non-exclusionary criteria including several criteria resulting from field observation. Using this suitability index 15 different sites were visited and based on the numerical evaluation provided by MCDA most suitable sites were determined.

  5. Preferences for colorectal cancer screening techniques and intention to attend: a multi-criteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Hummel, J Marjan; Steuten, Lotte G M; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C J M; Mulder, Nick; Ijzerman, Maarten J

    2013-10-01

    Despite the expected health benefits of colorectal cancer screening programs, participation rates remain low in countries that have implemented such a screening program. The perceived benefits and risks of the colorectal cancer screening technique are likely to influence the decision to attend the screening program. Besides the diagnostic accuracy and the risks of the screening technique, which can affect the health of the participants, additional factors, such as the burden of the test, may impact the individuals' decisions to participate. To maximise the participation rate of a screening program for a new colorectal cancer program in the Netherlands, it is important to know the preferences of the screening population for alternative screening techniques. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of preferences for particular attributes of the screening tests on the intention to attend a colorectal cancer screening program. We used a web-based questionnaire to elicit the preferences of the target population for a selection of colon-screening techniques. The target population consisted of Dutch men and women aged 55-75 years. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a technique for multi-criteria analysis, was used to estimate the colorectal cancer screening preferences. Respondents weighted the relevance of five criteria, i.e. the attributes of the screening techniques: sensitivity, specificity, safety, inconvenience, and frequency of the test. With regard to these criteria, preferences were estimated between four alternative screening techniques, namely, immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT), colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, and computerized tomographic (CT) colonography. A five-point ordinal scale was used to estimate the respondents' intention to attend the screening. We conducted a correlation analysis on the preferences for the screening techniques and the intention to attend. We included 167 respondents who were consistent in their judgments of the

  6. On the predictive information criteria for model determination in seismic hazard analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varini, Elisa; Rotondi, Renata

    2016-04-01

    estimate, but it is hardly applicable to data which are not independent given parameters (Watanabe, J. Mach. Learn. Res., 2010). A solution is given by Ando and Tsay criterion where the joint density may be decomposed into the product of the conditional densities (Ando and Tsay, Int. J. Forecast., 2010). The above mentioned criteria are global summary measures of model performance, but more detailed analysis could be required to discover the reasons for poor global performance. In this latter case, a retrospective predictive analysis is performed on each individual observation. In this study we performed the Bayesian analysis of Italian data sets by four versions of a long-term hazard model known as the stress release model (Vere-Jones, J. Physics Earth, 1978; Bebbington and Harte, Geophys. J. Int., 2003; Varini and Rotondi, Environ. Ecol. Stat., 2015). Then we illustrate the results on their performance evaluated by Bayes Factor, predictive information criteria and retrospective predictive analysis.

  7. Selecting essential information for biosurveillance--a multi-criteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Generous, Nicholas; Margevicius, Kristen J; Taylor-McCabe, Kirsten J; Brown, Mac; Daniel, W Brent; Castro, Lauren; Hengartner, Andrea; Deshpande, Alina

    2014-01-01

    The National Strategy for Biosurveillance defines biosurveillance as "the process of gathering, integrating, interpreting, and communicating essential information related to all-hazards threats or disease activity affecting human, animal, or plant health to achieve early detection and warning, contribute to overall situational awareness of the health aspects of an incident, and to enable better decision-making at all levels." However, the strategy does not specify how "essential information" is to be identified and integrated into the current biosurveillance enterprise, or what the metrics qualify information as being "essential". The question of data stream identification and selection requires a structured methodology that can systematically evaluate the tradeoffs between the many criteria that need to be taken in account. Multi-Attribute Utility Theory, a type of multi-criteria decision analysis, can provide a well-defined, structured approach that can offer solutions to this problem. While the use of Multi-Attribute Utility Theoryas a practical method to apply formal scientific decision theoretical approaches to complex, multi-criteria problems has been demonstrated in a variety of fields, this method has never been applied to decision support in biosurveillance.We have developed a formalized decision support analytic framework that can facilitate identification of "essential information" for use in biosurveillance systems or processes and we offer this framework to the global BSV community as a tool for optimizing the BSV enterprise. To demonstrate utility, we applied the framework to the problem of evaluating data streams for use in an integrated global infectious disease surveillance system.

  8. Behavior analysis of container ship in maritime accident in order to redefine the operating criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancuţa, C.; Stanca, C.; Andrei, C.; Acomi, N.

    2017-08-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency of maritime transport, container ships operators proceeded to increase the sizes of ships. The latest generation of ships in operation has 19,000 TEU capacity and the perspective is 21,000 TEU within the next years. The increasing of the sizes of container ships involves risks of maritime accidents occurrences. Nowadays, the general rules on operational security, tend to be adjusted as a result of the evaluation for each vessel. To create the premises for making an informed decision, the captain have to be aware of ships behavior in such situations. Not less important is to assure permanent review of the procedures for operation of ship, including the specific procedures in special areas, confined waters or separation schemes. This paper aims at analysing the behavior of the vessel and the respond of the structure of a container ship in maritime accident, in order to redefine the operating criteria. The method selected by authors for carrying out the research is computer simulations. Computer program provides the responses of the container ship model in various situations. Therefore, the simulations allow acquisition of a large category of data, in the scope of improving the prevention of accidents or mitigation of effects as much as possible. Simulations and assessments of certain situations that the ship might experience will be carried out to redefine the operating criteria. The envisaged scenarios are: introducing of maneuver speed for specific areas with high risk of collision or grounding, introducing of flooding scenarios of some compartments in loading programs, conducting of complex simulations in various situations for each vessel type. The main results of this work are documented proposals for operating criteria, intended to improve the safety in case of marine accidents, collisions and groundings. Introducing of such measures requires complex cost benefit analysis, that should not neglect the extreme economic impact

  9. Selecting Essential Information for Biosurveillance—A Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Generous, Nicholas; Margevicius, Kristen J.; Taylor-McCabe, Kirsten J.; Brown, Mac; Daniel, W. Brent; Castro, Lauren; Hengartner, Andrea; Deshpande, Alina

    2014-01-01

    The National Strategy for Biosurveillancedefines biosurveillance as “the process of gathering, integrating, interpreting, and communicating essential information related to all-hazards threats or disease activity affecting human, animal, or plant health to achieve early detection and warning, contribute to overall situational awareness of the health aspects of an incident, and to enable better decision-making at all levels.” However, the strategy does not specify how “essential information” is to be identified and integrated into the current biosurveillance enterprise, or what the metrics qualify information as being “essential”. Thequestion of data stream identification and selection requires a structured methodology that can systematically evaluate the tradeoffs between the many criteria that need to be taken in account. Multi-Attribute Utility Theory, a type of multi-criteria decision analysis, can provide a well-defined, structured approach that can offer solutions to this problem. While the use of Multi-Attribute Utility Theoryas a practical method to apply formal scientific decision theoretical approaches to complex, multi-criteria problems has been demonstrated in a variety of fields, this method has never been applied to decision support in biosurveillance.We have developed a formalized decision support analytic framework that can facilitate identification of “essential information” for use in biosurveillance systems or processes and we offer this framework to the global BSV community as a tool for optimizing the BSV enterprise. To demonstrate utility, we applied the framework to the problem of evaluating data streams for use in an integrated global infectious disease surveillance system. PMID:24489748

  10. Analysis of deaths in patients awaiting heart transplantation: impact on patient selection criteria.

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, G. A.; Rickenbacher, P. R.; Trindade, P. T.; Gullestad, L.; Jiang, J. P.; Schroeder, J. S.; Vagelos, R.; Oyer, P.; Fowler, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the clinical characteristics of patients who died on the Stanford heart transplant waiting list and to develop a method for risk stratifying status 2 patients (outpatients). METHODS: Data were reviewed from all patients over 18 years, excluding retransplants, who were accepted for heart transplantation over an eight year period from 1986 to 1994. RESULTS: 548 patients were accepted for heart transplantation; 53 died on the waiting list, and 52 survived on the waiting list for over one year. On multivariate analysis only peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2: 11.7 (SD 2.7) v 15.1 (5.2) ml/kg/min, P = 0.02) and cardiac output (3.97 (1.03) v 4.79 (1.06) litres/min, P = 0.04) were found to be independent prognostic risk factors. Peak VO2 and cardiac index (CI) were then analysed in the last 141 consecutive patients accepted for cardiac transplantation. All deaths and 88% of the deteriorations to status 1 on the waiting list occurred in patients with either a CI < 2.0 or a VO2 < 12. In those with a CI < 2.0 and a VO2 < 12, 38% died or deteriorated to status 1 in the first year on the waiting list. Patients with CI > or = 2.0 and a VO2 > or = 12 all survived throughout follow up. Using a Cox's proportional hazards model with CI and peak VO2 as covariates, tables were constructed predicting the chance of surviving for (a) 60 days and (b) 1 year on the waiting list. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide a basis for risk stratification of status 2 patients on the heart transplant waiting list. PMID:8665337

  11. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: meta-analysis of efficacy and acceptability.

    PubMed Central

    Song, F; Freemantle, N; Sheldon, T A; House, A; Watson, P; Long, A; Mason, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the evidence for using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors instead of tricyclic antidepressants in the first line treatment of depression. DESIGN--Meta-analysis of 63 randomised controlled trials comparing the efficacy and acceptability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with those of tricyclic and related antidepressants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Improvement in mean scores on Hamilton depression rating scale for 53 randomised controlled trials. Pooled drop out rates from the 58 trials which reported drop out by treatment group. RESULTS--Among the 20 studies reporting standard deviation for the Hamilton score no difference was found in efficacy between serotonin reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic and related antidepressants (standardised mean difference 0.004, 95% confidence interval -0.096 to 0.105). The difference remained insignificant when the remaining 33 studies that used the 17 item and 21 item Hamilton score were included by ascribing weighted standard deviations. The odds ratio for drop out rate in patients receiving serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with those receiving tricyclic antidepressants was 0.95 (0.86 to 1.07). Similar proportions in both groups cited lack of efficacy as the reason for dropping out but slightly more patients in the tricyclic group cited side effects (18.8% v 15.4% in serotonin reuptake group). CONCLUSIONS--Routine use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as the first line treatment of depressive illness may greatly increase cost with only questionable benefit. PMID:8471919

  12. Item Response Theory Analysis of DSM-IV Cannabis Abuse and Dependence Criteria in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Christie A.; Gelhorn, Heather; Crowley, Thomas J.; Sakai, Joseph T.; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan E.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Corley, Robin; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.

    2008-01-01

    A study to examine the DSM-IV criteria for cannabis abuse and dependence among adolescents is conducted. Results conclude that abuse and dependence criteria were not found to affect the different levels of severity in cannabis use.

  13. Item Response Theory Analysis of DSM-IV Cannabis Abuse and Dependence Criteria in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Christie A.; Gelhorn, Heather; Crowley, Thomas J.; Sakai, Joseph T.; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan E.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Corley, Robin; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.

    2008-01-01

    A study to examine the DSM-IV criteria for cannabis abuse and dependence among adolescents is conducted. Results conclude that abuse and dependence criteria were not found to affect the different levels of severity in cannabis use.

  14. Interpretations of legal criteria for involuntary psychiatric admission: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Feiring, Eli; Ugstad, Kristian N

    2014-10-25

    The use of involuntary admission in psychiatry may be necessary to enable treatment and prevent harm, yet remains controversial. Mental health laws in high-income countries typically permit coercive treatment of persons with mental disorders to restore health or prevent future harm. Criteria intended to regulate practice leave scope for discretion. The values and beliefs of staff may become a determinating factor for decisions. Previous research has only to a limited degree addressed how legal criteria for involuntary psychiatric admission are interpreted by clinical decision-makers. We examined clinicians' interpretations of criteria for involuntary admission under the Norwegian Mental Health Care Act. This act applies a status approach, whereby involuntary admission can be used at the presence of mental disorder and need for treatment or perceived risk to the patient or others. Further, best interest assessments carry a large justificatory burden and open for a range of extra-legislative factors to be considered. Deductive thematic analysis was used. Three ideal types of attitudes-to-coercion were developed, denoted paternalistic, deliberative and interpretive. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 10 Norwegian clinicians with experience from admissions to psychiatric care were carried out. Data was fit into the preconceived analytical frame. We hypothesised that the data would mirror the recent shift from paternalism towards a more human rights focused approach in modern mental health care. The paternalistic perspective was, however, clearly expressed in the data. Involuntary admission was considered to be in the patient's best interest, and patients suffering from serious mental disorder were assumed to lack decision-making capacity. In addition to assessment of need, outcome effectiveness and risk of harm, extra-legislative factors such as patients' functioning, experience, resistance, networks, and follow-up options were told to influence decisions

  15. Identification of foot and mouth disease risk areas using a multi-criteria analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gustavo Sousa e; Weber, Eliseu José; Hasenack, Heinrich; Groff, Fernando Henrique Sautter; Todeschini, Bernardo; Borba, Mauro Riegert; Medeiros, Antonio Augusto Rosa; Leotti, Vanessa Bielefeldt; Canal, Cláudio Wageck; Corbellini, Luis Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious disease that affects cloven-hoofed livestock and wildlife. FMD has been a problem for decades, which has led to various measures to control, eradicate and prevent FMD by National Veterinary Services worldwide. Currently, the identification of areas that are at risk of FMD virus incursion and spread is a priority for FMD target surveillance after FMD is eradicated from a given country or region. In our study, a knowledge-driven spatial model was built to identify risk areas for FMD occurrence and to evaluate FMD surveillance performance in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. For this purpose, multi-criteria decision analysis was used as a tool to seek multiple and conflicting criteria to determine a preferred course of action. Thirteen South American experts analyzed 18 variables associated with FMD introduction and dissemination pathways in Rio Grande do Sul. As a result, FMD higher risk areas were identified at international borders and in the central region of the state. The final model was expressed as a raster surface. The predictive ability of the model assessed by comparing, for each cell of the raster surface, the computed model risk scores with a binary variable representing the presence or absence of an FMD outbreak in that cell during the period 1985 to 2015. Current FMD surveillance performance was assessed, and recommendations were made to improve surveillance activities in critical areas. PMID:28552973

  16. Multi-criteria decision analysis for waste management in Saharawi refugee camps.

    PubMed

    Garfì, M; Tondelli, S; Bonoli, A

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare different waste management solutions in Saharawi refugee camps (Algeria) and to test the feasibility of a decision-making method developed to be applied in particular conditions in which environmental and social aspects must be considered. It is based on multi criteria analysis, and in particular on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a mathematical technique for multi-criteria decision making (Saaty, T.L., 1980. The Analytic Hierarchy Process. McGraw-Hill, New York, USA; Saaty, T.L., 1990. How to Make a Decision: The Analytic Hierarchy Process. European Journal of Operational Research; Saaty, T.L., 1994. Decision Making for Leaders: The Analytic Hierarchy Process in a Complex World. RWS Publications, Pittsburgh, PA), and on participatory approach, focusing on local community's concerns. The research compares four different waste collection and management alternatives: waste collection by using three tipper trucks, disposal and burning in an open area; waste collection by using seven dumpers and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using seven dumpers and three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill. The results show that the second and the third solutions provide better scenarios for waste management. Furthermore, the discussion of the results points out the multidisciplinarity of the approach, and the equilibrium between social, environmental and technical impacts. This is a very important aspect in a humanitarian and environmental project, confirming the appropriateness of the chosen method.

  17. Analysis of court criteria for awarding disability benefits to patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Xavier; Motos, Jaime; Montserrat, Antònia; Gallardo, Olga; Vergara, Mercedes

    2009-12-01

    Chronic disability and its consequences for social life and employment are important but often neglected aspects of Crohn's disease. No specific scores have been developed to evaluate chronic disability in patients with Crohn's disease; the medical criteria used by government authorities to award disability benefits have not been analyzed. We aimed to determine the courts' criteria for awarding disability benefits to patients with Crohn's disease in Spain. We systematically searched case law databases in Spain's regional Supreme Courts to identify sentences regarding awards of disability benefits to patients with Crohn's disease. Selected decisions were reviewed to extract variables related to the awarding of benefits. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine which variables predicted the awarding of benefits. Two hundred eighty sentences were reviewed. The rate of judicial decisions in favor of the claimants varied considerably between the various tribunals. Multivariate analysis showed that adequate description of the disease (odds ratio, 8.6), fecal incontinence (odds ratio, 8.9), the number of associated diseases (odds ratio, 2.3), and the presence of an ostomy (odds ratio, not estimable) were independent predictors of the awarding of Social Security benefits. The amount of Social Security benefits awarded to patients with Crohn's disease varied depending on the tribunal. The most important predictors of a court's disability award were the adequate description of the patient's disease, fecal incontinence, associated diseases, and presence of an ostomy.

  18. A multi-criteria decision analysis assessment of waste paper management options

    SciTech Connect

    Hanan, Deirdre; Burnley, Stephen; Cooke, David

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Isolated communities have particular problems in terms of waste management. ► An MCDA tool allowed a group of non-experts to evaluate waste management options. ► The group preferred local waste management solutions to export to the mainland. ► Gasification of paper was the preferred option followed by recycling. ► The group concluded that they could be involved in the decision making process. - Abstract: The use of Multi-criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) was investigated in an exercise using a panel of local residents and stakeholders to assess the options for managing waste paper on the Isle of Wight. Seven recycling, recovery and disposal options were considered by the panel who evaluated each option against seven environmental, financial and social criteria. The panel preferred options where the waste was managed on the island with gasification and recycling achieving the highest scores. Exporting the waste to the English mainland for incineration or landfill proved to be the least preferred options. This research has demonstrated that MCDA is an effective way of involving community groups in waste management decision making.

  19. Multi-criteria decision analysis and environmental risk assessment for nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkov, Igor; Satterstrom, F. Kyle; Steevens, Jeffery; Ferguson, Elizabeth; Pleus, Richard C.

    2007-08-01

    Nanotechnology is a broad and complex discipline that holds great promise for innovations that can benefit mankind. Yet, one must not overlook the wide array of factors involved in managing nanomaterial development, ranging from the technical specifications of the material to possible adverse effects in humans. Other opportunities to evaluate benefits and risks are inherent in environmental health and safety (EHS) issues related to nanotechnology. However, there is currently no structured approach for making justifiable and transparent decisions with explicit trade-offs between the many factors that need to be taken into account. While many possible decision-making approaches exist, we believe that multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) is a powerful and scientifically sound decision analytical framework for nanomaterial risk assessment and management. This paper combines state-of-the-art research in MCDA methods applicable to nanotechnology with a hypothetical case study for nanomaterial management. The example shows how MCDA application can balance societal benefits against unintended side effects and risks, and how it can also bring together multiple lines of evidence to estimate the likely toxicity and risk of nanomaterials given limited information on physical and chemical properties. The essential contribution of MCDA is to link this performance information with decision criteria and weightings elicited from scientists and managers, allowing visualization and quantification of the trade-offs involved in the decision-making process.

  20. Net clinical benefit of oral anticoagulants: a multiple criteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jason C; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Lu, Christine Y

    2015-01-01

    This study quantitatively evaluated the comparative efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apizaban) and warfarin for treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. We also compared these agents under different scenarios, including population with high risk of stroke and for primary vs. secondary stroke prevention. We used multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to assess the benefit-risk of these medications. Our MCDA models contained criteria for benefits (prevention of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism) and risks (intracranial and extracranial bleeding). We calculated a performance score for each drug accounting for benefits and risks in comparison to treatment alternatives. Overall, new agents had higher performance scores than warfarin; in order of performance scores: dabigatran 150 mg (0.529), rivaroxaban (0.462), apixaban (0.426), and warfarin (0.191). For patients at a higher risk of stroke (CHADS2 score≥3), apixaban had the highest performance score (0.686); performance scores for other drugs were 0.462 for dabigatran 150 mg, 0.392 for dabigatran 110 mg, 0.271 for rivaroxaban, and 0.116 for warfarin. Dabigatran 150 mg had the highest performance score for primary stroke prevention, while dabigatran 110 mg had the highest performance score for secondary prevention. Our results suggest that new oral anticoagulants might be preferred over warfarin. Selecting appropriate medicines according to the patient's condition based on information from an integrated benefit-risk assessment of treatment options is crucial to achieve optimal clinical outcomes.

  1. Multi-criteria decision analysis for waste management in Saharawi refugee camps

    SciTech Connect

    Garfi, M. Tondelli, S.; Bonoli, A.

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this paper is to compare different waste management solutions in Saharawi refugee camps (Algeria) and to test the feasibility of a decision-making method developed to be applied in particular conditions in which environmental and social aspects must be considered. It is based on multi criteria analysis, and in particular on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP), a mathematical technique for multi-criteria decision making (Saaty, T.L., 1980. The Analytic Hierarchy Process. McGraw-Hill, New York, USA; Saaty, T.L., 1990. How to Make a Decision: The Analytic Hierarchy Process. European Journal of Operational Research; Saaty, T.L., 1994. Decision Making for Leaders: The Analytic Hierarchy Process in a Complex World. RWS Publications, Pittsburgh, PA), and on participatory approach, focusing on local community's concerns. The research compares four different waste collection and management alternatives: waste collection by using three tipper trucks, disposal and burning in an open area; waste collection by using seven dumpers and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using seven dumpers and three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill; waste collection by using three tipper trucks and disposal in a landfill. The results show that the second and the third solutions provide better scenarios for waste management. Furthermore, the discussion of the results points out the multidisciplinarity of the approach, and the equilibrium between social, environmental and technical impacts. This is a very important aspect in a humanitarian and environmental project, confirming the appropriateness of the chosen method.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Thermoeconomic Evaluation Criteria for an Actual Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Gülcan; Açıkkalp, Emin; Savaş, Ahmet Fevzi; Yamık, Hasan

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an actual heat engine is investigated by using different thermoeconomic evaluation criteria in the literature. A criteria that has not been investigated in detail is considered and it is called as ecologico-economical criteria (F_{EC}). It is the difference of power cost and exergy destruction rate cost of the system. All four criteria are applied to an irreversible Carnot heat engine, results are presented numerically and some suggestions are made.

  3. Spatial multi-criteria decision analysis to predict suitability for African swine fever endemicity in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background African swine fever (ASF) is endemic in several countries of Africa and may pose a risk to all pig producing areas on the continent. Official ASF reporting is often rare and there remains limited awareness of the continent-wide distribution of the disease. In the absence of accurate ASF outbreak data and few quantitative studies on the epidemiology of the disease in Africa, we used spatial multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to derive predictions of the continental distribution of suitability for ASF persistence in domestic pig populations as part of sylvatic or domestic transmission cycles. In order to incorporate the uncertainty in the relative importance of different criteria in defining suitability, we modelled decisions within the MCDA framework using a stochastic approach. The predictive performance of suitability estimates was assessed via a partial ROC analysis using ASF outbreak data reported to the OIE since 2005. Results Outputs from the spatial MCDA indicate that large areas of sub-Saharan Africa may be suitable for ASF persistence as part of either domestic or sylvatic transmission cycles. Areas with high suitability for pig to pig transmission (‘domestic cycles’) were estimated to occur throughout sub-Saharan Africa, whilst areas with high suitability for introduction from wildlife reservoirs (‘sylvatic cycles’) were found predominantly in East, Central and Southern Africa. Based on average AUC ratios from the partial ROC analysis, the predictive ability of suitability estimates for domestic cycles alone was considerably higher than suitability estimates for sylvatic cycles alone, or domestic and sylvatic cycles in combination. Conclusions This study provides the first standardised estimates of the distribution of suitability for ASF transmission associated with domestic and sylvatic cycles in Africa. We provide further evidence for the utility of knowledge-driven risk mapping in animal health, particularly in data

  4. A fully multiple-criteria implementation of the Sobol‧ method for parameter sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolem, Rafael; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Shuttleworth, W. James; Zeng, Xubin; de Gonçalves, Luis Gustavo Gonçalves

    2012-04-01

    We present a novel rank-based fully multiple-criteria implementation of the Sobol' variance-based sensitivity analysis approach that implements an objective strategy to evaluate parameter sensitivity when model evaluation involves several metrics of performance. The method is superior to single-criterion approaches while avoiding the subjectivity observed in "pseudo" multiple-criteria methods. Further, it contributes to our understanding of structural characteristics of a model and simplifies parameter estimation by identifying insensitive parameters that can be fixed to default values during model calibration studies. We illustrate the approach by applying it to the problem of identifying the most influential parameters in the Simple Biosphere 3 (SiB3) model using a network of flux towers in Brazil. We find 27-31 (out of 42) parameters to be influential, most (˜78%) of which are primarily associated with physiology, soil, and carbon properties, and that uncertainties in the physiological properties of the model contribute most to total model uncertainty in regard to energy and carbon fluxes. We also find that the second most important model component contributing to the total output uncertainty varies according to the flux analyzed; whereas morphological properties play an important role in sensible heat flux, soil properties are important for latent heat flux, and carbon properties (mainly associated with the soil respiration submodel) are important for carbon flux (as expected). These distinct sensitivities emphasize the need to account for the multioutput nature of land surface models during sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation. Applied to other similar models, our approach can help to establish which soil-plant-atmosphere processes matter most in land surface models of Amazonia and thereby aid in the design of field campaigns to characterize and measure the associated parameters. The approach can also be used with other sensitivity analysis

  5. [Acceptance and commitment therapy].

    PubMed

    Ducasse, D; Fond, G

    2015-02-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a third generation of cognitive-behavioral therapies. The point is to help patients to improve their psychological flexibility in order to accept unavoidable private events. Thus, they have the opportunity to invest energy in committed actions rather than struggle against their psychological events. (i) To present the ACT basic concepts and (ii) to propose a systematic review of the literature about effectiveness of this kind of psychotherapy. (i) The core concepts of ACT come from Monestès (2011), Schoendorff (2011), and Harris (2012); (ii) we conducted a systematic review of the literature using the PRISMA's criteria. The research paradigm was « acceptance and commitment therapy AND randomized controlled trial ». The bases of the MEDLINE, Cochrane and Web of science have been checked. Overall, 61 articles have been found, of which, after reading the abstracts, 40 corresponded to the subject of our study. (I) Psychological flexibility is established through six core ACT processes (cognitive defusion, acceptance, being present, values, committed action, self as context), while the therapist emphasizes on experiential approach. (II) Emerging research shows that ACT is efficacious in the psychological treatment of a wide range of psychiatric problems, including psychosis, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, trichotillomania, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, eating disorders. ACT has also shown a utility in other areas of medicine: the management chronic pain, drug-dependence, smoking cessation, the management of epilepsy, diabetic self-management, the management of work stress, the management of tinnitus, and the management of multiple sclerosis. Meta-analysis of controlled outcome studies reported an average effect size (Cohen's d) of 0.66 at post-treatment (n=704) and 0.65 (n=580) at follow-up (on average 19.2 weeks later). In studies involving

  6. Computer therapy for the anxiety and depressive disorders is effective, acceptable and practical health care: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gavin; Cuijpers, Pim; Craske, Michelle G; McEvoy, Peter; Titov, Nickolai

    2010-10-13

    Depression and anxiety disorders are common and treatable with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), but access to this therapy is limited. Review evidence that computerized CBT for the anxiety and depressive disorders is acceptable to patients and effective in the short and longer term. Systematic reviews and data bases were searched for randomized controlled trials of computerized cognitive behavior therapy versus a treatment or control condition in people who met diagnostic criteria for major depression, panic disorder, social phobia or generalized anxiety disorder. Number randomized, superiority of treatment versus control (Hedges g) on primary outcome measure, risk of bias, length of follow up, patient adherence and satisfaction were extracted. 22 studies of comparisons with a control group were identified. The mean effect size superiority was 0.88 (NNT 2.13), and the benefit was evident across all four disorders. Improvement from computerized CBT was maintained for a median of 26 weeks follow-up. Acceptability, as indicated by adherence and satisfaction, was good. Research probity was good and bias risk low. Effect sizes were non-significantly higher in comparisons with waitlist than with active treatment control conditions. Five studies comparing computerized CBT with traditional face-to-face CBT were identified, and both modes of treatment appeared equally beneficial. Computerized CBT for anxiety and depressive disorders, especially via the internet, has the capacity to provide effective acceptable and practical health care for those who might otherwise remain untreated. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000030077.

  7. Improving Operational Acceptability of Dynamic Weather Routes Through Analysis of Commonly Use Routings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Antony D.; Sridhar, Banavar; McNally, David

    2016-01-01

    The Dynamic Weather Routes (DWR) tool is a ground-based trajectory automation system that continuously and automatically analyzes active in-flight aircraft in en route airspace to find simple modifications to flight plan routes that can save significant flying time, while avoiding weather and considering traffic conflicts, airspace sector congestion, special use airspace, and FAA routing restrictions. Trials of the DWR system have shown that significant delay savings are possible. However, some DWR advised routes are also rejected by dispatchers or modified before being accepted. Similarly, of those sent by dispatchers to flight crews as proposed route change requests, many are not accepted by air traffic control, or are modified before implementation as Center route amendments. Such actions suggest that the operational acceptability of DWR advised route corrections could be improved, which may reduce workload and increase delay savings. This paper analyzes the historical usage of different flight routings, varying from simple waypoint pairs to lengthy strings of waypoints incorporating jet routes, in order to improve DWR route acceptability. An approach is developed that can be incorporated into DWR, advising routings with high historical usage and savings potential similar to that of the nominal DWR advisory. It is hypothesized that modifying a nominal DWR routing to one that is commonly used, and nearby, will result in more actual savings since common routings are generally familiar and operationally acceptable to air traffic control. The approach allows routing segments with high historical usage to be concatenated to form routes that meet all DWR constraints. The relevance of a route's historical usage to its acceptance by dispatchers and air traffic control is quantified by analyzing historical DWR data. Results indicate that while historical usage may be less of a concern to flight dispatchers accepting or rejecting DWR advised route corrections, it may be

  8. Mindfulness- and Acceptance-based Interventions for Psychosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Haller, Heidemarie; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mindfulness- and acceptance-based interventions are increasingly studied as a potential treatment for a variety of mental conditions. Objective: To assess the effects of mindfulness- and acceptance-based interventions on psychotic symptoms and hospitalization in patients with psychosis Methods: MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO were screened from inception through April 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were analyzed when they assessed psychotic symptoms or hospitalization in patients with psychosis; affect, acceptance, mindfulness, and safety were defined as secondary outcomes. Results: Eight RCTs with a total of 434 patients comparing mindfulness-based (4 RCTs) or acceptance-based interventions (4 RCTs) to treatment as usual or attention control were included. Six RCTs had low risk of bias. Moderate evidence was found for short-term effects on total psychotic symptoms, positive symptoms, hospitalization rates, duration of hospitalization, and mindfulness and for long-term effects on total psychotic symptoms and duration of hospitalization. No evidence was found for effects on negative symptoms, affect, or acceptance. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion: Mindfulness- and acceptance-based interventions can be recommended as an additional treatment for patients with psychosis. PMID:26937312

  9. A Common-Fate Analysis of Pornography Acceptance, Use, and Sexual Satisfaction Among Heterosexual Married Couples.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cameron C; Carroll, Jason S; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Busby, Dean M; Willoughby, Brian J; Larson, Jeffry H

    2017-02-01

    Using matched, heterosexual couple data from the Relationship Evaluation Questionnaire (RELATE; n = 326 couples), an adapted common-fate approach was used to examine both common and unique attributes of husbands' and wives' acceptance of pornography and sexual satisfaction as well as husbands' and wives' pornography use. It was expected that spouses' unique as well as shared variance of pornography acceptance would be significantly associated with husbands' and wives' levels of personal pornography use and that these use patterns would be significantly associated with husbands' and wives' unique as well as shared variance of sexual satisfaction. It was also expected that pornography use would significantly mediate the relationship between pornography acceptance and sexual satisfaction. Results indicated that the shared variance of pornography acceptance was positively associated with both spouses' pornography use and that spouses' pornography use was negatively associated with their own sexual satisfaction. Wives' pornography use was found to be positively associated with the couple's shared variance of sexual satisfaction, but pornography use did not significantly mediate the relationship between pornography acceptance and sexual satisfaction. These findings emphasize the complexity of pornography use in couple relationships and the importance of studying pornography acceptance and use as a coupling dynamic within marriages rather than just an individual behavior.

  10. Launch commit criteria performance trending analysis, phase 1, revision A. SRM and QA mission services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An assessment of quantitative methods and measures for measuring launch commit criteria (LCC) performance measurement trends is made. A statistical performance trending analysis pilot study was processed and compared to STS-26 mission data. This study used four selected shuttle measurement types (solid rocket booster, external tank, space shuttle main engine, and range safety switch safe and arm device) from the five missions prior to mission 51-L. After obtaining raw data coordinates, each set of measurements was processed to obtain statistical confidence bounds and mean data profiles for each of the selected measurement types. STS-26 measurements were compared to the statistical data base profiles to verify the statistical capability of assessing occurrences of data trend anomalies and abnormal time-varying operational conditions associated with data amplitude and phase shifts.

  11. [Studies of performance evaluation and criteria for trans-fatty acids analysis using GC-FID].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Tomoko; Matsuda, Rieko

    2013-01-01

    Performance evaluation methods and criteria for trans-fatty acids analysis using GC-FID were examined. The measurement method constructed in this study was based on the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) official standard methods Ce1h-05. The method for fat extraction from general foods was based on the methods for nutrition labeling notified by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan and AOAC 996.06. To estimate trueness and precision, fortified samples were analyzed following the established experimental design. Five molecular species of trans-fatty acids that are rarely contained in foods were used for preparing the fortified samples. To estimate precision, more than four degrees of freedom of variance are required. Based on the results, within-laboratory trueness and reproducibility will be set at 90-110% and 10% (RSD%), respectively.

  12. A GIS based spatially-explicit sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approach for multi-criteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Feizizadeh, Bakhtiar; Jankowski, Piotr; Blaschke, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    GIS multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) techniques are increasingly used in landslide susceptibility mapping for the prediction of future hazards, land use planning, as well as for hazard preparedness. However, the uncertainties associated with MCDA techniques are inevitable and model outcomes are open to multiple types of uncertainty. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. We access the uncertainty of landslide susceptibility maps produced with GIS-MCDA techniques. A new spatially-explicit approach and Dempster-Shafer Theory (DST) are employed to assess the uncertainties associated with two MCDA techniques, namely Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) and Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA) implemented in GIS. The methodology is composed of three different phases. First, weights are computed to express the relative importance of factors (criteria) for landslide susceptibility. Next, the uncertainty and sensitivity of landslide susceptibility is analyzed as a function of weights using Monte Carlo Simulation and Global Sensitivity Analysis. Finally, the results are validated using a landslide inventory database and by applying DST. The comparisons of the obtained landslide susceptibility maps of both MCDA techniques with known landslides show that the AHP outperforms OWA. However, the OWA-generated landslide susceptibility map shows lower uncertainty than the AHP-generated map. The results demonstrate that further improvement in the accuracy of GIS-based MCDA can be achieved by employing an integrated uncertainty-sensitivity analysis approach, in which the uncertainty of landslide susceptibility model is decomposed and attributed to model's criteria weights.

  13. A GIS based spatially-explicit sensitivity and uncertainty analysis approach for multi-criteria decision analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feizizadeh, Bakhtiar; Jankowski, Piotr; Blaschke, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    GIS multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) techniques are increasingly used in landslide susceptibility mapping for the prediction of future hazards, land use planning, as well as for hazard preparedness. However, the uncertainties associated with MCDA techniques are inevitable and model outcomes are open to multiple types of uncertainty. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. We access the uncertainty of landslide susceptibility maps produced with GIS-MCDA techniques. A new spatially-explicit approach and Dempster-Shafer Theory (DST) are employed to assess the uncertainties associated with two MCDA techniques, namely Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP) and Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA) implemented in GIS. The methodology is composed of three different phases. First, weights are computed to express the relative importance of factors (criteria) for landslide susceptibility. Next, the uncertainty and sensitivity of landslide susceptibility is analyzed as a function of weights using Monte Carlo Simulation and Global Sensitivity Analysis. Finally, the results are validated using a landslide inventory database and by applying DST. The comparisons of the obtained landslide susceptibility maps of both MCDA techniques with known landslides show that the AHP outperforms OWA. However, the OWA-generated landslide susceptibility map shows lower uncertainty than the AHP-generated map. The results demonstrate that further improvement in the accuracy of GIS-based MCDA can be achieved by employing an integrated uncertainty-sensitivity analysis approach, in which the uncertainty of landslide susceptibility model is decomposed and attributed to model's criteria weights.

  14. Harnessing Ecosystem Models and Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis for the Support of Forest Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfslehner, Bernhard; Seidl, Rupert

    2010-12-01

    The decision-making environment in forest management (FM) has changed drastically during the last decades. Forest management planning is facing increasing complexity due to a widening portfolio of forest goods and services, a societal demand for a rational, transparent decision process and rising uncertainties concerning future environmental conditions (e.g., climate change). Methodological responses to these challenges include an intensified use of ecosystem models to provide an enriched, quantitative information base for FM planning. Furthermore, multi-criteria methods are increasingly used to amalgamate information, preferences, expert judgments and value expressions, in support of the participatory and communicative dimensions of modern forestry. Although the potential of combining these two approaches has been demonstrated in a number of studies, methodological aspects in interfacing forest ecosystem models (FEM) and multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) are scarcely addressed explicitly. In this contribution we review the state of the art in FEM and MCDA in the context of FM planning and highlight some of the crucial issues when combining ecosystem and preference modeling. We discuss issues and requirements in selecting approaches suitable for supporting FM planning problems from the growing body of FEM and MCDA concepts. We furthermore identify two major challenges in a harmonized application of FEM-MCDA: (i) the design and implementation of an indicator-based analysis framework capturing ecological and social aspects and their interactions relevant for the decision process, and (ii) holistic information management that supports consistent use of different information sources, provides meta-information as well as information on uncertainties throughout the planning process.

  15. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1135 - When must I accept comments on the siting analysis and revised materials separation plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... siting analysis and revised materials separation plan? 60.1135 Section 60.1135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... revised materials separation plan? (a) You must accept verbal comments at the public meeting. (b) You must...

  20. The Games Analysis Intervention: A Procedure to Increase the Peer Acceptance and Social Adjustment of Socially Isolated Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Mike

    The effectiveness of a therapeutic motor development program in increasing the social adjustment and peer acceptance of seven socially isolated fifth grade children was investigated using a single subject experimental design. The program was based on the games analysis model which allows movement games to be designed for individual motoric,…

  1. SU-E-T-269: Differential Hazard Analysis For Conventional And New Linac Acceptance Testing Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Harry, T; Yaddanapudi, S; Mutic, S; Cai, B; Goddu, S; Noel, C; Pawlicki, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: New techniques and materials have recently been developed to expedite the conventional Linac Acceptance Testing Procedure (ATP). The new ATP method uses the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for data collection and is presented separately. This new procedure is meant to be more efficient then conventional methods. While not clinically implemented yet, a prospective risk assessment is warranted for any new techniques. The purpose of this work is to investigate the risks and establish the pros and cons between the conventional approach and the new ATP method. Methods: ATP tests that were modified and performed with the EPID were analyzed. Five domain experts (Medical Physicists) comprised the core analysis team. Ranking scales were adopted from previous publications related to TG 100. The number of failure pathways for each ATP test procedure were compared as well as the number of risk priority numbers (RPN’s) greater than 100 were compared. Results: There were fewer failure pathways with the new ATP compared to the conventional, 262 and 556, respectively. There were fewer RPN’s > 100 in the new ATP compared to the conventional, 41 and 115. Failure pathways and RPN’s > 100 for individual ATP tests on average were 2 and 3.5 times higher in the conventional ATP compared to the new, respectively. The pixel sensitivity map of the EPID was identified as a key hazard to the new ATP procedure with an RPN of 288 for verifying beam parameters. Conclusion: The significant decrease in failure pathways and RPN’s >100 for the new ATP mitigates the possibilities of a catastrophic error occurring. The Pixel Sensitivity Map determining the response and inherent characteristics of the EPID is crucial as all data and hence results are dependent on that process. Grant from Varian Medical Systems Inc.

  2. A Latent Class Analysis of DSM-IV Alcohol Use Disorder Criteria and Binge Drinking in Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Beseler, Cheryl L.; Taylor, Laura A.; Kraemer, Deborah Tebes; Leeman, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescent and adult samples have shown that DSM-IV abuse and dependence criteria lie on a continuum of alcohol problem severity, but information on criteria functioning in college students is lacking. Prior factor analyses in a college sample (Beseler et al., 2010) indicated that a two-factor solution fit the data better than a single-factor solution after a binge drinking criterion was included. The second dimension may indicate a clustering of criteria related to excessive alcohol use in this college sample. Methods The present study was an analysis of data from an anonymous, online survey of undergraduates (N = 361) that included items pertaining to the DSM-IV alcohol use disorder (AUD) diagnostic criteria and binge drinking. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to determine whether the criteria best fit a categorical model, with and without a binge drinking criterion. Results In a LCA including the AUD criteria only, a 3-class solution was the best fit. Binge drinking worsened the fit of the models. The largest class (class 1, n = 217) primarily endorsed tolerance (18.4%); none were alcohol dependent. The middle class (class 2, n = 114) endorsed primarily tolerance (81.6%) and drinking more than intended (74.6%); 34.2% met criteria for dependence. The smallest class (class 3, n = 30) endorsed all criteria with high probabilities (30% to 100%); all met criteria for dependence. Alcohol consumption patterns did not differ significantly between classes 2 and 3. Class 3 was characterized by higher levels on several variables thought to predict risk of alcohol-related problems (e.g., enhancement motives for drinking, impulsivity and aggression). Conclusions Two classes of heavy drinking college students were identified, one of which appeared to be at higher risk than the other. The highest risk group may be less likely to “mature out” of high-risk drinking after college. PMID:22004067

  3. A latent class analysis of DSM-IV alcohol use disorder criteria and binge drinking in undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Beseler, Cheryl L; Taylor, Laura A; Kraemer, Deborah T; Leeman, Robert F

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent and adult samples have shown that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV) abuse and dependence criteria lie on a continuum of alcohol problem severity, but information on criteria functioning in college students is lacking. Prior factor analyses in a college sample (Beseler et al., 2010) indicated that a 2-factor solution fit the data better than a single-factor solution after a binge drinking criterion was included. The second dimension may indicate a clustering of criteria related to excessive alcohol use in this college sample. The present study was an analysis of data from an anonymous, online survey of undergraduates (N = 361) that included items pertaining to the DSM-IV alcohol use disorder (AUD) diagnostic criteria and binge drinking. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to determine whether the criteria best fit a categorical model, with and without a binge drinking criterion. In an LCA including the AUD criteria only, a 3-class solution was the best fit. Binge drinking worsened the fit of the models. The largest class (class 1, n = 217) primarily endorsed tolerance (18.4%); none were alcohol dependent. The middle class (class 2, n = 114) endorsed primarily tolerance (81.6%) and drinking more than intended (74.6%); 34.2% met criteria for dependence. The smallest class (class 3, n = 30) endorsed all criteria with high probabilities (30 to 100%); all met criteria for dependence. Alcohol consumption patterns did not differ significantly between classes 2 and 3. Class 3 was characterized by higher levels on several variables thought to predict risk of alcohol-related problems (e.g., enhancement motives for drinking, impulsivity, and aggression). Two classes of heavy-drinking college students were identified, one of which appeared to be at higher risk than the other. The highest risk group may be less likely to "mature out" of high-risk drinking after college. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  4. Effectiveness of Web-Delivered Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Relation to Mental Health and Well-Being: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Menna; Glendenning, Alexander; Hoon, Alice E; John, Ann

    2016-08-24

    The need for effective interventions to improve mental health and emotional well-being at a population level are gaining prominence both in the United Kingdom and globally. Advances in technology and widespread adoption of Internet capable devices have facilitated rapid development of Web-delivered psychological therapies. Interventions designed to manage a range of affective disorders by applying diverse therapeutic approaches are widely available. The main aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence base of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in a Web-based delivery format. A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis was conducted. Two electronic databases were searched for Web-delivered interventions utilizing ACT for the management of affective disorders or well-being. Only Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) were included. The search strategy identified 59 articles. Of these, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria specified. The range of conditions and outcome measures that were identified limited the ability to draw firm conclusions about the efficacy of Web-delivered ACT-based intervention for anxiety or well-being. ACT in a Web-based delivery format was found to be effective in the management of depression. Rates of adherence to study protocols and completion were high overall suggesting that this therapeutic approach is highly acceptable for patients and the general public.

  5. Effectiveness of Web-Delivered Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Relation to Mental Health and Well-Being: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Glendenning, Alexander; Hoon, Alice E; John, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for effective interventions to improve mental health and emotional well-being at a population level are gaining prominence both in the United Kingdom and globally. Advances in technology and widespread adoption of Internet capable devices have facilitated rapid development of Web-delivered psychological therapies. Interventions designed to manage a range of affective disorders by applying diverse therapeutic approaches are widely available. Objective The main aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence base of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in a Web-based delivery format. Method A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis was conducted. Two electronic databases were searched for Web-delivered interventions utilizing ACT for the management of affective disorders or well-being. Only Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) were included. Results The search strategy identified 59 articles. Of these, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria specified. The range of conditions and outcome measures that were identified limited the ability to draw firm conclusions about the efficacy of Web-delivered ACT-based intervention for anxiety or well-being. Conclusions ACT in a Web-based delivery format was found to be effective in the management of depression. Rates of adherence to study protocols and completion were high overall suggesting that this therapeutic approach is highly acceptable for patients and the general public. PMID:27558740

  6. Estimation of failure criteria in multivariate sensory shelf life testing using survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Ana; Gagliardi, Andrés; Ares, Gastón

    2017-09-01

    For most food products, shelf life is determined by changes in their sensory characteristics. A predetermined increase or decrease in the intensity of a sensory characteristic has frequently been used to signal that a product has reached the end of its shelf life. Considering all attributes change simultaneously, the concept of multivariate shelf life allows a single measurement of deterioration that takes into account all these sensory changes at a certain storage time. The aim of the present work was to apply survival analysis to estimate failure criteria in multivariate sensory shelf life testing using two case studies, hamburger buns and orange juice, by modelling the relationship between consumers' rejection of the product and the deterioration index estimated using PCA. In both studies, a panel of 13 trained assessors evaluated the samples using descriptive analysis whereas a panel of 100 consumers answered a "yes" or "no" question regarding intention to buy or consume the product. PC1 explained the great majority of the variance, indicating all sensory characteristics evolved similarly with storage time. Thus, PC1 could be regarded as index of sensory deterioration and a single failure criterion could be estimated through survival analysis for 25 and 50% consumers' rejection. The proposed approach based on multivariate shelf life testing may increase the accuracy of shelf life estimations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of power analysis to develop detectable significance criteria for sea urchin toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    When sufficient data are available, the statistical power of a test can be determined using power analysis procedures. The term “detectable significance” has been coined to refer to this criterion based on power analysis and past performance of a test. This power analysis procedure has been performed with sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development data from sediment porewater toxicity tests. Data from 3100 and 2295 tests for the fertilization and embryological development tests, respectively, were used to calculate the criteria and regression equations describing the power curves. Using Dunnett's test, a minimum significant difference (MSD) (β = 0.05) of 15.5% and 19% for the fertilization test, and 16.4% and 20.6% for the embryological development test, for α ≤ 0.05 and α ≤ 0.01, respectively, were determined. The use of this second criterion reduces type I (false positive) errors and helps to establish a critical level of difference based on the past performance of the test.

  8. Scenario and multiple criteria decision analysis for energy and environmental security of military and industrial installations.

    PubMed

    Karvetski, Christopher W; Lambert, James H; Linkov, Igor

    2011-04-01

    Military and industrial facilities need secure and reliable power generation. Grid outages can result in cascading infrastructure failures as well as security breaches and should be avoided. Adding redundancy and increasing reliability can require additional environmental, financial, logistical, and other considerations and resources. Uncertain scenarios consisting of emergent environmental conditions, regulatory changes, growth of regional energy demands, and other concerns result in further complications. Decisions on selecting energy alternatives are made on an ad hoc basis. The present work integrates scenario analysis and multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify combinations of impactful emergent conditions and to perform a preliminary benefits analysis of energy and environmental security investments for industrial and military installations. Application of a traditional MCDA approach would require significant stakeholder elicitations under multiple uncertain scenarios. The approach proposed in this study develops and iteratively adjusts a scoring function for investment alternatives to find the scenarios with the most significant impacts on installation security. A robust prioritization of investment alternatives can be achieved by integrating stakeholder preferences and focusing modeling and decision-analytical tools on a few key emergent conditions and scenarios. The approach is described and demonstrated for a campus of several dozen interconnected industrial buildings within a major installation. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  9. Multi-level multi-criteria analysis of alternative fuels for waste collection vehicles in the United States.

    PubMed

    Maimoun, Mousa; Madani, Kaveh; Reinhart, Debra

    2016-04-15

    Historically, the U.S. waste collection fleet was dominated by diesel-fueled waste collection vehicles (WCVs); the growing need for sustainable waste collection has urged decision makers to incorporate economically efficient alternative fuels, while mitigating environmental impacts. The pros and cons of alternative fuels complicate the decisions making process, calling for a comprehensive study that assesses the multiple factors involved. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods allow decision makers to select the best alternatives with respect to selection criteria. In this study, two MCDA methods, Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) and Simple Additive Weighting (SAW), were used to rank fuel alternatives for the U.S. waste collection industry with respect to a multi-level environmental and financial decision matrix. The environmental criteria consisted of life-cycle emissions, tail-pipe emissions, water footprint (WFP), and power density, while the financial criteria comprised of vehicle cost, fuel price, fuel price stability, and fueling station availability. The overall analysis showed that conventional diesel is still the best option, followed by hydraulic-hybrid WCVs, landfill gas (LFG) sourced natural gas, fossil natural gas, and biodiesel. The elimination of the WFP and power density criteria from the environmental criteria ranked biodiesel 100 (BD100) as an environmentally better alternative compared to other fossil fuels (diesel and natural gas). This result showed that considering the WFP and power density as environmental criteria can make a difference in the decision process. The elimination of the fueling station and fuel price stability criteria from the decision matrix ranked fossil natural gas second after LFG-sourced natural gas. This scenario was found to represent the status quo of the waste collection industry. A sensitivity analysis for the status quo scenario showed the overall ranking of diesel and

  10. Human Factors Process Task Analysis: Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure at the Advanced Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA). HF PFMEA includes the following 10 steps: Describe mission; Define System; Identify human-machine; List human actions; Identify potential errors; Identify factors that effect error; Determine likelihood of error; Determine potential effects of errors; Evaluate risk; Generate solutions (manage error). The presentation also describes how this analysis was applied to a liquid oxygen pump acceptance test.

  11. Descriptive analysis and U.S. consumer acceptability of 6 green tea samples from China, Japan, and Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeehyun; Chambers, Delores H

    2010-03-01

    In the past, green tea has been one of the least popular nonalcoholic beverages for U.S. consumers. However, green tea has been receiving attention because of its potential health benefits. Knowing which green tea flavor attributes contribute to consumer liking will help the fast growing green tea business including green tea importers, tea shops, and beverage companies to understand which characteristics are most accepted by U.S. consumers. The objectives of this study were (1) to examine differences in acceptability of commonly available loose leaf and bagged green teas available from the major exporters to the U.S. (Japan, Korea, and China) and (2) to determine which green tea flavor characteristics are related to consumers' liking. In the study, consumers from the U.S. evaluated 6 green tea samples from China, Japan, and Korea for acceptability. A highly trained panel also evaluated the green tea samples to provide descriptive sensory attributes that might be related to acceptability. We found that U.S. consumers liked green tea samples with lower flavor intensity and lower bitterness intensity. Consumers' acceptability of green tea was negatively correlated with spinach and animalic flavor and bitterness and astringency of green teas evaluated using descriptive sensory analysis, but the correlation was only moderate. To learn what green tea flavor characteristics influence consumers' liking, future studies using more green tea samples with different flavor profiles are needed.

  12. Net Clinical Benefit of Oral Anticoagulants: A Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Lu, Christine Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study quantitatively evaluated the comparative efficacy and safety of new oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apizaban) and warfarin for treatment of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. We also compared these agents under different scenarios, including population with high risk of stroke and for primary vs. secondary stroke prevention. Methods We used multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to assess the benefit-risk of these medications. Our MCDA models contained criteria for benefits (prevention of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism) and risks (intracranial and extracranial bleeding). We calculated a performance score for each drug accounting for benefits and risks in comparison to treatment alternatives. Results Overall, new agents had higher performance scores than warfarin; in order of performance scores: dabigatran 150 mg (0.529), rivaroxaban (0.462), apixaban (0.426), and warfarin (0.191). For patients at a higher risk of stroke (CHADS2 score≥3), apixaban had the highest performance score (0.686); performance scores for other drugs were 0.462 for dabigatran 150 mg, 0.392 for dabigatran 110 mg, 0.271 for rivaroxaban, and 0.116 for warfarin. Dabigatran 150 mg had the highest performance score for primary stroke prevention, while dabigatran 110 mg had the highest performance score for secondary prevention. Conclusions Our results suggest that new oral anticoagulants might be preferred over warfarin. Selecting appropriate medicines according to the patient’s condition based on information from an integrated benefit-risk assessment of treatment options is crucial to achieve optimal clinical outcomes. PMID:25897861

  13. TESTING MULTI-CRITERIA DECISION ANALYSIS FOR MORE TRANSPARENT RESOURCE-ALLOCATION DECISION MAKING IN COLOMBIA.

    PubMed

    Castro Jaramillo, Hector Eduardo; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Moreno-Mattar, Ornella

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, Colombia experienced an important institutional transformation after the establishment of the Health Technology Assessment Institute (IETS), the disbandment of the Regulatory Commission for Health and the reassignment of reimbursement decision-making powers to the Ministry of Health and Social Protection (MoHSP). These dynamic changes provided the opportunity to test Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) for systematic and more transparent resource-allocation decision-making. During 2012 and 2013, the MCDA framework Evidence and Value: Impact on Decision Making (EVIDEM) was tested in Colombia. This consisted of a preparatory stage in which the investigators conducted literature searches and produced HTA reports for four interventions of interest, followed by a panel session with decision makers. This method was contrasted with a current approach used in Colombia for updating the publicly financed benefits package (POS), where narrative health technology assessment (HTA) reports are presented alongside comprehensive budget impact analyses (BIAs). Disease severity, size of population, and efficacy ranked at the top among fifteen preselected relevant criteria. MCDA estimates of technologies of interest ranged between 71 to 90 percent of maximum value. The ranking of technologies was sensitive to the methods used. Participants considered that a two-step approach including an MCDA template, complemented by a detailed BIA would be the best approach to assist decision-making in this context. Participants agreed that systematic priority setting should take place in Colombia. This work may serve as the basis to the MoHSP on its interest of setting up a systematic and more transparent process for resource-allocation decision-making.

  14. Acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccination among Californian parents of daughters: a representative statewide analysis.

    PubMed

    Constantine, Norman A; Jerman, Petra

    2007-02-01

    To examine likelihood of parental acceptance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for young adolescent girls, together with reasons for acceptance and nonacceptance. The ultimate goal of this research is to inform policy decisions and educational planning in this area. A random-digit-dial telephone survey of parents in California households was conducted, yielding 522 parents with an eligible daughter. Cross tabulations and odds ratios were employed to analyze likelihood of vaccination acceptability. Reasons provided for acceptance or nonacceptance were analyzed qualitatively. Overall, 75% of the sample reported that they would be likely to vaccinate a daughter before age 13 years. Hispanic parents were more likely to accept vaccination than were non-Hispanic parents, whereas African-American and Asian-American parents were less likely. Other subgroups less likely to accept vaccination were identified. Five clusters of reasons by nonaccepting parents emerged: pragmatic concerns about effects on sexual behavior, specific HPV vaccine concerns, moral concerns about sexual behavior, general vaccine concerns, and denial of need. A sixth group of interest comprised those who would vaccinate before age 16 years, but not age 13. Consistent with previous studies on this topic, a large majority of California parents endorsed HPV vaccination for daughters by the recommended age. Although important subgroup disparities were found, majorities of all subgroups supported vaccination. This information, together with the identified clusters of cognitive decision factors for nonacceptance, has implications for policy decisions and educational planning in this area. Suggestions for further research on subgroup disparities and on cognitive factors involved in parents' decisions arise from these findings.

  15. Multi-Criteria Analysis for Biomass Utilization Applying Data Envelopment Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Hidetsugu; Hoshino, Satoshi; Kuki, Yasuaki

    This paper aimed to consider about material-recycling, preventing global warming, and economic efficiency on preset and planed 195 Biomass Towns applying DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis), which can evaluate operational efficiency entities such as private companies or projects. In the results, although the Biomass Town can recycle material efficiently, it was clarified that preventing global warming and business profitability was brushed off like it in Biomass Town Design. Moreover, from the point of view of operational efficiency, we suggested an improvement of the Biomass Town scale for more efficiency-enhancing applying DEA. We found that applying DEA was able to catch more improvements or indicator as compared with cost-benefit analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis.

  16. Nicotine replacement therapy decision based on fuzzy multi-criteria analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarmudi, Zamali; Matmali, Norfazillah; Abdullah, Mohd Lazim

    2017-08-01

    It has been observed that Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) is one of the alternatives to control and reduce smoking addiction among smokers. Since the decision to choose the best NRT alternative involves uncertainty, ambiguity factors and diverse input datasets, thus, this paper proposes a fuzzy multi-criteria analysis (FMA) to overcome these issues. It focuses on how the fuzzy approach can unify the diversity of datasets based on NRT's decision-making problem. The analysis done employed the advantage of the cost-benefit criterion to unify the mixture of dataset input. The performance matrix was utilised to derive the performance scores. An empirical example regarding the NRT's decision-making problem was employed to illustrate the proposed approach. Based on the calculations, this analytical approach was found to be highly beneficial in terms of usability. It was also very applicable and efficient in dealing with the mixture of input datasets. Hence, the decision-making process can easily be used by experts and patients who are interested to join the therapy/cessation program.

  17. Sustainability assessment of tertiary wastewater treatment technologies: a multi-criteria analysis.

    PubMed

    Plakas, K V; Georgiadis, A A; Karabelas, A J

    2016-01-01

    The multi-criteria analysis gives the opportunity to researchers, designers and decision-makers to examine decision options in a multi-dimensional fashion. On this basis, four tertiary wastewater treatment (WWT) technologies were assessed regarding their sustainability performance in producing recycled wastewater, considering a 'triple bottom line' approach (i.e. economic, environmental, and social). These are powdered activated carbon adsorption coupled with ultrafiltration membrane separation (PAC-UF), reverse osmosis, ozone/ultraviolet-light oxidation and heterogeneous photo-catalysis coupled with low-pressure membrane separation (photocatalytic membrane reactor, PMR). The participatory method called simple multi-attribute rating technique exploiting ranks was employed for assigning weights to selected sustainability indicators. This sustainability assessment approach resulted in the development of a composite index as a final metric, for each WWT technology evaluated. The PAC-UF technology appears to be the most appropriate technology, attaining the highest composite value regarding the sustainability performance. A scenario analysis confirmed the results of the original scenario in five out of seven cases. In parallel, the PMR was highlighted as the technology with the least variability in its performance. Nevertheless, additional actions and approaches are proposed to strengthen the objectivity of the final results.

  18. A comparative analysis based on different strength criteria for evaluation of risk factor for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Natali, A N; Pavan, P G

    2002-04-01

    A numerical analysis is developed to study the interaction phenomena between endousseus titanium dental implants and surrounding jawbone tissue. The interest is focused on the most appropriate evaluation of the stress state arising in the tissue because of the implant under physiological loading. The problem is considered with regard to linear elastic response of the one and to short time effect. Different configurations of bone-implant system are described, using axial-symmetrical and three-dimensional models, by means of finite and geometric element method. The investigation attains to the stress states induced in bone that lead to a limit condition near the effective failure surface. The parameter commonly adopted in literature, such as the Von Mises stress, represents an excessive simplification of problem formulation, leading to an incorrect evaluation of the real failure risk for the implant, due to the assumption of the isotropic and deviatoric nature of the adopted stress measure. More suitable criterion can be assumed, such as the Tsai-Wu criterion, to take into account the anisotropy that characterises the response of bone, as well as the influence of a hydrostatic stress state. The analysis developed offers a comparison of results by using different criteria, leading to an evaluation of reliability of the procedure to be followed and addressing also to an evaluation of a risk factor for the implant investigated.

  19. Strategic rehabilitation planning of piped water networks using multi-criteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Lisa; Scheidegger, Andreas; Reichert, Peter; Maurer, Max; Mauer, Max; Lienert, Judit

    2014-02-01

    To overcome the difficulties of strategic asset management of water distribution networks, a pipe failure and a rehabilitation model are combined to predict the long-term performance of rehabilitation strategies. Bayesian parameter estimation is performed to calibrate the failure and replacement model based on a prior distribution inferred from three large water utilities in Switzerland. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and scenario planning build the framework for evaluating 18 strategic rehabilitation alternatives under future uncertainty. Outcomes for three fundamental objectives (low costs, high reliability, and high intergenerational equity) are assessed. Exploitation of stochastic dominance concepts helps to identify twelve non-dominated alternatives and local sensitivity analysis of stakeholder preferences is used to rank them under four scenarios. Strategies with annual replacement of 1.5-2% of the network perform reasonably well under all scenarios. In contrast, the commonly used reactive replacement is not recommendable unless cost is the only relevant objective. Exemplified for a small Swiss water utility, this approach can readily be adapted to support strategic asset management for any utility size and based on objectives and preferences that matter to the respective decision makers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Multi-criteria decision analysis in environmental sciences: ten years of applications and trends.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ivy B; Keisler, Jeffrey; Linkov, Igor

    2011-09-01

    Decision-making in environmental projects requires consideration of trade-offs between socio-political, environmental, and economic impacts and is often complicated by various stakeholder views. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) emerged as a formal methodology to face available technical information and stakeholder values to support decisions in many fields and can be especially valuable in environmental decision making. This study reviews environmental applications of MCDA. Over 300 papers published between 2000 and 2009 reporting MCDA applications in the environmental field were identified through a series of queries in the Web of Science database. The papers were classified by their environmental application area, decision or intervention type. In addition, the papers were also classified by the MCDA methods used in the analysis (analytic hierarchy process, multi-attribute utility theory, and outranking). The results suggest that there is a significant growth in environmental applications of MCDA over the last decade across all environmental application areas. Multiple MCDA tools have been successfully used for environmental applications. Even though the use of the specific methods and tools varies in different application areas and geographic regions, our review of a few papers where several methods were used in parallel with the same problem indicates that recommended course of action does not vary significantly with the method applied.

  1. Variability analysis of AGN: a review of results using new statistical criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibecchi, L.; Andruchow, I.; Cellone, S. A.; Romero, G. E.; Combi, J. A.

    We present here a re-analysis of the variability results of a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN), which have been observed on several sessions with the 2.15 m "Jorge Sahade" telescope (CASLEO), San Juan, Argentina, and whose results are published (Romero et al. 1999, 2000, 2002; Cellone et al. 2000). The motivation for this new analysis is the implementation, dur- ing the last years, of improvements in the statistical criteria applied, taking quantitatively into account the incidence of the photometric errors (Cellone et al. 2007). This work is framed as a first step in an integral study on the statistical estimators of AGN variability. This study is motivated by the great diversity of statistical tests that have been proposed to analyze the variability of these objects. Since we note that, in some cases, the results of the object variability depend on the test used, we attempt to make a com- parative study of the various tests and analyze, under the given conditions, which of them is the most efficient and reliable.

  2. Acceptability of financial incentives for breastfeeding: thematic analysis of readers' comments to UK online news reports.

    PubMed

    Giles, Emma L; Holmes, Matthew; McColl, Elaine; Sniehotta, Falko F; Adams, Jean M

    2015-05-16

    Whilst it is recommended that babies are breastfed exclusively for the first six months, many mothers do not maintain breastfeeding for this length of time. Previous research confirms that women and midwives value financial incentives for breastfeeding, but limited research has explored the wider acceptability of these interventions to the general public. This paper examines opinion towards financial incentives for breastfeeding using reader responses to UK on-line media coverage of a study undertaken in this area. This study used netnography to undertake a thematic analysis of 3,373 reader comments posted in response to thirteen articles, published in November 2013, which reported findings from a feasibility study of financial incentives for breastfeeding. All articles were published on one of six UK news websites that achieved a monthly audience of at least five million viewers across laptop and desktop computers and mobile devices during April-May 2013. Nine analytical themes were identified, with a majority view that financial incentives for breastfeeding are unacceptable. These themes cover a range of opinions: from negligent parents unable to take responsibility for their own actions; through to psychologically vulnerable members of society who should be protected from coercion and manipulation; to capable and responsible women who can, and should be allowed to, make their own decisions. Many views focused on the immediate costs of the intervention, concluding that this was something that was currently unaffordable to fund (e.g. by the NHS). Others contrasted the value of the incentive against other 'costs' of breastfeeding. There was some consideration of the issue of cost-effectiveness and cost-saving, where the potential future benefit from initial investment was identified. Many commenters identified that financial incentives do not address the many structural and cultural barriers to breastfeeding. Overall, those commenting on the on-line UK news

  3. Use of the European preliminary criteria, the Breiman-classification tree and the American-European criteria for diagnosis of primary Sjögren's Syndrome in daily practice: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Langegger, C; Wenger, M; Duftner, C; Dejaco, C; Baldissera, I; Moncayo, R; Schirmer, M

    2007-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the use of the European preliminary criteria, the Breiman-classification tree and the American-European criteria for diagnosis of primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) in daily practice. A retrospective analysis of 17 consecutive patients with pSS (European criteria) was performed evaluating the application of the Schirmer test, semiquantitative sialoscintigraphy, immunologic tests, including rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibodies, Sjögren's syndrome autoantibodies (SS-A, SS-B) and lip biopsy. Out of the 17 patients with pSS according to the European criteria, 15 patients fulfilled the classification tree (=88.2%), and 4 patients fulfilled the American-European criteria (=23.5%, P = 0.001). In the four patients fulfilling the American-European criteria, a positive result of the sialoscintigraphy was not crucial for the diagnosis according to these criteria. In conclusion, the American-European criteria are more stringent than the European preliminary criteria. We assume the role of sialoscintigraphy to be reduced when applying the American-European criteria.

  4. Social acceptability of forest conditions and management practices: a problem analysis.

    Treesearch

    Bruce A. Shindler; Mark Brunson; George H. Stankey

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to improve understanding of the complex sociopolitical processes related to resource management and to help structure management response to conflict and contentiousness, misunderstanding among participants, and failed citizen-agency interactions. Public acceptance is essential to every resource management decision public agencies must...

  5. Evaluating Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: An Analysis of a Recent Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.

    2009-01-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a newer psychotherapy that has generated much clinical and research interest in recent years. However, the approach has begun to receive strong criticism from proponents of traditional cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Hofmann and Asmundson (2008) recently compared and contrasted ACT and traditional…

  6. Evaluating Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: An Analysis of a Recent Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.

    2011-01-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a newer psychotherapy that has generated much clinical and research interest in recent years. However, the approach has begun to receive strong criticism from proponents of traditional cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Hofmann and Asmundson (2008) recently compared and contrasted ACT and traditional…

  7. Exposure to Pornography and Acceptance of Rape Myths: A Research Summary Using Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Mike; And Others

    A study quantitatively summarized the literature examining the association between acceptance of rape myths and exposure to pornography to address disputes in the academic community regarding the consistency of such research. The entire collection of "Psychological Abstracts" and "Sociological Abstracts" was manually searched…

  8. The Changing Face of Scientific Discourse: Analysis of Genomic and Proteomic Database Usage and Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cecelia

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the growth in use and acceptance of Web-based genomic and proteomic databases (GPD) in scholarly communication. Confirms the role of GPD in the scientific literature cycle, suggests GPD are a storage and retrieval mechanism for molecular biology information, and recommends that existing models of scientific communication be updated to…

  9. GIS, Geoscience, Multi-criteria Analysis and Integrated Management of the Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacimi, Y.; Barich, A.

    2011-12-01

    In this 3rd millennium, geology can be considered as a science of decision that intervenes in all the society domains. It has passed its academic dimension to spread toward some domains that until now were out of reach. Combining different Geoscience sub-disciplines emanates from a strong will to demonstrate the contribution of this science and its impact on the daily life, especially by making it applicable to various innovative projects. Geophysics, geochemistry and structural geology are complementary disciplines that can be applied in perfect symbiosis in many domains like construction, mining prospection, impact assessment, environment, etc. This can be proved by using collected data from these studies and integrate them into Geographic Information Systems (GIS), in order to make a multi-criteria analysis, which gives generally very impressive results. From this point, it is easy to set mining, eco-geotouristic and risk assessment models in order to establish land use projects but also in the case of integrated management of the coastal zone (IMCZ). Touristic projects in Morocco focus on its coast which represents at least 3500 km ; the management of this zone for building marinas or touristic infrastructures requires a deep and detailed study of marine currents on the coast, for example, by creating surveillance models and a coastal hazards map. An innovative project that will include geophysical, geochemical and structural geology studies associated to a multi-criteria analysis. The data will be integrated into a GIS to establish a coastal map that will highlight low-risk erosion zones and thus will facilitate implementation of ports and other construction projects. YES Morocco is a chapter of the International YES Network that aims to promote Geoscience in the service of society and professional development of Young and Early Career Geoscientists. Our commitment for such project will be of qualitative aspect into an associative framework that will involve

  10. The Politics of Determining Merit Aid Eligibility Criteria: An Analysis of the Policy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Erik C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the scholarly attention on the effects of merit aid on college access and choice, particularly on the significant effect that states' varied eligibility criteria play, no studies have examined the policy process through which merit aid criteria are determined. This is surprising given the recent attention to state-level policy dynamics and…

  11. Experiment in multiple-criteria energy policy analysis. [Using HOPE (holistic preference evaluation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, J K

    1980-07-01

    An international panel of energy analysts participated in an experiment to use HOPE (holistic preference evaluation): an interactive parametric linear-programming method for multiple-criteria optimization. The criteria of cost, environmental effect, crude oil, and nuclear fuel were considered according to BESOM: an energy model for the US in the year 2000.

  12. The application of integral performance criteria to the analysis of discrete maneuvers in a driving simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repa, B. S.; Zucker, R. S.; Wierwille, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of vehicle transient response characteristics on driver-vehicle performance in discrete maneuvers as measured by integral performance criteria was investigated. A group of eight ordinary drivers was presented with a series of eight vehicle transfer function configurations in a driving simulator. Performance in two discrete maneuvers was analyzed by means of integral performance criteria. Results are presented.

  13. The Politics of Determining Merit Aid Eligibility Criteria: An Analysis of the Policy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Erik C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the scholarly attention on the effects of merit aid on college access and choice, particularly on the significant effect that states' varied eligibility criteria play, no studies have examined the policy process through which merit aid criteria are determined. This is surprising given the recent attention to state-level policy dynamics and…

  14. GIS-based multicriteria municipal solid waste landfill suitability analysis: a review of the methodologies performed and criteria implemented.

    PubMed

    Demesouka, O E; Vavatsikos, A P; Anagnostopoulos, K P

    2014-04-01

    Multicriteria spatial decision support systems (MC-SDSS) have emerged as an integration of the geographical information systems (GIS) and multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) methods. GIS-based MCDA allows the incorporation of conflicting objectives and decision maker (DM) preferences into spatial decision models. During recent decades, a variety of research articles have been published regarding the implementation of methods and/or tools in a variety of real-world case studies. The article discusses, in detail, the criteria and methods that are implemented in GIS-based landfill siting suitability analysis and especially the exclusionary and non-exclusionary criteria that can be considered when selecting sites for municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. This paper reviews 36 seminal articles in which the evaluation of candidate landfill sites is conducted using MCDA methods. After a brief description of the main components of a MC-SDSS and the applied decision rules, the review focuses on the criteria incorporated into the decision models. The review provides a comprehensive guide to the landfill siting analysis criteria, providing details regarding the utilization methods, their decision or exclusionary nature and their monotonicity.

  15. Choices, choices: the application of multi-criteria decision analysis to a food safety decision-making problem.

    PubMed

    Fazil, A; Rajic, A; Sanchez, J; McEwen, S

    2008-11-01

    In the food safety arena, the decision-making process can be especially difficult. Decision makers are often faced with social and fiscal pressures when attempting to identify an appropriate balance among several choices. Concurrently, policy and decision makers in microbial food safety are under increasing pressure to demonstrate that their policies and decisions are made using transparent and accountable processes. In this article, we present a multi-criteria decision analysis approach that can be used to address the problem of trying to select a food safety intervention while balancing various criteria. Criteria that are important when selecting an intervention were determined, as a result of an expert consultation, to include effectiveness, cost, weight of evidence, and practicality associated with the interventions. The multi-criteria decision analysis approach we present is able to consider these criteria and arrive at a ranking of interventions. It can also provide a clear justification for the ranking as well as demonstrate to stakeholders, through a scenario analysis approach, how to potentially converge toward common ground. While this article focuses on the problem of selecting food safety interventions, the range of applications in the food safety arena is truly diverse and can be a significant tool in assisting decisions that need to be coherent, transparent, and justifiable. Most importantly, it is a significant contributor when there is a need to strike a fine balance between various potentially competing alternatives and/or stakeholder groups.

  16. [Analysis of radiological criteria correlation and clinical manifestation of central lumbosacral spinal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Shevelev, I N; Kornienko, V N; Konovalov, N A; Cherkashov, A M; Nazarenko, A G; Asiutin, D S

    2012-01-01

    to assess the correlation analysis of radiologic criteria referred to central degenerative spinal stenosis and intensity of clinical manifestation. a retrospective cohort data were collected from 2010 till 2011, 27 patients who underwent surgical treatment of central spinal stenosis in Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. 16 male and 11 female patients were included in the present study. Mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 57.9 years. All patients had spinal canal decompression and transpedicular or oblique transcorporal fusion. Stabilization included different types of pedicle screws, including transcutaneous stabilization systems. Interbody fusion was achieved by posterolateral transforaminal approach (TLIF --transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion). 13 cases included combination of interbody fusion and guided oblique lumbar interbody fusion "GO-LIF", which could not be managed without robotic assistance. All patients underwent full preoperative examination. MR image evaluation included: antero-posterior diameter of the spinal canal (mm), interfacet interval (mm), and cross-section area of the spinal canal (mm2). Patients were evaluated by outcome analysis scales: Degenerative Disease Intensity Level (DDIL) and Swiss Spinal Stenosis Score (Zurich Claudication Questionnaire, Brigham spinal stenosis questionnaire). Surgical outcomes were evaluated according to modified classes of Kawabata et al. analysis of our patients group demonstrated absence of correlation between intensity level of degenerative central spinal stenosis based on neurovisualization methods and intensity of its clinical manifestation. Pearson's coefficient of correlation and Spearmen rank correlation for variable which evaluates clinical signs (DDIL in %) and neurovisualization data (antero-posterior diameter of the spinal canal (mm), interfacet interval (mm), and cross-section area of the spinal canal (mm2)) are not significant to zero (p > 0.2).

  17. Analysis and performance of various classification criteria sets in a Colombian cohort of patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Molano, Wilson; Landewé, Robert B M; Londoño, John; Romero-Sanchez, Consuelo; Valle-Oñate, Rafael; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of classification criteria sets (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS), European Spondylarthropathy Study Group (ESSG), and Amor) for spondyloarthritis (SpA) in a clinical practice cohort in Colombia and provide insight into how rheumatologists follow the diagnostic path in patients suspected of SpA. Patients with a rheumatologist's diagnosis of SpA were retrospectively classified according to three criteria sets. Classification rate was defined as the proportion of patients fulfilling a particular criterion. Characteristics of patients fulfilling and not fulfilling each criterion were compared. The ASAS criteria classified 81 % of all patients (n = 581) as having either axial SpA (44 %) or peripheral SpA (37 %), whereas a lower proportion met ESSG criteria (74 %) and Amor criteria (53 %). There was a high degree of overlap among the different criteria, and 42 % of the patients met all three criteria. Patients fulfilling all three criteria sets were older (36 vs. 30 years), had more SpA features (3 vs. 1 features), and more frequently had a current or past history of back pain (77 vs. 43 %), inflammatory back pain (47 vs. 13 %), enthesitis (67 vs. 26 %), and buttock pain (37 vs. 13 %) vs. those not fulfilling any criteria. HLA-B27, radiographs, and MRI-SI were performed in 77, 59, and 24 % of the patients, respectively. The ASAS criteria classified more patients as having SpA in this Colombian cohort when the rheumatologist's diagnosis is used as an external standard. Although physicians do not perform HLA-B27 or imaging in all patients, they do require these tests if the clinical symptoms fall short of confirming SpA and suspicion remains.

  18. Computer Therapy for the Anxiety and Depressive Disorders Is Effective, Acceptable and Practical Health Care: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Gavin; Cuijpers, Pim; Craske, Michelle G.; McEvoy, Peter; Titov, Nickolai

    2010-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety disorders are common and treatable with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), but access to this therapy is limited. Objective Review evidence that computerized CBT for the anxiety and depressive disorders is acceptable to patients and effective in the short and longer term. Method Systematic reviews and data bases were searched for randomized controlled trials of computerized cognitive behavior therapy versus a treatment or control condition in people who met diagnostic criteria for major depression, panic disorder, social phobia or generalized anxiety disorder. Number randomized, superiority of treatment versus control (Hedges g) on primary outcome measure, risk of bias, length of follow up, patient adherence and satisfaction were extracted. Principal Findings 22 studies of comparisons with a control group were identified. The mean effect size superiority was 0.88 (NNT 2.13), and the benefit was evident across all four disorders. Improvement from computerized CBT was maintained for a median of 26 weeks follow-up. Acceptability, as indicated by adherence and satisfaction, was good. Research probity was good and bias risk low. Effect sizes were non-significantly higher in comparisons with waitlist than with active treatment control conditions. Five studies comparing computerized CBT with traditional face-to-face CBT were identified, and both modes of treatment appeared equally beneficial. Conclusions Computerized CBT for anxiety and depressive disorders, especially via the internet, has the capacity to provide effective acceptable and practical health care for those who might otherwise remain untreated. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000030077 PMID:20967242

  19. Making Good Decisions in Healthcare with Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis: The Use, Current Research and Future Development of MCDA.

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, Axel C; Kaczynski, Anika

    2016-02-01

    Healthcare decision making is usually characterized by a low degree of transparency. The demand for transparent decision processes can be fulfilled only when assessment, appraisal and decisions about health technologies are performed under a systematic construct of benefit assessment. The benefit of an intervention is often multidimensional and, thus, must be represented by several decision criteria. Complex decision problems require an assessment and appraisal of various criteria; therefore, a decision process that systematically identifies the best available alternative and enables an optimal and transparent decision is needed. For that reason, decision criteria must be weighted and goal achievement must be scored for all alternatives. Methods of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) are available to analyse and appraise multiple clinical endpoints and structure complex decision problems in healthcare decision making. By means of MCDA, value judgments, priorities and preferences of patients, insurees and experts can be integrated systematically and transparently into the decision-making process. This article describes the MCDA framework and identifies potential areas where MCDA can be of use (e.g. approval, guidelines and reimbursement/pricing of health technologies). A literature search was performed to identify current research in healthcare. The results showed that healthcare decision making is addressing the problem of multiple decision criteria and is focusing on the future development and use of techniques to weight and score different decision criteria. This article emphasizes the use and future benefit of MCDA.

  20. Performance of the ASAS classification criteria for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sepriano, Alexandre; Rubio, Roxana; Ramiro, Sofia; Landewé, Robert; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2017-05-01

    To summarise the evidence on the performance of the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) (also imaging and clinical arm separately), peripheral (p)SpA and the entire set, when tested against the rheumatologist's diagnosis ('reference standard'). A systematic literature review was performed to identify eligible studies. Raw data on SpA diagnosis and classification were extracted or, if necessary, obtained from the authors of the selected publications. A meta-analysis was performed to obtain pooled estimates for sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, by fitting random effects models. Nine papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria (N=5739 patients). The entire set of the ASAS SpA criteria yielded a high pooled sensitivity (73%) and specificity (88%). Similarly, good results were found for the axSpA criteria (sensitivity: 82%; specificity: 88%). Splitting the axSpA criteria in 'imaging arm only' and 'clinical arm only' resulted in much lower sensitivity (30% and 23% respectively), but very high specificity was retained (97% and 94% respectively). The pSpA criteria were less often tested than the axSpA criteria and showed a similarly high pooled specificity (87%) but lower sensitivity (63%). Accumulated evidence from studies with more than 5500 patients confirms the good performance of the various ASAS SpA criteria as tested against the rheumatologist's diagnosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Extreme value distribution based gene selection criteria for discriminant microarray data analysis using logistic regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentian; Sun, Fengzhu; Grosse, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    One important issue commonly encountered in the analysis of microarray data is to decide which and how many genes should be selected for further studies. For discriminant microarray data analyses based on statistical models, such as the logistic regression models, gene selection can be accomplished by a comparison of the maximum likelihood of the model given the real data, L(D|M), and the expected maximum likelihood of the model given an ensemble of surrogate data with randomly permuted label, L(D(0)|M). Typically, the computational burden for obtaining L(D(0)M) is immense, often exceeding the limits of available computing resources by orders of magnitude. Here, we propose an approach that circumvents such heavy computations by mapping the simulation problem to an extreme-value problem. We present the derivation of an asymptotic distribution of the extreme-value as well as its mean, median, and variance. Using this distribution, we propose two gene selection criteria, and we apply them to two microarray datasets and three classification tasks for illustration.

  2. Multi-criteria Decision Analysis to Model Ixodes ricinus Habitat Suitability.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Raphaël; McGrath, Guy; McMahon, Barry J; Vanwambeke, Sophie O

    2017-06-19

    Tick-borne diseases present a major threat to both human and livestock health throughout Europe. The risk of infection is directly related to the presence of its vector. Thereby it is important to know their distribution, which is strongly associated with environmental factors: the presence and availability of a suitable habitat, of a suitable climate and of hosts. The present study models the habitat suitability for Ixodes ricinus in Ireland, where data on tick distribution are scarce. Tick habitat suitability was estimated at a coarse scale (10 km) with a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) method according to four different scenarios (depending on the variables used and on the weights granted to each of them). The western part of Ireland and the Wicklow mountains in the East were estimated to be the most suitable areas for I. ricinus in the island. There was a good level of agreement between results from the MCDA and recorded tick presence. The different scenarios did not affect the spatial outputs substantially. The current study suggests that tick habitat suitability can be mapped accurately at a coarse scale in a data-scarce context using knowledge-based methods. It can serve as a guideline for future countrywide sampling that would help to determine local risk of tick presence and refining knowledge on tick habitat suitability in Ireland.

  3. Rural tourism spatial distribution based on multi-criteria decision analysis and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongxian; Yang, Qingsheng

    2008-10-01

    To study spatial distribution of rural tourism can provide scientific decision basis for developing rural economics. Traditional ways of tourism spatial distribution have some limitations in quantifying priority locations of tourism development on small units. They can only produce the overall tourism distribution locations and whether locations are suitable to tourism development simply while the tourism develop ranking with different decision objectives should be considered. This paper presents a way to find ranking of location of rural tourism development in spatial by integrating multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and geography information system (GIS). In order to develop country economics with inconvenient transportation, undeveloped economy and better tourism resource, these locations should be firstly develop rural tourism. Based on this objective, the tourism develop priority utility of each town is calculated with MCDA and GIS. Towns which should be first develop rural tourism can be selected with higher tourism develop priority utility. The method is used to find ranking of location of rural tourism in Ningbo City successfully. The result shows that MCDA is an effective way for distribution rural tourism in spatial based on special decision objectives and rural tourism can promote economic development.

  4. Development of tissue level brain injury criteria by finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Ueno, K; Melvin, J W; Li, L; Lighthall, J W

    1995-08-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model of the direct cortical impact experiment was built and a preliminary validation against mechanical response was completed. The motion of the impactor was enforced in the model by applying the same acceleration history as that of the experimental impactor. A nonlinear contact surface algorithm was used for impactor-brain interface with the ABAQUS general purpose finite element program. The resulting motion of the impactor and the contacting node in the brain model confirmed that the impactor moved realistically and contacted the brain surface. The pressure generated in the model compared favorably with that measured by a pressure transducer in the experiment. The pattern of high shear deformation generated at the impact site in the model was similar to the pattern of contusion hemorrhage seen in the experiment. The pressure generated at the impact site propagated to the skull-brain boundary, especially, at the posterior margin of the cerebellum. Analysis of experimental data using a biomechanically validated finite element model will enable determination of tissue-level injury criteria for application in human brain models to predict head injury potential in contact, noncontact, or side impact situations.

  5. Prediction of Depression in Cancer Patients With Different Classification Criteria, Linear Discriminant Analysis versus Logistic Regression.

    PubMed

    Shayan, Zahra; Mohammad Gholi Mezerji, Naser; Shayan, Leila; Naseri, Parisa

    2015-11-03

    Logistic regression (LR) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) are two popular statistical models for prediction of group membership. Although they are very similar, the LDA makes more assumptions about the data. When categorical and continuous variables used simultaneously, the optimal choice between the two models is questionable. In most studies, classification error (CE) is used to discriminate between subjects in several groups, but this index is not suitable to predict the accuracy of the outcome. The present study compared LR and LDA models using classification indices. This cross-sectional study selected 243 cancer patients. Sample sets of different sizes (n = 50, 100, 150, 200, 220) were randomly selected and the CE, B, and Q classification indices were calculated by the LR and LDA models. CE revealed the a lack of superiority for one model over the other, but the results showed that LR performed better than LDA for the B and Q indices in all situations. No significant effect for sample size on CE was noted for selection of an optimal model. Assessment of the accuracy of prediction of real data indicated that the B and Q indices are appropriate for selection of an optimal model. The results of this study showed that LR performs better in some cases and LDA in others when based on CE. The CE index is not appropriate for classification, although the B and Q indices performed better and offered more efficient criteria for comparison and discrimination between groups.

  6. Mapping wetland functions using Earth observation data and multi-criteria analysis.

    PubMed

    Rapinel, Sébastien; Hubert-Moy, Laurence; Clément, Bernard; Maltby, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Wetland functional assessment is commonly conducted based on field observations, and thus, is generally limited to small areas. However, there is often a need for wetland managers to obtain information on wetland functional performance over larger areas. For this purpose, we are proposing a new field-based functional assessment procedure in which wetland functions are evaluated and classified into hydrogeomorphic units according to a multi-criteria analysis approach. Wetland-related geographic information system layers derived from Earth observation data (LiDAR, multispectral and radar data) are used in this study for a large-scale functional evaluation. These include maps of a hydrogeomorphic units, ditches, vegetation, annual flood duration, biomass, meadows management, and wetland boundaries. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, a 132 km(2) international long-term ecological research site located in the west of France was assessed. Four wetland functions were evaluated: flood peak attenuation, low water attenuation, denitrification, and habitat. A spatial distribution map of the individual wetland functions was generated, and the intensity levels of the functions were highlighted. Antagonisms between functions within individual hydrogeomorphic units were also identified. Mapping of hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological wetland functions over large areas can provide an efficient tool for policy makers and other stakeholders including water authorities, nature conservation agencies, and farmers. Specifically, this tool has the potential to provide a mapping of ecosystem services, conservation management priorities, and possible improvements in water resources management.

  7. Contract Source Selection: An Analysis of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable and Tradeoff Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    4=Very Good  3=Satisfactory  2=Marginal  1=Unsatisfactory In this research , we used an overall average of CPARS ratings as the second DV (i.e...thorough market research , acquisition professionals must decide at an early stage which source selection strategy (lowest price technically...acceptable or tradeoff) to utilize in order to achieve a best value contract award. This research attempts to determine if a relationship exists between

  8. [Longitudinal survey and analysis among Chengdu residents on cognition and acceptance of implant dentures].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yanping; Wang, Yongyue; Wang, Luming; Du, Bing

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to survey the cognition and acceptance of implant dentures among Chengdu residents in 2005 and 2013 and to comparatively analyze the differences and influencing factors. A questionnaire was designed for this study. Its main content included basic demographics of respondents (gender, age, cultural level, and income level), cognition level of implant dentures (concept and main characteristics of implant dentures), main concern of respondents regarding implant dentures and medical institutions, and acceptance level of the price of implant dentures, among others. The sampling survey was carried out among Chengdu residents in 2005 and 2013 using the designed questionnaire. The results were then statistically analyzed. Up to 908 valid questionnaires in 2005 and 905 valid questionnaires in 2013 were obtained. The level of cognition of implant dentures was higher in 2013 than in 2005, and the correlation between cognition and cultural level and that between cognition and income level were both positive. However, the correlation between cognition and age was negative. The success rate for implant dentures and medical treatment technology of medical institutions were the factors that the respondents were mainly concerned with. The main methods for disseminating information on implant dentures were the internet, television, newspapers, magazines, and introduction by friends. With the development of the society's economy and the improvement of culture and income level of Chengdu residents, the cognition and acceptance level of implant dentures have gradualy increased. Meanwhile, health education and medical technology still need to be strengthened.

  9. Multi-criteria decision analysis using hydrological indicators for decision support - a conceptual framework.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butchart-Kuhlmann, Daniel; Kralisch, Sven; Meinhardt, Markus; Fleischer, Melanie

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the quantity and quality of water available in water stressed environments under various potential climate and land-use changes is necessary for good water and environmental resources management and governance. Within the region covered by the Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management (SASSCAL) project, such areas are common. One goal of the SASSCAL project is to develop and provide an integrated decision support system (DSS) with which decision makers (DMs) within a given catchment can obtain objective information regarding potential changes in water flow quantity and timing. The SASSCAL DSS builds upon existing data storage and distribution capability, through the SASSCAL Information System (IS), as well as the J2000 hydrological model. Using output from validated J2000 models, the SASSCAL DSS incorporates the calculation of a range of hydrological indicators based upon Indicators of Hydrological Alteration/Environmental Flow Components (IHA/EFC) calculated for a historic time series (pre-impact) and a set of model simulations based upon a selection of possible climate and land-use change scenarios (post-impact). These indicators, obtained using the IHA software package, are then used as input for a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) undertaken using the open source diviz software package. The results of these analyses will provide DMs with an indication as to how various hydrological indicators within a catchment may be altered under different future scenarios, as well providing a ranking of how each scenario is preferred according to different DM preferences. Scenarios are represented through a combination of model input data and parameter settings in J2000, and preferences are represented through criteria weighting in the MCDA. Here, the methodology is presented and applied to the J2000 Luanginga model results using a set of hypothetical decision maker preference values as input for an MCDA based on

  10. The impact of expert knowledge on natural hazard susceptibility assessment using spatial multi-criteria analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Caroline; Kalantari, Zahra; Mörtberg, Ulla; Olofsson, Bo; Lyon, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Road and railway networks are one of the key factors to a country's economic growth. Inadequate infrastructural networks could be detrimental to a society if the transport between locations are hindered or delayed. Logistical hindrances can often be avoided whereas natural hindrances are more difficult to control. One natural hindrance that can have a severe adverse effect on both infrastructure and society is flooding. Intense and heavy rainfall events can trigger other natural hazards such as landslides and debris flow. Disruptions caused by landslides are similar to that of floods and increase the maintenance cost considerably. The effect on society by natural disasters is likely to increase due to a changed climate with increasing precipitation. Therefore, there is a need for risk prevention and mitigation of natural hazards. Determining susceptible areas and incorporating them in the decision process may reduce the infrastructural harm. Spatial multi-criteria analysis (SMCA) is a part of decision analysis, which provides a set of procedures for analysing complex decision problems through a Geographic Information System (GIS). The objective and aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of expert judgements for inundation, landslide and debris flow susceptibility assessments through a SMCA approach using hydrological, geological and land use factors. The sensitivity of the SMCA model was tested in relation to each perspective and impact on the resulting susceptibility. A least cost path function was used to compare new alternative road lines with the existing ones. This comparison was undertaken to identify the resulting differences in the susceptibility assessments using expert judgements as well as historic incidences of flooding and landslides in order to discuss the usefulness of the model in road planning.

  11. Efficacy and Acceptability of Orthokeratology for Slowing Myopic Progression in Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Daizong; Huang, Jinhai; Chen, Hao; Bao, Fangjun; Savini, Giacomo; Calossi, Antonio; Chen, Haisi; Li, Xuexi; Wang, Qinmei

    2015-01-01

    Background. To evaluate the efficacy and acceptability of orthokeratology for slowing myopic progression in children with a well conducted evidence-based analysis. Design. Meta-analysis. Participants. Children from previously reported comparative studies were treated by orthokeratology versus control. Methods. A systematic literature retrieval was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The included studies were subjected to meta-analysis using Stata version 10.1. Main Outcome Measures. Axial length change (efficacy) and dropout rates (acceptability) during 2-year follow-up. Results. Eight studies involving 769 subjects were included. At 2-year follow-up, a statistically significant difference was observed in axial length change between the orthokeratology and control groups, with a weighted mean difference (WMD) of −0.25 mm (95% CI, −0.30 to −0.21). The pooled myopic control rate declined with time, with 55, 51, 51, and 41% obtained after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of treatment, respectively. No statistically significant difference was obtained for dropout rates between the orthokeratology and control groups at 2-year follow-up (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.22). Conclusions. Orthokeratology is effective and acceptable for slowing myopic progression in children with careful education and monitoring. PMID:26221539

  12. Analysis of extensively washed hair from cocaine users and drug chemists to establish new reporting criteria.

    PubMed

    Morris-Kukoski, Cynthia L; Montgomery, Madeline A; Hammer, Rena L

    2014-01-01

    Samples from a self-proclaimed cocaine (COC) user, from 19 drug users (postmortem) and from 27 drug chemists were extensively washed and analyzed for COC, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine (NC), cocaethylene (CE) and aryl hydroxycocaines by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Published wash criteria and cutoffs were applied to the results. Additionally, the data were used to formulate new reporting criteria and interpretation guidelines for forensic casework. Applying the wash and reporting criteria, hair that was externally contaminated with COC was distinguished from hair collected from individuals known to have consumed COC. In addition, CE, NC and hydroxycocaine metabolites were only present in COC users' hair and not in drug chemists' hair. When properly applied, the use of an extended wash, along with the reporting criteria defined here, will exclude false-positive results from environmental contact with COC.

  13. Recognizing systemic sclerosis: comparative analysis of various sets of classification criteria.

    PubMed

    Romanowska-Próchnicka, Katarzyna; Walczyk, Marcela; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a complex disease characterized by autoimmunity, vasculopathy and tissue fibrosis. Although most patients present with some degree of skin sclerosis, which is a distinguishing hallmark, the clinical presentation vary greatly complicating the diagnosis. In this regard, new classification criteria were jointly published in 2013 by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). A recent major development in the classification criteria is improved sensitivity, particularly for detecting early disease. The new criteria allow more cases to be classified as having systemic sclerosis (SSc), which leads to earlier treatment. Moreover it is clinically beneficial in preventing the disease progression with its irreversible fibrosis and organ damage. The aim of this review is to give insight into new classification criteria and current trends in the diagnosis of systemic sclerosis.

  14. Recognizing systemic sclerosis: comparative analysis of various sets of classification criteria

    PubMed Central

    Romanowska-Próchnicka, Katarzyna; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a complex disease characterized by autoimmunity, vasculopathy and tissue fibrosis. Although most patients present with some degree of skin sclerosis, which is a distinguishing hallmark, the clinical presentation vary greatly complicating the diagnosis. In this regard, new classification criteria were jointly published in 2013 by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). A recent major development in the classification criteria is improved sensitivity, particularly for detecting early disease. The new criteria allow more cases to be classified as having systemic sclerosis (SSc), which leads to earlier treatment. Moreover it is clinically beneficial in preventing the disease progression with its irreversible fibrosis and organ damage. The aim of this review is to give insight into new classification criteria and current trends in the diagnosis of systemic sclerosis. PMID:28115780

  15. Multi-Criteria Decision Making for a Spatial Decision Support System on the Analysis of Changing Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olyazadeh, Roya; van Westen, Cees; Bakker, Wim H.; Aye, Zar Chi; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri

    2014-05-01

    Natural hazard risk management requires decision making in several stages. Decision making on alternatives for risk reduction planning starts with an intelligence phase for recognition of the decision problems and identifying the objectives. Development of the alternatives and assigning the variable by decision makers to each alternative are employed to the design phase. Final phase evaluates the optimal choice by comparing the alternatives, defining indicators, assigning a weight to each and ranking them. This process is referred to as Multi-Criteria Decision Making analysis (MCDM), Multi-Criteria Evaluation (MCE) or Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA). In the framework of the ongoing 7th Framework Program "CHANGES" (2011-2014, Grant Agreement No. 263953) of the European Commission, a Spatial Decision Support System is under development, that has the aim to analyse changes in hydro-meteorological risk and provide support to selecting the best risk reduction alternative. This paper describes the module for Multi-Criteria Decision Making analysis (MCDM) that incorporates monetary and non-monetary criteria in the analysis of the optimal alternative. The MCDM module consists of several components. The first step is to define criteria (or Indicators) which are subdivided into disadvantages (criteria that indicate the difficulty for implementing the risk reduction strategy, also referred to as Costs) and advantages (criteria that indicate the favorability, also referred to as benefits). In the next step the stakeholders can use the developed web-based tool for prioritizing criteria and decision matrix. Public participation plays a role in decision making and this is also planned through the use of a mobile web-version where the general local public can indicate their agreement on the proposed alternatives. The application is being tested through a case study related to risk reduction of a mountainous valley in the Alps affected by flooding. Four alternatives are evaluated in

  16. Discussion paper on applicability of oil and grease analysis for RCRA closure criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    A site characterization (SC) was performed for the Building 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility. The initial SC indicated areas which had oil and grease levels above the criteria of the currently proposed RCRA closure plan. After further investigation, it was demonstrated that the oil and grease parameter may not be an accurate indication of a release from this facility and should not be included as a contaminant of concern in the closure criteria.

  17. Acceptance and efficacy of interventions for family caregivers of elderly persons with a mental disorder: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Weinbrecht, Anna; Rieckmann, Nina; Renneberg, Babette

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct an extended meta-analysis of the efficacy and acceptance of supportive interventions for alleviating depressive symptoms in family caregivers of elderly relatives with a mental disorder, including dementia. The second aim was to analyze intervention characteristics as potential moderators of the efficacy and acceptance of these interventions. We searched electronic databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 2005 and 2014. Thirty-three studies were included in the meta-analysis with a total of 5,980 participants. No RCTs that tested interventions for caregivers of elderly patients with mental disorders other than dementia were found. The weighted pooled effect size of the interventions for caregivers of dementia patients was positive but small (standardized mean difference = 0.13; CI0.95 [0.03; 0.23], p = 0.01). Meta-regression analysis revealed higher effect sizes for interventions that were individually customized. Intervention discontinuation rates were low (mean 11%, SD = 6.3) and independent of most intervention characteristics. If the intervention was delivered via telecommunication intervention discontinuation rates tended to be higher (r = -0.39, p = 0.07). Comparative research for caregivers of elderly patients with mental disorders other than dementia is lacking. RCTs of interventions for family caregivers of dementia patients of the last decade show good acceptance among intervention participants, but there is still a need to improve the efficacy of these interventions. Individual customization of intervention components might enhance efficacy. More research is needed on the acceptance of telecommunication interventions for family caregivers.

  18. Addressing preference heterogeneity in public health policy by combining Cluster Analysis and Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis: Proof of Method.

    PubMed

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Turner, Robin; Cunich, Michelle; Salkeld, Glenn; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Dowie, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The use of subgroups based on biological-clinical and socio-demographic variables to deal with population heterogeneity is well-established in public policy. The use of subgroups based on preferences is rare, except when religion based, and controversial. If it were decided to treat subgroup preferences as valid determinants of public policy, a transparent analytical procedure is needed. In this proof of method study we show how public preferences could be incorporated into policy decisions in a way that respects both the multi-criterial nature of those decisions, and the heterogeneity of the population in relation to the importance assigned to relevant criteria. It involves combining Cluster Analysis (CA), to generate the subgroup sets of preferences, with Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA), to provide the policy framework into which the clustered preferences are entered. We employ three techniques of CA to demonstrate that not only do different techniques produce different clusters, but that choosing among techniques (as well as developing the MCDA structure) is an important task to be undertaken in implementing the approach outlined in any specific policy context. Data for the illustrative, not substantive, application are from a Randomized Controlled Trial of online decision aids for Australian men aged 40-69 years considering Prostate-specific Antigen testing for prostate cancer. We show that such analyses can provide policy-makers with insights into the criterion-specific needs of different subgroups. Implementing CA and MCDA in combination to assist in the development of policies on important health and community issues such as drug coverage, reimbursement, and screening programs, poses major challenges -conceptual, methodological, ethical-political, and practical - but most are exposed by the techniques, not created by them.

  19. SCORE: a novel multi-criteria decision analysis approach to assessing the sustainability of contaminated land remediation.

    PubMed

    Rosén, Lars; Back, Pär-Erik; Söderqvist, Tore; Norrman, Jenny; Brinkhoff, Petra; Norberg, Tommy; Volchko, Yevheniya; Norin, Malin; Bergknut, Magnus; Döberl, Gernot

    2015-04-01

    The multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) method provides for a comprehensive and transparent basis for performing sustainability assessments. Development of a relevant MCDA-method requires consideration of a number of key issues, e.g. (a) definition of assessment boundaries, (b) definition of performance scales, both temporal and spatial, (c) selection of relevant criteria (indicators) that facilitate a comprehensive sustainability assessment while avoiding double-counting of effects, and (d) handling of uncertainties. Adding to the complexity is the typically wide variety of inputs, including quantifications based on existing data, expert judgements, and opinions expressed in interviews. The SCORE (Sustainable Choice Of REmediation) MCDA-method was developed to provide a transparent assessment of the sustainability of possible remediation alternatives for contaminated sites relative to a reference alternative, considering key criteria in the economic, environmental, and social sustainability domains. The criteria were identified based on literature studies, interviews and focus-group meetings. SCORE combines a linear additive model to rank the alternatives with a non-compensatory approach to identify alternatives regarded as non-sustainable. The key strengths of the SCORE method are as follows: a framework that at its core is designed to be flexible and transparent; the possibility to integrate both quantitative and qualitative estimations on criteria; its ability, unlike other sustainability assessment tools used in industry and academia, to allow for the alteration of boundary conditions where necessary; the inclusion of a full uncertainty analysis of the results, using Monte Carlo simulation; and a structure that allows preferences and opinions of involved stakeholders to be openly integrated into the analysis. A major insight from practical application of SCORE is that its most important contribution may be that it initiates a process where criteria

  20. Multicriteria decision analysis methods with 1000Minds for developing systemic sclerosis classification criteria.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sindhu R; Naden, Raymond P; Fransen, Jaap; van den Hoogen, Frank; Pope, Janet E; Baron, Murray; Tyndall, Alan; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Denton, Christopher P; Distler, Oliver; Gabrielli, Armando; van Laar, Jacob M; Mayes, Maureen; Steen, Virginia; Seibold, James R; Clements, Phillip; Medsger, Thomas A; Carreira, Patricia E; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Chung, Lorinda; Fessler, Barri J; Merkel, Peter A; Silver, Richard; Varga, John; Allanore, Yannick; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf; Vonk, Madelon C; Walker, Ulrich A; Cappelli, Susanna; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-06-01

    Classification criteria for systemic sclerosis (SSc) are being developed. The objectives were to develop an instrument for collating case data and evaluate its sensibility; use forced-choice methods to reduce and weight criteria; and explore agreement among experts on the probability that cases were classified as SSc. A standardized instrument was tested for sensibility. The instrument was applied to 20 cases covering a range of probabilities that each had SSc. Experts rank ordered cases from highest to lowest probability; reduced and weighted the criteria using forced-choice methods; and reranked the cases. Consistency in rankings was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Experts endorsed clarity (83%), comprehensibility (100%), face and content validity (100%). Criteria were weighted (points): finger skin thickening (14-22), fingertip lesions (9-21), friction rubs (21), finger flexion contractures (16), pulmonary fibrosis (14), SSc-related antibodies (15), Raynaud phenomenon (13), calcinosis (12), pulmonary hypertension (11), renal crisis (11), telangiectasia (10), abnormal nailfold capillaries (10), esophageal dilation (7), and puffy fingers (5). The ICC across experts was 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.58, 0.86] and improved to 0.80 (95% CI: 0.68, 0.90). Using a sensible instrument and forced-choice methods, the number of criteria were reduced by 39% (range, 23-14) and weighted. Our methods reflect the rigors of measurement science and serve as a template for developing classification criteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Toward a sustainability label for food products: an analysis of experts' and consumers' acceptance.

    PubMed

    Engels, Stéphanie V; Hansmann, Ralf; Scholz, Roland W

    2010-01-01

    The recent proliferation of standards and labels for organic, fair-trade, locally produced, and healthy food products risks creating confusion among consumers. This study presents a standardized approach to developing a comprehensive sustainability label that incorporates ecological, economic, and social values. The methodology is based on an extension of modular life-cycle assessment to non-environmental sustainability criteria. Interviews with a wide range of experts (n=65) and a consumer survey (n=233) were conducted to analyze the feasibility and potential effectiveness of the approach. Responses indicated that a comprehensive sustainability label could considerably influence consumption patterns and facilitate cross-product comparisons.

  2. Resolve! Version 2.5: Flammable Gas Accident Analysis Tool Acceptance Test Plan and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    LAVENDER, J.C.

    2000-10-17

    RESOLVE! Version 2 .5 is designed to quantify the risk and uncertainty of combustion accidents in double-shell tanks (DSTs) and single-shell tanks (SSTs). The purpose of the acceptance testing is to ensure that all of the options and features of the computer code run; to verify that the calculated results are consistent with each other; and to evaluate the effects of the changes to the parameter values on the frequency and consequence trends associated with flammable gas deflagrations or detonations.

  3. Multi-criteria decision analysis for bioenergy in the Centre Region of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, T. C. J.; Cabral, P.; Ferreira, A. J. D.; Teixeira, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    With the consumption of fossil fuels, the resources essential to Man's survival are being rapidly contaminated. A sustainable future may be achieved by the use of renewable energies, allowing countries without non-renewable energy resources to guarantee energetic sovereignty. Using bioenergy may mean a steep reduction and/or elimination of the external dependency, enhancing the countries' capital and potentially reducing of the negative effects that outcome from the use of fossil fuels, such as loss of biodiversity, air, water, and soil pollution, … This work's main focus is to increase bioenergy use in the centre region of Portugal by allying R&D to facilitate determination of bioenergy availability and distribution throughout the study area.This analysis is essential, given that nowadays this knowledge is still very limited in the study area. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) was the main tool used to asses this study, due to its unseeingly ability to integrate various types of information (such as alphanumerical, statistical, geographical, …) and various sources of biomass (forest, agricultural, husbandry, municipal and industrial residues, shrublands, used vegetable oil and energy crops) to determine the bioenergy potential of the study area, as well as their spatial distribution. By allying GIS with multi-criteria decision analysis, the initial table-like information of difficult comprehension is transformed into tangible and easy to read results: both intermediate and final results of the created models will facilitate the decision making process. General results show that the major contributors for the bioenergy potential in the Centre Region of Portugal are forest residues, which are mostly located in the inner region of the study area. However, a more detailed analysis should be made to analyze the viability to use energy crops. As a main conclusion, we can say that, although this region may not use only this type of energy to be completely

  4. Carbon storage, timber production, and biodiversity: comparing ecosystem services with multi-criteria decision analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwenk, W. Scott; Donovan, Therese; Keeton, William S.; Nunery, Jared S.

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, land managers seek ways to manage forests for multiple ecosystem services and functions, yet considerable challenges exist in comparing disparate services and balancing trade-offs among them. We applied multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and forest simulation models to simultaneously consider three objectives: (1) storing carbon, (2) producing timber and wood products, and (3) sustaining biodiversity. We used the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) applied to 42 northern hardwood sites to simulate forest development over 100 years and to estimate carbon storage and timber production. We estimated biodiversity implications with occupancy models for 51 terrestrial bird species that were linked to FVS outputs. We simulated four alternative management prescriptions that spanned a range of harvesting intensities and forest structure retention. We found that silvicultural approaches emphasizing less frequent harvesting and greater structural retention could be expected to achieve the greatest net carbon storage but also produce less timber. More intensive prescriptions would enhance biodiversity because positive responses of early successional species exceeded negative responses of late successional species within the heavily forested study area. The combinations of weights assigned to objectives had a large influence on which prescriptions were scored as optimal. Overall, we found that a diversity of silvicultural approaches is likely to be preferable to any single approach, emphasizing the need for landscape-scale management to provide a full range of ecosystem goods and services. Our analytical framework that combined MCDA with forest simulation modeling was a powerful tool in understanding trade-offs among management objectives and how they can be simultaneously accommodated.

  5. Environmental condition assessment of US military installations using GIS based spatial multi-criteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Steve; Wang, Guangxing; Howard, Heidi; Anderson, Alan

    2012-08-01

    Environment functions in various aspects including soil and water conservation, biodiversity and habitats, and landscape aesthetics. Comprehensive assessment of environmental condition is thus a great challenge. The issues include how to assess individual environmental components such as landscape aesthetics and integrate them into an indicator that can comprehensively quantify environmental condition. In this study, a geographic information systems based spatial multi-criteria decision analysis was used to integrate environmental variables and create the indicator. This approach was applied to Fort Riley Military installation in which land condition and its dynamics due to military training activities were assessed. The indicator was derived by integrating soil erosion, water quality, landscape fragmentation, landscape aesthetics, and noise based on the weights from the experts by assessing and ranking the environmental variables in terms of their importance. The results showed that landscape level indicator well quantified the overall environmental condition and its dynamics, while the indicator at level of patch that is defined as a homogeneous area that is different from its surroundings detailed the spatiotemporal variability of environmental condition. The environmental condition was mostly determined by soil erosion, then landscape fragmentation, water quality, landscape aesthetics, and noise. Overall, environmental condition at both landscape and patch levels greatly varied depending on the degree of ground and canopy disturbance and their spatial patterns due to military training activities and being related to slope. It was also determined the environment itself could be recovered quickly once military training was halt or reduced. Thus, this study provided an effective tool for the army land managers to monitor environmental dynamics and plan military training activities. Its limitation lies at that the obtained values of the indicator vary and are

  6. Four Common Simplifications of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis do not hold for River Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    River rehabilitation aims at alleviating negative effects of human impacts such as loss of biodiversity and reduction of ecosystem services. Such interventions entail difficult trade-offs between different ecological and often socio-economic objectives. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) is a very suitable approach that helps assessing the current ecological state and prioritizing river rehabilitation measures in a standardized way, based on stakeholder or expert preferences. Applications of MCDA in river rehabilitation projects are often simplified, i.e. using a limited number of objectives and indicators, assuming linear value functions, aggregating individual indicator assessments additively, and/or assuming risk neutrality of experts. Here, we demonstrate an implementation of MCDA expert preference assessments to river rehabilitation and provide ample material for other applications. To test whether the above simplifications reflect common expert opinion, we carried out very detailed interviews with five river ecologists and a hydraulic engineer. We defined essential objectives and measurable quality indicators (attributes), elicited the experts´ preferences for objectives on a standardized scale (value functions) and their risk attitude, and identified suitable aggregation methods. The experts recommended an extensive objectives hierarchy including between 54 and 93 essential objectives and between 37 to 61 essential attributes. For 81% of these, they defined non-linear value functions and in 76% recommended multiplicative aggregation. The experts were risk averse or risk prone (but never risk neutral), depending on the current ecological state of the river, and the experts´ personal importance of objectives. We conclude that the four commonly applied simplifications clearly do not reflect the opinion of river rehabilitation experts. The optimal level of model complexity, however, remains highly case-study specific depending on data and resource

  7. Analysis of the Factors Affecting Consumer Acceptance of Accredited Online Health Information.

    PubMed

    Jo, Heui Sug; Song, Tae Min; Kim, Bong Gi

    2017-11-01

    With the increasing use of the internet and the spread of smartphones, health information seekers obtain considerable information through the internet. As the amount of online health information increases, the need for quality management of health information has been emphasized. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors affecting the intention of using accredited online health information by applying the extended technology acceptance model (Extended-TAM). An online survey was conducted from September 15, 2016 to October 3, 2016, on 500 men and women aged 19-69 years. The results showed that the greatest factor influencing the acceptance of the accredited health information was perceived usefulness, and the expectation for the quality of the accreditation system was the most important mediator variable. In order to establish the health information accreditation system as a means to provide easy and useful information to the consumers, it is necessary to carry out quality management and promote the system through the continuous monitoring of the accreditation system. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  8. Multi-criteria decision analysis as an innovative approach to managing zoonoses: results from a study on Lyme disease in Canada.

    PubMed

    Aenishaenslin, Cécile; Hongoh, Valérie; Cissé, Hassane Djibrilla; Hoen, Anne Gatewood; Samoura, Karim; Michel, Pascal; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Bélanger, Denise

    2013-09-30

    Zoonoses are a growing international threat interacting at the human-animal-environment interface and call for transdisciplinary and multi-sectoral approaches in order to achieve effective disease management. The recent emergence of Lyme disease in Quebec, Canada is a good example of a complex health issue for which the public health sector must find protective interventions. Traditional preventive and control interventions can have important environmental, social and economic impacts and as a result, decision-making requires a systems approach capable of integrating these multiple aspects of interventions. This paper presents the results from a study of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) approach for the management of Lyme disease in Quebec, Canada. MCDA methods allow a comparison of interventions or alternatives based on multiple criteria. MCDA models were developed to assess various prevention and control decision criteria pertinent to a comprehensive management of Lyme disease: a first model was developed for surveillance interventions and a second was developed for control interventions. Multi-criteria analyses were conducted under two epidemiological scenarios: a disease emergence scenario and an epidemic scenario. In general, we observed a good level of agreement between stakeholders. For the surveillance model, the three preferred interventions were: active surveillance of vectors by flagging or dragging, active surveillance of vectors by trapping of small rodents and passive surveillance of vectors of human origin. For the control interventions model, basic preventive communications, human vaccination and small scale landscaping were the three preferred interventions. Scenarios were found to only have a small effect on the group ranking of interventions in the control model. MCDA was used to structure key decision criteria and capture the complexity of Lyme disease management. This facilitated the identification of gaps in the scientific literature

  9. Multi-criteria decision analysis as an innovative approach to managing zoonoses: results from a study on Lyme disease in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zoonoses are a growing international threat interacting at the human-animal-environment interface and call for transdisciplinary and multi-sectoral approaches in order to achieve effective disease management. The recent emergence of Lyme disease in Quebec, Canada is a good example of a complex health issue for which the public health sector must find protective interventions. Traditional preventive and control interventions can have important environmental, social and economic impacts and as a result, decision-making requires a systems approach capable of integrating these multiple aspects of interventions. This paper presents the results from a study of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) approach for the management of Lyme disease in Quebec, Canada. MCDA methods allow a comparison of interventions or alternatives based on multiple criteria. Methods MCDA models were developed to assess various prevention and control decision criteria pertinent to a comprehensive management of Lyme disease: a first model was developed for surveillance interventions and a second was developed for control interventions. Multi-criteria analyses were conducted under two epidemiological scenarios: a disease emergence scenario and an epidemic scenario. Results In general, we observed a good level of agreement between stakeholders. For the surveillance model, the three preferred interventions were: active surveillance of vectors by flagging or dragging, active surveillance of vectors by trapping of small rodents and passive surveillance of vectors of human origin. For the control interventions model, basic preventive communications, human vaccination and small scale landscaping were the three preferred interventions. Scenarios were found to only have a small effect on the group ranking of interventions in the control model. Conclusions MCDA was used to structure key decision criteria and capture the complexity of Lyme disease management. This facilitated the

  10. Multi-criteria multi-stakeholder decision analysis using a fuzzy-stochastic approach for hydrosystem management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subagadis, Y. H.; Schütze, N.; Grundmann, J.

    2014-09-01

    The conventional methods used to solve multi-criteria multi-stakeholder problems are less strongly formulated, as they normally incorporate only homogeneous information at a time and suggest aggregating objectives of different decision-makers avoiding water-society interactions. In this contribution, Multi-Criteria Group Decision Analysis (MCGDA) using a fuzzy-stochastic approach has been proposed to rank a set of alternatives in water management decisions incorporating heterogeneous information under uncertainty. The decision making framework takes hydrologically, environmentally, and socio-economically motivated conflicting objectives into consideration. The criteria related to the performance of the physical system are optimized using multi-criteria simulation-based optimization, and fuzzy linguistic quantifiers have been used to evaluate subjective criteria and to assess stakeholders' degree of optimism. The proposed methodology is applied to find effective and robust intervention strategies for the management of a coastal hydrosystem affected by saltwater intrusion due to excessive groundwater extraction for irrigated agriculture and municipal use. Preliminary results show that the MCGDA based on a fuzzy-stochastic approach gives useful support for robust decision-making and is sensitive to the decision makers' degree of optimism.

  11. Automatic identification of heart failure diagnostic criteria, using text analysis of clinical notes from electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Roy J.; Steinhubl, Steven R.; Sun, Jimeng; Ebadollahi, Shahram; Stewart, Walter F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Early detection of Heart Failure (HF) could mitigate the enormous individual and societal burden from this disease. Clinical detection is based, in part, on recognition of the multiple signs and symptoms comprising the Framingham HF diagnostic criteria that are typically documented, but not necessarily synthesized, by primary care physicians well before more specific diagnostic studies are done. We developed a natural language processing (NLP) procedure to identify Framingham HF signs and symptoms among primary care patients, using electronic health record (EHR) clinical notes, as a prelude to pattern analysis and clinical decision support for early detection of HF. Design We developed a hybrid NLP pipeline that performs two levels of analysis: (1) At the criteria mention level, a rule-based NLP system is constructed to annotate all affirmative and negative mentions of Framingham criteria. (2) At the encounter level, we construct a system to label encounters according to whether any Framingham criterion is asserted, denied, or unknown. Measurements Precision, recall, and F-score are used as performance metrics for criteria mention extraction and for encounter labeling. Results Our criteria mention extractions achieve a precision of 0.925, a recall of 0.896, and an F-score of 0.910. Encounter labeling achieves an F-score of 0.932. Conclusion Our system accurately identifies and labels affirmations and denials of Framingham diagnostic criteria in primary care clinical notes and may help in the attempt to improve the early detection of HF. With adaptation and tooling, our development methodology can be repeated in new problem settings. PMID:23317809

  12. Balancing costs and benefits at different stages of medical innovation: a systematic review of Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA).

    PubMed

    Wahlster, Philip; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Kriza, Christine; Niederländer, Charlotte; Kolominsky-Rabas, Peter

    2015-07-09

    The diffusion of health technologies from translational research to reimbursement depends on several factors included the results of health economic analysis. Recent research identified several flaws in health economic concepts. Additionally, the heterogeneous viewpoints of participating stakeholders are rarely systematically addressed in current decision-making. Multi-criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) provides an opportunity to tackle these issues. The objective of this study was to review applications of MCDA methods in decisions addressing the trade-off between costs and benefits. Using basic steps of the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review of the healthcare literature was performed to identify original research articles from January 1990 to April 2014. Medline, PubMed, Springer Link and specific journals were searched. Using predefined categories, bibliographic records were systematically extracted regarding the type of policy applications, MCDA methodology, criteria used and their definitions. 22 studies were included in the analysis. 15 studies (68 %) used direct MCDA approaches and seven studies (32 %) used preference elicitation approaches. Four studies (19 %) focused on technologies in the early innovation process. The majority (18 studies - 81 %) examined reimbursement decisions. Decision criteria used in studies were obtained from the literature research and context-specific studies, expert opinions, and group discussions. The number of criteria ranged between three up to 15. The most frequently used criteria were health outcomes (73 %), disease impact (59 %), and implementation of the intervention (40 %). Economic criteria included cost-effectiveness criteria (14 studies, 64 %), and total costs/budget impact of an intervention (eight studies, 36 %). The process of including economic aspects is very different among studies. Some studies directly compare costs with other criteria while some include economic consideration in a second step. In early

  13. The Bradford Hill criteria and zinc-induced anosmia: a causality analysis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Terence M; Smith, Wendy M

    2010-07-01

    To apply the Bradford Hill criteria, which are widely used to establish causality between an environmental agent and disease, to evaluate the relationship between over-the-counter intranasal zinc gluconate therapy and anosmia. Patient and literature review applying the Bradford Hill criteria on causation. University of California, San Diego, Nasal Dysfunction Clinic. The study included 25 patients who presented to the University of California, San Diego, Nasal Dysfunction Clinic complaining of acute-onset anosmia after intranasal application of homeopathic zinc gluconate gel. Each of the 9 Bradford Hill criteria--strength of association, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient (dose-response), biological plausibility, biological coherence, experimental evidence, and analogy--was applied to intranasal zinc gluconate therapy and olfactory dysfunction using published, peer-reviewed medical literature and reported clinical experiences. Clinical, biological, and experimental data support the Bradford Hill criteria to demonstrate that intranasal zinc gluconate therapy causes hyposmia and anosmia. The Bradford Hill criteria represent an important tool for scientifically determining cause between environmental exposure and disease. Increased Food and Drug Administration oversight of homeopathic medications is needed to monitor the safety of these popular remedies.

  14. [Comparative analysis of Light's criteria and other biochemical parameters to distinguish exudates from transudates].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Castro, D; Díaz Nuevo, G; Pérez-Rodríguez, E

    2002-01-01

    Light's criteria have classically been used to differentiate exudates from transudates. Nevertheless, a number of studies have attempted to identify more efficient parameters. The objective of our study was to determine the usefulness of biochemical parameters to differentiate transudates from exudates, and to compare them with the so far best studied criteria: the Light's criteria. We prospectively analysed 850 non selected cases of pleural effusion, with closed final diagnosis after its confirmation, therapeutic response and follow-up, collected consecutively at the Pleura Unit of our hospital. The parameters evaluated as potentially discriminatory between transudates and exudates included: glucose, proteins, albumin, lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH), cholesterol, triglycerides, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase and adenosin-deaminase (ADA), both separately and in combination to obtain the highest yield. The highest diagnostic yield was observed with the combination of pleural cholesterol, pleural LDH, and the pleural fluid/serum protein ratio, but without significant differences between combinations of pleural cholesterol and LDH, pleaural LDH and pleural proteins, Light's criteria or modified Light's criteria. We recommend the use of pleural cholesterol higher than 47 mg/dl and pleural LDH higher than 222 IU/l to offer the same yield as the combination of three parameters, due to its lower cost and because the necessity of serum determinations is avoided.

  15. Analysis of diagnostic criteria in adamantiades-behçet disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    di Meo, Nicola; Bergamo, S; Vidimari, P; Bonin, S; Trevisan, G

    2013-07-01

    Adamantiades-Behçet's disease (ABD) is a chronic-relapsing, inflammatory and multi-systemic disease. Any organ or system may be involved: ABD presents a great variety of cutaneous and mucosal lesions, ocular manifestations, central and peripheral nervous system abnormalities, joint as well as gastrointestinal involvement. Since clear pathognomonic clinical features and laboratory tests are lacking, the diagnosis of ABD mainly relies on the characteristic clinical features. Several sets of diagnostic criteria have been used. The International Study Group for Behçet Disease (ISGBD) in 1990 formulated a set of criteria to warrant uniformity of both diagnosis and classification. Therefore, in 2006, a new set was proposed by the International Team for the Revision of the International Criteria for Behçet's Disease (ITR-ICBD) not only to uniform the previous criteria but also to establish best accuracy, along with an optimum sensivity and specificity. The aims of this study are both to analyze the clinical features of ABD patients and to validate the ISGBD and ITR-ICDB criteria for the diagnosis of ABD in our cohort.

  16. Multi-criteria analysis for the detection of the most critical European UNESCO Heritage sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valagussa, Andrea; Frattini, Paolo; Berta, Nadia; Spizzichino, Daniele; Leoni, Gabriele; Margottini, Claudio; Battista Crosta, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    A GIS-based multi-criteria analysis has been implemented to identify and to rank the most critical UNESCO Heritage sites at the European scale in the context of PROTHEGO JPI-Project. Two multi-criteria methods have been tested and applied to more than 300 European UNESCO Sites. First, the Analytic Hierarchy Procedure (AHP) was applied to the data of the UNESCO Periodic Report, in relation to 13 natural hazards that have affected or can potentially affect the Heritage sites. According to these reports, 22% of sites are without any documented hazard and 70% of the sites have at least one hazard affecting the site. The most important hazards on the European country are: fire (wildfire), storm, flooding, earthquake and erosion. For each UNESCO site, the potential risk was calculated as a weighed sum of the hazards that affect the site. The weighs of the 13 hazards were obtained by AHP procedure, which is a technique for multi-attribute decision making that enables the decomposition of a problem into hierarchy, based on the opinion of different experts about the dominance of risks. The weights are obtained by rescaling between 0 and 1 the eigenvectors relative to the maximum eigenvalue for the matrix of the coefficients. The internal coherence of the expert's attributions is defined through the calculation of the consistency ratio (Saaty, 1990). The result of the AHP method consists in a map of the UNESCO sites ranked according to the potential risk, where the site most at risk results to be the Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord in Norway. However, the quality of these results lies in the reliability of the Period Reports, which are produced by different experts with unknown level of scientific background. To test the reliability of these results, a comparison of the information of the periodic reports with available high-quality datasets (earthquake, volcano and landslide) at the Italian scale has been performed. Sites properly classified by the Period Reports range from

  17. Analysis of passenger acceptance of commercial flights having characteristics similar to STOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlthau, A. R.; Jacobson, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Previous work in the development of quantitative models for the prediction of passenger reaction to motion and vehicle environment parameters in flight was extended to include a class of aircraft appropriate for low-density, short-haul service. The results indicate that it is possible to obtain quantitative response inputs from an usually small special test-subject group which will be representative of the general traveling public. Additional data which indicate the importance of comfort as a factor in evaluating ride quality was obtained, and identification of the factors which contribute to judgments regarding comfort level was improved. Seat comfort and seat spacing is very vital in the smaller aircraft. Mathematical modeling applied in conjuction with passenger reaction data was shown to be very useful for establishing ride-quality design criteria.

  18. A mathematical analysis of the ABCD criteria for diagnosing malignant melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunju; Kwon, Kiwoon

    2017-03-01

    The medical community currently employs the ABCD (asymmetry, border irregularity, color variegation, and diameter of the lesion) criteria in the early diagnosis of a malignant melanoma. Although many image segmentation and classification methods are used to analyze the ABCD criteria, it is rare to see a study containing mathematical justification of the parameters that are used to quantify the ABCD criteria. In this paper, we suggest new parameters to assess asymmetry, border irregularity, and color variegation, and explain the mathematical meaning of the parameters. The suggested parameters are then tested with 24 skin samples. The parameters suggested for the 24 skin samples are displayed in three-dimensional coordinates and are compared to those presented in other studies (Ercal et al 1994 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 41 837–45, Cheerla and Frazier 2014 Int. J. Innovative Res. Sci., Eng. Technol. 3 9164–83) in terms of Pearson correlation coefficient and classification accuracy in determining the malignancy of the lesions.

  19. SU-E-T-679: Retrospective Analysis of the Sensitivity of Planar Dose Measurements To Gamma Analysis Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Elguindi, S; Ezzell, G; Gagneur, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IMRT QA using planar dose measurements is still a widely used method for checking the accuracy of treatment plans. A pass/fail judgment is made using gamma analysis based on a single endpoint. Using more stringent criteria is a way to increase the sensitivity to planning and delivery errors. Before such implementation, it is necessary to understand how the sensitivity to different gamma criteria settings affects gamma passing rates (GPR). Methods: 752 IMRT QA measurements were re-analyzed with varying distance to agreement (DTA) and dose difference (DD) percentages using a Matlab program. Other quantifying information such as the mean dose difference in the treatment target (defined as points that are greater than 80% of maximal dose) were stored in a relational database for retrospective analysis. Results: The average and standard deviation of GPR (%) fell from 99.84 ± (0.43) to 89.61 ± (6.08) when restricting DD from 5 − 1% respectively, as compared to a drop from 99.15 ± (1.19) to 95.00 ± (4.43), when restricting the DTA from 5 − 1 mm respectively. The mean dose difference (%) in the treatment target between measured and calculated dose was −1.96 ± (0. 83), −0.09 ± (0.98), and 1.44 ± (0. 86) for each of our institution’s three matched linear accelerators (LINAC 1, 2, and 3 respectively). For plans that are approximately 2.7 sigma below the mean GPR, an average of 78.4% of those plans were measured on LINAC 1 or 3, while only 48% of the total plans were run on those machines. Conclusion: The data demonstrates that when restricting gamma criterion, such as the DD, the greatest indicator of reduced GPR in our institution is which matched LINAC the plan was measured on. While small, these differences manifest themselves to levels comparable to other treatment related differences and possibly confound the gamma analysis.

  20. Adult "termination-of-resuscitation" (TOR)-criteria may not be suitable for children - a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Rotering, Victoria Maria; Trepels-Kottek, Sonja; Heimann, Konrad; Brokmann, Jörg-Christian; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Schoberer, Mark

    2016-12-07

    Only a small number of patients survive out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest (OHCA). The duration of CPR varies considerably and transportation of patients under CPR is often unsuccessful. Termination-of-resuscitation (TOR)-criteria aim to preclude futile resuscitation efforts. Our goal was to find out to which extent existing TOR-criteria can be transferred to paediatric OHCA-patients with special regard to their prognostic value. We performed a retrospective analysis of an eleven-year single centre patient cohort. 43 paediatric patients admitted to our institution after emergency-medical-system (EMS)-confirmed OHCA from 2003 to 2013 were included. Morrison's BLS- and ALS-TOR-rules as well as the Trauma-TOR-criteria by the American Association of EMS Physicians were evaluated for application in children, by calculating sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value for death-, as well as survival-prediction in our cohort. 26 patients achieved ROSC and 14 were discharged alive (n = 7 PCPC 1/2, n = 7 PCPC 5). Sensitivity for BLS-TOR-criteria predicting death was 48.3%, specificity 92.9%, the PPV 93.3% and the NPV 46.4%. ALS-TOR-criteria for death had a sensitivity of 10.3%, specificity of 100%, a PPV of 100% and an NPV of 35%. Retrospective application of the BLS-TOR-rule in our patient cohort identified the resuscitation of one later survivor as futile. ALS-TOR-criteria did not give false predictions of death. The proportion of CPRs that could have been abandoned is 48.2% for the BLS-TOR and only 10.3% for the ALS-TOR-rule. Both rules therefore appear not to be transferable to a paediatric population.