Sample records for analysis dublin ireland

  1. Space Radar Image of Dublin, Ireland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-15

    This radar image of Dublin, Ireland, shows how the radar distinguishes between densely populated urban areas and nearby areas that are relatively unsettled. In the center of the image is the city natural harbor along the Irish Sea.

  2. Radar Image of Dublin, Ireland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Visualization Date 1994-04-11 This radar image of Dublin, Ireland, shows how the radar distingishes between densely populated urban areas and nearby areas that are relatively unsettled. In the center of the image is the city's natural harbor along the Irish Sea. The pinkish areas in the center are the densely populated parts of the city and the blue/green areas are the suburbs. The two ends of the Dublin Bay are Howth Point, the circular peninsula near the upper right side of the image, and Dun Laoghaire, the point to the south. The small island just north of Howth is called "Ireland's Eye," and the larger island, near the upper right corner of the image is Lambay Island. The yellow/green mountains in the lower left of the image (south) are the Wicklow Mountains. The large lake in the lower left, nestled within these mountains, is the Poulaphouca Reservoir along River Liffey. The River Liffey, the River Dodder and the Tolka River are the three rivers that flow into Dublin. The straight features west of the city are the Grand Canal and the three rivers are the faint lines above and below these structures. The dark X-shaped feature just to the north of the city is the Dublin International Airport. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 11, 1994. This area is centered at 53.3 degrees north latitude, 6.2 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 55 kilometers by 42 kilometers (34 miles by 26 miles). The colors are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: Red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian, and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. Credit: NASA/GSFC For more

  3. Selections from the ABC 2017 Annual Conference, Dublin, Ireland: Finding a Pedagogical Pot o' Gold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, D. Joel

    2018-01-01

    This article, the first of a two-part series, offers readers 13 teaching innovations debuted at the 2017 Association for Business Communication's annual conference in Dublin, Ireland. Assignment topics presented here include communication strategy and message-packaging skills, deep communication insights, and career and personal development.…

  4. "The Problem of Trinity College Dublin": A Historical Perspective on Rationalisation in Higher Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a historical perspective on government policies for the rationalisation of higher education (HE) in Ireland through a critical re-appraisal of the initiative for "merger" of Trinity College and University College Dublin. The initiative launched by Donogh O'Malley in 1967 was the first significant attempt by an Irish…

  5. [Jonathan Swift's asylum in Dublin--Ireland's introduction to institutional psychiatry 250 years ago].

    PubMed

    Reuber, M

    1995-09-01

    250 years ago, the satirical writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift from Dublin (1667-1745) founded the first Irish lunatic asylum. Rejecting the theories put forward by the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes and the doctor Thomas Willis, he was influenced by the ideas of the Scottish doctor and the "enlightened" thinker John Locke. Swift's St. Patrick's Hospital did not, however, realise a new philosophical concept: architecture and therapeutic approach of the new institution were clearly modelled on the much older Hospital of St. Mary of Bethlehem ( = Bedlam). Despite its conservative conceptual basis, the first institution dedicated to the mentally ill and intellectually subnormal in Ireland became a starting point for the apparantly unstoppable expansion of the, at one time, most comprehensive asylum system in the world. After Swift's Hospital had been enlarged twice at the tax-payers' expense (1778, 1793), the administration decided to relieve the institution by erecting the Richmond Asylum (1810), the first public asylum in Ireland. When this establishment also became overcrowded, in 1817, legislation was passed which led to the establishment of the oldest system of public asylums in Europe.

  6. Prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis in Dublin, Ireland: a population based survey.

    PubMed

    Power, D; Codd, M; Ivers, L; Sant, S; Barry, M

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) in Ireland has never been established. Studies from different countries show varying rates, being almost 100 per cent greater in the highlands of Scotland (10/1,000) than in rural Lesotho (6/1,000). A recent study also suggests a fall in the prevalence of RA among women in the London urban area. Given these variations the validity of extrapolating prevalence rates established for other countries to Ireland is questionable. This study aimed to establish a prevalence rate for RA in a defined Dublin population. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to 2,500 people chosen at random from the electoral register. The questionnaire was designed to select out both undiagnosed patients and those with definite arthritis. Respondents whose replies indicated an arthritic process, but in whom no diagnosis had been made, were asked to attend for further assessment and investigations as appropriate. Those who responded that they had been diagnosed with arthritis were asked for consent to inspect their hospital or general practitioner records. A diagnosis of RA was based on American Rheumatism Association (ARA) criteria. Valid responses were received from 1,227 people surveyed (response rate = 49 per cent). Six cases of RA were identified including 2 previously undiagnosed cases. A prevalence rate of 5/1,000 has been estimated based on these findings.

  7. Characterising the hydrothermal circulation patterns beneath thermal springs in the limestones of the Carboniferous Dublin Basin, Ireland: a geophysical and geochemical approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Sarah; Henry, Tiernan; Muller, Mark R.; Jones, Alan G.; Moore, John Paul; Murray, John; Campanyà, Joan; Vozár, Jan; Walsh, John; Rath, Volker

    2016-04-01

    A hydrogeological conceptual model of the sources, circulation pathways and temporal variations of two low-enthalpy thermal springs is derived from a multi-disciplinary approach. The springs are situated in the Carboniferous limestones of the Dublin Basin, in east-central Ireland. Kilbrook spring (Co. Kildare) has the highest recorded temperatures for any thermal spring in Ireland (maximum of 25.0 °C), and St. Gorman's Well (Co. Meath) has a complex and variable temperature profile (maximum of 21.8 °C). These temperatures are elevated with respect to average Irish groundwater temperatures (9.5 - 10.5 °C), and represent a geothermal energy potential, which is currently under evaluation. A multi-disciplinary investigation based upon audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) surveys, time-lapse temperature and chemistry measurements, and hydrochemical analysis, has been undertaken with the aims of investigating the provenance of the thermal groundwater and characterising the geological structures facilitating groundwater circulation in the bedrock. The hydrochemical analysis indicates that the thermal waters flow within the limestones of the Dublin Basin, and there is evidence that Kilbrook spring receives a contribution from deep-basinal fluids. The time-lapse temperature, electrical conductivity and water level records for St. Gorman's Well indicate a strongly non-linear response to recharge inputs to the system, suggestive of fluid flow in karst conduits. The 3-D electrical resistivity models of the subsurface revealed two types of geological structure beneath the springs; (1) Carboniferous normal faults, and (2) Cenozoic strike-slip faults. These structures are dissolutionally enhanced, particularly where they intersect. The karstification of these structures, which extend to depths of at least 500 m, has provided conduits that facilitate the operation of a relatively deep hydrothermal circulation pattern (likely estimated depths between 240 and 1,000 m) within the Dublin

  8. Targeted intervention strategies to optimise diversion of BMW in the Dublin, Ireland region

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Purcell, M., E-mail: mary.purcell@cit.ie; Centre for Water Resources Research, School of Architecture, Landscape and Civil Engineering, University College Dublin, Newstead, Belfield, Dublin 4; Magette, W.L.

    Highlights: > Previous research indicates that targeted strategies designed for specific areas should lead to improved diversion. > Survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting. > Then logic modelling and behavioural research were employed to develop site-specific management intervention strategies. > Waste management initiatives can be tailored to specific needs of areas rather than one size fits all means currently used. - Abstract: Urgent transformation is required in Ireland to divert biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill and prevent increases in overall waste generation. When BMW is optimally managed, it becomes amore » resource with value instead of an unwanted by-product requiring disposal. An analysis of survey responses from commercial and residential sectors for the Dublin region in previous research by the authors proved that attitudes towards and behaviour regarding municipal solid waste is spatially variable. This finding indicates that targeted intervention strategies designed for specific geographic areas should lead to improved diversion rates of BMW from landfill, a requirement of the Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC. In the research described in this paper, survey responses and GIS model predictions from previous research were the basis for goal setting, after which logic modelling and behavioural research were employed to develop site-specific waste management intervention strategies. The main strategies devised include (a) roll out of the Brown Bin (Organics) Collection and Community Workshops in Dun Laoghaire Rathdown, (b) initiation of a Community Composting Project in Dublin City (c) implementation of a Waste Promotion and Motivation Scheme in South Dublin (d) development and distribution of a Waste Booklet to promote waste reduction activities in Fingal (e) region wide distribution of a Waste Booklet to the commercial sector and (f) Greening Irish Pubs Initiative. Each of these

  9. Ireland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    On August 7, 2003, the NASA Aqua MODIS instrument acquired this image of Ireland on the first day this summer that most of the island hasn´t been completely obscured by cloud cover. Called the Emerald Isle for a good reason, Ireland is draped in vibrant shades of green amidst the blue Atlantic Ocean and Celtic (south) and Irish (east) Seas. Faint ribbons of blue-green phytoplankton drift in the waters of the Celtic Sea, just south of Dublin. Dublin itself appears as a large grayish-brown spot on the Republic of Ireland´s northeastern coast. This large capital city (population 1.12 million) sits on the River Liffey, effectively splitting the city in half. Northern Ireland´s capital city, Belfast, also sits on a river: the River Lagan. This city, though its population is only a fifth of the size of Dublin´s, is also clearly visible in the image as a grayish-brown spot on the coast of the Irish Sea. Sensor Aqua/MODIS Credit Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC For more information go to: visibleearth.nasa.gov/view_rec.php?id=5744 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  10. Still Going Strong: A Tracer Study of the Community Mothers Programme, Dublin, Ireland. Early Childhood Development: Practice and Reflections. Following Footsteps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Brenda

    Home visiting is the strategy used by the Community Mothers Programme to enhance parenting skills of first-time mothers from economically disadvantaged areas in Dublin, Ireland. The home visitors are all women from the community who volunteer to visit parents in their homes once a month for 1 hour over a 12-month period. In a 1989 evaluation, 232…

  11. Syphilis serology in pregnancy: an eight-year study (2005-2012) in a large teaching maternity hospital in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    McGettrick, Padraig; Ferguson, Wendy; Jackson, Valerie; Eogan, Maeve; Lawless, Mairead; Ciprike, Vaneta; Varughese, Alan; Coulter-Smith, Sam; Lambert, John S

    2016-03-01

    All cases of positive syphilis serology detected in antenatal and peripartum screening in a large teaching maternity hospital in inner city Dublin, Ireland over an eight-year period (2005-2012 inclusive) were reviewed and included in our study. Demographic, antenatal registration, laboratory (including co-infections), partner serology, treatment and delivery data were recorded in our database. Infant follow-up, treatment and outcome data were also collected. During this period, 194 women had positive syphilis serology, of which 182 completed their pregnancies at the institution. This accounts for 0.28% of the total number of women completing their pregnancies during this time (N = 66038); 79 had no previous diagnosis of infection. There was one case of re-infection during pregnancy. Thirty-two women were co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. There was one case suggestive of congenital syphilis infection. Our study is a comprehensive analysis of the diagnosis, management and clinical outcomes of women testing positive for syphilis infection in pregnancy. It reveals the relatively high prevalence of syphilis infection in the population utilising the maternity services in north inner-city Dublin. It re-enforces the importance of continued active surveillance to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with maternal syphilis infection. It also highlights the importance of strategies such as re-testing high-risk groups and definitive screening of spouse serology. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. How Urban Parks Offer Opportunities for Physical Activity in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Eve; O'Mahony, Margaret; Geraghty, Dermot

    2018-04-21

    Parks are an important part of the urban fabric of cities. They offer people the opportunity to connect with nature, engage in physical activity, find a haven away from the city noise, or spend time alone or with family and friends. This study examines the relative importance of park and park visit characteristics for 865 survey participants in Dublin, Ireland. The data is analyzed using a multinomial logistic regression model which can distinguish the relative importance of attributes. The model results demonstrate an improvement over proportional by chance accuracy, indicating that the model is useful. The results suggest that when and why individuals go to the park along with the proximity of their residence to the park influence visit frequency more than their age and gender and more than their impression of the sound levels in the park. The contribution of the results, in terms of their potential usefulness to planners, suggest that the priority should be on the provision of park space close to residential areas, so that individuals can engage in activities such as walking and relaxation, and that the quality of that space, in the context of noise levels at least, is less important.

  13. Usage of unscheduled hospital care by homeless individuals in Dublin, Ireland: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Cullivan, Sarah; Sears, Jess; Lawlee, Ann Marie; Browne, Joe; Kieran, Jennifer; Segurado, Ricardo; O’Carroll, Austin; O’Reilly, Fiona; Creagh, Donnacha; Bergin, Colm; Kenny, Rose Anne; Byrne, Declan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Homeless people lack a secure, stable place to live and experience higher rates of serious illness than the housed population. Studies, mainly from the USA, have reported increased use of unscheduled healthcare by homeless individuals. We sought to compare the use of unscheduled emergency department (ED) and inpatient care between housed and homeless hospital patients in a high-income European setting in Dublin, Ireland. Setting A large university teaching hospital serving the south inner city in Dublin, Ireland. Patient data are collected on an electronic patient record within the hospital. Participants We carried out an observational cross-sectional study using data on all ED visits (n=47 174) and all unscheduled admissions under the general medical take (n=7031) in 2015. Primary and secondary outcome measures The address field of the hospital’s electronic patient record was used to identify patients living in emergency accommodation or rough sleeping (hereafter referred to as homeless). Data on demographic details, length of stay and diagnoses were extracted. Results In comparison with housed individuals in the hospital catchment area, homeless individuals had higher rates of ED attendance (0.16 attendances per person/annum vs 3.0 attendances per person/annum, respectively) and inpatient bed days (0.3 vs 4.4 bed days/person/annum). The rate of leaving ED before assessment was higher in homeless individuals (40% of ED attendances vs 15% of ED attendances in housed individuals). The mean age of homeless medical inpatients was 44.19 years (95% CI 42.98 to 45.40), whereas that of housed patients was 61.20 years (95% CI 60.72 to 61.68). Homeless patients were more likely to terminate an inpatient admission against medical advice (15% of admissions vs 2% of admissions in homeless individuals). Conclusion Homeless patients represent a significant proportion of ED attendees and medical inpatients. In contrast to housed patients, the bulk of usage of

  14. Usage of unscheduled hospital care by homeless individuals in Dublin, Ireland: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ní Cheallaigh, Clíona; Cullivan, Sarah; Sears, Jess; Lawlee, Ann Marie; Browne, Joe; Kieran, Jennifer; Segurado, Ricardo; O'Carroll, Austin; O'Reilly, Fiona; Creagh, Donnacha; Bergin, Colm; Kenny, Rose Anne; Byrne, Declan

    2017-12-01

    Homeless people lack a secure, stable place to live and experience higher rates of serious illness than the housed population. Studies, mainly from the USA, have reported increased use of unscheduled healthcare by homeless individuals.We sought to compare the use of unscheduled emergency department (ED) and inpatient care between housed and homeless hospital patients in a high-income European setting in Dublin, Ireland. A large university teaching hospital serving the south inner city in Dublin, Ireland. Patient data are collected on an electronic patient record within the hospital. We carried out an observational cross-sectional study using data on all ED visits (n=47 174) and all unscheduled admissions under the general medical take (n=7031) in 2015. The address field of the hospital's electronic patient record was used to identify patients living in emergency accommodation or rough sleeping (hereafter referred to as homeless). Data on demographic details, length of stay and diagnoses were extracted. In comparison with housed individuals in the hospital catchment area, homeless individuals had higher rates of ED attendance (0.16 attendances per person/annum vs 3.0 attendances per person/annum, respectively) and inpatient bed days (0.3 vs 4.4 bed days/person/annum). The rate of leaving ED before assessment was higher in homeless individuals (40% of ED attendances vs 15% of ED attendances in housed individuals). The mean age of homeless medical inpatients was 44.19 years (95% CI 42.98 to 45.40), whereas that of housed patients was 61.20 years (95% CI 60.72 to 61.68). Homeless patients were more likely to terminate an inpatient admission against medical advice (15% of admissions vs 2% of admissions in homeless individuals). Homeless patients represent a significant proportion of ED attendees and medical inpatients. In contrast to housed patients, the bulk of usage of unscheduled care by homeless people occurs in individuals aged 25-65 years. © Article author

  15. The prevalence of dental caries and fissure sealants in 12 year old children by disadvantaged status in Dublin (Ireland).

    PubMed

    Sagheri, D; McLoughlin, J; Clarkson, J J

    2009-03-01

    The aim was to record dental caries levels and the presence of fissure sealants in 12-year-old schoolchildren whose domestic water supply had been fluoridated since birth in Dublin (Ireland). Cross-sectional study. Participants A representative, random sample of 12-year-old schoolchildren in north-west Dublin. Dental caries levels were recorded using WHO criteria and fissure sealant was recorded when sealant was detectable on a permanent molar tooth. Medical card ownership, as a surrogate for disadvantage, was recorded by use of a questionnaire. Three-hundred and thirty-two (332) children were examined. The mean DMFT was 0.80 (SD 1.24). Analysis (Mann-Whitney U test) based on stratification of the sample according to medical-card status revealed no statistically significant difference between DMFT median scores of children of medical-card holders (i.e., social disadvantage background) and non medical-card holders (p-value = 0.23). However, the data revealed a social gradient in the presence of at least one fissure sealant. Approximately 10% more children in the group of medical-card holders had no fissure sealants present. Fisher's exact test was used to examine the association between the absence of fissure sealants and at least one fissure sealant between the two groups and was considered to be statistically significant (p-value = 0.04). This study demonstrated a social gradient in the presence of fissure sealants, but no such gradient in dental caries levels. This demonstrates the importance of population-based measures in the prevention of dental caries, such as water fluoridation, in reducing oral health inequalities.

  16. The Dublin Declaration on Maternal Health Care and Anti-Abortion Activism

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Dublin Declaration on Maternal Healthcare—issued by self-declared pro-life activists in Ireland in 2012—states unequivocally that abortion is never medically necessary, even to save the life of a pregnant woman. This article examines the influence of the Dublin Declaration on abortion politics in Latin America, especially El Salvador and Chile, where it has recently been used in pro-life organizing to cast doubt on the notion that legalizing abortion will reduce maternal mortality. Its framers argue that legalizing abortion will not improve maternal mortality rates, but reproductive rights advocates respond that the Dublin Declaration is junk science designed to preserve the world’s most restrictive abortion laws. Analyzing the strategy and impact of the Dublin Declaration brings to light one of the tactics used in anti-abortion organizing. PMID:28630540

  17. Ireland (2007)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Between 51.5 and 55.5 degrees north latitude, Ireland could easily find itself buried in snow during the winter, but the island's average temperature in January is 7 degrees Celsius (45 degrees Fahrenheit). Ireland's mild climate results from the influence of the ocean current known as the North Atlantic Drift, which extends the warm waters of the Gulf Stream northward. The island enjoys mild temperatures in the summertime as well; extreme heat and cold are virtually unknown. Precipitation ranges from 78.5 centimeters (31 inches) around Dublin to 300 centimeters (118 inches) along the west coast. The mild, rainy climate is good for vegetation. In this image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite on May 2, 2007, Ireland overwhelms the viewer with hues of green, particularly in the interior, where the vegetation overlies lowlands of limestone--the remains of marine animals from an ancient sea. Little of the island's famous greenness results from trees, however. Seventeenth-century clearing removed most of the country's forests, and despite replanting efforts, Ireland is Europe's least forested country, after Iceland. The island's mild temperatures and humidity have instead blanketed the landscape in abundant grasses. Along Ireland's west coast, bare brown rocks emerge from the plant cover. In the north, the rocks are primarily ancient, crystalline rocks deposited well over a billion years ago. In the south, the rocks are primarily sandstone deposited roughly 350 million years ago. Evidence of urbanization dots the landscape, especially along the east coast. The metropolitan area of Dublin appears as an uneven patch of gray, mingled with dots of green. Human habitation is also evident around Londonderry, Belfast, and Cork.

  18. Threshold Concepts: From Personal Practice to Communities of Practice. Proceedings of the National Academy's Sixth Annual Conference and the Fourth Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference [E-publication] (Dublin, Ireland, June 27-29, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mahony, Catherine, Ed.; Buchanan, Avril, Ed.; O'Rourke, Mary, Ed.; Higgs, Bettie, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The 6th Annual Conference of the National Academy for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (NAIRTL) and the 4th Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference was held at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, on June 27-29, 2012. The NAIRTL is a collaborative initiative between University College Cork, Cork Institute of Technology, National…

  19. Attitudes and behaviour towards waste management in the Dublin, Ireland region.

    PubMed

    Purcell, M; Magette, W L

    2010-10-01

    The hypothesis of this research was that attitudes about the management of biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) are spatially variable, even within a city of modest (1.2 million) population. For a select number of representative electoral districts in the Dublin, Ireland region, residents were surveyed regarding attitudes towards waste management in general, and BMW management in particular. A total of 850 survey responses were collected. Door-to-door interviews produced 688 responses in the residential sector; these were supplemented by 162 responses to a web-based survey. The surveys revealed that the majority of households use local authority, rather than private, waste collection services (both are available). The majority of residents, regardless of the local authority in which they live, were satisfied with their waste management service. "Reducing the quantity of waste generated" was regarded the most important future issue for 28% of residential respondents. Statistical analyses of the survey responses showed that the local authority in which respondents resided significantly influenced most responses (including waste collection service used, waste service satisfaction and backyard composting activity). Many responses (including waste service satisfaction, waste management influences) were also significantly related to the respondents' personal characteristics (e.g., education level, type of accommodation, age, etc.). These statistical results proved the hypothesis of the research and demonstrated that waste management initiatives designed for one area of the city (or, indeed, for uniform application to the city as a whole) could ignore the needs of other areas. The survey responses suggest that targeted intervention strategies would lead to improved diversion rates of BMW from landfill, a requirement of the Landfill Directive 1999/31/EC. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Dublin Declaration on Maternal Health Care and Anti-Abortion Activism: Examples from Latin America.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lynn M

    2017-06-01

    The Dublin Declaration on Maternal Healthcare-issued by self-declared pro-life activists in Ireland in 2012-states unequivocally that abortion is never medically necessary, even to save the life of a pregnant woman. This article examines the influence of the Dublin Declaration on abortion politics in Latin America, especially El Salvador and Chile, where it has recently been used in pro-life organizing to cast doubt on the notion that legalizing abortion will reduce maternal mortality. Its framers argue that legalizing abortion will not improve maternal mortality rates, but reproductive rights advocates respond that the Dublin Declaration is junk science designed to preserve the world's most restrictive abortion laws. Analyzing the strategy and impact of the Dublin Declaration brings to light one of the tactics used in anti-abortion organizing.

  1. Mid-Dinantian Waulsortian buildups in the Dublin Basin, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Ian D.; Strogen, Peter; Jones, Gareth Ll.

    1992-08-01

    The sedimentary history and biostratigraphic setting of Waulsortian carbonate buildups of the Feltrim Limestone Formation (late Courceyan to early Chadian) within the Dublin Basin are described. There is no unique precursor or successor facies to this formation, and the massive Waulsortian banks are composed predominantly of peloidal, skeletal wackestones and lime mudstones with packstones near the tops of banks. These banks form tabular bodies of moderate relief and are interbedded with thin shales and argillaceous crinoidal limestones of inter-bank facies. In the southwest of the basin inter-bank facies are rare and the bank facies have abundant stromatactis cavities, and uniquely at Roselawn a fauna of rugose corals. All buildups in the Dublin Basin have Phase C and/or D component assemblages of Lees and Miller (1985) and are interpreted as accumulating in moderately shallow-water depths, near or within the photic zone. Isopachs for the Feltrim Limestone Formation show a NE-SW-trending axial depocentre where the Waulsortian facies is in excess of 400 m thickness. Deposition appears to have taken place on this "double-sided" ramp, in a manner similar to the model of Lees (1982) for Belgium and southern Britain. Soft-sediment deformation such as large-scale slumping, shale-injections and water-escape structures, not previously recorded from these rocks is widespread. The upper surface of the Feltrim Limestone Formation is fissured and displays a prominent erosion surface. Termination of Waulsortian facies deposition and influx of terrigenous sediment was caused by rapid uplift, attributed to Chadian tectonism. However, eustatic sea-level fall cannot be ruled out as a partial cause of the demise of the Waulsortian.

  2. Measles outbreak in Dublin, 2000.

    PubMed

    McBrien, Jacqueline; Murphy, John; Gill, Denis; Cronin, Mary; O'Donovan, Catherine; Cafferkey, Mary T

    2003-07-01

    An outbreak of measles occurred in Ireland between December 1999 and July 2000. The majority of cases were in north Dublin, the catchment area of The Children's University Hospital (TCUH). Details of all of the 111 children attending the hospital with a diagnosis of measles between December 1999 and July 2000 were prospectively entered into a database. Charts were subsequently reviewed to extract epidemiologic and clinical details. National figures were obtained from the National Disease Surveillance Centre. In the study period 355 attended TCUH with a serologic or clinical diagnosis of measles, and 111 were admitted (47% female, 53% male). The main indications for admission were dehydration in 79%, pneumonia or pneumonitis in 47% and tracheitis in 32%. Thirteen children (11.7% of those admitted) required treatment in the intensive care unit, and in 7 of these mechanical ventilation was necessary. There were 3 deaths as a result of measles. Public health measures to curb spread of the disease included promotion of immunization for susceptible children nationally and recommending administration of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) from the age of 6 months, in North Dublin. This outbreak of measles posed a major challenge to the hospital and the community for the first half of 2000. The national MMR immunization rate before the outbreak was gravely suboptimal at 79%, whereas the rate in North Dublin, the catchment area of TCUH, was <70%. Three children died as a result of a vaccine-preventable illness.

  3. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition and source apportionment of the organic fraction across Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovadnevaite, J.; Lin, C.; Ceburnis, D.; Huang, R. J. J.; O'Dowd, C. D. D.

    2017-12-01

    A national wide characterization of PM1 was studied for the first time using a high-time resolution Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) and Aethalometer in Ireland during the heating season. Dublin, the capital of Ireland, is the most polluted area with an average PM1 of 7.6 μg/m3, with frequent occurrence of peak concentration over 200 μg/m3 primarily due to solid fuels burning, while Mace Head, in the west coast, is least polluted with an average PM1 of 0.8 μg/m3 due to the distance from the emission sources. The organic aerosol is the most dominant species across Ireland, contributing 65%, 58%, 32%, 33% to total PM1 mass in Dublin, Birr, Carnsore Point, and Mace Head, respectively. Birr, a small town in the midland of Ireland, has comparable PM1 levels (4.8 μg/m3) and similar chemical compositions with that in Dublin. Carnsore Point, on the southeast coast, has similar composition with that at Mace Head, but nearly 3 times the levels of PM1 mass due to its relative closeness to other European countries. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) with the multi-linear engine (ME-2) was performed on the organic matrix to quantify the contribution of factor candidates. Peat burning was found to be the dominant factor across Ireland, contributing more than 40% of the total organic mass in Dublin and Birr while OOA is dominant at rural Carnsore Point and Mace Head. Possible geographic origins of PM1 species and organic factors using polar plots were explored. The findings of solid fuels burning (primarily peat burning) driving the pollution episodes suggest an elimination or controlled emission of solid fuels burning would reduce PM1 by at least 50%.

  4. Smoking characteristics of Polish immigrants in Dublin.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Zubair; Clarke, Vanessa; Keogan, Sheila; Currie, Laura M; Zatonski, Witold; Clancy, Luke

    2008-12-31

    This study examined two main hypotheses: a) Polish immigrants' smoking estimates are greater than their Irish counterparts (b) Polish immigrants purchasing cigarettes from Poland smoke "heavier" (>/= 20 cigarettes a day) when compared to those purchasing cigarettes from Ireland. The study also set out to identify significant predictors of 'current' smoking (some days and everyday) among the Polish immigrants. Dublin residents of Polish origin (n = 1,545) completed a previously validated Polish questionnaire in response to an advertisement in a local Polish lifestyle magazine over 5 weekends (July-August, 2007). The Office of Tobacco Control telephone-based monthly survey data were analyzed for the Irish population in Dublin for the same period (n = 484). Age-sex adjusted smoking estimates were: 47.6% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 47.3%; 48.0%) among the Poles and 27.8% (95% CI: 27.2%; 28.4%) among the general Irish population (p < 0.001). Of the 57% of smokers (n = 345/606) who purchased cigarettes solely from Poland and the 33% (n = 198/606) who purchased only from Ireland, 42.6% (n = 147/345) and 41.4% (n = 82/198) were "heavy" smokers, respectively (p = 0.79). Employment (Odds Ratio [OR]: 2.89; 95% CI: 1.25-6.69), lower education (OR: 3.76; 95%CI: 2.46-5.74), and a longer stay in Ireland (>24 months) were significant predictors of current smoking among the Poles. An objective validation of the self-reported smoking history of a randomly selected sub-sample immigrant group, using expired carbon monoxide (CO) measurements, showed a highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.64) of expired CO levels with the reported number of cigarettes consumed (p < 0.0001). Polish immigrants' smoking estimates are higher than their Irish counterparts, and particularly if employed, with only primary-level education, and are overseas >2 years.

  5. Smoking characteristics of Polish immigrants in Dublin

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Zubair; Clarke, Vanessa; Keogan, Sheila; Currie, Laura M; Zatonski, Witold; Clancy, Luke

    2008-01-01

    Background This study examined two main hypotheses: a) Polish immigrants' smoking estimates are greater than their Irish counterparts (b) Polish immigrants purchasing cigarettes from Poland smoke "heavier" (≥ 20 cigarettes a day) when compared to those purchasing cigarettes from Ireland. The study also set out to identify significant predictors of 'current' smoking (some days and everyday) among the Polish immigrants. Methods Dublin residents of Polish origin (n = 1,545) completed a previously validated Polish questionnaire in response to an advertisement in a local Polish lifestyle magazine over 5 weekends (July–August, 2007). The Office of Tobacco Control telephone-based monthly survey data were analyzed for the Irish population in Dublin for the same period (n = 484). Results Age-sex adjusted smoking estimates were: 47.6% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 47.3%; 48.0%) among the Poles and 27.8% (95% CI: 27.2%; 28.4%) among the general Irish population (p < 0.001). Of the57% of smokers (n = 345/606) who purchased cigarettes solely from Poland and the 33% (n = 198/606) who purchased only from Ireland, 42.6% (n = 147/345) and 41.4% (n = 82/198) were "heavy" smokers, respectively (p = 0.79). Employment (Odds Ratio [OR]: 2.89; 95% CI: 1.25–6.69), lower education (OR: 3.76; 95%CI: 2.46–5.74), and a longer stay in Ireland (>24 months) were significant predictors of current smoking among the Poles. An objective validation of the self-reported smoking history of a randomly selected sub-sample immigrant group, using expired carbon monoxide (CO) measurements, showed a highly significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.64) of expired CO levels with the reported number of cigarettes consumed (p < 0.0001). Conclusion Polish immigrants' smoking estimates are higher than their Irish counterparts, and particularly if employed, with only primary-level education, and are overseas >2 years. PMID:19117510

  6. Participation of patients and family members in healthcare services at the service and national levels: A lesson learned in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Whiston, Lucy; Barry, Joe M; Darker, Catherine D

    2017-03-01

    Identify the current amount and intensity of patient and family participation at the patient, service and national levels from a diabetes and a psychiatric service perspective. Establish the current level of support for greater participation and related characteristics. Researcher-administered questionnaires were conducted with 738 patients and family members in an outpatient type 2 diabetes service and an outpatient psychiatric service, both in Dublin, Ireland. Patient and family participation at the service and national levels are restricted to the provision of information. Typically no involvement in discussions or the decision -making process is reported. The majority of participants favour greater patient participation at the service level (537/669; 80.3%) and the national level (561/651; 86.2%). Greater support for patient and family member participation is significantly associated with participant's age, service satisfaction and level of education. Patient and family participation is greatest at the patient level. The majority of patients and family members support greater participation at the service and national levels. The best way to implement participation needs to be identified. There needs to be a greater focus on participation at the service level. The role of family members also needs to be investigated further. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  8. Influences of traffic on Pb, Cu and Zn concentrations in roadside soils of an urban park in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Dao, Ligang; Morrison, Liam; Zhang, Hongxuan; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2014-06-01

    Soils in the vicinity of roads are recipients of contaminants from traffic emissions. In order to obtain a better understanding of the impacts of traffic on soils, a total of 225 surface soil samples were collected from an urban park (Phoenix Park, Dublin, Ireland) in a grid system. Metal (Pb, Cu and Zn) concentrations were determined using a portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer. Strong spatial variations for the concentrations of Pb, Cu and Zn were observed. The spatial distribution maps created using geographical information system techniques revealed elevated metal concentrations close to the main traffic route in the park. The relationships between the accumulation of Pb, Cu and Zn in the roadside soils and the distance from the road were well fitted with an exponential model. Elevated metal concentrations from traffic pollution extended to a distance of approximately 40 m from the roadside. The results of this study provide useful information for the management of urban parks particularly in relation to policies aimed at reducing the impact of traffic related pollution on soils.

  9. Towards a For-Profit University in Dublin: Another Brick in the Wall of Neo-Liberalism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limond, David

    2010-01-01

    This article concerns the provision of for-profit higher education in the Republic of Ireland (RoI), particularly in Dublin. It briefly sketches the general development of university/college provision in the RoI and, more importantly, it describes certain aspects of the current state of play and makes a tentative prediction for the future--namely,…

  10. An American in Dublin: Visit to an Irish Primary School Demonstrates Learning Forward's International Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    A visit to a primary school in Dublin, Ireland, shows that, although the structure of the Irish school system is much different than in the U.S., the professional learning needs and challenges are very much the same. In this article, Anthony Armstrong, publications editor at Learning Forward, writes about his meeting with Maria Spring, principal…

  11. The Dublin Dashboard: Design and Development of a Real-Time Analytical Urban Dashboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, G.; Kitchin, R.

    2016-09-01

    As many cities increase in size across multiple dimensions such as population, economic output and physical size, new methods for understanding and managing cities are required. Data produced by and about urban environments offer insight into what is happening in cities. Real-time data from sensors within the city record current transport and environmental conditions such as noise levels, water levels, journey times and public transport delays. Similarly administrative data such as demographics, employment statistics, property prices and crime rates all provide insight into how a city is evolving. Traditionally, these data were maintained separately and managed by individual city departments. Advances in technology and a move to open-government have placed many of these data in the public domain. Urban dashboards have emerged as a technique to visualise these data in an accessible way. This paper describes the implementation of one such dashboard, the Dublin Dashboard, an interactive website which collects, analyses and visualises data from a variety of sources about Dublin in Ireland through a series of interactive maps, graphs and applications. This paper describes the approach, the data and the technology used to develop the Dublin Dashboard and acts as a guideline for developing urban dashboards in other cities.

  12. Wilde's worlds: Sir William Wilde in Victorian Ireland.

    PubMed

    McGeachie, J

    2016-05-01

    Other contributors to this collection have evoked the disparate worlds inhabited by Sir William Wilde. To provide an overall assessment of his career. Looking at the historical conditions that made possible such a career spanning such disparate worlds. Deploying methodologies developed by historians of medicine and sociologists of science, the article brings together Wilde the nineteenth century clinician and Dublin man of science, the Wilde of the Census and of the west of Ireland, William Wilde Victorian medical man and Wilde the Irish medical man-the historian of Irish medical traditions and the biographer of Irish medical men, and William Wilde as an Irish Victorian. A variety of close British Isles parallels can be drawn between Wilde and his cohort in the medical elite of Dublin and their clinical peers in Edinburgh and London both in terms of clinical practice and self-presentation and in terms of the social and political challenges facing their respective ancient regime hegemonies in an age of democratic radicalisation. The shared ideological interests of Wilde and his cohort, however, were also challenged by the socio-political particularities and complexities of Ireland during the first half of the nineteenth century culminating in the catastrophe of the Great Famine. William Wilde saw the practice of scientific medicine as offering a means of deliverance from historical catastrophe for Irish society and invoked a specifically Irish scientific and medical tradition going back to the engagement with the condition of Ireland by enlightened medical men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

  13. Occurrence of pharmaceutical compounds in wastewater process streams in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Clair; Basha, Shaik; Morrissey, Anne; Tobin, John M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to establish baseline levels of pharmaceuticals in three wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) streams in the greater Dublin region to assess the removal efficiency of the selected WWTPs and to investigate the existence of any seasonal variability. Twenty compounds including several classes of antibiotics, acidic and basic pharmaceuticals, and prescribed medications were selected for investigation using a combination of membrane filtration, solid phase extraction (SPE) cleanup, and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Fourteen of the selected compounds were found in the samples. Increased effluent concentrations, compared to influent concentrations, for a number of compounds (carbamazepine, clotrimazole, propranolol, nimesulide, furosemide, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, metoprolol, and gemfibrozil) were observed. The detected concentrations were generally below toxicity levels and based on current knowledge are unlikely to pose any threat to aquatic species. Mefenamic acid concentrations detected in both Leixlip and Swords effluents may potentially exert ecotoxicological effects with maximum risk quotients (i.e., ratio of predicted exposure concentration to predicted no effect concentration) of 4.04 and 1.33, respectively.

  14. The passive control of air pollution exposure in Dublin, Ireland: a combined measurement and modelling case study.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J; Gill, L W; McNabola, A

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the potential real world application of passive control systems to reduce personal pollutant exposure in an urban street canyon in Dublin, Ireland. The implementation of parked cars and/or low boundary walls as a passive control system has been shown to minimise personal exposure to pollutants on footpaths in previous investigations. However, previous research has been limited to generic numerical modelling studies. This study combines real-time traffic data, meteorological conditions and pollution concentrations, in a real world urban street canyon before and after the implementation of a passive control system. Using a combination of field measurements and numerical modelling this study assessed the potential impact of passive controls on personal exposure to nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in the street canyon in winter conditions. A calibrated numerical model of the urban street canyon was developed, taking into account the variability in traffic and meteorological conditions. The modelling system combined the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations and a semi-empirical equation, and demonstrated a good agreement with measured field data collected in the street canyon. The results indicated that lane distribution, fleet composition and vehicular turbulence all affected pollutant dispersion, in addition to the canyon geometry and local meteorological conditions. The introduction of passive controls displayed mixed results for improvements in air quality on the footpaths for different wind and traffic conditions. Parked cars demonstrated the most comprehensive passive control system with average improvements in air quality of up to 15% on the footpaths. This study highlights the potential of passive controls in a real street canyon to increase dispersion and improve air quality at street level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Straight Talking: Explorations on Homosexuality and Homophobia in Secondary Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Higgins-Norman, James

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines research that was conducted among students, parents, teachers and senior management teams in six secondary schools in the Greater Dublin area of Ireland. The research involved semi-structured interviews and observations. The findings of this research are significant in that it was the first time any data had been gathered on…

  16. "Click Here to Order This Book": A Case Study of Print and Electronic Patron-Driven Acquisition in University College Dublin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Mark; McCarney, Eoin

    2014-01-01

    University College Dublin became the first library in the Republic of Ireland to trial patron-driven acquisition (PDA) as a collection development tool in 2013. A total of 42% of UCD Library's book budget was allocated to the project, which included both electronic and print books. This article describes the twelve month project from the tender…

  17. Injection of new psychoactive substance snow blow associated with recently acquired HIV infections among homeless people who inject drugs in Dublin, Ireland, 2015.

    PubMed

    Giese, Coralie; Igoe, Derval; Gibbons, Zorina; Hurley, Caroline; Stokes, Siobhan; McNamara, Sinead; Ennis, Orla; O'Donnell, Kate; Keenan, Eamon; De Gascun, Cillian; Lyons, Fiona; Ward, Mary; Danis, Kostas; Glynn, Ronan; Waters, Allison; Fitzgerald, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015, an outbreak of recently acquired HIV infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) was identified in Dublin, following similar outbreaks in Greece and Romania in 2011. We compared drug and risk behaviours among 15 HIV cases and 39 controls. Injecting a synthetic cathinone, snow blow, was associated with recent HIV infection (AOR: 49; p=0.003). Prevention and control efforts are underway among PWID in Dublin, but may also be needed elsewhere in Europe.

  18. The School-Based Lives of LGBT Youth in the Republic of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reygan, Finn

    2009-01-01

    There is a dearth of research on the experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth in schools in the Republic of Ireland. The current study assessed the school-based experiences of twenty five (N = 25) participants in the BeLonG To LGBT youth group in Dublin city using a mixed design survey instrument. The majority (n = 19) of…

  19. The penalty points system in Ireland - Does it remain effective 14 years on?

    PubMed

    Downey, C; Donnelly, M

    2018-06-01

    Road traffic accidents (RTAs) are the leading cause of trauma related mortality in Ireland. The penalty points system (PPS) was introduced in Ireland in 2002 to incentivise safer driving and reduce injury. Its early effect was studied previously 1 which concluded that there was a slight reduction in RTA related femoral shaft fractures (a sensitive indicator of high energy trauma) and a dramatic reduction in RTA related discharges. We hypothesized that over the following 14 years, the penalty points system might lose its effectiveness. Data was again collected from the same HIPE departments from six Dublin teaching hospitals and also University Hospital Waterford (to represent both an urban and a more rural population cohort respectively) examining RTA related femoral shaft fractures over an identical 6 month period (October-April). RTA related discharge data over an identical 6 month period was again acquired and analysed from Beaumont Hospital, Dublin (identical data source to previous study). These results were compared with the identical 6 month period in 2001/02 & 2002/03 (October-April). The total number of RTA related femoral shaft fracture discharges in Dublin decreased from 16 post introduction of PPS in the 2002/03 6-month period to 7 in 2015/16 6-month period. The number remained the same in the Waterford region (n = 5). The total RTA related discharges in Beaumont Hospital, Dublin decreased from 70 post PPS introduction to 57 in the 2015/16 6-month period. This represents an incidence rate of 4.5/1000 discharges (vs 6.9 post introduction) which was a statistically significant reduction (p = 0.014). The mean length of stay for these patients reduced from 13 to 7.7 days. There were consistent reductions in head injury (major & minor), lower limb fracture and facial fracture since the introduction of the PPS. The upper limb, pelvic/acetabular and thoracic injuries remained largely unchanged. Whilst RTA related spinal and abdominal injuries decreased

  20. Spatial Reflexivity and Undergraduate Transitions in the Republic of Ireland after the Celtic Tiger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cairns, David; Growiec, Katarzyna; Smyth, Jim

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the geographical mobility intentions of students aged between 18 and 24 years in the Republic of Ireland after the end of the economic boom commonly referred to as the "Celtic Tiger". Focusing upon a sample of undergraduates in Dublin and Cork, the article looks at how many respondents intend to move abroad in the…

  1. The perception of place and the 'origins of handedness' debate: towards a cognitive cartography of science in late-Victorian Dublin.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    In 1884, a medical paper entitled 'Consideration of the Structural and Acquisitional Elements in Dextral Pre-Eminence' penned by the Dublin physician George Sigerson, appeared in the Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy. A number of years later, the Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland presented a similar piece by Dublin anatomist Daniel John Cunningham, on the topic of 'Right-Handedness and Left-Brainedness'. For the late nineteenth-century scientific community, these articles represented two Dublin-based contributions to a long-running and wide-ranging debate on the origins of handedness. However, by building on the geographical premise that scientific knowledge bears the imprint of its location and that place matters in the way scientific claims come to be sanctioned, this paper probes, not merely an encounter with evolutionary science in the less well explored domain of fin de siècle Dublin, but more crucially, how these local reviews of manual dexterity were in part shaped by the scientists' differing perceptions of their city. By attending to the lives of Sigerson and Cunningham and focusing on the interplay between life-space, city-space and science, it underscores the critical role of place and space in the reception, circulation and mobilisation of scientific knowledge in the city. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiological and molecular responses of Lactuca sativa to colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin.

    PubMed

    Klerks, M M; van Gent-Pelzer, M; Franz, E; Zijlstra, C; van Bruggen, A H C

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the physiological and molecular interactions between the human-pathogenic organism Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin and the commercially available mini Roman lettuce cv. Tamburo. The association of S. enterica serovar Dublin with lettuce plants was first determined, which indicated the presence of significant populations outside and inside the plants. The latter was evidenced from significant residual concentrations after highly efficient surface disinfection (99.81%) and fluorescence microscopy of S. enterica serovar Dublin in cross sections of lettuce at the root-shoot transition region. The plant biomass was reduced significantly compared to that of noncolonized plants upon colonization with S. enterica serovar Dublin. In addition to the physiological response, transcriptome analysis by cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis also provided clear differential gene expression profiles between noncolonized and colonized lettuce plants. From these, generally and differentially expressed genes were selected and identified by sequence analysis, followed by reverse transcription-PCR displaying the specific gene expression profiles in time. Functional grouping of the expressed genes indicated a correlation between colonization of the plants and an increase in expressed pathogenicity-related genes. This study indicates that lettuce plants respond to the presence of S. enterica serovar Dublin at physiological and molecular levels, as shown by the reduction in growth and the concurrent expression of pathogenicity-related genes. In addition, it was confirmed that Salmonella spp. can colonize the interior of lettuce plants, thus potentially imposing a human health risk when processed and consumed.

  3. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content betweenmore » strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. As a result, the loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.« less

  4. Genomic comparison of the closely-related Salmonella enterica serovars enteritidis, dublin and gallinarum

    DOE PAGES

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; ...

    2015-06-03

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content betweenmore » strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. As a result, the loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars.« less

  5. Genomic Comparison of the Closely-Related Salmonella enterica Serovars Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, T. David; Schmieder, Robert; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Busch, Julia; Cassman, Noriko; Dutilh, Bas E.; Green, Dawn; Matlock, Brian; Heffernan, Brian; Olsen, Gary J.; Farris Hanna, Leigh; Schifferli, Dieter M.; Maloy, Stanley; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Edwards, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The Salmonella enterica serovars Enteritidis, Dublin, and Gallinarum are closely related but differ in virulence and host range. To identify the genetic elements responsible for these differences and to better understand how these serovars are evolving, we sequenced the genomes of Enteritidis strain LK5 and Dublin strain SARB12 and compared these genomes to the publicly available Enteritidis P125109, Dublin CT 02021853 and Dublin SD3246 genome sequences. We also compared the publicly available Gallinarum genome sequences from biotype Gallinarum 287/91 and Pullorum RKS5078. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, deletions, and differences in prophage and pseudogene content between strains belonging to the same serovar. Through our analysis we also identified several prophage cargo genes and pseudogenes that affect virulence and may contribute to a host-specific, systemic lifestyle. These results strongly argue that the Enteritidis, Dublin and Gallinarum serovars of Salmonella enterica evolve by acquiring new genes through horizontal gene transfer, followed by the formation of pseudogenes. The loss of genes necessary for a gastrointestinal lifestyle ultimately leads to a systemic lifestyle and niche exclusion in the host-specific serovars. PMID:26039056

  6. Grimsvotn ash plume detection by ground-based elastic Lidar at Dublin Airport on May 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, S.; Martucci, G.; O'Dowd, C.; sauvage, L.; Nolan, P.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic emissions comprising steam, ash, and gases are injected into the atmosphere and produce effects affecting Earth's climate. Volcanic ash is composed of non-spherical mineral and metal (particles spanning a large size range. The largest ones are likely to sediment quickly close to the eruption site. The ash component, and sulphate formed by subsequent oxidation of the SO2 occurring in clouds, poses a variety of hazards to humans and machinery on the ground, as well as damage to the aircrafts which fly through the ash layers. To mitigate such hazards the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) equipped with an ALS Lidar, produced by LEOSPHERE, deployed at Dublin Airport, which provides real-time range-corrected backscatter signal and depolarization ratio profiles allowing the detection and monitoring of ash plumes. On May, 21st 2011, the Grimsvotn Icelandic volcano erupted, sending a plume of ash, smoke and steam 12 km into the air and causing flights to be disrupted at Iceland's main Keflavik airport and at a number of North European airports. Due to upper level global circulation, the ash plume moved from Iceland towards Ireland and North of Scotland, and was detected a number of times by the ALS Lidar above Dublin Airport between May, 21st and 25th. A preliminary analysis of the detected volcanic plume is presented here as well as a preliminary intercomparison of the microphysical and optical characteristics with the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in 2010.

  7. Poisonings and clinical toxicology: a template for Ireland.

    PubMed

    Tormey, W P; Moore, T

    2013-03-01

    Poisons information is accessed around the clock in the British Isles from six centres of which two are in Ireland at Dublin and Belfast accompanied by consultant toxicologist advisory service. The numbers of calls in Ireland are down to about 40 per day due to easy access to online data bases. Access to Toxbase, the clinical toxicology database of the National Poisons Information Service is available to National Health Service (NHS) health professionals and to Emergency Departments and Intensive Care units in the Republic of Ireland. There are 59 Toxbase users in the Republic of Ireland and 99 % of activity originates in Emergency Departments. All United States Poison Control Centres primarily use Poisindex which is a commercial database from Thomson Reuters. Information on paracetamol, diazepam, analgesics and psycho-active compounds are the commonest queries. Data from telephone and computer accesses provide an indicator of future trends in both licit and illicit drug poisons which may direct laboratory analytical service developments. Data from National Drug-Related Deaths Index is the most accurate information on toxicological deaths in Ireland. Laboratory toxicology requirements to support emergency departments are listed. Recommendations are made for a web-based open access Toxbase or equivalent; for a co-location of poisons information and laboratory clinical toxicology; for the establishment of a National Clinical Toxicology Institute for Ireland; for a list of accredited medical advisors in clinical toxicology; for multidisciplinary case conferences in complex toxicology cases for coroners; for the establishment of a national clinical toxicology referral out-patients service in Ireland.

  8. 'Any style but gothic': Building a home for the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Wheelock, H

    2016-06-01

    On 15 July 1864 the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland held its first business meeting in its newly built home at 6 Kildare Street, Dublin. Although the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland had been in existence for over 200 years this was the first occasion that a College meeting had been held in a building owned by the College. This paper looks at the history behind the construction of a home for the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland. It will examine why it took over 200 years for the Physicians to find a permanent home, how they ended up with the building they did, and what they borrowed from the Royal College of Physicians in Edinburgh in the process.

  9. Male street prostitution in Dublin: a psychological analysis.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Ian; Acree, Michael; O'Mahony, Finbar; McCabe, Jenny; Kenny, Jean; Twyford, Jennifer; Quigley, Karen; McGlanaghy, Edel

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the mental health characteristics of 12 male street prostitutes (MSPs) in Dublin, with particular regard to issues of homelessness, substance abuse, depression, suicidal ideation, and self-esteem. Participants completed five psychometric tests, which indicated that all of the participants had above average levels of depression and suicidal ideation and low levels of self-esteem. This study found that candidates likely to become MSPs are young males with a combination of factors, including a background of childhood sexual or physical abuse, leaving school early, running away from home, and a dependence on heroin.

  10. Great Britain and Ireland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    NASA image acquired March 26, 2012 This nearly cloud-free view of Great Britain and Ireland was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite on March 26, 2012. Just a few days into spring, most of the land appears green, although not quite as brilliant as the summertime hues that give Ireland the nickname “the Emerald Island”. The islands of Ireland (west) and Great Britain (east) are separated by the Irish Sea, which is filled with the turquoise, green and tan swirls typical of sediment, although blooming algae could also contribute some color to the waters. To the southeast, the English Channel separates the island of Great Britain from France (south) and Belgium (north). London can be seen as a gray circle situated inland on the tan-colored River Thames. The sediment from the Thames flows into the English Channel due east of London. The United Kingdom is made up of Wales, Scotland and England, all located primarily on the island of Great Britain, and of Northern Ireland, which comprises the northern section of the island of Ireland. Dublin, in the Republic of Ireland, can be seen as a gray smudge on the eastern coast of the island. Almost due west Galway can be seen as a linear gray streak on the northern coast of Galway Bay, with the blue waters of Loch Corrib to the north. Most of the United Kingdom and Ireland are part of the Celtic broadleaf forest ecoregion, where acid-loving oak and mixed oak forests abound, along with fen and swamp forests and ombrotrophic mires. A portion of the Scottish Highlands, in the north of Great Britain, are covered by the Caledon conifer forest ecoregion. The Caledonia conifers once covered a large area of Scotland, but now only about 1% of the original forest survives, mostly high in the cooler areas of the Highlands. NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four

  11. The Educational Development of Students Following Participation in a Pre-School Programme in a Disadvantaged Area in Ireland. Studies and Evaluation Papers 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellaghan, Thomas; Greaney, Betty Jane

    This longitudinal study evaluated the effects of a preschool project designed to serve children between 3 and 5 years of age in a disadvantaged inner-city area in Dublin, Ireland. The preschool, established in 1969, emphasized the development of children's cognitive skills and established structures to increase parents' involvement in their…

  12. Dublin and Irish politics in the age of Charles Lucas.

    PubMed

    Hill, J

    2015-09-01

    In addition to his contributions to medicine, Charles Lucas had a long career in politics, starting in the 1740s as a guild representative on the lower house of Dublin corporation, and culminating in his election to the Irish House of Commons in 1761. By examining the background in Dublin and Irish politics, this paper explores Lucas' impact on the electorate, and how it was that he was able to win a parliamentary seat in Dublin and retain it for a decade while he campaigned in support of a range of important Patriot issues. Lucas had none of the qualifications that would normally be required for a successful politician. His father held some land, but as a younger son who had to make a living, Charles was apprenticed to a Dublin apothecary. Nor did he have the political connections that might have compensated for a lack of land, wealth, or status. But Lucas possessed other advantages, notably an education that enabled him to read the city's medieval charters, identifying areas where the Dublin freemen had lost 'ancient rights', and some experience of publishing, so that he could appeal to the electorate. Lucas' remarkable political success stemmed from both local circumstances and his own personal qualities.

  13. An inventory of trees in Dublin city centre.

    PubMed

    Ningal, Tine; Mills, Gerald; Smithwick, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    While urban areas are often considered to be comprised chiefly of artificial surfaces, they can contain a substantial portion of green space and a great diversity of natural habitats. These spaces include public parks, private gardens and street trees, all of which can provide valuable environmental services, such as improved air quality. Trees play a particular role in cities as they are often placed along roadsides and in the median strip of busy streets. As such they regulate access to sunshine, restrict airflow, provide shelter, scavenge air pollutants and manage noise at the street level. A tree planting policy can be an important part of a broader environmental strategy aimed at improving the quality of life in urban areas but this requires up-to-date knowledge of the current tree stock, which does not exist for Dublin. This article presents an inventory of trees in Dublin's city centre, defined as the area between the Grand and Royal canals. The results show that there are over 10,000 trees in the study area representing a density of 684 trees km-2 or one tree to approximately every 50 residents of the city centre. The tree canopy extent when in full foliage was nearly 1 km2 in extent or 6% of the study area. A more detailed analysis of those trees planted along streets shows little species variation but clear distinction in the sizes of trees, which is indicative of the age of planting. These data are used to estimate the carbon stored in Dublin's trees.

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for hyperthyroidism in Irish cats from the greater Dublin area.

    PubMed

    Bree, Laura; Gallagher, Barbara A; Shiel, Robert E; Mooney, Carmel T

    2018-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is common in older cats. Prevalence varies geographically, but is anecdotally considered low in Ireland. The aim of this study was to document prevalence of hyperthyroidism in older cats in the greater Dublin area of Ireland and to assess environmental and clinical associations for development and identification of the disease. Primary-care veterinary practices were requested to select cats aged 10 years or older where blood sampling was being performed for health screening or clinical investigations. Surplus serum/plasma samples were submitted to University College Dublin Diagnostic Endocrine Laboratory for total thyroxine (T 4 ) measurement. Cats were classified as hyperthyroid, equivocal or euthyroid based on a total T 4 concentration (reference interval, 15-60 nmol/L), of >60 nmol/L, 30-60 nmol/L or <30 nmol/L, respectively. Simultaneous free T 4 or repeat (after 4-6 weeks) total T 4 measurement was recommended in all equivocal cases. Animals receiving treatment for hyperthyroidism were excluded. A questionnaire completed by the client and veterinarian detailing historical and physical information was also required. Associations between categorical variables were analysed by Chi-square or Fisher's exact test and odds ratio (OR) calculated. A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Samples were submitted from 507 cats including 107 (21.1%) hyperthyroid, 54 (10.6%) equivocal and 346 (68.2%) euthyroid. The presence of goitre ( P  < 0.0001), tachypnoea ( P  = 0.0378), tachycardia ( P  = 0.002), polyphagia ( P  = 0.0003) and weight loss ( P  < 0.0001) were significantly associated with hyperthyroidism. Cats with goitre were more likely to be diagnosed as hyperthyroid [OR 2.85, (95% CI 1.75-4.62] compared to those without. However, goitre was only palpated in 40 of 102 (39.2%) hyperthyroid cats. Increasing age was the only significant ( P  < 0.002) risk factor for development of hyperthyroidism. A

  15. Balancing health care needs in a changing context: nursing highlights from the 2016 European Oncology Nursing Society Congress (EONS10), 17–18 October 2016, Dublin, Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Lichosik, Danuta; Caruso, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    European cancer nurses have to face many challenges as a result of the rapidly changing economic and political context in which balancing health care needs has become strategic for healthcare delivery. Currently, cancer nurses must overcome many obstacles arising from clinical, organisational, and educational issues. Within this scenario, the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) shaped its tenth congress programme to boost discussion and reflections, to share experiences and research, and to see how cancer nurses try to anticipate and embrace changes. The aim of this was to promote innovative solutions and to address the many issues involved with cancer care. EONS10 was held on 17–18 October in Dublin, Ireland. The congress was attended by more than 500 delegates. The programme covered the following themes: caring for families and carers, inequalities and access to cancer care, caring for patients with haematological cancers, palliative care, communication and information exchange, community cancer care (i.e. parallel sessions), roles and responsibility for advanced nursing practice, International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS)-Academy workshops (i.e. workshops), cancer survivorship, clinical leadership and new roles, oncology nursing research, symptom experiences and management, palliative care (i.e. proffered papers), poster presentations, and satellite symposia. The aim of this paper is to highlight and discuss the contents of the EONS10 congress. PMID:28144284

  16. Investigating traffic light violations by cyclists in Dublin City Centre.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Matthew; Caulfield, Brian

    2015-11-01

    This research examines the behaviour of cyclists in Dublin City with specific regard to red light running. A number of specific research questions are raised by this study. These questions address the impact of different infrastructure types on red light running, as well as the behavioural patterns and demographics of offending cyclists. Two data collection methods were used to gather information on cyclists in Dublin City - an observational survey and an online questionnaire. The observational surveys examined cyclist compliance with different traffic signal systems and the impact of on-road and off-road cycle infrastructure. An online questionnaire was used to get direct feedback from cyclists in Dublin City on the reasons (if any) they decide to commit infringement at traffic lights. With the recent growth of cycling in Dublin City (as well as many other international cities) it is vital to accommodate and manage this growing demand by ensuring the safety and road discipline of cyclists. The next few years will be crucial for the continued development of cycling in Dublin, particularly due to the increasing investment by transport planners in cycle infrastructure. It is therefore important to identify now the main factors which influence cyclist's decisions to break red lights in order to guide local traffic authorities in their efforts to reduce such transgressions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Frustration of Lady Aberdeen in her Crusade against Tuberculosis in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Breathnach, Caoimhghín S; Moynihan, John B

    2012-01-01

    When in his Annual Report for 1905 the Registrar General for Ireland pointed out to the lately arrived Lord Lieutenant, The Earl of Aberdeen, that annually in every 100 deaths in Ireland 16 were victims of tuberculosis, Lady Aberdeen took notice. In March 1907 she founded the WNHA with the clear duty of taking part in the fight against the appalling ravages of that disease, and organised a Tuberculosis Exhibition the following October. And so began a campaign that led to the building of Peamount Sanatorium in county Dublin, the Allan Ryan Hospital at Ringsend, and the Collier Dispensary in the city centre. However, the Irish parliamentarians at Westminster emasculated the Tuberculosis Prevention (Ireland) Act 1908 by ensuring that notification was not made compulsory. Passage of the National Health Insurance Act (1911) necessitated changes that resulted in the Tuberculosis Prevention (Ireland) Act (1913), but the crucial shortcomings of the earlier Act were not rectified: notification was necessary but still not compulsory. Lady Aberdeen recognised this serious flaw she was powerless to correct, and turned to propaganda, editing Sláinte, a monthly magazine founded in January 1909 by the WNHA, and editing a three-volume account of Ireland’s Crusade Against Tuberculosis (1908-1909). PMID:23536737

  18. University-Level Learners of Spanish in Ireland: A Profile Based on Data from the TCD Modern Languages Research Project. CLCS Occasional Paper No. 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, David; Singleton, Emer

    Drawing on data collected for a larger study of second language learner characteristics at the Trinity College Dublin (Ireland), a profile of freshmen taking introductory Spanish in 1990-91 is reported. Subjects were 21 students, 20 female and 1 male. Most were of traditional college age, and a few were in their 30s. Almost half had previous…

  19. Simulating Climate Change in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, P.; Lynch, P.

    2012-04-01

    At the Meteorology & Climate Centre at University College Dublin, we are using the CLM-Community's COSMO-CLM Regional Climate Model (RCM) and the WRF RCM (developed at NCAR) to simulate the climate of Ireland at high spatial resolution. To address the issue of model uncertainty, a Multi-Model Ensemble (MME) approach is used. The ensemble method uses different RCMs, driven by several Global Climate Models (GCMs), to simulate climate change. Through the MME approach, the uncertainty in the RCM projections is quantified, enabling us to estimate the probability density function of predicted changes, and providing a measure of confidence in the predictions. The RCMs were validated by performing a 20-year simulation of the Irish climate (1981-2000), driven by ECMWF ERA-40 global re-analysis data, and comparing the output to observations. Results confirm that the output of the RCMs exhibit reasonable and realistic features as documented in the historical data record. Projections for the future Irish climate were generated by downscaling the Max Planck Institute's ECHAM5 GCM, the UK Met Office HadGEM2-ES GCM and the CGCM3.1 GCM from the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling. Simulations were run for a reference period 1961-2000 and future period 2021-2060. The future climate was simulated using the A1B, A2, B1, RCP 4.5 & RCP 8.5 greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Results for the downscaled simulations show a substantial overall increase in precipitation and wind speed for the future winter months and a decrease during the summer months. The predicted annual change in temperature is approximately 1.1°C over Ireland. To date, all RCM projections are in general agreement, thus increasing our confidence in the robustness of the results.

  20. Coolmine Therapeutic Community, Dublin: a 40-year history of Ireland's first voluntary drug treatment service.

    PubMed

    Butler, Shane

    2016-02-01

    To document the evolution over 40 years (from 1973 to 2013) of Coolmine Therapeutic Community (Ireland's first voluntary drug treatment service) against a background of broader drug policy developments in the Republic of Ireland and elsewhere during this period. Data were gathered by means of archival research within Coolmine, complemented by semi-structured interviews with former clients, current and former Coolmine management and staff, and representatives of outsider stakeholder interests. Coolmines's history has three phases: (1) an early and uncontentious phase, in which external authorities provided financial support for Coolmine without questioning its work practices or outcomes; (2) a middle, controversial phase, in which Coolmine struggled for survival in an external policy environment now dominated by harm reduction strategies; and (3) a final phase in which, through the use of conventional corporate governance, Coolmine management sought to repair its damaged reputation by introducing evidence-based clinical practices. Coolmine Therapeutic Community was established when drug treatment services in Ireland were in their infancy, and its changing fortunes over subsequent decades reflected changing perceptions of what constitutes appropriate addiction treatment-and in particular the role to be played by former addicts within addiction treatment systems-as well as changing perceptions of funding relationships between statutory authorities and voluntary providers of health and social services. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Modelling the spatial distribution of SO2 and NOx emissions in Ireland.

    PubMed

    de Kluizenaar, Y; Aherne, J; Farrell, E P

    2001-01-01

    The spatial distributions of sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions are essential inputs to models of atmospheric transport and deposition. Information of this type is required for international negotiations on emission reduction through the critical load approach. High-resolution emission maps for the Republic of Ireland have been created using emission totals and a geographical information system, supported by surrogate statistics and landcover information. Data have been subsequently allocated to the EMEP 50 x 50-km grid, used in long-range transport models for the investigation of transboundary air pollution. Approximately two-thirds of SO2 emissions in Ireland emanate from two grid-squares. Over 50% of total SO2 emissions originate from one grid-square in the west of Ireland, where the largest point sources of SO2 are located. Approximately 15% of the total SO2 emissions originate from the grid-square containing Dublin. SO2 emission densities for the remaining areas are very low, < 1 t km-2 year-1 for most grid-squares. NOx emissions show a very similar distribution pattern. However, NOx emissions are more evenly spread over the country, as about 40% of total NOx emissions originate from road transport.

  2. Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in Ireland and the role of local government

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    O'Mullane, Monica, E-mail: Monica.omullane@truni.sk; Quinlivan, Aodh, E-mail: A.quinlivan@ucc.ie

    Background: Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in Ireland has developed significantly since its endorsement in the health strategies of the Republic of Ireland (2001) and Northern Ireland (2002). Throughout 2007 and 2008, research was conducted to examine HIA as a policy-informing tool throughout both jurisdictions. One aspect of this research investigated the role of local government and its relationship in advancing HIA practise and use in Ireland. Methods: A case study research design was used which employed qualitative research methods, including semistructured interviewing and participant observation. In total 48 interviews were conducted with members of the HIA steering committees and individualsmore » closely involved in the HIAs. Results: The relationship between local government and HIA in Northern Ireland is a positive one given the strong tradition of local government in the jurisdiction. The Review of Public Administration (RPA) negatively influenced the integration of HIA into local authority procedures. In the Republic of Ireland, the influence of social values and political will was found to be negatively present with the HIA on Traveller accommodation. Evidence from the HIA conducted on traffic and transport in Dublin was used to plan further health promotion and community planning activities in the area. Conclusion: Local government plays a vital role in HIA practise and development in both jurisdictions. The willingness to work with external partners (such as the health care services) was an important enabler or barrier to HIA operation. This will remain the case in the foreseeable future. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated influences on the use of HIA knowledge of four cases from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The engagement of the public authorities assists implementation of the findings of the HIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tension continues between positivist and

  3. 75 FR 76953 - Foreign-Trade Zone 238-Dublin, VA Site Renumbering Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 238--Dublin, VA Site Renumbering Notice Foreign-Trade Zone 238 was approved by the Foreign-Trade Zones Board on August 5, 1999 (Board Order 1047). FTZ 238 currently consists of 1 ``site'' totaling 50 acres in the Dublin area. The...

  4. Effect of the luxS gene on biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance by Salmonella serovar Dublin.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiangyu; Li, Junjie; Zhu, Mengjiao; Lu, Zhaoxin; Lv, Fengxia; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Bie, Xiaomei

    2018-05-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacterial cells that serve to protect them from external adverse influences and enhance bacterial resistance to antibiotics and sanitizers. Here, we studied the regulatory effects of glucose and sodium chloride on biofilm formation in Salmonella serovar Dublin (S. Dublin). To analyze expression levels of the quorum sensing gene luxS, we created a luxS knockout mutant. Also, antimicrobial resistance, hydrophobicity and autoinducer-2 (AI-2) activity of both the wild-type (WT) and the mutant strain were investigated. Our results revealed that glucose was not essential for S. Dublin biofilm formation but had an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation when the concentration was over 0.1%. NaCl was found to be indispensable in forming biofilm, and it also exerted an inhibitory effect at high concentrations (>1.0%). Both the WT and the mutant strains displayed significant MIC growth after biofilm formation. An increase of up to 32,768 times in the resistance of S. Dublin in biofilm phonotype against antibiotic (ampicillin) compared to its planktonic phonotype was observed. However, S. Dublin luxS knockout mutant only showed slight differences compared to the WT strain in the antimicrobial tests although it displayed better biofilm-forming capacity than the WT strain. The mutant strain also exhibited higher hydrophobicity than the WT strain, which was a feature related to biofilm formation. The production of the quorum sensing autoinducer-2 (AI-2) was significantly lower in the mutant strain than in the WT strain since the LuxS enzyme, encoded by the luxS gene, plays an essential role in AI-2 synthesis. However, the limited biofilm-forming ability in the WT strain indicated AI-2 was not directly related to S. Dublin biofilm formation. Furthermore, gene expression analysis of the WT and mutant strains revealed upregulation of genes related to biofilm stress response and enhanced resistance in the luxS mutant strain, which may provide evidence for

  5. Report from the International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugimoto, Shigeo; Adachi, Jun; Baker, Thomas; Weibel, Stuart

    This paper describes the International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications 2001 (DC-2001), the ninth major workshop of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI), which was held in Tokyo in October 2001. DC-2001 was a week-long event that included both a workshop and a conference. In the tradition of previous events, the workshop…

  6. Understanding hydrothermal circulation patterns at a low-enthalpy thermal spring using audio-magnetotelluric data: A case study from Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Sarah; Henry, Tiernan; Muller, Mark R.; Jones, Alan G.; Moore, John Paul; Murray, John; Campanyà, Joan; Vozar, Jan; Walsh, John; Rath, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Kilbrook spring is a thermal spring in east-central Ireland. The temperatures in the spring are the highest recorded for any thermal spring in Ireland (maximum of 25 °C). The temperature is elevated with respect to average Irish groundwater temperatures (9.5-10.5 °C), and represents a geothermal energy potential, which is currently under evaluation. A multi-disciplinary investigation based upon an audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) survey, and hydrochemical analysis including time-lapse temperature and chemistry measurements, has been undertaken with the aims of investigating the provenance of the thermal groundwater and characterising the geological structures facilitating groundwater circulation in the bedrock. The three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity model of the subsurface at Kilbrook spring was obtained by the inversion of AMT impedances and vertical magnetic transfer functions. The model is interpreted alongside high resolution temperature and electrical conductivity measurements, and a previous hydrochemical analysis. The hydrochemical analysis and time-lapse measurements suggest that the thermal waters have a relatively stable temperature and major ion hydrochemistry, and flow within the limestones of the Carboniferous Dublin Basin at all times. The 3-D resistivity model of the subsurface reveals a prominent NNW aligned structure within a highly resistive limestone lithology that is interpreted as a dissolutionally enhanced strike-slip fault, of Cenozoic age. The karstification of this structure, which extends to depths of at least 500 m directly beneath the spring, has provided conduits that facilitate the operation of a relatively deep hydrothermal circulation pattern (likely estimated depths between 560 and 1000 m) within the limestone succession of the Dublin Basin. The results of this study support the hypothesis that the winter thermal maximum and simultaneous increased discharge at Kilbrook spring is the result of rapid infiltration, heating and

  7. Proflavine-mediated inactivation of Salmonella dublin exposed to visible sunlight in natural fresh water.

    PubMed

    Kussovski, V K; Hristov, A E; Radoucheva, T S

    2001-01-01

    The survival of Salmonella dublin exposed to visible sunlight, and heterotrophic bacteria in freshwater microcosms in the presence and absence of the photosensitizer proflavine, was studied. Enumeration of S. dublin and the heterotrophic bacteria showed that in both illuminated and nonilluminated systems (without proflavine) the bacteria remained viable and culturable for at least 6 days. The optimal proflavine concentration (no effect in the dark and a maximal photoinactivation of salmonellae after irradiation) was 2 mg l(-1). In contrast to S. dublin, the heterotrophic bacteria overcame the initial inhibitory effect of proflavine. The possible use of photosterilization against contamination with pathogenic bacteria in water model ecosystems, is discussed.

  8. Coming to Journalism: A Comparative Case Study of Postgraduate Students in Dublin and Amman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Boyle, Neil; Knowlton, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from a pilot study of postgraduate journalism students in Dublin and Amman. The study compared professional outlooks and social characteristics of students in both contexts and examined institutional settings. The study finds that journalism students in Dublin and Amman have very similar views on the profession,…

  9. Ireland's contribution to orthopaedic literature: a bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, C; O Sullivan, P; Bilal, M; Walsh, A

    2013-10-01

    Bibliometric analysis of scientific performance within a country or speciality, facilitate the recognition of factors that may further enhance research activity and performance. Our aim was to illicit the current state of Irelands orthopaedic research output in terms of quantity and quality. We performed a retrospective bibliometric analysis of all Irish orthopaedic publications over the past 5 years, in the top 20 peer-reviewed orthopaedic journals. Utilising the MEDLINE database, each journal was evaluated for articles that were published over the study period. Reviews, editorials, reports and letters were excluded. Each article abstract was analysed for research content, and country of origin. A nation's mean IF was defined by multiplying each journal's IF by the number of articles. Publications per million (PmP) was calculated by dividing the total number of publications by the population of each country. We analysed a total of 25,595 article abstracts. Ireland contributed 109 articles in total (0.42% of all articles), however ranking according to population per million was 10th worldwide. Ireland ranked 18th worldwide in relation to mean impact factor, which was 2.91 over the study period. Ireland published in 16 of the top 20 journals, 9 of these were of European origin, and 1 of the top 5 was of American origin. In total, 61 Irish articles were assignable to clinical orthopaedic units. Clinical based studies (randomised controlled trials, observational, and epidemiology/bibliometric articles) and research based studies (In vivo, In vitro, and biomechanical) numbered 76 (69.7%) and 33 (30.2%) articles, respectively. This study provides a novel overview of current Irish orthopaedic related research, and how our standards translate to the worldwide orthopaedic community. In order to maintain our publication productivity, academic research should continue to be encouraged at post graduate level. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh

  10. Investigation of a cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity response as a means of detecting Salmonella dublin infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Aitken, M M; Hall, G A; Jones, P W

    1978-05-01

    Delayed hypersensitivity reactions developed 48 to 96 h after intradermal injection of killed Salmonella dublin in 25 of 28 cattle which had been inoculated intravenously, and in five of 10 cattle which had been inoculated orally with S dublin 24 to 493 days previously. Control animals showed no delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Persistence of infection in five of the intravenously inoculated and in four of the orally inoculated animals was confirmed by isolation of S dublin from the carcases at necropsy one week after skin testing. Failure to isolate the organism from the carcases of 21 animals which had reacted positively to the intradermal test did not eliminate the possibility of their being carriers of S dublin. Skin testing was concluded to be a reliable means of identifying animals which had been, and possibly still were, infected systemically with S dublin. However recovered animals might be falsely identified as infected. Repeated testing gave misleading results.

  11. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems at Waynesboro, Burke County, Georgia, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gonthier, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were characterized in the City of Waynesboro area in Burke County, Georgia, based on geophysical and drillers’ logs, flowmeter surveys, a 24-houraquifer test, and the collection and chemical analysis of water samples in a newly constructed well. At the test site, the Dublin aquifer system consists of interlayered sands and clays between depths of 396 and 691 feet, and the Midville aquifer system consists of a sandy clay layer overlying a sand and gravel layer between depths of 728 and 936 feet. The new well was constructed with three screened intervals in the Dublin aquifer system and four screened intervals in the Midville aquifer system. Wellbore-flowmeter testing at a pumping rate of 1,000 gallons per minute indicated that 52.2 percent of the total flow was from the shallower Dublin aquifer system with the remaining 47.8 percent from the deeper Midville aquifer system. The lower part of the lower Midville aquifer (900 to 930 feet deep), contributed only 0.1 percent of the total flow. Hydraulic properties of the two aquifer systems were estimated using data from two wellbore-flowmeter surveys and a 24-hour aquifer test. Estimated values of transmissivity for the Dublin and Midville aquifer systems were 2,000 and 1,000 feet squared per day, respectively. The upper and lower Dublin aquifers have a combined thickness of about 150 feet and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Dublin aquifer system averages 10 feet per day. The upper Midville aquifer, lower Midville confining unit, and lower Midville aquifer have a combined thickness of about 210 feet, and the horizontal hydraulic conductivity of the Midville aquifer system averages 6 feet per day. Storage coefficient of the Dublin aquifer system, computed using the Theis method on water-level data from one observation well, was estimated to be 0.0003. With a thickness of about 150 feet, the specific storage of the Dublin aquifer

  12. The diagnosis of salmonella abortion in cattle with particular reference to Salmonella dublin. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, M.

    1977-01-01

    The diagnosis of abortion in cattle caused by Salmonella dublin depends upon the isolation of the organism from either the products of conception, uterine discharges, vaginal mucus or milk together with serological evidence of active infection. S. dublin may be isolated when an active or a latent carrier cow abourts but in these cases an active infection will not be demonstrable. The retrospective identification of a case of S. dublin abortion may prove difficult as excretion of the organism is usually transient and the serum agglutinating antibodies frequently fall to low titres soon after the abortion. PMID:328768

  13. Report on Proceedings of the Tenth Annual European CME Forum, Dublin, Ireland, November 2017

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Ron

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The august setting of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland saw participants from 17 different countries assemble for the Tenth European CME Forum between 8th and 10th November 2017. The main themes of the meeting were classified under the headings Inward (Educational design), Outward (Listening to others) and Onward (Collaborations and partnerships) addressed via a combination of presentations, interactive workshops, posters, and panel discussions. Topics explored included team engagement, the voice of the patient, harmonisation in European accreditation, competencies for CME professionals, and publishing in CME. Discussion evoked both consensus and contention and provided participants with excellent networking opportunities moving forward to the next decade of Forum meetings. PMID:29644142

  14. Sir Patrick Dun and the Complete School of Physic in eighteenth-century Dublin.

    PubMed

    Mullaney, S

    2015-03-01

    2013 is the tercentenary of the death of Sir Patrick Dun. When Dun died in 1713, he left the proceeds of his estate to enhance medical education in Dublin by funding chairs in medicine. He showed remarkable innovation, but it took 95 years, five Acts of Parliament, two House of Commons enquiries and a House of Lords enquiry before Dun's wishes were brought to fruition and systematic clinical education was available for Dublin medical students. The passage of the final School of Physic Act in 1800 insured that a hospital would open in his name and regular clinical education was provided. The physician, Richard Steevens, who died 3 years earlier in 1710, left the proceeds of his estate to found a hospital, which opened, in his name, in 1733. The contemporary primary sources have been analysed and material from relevant secondary sources has been included where appropriate. Dublin was the beneficiary of these bequests and if circumstances had been more favourable, and the proceeds had been used more efficiently at the start of the eighteenth-century, Dublin could well have rivalled Edinburgh as the seat of medical education in the eighteenth century. In the early nineteenth century, it would fulfil that role and equal Edinburgh as one of the primary centres of medical education in Europe.

  15. Research-Teaching Linkages: Practice and Policy. Proceedings of the Third Annual Conference of the National Academy for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (3rd, Dublin, Ireland, November 11-12, 2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jennifer, Ed.; Griffin, Carrie, Ed.; Higgs, Bettie, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The third annual conference of the National Academy for Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning (NAIRTL) was held at Trinity College Dublin on 11-12 November 2009, and was attended by over 300 delegates. The theme--"Research-Teaching Linkages: Practice and Policy"--was timely and generated some fascinating papers, workshops and…

  16. Self-Harm, Methadone Use and Drug-Related Deaths amongst Those Registered As Being of No Fixed Abode or Homeless in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Glynn, R W; Lynn, E; Griffin, E; Fitzgerald, M; Ward, M

    2017-10-10

    This work aims to contribute to the evidence base regarding the health of those who experience homelessness in Ireland by collating data on methadone use, drug-related deaths and emergency department presentations due to self-harm. Data from the Central Methadone Treatment List (CTL), National Self-Harm Registry Ireland and the National Drug-Related Deaths Index were analysed. The percentage on the CTL registered as being of no fixed abode (NFA) or homeless increased from 2% to 7% from 2011-2014. The absolute number of presentations with deliberate self-harm from those of NFA increased by 49% from 2007-2014. The number of drug-related deaths amongst those of NFA or homeless and who died in Dublin fluctuated from 2004-13 with an overall upward trend. There is an urgent need to adequately resource and coordinate those services which aim to address factors (social and health inequalities, mental ill-health and addiction) which lead people into - and prevent them exiting from - homelessness.

  17. Principle Paradigms Revisiting the Dublin Core 1:1 Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    The Dublin Core "1:1 Principle" asserts that "related but conceptually different entities, for example a painting and a digital image of the painting, are described by separate metadata records" (Woodley et al., 2005). While this seems to be a simple requirement, studies of metadata quality have found that cultural heritage…

  18. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive probability values of serum agglutination test titres for the diagnosis of Salmonella Dublin culture-positive bovine abortion and stillbirth.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Miguel, C; Crilly, J; Grant, J; Mee, J F

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of maternal serology for the diagnosis of Salmonella Dublin bovine abortion and stillbirth. A retrospective, unmatched, case-control study was carried out using twenty year's data (1989-2009) from bovine foetal submissions to an Irish government veterinary laboratory. Cases (n = 214) were defined as submissions with a S. Dublin culture-positive foetus from a S. Dublin unvaccinated dam where results of maternal S. Dublin serology were available. Controls (n = 415) were defined as submissions where an alternative diagnosis other than S. Dublin was made in a foetus from an S. Dublin unvaccinated dam where the results of maternal S. Dublin serology were available. A logistic regression model was fitted to the data: the dichotomous dependent variable was the S. Dublin foetal culture result, and the independent variables were the maternal serum agglutination test (SAT) titre results. Salmonella serology correctly classified 87% of S. Dublin culture-positive foetuses at a predicted probability threshold of 0.44 (cut-off at which sensitivity and specificity are at a maximum, J = 0.67). The sensitivity of the SAT at the same threshold was 73.8% (95% CI: 67.4%-79.5%), and the specificity was 93.2% (95% CI: 90.3%-95.4%). The positive and negative predictive values were 84.9% (95% CI: 79.3%-88.6%) and 87.3% (95% CI: 83.5%-91.3%), respectively. This study illustrates that the use of predicted probability values, rather than the traditional arbitrary breakpoints of negative, inconclusive and positive, increases the diagnostic value of the maternal SAT. Veterinary laboratory diagnosticians and veterinary practitioners can recover from the test results, information previously categorized, particularly from those results declared to be inconclusive. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Examples of studies of solar and lunar cycles carried out in Ireland in Neolithic times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna McKenna-Lawlor, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Brứ na Bόinn (Newgrange) is the largest member of a group of Neolithic passage graves located in the Boyne Valley, Co. Meath, about 50 km from Dublin in Ireland. According to radio carbon dating, the monument was constructed between about 3200 and 3100 BC and it is thus s about five hundred years older than the current form of Stonehenge as well as older than the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. Also, it predates the Mycenaean culture of ancient Greece. At the Winter Solstice, the rising sun shines through an external architectural feature called the roof box and traverses a 19m long passage to illuminate an inner chamber decorated by an elegant triple spiral and other carvings. This illumination lasts for about 17 minutes. Today, first light enters about four minutes after sunrise, but calculations based on the precession of the Earth show that, 5,000 years ago, first light would have entered exactly at sunrise. The poster presents drawings of the geometrical alignment concerned and places the monument in the context of other Neolithic monuments in Ireland oriented to key dates in the solar calendar. Evidence for the existence in the Boyne Valley of an interest in lunar as well as in solar cycles is discussed and a carving of a lunar cycle, deemed to be the earliest to be identified without serious ambiguity in either Ireland or Britain, is illustrated and described.

  20. Genetic diversity, anti-microbial resistance, plasmid profile and frequency of the Vi antigen in Salmonella Dublin strains isolated in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vilela, F P; Frazão, M R; Rodrigues, D P; Costa, R G; Casas, M R T; Fernandes, S A; Falcão, J P; Campioni, F

    2018-02-01

    Salmonella Dublin is strongly adapted to cattle causing enteritis and/or systemic disease with high rates of mortality. However, it can be sporadically isolated from humans, usually causing serious disease, especially in patients with underlying chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to molecularly type S. Dublin strains isolated from humans and animals in Brazil to verify the diversity of these strains as well as to ascertain possible differences between strains isolated from humans and animals. Moreover, the presence of the capsular antigen Vi and the plasmid profile was characterized in addition to the anti-microbial resistance against 15 drugs. For this reason, 113 S. Dublin strains isolated between 1983 and 2016 from humans (83) and animals (30) in Brazil were typed by PFGE and MLVA. The presence of the capsular antigen Vi was verified by PCR, and the phenotypic expression of the capsular antigen was determined serologically. Also, a plasmid analysis for each strain was carried out. The strains studied were divided into 35 different PFGE types and 89 MLVA-types with a similarity of ≥80% and ≥17.5%, respectively. The plasmid sizes found ranged from 2 to >150 kb and none of the strains studied presented the capsular antigen Vi. Resistance or intermediate resistance was found in 23 strains (20.3%) that were resistant to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, imipenem, nalidixic acid, piperacillin, streptomycin and/or tetracycline. The majority of the S. Dublin strains studied and isolated over a 33-year period may descend from a common subtype that has been contaminating humans and animals in Brazil and able to cause invasive disease even in the absence of the capsular antigen. The higher diversity of resistance phenotypes in human isolates, as compared with animal strains, may be a reflection of the different anti-microbial treatments used to control S. Dublin infections in humans in Brazil. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. The benefits of utilising geo-mapping for visualising the vitamin D status of Dublin city and the surrounding urban districts.

    PubMed

    Laird, E; Shannon, T; Crowley, V E F; Healy, M

    2017-11-01

    There have been few published reports of visualising vitamin D status at a micro level, i.e., within large individual urban centres of countries. To produce a visual map of the vitamin D status [25-hydroxy vitamin D-25(OH)D] of a large urban centre (n > 350,000) incorporating the regions of Dublin city that constitute the general practitioner catchment area of a large academic teaching adult hospital. An observational investigation of 5287 free living Irish adults (>18 years). Approximately, 15.2 % of those sampled in the winter period (October-February) were vitamin D deficient (<30 nmol/L) compared with 10.8 % of those sampled in the summer period (March-September). Vitamin D tests requested from the most social economically deprived urban locations (Dublin 8 and Lucan postal districts) had the highest rates of deficiency (23.5 and 20.4 %, respectively, both seasons). On average, females had a significantly higher 25(OH)D concentration compared with males (57.9 vs 52.3 nmol/L, respectively), while the younger participants (18-50 years) mean 25(OH)D concentration was 27 % lower in winter and 20.7 % lower in summer in comparison with the older participants (>50 years) (P < 0.0001). For the first time in Ireland, a visual depiction of data can be used to aid in the rapid identification of vitamin D status trends within a major urban area. These findings provide useful data to help inform public health policy regarding endemic vitamin D insufficiency to help target the population groups and resident location areas most at risk.

  2. Alternatives to Industrial Work Placement at Dublin Institute of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Catherine; Gamble, Elena

    2011-01-01

    In the current economic crisis, higher education graduates need transferable professional skills more than ever. They need resourcefulness, an ability to work reflectively, a sense of civic awareness and an impressive curriculum vitae. This case study analyses how Dublin Institute of Technology's Programme for Students Learning With Communities…

  3. The NCI All Ireland Cancer Conference.

    PubMed

    Johnston; Daly; Liu

    1999-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recently decided to embark on an international partnership with the developing cancer programs on the Island of Ireland (Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland) in an attempt to further improve the quality and range of cancer services available for patients. This Transatlantic Partnership called the All Ireland-NCI Cancer Consortium offers exciting opportunities in cancer treatment, education and research as the cancer-caring communities from both the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland prepare to join with the U.S. NCI in this major endeavor. The inaugural event of the partnership will be the NCI All Ireland Cancer Conference to be held in Belfast, October 3-6, 1999. (See www.allirelandcancer.com, for information on the conference.) Cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity on the Island of Ireland. There are approximately 28,000 new cases and approximately 11,000 deaths from cancer each year. Therefore, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland have among the highest cancer incidence and mortality rates in the Western World. In recent years there has been a major restructuring of cancer services in both parts of the Island. This is the result of several government reports such as the Campbell Report in Northern Ireland and the National Strategy Document for Cancer in the Republic of Ireland. The National Strategy Document proposes that cancer treatment services should be centered around primary care services, regional services, supra-regional centers and a national coordinating structure whereby the supra-regional centers deliver specialist surgery, medical and radiation oncology, rehabilitation and specialist palliative care. Three supra-regional cancer centers are being established in the cities of Dublin, Cork and Galway and a National Cancer Forum, which has served as a multidisciplinary advisory board to the Government, has pushed the development and implementation of this plan. This has

  4. The relationship between mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases and two climatic factors in densely populated areas in Norway and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Eng, H; Mercer, J B

    2000-10-01

    Seasonal variations in mortality due to cardiovascular disease have been demonstrated in many countries, with the highest levels occurring during the coldest months of the year. It has been suggested that this can be explained by cold climate. In this study, we examined the relationship between mortality and two different climatic factors in two densely populated areas (Dublin, Ireland and Oslo/Akershus, Norway). Meteorological data (mean daily air temperatures and wind speed) and registered daily mortality data for three groups of cardiovascular disease for the period 1985-1994 were obtained for the two respective areas. The daily mortality ratio for both men and women of 60 years and older was calculated from the mortality data. The wind chill temperature equivalent was calculated from the Siple and Passels formula. The seasonal variations in mortality were greater in Dublin than in Oslo/Akershus, with mortality being highest in winter. This pattern was similar to that previously shown for the two respective countries as a whole. There was a negative correlation between mortality and both air temperature and wind chill temperature equivalent for all three groups of diseases. The slopes of the linear regression lines describing the relationship between mortality and air temperature were a lot steeper for the Irish data than for the Norwegian data. However, the difference between the steepness of the linear regression lines for the relationship between mortality and wind chill temperature equivalent was considerably less between the two areas. This can be explained by the fact that Dublin is a much windier area than Oslo/Akershus. The results of this study demonstrate that the inclusion of two climatic factors rather than just one changes the impression of the relationship between climate and cardiovascular disease mortality.

  5. Breast-feeding support in Ireland: a qualitative study of health-care professionals' and women's views.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Barbara; Kearney, John M

    2015-08-01

    To examine women's experience of professional support for breast-feeding and health-care professionals' experience of providing support. We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews among women with experience of breast-feeding and health-care professionals with infant feeding roles. Interviews with women were designed to explore their experience of support for breast-feeding antenatally, in hospital and postnatally. Interviews with health-care professionals were designed to explore their views on their role and experience in providing breast-feeding support. Interview transcripts were analysed using content analysis and aspects of Grounded Theory. Overarching themes and categories within the two sets were identified. Urban and suburban areas of North Dublin, Ireland. Twenty-two women all of whom had experience of breast-feeding and fifty-eight health-care professionals. Two overarching themes emerged and in each of these a number of categories were developed: theme 1, facilitators to breast-feeding support, within which being facilitated to breast-feed, having the right person at the right time, being discerning and breast-feeding support groups were discussed; and theme 2, barriers to breast-feeding support, within which time, conflicting information, medicalisation of breast-feeding and the role of health-care professionals in providing support for breast-feeding were discussed. Breast-feeding is being placed within a medical model of care in Ireland which is dependent on health-care professionals. There is a need for training around breast-feeding for all health-care professionals; however, they are limited in their support due to external barriers such as lack of time. Alternative support such as peer support workers should be provided.

  6. Histopathology case definition of naturally acquired Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin infection in young Holstein cattle in the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Heidi L; Thompson, Belinda; Duhamel, Gerald E

    2017-11-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin ( Salmonella Dublin) is a host-adapted bacterium that causes high morbidity and mortality in dairy cattle worldwide. A retrospective search of archives at the New York Animal Health Diagnostic Center revealed 57 culture-confirmed Salmonella Dublin cases from New York and Pennsylvania in which detailed histology of multiple tissues was available. Tissues routinely submitted by referring veterinarians for histologic evaluation included sections of heart, lungs, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Of the 57 S almonella Dublin-positive cases, all were Holstein breed, 53 were female (93%), and 49 (86%) were <6 mo of age. Specifically, in calves <6 mo of age, >90% (45 of 49) of lungs, 90% (28 of 31) of livers, 50% (11 of 22) of spleens, and 62% (18 of 29) of lymph nodes examined had moderate-to-severe inflammation with or without necrosis. Inconstant lesions were seen in 48% (10 of 21) of hearts examined, and consisted of variable inflammatory infiltrates and rare areas of necrosis. We propose a histopathology case definition of Salmonella Dublin in <6-mo-old Holstein cattle that includes a combination of pulmonary alveolar capillary neutrophilia with or without hepatocellular necrosis and paratyphoid granulomas, splenitis, and lymphadenitis. These findings will assist in the development of improved protocols for the diagnosis of infectious diseases of dairy cattle.

  7. Quality of Family Life and Mortality in Seventeenth Century Dublin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Inquiry into the quality of family life in seventeenth century Dublin is an attempt to understand conditions in the second largest city in the British Isles; further, the era was one of convulsions in the body politic, social, and religious. The Scottish James I and VI (1556 1625) determined that the Irish province closest to Scotland, Ulster,…

  8. Occupational stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region.

    PubMed

    McTiernan, K; McDonald, N

    2015-04-01

    Burnout negatively impacts the delivery of mental health services. Psychiatric nurses face stressors that are distinct from other nursing specialities. The research was conducted in Ireland and captured a relatively large sample of respondents. The results compared the stressors, coping strategies and burnout levels between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses. Occupational stress can negatively impact on the well-being of psychiatric nurses, which in turn can lead to poor client care. There is a dearth of published research conducted in Ireland that examines stress within the discipline. A between-groups study, undertaken in February 2011, investigated stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region. Sixty-nine participants (8 males and 61 females), aged between 18 to 60 years voluntarily completed the Mental Health Professional Stress Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the PsychNurse Methods of Coping Scale. The findings revealed that nurses were operating in a moderately stressful environment. Stressors focused on organizational issues as opposed to client issues. The main stressors identified were lack of resources, workload and organizational structures/processes. Both groups reported average levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization and average levels of personal accomplishment. A Mann-Whitney U-test and Independent Samples t-test found significant differences between hospital and community-based nurses regarding depersonalization and personal accomplishment, respectively. Hospital nurses reported higher depersonalization scores, and community nurses had a greater sense of personal accomplishment. The personal accomplishment scores of hospital nurses were below mental health professional norms. No significant differences emerged regarding coping strategies. Avoidant coping strategies were favoured by both groups. It is recommended that interventions

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates from Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Smith, Natalie; Power, Ultan F; McKillen, John

    2018-05-29

    To investigate the genetic diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in Northern Ireland, the ORF5 gene from nine field isolates was sequenced and phylogenetically analysed. The results revealed relatively high diversity amongst isolates, with 87.6-92.2% identity between farms at the nucleotide level and 84.1-93.5% identity at the protein level. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that all nine isolates belonged to the European (type 1) genotype and formed a cluster within the subtype 1 subgroup. This study provides the first report on PRRSV isolate diversity in Northern Ireland.

  10. Prediction of household and commercial BMW generation according to socio-economic and other factors for the Dublin region.

    PubMed

    Purcell, M; Magette, W L

    2009-04-01

    Both planning and design of integrated municipal solid waste management systems require accurate prediction of waste generation. This research predicted the quantity and distribution of biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) generation within a diverse 'landscape' of residential areas, as well as from a variety of commercial establishments (restaurants, hotels, hospitals, etc.) in the Dublin (Ireland) region. Socio-economic variables, housing types, and the sizes and main activities of commercial establishments were hypothesized as the key determinants contributing to the spatial variability of BMW generation. A geographical information system (GIS) 'model' of BMW generation was created using ArcMap, a component of ArcGIS 9. Statistical data including socio-economic status and household size were mapped on an electoral district basis. Historical research and data from scientific literature were used to assign BMW generation rates to residential and commercial establishments. These predictions were combined to give overall BMW estimates for the region, which can aid waste planning and policy decisions. This technique will also aid the design of future waste management strategies, leading to policy and practice alterations as a function of demographic changes and development. The household prediction technique gave a more accurate overall estimate of household waste generation than did the social class technique. Both techniques produced estimates that differed from the reported local authority data; however, given that local authority reported figures for the region are below the national average, with some of the waste generated from apartment complexes being reported as commercial waste, predictions arising from this research are believed to be closer to actual waste generation than a comparison to reported data would suggest. By changing the input data, this estimation tool can be adapted for use in other locations. Although focusing on waste in the Dublin region

  11. Session 1: Public health nutrition. Breast-feeding practices in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Roslyn C; Kearney, John M

    2008-11-01

    Breast-feeding is the superior infant feeding method from birth, with research consistently demonstrating its numerous short- and long-term health benefits for both mother and infant. As a global recommendation the WHO advises that mothers should exclusively breast-feed for the first 6-months of life, thus delaying the introduction of solids during this time. Historically, Irish breast-feeding initiation rates have remained strikingly low in comparison with international data and there has been little improvement in breast-feeding duration rates. There is wide geographical variation in terms of breast-feeding initiation both internationally and in Ireland. Some of these differences in breast-feeding rates may be associated with differing socio-economic characteristics. A recent cross-sectional prospective study of 561 pregnant women attending a Dublin hospital and followed from the antenatal period to 6 months post partum has found that 47% of the Irish-national mothers initiated breast-feeding, while only 24% were still offering 'any' breast milk to their infants at 6 weeks. Mothers' positive antenatal feeding intention to breast-feed is indicated as one of the most important independent determinants of initiation and 'any' breast-feeding at 6 weeks, suggesting that the antenatal period should be targeted as an effective time to influence and affect mothers' attitudes and beliefs pertaining to breast-feeding. These results suggest that the 'cultural' barrier towards breast-feeding appears to still prevail in Ireland and consequently an environment that enables women to breast-feed is far from being achieved. Undoubtedly, a shift towards a more positive and accepting breast-feeding culture is required if national breast-feeding rates are to improve.

  12. From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge; Workshop Proceedings

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kroposki, B.; Komomua, C.; O'Malley, M.

    This report summarizes the workshop entitled: From the Building to the Grid: An Energy Revolution and Modeling Challenge. The first workshop was held May 1-2, 2012 on NREL's campus in Golden, Colorado. The second was held June 6-7, 2012 at the University College Dublin, in Dublin, Ireland.

  13. A Content Analysis of School Anti-Bullying Policies in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Noel; Smith, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    This original study presents a content analysis of 100 primary and post-primary school anti-bullying policies in Northern Ireland using a 36-item scoring scheme. Overall schools had 52% of the items in their policies. Most schools included reference to physical, verbal, relational, material and cyberbullying but a minority mentioned racist,…

  14. MLVA for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Dublin: Development of a Method Suitable for Inter-Laboratory Surveillance and Application in the Context of a Raw Milk Cheese Outbreak in France in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Vignaud, Marie-Léone; Cherchame, Emeline; Marault, Muriel; Chaing, Emilie; Le Hello, Simon; Michel, Valerie; Jourdan-Da Silva, Nathalie; Lailler, Renaud; Brisabois, Anne; Cadel-Six, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Dublin (S. Dublin) figures among the most frequently isolated Salmonella strains in humans in France. This serovar may affect production and animal health mainly in cattle herds with corresponding high economic losses. Given that the current gold standard method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), provides insufficient discrimination for epidemiological investigations, we propose a standard operating procedure in this study for multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of S. Dublin, suitable for inter-laboratory surveillance. An in silico analysis on the genome of S. Dublin strains CT_02021853 was performed to identify appropriate microsatellite regions. Of 21 VNTR loci screened, six were selected and 401 epidemiologically unrelated and related strains, isolated from humans, food and animals were analyzed to assess performance criteria such as typeability, discriminatory power and epidemiological concordance. The MLVA scheme developed was applied to an outbreak involving Saint-Nectaire cheese for which investigations were conducted in France in 2012, making it possible to discriminate between epidemiologically related strains and sporadic case strains, while PFGE assigned only a single profile. The six loci selected were sequenced on a large set of strains to determine the sequence of the repeated units and flanking regions, and their stability was evaluated in vivo through the analysis of the strains investigated from humans, food and the farm environment during the outbreak. The six VNTR selected were found to be stable and the discriminatory power of the MLVA method developed was calculated to be 0.954 compared with that for PFGE, which was only 0.625. Twenty-four reference strains were selected from the 401 examined strains in order to represent most of the allele diversity observed for each locus. This reference set can be used to harmonize MLVA results and allow data exchange between

  15. The Salmonella dublin virulence plasmid mediates systemic but not enteric phases of salmonellosis in cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, T S; Paulin, S M; Plested, J S; Watson, P R; Jones, P W

    1995-01-01

    Plasmid-bearing and plasmid-free isolates and a plasmid-cured strain of Salmonella dublin were compared for virulence in calves. The plasmid-bearing strains were highly virulent, causing severe enteric and systemic disease with high mortality. In contrast, the plasmid-free strains caused diarrhea but only low mortality. The infection kinetics of a wild-type and a derivative plasmid-cured strain were compared. Both strains were isolated in high numbers from intestinal sites at 3 and 6 days after oral challenge and were isolated at comparable frequencies from systemic sites at 3 days, but not at 6 days, when the wild-type strain was predominant. The strains were equally invasive in intestinal epithelia with and without Peyer's patch and elicited comparable secretory and inflammatory responses and intestinal pathology in ligated ileal loops. The effect of the virulence plasmid on growth kinetics and on the outer membrane protein profile was assessed in an in vivo growth chamber. The virulence plasmid did not influence either extracellular growth or the expression of major outer membrane proteins. These observations demonstrate that the virulence plasmid is not involved in either the enteric phase of infection or the systemic dissemination of S. dublin but probably mediates the persistence of S. dublin at systemic sites. PMID:7790094

  16. Exploring the Functions of Reading: A Cross-Cultural Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaney, Vincent; Neuman, Susan B.

    To determine if purposes in reading differ with sex, grade level, and nationality, a 16-item "Functions of Reading Scale" (developed from content analysis of student essays on why they like to read) was administered to 459 Irish (Dublin, Ireland) and American (Windham, Connecticut) students in grades three, five, and eight. Data…

  17. The Homolog of the Gene bstA of the BTP1 Phage from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium ST313 Is an Antivirulence Gene in Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Espinel, Irene Cartas; Spiegelhauer, Malene Roed; Guerra, Priscila Regina; Andersen, Karsten Wiber; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2018-01-01

    In a previous study, a novel virulence gene, bstA , identified in a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium sequence type 313 (ST313) strain was found to be conserved in all published Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin genomes. In order to analyze the role of this gene in the host-pathogen interaction in S Dublin, a mutant where this gene was deleted ( S Dublin Δ bstA ) and a mutant which was further genetically complemented with bstA ( S Dublin 3246-C) were constructed and tested in models of in vitro and in vivo infection as well as during growth competition assays in M9 medium, Luria-Bertani broth, and cattle blood. In contrast to the results obtained for a strain of S Typhimurium ST313, the lack of bstA was found to be associated with increased virulence in S Dublin. Thus, S Dublin Δ bstA showed higher levels of uptake than the wild-type strain during infection of mouse and cattle macrophages and higher net replication within human THP-1 cells. Furthermore, during mouse infections, S Dublin Δ bstA was more virulent than the wild type following a single intraperitoneal infection and showed an increased competitive index during competitive infection assays. Deletion of bstA did not affect either the amount of cytokines released by THP-1 macrophages or the cytotoxicity toward these cells. The histology of the livers and spleens of mice infected with the wild-type strain and the S Dublin Δ bstA mutant revealed similar levels of inflammation between the two groups. The gene was not important for adherence to or invasion of human epithelial cells and did not influence bacterial growth in rich medium, minimal medium, or cattle blood. In conclusion, a lack of bstA affects the pathogenicity of S Dublin by decreasing its virulence. Therefore, it might be regarded as an antivirulence gene in this serovar. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Highway runoff quality in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Berhanu Desta, Mesfin; Bruen, Michael; Higgins, Neil; Johnston, Paul

    2007-04-01

    Highway runoff has been identified as a significant source of contaminants that impact on the receiving aquatic environment. Several studies have been completed documenting the characteristics of highway runoff and its implication to the receiving water in the UK and elsewhere. However, very little information is available for Ireland. The objective of this study was to determine the quality of highway runoff from major Irish roads under the current road drainage design and maintenance practice. Four sites were selected from the M4 and the M7 motorways outside Dublin. Automatic samplers and continuous monitoring devices were deployed to sample and monitor the runoff quality and quantity. More than 42 storm events were sampled and analysed for the heavy metals Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn, 16 US EPA specified PAHs, volatile organic compounds including MTBE, and a number of conventional pollutants. All samples were analysed based on the Standard Methods. Significant quantities of solids and heavy metals were detected at all sites. PAHs were not detected very often, but when detected the values were different from quantities observed in UK highways. The heavy metal concentrations were strongly related to the total suspended solids concentrations, which has a useful implication for runoff management strategies. No strong relationship was discovered between pollutant concentrations and event characteristics such as rainfall intensity, antecedent dry days (ADD), or rainfall depth (volume). This study has demonstrated that runoff from Irish motorways was not any cleaner than in the UK although the traffic volume at the monitored sites was relatively smaller. This calls for a site specific investigation of highway runoff quality before adopting a given management strategy.

  19. Hyper Text Mark-up Language and Dublin Core metadata element set usage in websites of Iranian State Universities' libraries.

    PubMed

    Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Ramezan-Shirazi, Mahtab; Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Nouri, Rasool

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in providing innovative solutions in the organization of electronic resources and research in this area shows a global trend in the use of new strategies such as metadata to facilitate description, place for, organization and retrieval of resources in the web environment. In this context, library metadata standards have a special place; therefore, the purpose of the present study has been a comparative study on the Central Libraries' Websites of Iran State Universities for Hyper Text Mark-up Language (HTML) and Dublin Core metadata elements usage in 2011. The method of this study is applied-descriptive and data collection tool is the check lists created by the researchers. Statistical community includes 98 websites of the Iranian State Universities of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education and Ministry of Science, Research and Technology and method of sampling is the census. Information was collected through observation and direct visits to websites and data analysis was prepared by Microsoft Excel software, 2011. The results of this study indicate that none of the websites use Dublin Core (DC) metadata and that only a few of them have used overlaps elements between HTML meta tags and Dublin Core (DC) elements. The percentage of overlaps of DC elements centralization in the Ministry of Health were 56% for both description and keywords and, in the Ministry of Science, were 45% for the keywords and 39% for the description. But, HTML meta tags have moderate presence in both Ministries, as the most-used elements were keywords and description (56%) and the least-used elements were date and formatter (0%). It was observed that the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Science follows the same path for using Dublin Core standard on their websites in the future. Because Central Library Websites are an example of scientific web pages, special attention in designing them can help the researchers to achieve faster and more accurate information resources

  20. Hyper Text Mark-up Language and Dublin Core metadata element set usage in websites of Iranian State Universities’ libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Ramezan-Shirazi, Mahtab; Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Nouri, Rasool

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Recent progress in providing innovative solutions in the organization of electronic resources and research in this area shows a global trend in the use of new strategies such as metadata to facilitate description, place for, organization and retrieval of resources in the web environment. In this context, library metadata standards have a special place; therefore, the purpose of the present study has been a comparative study on the Central Libraries’ Websites of Iran State Universities for Hyper Text Mark-up Language (HTML) and Dublin Core metadata elements usage in 2011. Materials and Methods: The method of this study is applied-descriptive and data collection tool is the check lists created by the researchers. Statistical community includes 98 websites of the Iranian State Universities of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education and Ministry of Science, Research and Technology and method of sampling is the census. Information was collected through observation and direct visits to websites and data analysis was prepared by Microsoft Excel software, 2011. Results: The results of this study indicate that none of the websites use Dublin Core (DC) metadata and that only a few of them have used overlaps elements between HTML meta tags and Dublin Core (DC) elements. The percentage of overlaps of DC elements centralization in the Ministry of Health were 56% for both description and keywords and, in the Ministry of Science, were 45% for the keywords and 39% for the description. But, HTML meta tags have moderate presence in both Ministries, as the most-used elements were keywords and description (56%) and the least-used elements were date and formatter (0%). Conclusion: It was observed that the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Science follows the same path for using Dublin Core standard on their websites in the future. Because Central Library Websites are an example of scientific web pages, special attention in designing them can help the researchers

  1. Extract from an Interview of Sean O'Connor: 8 September 1986

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, D. G.; O'Sullivan, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The educational community appreciates the editors of "Irish Educational Studies" for making the Interview with Sean O'Connor, in Dublin, Ireland available to a wider audience in 2014. The interview was originally in Sean O'Connor's home in Dublin on 8 September 1986. By that time, O'Connor had retired as Secretary of the Department of…

  2. Physiotherapy for low back pain: differences between public and private healthcare sectors in Ireland--a retrospective survey.

    PubMed

    Casserley-Feeney, Sarah N; Bury, Gerard; Daly, Leslie; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2008-10-01

    European clinical guidelines for low back pain (LBP) recommend early referral of appropriate patients to health services such as physiotherapy. The current study aimed to investigate any differences between the physiotherapy management of LBP, and the physiotherapist and patient profiles in public and private health settings in Ireland. A retrospective chart survey of all LBP patients referred for physiotherapy to one Dublin City hospital and three neighbouring private practices in 2003 was conducted. In total, 249 physiotherapy charts (hospital [H] n=93; private practice [Pr] n=156) were identified and demographic, LBP, and management details analysed. Only charts containing full LBP duration and physiotherapy treatment data were included in the analysis of these parameters (LBP duration: H=84, Pr=130; physiotherapy treatment: H=79, Pr=155). There were significantly higher percentages of female (H=66%; Pr=50%: p=0.017), older (H=46 years; Pr=36 years: p<0.001), and chronic LBP patients (>12 weeks; H=50%; Pr=2%: p<0.001) in the public setting. Public patients had significantly longer waiting times for physiotherapy (median H=10 weeks; Pr=0; p<0.001), and more treatment (H=5.1; Pr=2.5: p0.001) than private patients. While treatment approaches were similar for both settings, there was a significantly higher use of advice and spinal stabilisation exercises in the public setting. However, there was minimal difference in the management of acute or chronic LBP in both setting suggesting poor adherence to European guidelines. Findings showed longer waiting times, and a higher number and duration of physiotherapy treatments for acute and chronic LBP in the public setting suggesting the need to develop publicly funded primary healthcare in Ireland.

  3. The Role of Eportfolios in Finance Studies: A Cross-Country Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domínguez, Amparo S.; Morales, Lucía; Tarkovska, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the use of ePortfolios as an efficient assessment tool to support students pursuing a Business degree, where Finance is a major component. We conducted an analysis on the role of ePortfolios in Higher Education at Dublin Institute of Technology (Republic of Ireland) and at Universitat Jaume I (Spain) for undergraduate studies.…

  4. An Analysis of Gender Diversity in Urology in the UK and Ireland.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, E M; Nason, G J; Manecksha, R P

    2017-12-18

    Traditionally, surgery and certain surgical sub-specialities in particular have been predominantly male orientated. In recent years, there has been an increased proportion of female medical graduates which will ultimately have an effect on speciality choices. The aim of this study was to assess the gender diversity among urologists in the UK and Ireland. The total number and gender breakdown of consultant urologists and trainees in the UK and Ireland was obtained from the British Association of Urological Surgeons (BAUS) and the Irish Society of Urology (ISU) membership offices. The total number and gender breakdown of medical school entrants and graduates in 2015 was obtained from the six medical schools in the Republic of Ireland. There are a total of 1,012 consultant urologists in the UK and Ireland. In the UK, 141 (14.6%) are female compared to four (8.2%) in Ireland, p= 0.531. There was a significant increase in the number of females between consultant urologists and trainees in both the UK (p=0.0001) and Ireland (p=0.015). In recent years, there has been a significant change in the percentage of female trainees in the UK and Ireland (22.8% (n=75) in 2011 vs 31.7% (n=93) in 2014, p=0.019. Between the six medical schools in Ireland, there were significantly more female entrants (n=726, 56.5%) than female graduates (n=521, 51.2%) in 2015, p=0.013.There has been a significant shift in gender diversity in urology in the UK and Ireland. Efforts to increase diversity should be pursued to attract further trainees to urology.

  5. Stakeholder perspectives on the use of pig meat inspection as a health and welfare diagnostic tool in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland; a SWOT analysis.

    PubMed

    Devitt, C; Boyle, L; Teixeira, D L; O'Connell, N E; Hawe, M; Hanlon, A

    2016-01-01

    A SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis is a strategic management tool applied to policy planning and decision-making. This short report presents the results of a SWOT analysis, carried out with n  = 16 stakeholders i) involved in the pig industry in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, and ii) in general animal welfare and food safety policy areas. As part of a larger study called PIGWELFIND, the analysis sought to explore the potential development of pig meat inspection as an animal welfare and diagnostic tool. The final SWOT framework comprised two strengths, three opportunities, six weaknesses, and five threats. Issues around relationships and communication between producers and their veterinary practitioner, processors and producers were common to both the strengths and weakness clusters. Practical challenges within the processing plant were also named. Overall, the SWOT framework complements results reported in Devitt et al. (Ir Vet J 69:2, 2016) regarding problematic issues within the current system of information feedback on meat inspection especially within the Republic of Ireland, and the wider challenges of communication and problems of distrust. The results of the SWOT analysis support the conclusions from Devitt et al. (Ir Vet J 69:2, 2016), that trust between all stakeholders across the supply chain will be essential for the development of an effective environment in which to realise the full diagnostic potential of MI data. Further stakeholder engagement could seek to apply the findings of the SWOT analysis to a policy Delphi methodology, as used elsewhere.

  6. The prevalence and determinants of breast-feeding initiation and duration in a sample of women in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Roslyn C; Younger, Katherine M; Sheridan-Pereira, Margaret; White, Martin J; Kearney, John M

    2010-06-01

    To assess breast-feeding initiation and prevalence from birth to 6 months in a sample of mothers in Dublin, and to determine the factors associated with breast-feeding initiation and 'any' breast-feeding at 6 weeks in a sample of Irish-national mothers. This prospective cross-sectional study involved the recruitment of women during the antenatal period, with subsequent follow-up of mothers who delivered healthy, term singleton infants, at 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Participants were recruited from antenatal clinics in the Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin. In all, 401 Irish-national and forty-nine non-Irish-national mothers met the criteria for inclusion in the present study. Breast-feeding initiation rates of the Irish-national and non-Irish-nationals were 47% and 79.6%, respectively. Factors that were significantly (P = 0.000) associated with both breast-feeding initiation and 'any' breast-feeding at 6 weeks included mothers who were >or=35 years, educated to third level, reported positive postnatal encouragement to breast-feed from their partners and had a positive antenatal intention to breast-feed. The maternal negative perception that breast-feeding is an embarrassing way to feed an infant was demonstrated as a major barrier to initiation. Breast-feeding initiation and prevalence rates of the Irish-national population remain low and lag considerably behind national and international targets. Inclusion of the partner in breast-feeding promotional initiatives during the antenatal period may be crucial to increase breast-feeding rates in Ireland. Public health campaigns that focus on increasing the social acceptability of breast-feeding may prove effective in addressing this cultural barrier.

  7. Case of coccidioidomycosis in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Patrick Thomas; Deegan, Alexander P; McDonnell, Timothy J

    2016-08-11

    Coccidioidal infection is a well-recognised cause of pulmonary disease in certain parts of the south-western USA, Central and South America; however, it is rarely encountered elsewhere in the world. We describe the case of a previously healthy man presenting to a Dublin hospital with fever, dry cough and chest pain, following a visit to the western USA. Despite treatment with broad-spectrum antimicrobials, the patient developed progressive bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and a large pleural effusion. After extensive investigations including CT, bronchoscopy and pleural fluid analysis, a diagnosis of pulmonary coccidioidomycosis was made. Following the initiation of appropriate antifungal therapy, the patient made a full recovery. This case was of interest due to the rarity of the disease outside its areas of endemicity and the unusual findings associated with its diagnosis. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Daedalus in Dublin: A Physicist's Labyrinth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Thomas C.

    2014-03-01

    I describe some of the rich physical and natural-philosophy heritage of the urban center of the Irish capital Dublin (first tour) and its environs (second tour), in a two-part excursion that could take between two and eight hours in toto. In terms of history, both tours center around the nineteenth century. The first tour is located in and around Trinity College, and we encounter such personages as William Rowan Hamilton, George Fitzgerald, Ernest Walton, and Erwin Schrödinger, among others. Moving away from Trinity College, the second tour explores some of the periphery of the city. I describe the role of politics, money, and religion in shaping the emergence and development of scientific talent among the Irish people, and consequently the footprint left by physics in the city today, with its numerous sites and names that put Irish physics in an honorable place among the nations.

  9. Tom O'Connor: His legacy of atmospheric aerosol research in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, S. Gerard

    2013-05-01

    Dr. Thomas C. (Tom) O'Connor received his foundation in atmospheric aerosols through his M. Sc. work at University College Dublin (with P.J. Nolan) and then as research scholar with Leo W. Pollak at the Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies. On moving to Galway in 1956, a significant legacy was his choosing of a field station site at Mace Head and his pioneering measurements there. He played a pivotal role in the development and progression of the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station (www.macehead.org) for some 50 years. He passed away peacefully in November 2012.

  10. Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kail, Candice

    2010-01-01

    Ireland has a rich and long history. It is a land of fable and of strife, from the legendary warrior Fionn Mac Cumhaill (anglicized as Finn McCool) and the god-like Tuatha De Danann to the potato famine and the more recent Troubles. In the last decade, Ireland has experienced an economic boom and assumed a new place in the political landscape via…

  11. Creating the Social Foundations for Apprenticeship in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyhan, Barry; Ayres, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss Irelands national apprenticeship programme, introduced in 1993, in the context of the country's evolving economic and social policies. Design/methodology/approach: A critical analysis is undertaken of the industrial climate in Ireland, which prevented the introduction of a national apprenticeship…

  12. Exploring the consistency, transparency and portability of dental technology education: benchmarking across Norway, Ireland and Australia.

    PubMed

    Myhrer, T; Evans, J L; Haugen, H K; Gorman, C; Kavanagh, Y; Cameron, A B

    2016-08-01

    Dental technology programmes of study must prepare students to practice in a broad range of contemporary workplaces. Currently, there is limited evidence to benchmark dental technology education - locally, nationally or internationally. This research aims to improve consistency, transparency and portability of dental technology qualifications across three countries. Data were accessed from open-source curriculum documents and five calibrated assessment items. Three institutions collaborated with Oslo and Akershus University College, Norway; Trinity College Dublin, Ireland; and Griffith University, Australia. From these, 29-44 students completed 174 assessments. The curricula reflect the community needs of each country and display common themes that underpin professional dental technology practice. Assessment results differed between institutions but no more than a normal distribution. Face-to-face assessment moderation was critical to achieve consistency. This collaborative research has led to the development of a set of guidelines for other dental technology education providers interested in developing or aligning courses internationally to enhance the portability of qualifications. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Education Policy Outlook: Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pont, Beatriz; Figueroa, Diana Toledo; Zapata, Juliana; Fraccola, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    This policy profile on education in Ireland is part of the "Education Policy Outlook" series, which presents comparative analysis of education policies and reforms across the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. Building on the OECD's substantial comparative and sectoral knowledge base, the series…

  14. Empirical water depth predictions in Dublin Bay based on satellite EO multispectral imagery and multibeam data using spatially weighted geographical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteys, Xavier; Harris, Paul; Caloca, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    The coastal shallow water zone can be a challenging and expensive environment within which to acquire bathymetry and other oceanographic data using traditional survey methods. Dangers and limited swath coverage make some of these areas unfeasible to survey using ship borne systems, and turbidity can preclude marine LIDAR. As a result, an extensive part of the coastline worldwide remains completely unmapped. Satellite EO multispectral data, after processing, allows timely, cost efficient and quality controlled information to be used for planning, monitoring, and regulating coastal environments. It has the potential to deliver repetitive derivation of medium resolution bathymetry, coastal water properties and seafloor characteristics in shallow waters. Over the last 30 years satellite passive imaging methods for bathymetry extraction, implementing analytical or empirical methods, have had a limited success predicting water depths. Different wavelengths of the solar light penetrate the water column to varying depths. They can provide acceptable results up to 20 m but become less accurate in deeper waters. The study area is located in the inner part of Dublin Bay, on the East coast of Ireland. The region investigated is a C-shaped inlet covering an area of 10 km long and 5 km wide with water depths ranging from 0 to 10 m. The methodology employed on this research uses a ratio of reflectance from SPOT 5 satellite bands, differing to standard linear transform algorithms. High accuracy water depths were derived using multibeam data. The final empirical model uses spatially weighted geographical tools to retrieve predicted depths. The results of this paper confirm that SPOT satellite scenes are suitable to predict depths using empirical models in very shallow embayments. Spatial regression models show better adjustments in the predictions over non-spatial models. The spatial regression equation used provides realistic results down to 6 m below the water surface, with

  15. Family and Family Change in Ireland: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canavan, John

    2012-01-01

    In Ireland, historically and in the current era, family has been a central concern for society and the State. This article provides a descriptive overview of family life in Ireland and of major family-related changes over the past 40 years. It presents a general framework of analysis within which these changes can be understood, considers the…

  16. C2-C6 background hydrocarbon concentrations monitored at a roof top and green park site, in Dublin City centre.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, R T; Broderick, B M

    2007-09-01

    A 5 week monitoring campaign was carried out in Dublin City centre, to establish which site gave a more accurate background city centre estimation: a roof-top or green field site. This background represented a conservative estimate of HC exposure in Dublin City centre, useful for quantifying health effects related to this form of pollution and also for establishing a local background relative to the four surrounding main roads when the wind direction is travelling towards each road with the background receptor upwind. Over the entire monitoring campaign, the lowest concentrations and relative standard deviations were observed at the green field site, regardless of time of day or meteorological effects.

  17. A 305 year monthly rainfall series for the Island of Ireland (1711-2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Conor; Burt, Tim P.; Broderick, Ciaran; Duffy, Catriona; Macdonald, Neil; Matthews, Tom; McCarthy, Mark P.; Mullan, Donal; Noone, Simon; Ryan, Ciara; Thorne, Peter; Walsh, Seamus; Wilby, Robert L.

    2017-04-01

    This paper derives a continuous 305-year monthly rainfall series for the Island of Ireland (IoI) for the period 1711-2016. Two key data sources are employed: i) a previously unpublished UK Met Office Note which compiled annual rainfall anomalies and corresponding monthly per mille amounts from weather diaries and early observational records for the period 1711-1977; and ii) a long-term, homogenised monthly IoI rainfall series for the period 1850-2016. Using estimates of long-term average precipitation sampled from the quality assured series, the full record is reconstituted and insights drawn regarding notable periods and the range of climate variability and change experienced. Consistency with other long records for the region is examined, including: the England and Wales Precipitation series (EWP; 1766-2016); the early EWP Glasspoole series (1716-1765) and the Central England Temperature series (CET; 1711-2016). Strong correspondence between all records is noted from 1780 onwards. While disparities are evident between the early EWP and Ireland series, the latter shows strong decadal consistency with CET throughout the record. In addition, independent, early observations from Cork and Dublin, along with available documentary sources, corroborate the derived series and add confidence to our reconstruction. The new IoI rainfall record reveals that the wettest decades occurred in the early 18th Century, despite the fact that IoI has experienced a long-term winter wetting trend consistent with climate model projections. These exceptionally wet winters of the 1720s and 1730s were concurrent with almost unprecedented warmth in the CET, glacial advance throughout Scandinavia, and glacial retreat in West Greenland, consistent with a wintertime NAO-type forcing. Our study therefore demonstrates the value of long-term observational records for providing insight to the natural climate variability of the North Atlantic region.

  18. Dublin Institute of Technology's Programme for Students Learning with Communities: A Critical Account of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Elena; Bates, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the process of critically evaluating Dublin Institute of Technology's Programme for Students Learning With Communities after its first year of operation. The programme supports and promotes community-based learning/service-learning across DIT. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is presented in the form of a…

  19. Constructing a Global Learning Partnership in Physiotherapy: An Ireland-Uganda Initiative.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Cliona; Kazibwe, Herman; Whitehouse, Zillah; Blake, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    There is a strong correlation between disability and poverty and it is acknowledged that until disability issues are addressed, the goal of poverty reduction in low-income countries is unlikely to be achieved. Despite the high prevalence of disability in developing countries, there remains a significant shortage of rehabilitation professionals as highlighted by the WHO report, Human resources for Health (2006). The purpose of this project was to develop a collaborative and sustainable partnership to strengthen educational and research capacity in global health, disability, and rehabilitation between two physiotherapy schools; University College Dublin, Ireland, and Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda. This article aims to describe the approach used and initial project outcomes. This project involved a bilateral visit to both institutions by two members of staff of respective physiotherapy programs. These visits entailed stakeholder meetings, clinical site visits, and workshops to identify the priorities for the partnership and shape the collaboration going forward. Appreciative inquiry methodology was used during the workshops and the four-dimensional framework for curriculum development was used to guide analysis and underpin findings. The key priorities identified were (i) development of joint global health learning initiative, (ii) to explore the possibility of postgraduate learning and research opportunities for Ugandan colleagues, and (iii) to develop joint clinical placements. The rationale and context and a plan of action is described. The project is ambitious and in order to be sustainable, the importance of long-term interinstitutional commitment and further funding cannot be ignored. This work provides a framework for other universities and institutions wishing to undertake similar activities. Such partnerships provide rich learning opportunities for students and health professionals and facilitate a deeper understanding of global health

  20. "A Victim of Its Own Success"? The Diploma in Addiction Studies at Trinity College Dublin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Marguerite; Butler, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews and reflects on the Diploma in Addiction Studies: a 1-year, full-time programme taught at the School of Social Work and Social Policy in Trinity College Dublin since the academic year 1983/1984, which has recently had its external funding withdrawn. The programme was aimed at multidisciplinary classes, including students from…

  1. MMR immunisation status among Dublin paediatric A&E attenders.

    PubMed

    Murphy, A W; Power, R; Kinlen, D M; Johnson, Z

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish the need for opportunistic MMR immunisation among paediatric A&E attenders to the three Dublin paediatric hospitals and to examine the relationship between immunisation status and socioeconomic factors. Design was that of a two month cross sectional study. Survey data was then compared with information on the Eastern Health Board (EHB) records system. Small area and multiple regression analysis of socioeconomic factors derived from participants addresses was also performed. Subjects were 337 children who attended these departments and were aged between fifteen months and five years. For 66% of cases there was a history of MMR immunisation, 30% gave a negative history and 4% did not know. Of those giving a negative history, one third said immunisation had been omitted for no specific reason. EHB records suggested that 39% were immunised, 41% were not and 20% were not on file. Eligibility for the GMS was not associated with failure to immunise. Small area and multiple regression analysis showed little association between immunisation uptake and socioeconomic factors. An opportunistic MMR immunisation policy in A&E Departments would make an important contribution to increasing overall uptake figures. Parental knowledge of the implications of measles and the effectiveness of immunisation needs to be improved. Computerised child health systems must have high data quality standards and access to these systems should be made available in A&E departments.

  2. Identifying past fire regimes throughout the Holocene in Ireland using new and established methods of charcoal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, Donna; Mitchell, Fraser J. G.

    2016-04-01

    Globally, in recent years there has been an increase in the scale, intensity and level of destruction caused by wildfires. This can be seen in Ireland where significant changes in vegetation, land use, agriculture and policy, have promoted an increase in fires in the Irish landscape. This study looks at wildfire throughout the Holocene and draws on lacustrine charcoal records from seven study sites spread across Ireland, to reconstruct the past fire regimes recorded at each site. This work utilises new and accepted methods of fire history reconstruction to provide a recommended analytical procedure for statistical charcoal analysis. Digital charcoal counting was used and fire regime reconstructions carried out via the CharAnalysis programme. To verify this record new techniques are employed; an Ensemble-Member strategy to remove the objectivity associated with parameter selection, a Signal to Noise Index to determine if the charcoal record is appropriate for peak detection, and a charcoal peak screening procedure to validate the identified fire events based on bootstrapped samples. This analysis represents the first study of its kind in Ireland, examining the past record of fire on a multi-site and paleoecological timescale, and will provide a baseline level of data which can be built on in the future when the frequency and intensity of fire is predicted to increase.

  3. An outbreak of Salmonella dublin infection in England and Wales associated with a soft unpasteurized cows' milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Maguire, H; Cowden, J; Jacob, M; Rowe, B; Roberts, D; Bruce, J; Mitchell, E

    1992-12-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella dublin infection occurred in England and Wales in October to December 1989. Forty-two people were affected, mainly adults, and most lived in south-east England. Microbiological and epidemiological investigations implicated an imported Irish soft unpasteurized cows' milk cheese as the vehicle of infection. A case-control study showed a statistically significant association between infection and consumption of the suspect cheese (p = 0.001). Salmonella dublin was subsequently isolated from cheeses obtained from the manufacturer's premises. Initial control measures included the withdrawal of the cheese from retail sale and a Food Hazard Warning to Environmental Health Departments, as well as a press release, from the Department of Health. Subsequently, a decision was taken by the manufacturer to pasteurize milk used in the production of cheese for the UK market and importation of the cheese resumed in June 1990.

  4. Long-term cost effectiveness of cardiac secondary prevention in primary care in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Paddy; Murphy, Edel; Smith, Susan M; Cupples, Margaret E; Byrne, Molly; Murphy, Andrew W

    2017-04-01

    While cardiac secondary prevention in primary care is established practice, little is known about its long-term cost effectiveness. This study examines the cost effectiveness of a secondary prevention intervention in primary care in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland over 6 years. An economic evaluation, based on a cluster randomised controlled trial of 903 patients with heart disease, was conducted 4.5 years after the intervention ceased to be delivered. Patients originally randomised to the control received usual practice while those randomised to the intervention received a tailored care package over the 1.5-year delivery period. Data on healthcare costs and quality adjusted life expectancy were used to undertake incremental cost utility analysis. Multilevel regression was used to estimate mean cost effectiveness and uncertainty was examined using cost effectiveness acceptability curves. At 6 years, there was a divergence in the results across jurisdictions. While the probability of the intervention being cost effective in the Republic of Ireland was 0.434, 0.232, 0.180, 0.150, 0.115 and 0.098 at selected threshold values of €5000, €15,000, €20,000, €25,000, €35,000 and €45,000, respectively, all equivalent probabilities for Northern Ireland equalled 1.000. Our findings suggest that the intervention in its current format is likely to be more cost effective than usual general practice care in Northern Ireland, but this is not the case in the Republic of Ireland.

  5. Benchmarking care for very low birthweight infants in Ireland and Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B P; Armstrong, K; Ryan, C A; Jenkins, J G

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking is that process through which best practice is identified and continuous quality improvement pursued through comparison and sharing. The Vermont Oxford Neonatal Network (VON) is the largest international external reference centre for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. This report from 2004-7 compares survival and morbidity throughout Ireland and benchmarks these results against VON. A standardised VON database for VLBW infants was created in 14 participating centres across Ireland and Northern Ireland. Data on 716 babies were submitted in 2004, increasing to 796 babies in 2007, with centres caring for from 10 to 120 VLBW infants per year. In 2007, mortality rates in VLBW infants varied from 4% to 19%. Standardised mortality ratios indicate that the number of deaths observed was not significantly different from the number expected, based on the characteristics of infants treated. There was no difference in the incidence of severe intraventricular haemorrhage between all-Ireland and VON groups (5% vs 6%, respectively). All-Ireland rates for chronic lung disease (CLD; 15-21%) remained lower than rates seen in the VON group (24-28%). The rates of late onset nosocomial infection in the all-Ireland group (25-26%) remained double those in the VON group (12-13%). This is the first all-Ireland international benchmarking report in any medical specialty. Survival, severe intraventricular haemorrhage and CLD compare favourably with international standards, but rates of nosocomial infection in neonatal units are concerning. Benchmarking clinical outcomes is critical for quality improvement and informing decisions concerning neonatal intensive care service provision.

  6. David Gordon Campbell Robertson: A Biographical Sketch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, J. B.

    Emeritus Professor David Robertson of the Missouri University of Science and Technology was born in Dublin Ireland on 29 December 1941. His father was a merchant navy Captain who served during WWII and during David's early years his family lived in Dublin and Donegal where David went to the local elementary school. In 1954 he moved to London with his parents and attended Highgate School before commencing metallurgy at the Royal School of Mines, Imperial College, London in 1960.

  7. Decomposing socioeconomic inequality in child vaccination: results from Ireland.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Edel; Walsh, Brendan; O'Neill, Ciaran

    2014-06-05

    There is limited knowledge of the extent of or factors underlying inequalities in uptake of childhood vaccination in Ireland. This paper aims to measure and decompose socioeconomic inequalities in childhood vaccination in the Republic of Ireland. The analysis was performed using data from the first wave of the Growing Up in Ireland survey, a nationally representative survey of the carers of over 11,000 nine-month old babies collected in 2008 and 2009. Multivariate analysis was conducted to explore the child and parental factors, including socioeconomic factors that were associated with non-vaccination of children. A concentration index was calculated to measure inequality in childhood vaccination. Subsequent decomposition analysis identified key factors underpinning observed inequalities. Overall the results confirm a strong socioeconomic gradient in childhood vaccination in the Republic of Ireland. Concentration indices of vaccination (CI=-0.19) show a substantial pro-rich gradient. Results from the decomposition analysis suggest that a substantial proportion of the inequality is explained by household level variables such as socioeconomic status, household structure, income and entitlement to publicly funded care (29.9%, 24% 30.6% and 12.9% respectively). Substantial differences are also observed between children of Irish mothers and immigrant mothers from developing countries. Vaccination was less likely in lower than in higher income households. Access to publicly funded services was an important factor in explaining inequalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An outbreak of Salmonella dublin infection in England and Wales associated with a soft unpasteurized cows' milk cheese.

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, H.; Cowden, J.; Jacob, M.; Rowe, B.; Roberts, D.; Bruce, J.; Mitchell, E.

    1992-01-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella dublin infection occurred in England and Wales in October to December 1989. Forty-two people were affected, mainly adults, and most lived in south-east England. Microbiological and epidemiological investigations implicated an imported Irish soft unpasteurized cows' milk cheese as the vehicle of infection. A case-control study showed a statistically significant association between infection and consumption of the suspect cheese (p = 0.001). Salmonella dublin was subsequently isolated from cheeses obtained from the manufacturer's premises. Initial control measures included the withdrawal of the cheese from retail sale and a Food Hazard Warning to Environmental Health Departments, as well as a press release, from the Department of Health. Subsequently, a decision was taken by the manufacturer to pasteurize milk used in the production of cheese for the UK market and importation of the cheese resumed in June 1990. PMID:1468523

  9. Decomposing socioeconomic inequalities in childhood obesity: evidence from Ireland.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Brendan; Cullinan, John

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to quantify and decompose the socioeconomic gradient in childhood obesity in the Republic of Ireland. The analysis is performed using data from the first wave of the Growing Up in Ireland survey, a nationally representative survey of 8568 nine-year-old children conducted in 2007 and 2008. We estimate concentration indices to quantify the extent of the socioeconomic gradient in childhood obesity and undertake a subsequent decomposition analysis to pinpoint the key factors underpinning the observed inequalities. Overall the results confirm a strong socioeconomic gradient in childhood obesity in the Republic of Ireland. Concentration indices of obesity (CI=-0.168) and overweight/obese (CI=-0.057) show that the gradient is more pronounced in obese children, while results from the decomposition analysis suggest that the majority of the inequality in childhood obesity is explained by parental level variables. Our findings suggest that addressing childhood obesity inequalities requires coordinated policy responses at both the child and parental level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Developing Online Tutorials to Improve Information Literacy Skills for Second-Year Nursing Students of University College Dublin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Kirsteen; Bolich, Cecilia; Duffy, Daniel; Quinn, Ciarán; Walsh, Kathryn; Connolly, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the process of developing online tutorials for a specified student group, in this case Second-Year Nursing students in University College Dublin. The product was commissioned by the Health Sciences Library and the UCD School of Nursing, Midwifery, and Health Systems. It was developed as a "Capstone Project" for part…

  11. Disability Awareness and University Staff Training in Ireland (Practice Brief)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padden, Lisa; Ellis, Carol

    2015-01-01

    It is vital that all university staff have awareness of the difficulties that may be experienced by students with disabilities. Staff must be given the knowledge and resources to support these students effectively. University College Dublin (UCD) Access & Lifelong Learning has developed a communication and training strategy to improve…

  12. Exploring Sedimentary Basins with High Frequency Receiver Function: the Dublin Basin Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardi, A.; Piana Agostinetti, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Receiver Function (RF) method is a widely applied seismological tool for the imaging of crustal and lithospheric structures beneath a single seismic station with one to tens kilometers of vertical resolution. However, detailed information about the upper crust (0-10 km depth) can also be retrieved by increasing the frequency content of the analyzed RF data-set (with a vertical resolution lower than 0.5km). This information includes depth of velocity contrasts, S-wave velocities within layers, as well as presence and location of seismic anisotropy or dipping interfaces (e.g., induced by faulting) at depth. These observables provides valuable constraints on the structural settings and properties of sedimentary basins both for scientific and industrial applications. To test the RF capabilities for this high resolution application, six broadband seismic stations have been deployed across the southwestern margin of the Dublin Basin (DB), Ireland, whose geothermal potential has been investigated in the last few years. With an inter-station distance of about 1km, this closely spaced array has been designed to provide a clear picture of the structural transition between the margin and the inner portion of the basin. In this study, a Bayesian approach is used to retrieve the posterior probability distributions of S-wave velocity at depth beneath each seismic station. A multi-frequency RF data-set is analyzed and RF and curves of apparent velocity are jointly inverted to better constrain absolute velocity variations. A pseudo 2D section is built to observe the lateral changes in elastic properties across the margin of the basin with a focus in the shallow portion of the crust. Moreover, by means of the harmonic decomposition technique, the azimuthal variations in the RF data-set are isolated and interpreted in terms of anisotropy and dipping interfaces associated with the major fault system in the area. These results are compared with the available information from

  13. The role of the nurse lecturer in clinical practice in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    McSharry, Edel; McGloin, Helen; Frizzell, Anne Marie; Winters-O'Donnell, Lisa

    2010-07-01

    Undergraduate nurse education in Ireland transferred into the third level sector in 2002. As a result nurse lecturers are expected to develop a model of clinical practice that enables them to be involved in practice and its development while maintaining their own nursing expertise and credibility [An Bord Altranais, 2005. Requirements and Standards for Nurse Registration Education Programmes, third ed. An Bord Altranais, Dublin]. In light of this the researchers set out to explore the perceptions of the nurse lecturers' role in clinical practice among nurse lecturers, preceptors, clinical nurse managers, clinical placement co-ordinators and students. A qualitative research design using focus groups was chosen. A purposive sampling strategy generated the sample for 5 in-depth focus group interviews with the aforementioned key stakeholders and the data was thematically analysed. Five themes emerged which centred on the maintenance of lecturers' clinical credibility, the lecturers' role as a resource to clinical staff, teaching and assessing students in practice, the value of fostering relationships in practice and role duplication. The findings from this study supports the anecdotal evidence that confusion exists around the role but more importantly it gives the nurse lecturer population guidance on how to develop the role in partnership with the various stakeholders in a way that supports the nursing students and clinical staff in practice in an effective manner. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Young Women's Positive and Negative Perceptions of Self in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Siobhan; Neill, Gail

    2007-01-01

    This paper represents analysis of one aspect of a larger research project examining the everyday lives and experiences of young women in Northern Ireland. As an introductory exercise within focus groups, 48 young women considered and discussed the good and not so good things about being a young woman in Northern Ireland. Through these accounts…

  15. Bullying and Cyberbullying Studies in the School-Aged Population on the Island of Ireland: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foody, Mairéad; Samara, Muthanna; O'Higgins Norman, James

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bullying research has gained a substantial amount of interest in recent years because of the implications for child and adolescent development. Aim and sample: We conducted a meta-analysis of traditional and cyberbullying studies in the Republic and North of Ireland to gain an understanding of prevalence rates and associated issues…

  16. Spotlight on VET: Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of VET (vocational education and training) in Ireland. In Ireland, the main providers of VET are the national Training and Employment Authority (FAS--a non-commercial semi-State body, part of the public sector) and vocational education committees (VECs--public sector bodies at county level responsible for vocational…

  17. Gold potential in the Dalradian rocks of NW Northern Ireland: GIS-based prospectivity analysis using Tellus data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusty, P. A. J.; McDonnell, P. M.; Gunn, A. G.; Chacksfield, B. C.; Cooper, M.

    2009-04-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are essential tools for the management and integration of the large amounts of multivariate spatial data used in mineral exploration. Prospectivity analysis combines these datasets, in the context of a mineral deposit model, to produce a map showing the distribution of potential for a particular type of mineral deposit. In this example Arc-Spatial Data Modeller software has been used to analyse the prospectivity for orogenic vein gold mineralisation in the Dalradian rocks of north-western Northern Ireland. A knowledge-driven (fuzzy logic) approach was used because of the small number of gold deposits within the area. Fuzzy logic is used in situations where information is inexact and the use of classical set theory is inappropriate. Fuzzy logic allows assignment of weightings to exploration data on a continuous scale from 1 (full membership) to 0 (full non-membership). This allows a level of uncertainty or 'fuzziness' to be incorporated into the modelling. The key stages of prospectivity analysis are: (1) analysis of the deposit model to determine key exploration indicators; (2) data processing, interpretation and analysis to extract key indicators; (3) assignment of weightings, zones and styles of influence to key indicators; and (4) calculation of prospectivity. This research is based largely on new geochemical and geophysical data resulting from the Tellus Project in Northern Ireland. The Tellus Project involved geochemical and airborne geophysical surveys over the whole of Northern Ireland carried out between 2004-6 with funding from the Government of Northern Ireland. The study area (3074 km2) is underlain mainly by Neoproterozoic rocks of the Dalradian Supergroup (ca. 590 Ma) which form part of the Caledonide orogenic belt. The Dalradian Supergroup comprises a thick succession of semi-pelites, psammites and pelites, with graphitic pelite horizons that host much of the known gold mineralisation. In the Sperrin Mountains two

  18. Characteristics of hospital-treated intentional drug overdose in Ireland and Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Eve; Corcoran, Paul; Cassidy, Linda; O'Carroll, Amanda; Perry, Ivan J; Bonner, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study compared the profile of intentional drug overdoses (IDOs) presenting to emergency departments in Ireland and in the Western Trust Area of Northern Ireland between 2007 and 2012. Specifically the study aimed to compare characteristics of the patients involved, to explore the factors associated with repeated IDO and to report the prescription rates of common drug types in the population. Methods We utilised data from two comparable registries which monitor the incidence of hospital-treated self-harm, recording data from deliberate self-harm presentations involving an IDO to all hospital emergency departments for the period 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2012. Results Between 2007 and 2012 the registries recorded 56 494 self-harm presentations involving an IDO. The study showed that hospital-treated IDO was almost twice as common in Northern Ireland than in Ireland (278 vs 156/100 000, respectively). Conclusions Despite the overall difference in the rates of IDO, the profile of such presentations was remarkably similar in both countries. Minor tranquillisers were the drugs most commonly involved in IDOs. National campaigns are required to address the availability and misuse of minor tranquillisers, both prescribed and non-prescribed. PMID:25079938

  19. Mapping and converting essential Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata into MARC21 and Dublin Core: towards an alternative to the FGDC Clearinghouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chandler, A.; Foley, D.; Hafez, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to raise and address a number of issues related to the conversion of Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata into MARC21 and Dublin Core. We present an analysis of 466 FGDC metadata records housed in the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) node of the FGDC Clearinghouse, with special emphasis on the length of fields and the total length of records in this set. One of our contributions is a 34 element crosswalk, a proposal that takes into consideration the constraints of the MARC21 standard as implemented in OCLC's World Cat and the realities of user behavior.

  20. What would encourage blood donation in Ireland?

    PubMed

    Harrington, M; Sweeney, M R; Bailie, K; Morris, K; Kennedy, A; Boilson, A; O'Riordan, J; Staines, A

    2007-05-01

    Recent changes have resulted in the loss of 4% of the donor panel in the Republic of Ireland and 3% in Northern Ireland. In order to increase the number of donors in these two regions, it is important that transfusion service providers explore and understand the reasons, which prevent individuals from donating. The aim of this study was to explore these issues particularly in non-donors and those who had lapsed. This 7-month all-Ireland study was conducted by computer-assisted telephone interview. Data collected included sociodemographic history, donation status, as well as barriers/deterrents to donation. There were 4166 completed questionnaires (44% donors; 56% non-donors). Of the donors, 13% had donated blood within the last 2 years. Current donors cited 'awareness of patients needs' (88%), 'trust in the blood transfusion service' (70%), and 'an advertising campaign' (70%) as reasons encouraging them to donate blood. Lapsed donors and non-donors cited 'more frequent mobile clinics/sessions' (30% lapsed donors; 53% non-donors), 'if I was asked' (28% lapsed donors; 53% non-donors), and 'more flexible opening hours' (23% lapsed donors; 44% non-donors) as reasons that would encourage them to donate. The main reasons cited by non-donors for never having donated included 'medical reasons' (41% Republic of Ireland; 43% Northern Ireland), 'lack of information' (20% Republic of Ireland; 22% Northern Ireland), 'fear of needles' (15% Republic of Ireland; 17% Northern Ireland), and 'time constraints' (12% Republic of Ireland; 13% Northern Ireland). Among the non-donor group, 10% (Republic of Ireland) and 6% (Northern Ireland) claimed that they are not permitted to donate. Replacing regular donors is a major challenge for the transfusion service providers. This study shows that by facilitating the general public by introducing more mobile clinics/sessions, more flexible opening hours and having a better level of knowledge in the community about blood donation may encourage

  1. The Economic Impact of Ulster University on the Northern Ireland Economy. Higher Education in Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Ursula; McNicoll, Iain; White, James

    2015-01-01

    This study provides an analysis of the economic impact of Ulster University and its students on the Northern Ireland economy. With over 26,000 students, Ulster University is Northern Ireland's largest university in terms of student numbers. With its headquarters based at the Coleraine Campus, it has three more campuses in Northern Ireland: the…

  2. The Impact of Afforestation on the Carbon Stocks of Mineral Soils Across the Republic of Ireland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellock, M.; Laperle, C.; Kiely, G.; Reidy, B.; Duffy, C.; Tobin, B.

    2009-04-01

    conifer, broadleaf, and mixed (broadleaf and conifer) and soil type: brown earth, podzol, brown podzolic, gley and brown earth. The paired plot method involves selecting a second site that represents the same soil type and physical characteristics as the forest site. The only difference between the two sites should be the current land-use of the pair site, which should represent the pre-afforestation land-use of the forest site. Each forest site and its pair site will be sampled in the top 30 cm of soil for bulk density and organic carbon %, while litter and F/H layer samples will be taken and analysed for carbon. This data should provide an analysis of the carbon stocks of the soil and litter of both the forest site and its pair site allowing for comparison and thus the impact of afforestation on carbon stocks. References. Byrne, K.A., & Milne, R. (2006). Carbon stocks and sequestration in plantation forests in the Republic of Ireland. Forestry, 79, no. 4: 361. Davis, M.R., & Condron, L.M. (2002). Impact of grassland afforestation on soil carbon in New Zealand: a review of paired-site studies. Australian Journal of Soil Research, 40, no. 4: 675-690. Kyoto Protocol. 1997 Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. FCCC/CP/1997/7/Add.1, Decision 1/CP.3, Annex 7. UN. National Forest Inventory: NFI Methodology. (2007). Forest Service, The Department of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food, Wexford, Ireland. Pilcher, J.R. & Mac an tSaoir, S. (1995). Wood, Trees and Forests in Ireland. (Royal Irish Academy, Dublin. Renou, F. & Farrell, E.P. (2005). Reclaiming peatlands for forestry: the Irish experience. In: Stanturf, J.A. and Madsen, P.A. (eds.). Restoration of boreal and temperate forests. CRC Press, Boca Raton. p.541-557. UNFCCC. 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Palais des Nations, Geneva. http://www.unfccc.de/index.html

  3. Towards a quantification of ocean wave heights off the west coast of Ireland using land based seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donne, S.; Bean, C. J.; Lokmer, I.; Lambkin, K.; Creamer, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean gravity waves are driven by atmospheric pressure systems. Their interactions with one another and reflection off coastlines generate pressure changes at the sea floor. These pressure fluctuations are the cause of continuous background seismic noise known as microseisms. The levels of microseism activity vary as a function of the sea state and increase during periods of intensive ocean wave activity. In 2011 a seismic network was deployed along the west coast of Ireland to continuously record microseisms generated in the Atlantic Ocean, as part of the Wave Observation (WaveObs) project based in University College Dublin. This project aims to determine the characteristics of the causative ocean gravity waves through calibration of the microseism data with ocean buoy data. In initial tests we are using a Backpropagation Feed-forward Artificial Neural Network (BP ANN) to establish the underlying relationships between microseisms and ocean waves. ANNs were originally inspired by studies of the mammalian brain and nervous system and are designed to learn by example. If successful these tools could then be used to estimate ocean wave heights and wave periods using a land-based seismic network and complement current wave observations being made offshore by marine buoys. Preliminary ANN results are promising with the network successfully able to reconstruct trends in ocean wave heights and periods. Microseisms can provide significant information about oceanic processes. With a deeper understanding of how these processes work there is potential for 1) locating and tracking the evolution of the largest waves in the Atlantic and 2) reconstructing the wave climate off the west coast of Ireland using legacy seismic data on a longer time scale than is currently available using marine based observations.

  4. Supervised classification of continental shelf sediment off western Donegal, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteys, X.; Craven, K.; McCarron, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Managing human impacts on marine ecosystems requires natural regions to be identified and mapped over a range of hierarchically nested scales. In recent years (2000-present) the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS) and Integrated Mapping for the Sustainable Development of Ireland's Marine Resources programme (INFOMAR) (Geological Survey Ireland and Marine Institute collaborations) has provided unprecedented quantities of high quality data on Ireland's offshore territories. The increasing availability of large, detailed digital representations of these environments requires the application of objective and quantitative analyses. This study presents results of a new approach for sea floor sediment mapping based on an integrated analysis of INFOMAR multibeam bathymetric data (including the derivatives of slope and relative position), backscatter data (including derivatives of angular response analysis) and sediment groundtruthing over the continental shelf, west of Donegal. It applies a Geographic-Object-Based Image Analysis software package to provide a supervised classification of the surface sediment. This approach can provide a statistically robust, high resolution classification of the seafloor. Initial results display a differentiation of sediment classes and a reduction in artefacts from previously applied methodologies. These results indicate a methodology that could be used during physical habitat mapping and classification of marine environments.

  5. Road accident facts Ireland, 2001

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-10-01

    This report covers all road or traffic accidents reported : to the Garda Sochna involving fatalities, personal : injury or material damage which occurred on public : roads in Ireland (exclusive of Northern Ireland) in 2001. : Accidents on private...

  6. Road accident facts Ireland, 2000

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-08-01

    This report covers all road or traffic accidents reported : to the Garda Sochna involving fatalities, personal : injury or material damage which occurred on public : roads in Ireland (exclusive of Northern Ireland) in 2000. : Accidents on private...

  7. Road accident facts Ireland, 1999

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-12-01

    This report covers all road or traffic accidents reported to the Garda Siochana involving fatalities, personal injury, or material damage which occurred on public roads in Ireland (exclusive of Northern Ireland) in 1999. Accidents on private property...

  8. Road accident facts Ireland, 1998

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-10-01

    This report covers all road or traffic accidents reported to the Garda Siochana involving fatalities, personal injury or material damage which occurred on public roads in ireland (exclusive of Northern Ireland) in 1998. Accidents on private property,...

  9. Detection of major climatic and environmental predictors of liver fluke exposure risk in Ireland using spatial cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Selemetas, Nikolaos; de Waal, Theo

    2015-04-30

    Fasciolosis caused by Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke) can cause significant economic and production losses in dairy cow farms. The aim of the current study was to identify important weather and environmental predictors of the exposure risk to liver fluke by detecting clusters of fasciolosis in Ireland. During autumn 2012, bulk-tank milk samples from 4365 dairy farms were collected throughout Ireland. Using an in-house antibody-detection ELISA, the analysis of BTM samples showed that 83% (n=3602) of dairy farms had been exposed to liver fluke. The Getis-Ord Gi* statistic identified 74 high-risk and 130 low-risk significant (P<0.01) clusters of fasciolosis. The low-risk clusters were mostly located in the southern regions of Ireland, whereas the high-risk clusters were mainly situated in the western part. Several climatic variables (monthly and seasonal mean rainfall and temperatures, total wet days and rain days) and environmental datasets (soil types, enhanced vegetation index and normalised difference vegetation index) were used to investigate dissimilarities in the exposure to liver fluke between clusters. Rainfall, total wet days and rain days, and soil type were the significant classes of climatic and environmental variables explaining the differences between significant clusters. A discriminant function analysis was used to predict the exposure risk to liver fluke using 80% of data for modelling and the remaining subset of 20% for post hoc model validation. The most significant predictors of the model risk function were total rainfall in August and September and total wet days. The risk model presented 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity and an accuracy of 95% correctly classified cases. A risk map of exposure to liver fluke was constructed with higher probability of exposure in western and north-western regions. The results of this study identified differences between clusters of fasciolosis in Ireland regarding climatic and environmental variables and

  10. Bilateral comparison of 10 V standards between the NSAI-NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, March to April 2011 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, O.; Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.

    2011-01-01

    As a part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland-National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI-NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out from March to April 2011. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B) were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the 10 V output EMF of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages on internal temperature and ambient pressure. The comparison results show that the voltage standards maintained by NSAI-NML and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated expanded uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  11. Dental students' perceived sources of stress: a multi-country study.

    PubMed

    Polychronopoulou, Argy; Divaris, Kimon

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify dental students' self-reported sources of stress and to explore the role of specific curricular and institutional differences in the variation of perceived stressors among dental students in Greece, Ireland, Slovenia, Sweden, Spain, and Croatia. A thirty-item modified version of the Dental Environment Stress (DES) questionnaire was administered to all undergraduate students enrolled at six European dental schools selected to reflect geographical, curricular, and professional environment diversity: Athens, Greece; Dublin, Ireland; Ljubljana, Slovenia; Malmö, Sweden; Santiago de Compostela, Spain; and Zagreb, Croatia. Participation varied from 93 percent in Athens to 65 percent in Dublin. A total of 1,492 questionnaires were available for analysis. Univariate analysis and multivariate modelling were used for data analysis. Performance pressure, workload, and self-efficacy beliefs constituted the students' main concerns. In the univariate analysis, student responses differed by country: Swedish students provided the lowestst scores in five out of six DES factors, Spanish students were the most concerned about "clinical training" and "performance pressure," whereas Greek students were the most concerned about "patient treatment." Multivariate modelling revealed that problem-based learning (PBL) was inversely associated with perceived stress for "self-efficacy beliefs" OR (95% CI): 0.66 (0.52, 0.84), "workload" OR (95% CI): 0.58 (0.41, 0.80); and "clinical training" OR (95% CI): 0.69 (0.50, 0.95) when compared to traditional curricula. Students' perceived stressors differed greatly among the six institutions and were associated with both individual (gender, study level) and educational/institutional (curriculum type, class size, educational costs) parameters.

  12. Monopoly Profits: The Market for Taxi Licenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Presents a case study dealing with open versus closed markets for use in college economics classes. Using the example of the taxi license monopoly in Dublin, Ireland, students examine how theories of supply and demand explain the characteristics of open and closed markets. (AM)

  13. Ageing in Changing Community Contexts: Cross-Border Perspectives from Rural Ireland and Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kieran; O'Shea, Eamon; Scharf, Thomas; Murray, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Ongoing demographic, social, economic and cultural changes point to the dynamic and continually changing contexts of rural areas in Ireland and Northern Ireland. However, the influence of such changes on the lives of older people remains under-explored, particularly the question of how older people perceive, connect to and engage in their…

  14. The Impact of Problem-Based Learning on the Information Behavior and Literacy of Veterinary Medicine Students at University College Dublin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Lorna

    2007-01-01

    Research was conducted on the impact of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) on the information seeking and literacy of veterinary students at University College Dublin. Data were collected using both quantitative and qualitative methods from students, academics and the librarian. Results showed that PBL has a significant impact on how students find and…

  15. Telemedicine services in the Republic of Ireland: an evolving policy context.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Anne; Murphy, Andrew William; Clerkin, Pauline

    2006-05-01

    The Republic of Ireland is characterised by few urban conurbations and a high rural population, including significant numbers of island dwellers. Information communication technologies (ICT), including telemedicine, present opportunities to address rural health-service delivery issues. As in other countries, the recent National Health Information Strategy is regarded as pivotal to the modernisation of the Irish health care system. There is, however, a dearth of research about telemedicine in Ireland. This paper reports, to the best of our knowledge, the first systematic review of telemedicine in the two regional health boards in the Republic of Ireland. Details of 11 telemedicine services, all initiated by local policy, will be presented. Results of an interview study with service providers about their experiences of the practices and processes involved in telemedicine service delivery are also provided. The focus of our analysis is two-fold. We assess the resonance of these Irish data with the international literature with particular reference to a recently developed model for the normalisation of telemedicine. For the first time, this model which was developed in the United Kingdom is applied to a fresh set of empirical data in a different health care context. We then discuss a number of health information policy issues for Ireland and elsewhere arising from our analysis.

  16. Clew Bay, Ireland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-26

    Clew Bay is in County Mayo, Republic of Ireland. It contains Ireland's best example of sunken glacial drumlins. Clew Bay is associated with Grace O'Malley, the Pirate Queen during Elizabethan times; and Dorinish, a private island purchased by John Lennon. The drumlins are low hills formed from glacial sediment deposited at the end of the last Ice Age. The image was acquired May 31, 2016, covers an area of 22.5 by 26.2 km, and is located at 53.9 degrees north, 9.6 degrees west. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18670

  17. Characteristics of hospital-treated intentional drug overdose in Ireland and Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Eve; Corcoran, Paul; Cassidy, Linda; O'Carroll, Amanda; Perry, Ivan J; Bonner, Brendan

    2014-07-29

    This study compared the profile of intentional drug overdoses (IDOs) presenting to emergency departments in Ireland and in the Western Trust Area of Northern Ireland between 2007 and 2012. Specifically the study aimed to compare characteristics of the patients involved, to explore the factors associated with repeated IDO and to report the prescription rates of common drug types in the population. We utilised data from two comparable registries which monitor the incidence of hospital-treated self-harm, recording data from deliberate self-harm presentations involving an IDO to all hospital emergency departments for the period 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2012. Between 2007 and 2012 the registries recorded 56 494 self-harm presentations involving an IDO. The study showed that hospital-treated IDO was almost twice as common in Northern Ireland than in Ireland (278 vs 156/100 000, respectively). Despite the overall difference in the rates of IDO, the profile of such presentations was remarkably similar in both countries. Minor tranquillisers were the drugs most commonly involved in IDOs. National campaigns are required to address the availability and misuse of minor tranquillisers, both prescribed and non-prescribed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Work-related ill-health: Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, Great Britain 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    Money, A; Carder, M; Noone, P; Bourke, J; Hayes, J; Turner, S; Agius, R

    2015-01-01

    Data on work-related ill-health (WRIH) in the Republic of Ireland is inconsistent. To compare the incidence of WRIH in the Republic of Ireland (ROI), Northern Ireland (NI) and Great Britain (GB) reported by clinical specialists in skin and respiratory medicine and by specialist occupational physicians (OPs). Analysis of data reported to three surveillance schemes in The Health and Occupation Research (THOR) network in ROI and corresponding UK schemes. Contact dermatitis was the most frequently reported skin disease in the three areas. Asthma was the most frequently-reported respiratory disease in the ROI, while asbestos-related cases predominate in GB and NI. Mental health disorders, followed by musculoskeletal disorders were reported most frequently by OPs. Annual average incidence rates for skin disease were 2 per 100000 employed (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-2.8) in the ROI and 7 per 100000 for GB (95% CI 4.8-9.4). Unadjusted incidence rates for respiratory disease were 1 (95% CI 0.3-1) and 8 (95% CI 6.1-10.7) per 100000 in the ROI and GB, respectively; adjusted for reporter non-response, these figures increased to 15 (95% CI 11.3-19.6) and 32 (95% CI 28.4-35.6) per 100000 respectively. This is the first paper to include THOR data on WRIH from the ROI, NI and GB. Consistent and dedicated data collection in the ROI via the THOR schemes is viable and important in the light of a deficit of occupational ill-health data. Sustained efforts to improve participation are underway. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. An economic cost analysis of emergency department key performance indicators in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Brenda; Jones, Cheryl; McCabe, Aileen; O'Sullivan, Ronan; Wakai, Abel

    2017-06-01

    High quality data is fundamental to using key performance indicators (KPIs) for performance monitoring. However, the resources required to collect high quality data are often significant and should usually be targeted at high priority areas. As part of a study of 11 emergency department (ED) KPIs in Ireland, the primary objective of this study was to estimate the relative cost of collecting the additional minimum data set (MDS) elements for those 11 KPIs. An economic cost analysis focused on 12 EDs in the Republic of Ireland. The resource use data were obtained using two separate focus group interviews. The number of available MDS elements was obtained from a sample of 100 patient records per KPI per participating ED. Unit costs for all resource use were taken at the midpoint of the relevant staff salary scales. An ED would need to spend an estimated additional &OV0556;3561 per month on average to capture all the MDS elements relevant to the 11 KPIs investigated. The additional cost ranges from 14.8 to 39.2%; this range is 13.9-32.3% for small EDs, whereas the range for medium EDs is 11.7-40%. Regional EDs have a higher additional estimated cost to capture all the relevant MDS elements (&OV0556;3907), compared with urban EDs (&OV0556;3353). The additional cost of data collection, contingent on that already collected, required to capture all the relevant MDS elements for the KPIs examined, ranges from 14.8 to 39.2% per KPI, with variation identified between regional and urban hospitals.

  20. International trends in health science librarianship Part 8: the UK and the Republic of Ireland Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Karen; Lawton, Aoife

    2013-12-01

    This is the 8th in a series of articles exploring international trends in health science librarianship with a focus on the UK and Ireland in the first decade of the 21st century. The invited authors are from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Future issues will track trends from Scotland and Wales. © 2013 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  1. Association of Educational Attainment and Adolescent Substance Use Disorder in a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apantaku-Olajide, Tunde; James, Philip D.; Smyth, Bobby P.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores substance use, psychosocial problems, and the relationships to educational status in 193 adolescents (school dropouts, 63; alternative education, 46; mainstream students, 84) who attended a substance abuse treatment facility in Dublin, Ireland, within a 42-month period. For each adolescent, data on demographics, family…

  2. Comparison of midwife-led and consultant-led care of healthy women at low risk of childbirth complications in the Republic of Ireland: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background No midwifery-led units existed in Ireland before 2004. The aim of this study was to compare midwife-led (MLU) versus consultant-led (CLU) care for healthy, pregnant women without risk factors for labour and delivery. Methods An unblinded, pragmatic randomised trial was designed, funded by the Health Service Executive (Dublin North-East). Following ethical approval, all women booking prior to 24 weeks of pregnancy at two maternity hospitals with 1,300-3,200 births annually in Ireland were assessed for trial eligibility.1,653 consenting women were centrally randomised on a 2:1 ratio to MLU or CLU care, (1101:552). 'Intention-to-treat' analysis was used to compare 9 key neonatal and maternal outcomes. Results No statistically significant difference was found between MLU and CLU in the seven key outcomes: caesarean birth (163 [14.8%] vs 84 [15.2%]; relative risk (RR) 0.97 [95% CI 0.76 to 1.24]), induction (248 [22.5%] vs 138 [25.0%]; RR 0.90 [0.75 to 1.08]), episiotomy (126 [11.4%] vs 68 [12.3%]; RR 0.93 [0.70 to 1.23]), instrumental birth (139 [12.6%] vs 79 [14.3%]; RR 0.88 [0.68 to 1.14]), Apgar scores < 8 (10 [0.9%] vs 9 [1.6%]; RR 0.56 [0.23 to 1.36]), postpartum haemorrhage (144 [13.1%] vs 75 [13.6%]; RR 0.96 [0.74 to 1.25]); breastfeeding initiation (616 [55.9%] vs 317 [57.4%]; RR 0.97 [0.89 to 1.06]). MLU women were significantly less likely to have continuous electronic fetal monitoring (397 [36.1%] vs 313 [56.7%]; RR 0.64 [0.57 to 0.71]), or augmentation of labour (436 [39.6%] vs 314 [56.9%]; RR 0.50 [0.40 to 0.61]). Conclusions Midwife-led care, as practised in this study, is as safe as consultant-led care and is associated with less intervention during labour and delivery. Trial registration number ISRCTN: ISRCTN14973283 PMID:22035427

  3. Understanding the state of health information in Ireland: A qualitative study using a socio-technical approach.

    PubMed

    Craig, Sarah; Kodate, Naonori

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to add to the broader literature on socio-technical theory and its value and/or relevance to health information in Ireland. The paper focuses on three factors that can impact on health information; those of policy, infrastructure and people (PIP) and examines how Ireland compares with other countries in relation to these factors. Qualitative methods (documentary analysis and semi-structured interviews) were used. Key policy and strategy documents, and original research articles from Australia, Canada, Ireland, the UK and the US were analysed from a comparative perspective. The dimensions of policy, infrastructure and people were then explored through semi-structured interviews with health information experts in Ireland. Their perceptions were compared with and contrasted against the findings from the documentary analysis, and examined thematically. The views of health information experts support the findings of the review of Ireland's development in this area compared with other countries and that Ireland lags behind others in policy and practice terms. The paper concludes that the three dimensions of policy, infrastructure and people do indeed help to frame the understanding of health information in Ireland and that a socio-technical perspective, combined with a comparative approach, can also help both policy makers and practitioners in identifying the scope for improvement in health information. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Universal Design for Learning and Its Application to Clinical Placements in Health Science Courses (Practice Brief)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heelan, Ann; Halligan, Phil; Quirke, Mary

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Ireland's Association for Higher Education, Access and Disability (AHEAD), in partnership with the School of Nursing University College Dublin (UCD), hosted a summer school for professionals working in the Health Sciences sector who have responsibility for including students with disabilities in the health professions, including clinical…

  5. 76 FR 23838 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Open Axis Group...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Production Act of 1993--Open Axis Group, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on March 22, 2011, pursuant to.... (``the Act''), Open Axis Group, Inc. (``Open Axis'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with..., Ontario, CANADA; and OpenJaw Technologies Ltd., Dublin, IRELAND, have been added as parties to this...

  6. Analysis of the operation of on farm emergency slaughter of bovine animals in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Paul; McKevitt, Aideen

    2015-01-01

    On Farm Emergency Slaughter (OFES) is the slaughter outside the slaughterhouse, of an otherwise healthy animal, which has suffered an accident that, for welfare reasons, prevented its transport to a slaughterhouse. The procedure is designed to prevent the transport of welfare compromised animals, which may have veterinary certification to slaughterhouses for Casualty Slaughter (CS), and provides an alternative to the euthanasia and disposal of injured animals that are otherwise fit for human consumption. The aim of this study was to analyse the operation of OFES in the Republic of Ireland between 1st January 2011 and 31st December 2013. Data were obtained from the Animal Identification and Movement electronic database of the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine. Two structured surveys were designed, one for Official Veterinarians (OVs) who work in slaughterhouses and the second for Private Veterinary Practitioners (PVPs) who work in food animal practice in the Republic of Ireland. Surveys were administered through SurveyMonkey. The total number of bovines slaughtered and the number that underwent OFES in Northern Ireland and the Netherlands were obtained from the Northern Ireland Department of Agriculture and Rural Development and the Netherlands Food and Consumer Safety Authority. OFES is neither widely available nor used in the Republic of Ireland. Results from the OV survey showed that Food Business Operators consider that facilitation of OFES would be detrimental to business. Data from the 5 slaughterhouses which offer OFES showed that acceptance criteria are not standardised. Results from the PVP survey showed that 77 % (n = 79) of PVPs were willing to certify animals for OFES. Fifty four percent (n = 49) were aware of slaughterhouses in their area that provided the service of OFES and 64 % (n = 57) stated a willingness to certify the transport of acutely injured animals to slaughterhouses for CS. Data from the Northern Ireland

  7. Seroepidemiology and phylogenetic characterisation of measles virus in Ireland, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    O' Riordan, Bernadette; Carr, Michael J; Connell, Jeff; Dunford, Linda; Hall, William W; Hassan, Jaythoon

    2014-08-01

    Ireland is classified as an area of high measles incidence. A World Health Organisation-European Region strategic plan exists for measles elimination by 2015. To retrospectively investigate measles outbreaks using all patient samples (sera and oral fluid) received for measles laboratory diagnosis and characterise the genetic diversity of circulating measles genotypes in Ireland. 704 cases of acute measles infection as determined by the presence of measles specific IgM in sera and oral fluids were confirmed at the National Virus Reference Laboratory. Measles positive samples (n=116) were examined by genotyping, sequence analysis and phylogenetic characterisation. Three measles outbreaks occurred over the study period: 2004, 2009/2010 and 2011. Measles IgM positivity ranged from 22-29% in outbreak years to 5-10% in the intervening years. Age profile analysis revealed that whereas individuals >10 years accounted for only 8% of cases in the 2004 outbreak, this increased to 33% and 29% in the 2009/2010 and 2011 outbreaks, respectively. The <1 year cohort accounted for 18-20% of cases in all outbreaks. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated both indigenous transmission and also importation events. Clade D viruses were exclusively found circulating in Ireland, with autochthonous transmission of diverse genotype D4 strains associated with large outbreaks across Europe. More recently, genotype D8 was identified and these were associated with importation events. This study provides a comprehensive genetic analysis of circulating measles genotypes in Ireland and discriminated between indigenous and imported viral strains. Notably, an increase in laboratory-confirmed measles cases in the greater than 10 years of age group was seen over the study period. This information is valuable to inform vaccination strategies with a focus on those populations who remain susceptible to measles infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Museum of Irish Industry, Robert Kane and Education for All in the Dublin of the 1850s and 1860s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Clara

    2009-01-01

    The Museum of Irish Industry in Dublin, in its short existence (1845-1867) facilitated the access of ordinary people to popular scientific education, became a "cause celebre" and was defended by popular protest when the government recommended its abolition in 1862. Its Director, Sir Robert Kane (1809-1890) was not only an advocate of…

  9. The scale and nature of Viking settlement in Ireland from Y-chromosome admixture analysis.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Brian; Brady, Claire; Moore, Laoise T; Bradley, Daniel G

    2006-12-01

    The Vikings (or Norse) played a prominent role in Irish history but, despite this, their genetic legacy in Ireland, which may provide insights into the nature and scale of their immigration, is largely unexplored. Irish surnames, some of which are thought to have Norse roots, are paternally inherited in a similar manner to Y-chromosomes. The correspondence of Scandinavian patrilineal ancestry in a cohort of Irish men bearing surnames of putative Norse origin was examined using both slow mutating unique event polymorphisms and relatively rapidly changing short tandem repeat Y-chromosome markers. Irish and Scandinavian admixture proportions were explored for both systems using six different admixture estimators, allowing a parallel investigation of the impact of method and marker type in Y-chromosome admixture analysis. Admixture proportion estimates in the putative Norse surname group were highly consistent and detected little trace of Scandinavian ancestry. In addition, there is scant evidence of Scandinavian Y-chromosome introgression in a general Irish population sample. Although conclusions are largely dependent on the accurate identification of Norse surnames, the findings are consistent with a relatively small number of Norse settlers (and descendents) migrating to Ireland during the Viking period (ca. AD 800-1200) suggesting that Norse colonial settlements might have been largely composed of indigenous Irish. This observation adds to previous genetic studies that point to a flexible Viking settlement approach across North Atlantic Europe.

  10. Analysis of Primary School Curriculum of Turkey, Finland, and Ireland in Terms of Media Literacy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanriverdi, Belgin; Apak, Ozlem

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the implications of Media Literacy Education (MLE) in Turkey by analyzing the Primary School Curricula in terms of MLE comparatively in Turkey, Ireland and Finland. In this study, the selection of Finland and Ireland curricula is related with those countries' being the pioneering countries in MLE and the…

  11. Effect of air pollution control on mortality and hospital admissions in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Dockery, Douglas W; Rich, David Q; Goodman, Patrick G; Clancy, Luke; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; George, Prethibha; Kotlov, Tania

    2013-07-01

    During the 1980s the Republic of Ireland experienced repeated severe pollution episodes. Domestic coal burning was a major source of this pollution. In 1990 the Irish government introduced a ban on the marketing, sale, and distribution of coal in Dublin. The ban was extended to Cork in 1995 and to 10 other communities in 1998 and 2000. We previously reported decreases in particulate black smoke (BS*) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations, measured as total gaseous acidity, in Dublin after the 1990 coal ban (Clancy et al. 2002). In the current study we explored and compared the effectiveness of the sequential 1990, 1995, and 1998 bans in reducing community air pollution and in improving public health. We compiled records of daily BS, total gaseous acidity (SO2), and counts of cause-specific deaths from 1981 to 2004 for Dublin County Borough (1990 ban), county Cork (1995 ban), and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1998 ban). We also compiled daily counts of hospital admissions for cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive diagnoses for Cork County Borough (1991 to 2004) and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1993 to 2004). We compared pre-ban and post-ban BS and SO2 concentrations for each city. Using interrupted time-series methods, we estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized mortality rates in each city or county after the corresponding local coal ban. We regressed weekly age- and sex-standardized mortality rates against an indicator of the post- versus pre-ban period, adjusting for influenza epidemics, weekly mean temperature, and a season smooth of the standardized mortality rates in Coastal counties presumably not affected by the bans. We compared these results with similar analyses in Midlands counties also presumably unaffected by the bans. We also estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized, weekly hospital admissions rates normalized for underreporting in each city or county after the 1995

  12. Paul Mills Ireland III Portrait of a Soldier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, John P.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation explores the life and identity of Paul Mills Ireland, III. The qualitative study was conducted using the portraiture approach and was further developed by incorporating the holistic content approach of analysis in narrative research. This fifth generation soldier was the product of a strong military lineage, most of whom were…

  13. Cyberbullying, Schools and the Law: A Comparative Study in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Noel; Mc Guckin, Conor

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study addresses the fast developing behavioural issue of cyberbullying in schools and its complex legal context. Purpose: This study set out to investigate teachers' perceptions of the extent of cyberbullying and the extent to which school leaders in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland feel knowledgeable and confident…

  14. Aspects of agricultural land use in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    1986-02-01

    Ireland's soil regions consist largely of Luvisols, Cambisols, and Gleysols. Approximately 60% of Ireland's land area is subject to varying degrees of soil limitations. Twenty-five percent of the land area comprises wet lowland mineral soils. Ninety percent of Ireland's agricultural area comprises pasture, hay, and silage. Approximately 30% of the agricultural area is devoted to dairying, and 55% to cattle production. is devoted to dairying, and 55% to cattle production. Trends in agricultural land use indicate that tillage declined substantially while livestock showed a substantial increase particularly in the decade 1965 1975. Research concludes that over 2.8 million ha has a capacity to carry at least 100 LU/40 ha (100 acres). Levels of fertilizer use in Ireland are below EEC levels. The highest fertilizer use levels are associated with the eastern and southern areas of Ireland. Tillage crops occupy only 10% of the agricultural area, while they account for 26% of tertilizer and lime use.

  15. Me and My Body (MAMBO): An Interactive Science Education Programme for Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalzo, Clare; Killard, Fiona; MacCormac, Aoife; Fryar, James; O' Brien, Emma; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a novel science education initiative developed for 8-to 12-year-old children by the Biomedical Diagnostics Institute at Dublin City University, Ireland. "Me and My Body" (MAMBO) is an interactive, multi-faceted programme that enables children to explore and understand the dynamic physiological parameters of the human…

  16. Establishing a Korean Language Programme in a European Higher Education Context: Rationale, Curriculum and Assessment Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Lorna; Do, Eunjee

    2013-01-01

    A growth in interest in Korean contemporary culture in Europe has benefitted Korean language studies in Higher Education. This article describes an innovative Korean language programme in the School of Linguistic, Speech and Communication Sciences at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. Since its establishment as a pilot project in 2010, the Korean…

  17. A Case Study of a National University Research Project and Its Technological Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegel, Melina

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined the implementation of a major research endeavor in an institution of higher education, Trinity College, Dublin, in Ireland, with particular focus on the change process during the initiation of the project and the subsequent needs assessment and implementation of technological solutions. This study identified the stages,…

  18. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-01-01

    On his staff page of the Trinity College Dublin website, Michael Coey lists "champagne" as his favourite drink. At the end of 2012, the Belfast-born experimental physicist received an extra reason to raise a celebratory glass thanks to Science Foundation Ireland (SFI), which named him its Researcher of the Year.

  19. Learning Networks--Enabling Change through Community Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Learning networks are a critical element of ethos of the community action research approach taken by the Early Learning Initiative at the National College of Ireland, a community-based educational initiative in the Dublin Docklands. Key criteria for networking, whether at local, national or international level, are the individual's and…

  20. "Into the Melting Pot": The Development of a European Dimension in a 4-Year Programme in Languages and International Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, R. Leslie

    In response to the need for improved international trade in Ireland, an undergraduate program of applied languages and international marketing was developed at the National Institute for Higher Education, a unique Irish technological university in Dublin. In the first year, students study French and German and four business subjects (marketing,…

  1. Increasing HIV testing among African immigrants in ireland: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Adedimeji, Adebola A; Asibon, Aba; O'Connor, Gerard; Carson, Richard; Cowan, Ethan; McKinley, Philip; Leider, Jason; Mallon, Patrick; Calderon, Yvette

    2015-02-01

    In 2012, immigrants constitute 63% of new cases of heterosexually transmitted HIV among individuals born outside Ireland. Current strategies to encourage testing can be ineffective if immigrants perceive them as culturally insensitive. We obtained qualitative data to explore challenges to voluntary HIV-testing for immigrants in Ireland. Content analysis was undertaken to identify and describe pertinent themes. Widespread beliefs that HIV is primarily a disease of African immigrants were identified as challenges that constrain access to testing and care. The organization and location of testing services, attitude of health workers, and beliefs regarding mandatory HIV-testing for immigrants seeking access to welfare benefits were also identified. Immigrants in Ireland encounter a variety of structural, cultural and personal constraints to HIV testing. Opportunities exist in the Irish Health system to increase testing among immigrants through greater acknowledgement of cultural sensitivities of immigrant groups.

  2. Prevalence of culturable airborne spores of selected allergenic and pathogenic fungi in outdoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Gorman, Céline M.; Fuller, Hubert T.

    2008-06-01

    Temporal and spatial variations in airborne spore concentrations of selected allergenic and pathogenic fungi were examined in Dublin, Ireland, in 2005. Air samples were taken at four outdoor locations in the city every 2 weeks, coupled with measurements of meteorological conditions. Total culturable airborne fungal spore concentrations in Dublin ranged from 30-6800 colony forming units per cubic metre of air (CFU m-3) over the 12-month period. Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Alternaria spores were constantly present in the Dublin atmosphere, representing >20% of the total culturable spore count. Concentrations of Cladosporium increased significantly in summer and reached allergenic threshold levels, peaking at over 3200 CFU m-3 in August. Penicillium spore concentrations never reached allergenic threshold levels, with average concentrations of <150 CFU m-3. Alternaria conidia formed only 0.3% of the total culturable fungal spore count and concentrations never exceeded 50 CFU m-3, attributable to the coastal position of Dublin and its low levels of arable production. The opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus was present throughout the year in nominal concentrations (<10 CFU m-3), but sporadic high counts were also recorded (300-400 CFU m-3), the potential health implications of which give cause for concern. Spores of neither Cryptococcus neoformans nor Stachybotrys chartarum were detected, but airborne basidiospores of Schizophyllum commune were evidenced by the dikaryotization of monokaryon tester strains following exposure to the air. The relationships between airborne fungal spore concentrations and meteorological factors were analysed by redundancy analysis and revealed positive correlations between temperature and Cladosporium and relative humidity and Penicillium and Aspergillus.

  3. A Brief History of the Potato in Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Provides historical information on the potato in Ireland focusing on how the potato arrived in Ireland and the advantages and disadvantages of the potato as a food crop. Discusses the Irish potato famine in Ireland, effects of the famine, and the government's laissez-faire response. Includes a list of questions. (CMK)

  4. The College of Anaesthetists of Ireland Simulation Training programme: a descriptive report and analysis of course participants' feedback.

    PubMed

    Cafferkey, Aine; Coyle, Elizabeth; Greaney, David; Harte, Sinead; Hayes, Niamh; Langdon, Miriam; Straub, Birgitt; Burlacu, Crina

    2018-03-20

    Simulation-based education is a modern training modality that allows healthcare professionals to develop knowledge and practice skills in a safe learning environment. The College of Anaesthetists of Ireland (CAI) was the first Irish postgraduate medical training body to introduce mandatory simulation training into its curriculum. Extensive quality assurance and improvement data has been collected on all simulation courses to date. Describe The College of Anaesthetists of Ireland Simulation Training (CAST) programme and report the analysis of course participants' feedback. A retrospective review of feedback forms from four simulation courses from March 2010 to August 2016 took place. Qualitative and quantitative data from 1069 participants who attended 112 courses was analysed. Feedback was overall very positive. Course content and delivery were deemed to be appropriate. Participants agreed that course participation would influence their future practice. A statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) between self-reported pre- and post-course confidence scores was observed in 19 out of 25 scenarios. The learning environment, learning method and debrief were highlighted as aspects of the courses that participants liked most. The mandatory integration of CAST has been welcomed with widespread enthusiasm among specialist anaesthesia trainees. Intuitively, course participation instils confidence in trainees and better equips them to manage anaesthesia emergencies in the clinical setting. It remains to be seen if translational outcomes result from this increase in confidence. Nevertheless, the findings of this extensive review have cemented the place of mandatory simulation training in specialist anaesthesia training in Ireland.

  5. Social Distance as a Factor in the Achievement of Pragmatic Competence. CLCS Occasional Paper No. 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Barbara Lazenby

    Acquisition of pragmatic competence by second language learners in the target language environment is examined, drawing on a study of learners of English as a Second Language in Dublin (Ireland). The hypothesis presented is that learners who perceive social or cultural distance between themselves and the target language culture will have greater…

  6. "So Either You Have a Foetal Monitor or You Have Your Waters Broken, Basically Is It?": Articulating Maternity Care Policy at a Midwives' Ante-Natal Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Mary-Pat

    2010-01-01

    Maternity care in Ireland has been described as a "testament to the strength and influence of the medical profession" (Mc Kee 1986: 192). A review of maternity and gynaecology services in the Dublin area in 2004 revealed that "no participant...thought that the maternity services were women centred at the time" (Women's Health…

  7. "Bursting" to Go and Other Experiences: Children's Views on Using the Toilet in the First School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatlow-Golden, Mimi; O'Farrelly, Christine; Booth, Ailbhe; Doyle, Orla

    2017-01-01

    Children's use of the toilet at school, although rarely explored, is an important facet of school experience with consequences for physical and psychological health. A mixed methods study investigated views of 25 children (4-5 years) regarding potential stressors in the first school year, including views of toileting, in Dublin, Ireland. Despite…

  8. Report from the European Prison Education Association, June 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Cormac

    2006-01-01

    It has just been announced that the 11th European Prison Education Association (EPEA) International Conference will take place in Dublin, Ireland from the 13th to 17th June 2007. Further details and an application form will be available in September 2006. Regular updates will be available at www.epea.org.

  9. Mothers Who Formula Feed: Their Practices, Support Needs and Factors Influencing Their Infant Feeding Decision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarrant, Roslyn C.; Sheridan-Pereira, Margaret; McCarthy, Roberta A.; Younger, Katherine M.; Kearney, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of mothers in Ireland provide formula milk to their infants during the initial weeks postpartum; however, data are lacking on their formula feeding practices and support needs. This prospective Dublin-based observational study, which included 450 eligible mother-term infant pairs recruited and followed up to six months postpartum,…

  10. Ptolemy's Britain and Ireland: A New Digital Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, Corey; Durham, Anthony; Gusev, Dmitri A.; Stafeyev, Sergey K.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we expand application of our mathematical methods for translating ancient coordinates from the classical Geography by Claudius Ptolemy into modern coordinates from India and Arabia to Britain and Ireland, historically important islands on the periphery of the ancient Roman Empire. The methods include triangulation and flocking with subsequent Bayesian correction. The results of our work can be conveniently visualized in modern GIS tools, such as ArcGIS, QGIS, and Google Earth. The enhancements we have made include a novel technique for handling tentatively identified points. We compare the precision of reconstruction achieved for Ptolemy's Britain and Ireland with the precisions that we had computed earlier for his India before the Ganges and three provinces of Arabia. We also provide improved validation and comparison amongst the methods applied. We compare our results with the prior work, while utilizing knowledge from such important ancient sources as the Antonine Itinerary, Tabula Peutingeriana, and the Ravenna Cosmography. The new digital reconstruction of Claudius Ptolemy's Britain and Ireland presented in this paper, along with the accompanying linguistic analysis of ancient toponyms, contributes to improvement of understanding of our cultural cartographic heritage by making it easier to study the ancient world using the popular and accessible GIS programs.

  11. Ramp sedimentation in the Dinantian limestones of the Shannon Trough, Co. Limerick, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Ian D.; Strogen, Peter

    1992-08-01

    During the late Chadian and Arundian (Lower Carboniferous), an extensive carbonate ramp (Limerick Ramp) developed over County Limerick, southwest Ireland, dipping northwestwards. Three distinct facies can be recognised corresponding to position on this ramp: inner, mid- and outer ramp. The inner ramp facies of oolitic and crinoidal grainstones (Herbertstown Limestone Formation) in east Limerick formed a major shoal behind which peritidal limestones were deposited. The mid-ramp facies of muddy bioclastic limestones and shales (Cooperhill facies) in north Limerick formed between fairweather and storm wave bases. The outer ramp (basinal) facies of mudstones and thin graded resedimented limestones (Rathkeale Beds) in west Limerick developed below storm wave base when fine terrigenous input was high. Later in the Arundian there was progradation of the nearshore oolitic and crinoidal grainstones over the mid-ramp facies. By the Holkerian, the deep-water basinal facies in west Limerick was buried beneath mid-ramp facies (Durnish Limestone). The initiation of the Limerick Ramp is closely related to the formation of the Shannon Trough. In the late Courceyan, accelerated subsidence in the Shannon area during deposition of Waulsortian facies marked the onset of a sag phase. Following a quiescent period in early Chadian, subsidence was renewed in the late Chadian and Arundian, when major facies changes occurred on the ramp. Comparison of the Shannon Trough with the Dublin Basin shows that in the latter, tectonic events in the Chadian and Arundian, particularly syn-sedimentary faulting, created a sharp division between platform and basinal sedimentation. Such tectonic influence is not recognised in the Shannon Trough. Here differential subsidence and eustatic sea-level changes led to more permanent ramp existence, modified only by westwards progradation.

  12. Benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing in Ireland: analysis of national prescribing trends from 2005 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, Cathal A; Ryan, Cristín; Cahir, Caitriona; Bradley, Colin P; Bennett, Kathleen

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine prescribing trends for benzodiazepines and Z-drugs to General Medical Services (GMS) patients in Ireland. A repeated cross-sectional analysis of the national pharmacy claims database was conducted for GMS patients aged ≥16 years from 2005 to 2015. Prescribing rates per 1000 eligible GMS population were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Negative binomial regression was used to determine longitudinal trends and compare prescribing rates across years, gender and age groups. Duration of supply and rates of concomitant benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing were determined. Age (16-44, 45-64, ≥65 years) and gender trends were investigated. Benzodiazepine prescribing rates decreased significantly from 225.92/1000 population (95% CI 224.94-226.89) in 2005 to 166.07/1000 population (95% CI 165.38-166.75) in 2015 (P < 0.0001). Z-drug prescribing rates increased significantly from 95.36/1000 population (95% CI 94.73-96.00) in 2005 to 109.11/1000 population (95% CI 108.56-109.67) in 2015 (P = 0.048). Approximately one-third of individuals dispensed either benzodiazepines or Z-drugs were receiving long-term prescriptions (>90 days). The proportion of those receiving >1 benzodiazepine and/or Z-drug concomitantly increased from 11.9% in 2005 to 15.3% in 2015. Benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing rates were highest for older women (≥65 years) throughout the study period. Benzodiazepine prescribing to the GMS population in Ireland decreased significantly from 2005 to 2015, and was coupled with significant increases in Z-drug prescribing. The study shows that benzodiazepine and Z-drug prescribing is common in this population, with high proportions of individuals receiving long-term prescriptions. Targeted interventions are needed to reduce potentially inappropriate long-term prescribing and use of these medications in Ireland. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Dad Was a Terrible Hard Worker: The Influence of Family and School on Dublin's Men's Working Lives--Preliminary Findings. CLMS Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, John

    The influences that home, family, and education have on Irish men's experiences of working life are explored based on interviews and questionnaire research carried out in North Dublin during 1997 and 1998. A two-stage research design was adopted. The first stage involved a short attitudinal-type questionnaire given to men at a sporting club. The…

  14. Composition variability of spent mushroom compost in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S N; Mullen, G J; Murphy, M C

    2008-01-01

    Spent mushroom compost (SMC) has proven to be an attractive material for improving soil structure in tilled soils and increasing dry matter production in grassland soils, owing to its high organic matter content and availability of essential plant nutrients. Because of this, it is important to identify the variability in composition of SMC in order to evaluate its merit as a fertilizer/soil conditioner. For this reason, a study was carried out involving the analysis of SMC samples obtained from five mushroom growers using compost from each of the 13 mushroom composting yards currently operating in both Northern Ireland (5 yd) and the Republic of Ireland (8 yd). The selected parameters measured include dry matter, organic matter, total N, P and K, C/N ratio; plant-available P and K, pH, EC, total Ca, Mg, Na, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb; and cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin constituents. Yield of mushroom data were also collected from the selected growers. There were significant differences (P<0.05) within two compost production yards for some parameters, therefore, for the most part, the uniformity of SMC within each yard is relatively consistent. However, significant differences (P<0.05) were evident when comparing SMC obtained from growers supplied with compost from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland independently, particularly among total and available phosphorus and potassium values. The results obtained show that, while SMC has fertilizer merit, its variability of composition must be taken into account when assessing this value. The variability of composition is also of particular interest in the context of recent emphasis on plant nutrient management in agriculture.

  15. Overseas nurse recruitment: Ireland as an illustration of the dynamic nature of nurse migration.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Niamh; Brugha, Ruairí; McGee, Hannah

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents an analysis of Ireland's recent experience of overseas nurse recruitment. Ireland began actively recruiting nurses from overseas in 2000 and has recruited almost 10,000 nurses, primarily from India and the Philippines since that time. This paper takes a timely look at the Irish experience to date. It reviews the literature on the supply and demand factors that determine the need for, and the international migration of, nurses and presents working visa and nurse registration statistics. This enables the authors to quantify and discuss the trends and scale of recent nurse migration to Ireland from outside the European Union (EU). The paper discusses the data essential for national workforce planning and highlights the deficiencies in the Irish data currently available for that purpose. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of Ireland's heavy reliance on overseas nurse recruitment.

  16. Cyber-Bullying: The Situation in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Moore, Mona

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the first major survey of cyber-bullying undertaken in Ireland. While preliminary results have been published they were based on a smaller and incomplete sample of 12-16 year olds living in Ireland. The preliminary results addressed the incidence level of cyber-bullying and that of the different subcategories of…

  17. 100 Years of Primary Curriculum Development and Implementation in Ireland: A Tale of a Swinging Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    There are ongoing initiatives in curriculum development and implementation in Ireland and internationally in order to enhance the educational experiences and outcomes of learners. This article is the first historical longitudinal analysis of primary school curriculum development and implementation in Ireland from the 1890s to the 1990s. The…

  18. The University and the State in a Global Age: Renegotiating the Traditional Social Contract?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwiek, Marek

    2005-01-01

    This article is based on the Keynote Address to the European Conference on Educational Research (ECER), Dublin, Ireland, 7-10 September 2005. It argues that we are facing the simultaneous renegotiation of the major post-war social contract (concerning the welfare state) in Europe and the renegotiation of a smaller-scale modern social pact: the…

  19. Report from the European Prison Education Association, September 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Cormac

    2007-01-01

    The main activity of the European Prison Education Association (EPEA) since the last edition of the Journal was the 11th European Prison Education Association International Conference, which took place in Dublin, Ireland from June 13th to 17th. The conference, Learning for Liberation, was the largest EPEA conference to date with 180 participants…

  20. Emerging Trends and New Directions in Telecollaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dowd, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the most significant emerging trends and tendencies in telecollaborative practice. In order to achieve this, I review the recent literature in the area and I identify recurring themes from the Telecollaboration in Higher Education conference which took place in Trinity College Dublin, Ireland from 21 to 23…

  1. Evaluation of a Bereavement Training Program for Staff in an Intellectual Disabilities Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Sile; Guerin, Suzanne; McEvoy, John; Dodd, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The impact of a staff-training program on knowledge and confidence in supporting people with intellectual disabilities (ID) at the time of bereavement was examined. Thirty-three staff members from a Dublin, Ireland-based ID support service participated in the study. Both the training (n = 17) and control (n = 16) groups completed measures of…

  2. Sickness certification difficulties in Ireland--a GP focus group study.

    PubMed

    Foley, M; Thorley, K; Von Hout, M-C

    2013-07-01

    Sickness certification causes problems for general practitioners (GPs). Difficulty with the assessment of capacity to work, conflict with patients and other non-medical factors have been shown to influence GPs' decision-making. Inadequate leadership and management of certification issues add to GPs' difficulties. To explore problems associated with sickness certification, as part of a larger mixed method research project exploring GPs' experiences and perceptions of sickness certification in Ireland. A qualitative study in an urban region of Ireland. A focus group of four male and four female GPs explored problems encountered by GPs in certifying sickness absence. Thematic data analysis was used. Three major themes emerged: perception of the sickness certification system, organization of health care and cultural factors in sickness absence behaviour. Employment structures in public and private sectors and lack of communication with other health care providers and employers were identified as complicating sickness certification. GPs encounter a complexity of issues in sick certification and are dissatisfied with their role in certifying sickness absence. Our results open the debate for policy change and development in Ireland.

  3. Youth in Northern Ireland: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a collection of articles that represent some of the research and policy analysis of key issues affecting the lives of young people currently living in Northern Ireland, which is in the midst of an unparalleled political and social transformation. The articles focus on crime, drug use, criminal justice, families, divorce, and youth…

  4. Feasibility and utility of microsatellite markers in archaeological cattle remains from a Viking Age settlement in Dublin.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C J; Connellan, J; Wallace, P F; Park, S D E; McCormick, F M; Olsaker, I; Eythórsdóttir, E; MacHugh, D E; Bailey, J F; Bradley, D G

    2003-12-01

    Nineteen cattle bones from the Viking 10th and early 11th century levels in Dublin were assessed for presence of reliable genotypes from three autosomal markers. Due to the good preservational condition of the samples, it was possible to amplify and type at least two out of three of the microsatellite markers (CSRM60, HEL1 and ILSTS001) in 11 specimens. Full three-loci genotypes were obtained from a subset of seven of these samples. A comparative analysis was performed using data from the same three markers in 11 extant British, Irish and Nordic cattle breeds. Although the medieval remains displayed lower levels of diversity than the modern European breeds, the results fit within the ranges obtained from the extant populations. The results indicate a probable origin for the ancient Irish cattle as the remains group significantly more closely with breeds from the British Isles than with those from Scandinavia. The data collected indicate that microsatellites may be useful for the further study of ancient cattle.

  5. [Primary care in Ireland].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    Spanish doctors are still leaving the country to look for quality work. Ireland is not a country with many Spanish professionals but it is interesting to know its particular Health care system. Ireland is one of the countries with a national health care system, although it has a mixture of private health care insurance schemes. People have a right to health care if they have been living in Ireland at least for a year. Access to the primary care health system depends on age and income: free of charge for Category 1 and co-payments for the rest. This division generates great inequalities among the population. Primary Care doctors are self-employed, and they work independently. However, since 2001 they have tended to work in multidisciplinary teams in order to strengthen the Primary Care practice. Salary is gained from a combination of public and private incomes which are not differentiated. The role of the General Practitioner consists in the treatment of acute and chronic diseases, minor surgery, child care, etc. There is no coordination between Primary and Secondary care. Access to specialised medicine is regulated by the price of consultation. Primary Care doctors are not gatekeepers. To be able to work here, doctors must have three years of training after medical school. After that, Continuing Medical Education is compulsory, and the college of general practitioners monitors it annually. The Irish health care system does not fit into the European model. Lack of a clear separation between public and private health care generates great inequalities. The non-existence of coordination between primary and specialised care leads to inefficiencies, which Ireland cannot allow itself after a decade of economic crisis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Suicide among Young People and Adults in Ireland: Method Characteristics, Toxicological Analysis and Substance Abuse Histories Compared.

    PubMed

    Arensman, Ella; Bennardi, Marco; Larkin, Celine; Wall, Amanda; McAuliffe, Carmel; McCarthy, Jacklyn; Williamson, Eileen; Perry, Ivan J

    2016-01-01

    Information on factors associated with suicide among young individuals in Ireland is limited. The aim of this study was to identify socio-demographic characteristics and circumstances of death associated with age among individuals who died by suicide. The study examined 121 consecutive suicides (2007-2012) occurring in the southern eastern part of Ireland (Cork city and county). Data were obtained from coroners, family informants, and health care professionals. A comparison was made between 15-24-year-old and 25-34-year-old individuals. Socio-demographic characteristics of the deceased, methods of suicide, history of alcohol and drug abuse, and findings from toxicological analysis of blood and urine samples taken at post mortem were included. Pearson's χ2 tests and binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Alcohol and/or drugs were detected through toxicological analysis for the majority of the total sample (79.5%), which did not differentiate between 15-24-year-old and 25-34-year-old individuals (74.1% and 86.2% respectively). Compared to 25-34-year-old individuals, 15-24-year-old individuals were more likely to engage in suicide by hanging (88.5%). Younger individuals were less likely to die by intentional drug overdose and carbon monoxide poisoning compared to older individuals. Younger individuals who died between Saturday and Monday were more likely to have had alcohol before dying. Substance abuse histories were similar in the two age groups. Based on this research it is recommended that strategies to reduce substance abuse be applied among 25-34-year-old individuals at risk of suicide. The wide use of hanging in young people should be taken into consideration for future means restriction strategies.

  7. Secondary prevention and cognitive function after stroke: a study protocol for a 5-year follow-up of the ASPIRE-S cohort

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David; Gaynor, Eva; Bennett, Kathleen; Dolan, Eamon; Callaly, Elizabeth; Large, Margaret; Hickey, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive impairment is common following stroke and can increase disability and levels of dependency of patients, potentially leading to greater burden on carers and the healthcare system. Effective cardiovascular risk factor control through secondary preventive medications may reduce the risk of cognitive decline. However, adherence to medications is often poor and can be adversely affected by cognitive deficits. Suboptimal medication adherence negatively impacts secondary prevention targets, increasing the risk of recurrent stroke and further cognitive decline. The aim of this study is to profile cognitive function and secondary prevention, including adherence to secondary preventive medications and healthcare usage, 5 years post-stroke. The prospective associations between cognition, cardiovascular risk factors, adherence to secondary preventive medications, and rates of recurrent stroke or other cardiovascular events will also be explored. Methods and analysis This is a 5-year follow-up of a prospective study of the Action on Secondary Prevention Interventions and Rehabilitation in Stroke (ASPIRE-S) cohort of patients with stroke. This cohort will have a detailed assessment of cognitive function, adherence to secondary preventive medications and cardiovascular risk factor control. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for this study was granted by the Research Ethics Committees at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin and Connolly Hospital, Dublin, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, and the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Findings will be disseminated through presentations and peer-reviewed publications. PMID:28348196

  8. The Persistence of Sperm and the Development of Time Since Intercourse (TSI) Guidelines in Sexual Assault Cases at Forensic Science Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    Casey, David G; Domijan, Katarina; MacNeill, Sarah; Rizet, Damien; O'Connell, Declan; Ryan, Jennifer

    2017-05-01

    The persistence of sperm using confirmatory microscopic analysis, the persistence of sperm with tails, time since intercourse (TSI) analysis, and results from the acid phosphatase (AP) reaction from approximately 5581 swabs taken from circa 1450 sexual assault cases are presented. The observed proportions of sperm in the vagina and anus declines significantly after 48 h TSI, and sperm on oral swabs were observed up to 15 h TSI. The AP reaction as a predictor of sperm on intimate swabs is questioned. All AP reaction times gave a low true positive rate; 23% of sperm-positive swabs gave a negative AP reaction time. We show the AP reaction is an unsafe and an unreliable predictor of sperm on intimate swabs. We propose that TSI not AP informs precase assessment and the evaluative approach for sexual assault cases. To help inform an evaluative approach, TSI guidelines are presented. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. An evaluation of the range and availability of intensive smoking cessation services in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Currie, L M; Keogan, S; Campbell, P; Gunning, M; Kabir, Z; Clancy, L

    2010-03-01

    A review of smoking cessation (SC) services in Ireland is a necessary step in improving service planning and provision. To assess the range and availability of intensive SC services in Ireland in 2006. A survey of SC service providers in Ireland was conducted. Descriptive analysis and simple linear regression analysis was used. Response rate was 86.3% (63/73). All service providers surveyed are employing evidence-based interventions; the most common form of support is individual counselling with initial sessions averaging 40 min and weekly review sessions 20 min in duration. Reaching the recommended target of treating 5.0% of smokers does not seem feasible given the current distribution of resources and there appears to be regional differences in resource allocation. While intensive SC services are available in all four Health Service Executive Areas, it would appear that there is little uniformity or consistency countrywide in the scope and structure of these services.

  10. High resolution seismic tomography imaging of Ireland with quarry blast data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroucau, P.; Lebedev, S.; Bean, C. J.; Grannell, J.

    2017-12-01

    Local earthquake tomography is a well established tool to image geological structure at depth. That technique, however, is difficult to apply in slowly deforming regions, where local earthquakes are typically rare and of small magnitude, resulting in sparse data sampling. The natural earthquake seismicity of Ireland is very low. That due to quarry and mining blasts, on the other hand, is high and homogeneously distributed. As a consequence, and thanks to the dense and nearly uniform coverage achieved in the past ten years by temporary and permanent broadband seismological stations, the quarry blasts offer an alternative approach for high resolution seismic imaging of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath Ireland. We detected about 1,500 quarry blasts in Ireland and Northern Ireland between 2011 and 2014, for which we manually picked more than 15,000 P- and 20,000 S-wave first arrival times. The anthropogenic, explosive origin of those events was unambiguously assessed based on location, occurrence time and waveform characteristics. Here, we present a preliminary 3D tomographic model obtained from the inversion of 3,800 P-wave arrival times associated with a subset of 500 events observed in 2011, using FMTOMO tomographic code. Forward modeling is performed with the Fast Marching Method (FMM) and the inverse problem is solved iteratively using a gradient-based subspace inversion scheme after careful selection of damping and smoothing regularization parameters. The results illuminate the geological structure of Ireland from deposit to crustal scale in unprecedented detail, as demonstrated by sensitivity analysis, source relocation with the 3D velocity model and comparisons with surface geology.

  11. Bioelectromagnetics 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-14

    fields in wound healing and nerve regeneration; 2) ultrashort high voltage pulses for tumor treatment; 3) therapeutic uses of magnetic fields; 4...7 Session 3: Role Of Electric Fields In Wound Healing And Nerve Regeneration (Continued)..........26 Session 4: Exposure...8 Bioelectromagnetics 2005, Dublin, Ireland Session 1: Role Of Electric Fields In Wound Healing And Nerve Regeneration Chairs: Richard

  12. Teaching Qur'An in Irish Muslim Schools--Curriculum, Approaches, Perspectives and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sai, Youcef

    2018-01-01

    This article draws on ethnographic fieldwork that took place in 2014 in two primary Muslim schools based in Dublin in the Republic of Ireland. Based on observations and semistructured interviews, three teachers were observed and interviewed on how the Qur'an was taught to fourth and fifth class pupils. The research findings explore the following:…

  13. A Review of the Disability Access Route to Education in UCD 2010-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padden, Lisa; Tonge, Julie

    2018-01-01

    This article offers a review of the DARE as it operated in University College Dublin (UCD), Ireland from 2010 to 2013. This DARE scheme allows applicants to provide details of their disability and its impact on their education, with a view to competing for specially allocated places on their programme of choice, should they not receive an offer of…

  14. Steering the Ark: A Cultural Center for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on his experience developing and running The Ark, a Cultural Center for Children in Dublin, Ireland. The author describes the practice and ten guiding principles behind the center. While acknowledging that arts education and arts practice for and with young people is a rich and varied landscape, within which a…

  15. Young Adolescents' Positioning of Human Rights: Findings from Colombia, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Keith C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated how young adolescents thought about the location of human rights issues and the nature of violations in differing geographic regions. Open-ended, task-based interviews were conducted with 116 students in Colombia, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland and the United States. Although students in each location pointed to…

  16. The Economic Impact of Queen's University Belfast on the Northern Ireland Economy. Higher Education in Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Ursula; McNicoll, Iain; White, James

    2015-01-01

    This study provides an analysis of the economic impact of Queen's University Belfast and its students on the Northern Ireland economy. Based in the City of Belfast, the university has over 22,500 students. Its turnover of nearly £290 million makes it Northern Ireland's largest university in terms of its financial standing. With origins going back…

  17. An Maith Leat an Ghaeilge? An Analysis of Variation in Primary Pupil Attitudes to Irish in the Growing up in Ireland Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devitt, Ann; Condon, Joe; Dalton, Gene; O'Connell, Jane; Ní Dhuinn, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of primary schoolchildren's attitudes to the Irish language, Gaeilge, in the context of national policy in the Republic of Ireland. In particular, the study examines the factors (social, cultural, cognitive and organisational) that may be related to a pronounced excess in disengagement with Irish over and above…

  18. Communications, Corporatism, and Dependent Development in Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Desmond

    1995-01-01

    Explores the complex relationship between the corporate state and public service broadcasting in Europe, using a historical case study of Ireland. Discusses the Pan-European debate; public service broadcasting; critical media theory and the state; broadcasting and the corporate state; the corporate state and broadcasting in Ireland; neo-liberal…

  19. An overview of cleaner fish use in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Warberg, M

    2017-11-21

    Sea lice infestations represent one of the most significant challenges facing the salmon farming industry, giving rise to lost production, additional costs of treatment and potential negative interactions with wild stocks. At present, cleaner fish, which actively remove lice from salmon, are an effective, biological, long-term option which has been adopted by many countries. In Ireland, several key studies were conducted in the 1990s on the use of wild-caught wrasse (corkwing, goldsinny and rock cook) as cleaner fish in experimental and commercial scale trials. More recently, the National University of Ireland Galway (NUIG), at their marine research facility in Carna (CRS), has undertaken applied research on ballan wrasse and lumpsucker. Currently, CRS is providing lumpsucker juveniles and research and development for the Irish salmon industry with support from BIM (Ireland's Seafood Development Agency) and Marine Harvest Ireland. There is a large amount of research currently being carried out in this area in all countries that are utilizing cleaner fish technology. The current focus in Ireland is the development of a native lumpsucker broodstock to facilitate its sustainable production. The aim of this article was to provide an overview of the research, challenges and use of cleaner fish in Ireland. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Fish Diseases Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Suicide among Young People and Adults in Ireland: Method Characteristics, Toxicological Analysis and Substance Abuse Histories Compared

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Celine; Wall, Amanda; McAuliffe, Carmel; McCarthy, Jacklyn; Williamson, Eileen; Perry, Ivan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Information on factors associated with suicide among young individuals in Ireland is limited. The aim of this study was to identify socio-demographic characteristics and circumstances of death associated with age among individuals who died by suicide. Methods The study examined 121 consecutive suicides (2007–2012) occurring in the southern eastern part of Ireland (Cork city and county). Data were obtained from coroners, family informants, and health care professionals. A comparison was made between 15-24-year-old and 25-34-year-old individuals. Socio-demographic characteristics of the deceased, methods of suicide, history of alcohol and drug abuse, and findings from toxicological analysis of blood and urine samples taken at post mortem were included. Pearson’s χ2 tests and binary logistic regression analysis were performed. Results Alcohol and/or drugs were detected through toxicological analysis for the majority of the total sample (79.5%), which did not differentiate between 15-24-year-old and 25-34-year-old individuals (74.1% and 86.2% respectively). Compared to 25-34-year-old individuals, 15-24-year-old individuals were more likely to engage in suicide by hanging (88.5%). Younger individuals were less likely to die by intentional drug overdose and carbon monoxide poisoning compared to older individuals. Younger individuals who died between Saturday and Monday were more likely to have had alcohol before dying. Substance abuse histories were similar in the two age groups. Conclusion Based on this research it is recommended that strategies to reduce substance abuse be applied among 25-34-year-old individuals at risk of suicide. The wide use of hanging in young people should be taken into consideration for future means restriction strategies. PMID:27898722

  1. Disablist Bullying in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland: An Investigation of Student Teachers' Knowledge, Experience and Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Noel; Mc Guckin, Conor

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the knowledge, experience and confidence of student teachers from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland in relation to disablist bullying. Adopting a mixed methodological approach of four focus groups (N = 18) and a pencil-and-paper questionnaire (N = 257), the study explored the students knowledge, experience and…

  2. Management of dredge material in the Republic of Ireland - A review.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, C; Harrington, J

    2012-05-01

    As an island nation the Republic of Ireland's ports and harbours are key to the economic wellbeing of the country as they are the primary transport link to the United Kingdom, mainland Europe and beyond. This paper examines the main aspects of the Irish dredging industry with comparison to international practice and standards, including the source of the dredge material and volumes generated annually, the dredging plant employed and the management processes currently practised. Relevant European and Irish legislation governing dredging, disposal at sea and waste licensing are presented. The potential impacts of disposal at sea are discussed with the implications for the Irish dredging industry of recently introduced European Directives assessed. Beneficial use rates for dredge material and the techniques implemented in Ireland are examined and compared with international practice. Recent notable beneficial use projects for dredge material and proposed innovative dredge material management techniques for specific dredging projects in Ireland are presented. Proposals to encourage greater beneficial use of dredge material and minimise disposal at sea for Ireland are presented including the introduction of environmental credits, tax breaks and a grant system for pilot schemes. An alternative disposal at sea charge fee structure is also recommended to encourage alternative dredge material management practices. Ireland's management of contaminated sediment is also presented with recent projects described highlighting the current practice of primarily exporting contaminated sediment to mainland Europe. Alternative methods of treatment of contaminated sediment are assessed in an Irish context. Future issues and challenges facing the Irish dredging industry are assessed and a critical analysis of the current approaches to dredge material management is presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Trends in Irish-Medium Education in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland since 1920: Shifting Agents and Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdory, Sara E.; Janmaat, Jan Germen

    2015-01-01

    Some recent studies have suggested a significant bottom-up or parental component to recent movements for autochthonous minority language-medium education (MLME). This study takes MLME as the outcome of interest and seeks to explain trends in Irish-medium education (IME) in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland since 1920--a unique…

  4. Relationships between Attitudes to Irish, Social Class, Religion and National Identity in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riagain, Padraig O.

    2007-01-01

    Research on language attitudes in the Republic of Ireland has been greatly influenced by stratification theories. That is to say, differences in attitudes are seen to reflect the positions individuals occupy in the social structure. Research on language attitudes in Northern Ireland is less developed, but has tended to view such attitudes as…

  5. Analysis of outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease in Ireland: 1998 and 1999.

    PubMed

    Bonner, C; Foley, B; Wall, P; Fitzgerald, M

    2001-05-01

    Surveillance of general outbreaks of infectious gastroenteritis was introduced in 1998 by the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI), in co-operation with the eight health boards. A total of 67 general outbreaks of gastroenteritis in Ireland were reported to the FSAI in 1998 and 1999. Over 1900 people were ill as a result of these outbreaks. Four percent required hospitalisation and there were two deaths. The duration of the outbreaks varied between one day and 38 days. Salmonellae (44%) and small round structured viruses (SRSV) (12%) were the most commonly reported pathogens. In 25% of the outbreaks the aetiology was unknown. The commonest settings were restaurants, hotels and take-aways, which accounted for 45% (30/67) of all outbreaks. Sixteen percent of all outbreaks occurred in hospitals and residential institutions. Over half of the outbreaks were reported to be foodborne, 63% of which were due to various serotypes of Salmonella enterica. Eggs were implicated as the vehicle of infection in 13% of all outbreaks. An infected food handler was identified in almost one third of outbreaks, although it could not be established if this had contributed directly to the outbreak.

  6. Implementing Major Trauma Audit in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Deasy, Conor; Cronin, Marina; Cahill, Fiona; Geary, Una; Houlihan, Patricia; Woodford, Maralyn; Lecky, Fiona; Mealy, Ken; Crowley, Philip

    2016-01-01

    There are 27 receiving trauma hospitals in the Republic of Ireland. There has not been an audit system in place to monitor and measure processes and outcomes of care. The National Office of Clinical Audit (NOCA) is now working to implement Major Trauma Audit (MTA) in Ireland using the well-established National Health Service (NHS) UK Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN). The aim of this report is to highlight the implementation process of MTA in Ireland to raise awareness of MTA nationally and share lessons that may be of value to other health systems undertaking the development of MTA. The National Trauma Audit Committee of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, consisting of champions and stakeholders in trauma care, in 2010 advised on the adaptation of TARN for Ireland. In 2012, the Emergency Medicine Program endorsed TARN and in setting up the National Emergency Medicine Audit chose MTA as the first audit project. A major trauma governance group was established representing stakeholders in trauma care, a national project co-ordinator was recruited and a clinical lead nominated. Using Survey Monkey, the chief executives of all trauma receiving hospitals were asked to identify their hospital's trauma governance committee, trauma clinical lead and their local trauma data co-ordinator. Hospital Inpatient Enquiry systems were used to identify to hospitals an estimate of their anticipated trauma audit workload. There are 25 of 27 hospitals now collecting data using the TARN trauma audit platform. These hospitals have provided MTA Clinical Leads, allocated data co-ordinators and incorporated MTA reports formally into their clinical governance, quality and safety committee meetings. There has been broad acceptance of the NOCA escalation policy by hospitals in appreciation of the necessity for unexpected audit findings to stimulate action. Major trauma audit measures trauma patient care processes and outcomes of care to drive quality improvement at hospital and

  7. Seeing the Wood from the Trees: A Critical Policy Analysis of Intersections between Social Class Inequality and Education in Twenty-First Century Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a critical policy analysis of intersections between social class inequality and education policy in Ireland. The focus is upon contemporary policy and legislation such as The Irish Constitution and equality legislation; social inclusion policies such as the DEIS scheme; literacy and numeracy policy documents; as well as current…

  8. The status of Phytophthora ramorum in Ireland

    Treesearch

    Carmel O?Connor; Elizabeth Gosling

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the first 2 years of data collected to study the ecology of Phytophthora ramorum in Ireland. Since spring 2005, sampling has been carried out for the presence of the pathogen in soil and watercourses from 11 susceptible forest sites in Ireland, using a rapid DNA method in conjunction with morphological identification methods....

  9. Report from the European Prison Education Association, December 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behan, Cormac

    2006-01-01

    The main activity of the European Prison Education Association over the last number of months has been organizing the 11th EPEA conference in Dublin, Ireland in 2007. Application forms to attend the conference (13th-17th June 2007), are available to download at www.epea.org. Applications can be submitted online or by regular mail. The closing date…

  10. Stress and stressors in the clinical environment: a comparative study of fourth-year student nurses and newly qualified general nurses in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Patricia; Matthews, Anne; Coyne, Imelda

    2013-03-01

    To measure and compare the perceived levels of job-related stress and stressors of newly qualified nurses and fourth-year student nurses in the clinical environment and to explore the participants' views on stress and stressors. Stress in the nursing workplace has significant consequences for the person, the patient and the organisation, such as psychological and physical health deterioration and impaired professional practice. To address this problem, stress and stressors need to be measured and identified. This study used a cross-sectional survey design and self-reporting questionnaires to measure and compare levels of stress in both groups. Convenience sampling involved all newly qualified nurses (n = 120) and fourth-year student nurses (n = 128) in Dublin North-East region in Ireland. The instrument used was 'The Nursing Stress Scale' (Gray-Toft & Anderson 1981, Journal of Behavioral Assessment 3, 11-23). Descriptive, qualitative analysis was conducted on an open-ended question. Data were obtained from newly qualified nurses (n = 31) and fourth-year student nurses (n = 40) in six acute hospital sites. Levels of perceived stress and stressors were high in both groups. Themes identified from the responses to the open question by both groups included excessive workload, difficult working relationships and unmet clinical learning needs. Student nurses also reported the combination of academic demands with clinical placement as a major stressor. There was no significant difference between each group. Stress continues to be a problem for nurses in the clinical setting. Excessive workload requires urgent attention by hospital managers in view of widespread retention difficulties. Themes identified could provide a framework for possible interventions for improving the clinical environment for nurses. These results can help stakeholders in nurse education and practice to develop interventions to reduce stress for both groups and to ease the transition from student to

  11. Interrogating medical tourism: Ireland, abortion, and mobility rights.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Mary; White, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Medical tourism in Ireland, like in many Western states, is built around assumptions about individual agency, choice, possibility, and mobility. One specific form of medical tourism—the flow of women from Ireland traveling in order to secure an abortion—disrupts and contradicts these assumptions. One legacy of the bitter, contentious political and legal battles surrounding abortion in Ireland in the 1980s and 1990s has been securing the right of mobility for all pregnant Irish citizens to cross international borders to secure an abortion. However, these mobility rights are contingent upon nationality, social class, and race, and they have enabled successive Irish governments to avoid any responsibility for providing safe, legal, and affordable abortion services in Ireland. Nearly twenty years after the X case discussed here, the pregnant female body moving over international borders—entering and leaving the state—is still interpreted as problematic and threatening to the Irish state.

  12. Predictors of career progression and obstacles and opportunities for non-EU hospital doctors to undertake postgraduate training in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, Ella; Keegan, Conor; Humphries, Niamh; McAleese, Sara; Thomas, Steve; Normand, Charles; Brugha, Ruairí

    2016-06-30

    The World Health Organization's Global Code on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel urges Member States to observe fair recruitment practices and ensure equality of treatment of migrant and domestically-trained health personnel. However, international medical graduates (IMGs) have experienced difficulties in accessing postgraduate training and in progressing their careers in several destination countries. Ireland is highly dependent on IMGs, but also employs non-European Union (EU) doctors who qualified as doctors in Ireland. However, little is known regarding the career progression of these doctors. In this context, the present study assesses the determinants of career progression of non-EU doctors with particular focus on whether barriers to progression exist for those graduating outside Ireland compared to those who have graduated within. The study utilises quantitative data from an online survey of non-EU doctors registered with the Medical Council of Ireland undertaken as part of the Doctor Migration Project (2011-2013). Non-EU doctors registered with the Medical Council of Ireland were asked to complete an online survey about their recruitment, training and career experiences in Ireland. Analysis was conducted on the responses of 231 non-EU hospital doctors whose first post in Ireland was not permanent. Career progression was analysed by means of binary logistic regression analysis. While some of the IMGs had succeeded in accessing specialist training, many experienced slow or stagnant career progression when compared with Irish-trained non-EU doctors. Key predictors of career progression for non-EU doctors working in Ireland showed that doctors who qualified outside of Ireland were less likely than Irish-trained non-EU doctors to experience career progression. Length of stay as a qualified doctor in Ireland was strongly associated with career progression. Those working in anaesthesia were significantly more likely to experience career

  13. IRETHERM: The geothermal energy potential of Irish radiothermal granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Thomas; Jones, Alan; Muller, Mark; Feely, Martin; Brock, Andrew; Long, Mike; Waters, Tim

    2014-05-01

    The IRETHERM project is developing a strategic understanding of Ireland's deep geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One aspect of IRETHERM's research focuses on Ireland's radiothermal granites, where increased concentrations of radioelements provide elevated heat-production (HP), surface heat-flow (SHF) and subsurface temperatures. An understanding of the contribution of granites to the thermal field of Ireland is important to assessing the geothermal energy potential of this low-enthalpy setting. This study focuses on the Galway granite in western Ireland, and the Leinster and the buried Kentstown granites in eastern Ireland. Shallow (<250 m) boreholes were drilled into the exposed Caledonian Leinster and Galway granites as part of a 1980's geothermal project. These studies yielded HP = 2-3 μWm-3 and HF = 80 mWm-2 at the Sally Gap borehole in the Northern Units of the Leinster granite, to the SW of Dublin. In the Galway granite batholith, on the west coast of Ireland, the Costelloe-Murvey granite returned HP = 7 μWm-3 and HF = 77 mWm-2, measured at the Rossaveal borehole. The buried Kentstown granite, 35 km NW of Dublin, has an associated negative Bouguer anomaly and was intersected by two mineral exploration boreholes at depths of 660 m and 490 m. Heat production is measured at 2.4 μWm-3 in core samples taken from the weathered top 30 m of the granite. The core of this study consists of a program of magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data acquisition across the three granite bodies, over three fieldwork seasons. MT and AMT data were collected at 59 locations along two profiles over the Leinster granite. Preliminary results show that the northern units of the Leinster granite (40 km SW of Dublin) extend to depths of 2-5 km. Preliminary results from the southern profile suggest a greater thickness of granite to a depth of 6-9 km beneath the Tullow pluton, 75 km SW of

  14. The Brady Bunch? New evidence for nominative determinism in patients' health: retrospective, population based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Keaney, John J; Groarke, John D; Galvin, Zita; McGorrian, Catherine; McCann, Hugh A; Sugrue, Declan; Keelan, Edward; Galvin, Joseph; Blake, Gavin; Mahon, Niall G; O'Neill, James

    2013-12-12

    To ascertain whether a name can influence a person's health, by assessing whether people with the surname "Brady" have an increased prevalence of bradycardia. Retrospective, population based cohort study. One university teaching hospital in Dublin, Ireland. People with the surname "Brady" in Dublin, determined through use of an online telephone directory. Prevalence of participants who had pacemakers inserted for bradycardia between 1 January 2007 and 28 February 2013. 579 (0.36%) of 161,967 people who were listed on the Dublin telephone listings had the surname "Brady." The proportion of pacemaker recipients was significantly higher among Bradys (n=8, 1.38%) than among non-Bradys (n=991, 0.61%; P=0.03). The unadjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for pacemaker implantation among individuals with the surname Brady compared with individuals with other surnames was 2.27 (1.13 to 4.57). Patients named Brady are at increased risk of needing pacemaker implantation compared with the general population. This finding shows a potential role for nominative determinism in health.

  15. Animal Health Ireland: providing national leadership and coordination of non-regulatory animal health issues in Ireland.

    PubMed

    More, S J; Doherty, M L; Downey, L; McKenzie, K; Devitt, C; O'Flaherty, J

    2011-12-01

    Livestock production plays an important role in the Irish economy. Regulatory animal health issues are the responsibility of government, but until recently there has been no national coordination of non-regulatory animal health issues. This gap has recently been filled with the establishment of Animal Health Ireland (AHI), a not-for-profit, partnership-based organisation providing national leadership and coordination of non-regulatory animal health issues in Ireland. Animal Health Ireland provides benefits to livestock producers and processors by providing the knowledge, education and coordination required to establish effective control strategies, both on-farm and nationally. This paper presents a brief overview of the context for AHI, and of its establishment and initial activities. Non-regulatory animal health issues have been prioritised. A series of work programmes (each focusing on a high-priority issue) have been established. Partnership is critical to success, both for AHI as an organisation and for effective farm-level transfer of knowledge. This model for national leadership and coordination of non-regulatory animal health issues may be of relevance elsewhere.

  16. 9 CFR 93.432 - Cattle from the Republic of Ireland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... consignor and consignee, and descriptions of the cattle, including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cattle from the Republic of Ireland... Cattle from the Republic of Ireland. (a) All cattle to be imported from the Republic of Ireland shall be...

  17. 9 CFR 93.432 - Cattle from the Republic of Ireland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... consignor and consignee, and descriptions of the cattle, including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cattle from the Republic of Ireland... Cattle from the Republic of Ireland. (a) All cattle to be imported from the Republic of Ireland shall be...

  18. 9 CFR 93.432 - Cattle from the Republic of Ireland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... consignor and consignee, and descriptions of the cattle, including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cattle from the Republic of Ireland... Cattle from the Republic of Ireland. (a) All cattle to be imported from the Republic of Ireland shall be...

  19. 9 CFR 93.432 - Cattle from the Republic of Ireland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... consignor and consignee, and descriptions of the cattle, including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cattle from the Republic of Ireland... Cattle from the Republic of Ireland. (a) All cattle to be imported from the Republic of Ireland shall be...

  20. 9 CFR 93.432 - Cattle from the Republic of Ireland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... consignor and consignee, and descriptions of the cattle, including breed, ages, markings, and tattoo and... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cattle from the Republic of Ireland... Cattle from the Republic of Ireland. (a) All cattle to be imported from the Republic of Ireland shall be...

  1. Developing recommendations to improve the quality of diabetes care in Ireland: a policy analysis.

    PubMed

    Mc Hugh, Sheena M; Perry, Ivan J; Bradley, Colin; Brugha, Ruairí

    2014-09-18

    In 2006, the Health Service Executive (HSE) in Ireland established an Expert Advisory Group (EAG) for Diabetes, to act as its main source of operational policy and strategic advice for this chronic condition. The process was heralded as the starting point for the development of formal chronic disease management programmes. Although recommendations were published in 2008, implementation did not proceed as expected. Our aim was to examine the development of recommendations by the EAG as an instrumental case study of the policy formulation process, in the context of a health system undergoing organisational and financial upheaval. This study uses Kingdon's Multiple Streams Theory to examine the evolution of the EAG recommendations. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 15 stakeholders from the advisory group. Interview data were supplemented with documentary analysis of published and unpublished documents. Thematic analysis was guided by the propositions of the Kingdon model. In the problem stream, the prioritisation of diabetes within the policy arena was a gradual process resulting from an accumulation of evidence, international comparison, and experience. The policy stream was bolstered by group consensus rather than complete agreement on the best way to manage the condition. The EAG assumed the politics stream was also on course to converge with the other streams, as the group was established by the HSE, which had the remit for policy implementation. However, the politics stream did not converge due to waning support from health service management and changes to the organisational structure and financial capacity of the health system. These changes trumped the EAG process and the policy window remained closed, stalling implementation. Our results reflect the dynamic nature of the policy process and the importance of timing. The results highlight the limits of rational policy making in the face of organisational and fiscal upheaval

  2. A profile of physiotherapy supply in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Eighan, James; Walsh, Brendan; Smith, Samantha; Wren, Maev-Ann; Barron, Steve; Morgenroth, Edgar

    2018-04-13

    The lack of information on public and private physiotherapy supply in Ireland makes current and future resource allocation decisions difficult. This paper estimates the supply of physiotherapists in Ireland and profiles physiotherapists across acute and non-acute sectors, and across public and private practice. It examines geographic variation in physiotherapist supply, examining the implications of controlling for healthcare need. Physiotherapist headcounts are estimated using Health Service Personnel Census (HSPC) and Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists (ISCP) Register data. Headcounts are converted to whole-time equivalents (WTEs) using the HSPC and a survey of ISCP members to account for full- and part-time working practices. Non-acute supply per 10,000 population in each county is estimated to examine geographic inequalities and the raw population is adjusted in turn for a range of need indicators. An estimated 3172 physiotherapists were practising in Ireland in 2015; 6.8 physiotherapists per 10,000, providing an estimated 2620 WTEs. Females accounted for 74% of supply. Supply was greater in the non-acute sector; 1774 WTEs versus 846 WTEs in the acute sector. Physiotherapists in the acute sector were located mainly in publicly financed institutions (89%) with an even public/private split observed in the non-acute sector. Non-acute physiotherapist supply is unequally distributed across Ireland (Gini coefficient = 0.12; 95% CI 0.08-0.15), and inequalities remain after controlling for variations in healthcare needs across counties. The supply of physiotherapists in Ireland is 30% lower than the EU-28 average. Substantial inequality in the distribution of physiotherapists across counties is observed.

  3. New OBS network deployment offshore Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, Florian; Bean, Chris; Craig, David; Jousset, Philippe; Horan, Clare; Hogg, Colin; Donne, Sarah; McCann, Hannah; Möllhoff, Martin; Kirk, Henning; Ploetz, Aline

    2016-04-01

    With the presence of the stormy NE Atlantic, Ireland is ideally located to investigate further our understanding of ocean generated microseisms and use noise correlation methods to develop seismic imaging in marine environments as well as time-lapse monitoring. In order to study the microseismic activity offshore Ireland, 10 Broad Band Ocean Bottom Seismographs (OBSs) units including hydrophones have been deployed in January 2016 across the shelf offshore Donegal and out into the Rockall Trough. This survey represents the first Broadband passive study in this part of the NE Atlantic. The instruments will be recovered in August 2016 providing 8 months worth of data to study microseisms but also the offshore seismic activity in the area. One of the main goal of the survey is to investigate the spatial and temporal distributions of dominant microseism source regions, close to the microseism sources. Additionally we will study the coupling of seismic and acoustic signals at the sea bed and its evolution in both the deep water and continental shelf areas. Furthermore, the survey also aims to investigate further the relationship between sea state conditions (e.g. wave height, period), seafloor pressure variations and seismic data recorded on both land and seafloor. Finally, the deployed OBS network is also the first ever attempt to closely monitor local offshore earthquakes in Ireland. Ireland seismicity although relatively low can reduce slope stability and poses the possibility of triggering large offshore landslides and local tsunamis.

  4. Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Higher Education in Ireland. OECD Skills Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This report presents evidence-based analysis on Ireland's higher education transformation process towards an innovative, interconnected and multidisciplinary entrepreneurial system, designed to empower its students and staff to demonstrate enterprise, innovation and creativity in teaching, research and societal engagement. Using the OECD-European…

  5. The Pied Piper of Neo Liberalism Calls the Tune in the Republic of Ireland: An Analysis of Education Policy Text from 2000-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmie, Geraldine Mooney

    2012-01-01

    This article offers an analysis of the rhetoric of education policy text during the timeframe from 2000 to 2012 in the Republic of Ireland. The study was framed within two different discourses of the role of the teacher: one discourse regards the teacher as a professional within a dynamic system of democratic relations (Anyon, 2011; Apple, 2012;…

  6. Community Development in Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Anna

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade, community development in Ireland has emphasized social and economic inclusion, regeneration, and civic participation. Continuing challenges include designation of diverse community representatives, demand for increased administrative efficiency, and management of mandates and accountability. There are more community development…

  7. A Comparative Examination of Schools' Responses to Bereavement and the Associated Needs of the School Community in Galway, West of Ireland and Derry, Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, Marguerita; Tracey, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The aim and objective of this study is to examine and compare how schools in Galway, Republic of Ireland and Derry in the North of Ireland (cities located within two independent jurisdictions in Ireland) manage and respond to bereavement. To carry out a survey of schools, the "Loss in Schools" questionnaire is considered the most…

  8. Woman-centred care during pregnancy and birth in Ireland: thematic analysis of women's and clinicians' experiences.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Andrew; Devane, Declan; Houghton, Catherine; Grealish, Annmarie; Tully, Agnes; Smith, Valerie

    2017-09-25

    Recent policy and service provision recommends a woman-centred approach to maternity care. Midwife-led models of care are seen as one important strategy for enhancing women's choice; a core element of woman-centred care. In the Republic of Ireland, an obstetric consultant-led, midwife-managed service model currently predominates and there is limited exploration of the concept of women centred care from the perspectives of those directly involved; that is, women, midwives, general practitioners and obstetricians. This study considers women's and clinicians' views, experiences and perspectives of woman-centred maternity care in Ireland. A descriptive qualitative design. Participants (n = 31) were purposively sampled from two geographically distinct maternity units. Interviews were face-to-face or over the telephone, one-to-one or focus groups. A thematic analysis of the interview data was performed. Five major themes representing women's and clinicians' views, experiences and perspectives of women-centred care emerged from the data. These were Protecting Normality, Education and Decision Making, Continuity, Empowerment for Women-Centred Care and Building Capacity for Women-Centred Care. Within these major themes, sub-themes emerged that reflect key elements of women-centred care. These were respect, partnership in decision making, information sharing, educational impact, continuity of service, staff continuity and availability, genuine choice, promoting women's autonomy, individualized care, staff competency and practice organization. Women centred-care, as perceived by participants in this study, is not routinely provided in Ireland and women subscribe to the dominant culture that views safety as paramount. Women-centred care can best be facilitated through continuity of carer and in particular through midwife led models of care; however, there is potential to provide women-centred care within existing labour wards in terms of consistency of care, education of

  9. Energy drinks available in Ireland: a description of caffeine and sugar content.

    PubMed

    Keaver, Laura; Gilpin, Susannah; Fernandes da Silva, Joana Caldeira; Buckley, Claire; Foley-Nolan, Cliodhna

    2017-06-01

    To describe the caffeine and sugar content of all energy drinks available on the island of Ireland. Two retail outlets were selected from each of: multinational, convenience and discount stores in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, and all available single-serve energy drinks were purchased. The cross-sectional survey was conducted in February 2015 and brand name, price, volume, caffeine and sugar content were recorded for each product. Descriptive analysis was performed. Seventy-eight products were identified on the island of Ireland (regular, n 59; diet/sugar-free/light, n 19). Caffeine and sugar content was in the range of 14-35 mg and 2·9-15·6 g per 100 ml, respectively. Mean caffeine content of 102·2 mg per serving represents 25·6 % of the maximum intake advised for adults by the European Food Safety Authority. Per serving, mean sugar content of regular energy drinks was 37 g. This exceeds WHO recommendations for maximum daily sugar intake of <5 % of total energy intake (25 g for adults consuming 8368 kJ (2000 kcal) diet). If displaying front-of-pack labelling, fifty-seven of the fifty-nine regular energy drinks would receive a Food Standards Agency 'red' colour-coded label for sugar. Energy drinks are freely available on the island of Ireland and all products surveyed can be defined as highly caffeinated products. This has potential health issues particularly for children and adolescents where safe limits of caffeine have not been determined. Energy drinks surveyed also contained high levels of sugar and could potentially contribute to weight gain and adverse dental health effects.

  10. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA) (12th, Maynooth, Greater Dublin, Ireland, October 24-26, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 12th International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2015), October 24-26, 2015, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS), co-organized by Maynooth University, Ireland, and endorsed by the…

  11. Linguistic Barriers among Internationally Educated Teachers in Ireland and Canada: A Critical Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Clea; McDaid, Rory

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on qualitative interview and focus group data collected from Internationally Educated Teachers (IETs) in the context of two different research studies conducted in Ireland and Manitoba, Canada, this article critically examines how national/regional linguistic requirements and expectations of a hidden curriculum are experienced as barriers…

  12. Reporting the Rhetoric, Implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child as Represented in Ireland's Second Report to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child: A Critical Discourse Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiersey, Rachel A.; Hayes, Noirin

    2010-01-01

    Ireland's second periodic report to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) presents the government's case that it is succeeding in protecting and promoting the rights of all children in Ireland. This article presents a critical discourse analysis of the government's Report to the CRC. Using a refined critical discourse…

  13. A method to assess obstetric outcomes using the 10-Group Classification System: a quantitative descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Rossen, Janne; Lucovnik, Miha; Eggebø, Torbjørn Moe; Tul, Natasa; Murphy, Martina; Vistad, Ingvild; Robson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Internationally, the 10-Group Classification System (TGCS) has been used to report caesarean section rates, but analysis of other outcomes is also recommended. We now aim to present the TGCS as a method to assess outcomes of labour and delivery using routine collection of perinatal information. Design This research is a methodological study to describe the use of the TGCS. Setting Stavanger University Hospital (SUH), Norway, National Maternity Hospital Dublin, Ireland and Slovenian National Perinatal Database (SLO), Slovenia. Participants 9848 women from SUH, Norway, 9250 women from National Maternity Hospital Dublin, Ireland and 106 167 women, from SLO, Slovenia. Main outcome measures All women were classified according to the TGCS within which caesarean section, oxytocin augmentation, epidural analgesia, operative vaginal deliveries, episiotomy, sphincter rupture, postpartum haemorrhage, blood transfusion, maternal age >35 years, body mass index >30, Apgar score, umbilical cord pH, hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy, antepartum and perinatal deaths were incorporated. Results There were significant differences in the sizes of the groups of women and the incidences of events and outcomes within the TGCS between the three perinatal databases. Conclusions The TGCS is a standardised objective classification system where events and outcomes of labour and delivery can be incorporated. Obstetric core events and outcomes should be agreed and defined to set standards of care. This method provides continuous and available observations from delivery wards, possibly used for further interpretation, questions and international comparisons. The definition of quality may vary in different units and can only be ascertained when all the necessary information is available and considered together. PMID:28706102

  14. Small Rural Schools in Ireland: Problems and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugrue, Ciaran

    This paper provides an overview of practices in small rural elementary schools in Ireland and recent trends related to school size. There are 3,200 "ordinary" elementary schools in the Republic of Ireland serving children aged 4-12 in eight levels: two preschool levels and grades 1-6. System-wide policies with implications for small…

  15. INFOMAR, Ireland's National Seabed Mapping Programme; Sharing Valuable Insights.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, M. T.; McGrath, F.; Cullen, S.; Verbruggen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Following the successful high-resolution deep-sea mapping carried out as part of the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS), a strategic, long term programme was established: INtegrated mapping FOr the sustainable development of Ireland MArine Resources (INFOMAR). Funded by Ireland's Department of Communication, Climate Action and Environment, INFOMAR comprises a multi-platform approach to completing Ireland's marine mapping, and is a key action in the integrated marine plan, Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth. Co-managed by Geological Survey Ireland and the Marine Institute, the programme has three work strands: Data Acquisition; Data Exchange and Integration; Value Added Exploitation.The Data Acquisition strand includes collection of geological, hydrographic, oceanographic, habitat and heritage datasets that underpin sustainable development and management of Ireland's marine resources. INFOMAR operates a free data policy; data and outputs are delivered online through the Data Exchange and Integration strand. Uses of data and outputs are wide-ranging and multipurpose. In order to address the evolution and diversification of user requirements, further data product development is facilitated through the Value Added Exploitation strand.Ninety percent of Ireland's territory lies offshore. Therefore, strategic national seabed mapping continues to provide critical, high-resolution baseline datasets for numerous economic sectors and societal needs. From these we can glean important geodynamic knowledge of Ireland's vast maritime territory. INFOMAR remains aligned with national and European policies and directives. Exemplified by our commitment to EMODnet, a European Commission funded project that supports the collection, standardisation and sharing of available marine information, data and data products across all European Seas. As EMODnet Geology Minerals leaders we have developed a framework for mapping marine minerals. Furthermore, collaboration with the international research

  16. An application of HOMER and ACMANT for homogenising monthly precipitation records in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, John; Curley, Mary; Domonkos, Peter; Aguilar, Enric; Walsh, Seamus; Sweeney, John

    2015-04-01

    Climate change studies based only on raw long-term data are potentially flawed due to the many breaks introduced from non-climatic sources. Consequently, accurate climate data is an essential prerequisite for basing climate related decision making on; and quality controlled, homogenised climate data are becoming integral to European Union Member State efforts to deliver climate services. Ireland has a good repository of monthly precipitation data at approximately 1900 locations stored in the Met Éireann database. The record length at individual precipitation stations varies greatly. However, an audit of the data established the continuous record length at each station and the number of missing months, and based on this two initial subsets of station series (n = 88 and n = 110) were identified for preliminary homogenisation efforts. The HOMER joint detection algorithm was applied to the combined network of these 198 longer station series on an Ireland-wide basis where contiguous intact monthly records ranged from ~40 to 71 years (1941 - 2010). HOMER detected 91 breaks in total in the country-wide series analysis distributed across 63 (~32%) of the 71 year series records analysed. In a separate approach, four sub-series clusters (n = 38 - 61) for the 1950 - 2010 period were used in a parallel analysis applying both ACMANT and HOMER to a regionalised split of the 198 series. By comparison ACMANT detected a considerably higher number of breaks across the four regional series clusters, 238 distributed across 123 (~62%) of the 61 year series records analysed. These preliminary results indicate a relatively high proportion of detected breaks in the series, a situation not generally reflected in observed later 20th century precipitation records across Europe (Domonkos, 2014). However, this elevated ratio of series with detected breaks (~32% in HOMER and ~62% in ACMANT) parallels the break detection rate in a recent analysis of series in the Netherlands (Buishand et al

  17. Trinity mysteries: university, elite schooling and sport in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Finn, Gerry P T

    2010-01-01

    The development of sport in Ireland was, contrary to some arguments, highly influenced by English examples and Anglo-Irish institutions. Trinity College and prestigious Irish schools did have an impact, as did the number of Irish students sent to England for public school or university education. Athleticism was evident in Ireland as it was in England. Although the development of soccer did follow a slightly different trajectory from other sports, as was also the case in both England and Scotland, this does not mean that it departed from this broad evolutionary model of Irish sport. Yet this was Ireland: and Ireland was different. As opposition to British rule intensified, forms of sporting participation took on more and more of a national symbolism. The outcome was the emergence of a very potent form of athleticism: an Irish athleticism for an Irish people.

  18. The Fallibility of High Stakes "11-Plus" Testing in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John; Cowan, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    This paper sets out the findings from a large-scale analysis of the Northern Ireland Transfer Procedure Tests, used to select pupils for grammar schools. As it was not possible to get completed test scripts from government agencies, over 3000 practice scripts were completed in simulated conditions and were analysed to establish whether the tests…

  19. Interhospital Transport of Critically Ill Children to PICUs in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland: Analysis of an International Dataset.

    PubMed

    Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Dimitriades, Konstantinos; Freeburn, Lynsey; Kashyap, Aravind; Dixon, Michaela; Barry, Peter W; Claydon-Smith, Kathryn; Wardhaugh, Allan; Lamming, Caroline R; Draper, Elizabeth S

    2018-06-01

    International data on characteristics and outcomes of children transported from general hospitals to PICUs are scarce. We aimed to 1) describe the development of a common transport dataset in the United Kingdom and Ireland and 2) analyze transport data from a recent 2-year period. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Specialist pediatric critical care transport teams and PICUs in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Critically ill children less than 16 years old transported by pediatric critical care transport teams to PICUs in the United Kingdom and Ireland. None. A common transport dataset was developed as part of the Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network, and standardized data were collected from all PICUs and pediatric critical care transport teams from 2012. Anonymized data on transports (and linked PICU admissions) from a 2-year period (2014-2015) were analyzed to describe patient and transport characteristics, and in uni- and multivariate analyses, to study the association between key transport factors and PICU mortality. A total of 8,167 records were analyzed. Transported children were severely ill (median predicted mortality risk 4.4%) with around half being infants (4,226/8,167; 51.7%) and nearly half presenting with respiratory illnesses (3,619/8,167; 44.3%). The majority of transports were led by physicians (78.4%; consultants: 3,059/8,167, fellows: 3,344/8,167). The median time for a pediatric critical care transport team to arrive at the patient's bedside from referral was 85 minutes (interquartile range, 58-135 min). Adverse events occurred in 369 transports (4.5%). There were considerable variations in how transports were organized and delivered across pediatric critical care transport teams. In multivariate analyses, consultant team leader and transport from an intensive care area were associated with PICU mortality (p = 0.006). Variations exist in United Kingdom and Ireland services for critically ill children needing

  20. Promoting learning transfer in post registration education: a collaborative approach.

    PubMed

    Finn, Frances L; Fensom, Sue A; Chesser-Smyth, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Pre-registration nurse education in Ireland became a four year undergraduate honors degree programme in 2002 (Government of Ireland, 2000. The Nursing Education Forum Report. Dublin, Dublin Stationary Office.). Consequently, the Irish Government invested significant resources in post registration nursing education in order to align certificate and diploma trained nurses with the qualification levels of new graduates. However, a general concern amongst academic and clinical staff in the South East of Ireland was that there was limited impact of this initiative on practice. These concerns were addressed through a collaborative approach to the development and implementation of a new part-time post registration degree that incorporated an enquiry and practice based learning philosophy. The principles of learning transfer (Ford, K., 1994. Defining transfer of learning the meaning is in the answers. Adult Learning 5 (4), p. 2214.) underpinned the curriculum development and implementation process with the goal of reducing the theory practice gap. This paper reports on all four stages of the curriculum development process: exploration, design, implementation and evaluation (Quinn, F.M., 2002. Principles and Practices of Nurse Education, fourth ed. Nelson Thornes, Cheltenham), and the subsequent impact of learning transfer on practice development. Eclectic approaches of quantitative and qualitative data collection techniques were utilised in the evaluation. The evaluation of this project to date supports our view that this practice based enquiry curriculum promotes the transfer of learning in the application of knowledge to practice, impacting both student and service development.

  1. Pathogen translocation and histopathological lesions in an experimental model of Salmonella Dublin infection in calves receiving lactic acid bacteria and lactose supplements

    PubMed Central

    Zbrun, María V.; Soto, Lorena P.; Bertozzi, Ezequiel; Sequeira, Gabriel J.; Marti, Luis E.; Signorini, Marcelo L.; Armesto, Roberto Rodríguez; Rosmini, Marcelo R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of a lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculum to protect calves with or without lactose supplements against Salmonella Dublin infection by evaluating histopathological lesions and pathogen translocation. Fifteen calves were divided into three groups [control group (C-G), a group inoculated with LAB (LAB-G), and a group inoculated with LAB and given lactose supplements (L-LAB-G)] with five, six, and four animals, respectively. The inoculum, composed of Lactobacillus (L.) casei DSPV 318T, L. salivarius DSPV 315T, and Pediococcus acidilactici DSPV 006T, was administered with milk replacer. The LAB-G and L-LAB-G received a daily dose of 109 CFU/kg body weight of each strain throughout the experiment. Lactose was provided to the L-LAB-G in doses of 100 g/day. Salmonella Dublin (2 × 1010 CFU) was orally administered to all animals on day 11 of the experiment. The microscopic lesion index values in target organs were 83%, 70%, and 64.3% (p < 0.05) for the C-G, LAB-G, and L-LAB-G, respectively. Administration of the probiotic inoculum was not fully effective against infection caused by Salmonella. Although probiotic treatment was unable to delay the arrival of pathogen to target organs, it was evident that the inoculum altered the response of animals against pathogen infection. PMID:23000583

  2. Underreporting of viral encephalitis and viral meningitis, Ireland, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Tara A; O'Lorcain, Piaras; Moran, Joanne; Garvey, Patricia; McKeown, Paul; Connell, Jeff; Cotter, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Viral encephalitis (VE) and viral meningitis (VM) have been notifiable infectious diseases under surveillance in the Republic of Ireland since 1981. Laboratories have reported confirmed cases by detection of viral nucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid since 2004. To determine the prevalence of these diseases in Ireland during 2005-2008, we analyzed 3 data sources: Hospital In-patient Enquiry data (from hospitalized following patients discharge) accessed through Health Intelligence Ireland, laboratory confirmations from the National Virus Reference Laboratory, and events from the Computerised Infectious Disease Reporting surveillance system. We found that the national surveillance system underestimates the incidence of these diseases in Ireland with a 10-fold higher VE hospitalization rate and 3-fold higher VM hospitalization rate than the reporting rate. Herpesviruses were responsible for most specified VE and enteroviruses for most specified VM from all 3 sources. Recommendations from this study have been implemented to improve the surveillance of these diseases in Ireland.

  3. Climate change: potential implications for Ireland's biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Alison

    2018-03-01

    A national biodiversity and climate change adaptation plan is being developed for Ireland by the Department of Communications, Climate Action, and Environment. In order to inform such a plan, it was necessary to review and synthesize some of the recent literature pertaining to the impact of climate change on biodiversity in Ireland. Published research on this topic fell within three broad categories: (i) changes in the timing of life-cycle events (phenology) of plants, birds, and insects; (ii) changes in the geographic range of some bird species; and (iii) changes in the suitable climatic zones of key habitats and species. The synthesis revealed evidence of (i) a trend towards earlier spring activity of plants, birds, and insects which may result in a change in ecosystem function; (ii) an increase in the number of bird species; and (iii) both increases and decreases in the suitable climatic area of key habitats and species, all of which are expected to impact Ireland's future biodiversity. This process identified data gaps and limitations in available information both of which could be used to inform a focused research strategy. In addition, it raises awareness of the potential implications of climate change for biodiversity in Ireland and elsewhere and demonstrates the need for biodiversity conservation plans to factor climate change into future designs.

  4. Climate change: potential implications for Ireland's biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Alison

    2018-03-12

    A national biodiversity and climate change adaptation plan is being developed for Ireland by the Department of Communications, Climate Action, and Environment. In order to inform such a plan, it was necessary to review and synthesize some of the recent literature pertaining to the impact of climate change on biodiversity in Ireland. Published research on this topic fell within three broad categories: (i) changes in the timing of life-cycle events (phenology) of plants, birds, and insects; (ii) changes in the geographic range of some bird species; and (iii) changes in the suitable climatic zones of key habitats and species. The synthesis revealed evidence of (i) a trend towards earlier spring activity of plants, birds, and insects which may result in a change in ecosystem function; (ii) an increase in the number of bird species; and (iii) both increases and decreases in the suitable climatic area of key habitats and species, all of which are expected to impact Ireland's future biodiversity. This process identified data gaps and limitations in available information both of which could be used to inform a focused research strategy. In addition, it raises awareness of the potential implications of climate change for biodiversity in Ireland and elsewhere and demonstrates the need for biodiversity conservation plans to factor climate change into future designs.

  5. Met Éireann high resolution reanalysis for Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, Emily; Whelan, Eoin; Hanley, John

    2017-03-01

    The Irish Meteorological Service, Met Éireann, has carried out a 35-year very high resolution (2.5 km horizontal grid) regional climate reanalysis for Ireland using the ALADIN-HIRLAM numerical weather prediction system. This article provides an overview of the reanalysis, called MÉRA, as well as a preliminary analysis of surface parameters including screen level temperature, 10 m wind speeds, mean sea-level pressure (MSLP), soil temperatures, soil moisture and 24 h rainfall accumulations. The quality of the 3-D variational data assimilation used in the reanalysis is also assessed. Preliminary analysis shows that it takes almost 12 months to spin up the deep soil in terms of moisture, justifying the choice of running year-long spin up periods. Overall, the model performed consistently over the time period. Small biases were found in screen-level temperatures (less than -0.5 °C), MSLP (within 0.5 hPa) and 10 m wind speed (up to 0.5 m s-1) Soil temperatures are well represented by the model. 24 h accumulations of precipitation generally exhibit a small positive bias of ˜ 1 mm per day and negative biases over mountains due to a mismatch between the model orography and the geography of the region. MÉRA outperforms the ERA-Interim reanalysis, particularly in terms of standard deviations in screen-level temperatures and surface winds. This dataset is the first of its kind for Ireland that will be made publically available during spring 2017.

  6. All Christians? Experiences of science educators in Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Colette; Hickey, Ivor; Beggs, Jim

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we respond to Staver's article (this issue) on an attempt to resolve the discord between science and religion. Most specifically, we comment on Staver's downplaying of difference between Catholics and Protestants in order to focus on the religion-science question. It is our experience that to be born into one or other of these traditions in some parts of the world (especially Northern Ireland) resulted in starkly contrasting opportunities, identities and practices in becoming and being science educators. The paper starts with a short contextual background to the impact of religion on schooling and higher education in Northern Ireland. We then explore the lives and careers of three science/religious educators in Northern Ireland: Catholic (Jim) and Protestant (Ivor) males who are contemporaries and whose experience spans pre-Troubles to post-conflict and a Catholic female (Colette) who moved to Northern Ireland during the Troubles as a teenager. Finally, we discuss the situation regarding the teaching of creationism and evolution in Northern Ireland—an issue has recently generated high public interest. The Chair of the Education Committee of the Northern Ireland Assembly recently stated that "creationism is not for the RE class because I believe that it can stand scientific scrutiny and that is a debate which I am quite happy to encourage and be part of…" (News Letter 2008). It could be the case that the evolution debate is being fuelled as a deliberate attempt to undermine some of the post-conflict collaboration projects between schools and communities in Northern Ireland.

  7. Road accident facts Ireland, 2002

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-11-01

    This report covers all road traffic accidents reported to : the Garda Sochna, where details were forwarded to the : National Roads Authority, involving fatalities, personal : injury or material damage which occurred on public : roads in Ireland (...

  8. Vocational Training in Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooney, Roy; Dunne, Paul

    This monograph, one of a series of studies of vocational education in the countries of the European Communities, describes the vocational training system in Ireland. The study was compiled from existing statistics and descriptions, and most figures cited refer to 1984. The report is organized in eight chapters. Chapter 1 covers population,…

  9. The development of counselling psychology in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Allison; O'Callaghan, Dermot; O'Brien, Owen; Broderick, John; Long, Catherine; O'Grady, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the distinctive nature of the specialism of counselling psychology and outlines the development of the discipline in Ireland in the context of international developments and its recognition as a professional branch of applied psychology. Today, counselling psychologists are employed in varied clinical and non-clinical settings including health and mental health services (statutory, private and voluntary sector) along with education, forensic, justice, industry and private practices. Counselling psychologist is the primary professional identity of many practising psychologists in Ireland and the Psychological Society of Ireland's Division of Counselling Psychology is the main affiliation of at least 179 members. With its focus on facilitating personal and interpersonal functioning across the life span and its emphasis on the therapeutic process, the specialism continues to bridge the disciplines of psychology, counselling and psychotherapy. In this article, some of the challenges still faced by counselling psychology are explored as it navigates its way through the changing landscape of further development and evolution. PMID:26494940

  10. Challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland: 1. clinical veterinary services.

    PubMed

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; More, Simon J; Morton, David B; Hanlon, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    The provision of veterinary clinical services is known to elicit a range of challenges which require an ethical appraisal. In a recent Policy Delphi study, referrals/second opinions and 24 h emergency care were identified as matters of key concern by veterinary professionals in Ireland. In this case study (the first in a series of three resulting from a research workshop exploring challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland; the other two case studies investigate the on-farm use of veterinary antimicrobials and emergency/casualty slaughter certification) we aim to provide a value-based reflection on the constraints and possible opportunities for two prominent veterinary clinical services in Ireland: referrals/second opinions and 24 h emergency care. Using a qualitative focus group approach, this study gathered evidence from relevant stakeholders, namely referral and referring veterinarians, clients, animal charities, and the regulatory body. Six overarching, interrelated constraints emerged from the thematic analysis: the need to improve current guidance, managing clients' expectations, concerns with veterinarian well-being, financial issues, timeliness of referral, and conflicts between veterinary practices. Possible solutions to improve veterinary referral and out-of-hours clinical services included clarifying the terms used in current norms and regulations (namely 'referral', 'second opinion', '24 h emergency care' and '24 h cover'), improved communication (making the client aware of the different levels of veterinary care that are being offered, and transparent and full disclosure of clinical records), and the promotion of Continuing Veterinary Education in communication, business management and ethical decision-making. These findings may help inform the Veterinary Council of Ireland about future recommendations and regulatory measures.

  11. The effect of multiple chronic conditions on self-rated health, disability and quality of life among the older populations of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland: a comparison of two nationally representative cross-sectional surveys

    PubMed Central

    McDaid, Olga; Hanly, Mark J; Richardson, Kathryn; Kee, Frank; Kenny, Rose Anne; Savva, George M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Multimorbidity is common in the older population, but the impact of combinations of chronic conditions on disability and quality of life (QoL) is not well known. This analysis explores the effect of specific combinations of chronic diseases on disability, QoL and self-rated health (SRH). Design We used data from two population representative cross-sectional studies, the Northern Ireland Health and Social Wellbeing Survey (NIHSWS) 2005 and the Survey of Lifestyle, Attitudes and Nutrition (SLAN) 2007 (conducted in the Republic of Ireland). Setting Randomly selected community-living participants were interviewed at home. Participants A total of 6159 participants aged 50 years and older were included in the analysis. Outcome measures Chronic conditions were classified as cardiovascular disease, chronic pain, diabetes or respiratory disease. Interaction terms estimated by logistic regression were used to examine the effects of multiple chronic conditions on disability, SRH and QoL. Results Each chronic condition group was correlated with each of the others after adjusting for sociodemographic factors. Those from Northern Ireland were more likely to report a limitation in daily activities (45%) compared to those from the Republic of Ireland (21%). Each condition had an independent effect on disability, SRH and QoL, and those with multiple chronic conditions reported the worst outcomes. However, there were no statistically significant positive interactions between chronic condition groups with respect to any outcome. Conclusions Chronic conditions affect individuals largely independent of each other with respect to their effect on disability, SRH and QoL. However, a significant proportion of the population aged 50 years and over across the island of Ireland lives with multimorbidity, and this group is at the highest risk of disability, poor SRH and poor QoL. PMID:23794595

  12. Electrical Fatalities in Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, James

    2009-01-01

    A review of autopsy reports in cases of electrocution in Northern Ireland revealed that there were 50 accidental electrocutions and 9 suicidal electrocutions over a 22 year period (1982 – 2003). No cases of homicidal electrocution were detected in this jurisdiction. Analysis of the cohort of accidental electrocutions showed that there was a clear skew towards young and middle-aged male adults with deaths occurring more frequently in the summer months. Almost 60% of individuals were engaged in occupational tasks when they were accidentally electrocuted. High and low voltage-related deaths occurred with similar frequency and electrical appliances were found to be responsible for approximately one third of accidental electrocutions. The potential hazards of electricity must continue to be stressed in public safety campaigns if these relatively uncommon but tragic deaths are to be prevented. PMID:19252729

  13. Management of intra-abdominal infections: recommendations by the WSES 2016 consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Ansaloni, Luca; Biffl, Walter L; Boermeester, Marja A; Ceresoli, Marco; Chiara, Osvaldo; Coccolini, Federico; De Waele, Jan J; Di Saverio, Salomone; Eckmann, Christian; Fraga, Gustavo P; Giannella, Maddalena; Girardis, Massimo; Griffiths, Ewen A; Kashuk, Jeffry; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Khokha, Vladimir; Kluger, Yoram; Labricciosa, Francesco M; Leppaniemi, Ari; Maier, Ronald V; May, Addison K; Malangoni, Mark; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Mazuski, John; Montravers, Philippe; Peitzman, Andrew; Pereira, Bruno M; Reis, Tarcisio; Sakakushev, Boris; Sganga, Gabriele; Soreide, Kjetil; Sugrue, Michael; Ulrych, Jan; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Viale, Pierluigi; Moore, Ernest E

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the consensus conference on the management of intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) which was held on July 23, 2016, in Dublin, Ireland, as a part of the annual World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) meeting. This document covers all aspects of the management of IAIs. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation recommendation is used, and this document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference findings.

  14. ICT Policy and Implementation in Education: Cases in Canada, Northern Ireland and Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Roger; Hunter, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Countries with similar levels of economic development often implement different education ICT policies. Much of the existing research attributes such differences to economic and political factors. In this paper, we examine the development of ICT policy and implementation in the two parts of Ireland and in two Canadian provinces and find that…

  15. Telling Tales--Cruelty and Abuse in Schooling in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffers, Gerry

    2016-01-01

    The report of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse (Government of Ireland, 2009)--the Ryan Report--shocked Ireland and the wider world with its chilling descriptions of abuse that was systemic, pervasive, chronic, excessive, arbitrary and endemic. Subsequent debate has, rightly, centred on the "religious" arena, highlighting the…

  16. An early record of Meloidogyne fallax from Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Topalović, Olivera; Moore, John F.; Janssen, Toon; Bert, Wim; Karssen, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp., cause huge economic losses worldwide. Currently, three Meloidogyne spp. are present on the quarantine A2 list of EPPO, Meloidogyne chitwoodi, Meloidogyne fallax and Meloidogyne enterolobii. As a quarantine organism, Meloidogyne fallax has been detected in England and Northern Ireland on sport turf in 2011, and in England on leek in 2013. However, its presence in Ireland has probably been overlooked since 1965, when Mr. John F. Moore and Dr. Mary T. Franklin had detected a new Meloidogyne species for that time. While the relevant data was recorded and a preliminary manuscript describing the species was prepared but never submitted for publication, and together with the original slides, pictures and drawings, it was restudied recently. We compared the population of Irish Meloidogyne sp. to other similar Meloidogyne spp. Careful observation and comparison shows that it belongs to Meloidogyne fallax. The characters found to be common for Irish Meloidogyne sp. and Meloidogyne fallax are female stylet length (14.6 μm) with oval to rounded basal knobs, oval shaped perineal pattern with moderately high dorsal arch, slender stylet in males (18.5 μm) with set off and rounded basal knobs, slightly set off male head with one post-labial annule and incomplete transverse incisures, and second-stage juveniles with large and rounded stylet basal knobs, and a gradually tapering tail (46.9 μm) with a broadly rounded tip and a clearly delimitated smooth hyaline part sometimes marked by constrictions (12.9 μm). The host test and gall formation also correspond to Meloidogyne fallax. The identification could not be additionally supported by molecular analysis, as we were unable to extract DNA from the old permanent slides. Nevertheless, our study reveals that the Meloidogyne species detected in Ireland in 1965 belongs to Meloidogyne fallax. PMID:28144174

  17. Implementing E-Learning in Northern Ireland: Prospects and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhomoibhi, James O.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Aims to examine trends in the development of e-learning in Northern Ireland, report on existing policies, practices and issues affecting its implementation across the sectors. Design/methodology/approach: The present study draws on e-learning policies and strategies that have been developed for Northern Ireland. Examples were drawn from…

  18. Community access to health information in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Macdougall, J

    1999-06-01

    This paper is based on a research project conducted on consumer health information (CHI) in the Republic of Ireland, the results of which were published in a report entitled Well Read: Developing Consumer Health Information in Ireland. The paper describes the research methodology and the Irish experience in relation to CHI followed by a discussion of access problems, illustrated with examples from the special needs and primary care sectors. The role of information providers in relation to primary healthcare and libraries is examined briefly, and finally the main research conclusions and recommendations are highlighted.

  19. Network analysis of the Viking Age in Ireland as portrayed in Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh.

    PubMed

    Yose, Joseph; Kenna, Ralph; MacCarron, Máirín; MacCarron, Pádraig

    2018-01-01

    Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh ('The War of the Gaedhil with the Gaill') is a medieval Irish text, telling how an army under the leadership of Brian Boru challenged Viking invaders and their allies in Ireland, culminating with the Battle of Clontarf in 1014. Brian's victory is widely remembered for breaking Viking power in Ireland, although much modern scholarship disputes traditional perceptions. Instead of an international conflict between Irish and Viking, interpretations based on revisionist scholarship consider it a domestic feud or civil war. Counter-revisionists challenge this view and a long-standing and lively debate continues. Here, we introduce quantitative measures to the discussions. We present statistical analyses of network data embedded in the text to position its sets of interactions on a spectrum from the domestic to the international. This delivers a picture that lies between antipodal traditional and revisionist extremes; hostilities recorded in the text are mostly between Irish and Viking-but internal conflict forms a significant proportion of the negative interactions too.

  20. The Brady Bunch? New evidence for nominative determinism in patients’ health: retrospective, population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Groarke, John D; Galvin, Zita; McGorrian, Catherine; McCann, Hugh A; Sugrue, Declan; Keelan, Edward; Galvin, Joseph; Blake, Gavin; Mahon, Niall G; O’Neill, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether a name can influence a person’s health, by assessing whether people with the surname “Brady” have an increased prevalence of bradycardia. Design Retrospective, population based cohort study. Setting One university teaching hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Participants People with the surname “Brady” in Dublin, determined through use of an online telephone directory. Main outcome measure Prevalence of participants who had pacemakers inserted for bradycardia between 1 January 2007 and 28 February 2013. Results 579 (0.36%) of 161 967 people who were listed on the Dublin telephone listings had the surname “Brady.” The proportion of pacemaker recipients was significantly higher among Bradys (n=8, 1.38%) than among non-Bradys (n=991, 0.61%; P=0.03). The unadjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for pacemaker implantation among individuals with the surname Brady compared with individuals with other surnames was 2.27 (1.13 to 4.57). Conclusions Patients named Brady are at increased risk of needing pacemaker implantation compared with the general population. This finding shows a potential role for nominative determinism in health. PMID:24336304

  1. The 'healthy immigrant' effect: initial evidence for Ireland.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Anne

    2012-07-01

    The period from 1996 to 2008 was one of rapid economic and social change in Ireland, with one of the most significant changes being the transition from a situation of net emigration to one of substantial net immigration. Although research on the impact of immigration on Irish society, as well as the labour market characteristics and experiences of immigrants in Ireland has increased in recent years, comparatively little is known about the health status of immigrants to Ireland. An extensive international literature has documented a 'healthy immigrant' effect for large immigrant-receiving countries such as the United States, Canada and Australia, whereby the health status of immigrants is better than comparable native-born individuals. There is also evidence to suggest that immigrants' health status deteriorates with time spent in the host country. However, the Irish immigration experience differs considerably from that of countries that have been the focus of research on the 'healthy immigrant' effect. Using microdata from a nationally representative survey of the population in 2007, this paper finds only limited evidence in favour of a 'healthy immigrant' effect for Ireland, although the distinctive features of the Irish immigrant population, and the nature of the data available, may partly explain the results.

  2. The changing seascape of Galway Bay, Western Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mc Cullagh, D.; Benetti, S.; Plets, R. M. K.; Edwards, R.

    2016-12-01

    During the late Quaternary significant environmental and relative sea-level variations have contributed to shaping present day coastlines. This is particularly evident along formerly glaciated continental margins. Strong evidence of these changes are recorded in Galway Bay, Western Ireland. This research uses a multidisciplinary approach. Seismic and multibeam data, sedimentological, micropaleontological, geochemical analysis and 15 radiocarbon dates of sediment cores from the bay provide post last glacial maximum (LGM) sea level and environmental reconstructions for the region. The acoustic stratigraphy of the bay includes 3 seismic units: the deepest unit represents the acoustic basement, composed of limestone and granite bedrock; the middle unit is composed of the oldest preserved sediments, deposited during and after the LGM, and interpreted to be glacial till. The uppermost unit represents deposition and reworking after glacial retreat. The erosive action of the ice sheet that extended off the Irish coast is thought to be responsible for the removal and reworking of all sediments older that the LGM. In the sediment cores, three main lithofacies were identified: 1) a sandy silt and clay facies, 2) a distinct shell hash interlayer and, 3) a fine silty sand facies. These 3 facies are found within the uppermost seismic unit, and initial radiocarbon dating of shells in 4 cores, constrain these sediments and the uppermost seismic unit to the Holocene. Preliminary qualitative analysis on foraminifera from several cores shows a general trend of progression from estuarine to open marine conditions, inferred from indicator species. This trend is supported by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis which shows increased ratios of Cl/Fe in younger deposits. Constraining dates on sea level variations in the region will be added to the sea level database for Ireland and possibly used to adjust the existing relative sea level models. These are important for understating past sea

  3. Visual impairment in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed Central

    Canavan, Y. M.; Jackson, A. J.; Stewart, A.

    1997-01-01

    Statistics on the registration of blind and partially-sighted patients in Northern Ireland underestimate the true extent of visual impairment within our community. In comparison to other UK regions, where between 0.53% and 0.59% of the population avail of blind or partial sight registration, only 0.35% of residents in Northern Ireland appear on the respective registers. Most patients on the combined registers are in the older age groups and many also suffer from other disabilities. Regional discrepancies may be attributed to a combination of factors including: patient attitudes to the registration process, medical attitudes to registration and local anomalies in the way in which social services departments both record and present annual registration returns. Better liaison is necessary between the community, hospital and voluntary sector providers to improve identification and support services for the visually impaired in the future. PMID:9414937

  4. Underreporting of Viral Encephalitis and Viral Meningitis, Ireland, 2005–2008

    PubMed Central

    O’Lorcain, Piaras; Moran, Joanne; Garvey, Patricia; McKeown, Paul; Connell, Jeff; Cotter, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Viral encephalitis (VE) and viral meningitis (VM) have been notifiable infectious diseases under surveillance in the Republic of Ireland since 1981. Laboratories have reported confirmed cases by detection of viral nucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid since 2004. To determine the prevalence of these diseases in Ireland during 2005–2008, we analyzed 3 data sources: Hospital In-patient Enquiry data (from hospitalized following patients discharge) accessed through Health Intelligence Ireland, laboratory confirmations from the National Virus Reference Laboratory, and events from the Computerised Infectious Disease Reporting surveillance system. We found that the national surveillance system underestimates the incidence of these diseases in Ireland with a 10-fold higher VE hospitalization rate and 3-fold higher VM hospitalization rate than the reporting rate. Herpesviruses were responsible for most specified VE and enteroviruses for most specified VM from all 3 sources. Recommendations from this study have been implemented to improve the surveillance of these diseases in Ireland. PMID:23965781

  5. International collaboration: a retrospective study examining the survival of Irish citizens following lung transplantation in both the UK and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Adamali, Huzaifa I; Judge, Eoin P; Healy, David; Nolke, Lars; Redmond, Karen C; Bartosik, Waldemar; McCarthy, Jim; Egan, Jim J

    2012-01-01

    Prior to 2005, Irish citizens had exclusively availed of lung transplantation services in the UK. Since 2005, lung transplantation has been available to these patients in both the UK and Ireland. We aimed to evaluate the outcomes of Irish patients undergoing lung transplantation in both the UK and Ireland. We retrospectively examined the outcome of Irish patients transplanted in the UK and Ireland. Lung allocation score (LAS) was used as a marker of disease severity. A total of 134 patients have undergone transplantation. 102 patients underwent transplantation in the UK and 32 patients in Ireland. In total, 52% were patients with cystic fibrosis, 19% had emphysema and 15% had idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In Ireland, 44% of the patients suffered from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, 31% had emphysema and 16% had cystic fibrosis. A total of 96 double sequential transplants and 38 single transplants have been performed. LAS of all patients undergoing lung transplantation was 37.8 (±1.02). The mean LAS for patients undergoing lung transplantation in Ireland was 44.7 (±3.1), and 35 (±0.4) for patients undergoing lung transplantation in the UK (p<0.05). The 5-year survival of all Irish citizens who had undergone lung transplantation was 73%. The 5-year survival of Irish patients transplanted in the UK was 69% and in Ireland was 91% and 73% at 5.01 years. International collaboration can be achieved, as evidenced by the favourable outcomes seen in Irish citizens who undergo lung transplantation in both the UK and Ireland. Irish citizens undergoing lung transplantation in Ireland have a higher LAS score. Despite excellent outcomes, an intention-to-treat analysis of the treatment utility (transplant) indicates the limited effectiveness of lung transplantation in Ireland and emphasises the need for increased rates of lung transplantation.

  6. Nurse migration and health workforce planning: Ireland as illustrative of international challenges.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Niamh; Brugha, Ruairi; McGee, Hannah

    2012-09-01

    Ireland began actively recruiting nurses internationally in 2000. Between 2000 and 2010, 35% of new recruits into the health system were non-EU migrant nurses. Ireland is more heavily reliant upon international nurse recruitment than the UK, New Zealand or Australia. This paper draws on in-depth interviews (N=21) conducted in 2007 with non-EU migrant nurses working in Ireland, a quantitative survey of non-EU migrant nurses (N=337) conducted in 2009 and in-depth interviews conducted with key stakeholders (N=12) in late 2009/early 2010. Available primary and secondary data indicate a fresh challenge for health workforce planning in Ireland as immigration slows and nurses (both non-EU and Irish trained) consider emigration. Successful international nurse recruitment campaigns obviated the need for health workforce planning in the short-term, however the assumption that international nurse recruitment had 'solved' the nursing shortage was short-lived and the current presumption that nurse migration (both emigration and immigration) will always 'work' for Ireland over-plays the reliability of migration as a health workforce planning tool. This article analyses Ireland's experience of international nurse recruitment 2000-2010, providing a case study which is illustrative of health workforce planning challenges faced internationally. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Considering quality of care for young adults with diabetes in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Research on the quality of diabetes care provided to young adults with Type 1 diabetes is lacking. This study investigates perceptions of quality of care for young adults with Type 1 diabetes (23–30 years old) living in the Republic of Ireland. Methods Thirty-five young adults with Type 1 diabetes (twenty-nine women, six men) and thirteen healthcare professionals (ten diabetes nurse specialists, three consultant Endocrinologists) were recruited. All study participants completed semi-structured interviews that explored their perspectives on the quality of diabetes services in Ireland. Interviews were analyzed using standard qualitative thematic analysis techniques. Results Most interviewees identified problems with Irish diabetes services for young adults. Healthcare services were often characterised by long waiting times, inadequate continuity of care, overreliance on junior doctors and inadequate professional-patient interaction times. Many rural and non-specialist services lacked funding for diabetes education programmes, diabetes nurse specialists, insulin pumps or for psychological support, though these services are important components of quality Type 1 diabetes healthcare. Allied health services such as psychology, podiatry and dietician services appeared to be underfunded in many parts of the country. While Irish diabetes services lacked funding prior to the recession, the economic decline in Ireland, and the subsequent austerity imposed on the Irish health service as a result of that decline, appears to have additional negative consequences. Despite these difficulties, a number of specialist healthcare services for young adults with diabetes seemed to be providing excellent quality of care. Although young adults and professionals identified many of the same problems with Irish diabetes services, professionals appeared to be more critical of diabetes services than young adults. Young adults generally expressed high levels of satisfaction with

  8. Demographic trends in suicide in the UK and Ireland 1980-2010.

    PubMed

    Murphy, O C; Kelleher, C; Malone, K M

    2015-03-01

    Ireland has the 17th highest suicide rate in the EU and the 4th highest among 15-24-year-old males (WHO 2012). Suicide is the leading cause of death in this age group; death by hanging accounted for 69 % of suicides in 2010. This study examines youth suicide rates from 1980 to 2010 in Ireland and compares them to the rates in Northern Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales. Irish data were obtained from the Central Statistics Office and their annual reports on Vital Statistics. Northern Irish data were obtained from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency website; Scottish data were from the General Register Office for Scotland and English/Welsh data from the Office for National Statistics website. There has been a threefold increase in young male suicide in Ireland over the past three decades (8.9-29.7 per 100,000). In contrast, there has been approximately a threefold reduction in deaths by road traffic accidents in young men in the same period (42.7-16.2 per 100,000). Suicide rates in young men are similar in Scotland and Northern Ireland for the same period but are 50 % lower in England and Wales. Despite the rates of hanging as a method of suicide increasing in all jurisdictions, the overall rate in England and Wales has continued to decline. The suicide rate in Ireland remains very high and strategies to address this are urgently required. Our study indicates that national suicide prevention strategies can be effective.

  9. Defending Identity and Ethos: An Analysis of Teacher Perceptions of School Collaboration in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the process of collaborative working between teachers located in separate faith-based schools in Northern Ireland. Drawing on theories of intergroup relations, and with reference to in-depth interviews with teachers in post-primary schools, the article shows that despite earlier research which identified a…

  10. Medical school selection criteria as predictors of medical student empathy: a cross-sectional study of medical students, Ireland.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Moran, Joseph; Corcoran, Paul; O'Flynn, Siun; O'Tuathaigh, Colm; O'Sullivan, Aoife M

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether performance in any of the Health Professions Admissions Test (HPAT) sections, most specifically the interpersonal understanding section, correlates with self-reported empathy levels in medical students. The study was conducted in University College Cork, Ireland. 290 students participated in the study. Matching HPAT scores were available for 263 students. All male and female undergraduate students were invited to participate. Postgraduate and international students were excluded. Primary measures: HPAT-Ireland and Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSE) scores were compared including subsection analysis. Secondary measures: comparisons were made between groups such as gender and year of programme. A total of 290 students participated. Males scored significantly higher than females for total HPAT-Ireland (U=7329, z=-2.04, p<0.05), HPAT-Ireland section 1 (U=5382, z=-5.21, p<0.001) and section 3 scores (U=6833, z=-2.85, p<0.01). In contrast, females scored significantly higher than males on HPAT-Ireland section 2 (U=5844, z=-4.46, p<0.001). Females demonstrated significantly higher total JSE scores relative to males (mean score ± SEM: 113.33±1.05 vs 109.21±0.95; U=8450, z=-2.83, p<0.01). No significant association was observed between JSE scores and any of the HPAT-Ireland measures (all p>0.05). There was no effect of programme year on JSE scores (all p>0.05). The introduction of the HPAT-Ireland test was partly designed to identify students with strong interpersonal skills. A significant finding of this study is that JSE values did not correlate with HPAT-Ireland scores. This study suggests no clear link between scores on a selection test, the HPAT-Ireland, which is designed to assess several skill domains including interpersonal skills, and scores on a psychometric measure of empathy, at any point during medical education. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  11. A method to assess obstetric outcomes using the 10-Group Classification System: a quantitative descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Janne; Lucovnik, Miha; Eggebø, Torbjørn Moe; Tul, Natasa; Murphy, Martina; Vistad, Ingvild; Robson, Michael

    2017-07-12

    Internationally, the 10-Group Classification System (TGCS) has been used to report caesarean section rates, but analysis of other outcomes is also recommended. We now aim to present the TGCS as a method to assess outcomes of labour and delivery using routine collection of perinatal information. This research is a methodological study to describe the use of the TGCS. Stavanger University Hospital (SUH), Norway, National Maternity Hospital Dublin, Ireland and Slovenian National Perinatal Database (SLO), Slovenia. 9848 women from SUH, Norway, 9250 women from National Maternity Hospital Dublin, Ireland and 106 167 women, from SLO, Slovenia. All women were classified according to the TGCS within which caesarean section, oxytocin augmentation, epidural analgesia, operative vaginal deliveries, episiotomy, sphincter rupture, postpartum haemorrhage, blood transfusion, maternal age >35 years, body mass index >30, Apgar score, umbilical cord pH, hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, antepartum and perinatal deaths were incorporated. There were significant differences in the sizes of the groups of women and the incidences of events and outcomes within the TGCS between the three perinatal databases. The TGCS is a standardised objective classification system where events and outcomes of labour and delivery can be incorporated. Obstetric core events and outcomes should be agreed and defined to set standards of care. This method provides continuous and available observations from delivery wards, possibly used for further interpretation, questions and international comparisons. The definition of quality may vary in different units and can only be ascertained when all the necessary information is available and considered together. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Suicide and Young People: The Case of Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Suicides in Northern Ireland are examined in the context of what is known about global and regional trends with respect to gender and age, and change over time. For Northern Ireland, suicide numbers and rates are plotted for 10-24 year olds from 1967 to 2005. Questions are raised about the validity of officially registered suicides in the light of…

  13. Network analysis of the Viking Age in Ireland as portrayed in Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh

    PubMed Central

    Yose, Joseph; MacCarron, Máirín; MacCarron, Pádraig

    2018-01-01

    Cogadh Gaedhel re Gallaibh (‘The War of the Gaedhil with the Gaill’) is a medieval Irish text, telling how an army under the leadership of Brian Boru challenged Viking invaders and their allies in Ireland, culminating with the Battle of Clontarf in 1014. Brian’s victory is widely remembered for breaking Viking power in Ireland, although much modern scholarship disputes traditional perceptions. Instead of an international conflict between Irish and Viking, interpretations based on revisionist scholarship consider it a domestic feud or civil war. Counter-revisionists challenge this view and a long-standing and lively debate continues. Here, we introduce quantitative measures to the discussions. We present statistical analyses of network data embedded in the text to position its sets of interactions on a spectrum from the domestic to the international. This delivers a picture that lies between antipodal traditional and revisionist extremes; hostilities recorded in the text are mostly between Irish and Viking—but internal conflict forms a significant proportion of the negative interactions too. PMID:29410814

  14. Geographic Accessibility to Higher Education on the Island of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sharon; Flannery, Darragh; Cullinan, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents, for the first time, comprehensive measures of geographic accessibility to higher education both within and between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. Using geographic information system techniques, we find high levels of geographic accessibility to higher education in both jurisdictions. However, when we…

  15. Outcrop Geomorphology and Sediment Characterization in Killary Harbour, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouse, L. E.; Sautter, L.

    2016-02-01

    Killary Harbour in western Ireland is one of three fjards found in the country. A fjard is formed by glacial carving, but differs from fjords in being shallower, shorter, and broader in profile. The Harbour is located near the border of County Mayo and County Galway. The Marine Institute of Ireland, The Geological Survey of Ireland, and the INFOMAR project, led by chief scientist Kevin Sheehan, conducted bathymetric surveys in Killary Harbour, Ireland during July and August of 2014 aboard the R/V Celtic Voyager. A Kongsberg EM2040 multi-beam sonar was utilized to acquire the raw data, which was post-processed using CARIS HIPS and SIPS 9.0. The area of study is shallow harbor seafloor depths ranging from 15 to 60 m. An abundance of rocky outcrops and narrow channels are present in the North-Western section of the study area. Backscatter data collected during acquisition were used to determine the relative hardness of seafloor sediments and rocky outcrops. Characterization of the bathymetric terrain and sediments of the harbour could prove to be useful in finding hardbottom substrate for ideal fish habitat.

  16. Diageo's 'Stop Out of Control Drinking' Campaign in Ireland: An Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Petticrew, Mark; Fitzgerald, Niamh; Durand, Mary Alison; Knai, Cécile; Davoren, Martin; Perry, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been argued that the alcohol industry uses corporate social responsibility activities to influence policy and undermine public health, and that every opportunity should be taken to scrutinise such activities. This study analyses a controversial Diageo-funded ‘responsible drinking’ campaign (“Stop out of Control Drinking”, or SOOCD) in Ireland. The study aims to identify how the campaign and its advisory board members frame and define (i) alcohol-related harms, and their causes, and (ii) possible solutions. Methods Documentary analysis of SOOCD campaign material. This includes newspaper articles (n = 9), media interviews (n = 11), Facebook posts (n = 92), and Tweets (n = 340) produced by the campaign and by board members. All material was coded inductively, and a thematic analysis undertaken, with codes aggregated into sub-themes. Results The SOOCD campaign utilises vague or self-defined concepts of ‘out of control’ and ‘moderate’ drinking, tending to present alcohol problems as behavioural rather than health issues. These are also unquantified with respect to actual drinking levels. It emphasises alcohol-related antisocial behaviour among young people, particularly young women. In discussing solutions to alcohol-related problems, it focuses on public opinion rather than on scientific evidence, and on educational approaches and information provision, misrepresenting these as effective. “Moderate drinking” is presented as a behavioural issue (“negative drinking behaviours”), rather than as a health issue. Conclusions The ‘Stop Out of Control Drinking’ campaign frames alcohol problems and solutions in ways unfavourable to public health, and closely reflects other Diageo Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activity, as well as alcohol and tobacco industry strategies more generally. This framing, and in particular the framing of alcohol harms as a behavioural issue, with the implication that consumption should be guided

  17. Diageo's 'Stop Out of Control Drinking' Campaign in Ireland: An Analysis.

    PubMed

    Petticrew, Mark; Fitzgerald, Niamh; Durand, Mary Alison; Knai, Cécile; Davoren, Martin; Perry, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that the alcohol industry uses corporate social responsibility activities to influence policy and undermine public health, and that every opportunity should be taken to scrutinise such activities. This study analyses a controversial Diageo-funded 'responsible drinking' campaign ("Stop out of Control Drinking", or SOOCD) in Ireland. The study aims to identify how the campaign and its advisory board members frame and define (i) alcohol-related harms, and their causes, and (ii) possible solutions. Documentary analysis of SOOCD campaign material. This includes newspaper articles (n = 9), media interviews (n = 11), Facebook posts (n = 92), and Tweets (n = 340) produced by the campaign and by board members. All material was coded inductively, and a thematic analysis undertaken, with codes aggregated into sub-themes. The SOOCD campaign utilises vague or self-defined concepts of 'out of control' and 'moderate' drinking, tending to present alcohol problems as behavioural rather than health issues. These are also unquantified with respect to actual drinking levels. It emphasises alcohol-related antisocial behaviour among young people, particularly young women. In discussing solutions to alcohol-related problems, it focuses on public opinion rather than on scientific evidence, and on educational approaches and information provision, misrepresenting these as effective. "Moderate drinking" is presented as a behavioural issue ("negative drinking behaviours"), rather than as a health issue. The 'Stop Out of Control Drinking' campaign frames alcohol problems and solutions in ways unfavourable to public health, and closely reflects other Diageo Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activity, as well as alcohol and tobacco industry strategies more generally. This framing, and in particular the framing of alcohol harms as a behavioural issue, with the implication that consumption should be guided only by self-defined limits, may not have been recognised by all

  18. Passing through - reasons why migrant doctors in Ireland plan to stay, return home or migrate onwards to new destination countries.

    PubMed

    Brugha, Ruairí; McAleese, Sara; Dicker, Pat; Tyrrell, Ella; Thomas, Steve; Normand, Charles; Humphries, Niamh

    2016-06-30

    International recruitment is a common strategy used by high-income countries to meet their medical workforce needs. Ireland, despite training sufficient doctors to meet its internal demand, continues to be heavily dependent on foreign-trained doctors, many of whom may migrate onwards to new destination countries. A cross-sectional study was conducted to measure and analyse the factors associated with the migratory intentions of foreign doctors in Ireland. A total of 366 non-European nationals registered as medical doctors in Ireland completed an online survey assessing their reasons for migrating to Ireland, their experiences whilst working and living in Ireland, and their future plans. Factors associated with future plans - whether to remain in Ireland, return home or migrate to a new destination country - were tested by bivariate and multivariate analyses, including discriminant analysis. Of the 345 foreign doctors who responded to the question regarding their future plans, 16 % of whom were Irish-trained, 30 % planned to remain in Ireland, 23 % planned to return home and 47 % to migrate onwards. Country of origin, personal and professional reasons for migrating, experiences of training and supervision, opportunities for career progression, type of employment contract, citizenship status, and satisfaction with life in Ireland were all factors statistically significantly associated with the three migratory outcomes. Reported plans may not result in enacted emigration. However, the findings support a growing body of evidence highlighting dissatisfaction with current career opportunities, contributing to the emigration of Irish doctors and onward migration of foreign doctors. Implementation of the WHO Global Code, which requires member states to train and retain their own health workforce, could also help reduce onward migration of foreign doctors to new destination countries. Ireland has initiated the provision of tailored postgraduate training to doctors from

  19. Update of Ireland's national average indoor radon concentration - Application of a new survey protocol.

    PubMed

    Dowdall, A; Murphy, P; Pollard, D; Fenton, D

    2017-04-01

    In 2002, a National Radon Survey (NRS) in Ireland established that the geographically weighted national average indoor radon concentration was 89 Bq m -3 . Since then a number of developments have taken place which are likely to have impacted on the national average radon level. Key among these was the introduction of amending Building Regulations in 1998 requiring radon preventive measures in new buildings in High Radon Areas (HRAs). In 2014, the Irish Government adopted the National Radon Control Strategy (NRCS) for Ireland. A knowledge gap identified in the NRCS was to update the national average for Ireland given the developments since 2002. The updated national average would also be used as a baseline metric to assess the effectiveness of the NRCS over time. A new national survey protocol was required that would measure radon in a sample of homes representative of radon risk and geographical location. The design of the survey protocol took into account that it is not feasible to repeat the 11,319 measurements carried out for the 2002 NRS due to time and resource constraints. However, the existence of that comprehensive survey allowed for a new protocol to be developed, involving measurements carried out in unbiased randomly selected volunteer homes. This paper sets out the development and application of that survey protocol. The results of the 2015 survey showed that the current national average indoor radon concentration for homes in Ireland is 77 Bq m -3 , a decrease from the 89 Bq m -3 reported in the 2002 NRS. Analysis of the results by build date demonstrate that the introduction of the amending Building Regulations in 1998 have led to a reduction in the average indoor radon level in Ireland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The cost and cost-effectiveness of opportunistic screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Paddy; O'Neill, Ciaran; Adams, Elisabeth; Turner, Katherine; O'Donovan, Diarmuid; Brugha, Ruairi; Vaughan, Deirdre; O'Connell, Emer; Cormican, Martin; Balfe, Myles; Coleman, Claire; Fitzgerald, Margaret; Fleming, Catherine

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the cost and cost-effectiveness of opportunistic screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in Ireland. Prospective cost analysis of an opportunistic screening programme delivered jointly in three types of healthcare facility in Ireland. Incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using an existing dynamic modelling framework to compare screening to a control of no organised screening. A healthcare provider perspective was adopted with respect to costs and included the costs of screening and the costs of complications arising from untreated infection. Two outcome measures were examined: major outcomes averted, comprising cases of pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and tubal factor infertility in women, neonatal conjunctivitis and pneumonia, and epididymitis in men; and quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) gained. Uncertainty was explored using sensitivity analyses and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. The average cost per component of screening was estimated at €26 per offer, €66 per negative case, €152 per positive case and €74 per partner notified and treated. The modelled screening scenario was projected to be more effective and more costly than the control strategy. The incremental cost per major outcomes averted was €6093, and the incremental cost per QALY gained was €94,717. For cost-effectiveness threshold values of €45,000 per QALY gained and lower, the probability of the screening being cost effective was estimated at <1%. An opportunistic chlamydia screening programme, as modelled in this study, would be expensive to implement nationally and is unlikely to be judged cost effective by policy makers in Ireland.

  1. Genetic structure of pike (Esox lucius) reveals a complex and previously unrecognized colonization history of Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Pedreschi, Debbi; Kelly-Quinn, Mary; Caffrey, Joe; O’Grady, Martin; Mariani, Stefano; Phillimore, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Aim We investigated genetic variation of Irish pike populations and their relationship with European outgroups, in order to elucidate the origin of this species to the island, which is largely assumed to have occurred as a human-mediated introduction over the past few hundred years. We aimed thereby to provide new insights into population structure to improve fisheries and biodiversity management in Irish freshwaters. Location Ireland, Britain and continental Europe. Methods A total of 752 pike (Esox lucius) were sampled from 15 locations around Ireland, and 9 continental European sites, and genotyped at six polymorphic microsatellite loci. Patterns and mechanisms of population genetic structure were assessed through a diverse array of methods, including Bayesian clustering, hierarchical analysis of molecular variance, and approximate Bayesian computation. Results Varying levels of genetic diversity and a high degree of population genetic differentiation were detected. Clear substructure within Ireland was identified, with two main groups being evident. One of the Irish populations showed high similarity with British populations. The other, more widespread, Irish strain did not group with any European population examined. Approximate Bayesian computation suggested that this widespread Irish strain is older, and may have colonized Ireland independently of humans. Main conclusions Population genetic substructure in Irish pike is high and comparable to the levels observed elsewhere in Europe. A comparison of evolutionary scenarios upholds the possibility that pike may have colonized Ireland in two ‘waves’, the first of which, being independent of human colonization, would represent the first evidence for natural colonization of a non-anadromous freshwater fish to the island of Ireland. Although further investigations using comprehensive genomic techniques will be necessary to confirm this, the present results warrant a reappraisal of current management strategies

  2. Genetic structure of pike (Esox lucius) reveals a complex and previously unrecognized colonization history of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Pedreschi, Debbi; Kelly-Quinn, Mary; Caffrey, Joe; O'Grady, Martin; Mariani, Stefano; Phillimore, Albert

    2014-03-01

    We investigated genetic variation of Irish pike populations and their relationship with European outgroups, in order to elucidate the origin of this species to the island, which is largely assumed to have occurred as a human-mediated introduction over the past few hundred years. We aimed thereby to provide new insights into population structure to improve fisheries and biodiversity management in Irish freshwaters. Ireland, Britain and continental Europe. A total of 752 pike ( Esox lucius ) were sampled from 15 locations around Ireland, and 9 continental European sites, and genotyped at six polymorphic microsatellite loci. Patterns and mechanisms of population genetic structure were assessed through a diverse array of methods, including Bayesian clustering, hierarchical analysis of molecular variance, and approximate Bayesian computation. Varying levels of genetic diversity and a high degree of population genetic differentiation were detected. Clear substructure within Ireland was identified, with two main groups being evident. One of the Irish populations showed high similarity with British populations. The other, more widespread, Irish strain did not group with any European population examined. Approximate Bayesian computation suggested that this widespread Irish strain is older, and may have colonized Ireland independently of humans. Population genetic substructure in Irish pike is high and comparable to the levels observed elsewhere in Europe. A comparison of evolutionary scenarios upholds the possibility that pike may have colonized Ireland in two 'waves', the first of which, being independent of human colonization, would represent the first evidence for natural colonization of a non-anadromous freshwater fish to the island of Ireland. Although further investigations using comprehensive genomic techniques will be necessary to confirm this, the present results warrant a reappraisal of current management strategies for this species.

  3. Low Energy Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Out of a commitment to reducing carbon dioxide emissions, Ireland's Department of Education and Science has designed and constructed two low energy schools, in Tullamore, County Offaly, and Raheen, County Laois. With energy use in buildings responsible for approximately 55% of the CO[subscript 2] released into the atmosphere and a major…

  4. Family Communication in Inherited Cardiovascular Conditions in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Sinead; Green, Andrew; McAllister, Marion; Shipman, Hannah

    2016-12-01

    Over 100,000 individuals living in Ireland carry a mutated gene for an inherited cardiac condition (ICC), most of which demonstrate an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. First-degree relatives of individuals with these mutations are at a 50 % risk of being a carrier: disclosing genetic information to family members can be complex. This study explored how families living in Ireland communicate genetic information about ICCs and looked at the challenges of communicating information, factors that may affect communication and what influence this had on family relationships. Face to face interviews were conducted with nine participants using an approved topic guide and results analysed using thematic analysis. The participants disclosed that responsibility to future generations, gender, proximity and lack of contact all played a role in family communication. The media was cited as a source of information about genetic information and knowledge of genetic information tended to have a positive effect on families. Results from this study indicate that individuals are willing to inform family members, particularly when there are children and grandchildren at risk, and different strategies are utilised. Furthermore, understanding of genetics is partially regulated not only by their families, but by the way society handles information. Therefore, genetic health professionals should take into account the familial influence on individuals and their decision to attend genetic services, and also that of the media.

  5. Microseism Source Distribution Observed from Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David; Bean, Chris; Donne, Sarah; Le Pape, Florian; Möllhoff, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Ocean generated microseisms (OGM) are recorded globally with similar spectral features observed everywhere. The generation mechanism for OGM and their subsequent propagation to continental regions has led to their use as a proxy for sea-state characteristics. Also many modern seismological methods make use of OGM signals. For example, the Earth's crust and upper mantle can be imaged using ``ambient noise tomography``. For many of these methods an understanding of the source distribution is necessary to properly interpret the results. OGM recorded on near coastal seismometers are known to be related to the local ocean wavefield. However, contributions from more distant sources may also be present. This is significant for studies attempting to use OGM as a proxy for sea-state characteristics such as significant wave height. Ireland has a highly energetic ocean wave climate and is close to one of the major source regions for OGM. This provides an ideal location to study an OGM source region in detail. Here we present the source distribution observed from seismic arrays in Ireland. The region is shown to consist of several individual source areas. These source areas show some frequency dependence and generally occur at or near the continental shelf edge. We also show some preliminary results from an off-shore OBS network to the North-West of Ireland. The OBS network includes instruments on either side of the shelf and should help interpret the array observations.

  6. Agglutinated foraminifera from the Ludlow (Silurian) of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Michael; Ferretti, Annalisa; Messori, Fabio; Papazzoni, Cesare Andrea; Sevastopulo, George

    2017-04-01

    United States that were parts of Laurentia during Silurian times appears to confirm data derived from paleomagnetic analysis of Homerian (upper Wenlock) sediments from the Dingle Peninsula (Mac Niocaill, 2000) indicating that the ocean between Laurentia and Avalonia had narrowed to below the limits of paleomagnetic resolution already by Wenlock time. Kaminski M.A, Ferretti A., Messori F., Papazzoni C.A. & Sevastopulo G. 2016. Silurian agglutinated foraminifera from the Dingle Peninsula, Ireland. Bollettino della Società Paleontologica Italiana, 55, 127-138. Kircher J.M. & Brasier M.D. 1989. Cambrian to Devonian. In Jenkins D.G. & Murray J.W. (eds), Stratigraphical Atlas of Fossil Foraminifera. 593 pp. Ellis Horwood Ltd., Chichester. Mac Niocaill C. 2000. A new Silurian palaeolatitude for eastern Avalonia and evidence for crustal rotations in the Avalonian margin of southwestern Ireland. Geophysical Journal International, 141, 661-671.

  7. PREFACE: Kelvin and Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, Raymond; McCartney, Mark; Whitaker, Andrew

    2009-07-01

    Sir Joseph Larmor unveiling the Kelvin memorial in the Botanic Gardens, Belfast on a rainy day in 1913 Sir Joseph Larmor unveiling the Kelvin memorial in the Botanic Gardens, Belfast on a rainy day in 1913 © The Ulster Museum: Hogg collection William Thomson, later Lord Kelvin, was born in Belfast in 1824, and his family had lived near Ballynahinch in the north of Ireland, quite close to Belfast, from the seventeenth century. At the time of Kelvin's birth, James Thomson, his father, was Professor of Mathematics at the Belfast Royal Academical Institution (Inst). However, following the death of his wife in 1830, James took up a new position as Professor at the University of Glasgow, and he and his children moved there in 1832. Apart from three years studying at Cambridge, and a very brief period immediately afterwards travelling and teaching in Cambridge, Kelvin was to spend the rest of his life in Glasgow, where he occupied the Chair of Natural Philosophy (or Physics) for 53 years. The natural assumption might be that his birth in Ireland was irrelevant to Kelvin's life and work, and that the fine monument erected in his honour in Belfast's Botanic Gardens, which is pictured on the front cover of this volume, was more a demonstration of civic pride than a recognition of an aspect of Kelvin's life which was important to him. The purpose of the meeting was to demon strate that this was not the case, that, great Glaswegian as he undoubtedly became, Kelvin always delighted in the title of Irishman. The influence of his father, very much an Ulsterman, was immense, and Kelvin and his siblings were to follow his non-sectarian and reforming approach. Also important for Kelvin was his Christian upbringing, which began in Belfast, and his beliefs were to play a role of importance in his life and indeed in much of his most important work, in particular that on thermodynamics. Two of his siblings returned to Belfast and spent much of their lives there, and Kelvin was a

  8. The use of pain relief during labor among migrant obstetric populations.

    PubMed

    Husarova, Viera; Macdarby, Laura; Dicker, Patrick; Malone, Fergal D; McCaul, Conan L

    2016-11-01

    To identify patterns in intrapartum analgesia use in the migrant obstetric population. A retrospective analysis included all deliveries with neonates above 500g in weight at a university hospital in Dublin, Ireland between 2009 and 2013. Analgesia was classified as neuraxial or non-neuraxial. Parturients were excluded owing to missing data, elective cesarean deliveries, and the use of analgesia during treatment for obstetric complications. There were 36 689 deliveries included in the present study. Increased odds of not using neuraxial analgesia during delivery were observed among migrant parturients from North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Far East, India, and Eastern Europe compared with western Europe (all P<0.05). Increased odds of not receiving any analgesia during delivery were demonstrated among parturients from North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Far East, North America, Eastern Europe, and India compared with western Europe (all P<0.05). Disparities exist in the use of intrapartum analgesia between migrant and western European populations in Ireland. Migrants from Africa were the least likely to use any analgesia. The reasons for this are speculative but could be influenced by expectations of care in the region of origin. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Low pressure system off Ireland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-16

    In early June, 2015 a strong low pressure system over the North Atlantic Ocean brought rain and gusty winds to Ireland and the United Kingdom. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image of the spiraling system on June 5. A very deep low pressure area lies in the center of the spiral, just off the northwestern shore of emerald-green Ireland. Bands of cloud, containing rain and thunderstorms, swirl into the center of the low, and extend over the British Isles. A low pressure system will pull in air from the surrounding area, creating spiraling winds. Winds around the center of a low pressure spiral counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere, as we see here (clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere) and towards the center of the system. Although the system was impressive on June 5, it intensified over the next several days. According to MarkVoganWeather.com, by June 7 the pressure in the unusually deep Atlantic low, which had been hanging around 980mb, was expected to drop lower to about 978mb off of Anglesey, brining northwest gales along the Atlantic west and south coasts of Ireland, England and Wales. Winds gust of up to 80 mph were possible, along with heavy rains. Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  10. Bilateral comparison of 10 V standards between the NSAI - NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, February 2016 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Power, O.; Stock, M.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland - National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI - NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out in January and February 2016. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM7 (Z7) and BIPM9 (Z9), were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage at the 10 V level consists of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. At the BIPM the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned to DC voltage standards by NSAI - NML, at the level of 10 V, at NSAI - NML, UNML, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of the 31 of January 2016. UNML - UBIPM = + 0.22 μV uc = 1.35 μV , at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  11. Bilateral Comparison of 10 V Standards between the NSAI - NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, March 2015 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.; Power, O.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland - National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI - NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out in February and March 2015. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM6 (Z6) and BIPMC (ZC), were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage at the 10 V level consists of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. At the BIPM the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final resultof the comparison is presented as the difference between the values assigned to DC voltage standards by NSAI - NML, at the level of 10 V,at NSAI - NML, UNML, and those assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 24 February 2015. UNML - UBIPM = - 0.82 mV; uc = 1.35 mV , at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. Practical Work in Ireland: A Time of Reform and Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Declan

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the role of practical work in science education in Ireland. The 2002 report of a government Task Force on the Physical Sciences, set up to consider the problems facing the teaching of the physical sciences in second-level schools in Ireland, has resulted in rapid reform of the science curriculum at both junior…

  13. The cost of chronic pain: an analysis of a regional pain management service in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Brenda; Finn, David P; O'Gorman, David; Ruane, Nancy; McGuire, Brian E

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the study was to collect data on the direct and indirect economic cost of chronic pain among patients attending a pain management clinic in Ireland. A tertiary pain management clinic serving a mixed urban and rural area in the West of Ireland. Data were collected from 100 patients using the Client Services Receipt Inventory and focused on direct and indirect costs of chronic pain. Patients were questioned about health service utilization, payment methods, and relevant sociodemographics. Unit costs were multiplied by resource use data to obtain full costs. Cost drivers were then estimated. Our study showed a cost per patient of US$24,043 over a 12-month period. Over half of this was attributable to wage replacement costs and lost productivity in those unable to work because of pain. Hospital stays and outpatient hospital services were the main drivers for health care utilization costs, together accounting for 63% of the direct medical costs per study participant attending the pain clinic. The cost of chronic pain among intensive service users is significant, and when extrapolated to a population level, these costs represent a very substantial economic burden. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. From Emigration to Immigration: New Dawn for an Intercultural 21st Century Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutwarasibo, Fidele

    2005-01-01

    Within the course of a decade Ireland has emerged from being a country of emigration to a country of immigration. Since the mid-1990s, Ireland has undergone rapid economic expansion with the recent economic growth resulting in approximately 252,000 migrants entering Ireland over the last 6 years, according to the Irish Times (2003). While a large…

  15. Childhood adversity profiles and adult psychopathology in a representative Northern Ireland study.

    PubMed

    McLafferty, Margaret; Armour, Cherie; McKenna, Aine; O'Neill, Siobhan; Murphy, Sam; Bunting, Brendan

    2015-10-01

    Childhood adversities are key aetiological factors in the onset and persistence of psychopathology. The aims of this study were to identify childhood adversity profiles, and investigate the relationship between the adversity classes and psychopathology in Northern Ireland. The study utilized data from the Northern Ireland Study of Health and Stress, an epidemiological survey (N=1986), which used the CIDI to examine mental health disorders and associated risk factors. Latent Class Analysis revealed 3 distinct typologies; a low risk class (n=1709; 86%), a poly-adversity class (n=122; 6.1%), and an economic adversity class (n=155; 7.8%). Logistic Regression models revealed that individuals in the economic adversity class had a heightened risk of anxiety and substance disorders, with individuals in the poly-adversity class more likely to have a range of mental health problems and suicidality. The findings indicate the importance of considering the impact of co-occurring childhood adversities when planning treatment, prevention, and intervention programmes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Cost of Blindness in the Republic of Ireland 2010-2020.

    PubMed

    Green, D; Ducorroy, G; McElnea, E; Naughton, A; Skelly, A; O'Neill, C; Kenny, D; Keegan, D

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To estimate the prevalence of blindness in the Republic of Ireland and the associated financial and total economic cost between 2010 and 2020. Methods. Estimates for the prevalence of blindness in the Republic of Ireland were based on blindness registration data from the National Council for the Blind of Ireland. Estimates for the financial and total economic cost of blindness were based on the sum of direct and indirect healthcare and nonhealthcare costs. Results. We estimate that there were 12,995 blind individuals in Ireland in 2010 and in 2020 there will be 17,997. We estimate that the financial and total economic costs of blindness in the Republic of Ireland in 2010 were €276.6 million and €809 million, respectively, and will increase in 2020 to €367 million and €1.1 billion, respectively. Conclusions. Here, ninety-eight percent of the cost of blindness is borne by the Departments of Social Protection and Finance and not by the Department of Health as might initially be expected. Cost of illness studies should play a role in public policy making as they help to quantify the indirect or "hidden" costs of disability and so help to reveal the true cost of illness.

  17. Restricted access to abortion in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland: exploring abortion tourism and barriers to legal reform.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Fiona; O'Dowd, Kellie

    2014-01-01

    Access to abortion remains a controversial issue worldwide. In Ireland, both north and south, legal restrictions have resulted in thousands of women travelling to England and Wales and further afield to obtain abortions in the last decade alone, while others purchase the 'abortion pill' from Internet sources. This paper considers the socio-legal context in both jurisdictions, the data on those travelling to access abortion and the barriers to legal reform. It argues that moral conservatism in Ireland, north and south, has contributed to the restricted access to abortion, impacting on the experience of thousands of women, resulting in these individuals becoming 'abortion tourists'.

  18. Ten Years after Patten: Young People and Policing in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Jonny; Jarman, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Through a comprehensive review of existing literature, this article documents young people's experiences of policing during the period of political transition and extensive reform of the structures of policing in Northern Ireland since the publication of the Independent Commission on Policing for Northern Ireland (The Patten Report) in 1999. The…

  19. Contribution of the Vincentians to Catholic Education in Ireland and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article is an account of the actions and achievements, i.e. the "contribution", of the Ireland Province of the Vincentian Congregation, known officially as "the Congregation of the Mission", in respect of Catholic education in Ireland and England. The approach is, first, to outline the motives and intentions of the…

  20. Derrida and the School: Language Loss and Language Learning in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahon, Áine

    2017-01-01

    With specific reference to the teaching of Irish and English in Ireland, I am concerned in this paper with the experiences of language dispossession and language pedagogy. Drawing on Jacques Derrida's key concepts of "hospitality" and "monolingualism," I argue that in Ireland the first of these experiences cannot be separated…

  1. Investigations of attitudes towards offshore wind farm development in ireland: their implications towards future development of the industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Aidan

    This current research investigates what the attitudes of Irish people are towards the development of offshore wind farms in Ireland. Using a qualitative approach, a questionnaire is carefully designed and distributed among a sample population from three coastal communities. One is located on the west coast and two on the east coast. The two locations on the east coast have an involvement in offshore wind farms. One of the locations plays host to Ireland's only offshore wind farm, while there are plans in place for an offshore wind farm at the other location. The results from the questionnaires are analyzed with regard to the respondent's proximity to the coast, their age, their gender and their educational levels. This analysis results in a number of conclusions being generated. Overall, it is found that there is a strong support among the respondents for the development of offshore wind farms in Ireland.

  2. A national survey (NAP5-Ireland baseline) to estimate an annual incidence of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Jonker, W R; Hanumanthiah, D; O'Sullivan, E P; Cook, T M; Pandit, J J

    2014-09-01

    As part of the 5th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland concerning accidental awareness during general anaesthesia, we issued a questionnaire to every consultant anaesthetist in each of 46 public hospitals in Ireland, represented by 41 local co-ordinators. The survey ascertained the number of new cases of accidental awareness becoming known to them for patients under their care or supervision for a calendar year, as well as their career experience. Consultants from all hospitals responded, with an individual response rate of 87% (299 anaesthetists). There were eight new cases of accidental awareness that became known to consultants in 2011; an estimated incidence of 1:23 366. Two out of the eight cases (25%) occurred at or after induction of anaesthesia, but before surgery; four cases (50%) occurred during surgery; and two cases (25%) occurred after surgery was complete, but before full emergence. Four cases were associated with pain or distress (50%), one after an experience at induction and three after experiences during surgery. There were no formal complaints or legal actions that arose in 2011 related to awareness. Depth of anaesthesia monitoring was reported to be available in 33 (80%) departments, and was used by 184 consultants (62%), 18 (6%) routinely. None of the 46 hospitals had a policy to prevent or manage awareness. Similar to the results of a larger survey in the UK, the disparity between the incidence of awareness as known to anaesthetists and that reported in trials warrants explanation. Compared with UK practice, there appears to be greater use of depth of anaesthesia monitoring in Ireland, although this is still infrequent. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Breast reconstruction in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, C J; Couto, E; Kerin, M J; Rainsbury, R M; George, W D; Purushotham, A D

    2002-03-01

    Although it is becoming more common, previous surveys have identified concerns regarding the safety of immediate reconstruction following mastectomy. The aims of this study were to define current practice of breast reconstruction in the UK and Ireland, and to identify the characteristics of surgeons who use immediate breast reconstruction. : A postal questionnaire survey of 498 consultant breast surgeons in the UK and Ireland was performed in January 2000. There were 376 responses (response rate 76 per cent). Eighty-eight per cent of surgeons 'always' or 'usually' discuss reconstruction with patients due to undergo mastectomy; clinicians with a heavy caseload were significantly more likely to discuss it (odds ratio (OR) 18.45 (95 per cent confidence interval 1.99 to 171.07)). The majority of respondents (57 per cent) preferred delayed to immediate breast reconstruction; 70 per cent believed that immediate reconstruction has disadvantages, most commonly that it interferes with adjuvant therapy (56 per cent). Older surgeons were significantly less likely to perform immediate reconstruction (OR 5.18 (2.21 to 12.11)), and were significantly more likely to believe that immediate breast reconstruction has disadvantages (OR 2.02 (1.01 to 4.05)). Surgeons from Ireland were less likely to discuss and perform breast reconstruction (OR 0.20 (0.10 to 0.43) and 0.27 (0.12 to 0.60) respectively), or to have access to a plastic surgeon (OR 0.22 (0.11 to 0.44)). : Significant variation exists in the delivery of breast reconstruction after mastectomy in the UK and Ireland. The age, workload and personal characteristics of the surgeon are important in determining reconstructive practice.

  4. The consequences of Ireland's culture of medical migration.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Niamh; Crowe, Sophie; McDermott, Cian; McAleese, Sara; Brugha, Ruairi

    2017-12-28

    In recent years, Ireland has experienced a large-scale, outward migration of doctors. This presents a challenge for national policy makers and workforce planners seeking to build a self-sufficient medical workforce that trains and retains enough doctors to meet demand. Although, traditionally, medical migration has been considered beneficial to the Irish health system, austerity has brought a greater level of uncertainty to the health system and, with it, a need to reappraise the professional culture of migration and its impact on the Irish health system. This paper illustrates how a culture of migration informs career and migration plans. It draws on quantitative data-registration and migration data from source and destination countries-and qualitative data-in-depth interviews with 50 doctors who had undertaken postgraduate medical training in Ireland. Of 50 respondents, 42 highlighted the importance of migration. The culture of medical migration rests on two assumptions-that international training/experience is beneficial to all doctors and that those who emigrate will return to Ireland with additional skills and experience. This assumption of return is challenged by a new generation of doctors whose professional lives have been shaped by globalisation and by austerity. Global comparisons reveal the comparatively poor working conditions, training and career opportunities in Ireland and the relative attractiveness of a permanent career abroad. In light of these changes, there is a need to critically appraise the culture of medical migration to determine if and in what circumstances migration is appropriate to the needs of the Irish health system. The paper considers the need to reappraise the culture of medical migration and the widespread emigration that it promotes.

  5. Suicide in Northern Ireland: An Analysis of Gender Differences in Demographic, Psychological, and Contextual Factors.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Siobhan; Corry, Colette; McFeeters, Danielle; Murphy, Sam; Bunting, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding death by suicide can give us insight into the factors affecting suicide risk in particular regions. This study examined gender and circumstances surrounding death by suicide in Northern Ireland from 2005 to 2011. The study analyzed 1,671 suicides (77% male and 23% female cases) using information contained from the coroner's files on suicides and undetermined deaths. Hanging was the most common method and more than one third of the deceased had prior suicide attempts. There was evidence of alcohol use in 41% of the cases. Only, 61% of cases had recorded adverse events; most had multiple and complex combinations of experiences. Relationship and interpersonal difficulties were the most common category of adverse event (40.3%). However, illness and bereavement, employment /financial crisis, and health problems were also common. One third of those who died by suicide were employed, compared with 50.3% who were not in employment. Just over half (50.1%) were known to have a mental health disorder. The results provide the first profile of deaths by suicide in Northern Ireland. They highlight the need to target people who have difficult life experiences in suicide prevention work, notably men, people with employment, financial and relationship crises, and those with mental disorders.

  6. Refugees, the asylum system and mental healthcare in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Molly; Duffy, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The number of people seeking refugee status in Ireland is increasing year on year and the burden of mental illness experienced by refugees and asylum seekers is high. The College of Psychiatrists of Ireland has recommended the establishment of a number of specialist refugee mental health teams. In this paper we discuss the Irish asylum system, the Irish evidence regarding mental illness in this population, and current health service policy regarding refugee mental health. We propose a model of specialist refugee mental healthcare delivery. PMID:29093895

  7. Mathematical methods in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Kashdan, Eugene; Duncan, Dominique; Parnell, Andrew; Schattler, Heinz

    2016-12-01

    The editors of this Special Issue of Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering were the organizers for the Third International Workshop "Mathematical Methods in System Biology" that took place on June 15-18, 2015 at the University College Dublin in Ireland. As stated in the workshop goals, we managed to attract a good mix of mathematicians and statisticians working on biological and medical applications with biologists and clinicians interested in presenting their challenging problems and looking to find mathematical and statistical tools for their solutions.

  8. Erratum to "Large-scale mitochondrial COI gene sequence variability reflects the complex colonization history of the invasive soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria (L.) (Bivalvia)" [Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci. 181 (2016) 256-265

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasota, Rafal; Pierscieniak, Karolina; Garcia, Pascale; Simon-Bouhet, Benoit; Wolowicz, Maciej

    2017-03-01

    The publisher regrets a printing error in the last paragraph in the Results section. The correct text should read as follows: Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F*, and Fu's Fs were negative for all American populations, and statistically significant in most cases (Table 3). In most of the European populations the values of neutrality tests were positive, but not statistically significant. The highest positive values of neutrality tests were noted in the populations from Reykjavik (Iceland) and Dublin (Ireland) (Table 3).

  9. Phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Ireland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Irish Sea (right) is full of phytoplankton in this true-color image from January 15, 2002. The Irish Sea separates Ireland (center) from the United Kingdom (right). In this image the water of both the Irish and Celtic (lower right) Seas appears quite turbid, being a milky blue-green compared to the clearer waters of the open Atlantic (left). This milky appearance is likely due to the growth of marine plants called phytoplankton. Despite the fact that Ireland is at the same latitude as southern Hudson Bay, Canada, it remains green year round, thanks to the moderating effect on temperatures of the Atlantic Ocean. The Gulf Stream bring warmer waters up from the tropics, and southwesterly winds bring warmer air to the country, thus moderating seasonal temperature extremes.

  10. Space Radar Image of County Kerry, Ireland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-15

    The Iveragh Peninsula, one of the four peninsulas in southwestern Ireland, is shown in this spaceborne radar image. The lakes of Killarney National Park are the green patches on the left side of the image.

  11. The bedrock electrical conductivity structure of Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamish, David

    2013-08-01

    An airborne geophysical survey of the whole of Northern Ireland has provided over 4.8 M estimates of the bedrock conductivity over the wide range of geological formations present. This study investigates how such data can be used to provide additional knowledge in relation to existing digital geological map information. A by-product of the analysis is a simplification of the spatially aggregated information obtained in such surveys. The methodology used is a GIS-based attribution of the conductivity estimates using a lithological classification of the bedrock formations. A 1:250k geological classification of the data is performed leading to a 56 unit lithological and geostatistical analysis of the conductivity information. The central moments (medians) of the classified data are used to provide a new digital bedrock conductivity map of Northern Ireland with values ranging from 0.32 to 41.36 mS m-1. This baseline map of conductivities displays a strong correspondence with an existing 4 quadrant, chrono-geological description of Northern Ireland. Once defined, the baseline conductivity map allows departures from the norm to be assessed across each specific lithological unit. Bulk electrical conductivity is controlled by a number of petrophysical parameters and it is their variation that is assessed by the procedures employed. The igneous rocks are found to display the largest variability in conductivity values and many of the statistical distributions are multi-modal. A sequence of low-value modes in these data are associated with intrusives within volcanic complexes. These and much older Neoproterzoic rocks appear to represent very low porosity formations that may be the product of rapid cooling during emplacement. By way of contrast, extensive flood basalts (the Antrim lavas) record a well-defined and much higher median value (12.24 mS m-1) although they display complex spatial behaviour in detail. Sedimentary rocks appear to follow the broad behaviours anticipated

  12. The Accelerating Campus Entrepreneurship (ACE) Initiative: Creating Entrepreneurial Graduates for Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Maebh; Hamouda, Angela; Cormican, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    According to the GEM Ireland Report (2009), those who have exposure to entrepreneurship education in Ireland have an increased propensity to start a new venture. The importance of entrepreneurial skills was picked up by the European Union which, in its Lisbon Strategy of March 2000, declared its objective of transforming Europe into the most…

  13. The new system of health accounts in Ireland: what does it all mean?

    PubMed

    Turner, B

    2017-08-01

    The Central Statistics Office released new figures on Ireland's health spending in December 2015, based on the System of Health Accounts (SHA2011). These figures differ from previous figures, by virtue of an expanded definition of what constitutes health care. The new figures also provide more detail on health expenditure than the previous figures allowed. This article examines the new figures, drawing out findings of note and discussing the implications of these for the Irish health care system. It also compares Ireland with international health systems, highlighting where Ireland is unusual or comparable to international norms. Healthcare spending in Ireland as a percentage of GDP is higher than in many other countries, having increased during the economic downturn, although this was due more to the contraction in GDP than an increase in spending. While the majority of healthcare expenditure in Ireland comes from the Government, the share of private expenditure on healthcare in Ireland has increased, with implications for equity in the system. Over half of the expenditure is on curative and rehabilitative services, broadly in line with other countries. The proportion of spending going to long-term care facilities is relatively high by international standards. Suggestions that Ireland is over-spending on health need to be tempered by cognisance that the Irish health system is under-resourced in a number of areas (particularly the number of doctors and the number of hospital beds) and has not fully recovered from cutbacks in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

  14. Winning the Future: An Investigation into the Creativity Capacity across the Levels of Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Keelin

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated the creativity capacity across the levels of education in Ireland, involving 702 participants. Creative capacity was investigated through a comparative analysis of creativity quotient (CQ). A divergent thinking task comprising the "how many uses" activity was assessed using the criteria for determining CQ;…

  15. Hearing Voices: Lessons from the History of Psychiatry in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Kelly, B D

    2017-03-10

    The history of psychiatry is a history of therapeutic enthusiasm, with all of the triumph and tragedy, hubris and humility that such enthusiasm brings. During the 1800s and early 1900s, Ireland-s public asylums were routinely overcrowded, unhygienic and, quite commonly, fatal. The asylums became all-too-convenient options for a society with an apparently insatiable hunger for institutions, incarceration and control. The emergence of clinical professionals, both medical and nursing, was inevitably a factor in this complex mix, but the effects of any search for professional prestige were dwarfed by asylum doctors' clear outrage at what the asylum system became. There were powerful, non-medical, vested interests in keeping large asylums open. Irish society consistently failed to generate solutions to real human suffering (mental illness, disability, disease, poverty, ill fortune) other than the extraordinary network of institutions that characterised so much of Irish history: orphanages, industrial schools, reformatories, workhouses, laundries, borstals, prisons and asylums. As a result, Ireland's remarkable asylum system was primarily a social creation rather than a medical one. Notwithstanding this complex history, Ireland's mental health services have been transformed over the past five decades, although real challenges remain, especially in relation to the homeless mentally ill, the mentally ill in prison, and providing meaningful support to families.

  16. KEY COMPARISON Bilateral comparison of 1.018 V and 10 V standards between the NSAI-NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, March to April 2010 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.a and b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, O.; Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.

    2010-01-01

    As a part of the ongoing BIPM key comparisons BIPM.EM-K11.a and b, a comparison of the 1.018 V and 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and of the National Standards Authority of Ireland-National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI-NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out from March to April 2010. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage is maintained at the 10 V level by means of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF of each travelling standard, at the 10 V output terminals, was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. Measurements of the output EMF of the travelling standards at the 1.018 V output terminals were made using a potentiometer, standardized against the local 10 V reference standard. At the BIPM, the travelling standards were calibrated at both voltages before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, using the BIPM Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages on internal temperature and ambient pressure. The comparison results show that the voltage standards maintained by NSAI-NML and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated expanded uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  17. The Association of Attitude to Reading and Reading Achievement among a Representative Sample of Nine Year Olds in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fives, Allyn

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the association between reading self-belief and reading achievement among a representative sample of nine year old children in the Republic of Ireland. Results from analysis of variance and simple effects analysis showed a positive linear association between reading achievement and "attitude to reading." The…

  18. "Give Them Time" -- An Analysis of School Readiness in Ireland's Early Education System: A Steiner Waldorf Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Doireann; Angus, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a Steiner Waldorf Perspective to School Readiness and applies that international ideology to educational practice and curriculum policy in modern Ireland. The case for a later school start is championed with strong arguments underpinning the reasons why a later start is better in the long run for children's formal learning…

  19. The National Maritime College of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greville, Eamonn

    2005-01-01

    The new National Maritime College of Ireland is regarded as the country's most exciting and innovative development in maritime training and education and is the first tertiary institution to be built and operated under the government's Public Private Partnership (PPP) model of procurement. The project is the outcome of a partnership between Cork…

  20. The Cost of Blindness in the Republic of Ireland 2010–2020

    PubMed Central

    Green, D.; Ducorroy, G.; McElnea, E.; Naughton, A.; Skelly, A.; O'Neill, C.; Kenny, D.; Keegan, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To estimate the prevalence of blindness in the Republic of Ireland and the associated financial and total economic cost between 2010 and 2020. Methods. Estimates for the prevalence of blindness in the Republic of Ireland were based on blindness registration data from the National Council for the Blind of Ireland. Estimates for the financial and total economic cost of blindness were based on the sum of direct and indirect healthcare and nonhealthcare costs. Results. We estimate that there were 12,995 blind individuals in Ireland in 2010 and in 2020 there will be 17,997. We estimate that the financial and total economic costs of blindness in the Republic of Ireland in 2010 were €276.6 million and €809 million, respectively, and will increase in 2020 to €367 million and €1.1 billion, respectively. Conclusions. Here, ninety-eight percent of the cost of blindness is borne by the Departments of Social Protection and Finance and not by the Department of Health as might initially be expected. Cost of illness studies should play a role in public policy making as they help to quantify the indirect or “hidden” costs of disability and so help to reveal the true cost of illness. PMID:26981276

  1. Superior Educational Attainment and Strategies of Land Inheritance in Post-Famine Ireland: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillas, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    To date no major study exists on the impact of the Great Famine on patterns of participation in superior education in Ireland, or on the impact of superior education on the life courses and inheritance potential of boys from small farming families. This paper provides a historical analysis and interpretation of patterns of participation in…

  2. Patterns of alcohol consumption in middle-aged men from France and Northern Ireland. The PRIME study.

    PubMed

    Marques-Vidal, P; Arveiler, D; Evans, A; Montaye, M; Bingham, A; Ruidavets, J B; McMaster, D; Haas, B; Amouyel, P; Ducimetière, P

    2000-04-01

    To assess the patterns of alcohol consumption in France and Northern Ireland. Four cross-sectional studies. Sample of 50-59 y old men living in France and Northern Ireland, consuming at least one unit of alcoholic beverage per week. 5363 subjects from France and 1367 from Northern Ireland. None. Consumption of wine was higher in France whereas consumption of beer and spirits was higher in Northern Ireland. Alcohol drinking was rather homogeneous throughout the week in France, whereas Fridays and Saturdays accounted for 60% of total alcohol consumption in Northern Ireland. In both countries, current smokers had a higher consumption of all types of alcoholic beverages than non-smokers. Similarly, obese and hypertensive subjects had a higher total alcohol consumption than non-obese or normotensive subjects, but the type of alcoholic beverages differed between countries. In Northern Ireland, subjects which reported some physical activity consumed significantly less alcoholic beverages than sedentary subjects, whereas no differences were found in France. Conversely, subjects with dyslipidemia consumed more alcoholic beverages than normolipidemic subjects in France, whereas no differences were found in Northern Ireland. In France, total alcohol, wine and beer consumption was negatively related to socioeconomic status and educational level. In Northern Ireland, total alcohol, beer and spirits consumption was negatively related whereas wine consumption was positively related to socioeconomic status and educational level. Alcohol drinking patterns differ between France and Northern Ireland, and also according to cardiovascular risk factors, socioeconomic and educational levels. Merck, Sharp & Dohme-Chibret (France), the NICHSA and the Department of Health and Social Service (Northern Ireland).

  3. Student Civic Participation in School: What Makes a Difference in Ireland?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilleece, Lorraine; Cosgrove, Jude

    2012-01-01

    Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child provides for the views of the child to be given due weight in accordance with the child's age and maturity. Legislation in Ireland recognizes the rights of children to have a voice in educational matters. Based on a sample of 2838 14-year-olds in Ireland and using questionnaire…

  4. The Language Planning Situation in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laoire, Muiris O.

    2005-01-01

    Language planning for the Irish language in the Republic of Ireland has featured prominently in international language policy and planning literature over the years. Researchers in the field may not be up to date, however, with recent developments in the area of Irish language planning and their impact on the language ecology. This monograph…

  5. Exposure to Community Violence and Political Socialization among Adolescents in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Linda

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of adolescent exposure to cross-community violence, intense paramilitary operations, aggression, and intimidation in Northern Ireland. Using publicly available survey data gathered by agencies in Northern Ireland, the research examines the effects of exposure to political violence with focus upon the manner by…

  6. Logistic regression model for detecting radon prone areas in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Elío, J; Crowley, Q; Scanlon, R; Hodgson, J; Long, S

    2017-12-01

    A new high spatial resolution radon risk map of Ireland has been developed, based on a combination of indoor radon measurements (n=31,910) and relevant geological information (i.e. Bedrock Geology, Quaternary Geology, soil permeability and aquifer type). Logistic regression was used to predict the probability of having an indoor radon concentration above the national reference level of 200Bqm -3 in Ireland. The four geological datasets evaluated were found to be statistically significant, and, based on combinations of these four variables, the predicted probabilities ranged from 0.57% to 75.5%. Results show that the Republic of Ireland may be divided in three main radon risk categories: High (HR), Medium (MR) and Low (LR). The probability of having an indoor radon concentration above 200Bqm -3 in each area was found to be 19%, 8% and 3%; respectively. In the Republic of Ireland, the population affected by radon concentrations above 200Bqm -3 is estimated at ca. 460k (about 10% of the total population). Of these, 57% (265k), 35% (160k) and 8% (35k) are in High, Medium and Low Risk Areas, respectively. Our results provide a high spatial resolution utility which permit customised radon-awareness information to be targeted at specific geographic areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Radon monitoring and hazard prediction in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elio, Javier; Crowley, Quentin; Scanlon, Ray; Hodgson, Jim; Cooper, Mark; Long, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas which forms as a decay product from uranium. It is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation affecting the global population. When radon is inhaled, its short-lived decay products can interact with lung tissue leading to DNA damage and development of lung cancer. Ireland has among the highest levels of radon in Europe and eighth highest of an OECD survey of 29 countries. Every year some two hundred and fifty cases of lung cancer in Ireland are linked to radon exposure. This new research project will build upon previous efforts of radon monitoring in Ireland to construct a high-resolution radon hazard map. This will be achieved using recently available high-resolution airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (radiometric) and soil geochemistry data (http://www.tellus.ie/), indoor radon concentrations (http://www.epa.ie/radiation), and new direct measurement of soil radon. In this regard, legacy indoor radon concentrations will be correlated with soil U and Th concentrations and other geogenic data. This is a new approach since the vast majority of countries with a national radon monitoring programme rely on indoor radon measurements, or have a spatially limited dataset of soil radon measurements. Careful attention will be given to areas where an indicative high radon hazard based on geogenic factors does not match high indoor radon concentrations. Where such areas exist, it may imply that some parameter(s) in the predictive model does not match that of the environment. These areas will be subjected to measurement of radon soil gas using a combination of time averaged (passive) and time dependant (active) measurements in order to better understand factors affecting production, transport and accumulation of radon in the natural environment. Such mapping of radon-prone areas will ultimately help to inform when prevention and remediation measures are necessary, reducing the radon exposure of the population. Therefore, given

  8. E-Work in Ireland. IES Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, P.; Bertin, I.; Huws, U.

    Electronic work (E-work) in Ireland was examined through a comparison of survey results from 301 Irish companies with 50 or more employees with averages for the 18 European countries, including 62 in the knowledge sector, and a subsequent survey of 100 smaller companies. Findings from other Irish surveys examining e-work were also considered.…

  9. Depression among Adolescents in Northern Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Examines the nature and distribution of self-reported depression among a sample of 887 students in Northern Ireland. Findings indicate that 12% of the total sample could be defined as depressed, and approximately 4% reported that they wanted to commit suicide. Significant sex or school form associations were not found, except in one form where a…

  10. Challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland: 2. On-farm use of veterinary antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; More, Simon J; Morton, David B; Hanlon, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in recent years as a significant public health threat, which requires both an ethical and a scientific approach. In a recent Policy Delphi study, on-farm use of antimicrobials was a key concern identified by veterinary professionals in Ireland. In this case study (the second in a series of three resulting from a research workshop exploring the challenges facing the veterinary profession in Ireland; the other two case studies investigate clinical veterinary services and emergency/casualty slaughter certification) we aim to provide a value-based reflection on the constraints and possible opportunities for responsible use of veterinary antimicrobials in Ireland. Using a qualitative focus group approach, this study gathered evidence from relevant stakeholders, namely veterinarians working in public and private organisations, a representative from the veterinary regulatory body, a dairy farmer and a general medical practitioner. Three overarching constraints to prudent on-farm use of veterinary antimicrobials emerged from the thematic analysis: 'Defective regulations', 'Lack of knowledge and values' regarding farmers and vets and 'Farm-centred concerns', including economic and husbandry concerns. Conversely, three main themes which reflect possible opportunities to the barriers were identified: 'Improved regulations', 'Education' and 'Herd health management'. Five main recommendations arose from this study based on the perspectives of the study participants including: a) the potential for regulatory change to facilitate an increase in the number of yearly visits of veterinarians to farms and to implement electronic prescribing and shorter validity of prescriptions; b) a 'One Health' education plan; c) improved professional guidance on responsible use of veterinary antimicrobials; d) improved on-farm herd health management practices; and e) the promotion of a 'One Farm-One Vet' policy. These findings may assist Veterinary Council of

  11. Primary Geography in the Republic of Ireland: Practices, Issues and Possible Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Susan

    2015-01-01

    In the Republic of Ireland, geography is recognized as an important subject for children to learn and all pupils take it throughout their primary school years. The current curriculum, the Primary School Curriculum-Geography, follows a tradition of innovative, child-centered geography curricula in Ireland. This article outlines the history of…

  12. Wave Clouds over Ireland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Visualization Date 2003-12-18 Clouds ripple over Ireland and Scotland in a wave pattern, similar to the pattern of waves along a seashore. The similarity is not coincidental — the atmosphere behaves like a fluid, so when it encounters an obstacle, it must move around it. This movement forms a wave, and the wave movement can continue for long distances. In this case, the waves were caused by the air moving over and around the mountains of Scotland and Ireland. As the air crested a wave, it cooled, and clouds formed. Then, as the air sank into the trough, the air warmed, and clouds did not form. This pattern repeated itself, with clouds appearing at the peak of every wave. Other types of clouds are also visible in the scene. Along the northwestern and southwestern edges of this true-color image from December 17, 2003, are normal mid-altitude clouds with fairly uniform appearances. High altitude cirrus-clouds float over these, casting their shadows on the lower clouds. Open- and closed-cell clouds formed off the coast of northwestern France, and thin contrail clouds are visible just east of these. Contrail clouds form around the particles carried in airplane exhaust. Fog is also visible in the valleys east of the Cambrian Mountains, along the border between northern/central Wales and England. This is an Aqua MODIS image. Sensor Aqua/MODIS Credit Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC For more information go to: visibleearth.nasa.gov/view_rec.php?id=6146

  13. The Scientific Work of John A. McClelland: A Recently Discovered Manuscript

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    John Alexander McClelland (1870-1920) was educated at Queen’s College Galway and the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge. He was Professor of Experimental Physics at University College Dublin from 1900 to 1920. He was best known for his pioneering work on the scattering of β rays and on the conductivity of gases and the mobility of ions. He established a research school on atmospheric aerosols that was continued by his successor, John James Nolan (1887-1952), which strongly influenced physics research in Ireland up to the present. A recently discovered manuscript of a commemorative address by Nolan in 1920, which is reproduced in Appendix I, is a unique contemporary summary of McClelland’s research and character, and is an important contribution to the history of experimental physics in Ireland.

  14. The FEBS Journal in 2016: read, reflect and don't feed the wolves.

    PubMed

    Martin, Seamus J

    2016-01-01

    Seamus Martin holds the Smurfit Chair of Medical Genetics at the Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. He obtained his PhD with Tom Cotter at the National University of Ireland, followed by post-doctoral fellowships with Ivan Roitt at UCL, London, UK, and Doug Green at The La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, California, USA. He works on all aspects of cell death control and is especially interested in the links between apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation. He received the GlaxoSmithKline Award of The Biochemical Society for his work on unravelling the caspase activation cascade and was elected to the Royal Irish Academy in 2006 and EMBO in 2009. He has been the Editor-in-Chief of The FEBS Journal since 2014. © 2015 FEBS.

  15. Mental health legislation and human rights in England, Wales and the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brendan D

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO) published its Resource Book on Mental Health, Human Rights and Legislation (Geneva: WHO) presenting a detailed statement of human rights issues which need to be addressed in national legislation relating to mental health. The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent to which revised mental health legislation in England, Wales (2007) and Ireland (2001) accords with these standards (excluding standards relating solely to children or mentally-ill offenders). Legislation in England and Wales meets 90 (54.2%) of the 166 WHO standards examined, while legislation in Ireland meets 80 standards (48.2%). Areas of high compliance include definitions of mental disorder, relatively robust procedures for involuntary admission and treatment (although provision of information remains suboptimal) and clarity regarding offences and penalties Areas of medium compliance relate to competence, capacity and consent (with a particular deficit in capacity legislation in Ireland), oversight and review (which exclude long-term voluntary patients and require more robust complaints procedures), and rules governing special treatments, seclusion and restraint. Areas of low compliance relate to promoting rights (impacting on other areas within legislation, such as information management), voluntary patients (especially non-protesting, incapacitated patients), protection of vulnerable groups and emergency treatment. The greatest single deficit in both jurisdictions relates to economic and social rights. There are four key areas in need of rectification and clarification in relation to mental health legislation in England, Wales and Ireland; these relate to (1) measures to protect and promote the rights of voluntary patients; (2) issues relating to competence, capacity and consent (especially in Ireland); (3) the role of "common law" in relation to mental health law (especially in England and Wales); and (4) the extent to which each jurisdiction

  16. Long-term costs of introducing HPV-DNA post-treatment surveillance to national cervical cancer screening in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Agapova, Maria; Duignan, Andrea; Smith, Alan; O'Neill, Ciaran; Basu, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Co-testing (cytology plus human papillomavirus DNA testing) as part of cervical cancer surveillance in Ireland increases one-time testing costs. Of interest to policy makers was the long-term impact of these costs accompanied by decreases in intensity of recalls for women with no detected abnormalities. A cost analysis of cytology-only and co-testing strategy was implemented using decision analytic modeling, aggregating testing utilization and costs for each of the two strategies over 12 years. Aggregated incremental costs of the co-testing strategy were positive for the first 3 years but became negative thereafter, generating a cost savings of roughly €20 million in favor of the cytology-only strategy over a 12-year period. Results were robust over a range of sensitivity analyses with respect to discount and attrition rates. This analysis provided valuable information to policy makers contributing to the introduction of co-testing for post-treatment surveillance (PTS) in Ireland.

  17. Long-term costs of introducing HPV-DNA post-treatment surveillance to national cervical cancer screening in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Agapova, Maria; Duignan, Andrea; Smith, Alan; O'Neill, Ciaran; Basu, Anirban

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Co-testing (cytology plus human papillomavirus DNA testing) as part of cervical cancer surveillance in Ireland increases one-time testing costs. Of interest to policy makers was the long-term impact of these costs accompanied by decreases in intensity of recalls for women with no detected abnormalities. Methods A cost-analysis of cytology-only and co-testing was implemented using decision analytic modeling, aggregating testing utilization and costs for each of the two strategies over 12 years. Results Aggregated incremental costs of the co-testing strategy were positive for the first 3 years but became negative thereafter, generating a cost savings of roughly €20 million in favor of the cytology-only strategy over a 12-year period. Results were robust over a range of sensitivity analyses with respect to discount and attrition rates. Discussion This analysis provided valuable information to policy makers contributing to the introduction of co-testing for post-treatment surveillance in Ireland. PMID:26377838

  18. The evolution of health policy guidelines for assisted reproduction in the Republic of Ireland, 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Walsh, David J; Ma, Mary L; Sills, Eric Scott

    2011-06-24

    This analysis reports on Irish regulatory policies for in vitro fertilisation (IVF) from 2004-2009, in the context of membership changes within the Medical Council of Ireland. To achieve this, the current (2009) edition of the Guide to Professional Conduct & Ethics was compared with the immediately preceding version (2004). The statutory composition of the Medical Council from 2004-2009 was also studied. Content analysis of the two editions identified the following differences: 1) The 2004 guide states that IVF "should only be used after thorough investigation has failed to reveal a treatable cause of the infertility", while the 2009 guide indicates IVF "should only be used after thorough investigation has shown that no other treatment is likely to be effective"; 2) The 2004 stipulation stating that fertilized ovum (embryo) "must be used for normal implantation and must not be deliberately destroyed" is absent from the 2009 guidelines; 3) The option to donate "unused fertilised ova" (embryos) is omitted from the 2009 guidelines; 4) The 2009 guidelines state that ART should be offered only by "suitably qualified professionals, in appropriate facilities, and according to the international best practice"; 5) The 2009 guidelines introduce criteria that donations as part of a donor programme should be "altruistic and non-commercial". These last two points represent original regulatory efforts not appearing in the 2004 edition. The Medical Practitioners Act 2007 reduced the number of physicians on the Medical Council to 6 (of 25) members. The ethical guidelines from 2004 preceded this change, while the reconstituted Medical Council published the 2009 version. Between 2004 and 2009, substantial modifications in reproductive health policy were incorporated into the Medical Council's ethical guidelines. The absence of controlling Irish legislation means that patients and IVF providers in Ireland must rely upon these guidelines by default. Our critique traces the evolution

  19. "High/Scope Supporting the Child, the Family, the Community": A Report of the Proceedings of the High/Scope Ireland Third Annual Conference, 12th October 2004, Newry, Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peyton, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    The third annual High/Scope Ireland Conference provided a forum for speakers workshop leaders and delegates from across Ireland, the UK, USA, Europe and South Africa to share their experiences of High/Scope in action. Research demonstrates that long term benefits for High/Scope participants include increased literacy rates, school success and…

  20. Exotic diseases of dogs and cats at risk of importation to Ireland

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Changes in legislation that facilitate movement of companion animals within the European Union will expose those animals to microbial and parasitic organisms currently exotic to Ireland. This paper reviewed information on the exotic diseases most likely to be introduced to Ireland by travelling dogs and cats: rabies, leishmaniosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis and dirofilariosis. PMID:21851670

  1. Continuing Professional Development - Why Bother? Perceptions and Motivations of Teachers in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Dorothy J.; McConnell, Barbara; O'Sullivan, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In a larger study carried out by O'Sullivan "et al." to explore the perceptions and experiences of teachers in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland who were engaged in continuing professional development (CPD), one of the significant findings to emerge was the key role of teacher motivation. The current study therefore focuses on…

  2. Understanding Achievement Differences between Schools in Ireland--Can Existing Data-Sets Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilleece, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increased focus on school accountability in Ireland and calls for greater use to be made of student achievement data for monitoring student outcomes. In this paper, it is argued that existing data-sets in Ireland offer limited potential for the value-added modelling approaches used for accountability purposes in many…

  3. Are We Cutting Enough? A Five-Year Audit of Melanoma Excision Margins in the South East of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Catherine Tracy; Allen, Jack; Patterson, Ken; O'Donoghue, Gerrard

    2018-01-05

    Malignant melanoma is the fifth commonest invasive cancer in Ireland. The British Association of Dermatology (BAD) guidelines are currently the recognized standard for melanoma related surgery. The aim was to examine adherence to BAD guidelines and establish contributing factors resulting in non-adherence to guidelines in a group of melanoma patients in the South East Region of Ireland. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained melanoma registry of all patients undergoing surgery in the South East Region of Ireland from January 2011 to 2016 was performed. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. Univariate analysis using logistic regression was performed to examine factors associated with not meeting the BAD margin excision guidelines Data with a p < 0.05 was analyzed using a multivariate logistic regression model. 459 patients underwent surgery for invasive cutaneous melanoma. 314 (68.4%) surgeries had excision margins adequately recorded and of these 234(74.5%) fulfilled the BAD guidelines. 267(58.2%) patients (2011-2016 inclusive) qualified for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNLB) with a cancer staging of pT1b or higher. Of these patients 100(37%) agreed to proceed to a SNLB following informed discussion. 33 had a positive sentinel node. On multivariate analysis inadequate margins were independently associated with tumor thickness 2.01-4.00 mm (p = 0.0001) and >4.00 mm (p = 0.0001) and head and neck location (p < 0.0001). Adherence to BAD guidelines in the South East is good but requires optimization since centralization of melanoma treatment in 2013 to a single specialized center. It is important that Clinicians are fully aware of the implications of not achieving adequate excision margins in surgery. Improvements in melanoma data management is needed to fully evaluate current practices in Ireland.

  4. The first prospective injury audit of League of Ireland footballers

    PubMed Central

    Fitzharris, Nigel; Jones, Ashley; Francis, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Football has the highest sports participation (10.6%) in Ireland ahead of its Gaelic counterpart (3.9%). Research into injury incidence and patterns in Irish football is non-existent. The aim of this study was to conduct a prospective injury audit of League of Ireland (semiprofessional) footballers during the 2014 season (8 months, 28 games). Methods A total of 140 semiprofessional League of Ireland footballers were prospectively followed between March and November 2014. Data were collected in accordance with the international consensus on football injury epidemiology. Results The injury rate was 9.2/1000 hour exposure to football (95% CI 6.2 to 12.9, p<0.05). Players were at a higher risk of injury during a match compared with training (23.1 (95% CI 15.2 to 31.3) vs 4.8 (95% CI 2.2 to 7.7)/1000 hours, p<0.05). Injuries were most common during non-contact activity (54.6%), mainly running (30.9%), and occurred almost three times more often in the second half (56% vs 21%, p<05). Strains (50.1%) and sprains (20.3%) were the most common injury types, and the thigh region was injured most often (28.3%). Conclusions The prevalence of injury in League of Ireland football is similar to that of European professional football, although the incidence of injury is higher. The incidence of injury is in line with that of Dutch amateur football. PMID:29071112

  5. An overview of Ireland's National Radon Policy.

    PubMed

    Long, S; Fenton, D

    2011-05-01

    In Ireland radon is a significant public health issue and is linked to 150-200 lung cancer deaths each year. Irish National Radon Policy aims to reduce individual risk by identifying and remediating buildings with high radon concentrations and also to reduce collective dose through radon prevention as required by revised building regulations. Achievements to date are significant and include the completion of the National Radon Survey, the testing of every school in Ireland, the on-going testing of social housing, collaboration between the public health and radiation protection authorities and the inclusion of radon in inspections of workplaces. However, this work now needs to be drawn together centrally to comprehensively address the radon problem. The RPII and the relevant central governing department, the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government are currently working to constitute a group of key experts from relevant public authorities to drive the development of a National Radon Control Strategy.

  6. Quality assurance: The 10-Group Classification System (Robson classification), induction of labor, and cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Robson, Michael; Murphy, Martina; Byrne, Fionnuala

    2015-10-01

    Quality assurance in labor and delivery is needed. The method must be simple and consistent, and be of universal value. It needs to be clinically relevant, robust, and prospective, and must incorporate epidemiological variables. The 10-Group Classification System (TGCS) is a simple method providing a common starting point for further detailed analysis within which all perinatal events and outcomes can be measured and compared. The system is demonstrated in the present paper using data for 2013 from the National Maternity Hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Interpretation of the classification can be easily taught. The standard table can provide much insight into the philosophy of care in the population of women studied and also provide information on data quality. With standardization of audit of events and outcomes, any differences in either sizes of groups, events or outcomes can be explained only by poor data collection, significant epidemiological variables, or differences in practice. In April 2015, WHO proposed that the TGCS (also known as the Robson classification) is used as a global standard for assessing, monitoring, and comparing cesarean delivery rates within and between healthcare facilities. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. First evidence of a Late Upper Palaeolithic human presence in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowd, Marion; Carden, Ruth F.

    2016-05-01

    The colonisation of North West Europe by humans and fauna following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been the subject of considerable discussion in recent decades and within multiple disciplines. Here we present new evidence that pushes back the date of human footfall in Ireland by up to 2500 cal BP to the Upper Palaeolithic. An assemblage of animal bones recovered from a cave in the west of Ireland during antiquarian excavations in 1903 included a butchered brown bear bone (patella) which was recently subjected to two independent radiocarbon dating processes; the resultant dates were in agreement: 12,810-12,590 cal BP and 12,810-12,685 cal BP. This find rewrites the antiquity of human occupation of Ireland and challenges the traditional paradigm that certain biota may have naturally colonised the island prior to human arrival.

  8. Radionuclide monitoring in Northern Ireland of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, B J; Cranley, K

    1987-01-01

    Northern Ireland received higher radiation doses due to the radionuclide contamination from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident than did the south of England. Levels of radioactive iodine (131I) and caesium (137Cs) in cows' milk in Northern Ireland increased to 166 and 120 Bq/l respectively in May 1986, but had decreased by factors of one million, and of twenty-five, respectively, by 1 September 1986. The resultant radiation doses represent less than one per cent of those received by a Northern Ireland individual over a period of 40 years from natural background radiation sources. The added risk to any individual from the Chernobyl accident will therefore be very small and may best be judged in the context of the enormously greater risk of death due to potentially preventable diseases, such as smoking-related lung cancer, and coronary heart disease. PMID:3590387

  9. Ireland's Multicultural Classrooms and Initial Teacher Education: The Convergence of Culture and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Maria

    2009-01-01

    In the context of Ireland's changing demographics, this paper explores the importance of pedagogic research in informing both philosophies and pedagogical practices in Initial Teacher Education (ITE) which endeavours to facilitate student teachers' engagement with the teaching and learning process in Ireland's multicultural classrooms. By…

  10. Devising and Implementing a Suitable Graduate Education Platform for Dublin's Institute of Technology (DIT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carton, Janet; Jerrams, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education platforms have received general acclaim as key components in the future structural development of third-level and fourth-level education in Europe. In Ireland the Higher Education Authority (HEA) has endorsed the restructuring of postgraduate education to incorporate the training of research students in key generic and…

  11. PhysDoc: A Distributed Network of Physics Institutions: Collecting, Indexing, and Searching High Quality Documents by Using Harvest; The Dublin Core Metadata Initiative: Mission, Current Activities, and Future Directions; Information Services for Higher Education: A New Competitive Space; Intellectual Property Conservancies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severiens, Thomas; Hohlfeld, Michael; Zimmermann, Kerstin; Hilf, Eberhard R.; von Ossietzky, Carl; Weibel, Stuart L.; Koch, Traugott; Hughes, Carol Ann; Bearman, David

    2000-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss a variety to topics, including a distributed network of physics institutions documents called PhysDocs which harvests information from the local Web-servers of professional physics institutions; the Dublin Core metadata initiative; information services for higher education in a competitive environment; and…

  12. Bilateral comparison of 10 V standards between the NSAI-NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, March 2014 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Power, O.; Stock, M.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland-National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI-NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out in February and March 2014. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM_4 (Z4) and BIPM_5 (Z5), were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage at the 10 V level consists of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF (Electromotive Force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. At the BIPM the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the value assigned to DC voltage standard by NSAI-NML, at the level of 10 V, at NSAI-NML, UNML, and that assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 10 March 2014. UNML - UBIPM = -0.64 µV uc = 1.35 µV, at 10 V where uc is thecombined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML,based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. The comparison results show that the voltage standards maintained by NSAI-NML and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated standard uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to

  13. Entrepreneurship Education: Ireland's Solution to Economic Regeneration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John; Fenton, Mary; Barry, Almar

    2012-01-01

    The significance of entrepreneurship has come into sharper focus as enterprise and innovation are being flagged as solutions to regenerate the Irish economy. The Irish Innovation Task Force believes that Ireland could become an "innovation hub", attracting foreign risk capital and international and indigenous entrepreneurs to start and…

  14. Strategic Planning in Ireland's Institutes of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elwood, Larry; Rainnie, Al

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses upon Ireland's institute of technology sector, which has been transformed from a 1970s technical orientation to its broader current role of research and higher education provision. The transformational shifts experienced by institutes over the previous three decades have been profound: increased autonomy, new managerial and…

  15. The male to female ratio at birth in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland: influence of societal stress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Male live births occur slightly in excess of female births. The ratio of male divided by total births is referred to as M/F. Many factors reduce M/F including toxins, stress, and privation, with excess male foetal loss. “The Troubles” (1969-1998) of Northern Ireland (NI) and the economic downturn of Republic of Ireland (ROI) from 2007 posed stresses with corresponding controls. This study analysed M/F in NI and ROI. Methods Annual male and female live births in NI and the ROI were compared using chi tests. Results M/F was significantly higher in NI than in ROI. M/F in NI dropped after 1974. M/F rose in ROI up to 1994, then fell. Discussion Violence-related stress may have been the cause for the M/F drop in NI. Economic improvement followed by recession may have caused parallel M/F changes in ROI. These findings agree with the stress hypothesis of M/F. PMID:26668416

  16. Space Radar Image of County Kerry, Ireland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Iveragh Peninsula, one of the four peninsulas in southwestern Ireland, is shown in this spaceborne radar image. The lakes of Killarney National Park are the green patches on the left side of the image. The mountains to the right of the lakes include the highest peaks (1,036 meters or 3,400 feet) in Ireland. The patchwork patterns between the mountains are areas of farming and grazing. The delicate patterns in the water are caused by refraction of ocean waves around the peninsula edges and islands, including Skellig Rocks at the right edge of the image. The Skelligs are home to a 15th century monastery and flocks of puffins. The region is part of County Kerry and includes a road called the 'Ring of Kerry' that is one of the most famous tourist routes in Ireland. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on April 12, 1994. The image is 82 kilometers by 42 kilometers (51 miles by 26 miles) and is centered at 52.0 degrees north latitude, 9.9 degrees west longitude. North is toward the lower left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is L-band, vertically transmitted and received; and blue is C-band, vertically transmitted and received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  17. New Educational Horizons in Contemporary Ireland: Trends and Challenges. Rethinking Education. Volume 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenham, Thomas G., Ed.; Kieran, Patricia, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Ireland is in the grip of a postmodern cultural deconstruction on many levels. The traditional "grand narratives" are increasingly viewed with suspicion and disenchantment as Ireland struggles to understand its evolving identity. There is a growing need for comprehensive interdisciplinary research that will facilitate teaching and…

  18. Incentivizing advanced mathematics study at upper secondary level: the case of bonus points in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treacy, Páraic Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Secondary level mathematics education in Ireland has recently experienced a period of significant change with the introduction of new curricula and the addition of an incentive to study upper secondary mathematics at the most advanced level (Higher Level). This incentive, typically referred to as 'bonus points', appears to have aided a significant increase in the number of students studying upper secondary mathematics at Higher Level. However, thematic analysis of interviews with experienced upper secondary mathematics examiners and exploration of mathematics diagnostic test data outlined in this paper suggest that the difficulty of the Higher Level upper secondary mathematics final examination in Ireland has reduced since the introduction of the bonus points initiative. The sharp increase in students attempting this examination coupled with a policy of maintaining a consistent proportion of students achieving passing grades was identified as a key reason for this possible reduction in standards.

  19. The Harp: The Symbol of Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Donna Dee

    The harp as a symbol of the Irish people is discussed. The first part of the paper discusses the early use of the harp in Irish society and how the magical powers of this instrument affected the natives and invaders of the small island for centuries. From the time of the Celtic occupation of Ireland in 500 BC, music played by harpers has been…

  20. Evolution and Epidemiology of Multidrug-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in the United Kingdom and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Martin, Veronique; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen that has become a leading causative agent of hospital-based infections over the past few decades. The emergence and global expansion of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant (MDR) clones of K. pneumoniae have been increasingly reported in community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Despite this, the population genomics and epidemiology of MDR K. pneumoniae at the national level are still poorly understood. To obtain insights into these, we analyzed a systematic large-scale collection of invasive MDR K. pneumoniae isolates from hospitals across the United Kingdom and Ireland. Using whole-genome phylogenetic analysis, we placed these in the context of previously sequenced K. pneumoniae populations from geographically diverse countries and identified their virulence and drug resistance determinants. Our results demonstrate that United Kingdom and Ireland MDR isolates are a highly diverse population drawn from across the global phylogenetic tree of K. pneumoniae and represent multiple recent international introductions that are mainly from Europe but in some cases from more distant countries. In addition, we identified novel genetic determinants underlying resistance to beta-lactams, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and tetracyclines, indicating that both increased virulence and resistance have emerged independently multiple times throughout the population. Our data show that MDR K. pneumoniae isolates in the United Kingdom and Ireland have multiple distinct origins and appear to be part of a globally circulating K. pneumoniae population. PMID:28223459

  1. Religion and Primary School Choice in Ireland: School Institutional Identities and Student Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darmody, Merike; Smyth, Emer

    2018-01-01

    Ireland's demographic profile has changed significantly in the past 20 years, being now characterised by increasing cultural, ethnic and religious diversity. However, primary schooling in Ireland has remained highly denominational, mostly Roman Catholic, in nature, with a small number of minority faith schools and multi-denominational schools.…

  2. Safety and security in acute admission psychiatric wards in Ireland and London: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cowman, Seamus; Bowers, Len

    2009-05-01

    The comparative element of this study is to describe safety and security measures in psychiatric acute admission wards in the Republic of Ireland and London; to describe differences and similarities in terms of safety and security patterns in the Republic of Ireland and London; and to make recommendations on safety and security to mental health services management and psychiatric nurses. Violence is a serious problem in psychiatric services and staff experience significant psychological reactions to being assaulted. Health and Safety Authorities in the UK and Ireland have expressed concern about violence and assault in healthcare, however, there remains a lack of clarity on matters of procedure and policy pertaining to safety and security in psychiatric hospitals. A descriptive survey research design was employed. Questionnaires were circulated to all acute wards in London and in Ireland and the resulting data compared. A total of 124 psychiatric wards from London and 43 wards from Ireland were included in this study and response rates of 70% (London) and 86% (Ireland) were obtained. Differences and similarities in safety and security practices were identified between London and Ireland, with Irish wards having generally higher and more intensive levels of security. There is a lack of coherent policy and procedure in safety and security measures across psychiatric acute admission wards in the Republic of Ireland and London. Given the trends in European Union (EU) regulation, there is a strong argument for the publication of acceptable minimum guidelines for safety and security in mental health services across the EU. There must be a concerted effort to ensure that all policy and procedure in safety and security is founded on evidence and best practice. Mental health managers must establish a review of work safety and security procedures and practices. Risk assessment and environmental audits of all mental health clinical environments should be mandatory.

  3. Stories of Change: The National University of Ireland, Galway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclabhrainn, Iain

    The National University of Ireland, Galway, was founded in the 1840s and is now one of seven universities in the Republic of Ireland. It has over 14,500 students and about 700 academic staff in five Colleges spanning traditional and modern academic disciplines. The location is a small but very vibrant city which is making a lot of efforts to preserve the Irish culture and tradition. This is an aspect which is also reflected in the university's ethos. Its research specializes in areas such as Web technologies, biomedical sciences, environment, humanities, and applied social sciences and its research funding and output have increased dramatically over the last 10 years, in itself producing a large shift in institutional culture.

  4. Ireland's medical brain drain: migration intentions of Irish medical students.

    PubMed

    Gouda, Pishoy; Kitt, Kevin; Evans, David S; Goggin, Deirdre; McGrath, Deirdre; Last, Jason; Hennessy, Martina; Arnett, Richard; O'Flynn, Siun; Dunne, Fidelma; O'Donovan, Diarmuid

    2015-03-12

    To provide the optimum level of healthcare, it is important that the supply of well-trained doctors meets the demand. However, despite many initiatives, Ireland continues to have a shortfall of physicians, which has been projected to persist. Our study aimed to investigate the migration intentions of Irish medical students and identify the factors that influence their decisions in order to design appropriate interventions to sustain the supply of trained doctors in order to maintain a viable medical system. An online cross-sectional survey was undertaken of all Irish medical students studying in the Republic of Ireland. The survey included nominal, ordinal, and scale items to determine migration intentions, factors influencing their decisions, and understanding of the Irish healthcare system. A total of 2 273 medical students responded (37% response rate), of whom 1 519 were classified as Irish medical students (having completed secondary school in Ireland). Of these, 88% indicated they were either definitely migrating or contemplating migrating following graduation or completion of the pre-registration intern year. Forty percent expressed an intention of returning to Ireland within 5 years. The factors most influencing their decision to leave were career opportunities (85%), working conditions (83%), and lifestyle (80%). The migration intentions expressed in this study predict an immediate and severe threat to the sustainability of the Irish healthcare service. Urgent interventions such as providing information about career options and specialty training pathways are required. These must begin in the undergraduate phase and continue in postgraduate training and are needed to retain medical school graduates.

  5. The rate of radon remediation in Ireland 2011-2015: Establishing a base line rate for Ireland's National Radon Control Strategy.

    PubMed

    Dowdall, A; Fenton, D; Rafferty, B

    2016-10-01

    Radon is the greatest source of radiation exposure to the public. In Ireland, it is estimated that approximately 7% of the national housing stock have radon concentrations above the Reference Level of 200 Bq m -3 . A radon test can be carried out to identify homes with radon levels above the Reference Level. However there is no health benefit associated with radon testing unless it leads to remediation. Surveys to establish the rate of remediation in Ireland, that is the proportion of householders who having found levels of radon above the Reference Level proceed to carry out remediation work have been carried out in 2011 and 2013. Reasons for not carrying out remediation work were also investigated. In 2015 the survey was repeated to establish the current rate of remediation and reasons for not remediating. This report presents the results of that survey. It also compiles the data from all three surveys to identify any trends over time. The rate of remediation is an important parameter in estimating the effectiveness of programmes aimed at reducing radon levels. Currently the rate of remediation is 22% and the main reasons householders gave for not remediating were not certain there is a serious risk and concern about the cost of the work. In Ireland, this figure of 22% will be now used as a baseline metric against which the effectiveness of its National Radon Control Strategy will be measured over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. What's in the Numbers? Child Welfare Statistics and the Children (Northern Ireland) Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Davy; Pinkerton, John

    2016-01-01

    This article draws attention to the importance of routinely collected administrative data as an important source for understanding the characteristics of the Northern Ireland child welfare system as it has developed since the Children (Northern Ireland) Order 1995 became its legislative base. The article argues that the availability of such data…

  7. Factors influencing initiation and duration of breast feeding in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Leahy-Warren, Patricia; Mulcahy, Helen; Phelan, Agnes; Corcoran, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with mothers breast feeding and to identify, for those who breast fed, factors associated with breast feeding for as long as planned. breast feeding rates in Ireland are amongst the lowest in Europe. Research evidence indicates that in order for mothers to be successful at breast feeding, multiplicities of supports are necessary for both initiation and duration. The nature of these supports in tandem with other influencing factors requires analysis from an Irish perspective. cross-sectional study involving public health nurses and mothers in Ireland. This paper presents the results of the mothers' evaluation. mothers (n=1715) with children less than three years were offered a choice of completing the self-report questionnaires online or by mail. Data were analysed and reported using descriptive and inferential statistics. four in every five participants breast fed their infant and two thirds of them breast fed as long as planned. The multivariate logistic regression analysis identified that third level education, being a first time mother or previously having breast fed, participating online, having more than two public health nurse visits, and having a positive infant feeding attitude were independently and statistically significantly associated with breast feeding. Among mothers who breast fed, being aged at least 35 years, participating online, having a positive infant feeding attitude and high breast feeding self-efficacy were independently and statistically significantly associated with breast feeding for as long as planned. findings from this study reinforce health inequalities therefore there needs to be a renewed commitment to reducing health inequalities in relation to breast feeding. this study has identified factors associated with initiation and duration of breast feeding that are potentially modifiable through public health interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An analysis of the synoptic and climatological applicability of circulation type classifications for Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broderick, Ciaran; Fealy, Rowan

    2013-04-01

    Circulation type classifications (CTCs) compiled as part of the COST733 Action, entitled 'Harmonisation and Application of Weather Type Classifications for European Regions', are examined for their synoptic and climatological applicability to Ireland based on their ability to characterise surface temperature and precipitation. In all 16 different objective classification schemes, representative of four different methodological approaches to circulation typing (optimization algorithms, threshold based methods, eigenvector techniques and leader algorithms) are considered. Several statistical metrics which variously quantify the ability of CTCs to discretize daily data into well-defined homogeneous groups are used to evaluate and compare different approaches to synoptic typing. The records from 14 meteorological stations located across the island of Ireland are used in the study. The results indicate that while it was not possible to identify a single optimum classification or approach to circulation typing - conditional on the location and surface variables considered - a number of general assertions regarding the performance of different schemes can be made. The findings for surface temperature indicate that that those classifications based on predefined thresholds (e.g. Litynski, GrossWetterTypes and original Lamb Weather Type) perform well, as do the Kruizinga and Lund classification schemes. Similarly for precipitation predefined type classifications return high skill scores, as do those classifications derived using some optimization procedure (e.g. SANDRA, Self Organizing Maps and K-Means clustering). For both temperature and precipitation the results generally indicate that the classifications perform best for the winter season - reflecting the closer coupling between large-scale circulation and surface conditions during this period. In contrast to the findings for temperature, spatial patterns in the performance of classifications were more evident for

  9. Family SMEs in Ireland as Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdthistle, Naomi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether small and medium-sized family businesses in Ireland have the potential to be classified as learning organizations. Design/methodology/approach: The research methodology adopted for this study is that of multiple-case studies. In this research, personal interviews were selected as the…

  10. The Northern Ireland Resource File and Aspire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, David; Montgomery, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The paper begins by identifying issues as to how initial teacher training and in-service training for teachers inadequately prepares them for teaching the pupils with special educational needs (SEN). The paper then provides a brief legislative background to SEN in the Northern Ireland context, before describing two elements of educational reform…

  11. Identity Dystopias, Empire Framing and Theoretical Hegemonies: Two Case Studies, India and Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allender, Tim; O'Donoghue, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the connections between official contemporary identity formation and colonial pasts. Using the case studies of India and Ireland the article explores how different traditions of theorisation are powerful in these formations. India and Ireland were two colonial domains that had many linkages outside the ambit of the British.…

  12. Ireland and medical research with minors: some medico-legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Asim A

    2008-07-01

    The practice of medical research with minors in Ireland consist of practices pertaining to therapeutic and non-therapeutic medical research. Clinical trials (a category of therapeutic research), is governed by legislation. However, any other therapeutic research (non-clinical trials research) and non-therapeutic research, e.g. observational medical research such as a longitudinal study of children or non-therapeutic research such as blood sample collection for analysis of cause of disease, are unregulated by legislation. This, article will outline and describe some of the medico-legal issues involved in both types of research and will comment on matters such as what national law exists, how the directive on good clinical practice has been implemented, what guidelines, if any, exist.

  13. Graduate Employment and Training in SMEs in Northern Ireland: An Overview Using the 2000 Labour Force Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Richard; Reid, Renee S.

    2005-01-01

    Using the UK Labour Force Survey, this paper considers whether graduate employment is more important in the small and medium-size enterprise (SME) sector in Northern Ireland than in other regions of the UK. The authors disaggregate their analysis by gender, occupation and industry to provide a detailed breakdown. The issue of whether graduates are…

  14. Trends in the Evolution of the Public Web, 1998-2002; The Fedora Project: An Open-source Digital Object Repository Management System; State of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, April 2003; Preservation Metadata; How Many People Search the ERIC Database Each Day?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Edward T.; Lavoie, Brian F.; Bennett, Rick; Staples, Thornton; Wayland, Ross; Payette, Sandra; Dekkers, Makx; Weibel, Stuart; Searle, Sam; Thompson, Dave; Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles that examine key trends in the development of the public Web: size and growth, internationalization, and metadata usage; Flexible Extensible Digital Object and Repository Architecture (Fedora) for use in digital libraries; developments in the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI); the National Library of New Zealand Te Puna…

  15. ISO, FGDC, DIF and Dublin Core - Making Sense of Metadata Standards for Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. R.; Ritchey, N. A.; Peng, G.; Toner, V. A.; Brown, H.

    2014-12-01

    Metadata standards provide common definitions of metadata fields for information exchange across user communities. Despite the broad adoption of metadata standards for Earth science data, there are still heterogeneous and incompatible representations of information due to differences between the many standards in use and how each standard is applied. Federal agencies are required to manage and publish metadata in different metadata standards and formats for various data catalogs. In 2014, the NOAA National Climatic data Center (NCDC) managed metadata for its scientific datasets in ISO 19115-2 in XML, GCMD Directory Interchange Format (DIF) in XML, DataCite Schema in XML, Dublin Core in XML, and Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT) in JSON, with more standards and profiles of standards planned. Of these standards, the ISO 19115-series metadata is the most complete and feature-rich, and for this reason it is used by NCDC as the source for the other metadata standards. We will discuss the capabilities of metadata standards and how these standards are being implemented to document datasets. Successful implementations include developing translations and displays using XSLTs, creating links to related data and resources, documenting dataset lineage, and establishing best practices. Benefits, gaps, and challenges will be highlighted with suggestions for improved approaches to metadata storage and maintenance.

  16. Racism and Citizenship Education in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Eamonn

    2007-01-01

    Racist attitudes towards, and attacks on, the minority ethnic populations in Northern Ireland (NI) have increased dramatically over the last number of years. Despite the increased media attention regarding racist attacks, the fallacy that racism is not a major problem in NI is an enduring one. However, there is a growing recognition that minority…

  17. Comparison of family planning in Cuba and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Suzie; Stronge, Shirley

    2015-08-26

    Family planning gives individuals and couples control and choice over the number of children they have and the timing of their births. Developments in reproductive health have resulted in major changes in the options for family planning, providing more choice and control over fertility. This article explores reproductive health in the Republic of Cuba and the Republic of Ireland, with a focus on contraceptive use and termination of pregnancy as methods of family planning. The predominant religion in both countries is Catholicism, which promotes the right to life of the unborn child. The two countries have adopted different approaches to the availability of both contraception and termination of pregnancy. Cuba has offered free access to contraception and termination of pregnancy since the 1960s to reduce maternal mortality. In Ireland, contraception was not widely available until 1995 and termination of pregnancy is available only in extremely limited circumstances.

  18. The Role of the Social Partners in Vocational Education and Training, Including Continuing Education and Training, in Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Timothy; Coldrick, Arthur J.

    This document is the result of the analysis of reports and the conduct of interviews with representatives of the social partners (employers, employers' organizations, and unions), education and training agencies, and other relevant agencies in Ireland. The document consists of four parts and a bibliography. The first part describes vocational…

  19. The Role of Parental Expectations in Understanding Social and Academic Well-Being among Children with Disabilities in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Selina; Maître, Bertrand; Watson, Dorothy; Banks, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    This paper draws on longitudinal data to examine the extent to which parents' educational expectations shape academic development and changes in self-concept among young people with different types of disability. The analysis is based on the "Growing Up in Ireland" longitudinal study, which tracked 7423 children between the primary to…

  20. "Managed competition" for Ireland? The single versus multiple payer debate.

    PubMed

    Mikkers, Misja; Ryan, Padhraig

    2014-09-26

    A persistent feature of international health policy debate is whether a single-payer or multiple-payer system can offer superior performance. In Ireland, a major reform proposal is the introduction of 'managed competition' based on the recent reforms in the Netherlands, which would replace many functions of Ireland's public payer with a system of competing health insurers from 2016. This article debates whether Ireland meets the preconditions for effective managed competition, and whether the government should implement the reform according to its stated timeline. We support our arguments by discussing the functioning of the Dutch and Irish systems. Although Ireland currently lacks key preconditions for effective implementation, the Dutch experience demonstrates that some of these can be implemented over time, such as a more rigorous risk equalization system. A fundamental problem may be Ireland's sparse hospital distribution. This may increase the market power of hospitals and weaken insurers' ability to exclude inefficient or poor quality hospitals from contracts, leading to unwarranted spending growth. To mitigate this, the government proposes to introduce a system of price caps for hospital services.The Dutch system of competition is still in transition and it is premature to judge its success. The new system may have catalyzed increased transparency regarding clinical performance, but outcome measurement remains crude. A multi-payer environment creates some disincentives for quality improvement, one of which is free-riding by insurers on their rivals' quality investments. If a Dutch insurer invests in improving hospital quality, hospitals will probably offer equivalent quality to consumers enrolled with other insurance companies. This enhances equity, but may weaken incentives for improvement. Consequently the Irish government, rather than insurers, may need to assume responsibility for investing in clinical quality. Plans are in place to assure consumers of

  1. The visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Cromie, H.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1989 there has been a burgeoning of the visual arts in Northern Ireland hospitals. This paper compares the three organisational models for hospital arts currently operating within the Province and in an overview discusses ways to coordinate working practice for future development of the visual arts in local hospitals. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:8533183

  2. Many Voices: Building a Biblioblogosphere in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Michelle; Kouker, Alexander; O'Connor, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Blogging has been associated with the Library and Information Science (LIS) community for some time now. Libfocus.com is an online blog that was founded in 2011. Its goal was to create a communal communication space for LIS professionals in Ireland and beyond, to share and discuss issues and ideas. The content of the blog is curated by an…

  3. The use of beached bird surveys for marine plastic litter monitoring in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Acampora, Heidi; Lyashevska, Olga; Van Franeker, Jan Andries; O'Connor, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Marine plastic litter has become a major threat to wildlife. Marine animals are highly susceptible to entanglement and ingestion of debris at sea. Governments all around the world are being urged to monitor litter sources and inputs, and to mitigate the impacts of marine litter, which is primarily composed of plastics. European policies, such as Oslo-Paris Convention (OSPAR) and Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) have adopted the monitoring of a seabird species, the Northern Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis), as an environmental quality indicator through the analysis of stomach contents of beached Fulmar specimens. The aims of this research were to: firstly set a baseline investigation of multispecies of seabirds in Ireland affected by the ingestion of litter and, secondly to investigate the feasibility of using Fulmar and/or other potential species of seabird as an indicator for marine debris in Ireland through beached bird surveys. Within 30 months, 121 birds comprising 16 different species were collected and examined for the presence of litter. Of these, 27.3% (n = 33) comprising 12 different species were found to ingest litter, mainly plastics. The average mass of ingested litter was 0.141 g. Among 14 sampled Northern Fulmars, 13 (93%) had ingested plastic litter, all of them over the 0.1 g threshold used in OSPAR and MSFD policy target definitions. Results show that seabirds in Ireland are ingesting marine litter, as in many other countries in the world. Monitoring seabird litter ingestion has the potential to form part of a wider marine litter monitoring programme that can help to inform mitigation and management measures for marine litter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prospects and Progress in Public Health and Health Promotion Research in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Brian; Yarnell, John

    2004-01-01

    Life expectancy in Northern Ireland continues to increase and it is expected that mortality due to heart disease, stroke and some cancers will continue to fall. The infant mortality rate, once higher is similar to that of the other UK and European countries. However, in common with neighboring countries, Northern Ireland has low levels of physical…

  5. Bilateral comparison of 10 V standards between the NSAI-NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, January to February 2013 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, O.; Chayramy, R.; Solve, S.; Stock, M.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland-National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI-NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out from January to February 2013. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM_8 (Z8) and BIPM_9 (Z9), were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage at the 10 V level consists of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF (electromotive force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. At the BIPM the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson Voltage Standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages of the Zener standards on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the value assigned to DC voltage standard by NSAI-NML, at the level of 10 V, at NSAI-NML, UNML, and that assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 5 February 2013. UNML - UBIPM = -0.63 µV uc = 1.31 µV, at 10 V where uc is thecombined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML,based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. The comparison results show that the voltage standards maintained by NSAI-NML and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated standard uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according

  6. Barriers to glaucoma case finding as perceived by optometrists in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Catriona; O'Brien, Colm; Butler, John S; Loughman, James

    2018-01-01

    This research was designed to provide an in-depth exploration of the perceptions of optometrists relating to the challenges of glaucoma case finding in the Irish health-care system. A survey was developed, piloted and distributed for anonymous completion by optometrists registered to practise in Ireland. The survey included 10 five-level Likert items exploring potential barriers to glaucoma detection and a free-text box for participants to comment more broadly. One hundred and ninety-nine optometrists (27 per cent of registrants) responded to the survey. Among the barriers identified, there was notable agreement (71 per cent) with the need for extra training on glaucoma detection. Logistic regression showed that optometrists without postgraduate qualifications were more likely to agree with the need for extra training (OR 3.2, 95 per cent CI 1.3-8.1). Respondents largely agreed (61 per cent) that patient unwillingness to pay additional fees for supplementary glaucoma-specific tests was also a barrier. Appointment times of less than 30 minutes were significantly associated with six of the 10 proposed barriers to glaucoma detection. A logistic regression analysis (n = 179) confirmed that the time allotted per appointment was a significant predictor of the agreement time of optometrists as a barrier (χ 2 [1] = 13.52, p < 0.001). Multiple linear regression showed that optometrists with less experience, charging lower fees, and working in large multiples or franchised practices have the shortest appointment times. The strong link found between postgraduate education and the confidence of optometrists in detecting glaucoma indicates that optometrists wishing to increase their scope of practice in the new legislative environment in Ireland may more actively seek training in areas of interest. The responses also indicate a lack of funding for the level of diagnostic testing required for accurate glaucoma diagnosis. Recent increases in the state's eye examination fees look

  7. The Social Context of Education in Northern Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Seamus; Morgan, Valeria

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of the effects of social upheaval in Northern Ireland on the school system looks at the politically and religiously divided schools, traditional segregation by social class and sex, changes currently being attempted, establishment of common curricular elements, and the role of parents. (MSE)

  8. Epilepsy in Ireland: towards the primary-tertiary care continuum.

    PubMed

    Varley, Jarlath; Delanty, Norman; Normand, Charles; Coyne, Imelda; McQuaid, Louise; Collins, Claire; Boland, Michael; Grimson, Jane; Fitzsimons, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease affecting people of every age, gender, race and socio-economic background. The diagnosis and optimal management relies on contribution from a number of healthcare disciplines in a variety of healthcare settings. To explore the interface between primary care and specialist epilepsy services in Ireland. Using appreciative inquiry, focus groups were held with healthcare professionals (n=33) from both primary and tertiary epilepsy specialist services in Ireland. There are significant challenges to delivering a consistent high standard of epilepsy care in Ireland. The barriers that were identified are: the stigma of epilepsy, unequal access to care services, insufficient human resources, unclear communication between primary-tertiary services and lack of knowledge. Improving the management of people with epilepsy requires reconfiguration of the primary-tertiary interface and establishing clearly defined roles and formalised clinical pathways. Such initiatives require resources in the form of further education and training and increased usage of information communication technology (ICT). Epilepsy services across the primary-tertiary interface can be significantly enhanced through the implementation of a shared model of care underpinned by an electronic patient record (EPR) system and information communication technology (ICT). Better chronic disease management has the potential to halt the progression of epilepsy with ensuing benefits for patients and the healthcare system. Copyright 2009 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bullying and cyberbullying studies in the school-aged population on the island of Ireland: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Foody, Mairéad; Samara, Muthanna; O'Higgins Norman, James

    2017-12-01

    Bullying research has gained a substantial amount of interest in recent years because of the implications for child and adolescent development. We conducted a meta-analysis of traditional and cyberbullying studies in the Republic and North of Ireland to gain an understanding of prevalence rates and associated issues (particularly psychological correlates and intervention strategies) among young people (primary and secondary school students). Four electronic databases were searched (PsychArticles, ERIC, PsychInfo and Education Research Complete) for studies of traditional bullying and cyberbullying behaviours (perpetrators, victims or both) published between January 1997 and April 2016. A final sample of 39 articles fit our selection criteria. CMA software was used to estimate a pooled prevalence rate for traditional/cyberbullying victimization and perpetration. A systematic review on the psychological impacts for all types of bullying and previously used interventions in an Irish setting is also provided. The results demonstrate the influence moderating factors (e.g., assessment tools, answer scale, time frame) have on reported prevalence rates. These results are discussed in light of current studies, and points for future research are considered. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Government Actions to Control Terrorist Violence: A Case Study on Northern Ireland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) E~~0! G~P I -OP ITerrorism; Government Legislation to Control Terrorism; Irish Re...of the British government’s efforts to legislate improvements in Northern Ireland. It appears that only through this process can peace and...international attention and has been the focus of much of the British government’s efforts to legislate improvements in Northern Ireland. It appears that

  11. Islands of Healing: A St. Patrick's Day Look at Integrated Schools in Northern Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Abigail Stahl

    In Northern Ireland, groups of school children, parents, teachers, and principals are supporting religiously integrated schools. This paper gives an account of this movement and the history behind Catholic/Protestant tensions in Northern Ireland. The "Controlled" school system in the country is largely Protestant, whereas the…

  12. A Qualitative Study of the Lived Experiences of Disabled Post-Transition Students in Higher Education Institutions in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redpath, Jennifer; Kearney, Patricia; Nicholl, Peter; Mulvenna, Maurice; Wallace, Jonathan; Martin, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a systematic analysis of 13 in-depth interviews of disabled students from universities in Northern Ireland. Undertaken as part of the Uni4U initiative, the findings presented describe barriers experienced by students with disabilities to participation in higher education. The students provided comments concerning their…

  13. The road to smoke-free legislation in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Currie, Laura M; Clancy, Luke

    2011-01-01

    To describe the process through which Ireland changed its policies towards smoking in work-places and distil lessons for others implementing or extending smoke-free laws. This analysis is informed by a review of secondary sources including a commissioned media analysis, documentary analysis and key informant interviews with policy actors who provide insight into the process of smoke-free policy development. The policy analysis techniques used include the development of a time-line for policy reform, stakeholder analysis, policy mapping techniques, impact analysis through use of secondary data and a review process. The policy analysis triangle, which highlights the importance of examining policy content, context, actors and processes, will be used as an analytical framework. The importance of the political, economic, social and cultural context emerged clearly. The interaction of the context with the policy process both in identification of need for policy and its formulation demonstrated the opportunity for advocates to exert influence at all points of the process. The campaign to support the legislation had the following characteristics: a sustained consistent simple health message, sustained political leadership/commitment, a strong coalition between the Health Alliance, the Office of Tobacco Control and the Department of Health and Children, with cross-party political support and trade union support. The public and the media support clearly defined the benefit of deliberate and consistent planning and organization of a communication strategy. The Irish smoke-free legislation was a success as a policy initiative because of timing, dedication, planning, implementation and the existence of strong leadership and a powerful convinced credible political champion. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Louis I. Dublin and the development of the observational study: the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company natural history (cohort) studies of typhoid fever and scarlet fever.

    PubMed

    Lilienfeld, David E

    2009-06-01

    During 1911-1914, using the resources of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, Louis I. Dublin conducted two national studies into the survival of those surviving episodes of typhoid fever or scarlet fever. He identified an elevated risk of such mortality, associated with specific causes of death, among those having had typhoid fever but not among the scarlet fever survivors. The studies were methodologically sophisticated, resembling those conducted three to four decades later. The studies appear to have been accepted by the medical and public health communities. However, the absence of modern data processing technology and the lack of financial support for such studies by other investigators precluded the further development of modern epidemiology until World War II.

  15. Teachers' Stories of Engaging Students in Controversial Action Projects on the Island of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McSharry, Majella; Cusack, Mella

    2016-01-01

    Civic, Social and Political Education (CSPE) in the Republic of Ireland and Local and Global Citizenship (LGC) in Northern Ireland keenly promote students' active participation in society. However, the purpose of this participation is not necessarily to encourage students to campaign for change in the present but rather that "students are…

  16. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Two Alternative Models of Maternity Care in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Fawsitt, Christopher G; Bourke, Jane; Murphy, Aileen; McElroy, Brendan; Lutomski, Jennifer E; Murphy, Rosemary; Greene, Richard A

    2017-12-01

    The Irish government has committed to expand midwifery-led care alongside consultant-led care nationally, although very little is known about the potential net benefits of this reconfiguration. To formally compare the costs and benefits of the major models of care in Ireland, with a view to informing priority setting using the contingent valuation technique and cost-benefit analysis. A marginal payment scale willingness-to-pay question was adopted from an ex ante perspective. 450 pregnant women were invited to participate in the study. Cost estimates were collected primarily, describing the average cost of a package of care. Net benefit estimates were calculated over a 1-year cycle using a third-party payer perspective. To avoid midwifery-led care, women were willing to pay €821.13 (95% CI 761.66-1150.41); to avoid consultant-led care, women were willing to pay €795.06 (95% CI 695.51-921.15). The average cost of a package of consultant- and midwifery-led care was €1,762.12 (95% CI 1496.73-2027.51) and €1018.47 (95% CI 916.61-1120.33), respectively. Midwifery-led care ranked as the best use of resources, generating a net benefit of €1491.22 (95% CI 989.35-1991.93), compared with €123.23 (95% CI -376.58 to 621.42) for consultant-led care. While both models of care are cost-beneficial, the decision to provide both alternatives may be constrained by resource issues. If only one alternative can be implemented then midwifery-led care should be undertaken for low-risk women, leaving consultant-led care for high-risk women. However, pursuing one alternative contradicts a key objective of government policy, which seeks to improve maternal choice. Ideally, multiple alternatives should be pursued.

  17. Who Teaches Mathematics at Second Level in Ireland?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni Riordain, Maire; Hannigan, Ailish

    2011-01-01

    Ireland's "mathematics problem" is well-documented and extensively reported in the media and elsewhere (Expert Group on Future Skills Needs (EGFSN) 2008; Task Force on the Physical Sciences 2002). Concern primarily lies with post-primary students' underperformance in mathematics coupled with a failure to make a successful transition to…

  18. Newcomer Pupils in Northern Ireland: A Pastoral Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sharon Jayne

    2015-01-01

    Rapid changes in Northern Ireland's demographic, resulting in an increasingly multicultural and multilingual school population, are presenting new opportunities and challenges for schools in a region emerging from a troubled recent past. Reflecting on this from a pastoral perspective, this article focuses on the relationships between the school…

  19. Relationships of People with Learning Disabilities in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bane, Geraldine; Deely, Marie; Donohoe, Brian; Dooher, Martin; Flaherty, Josephine; Iriarte, Edurne Garcia; Hopkins, Rob; Mahon, Ann; Minogue, Ger; Mc Donagh, Padraig; O'Doherty, Siobhain; Curry, Martin; Shannon, Stephen; Tierney, Edel; Wolfe, Marie

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the perspectives of people with learning disabilities on relationships and supports in the Republic of Ireland. A national research network consisting of 21 researchers with learning disabilities, 12 supporters, and 7 university researchers conducted the study. Researchers with learning disabilities and their supporters ran 16…

  20. Needs of informal caregivers across the caregiving course in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Sile; Corr, Bernie; Mays, Iain; Pender, Niall; Hardiman, Orla

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a debilitating terminal condition. Informal caregivers are key figures in ALS care provision. The physical, psychological and emotional impact of providing care in the home requires appropriate assistance and support. The objective of this analysis is to explore the needs of informal ALS caregivers across the caregiving course. Design In an open-ended question as part of a semistructured interview, caregivers were asked what would help them in their role. Interviews took place on three occasions at 4-month to 6-month intervals. Demographic, burden and quality of life data were collected, in addition to the open-ended responses. We carried out descriptive statistical analysis and thematic analysis of qualitative data. Setting and participants Home interviews at baseline (n=81) and on two further occasions (n=56, n=41) with informal caregivers of people with ALS attending the National ALS/MND Clinic at Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Results The majority of caregivers were family members. Hours of care provided and caregiver burden increased across the interview series. Thematic analysis identified what would help them in their role, and needs related to external support and services, psychological-emotional factors, patient-related behaviours, a cure and ‘nothing’. Themes were interconnected and their prevalence varied across the interview time points. Conclusion This study has shown the consistency and adaptation in what caregivers identified as helpful in their role, across 12–18 months of a caregiving journey. Support needs are clearly defined, and change with time and the course of caregiving. Caregivers need support from family, friends and healthcare professionals in managing their tasks and the emotional demands of caregiving. Identifying the specific needs of informal caregivers should enable health professionals to provide tailored supportive interventions

  1. The challenges and future of oral drug delivery: An interview with David Brayden.

    PubMed

    Brayden, David J

    2016-12-01

    David Brayden speaks to Hannah Makin, Commissioning Editor: David Brayden is a Full Professor (Advanced Drug Delivery) at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin (UCD) and also a Fellow of the UCD Conway Institute. Following a PhD in Pharmacology at the University of Cambridge, UK (1989), and a postdoctoral research fellowship at Stanford University, CA, USA, he set up Elan Biotechnology Research's in vitro pharmacology laboratory in Dublin (1991). At Elan, he became a senior scientist and project manager of several of Elan's joint-venture drug delivery research collaborations with US biotech companies. In 2001, he joined UCD as a lecturer in veterinary pharmacology and was appointed Associate Professor in 2006 and Full Professor in 2014. He was a Director of the Science Foundation Ireland Research Cluster (The Irish Drug Delivery Research Network) from 2007 to 2013, is a Deputy Coordinator of an FP7 Consortium on oral peptides in nanoparticles ('TRANS-INT', 2012-2017), and is a Co-Principal Investigator in 'CURAM', Science Foundation Ireland's new Centre for Medical Devices (2014-2020 [ 1 ]). He was made a Fellow of the Controlled Release Society in 2012. He is the author or co-author of >200 research publications and patents. D Brayden serves on the Editorial Advisory Boards of Drug Discovery Today, European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews and the Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and is an Associate Editor of Therapeutic Delivery. D Brayden works as an independent consultant for drug delivery companies.

  2. Approaches for the Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute's Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention: lessons from the all-Ireland NCI cancer consortium.

    PubMed

    Otero, Isabel V; Williams, Makeda; Harford, Joe B

    2012-06-01

    The NCI Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention (SCCP) has provided interdisciplinary training in cancer prevention and control to cancer health-care professionals, including nurses, physicians, and scientists, since 1986. It has trained over 1,200 participants, 256 of them from Ireland and Northern Ireland through two summer courses: a 4-week course on Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control (PP) and 1-week on Molecular Prevention (MP). This report is our attempt to measure achievements and level of satisfaction among alumni from the island of Ireland upon return to their home institution. A questionnaire was developed to assess this. Our analysis found statistically significant differences in the types of accomplishments reported among respondents of the MP and PP courses as well as statistically significant differences in their level of satisfaction. More data are needed to better explain the differences observed as well as level of resources available to alumni upon their return home.

  3. European Union policy on pesticides: implications for agriculture in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Jess, Stephen; Kildea, Steven; Moody, Aidan; Rennick, Gordon; Murchie, Archie K; Cooke, Louise R

    2014-11-01

    European Community (EC) legislation has limited the availability of pesticide active substances used in effective plant protection products. The Pesticide Authorisation Directive 91/414/EEC introduced the principle of risk assessment for approval of pesticide active substances. This principle was modified by the introduction of Regulation (EC) 1107/2009, which applies hazard, the intrinsic toxicity of the active substance, rather than risk, the potential for hazard to occur, as the approval criterion. Potential impacts of EC pesticide legislation on agriculture in Ireland are summarised. While these will significantly impact on pesticide availability in the medium to long term, regulations associated with water quality (Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC and Drinking Water Directive 1998/83/EC) have the potential to restrict pesticide use more immediately, as concerns regarding public health and economic costs associated with removing pesticides from water increase. This rationale will further reduce the availability of effective pesticide active substances, directly affecting crop protection and increasing pesticide resistance within pest and disease populations. In addition, water quality requirements may also impact on important active substances used in plant protection in Ireland. The future challenge for agriculture in Ireland is to sustain production and profitability using reduced pesticide inputs within a framework of integrated pest management. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Structural Mapping and Geomorphology of Ireland's Southwest Continental Shelf Using High Resolution Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, S.; Wireman, R.

    2016-02-01

    Bathymetric surveys were conducted on the continental shelf off the southwest coast of County Cork, Ireland by the Marine Institute of Ireland, the Geological Survey of Ireland, and the INFOMAR project. Data were collected from July 2006 through September 2014 using a Kongsberg EM2040 multibeam echosounder aboard the R/Vs Celtic Voyager and Keary, and a Kongsberg EM1002 on the R/V Celtic Explorer. Sonar data were post-processed with CARIS HIPS and SIPS 9.0 to create 2D and 3D bathymetric and backscatter intensity surfaces with a resolution of 1 m. The offshore study site is part of the 286 Ma western Variscian orogenic front and has several massive outcrops, exhibiting 5 to 20 m of near-vertical relief. These outcrops were structurally mapped and relatively aged, and exhibit significant folding, rotation, tilting, and joint systems. Google Earth, ArcGIS, and previous terrestrial studies were used to further analyze how geomorphology is controlled by seafloor composition and structural features. Rock type and age were interpreted by comparing fracture analysis of the joints and fold trends to similar onshore outcrops documented previously, to determine an age of 416-299 Ma for the shelf's outcropping strata and associated structural features. The oldest features observed are regional anticlines and synclines containing Upper Devonian Old Red Sandstone and Lower Carboniferous shales. Within the shale layers are NE-SW plunging parasitic chevron folds. Jointing is observed in both sandstone and shale layers and is superimposed on chevron folding, with cross joints appearing to influence shallow current patterns. Rotation of the regional folds is the youngest structural feature, as both the parasitic folds and joint systems are warped. Our study shows that high resolution sonar is an effective tool for offshore structural mapping and is an important resource for understanding the geomorphology and geologic history of submerged outcrops on continental shelf systems.

  5. Examining the breastfeeding support resources of the public health nursing services in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Helen; Phelan, Agnes; Corcoran, Paul; Leahy-Warren, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was to review breastfeeding support provided by Public Health Nurses in Ireland. The objectives were to identify the availability of appropriate guiding policies, educational preparation, attitude of Public Health Nurses and the availability and use of other supportive services. Breastfeeding rates in Ireland are among the lowest in Europe. The main source of formal support for breastfeeding mothers in the community in Ireland is from Public Health Nurses who can make referral to other non-statutory resources. The nature of this support is determined by policies guiding clinical practice and education that increases breastfeeding confidence and competence of all personnel. Consequently, an assessment of breastfeeding resources requires an analysis of all these variables. A large quantitative, cross-sectional study was conducted, involving Public Health Nurses and mothers. This paper represents the results from the perspective of Public Health Nurses. Directors of Public Health Nursing (n = 24) and Public Health Nurses (n = 204) completed self-report questionnaires by mail and online. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences and reported using descriptive and inferential statistics. Public Health Nurses are well educated to support breastfeeding and have a positive attitude and a high degree of self-assessed confidence and competence. A wide variety of non-statutory support exists for breastfeeding but is not always used to their full potential. Standardising educational requirements for Public Health Nurses in supporting breastfeeding is an area that requires attention. Ultimately, service delivery in relation to supporting breastfeeding mothers would benefit from being more timely and responsive. Awareness of support resources is necessary for Public Health Nurses to make appropriate referrals for breastfeeding mothers. Furthermore, Directors of Public Health Nursing need to encourage the breastfeeding supportive

  6. Burnout among Accounting and Finance Academics in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Marann; Chughtai, Aamir; Flood, Barbara; Murphy, Evelyn; Willis, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the levels of burnout experienced by accounting and finance academics in Ireland. Design/methodology/approach: Data for this cross-sectional survey study were collected from 100 accounting and finance academics teaching in Irish third level institutions. Independent sample "t"-tests, one…

  7. The spatial distribution of pet dogs and pet cats on the island of Ireland

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is considerable international research regarding the link between human demographics and pet ownership. In several international studies, pet ownership was associated with household demographics including: the presence of children in the household, urban/rural location, level of education and age/family structure. What is lacking across all these studies, however, is an understanding of how these pets are spatially distributed throughout the regions under study. This paper describes the spatial distribution of pet dog and pet cat owning households on the island of Ireland. Results In 2006, there were an estimated 640,620 pet dog owning households and 215,542 pet cat owning households in Ireland. These estimates are derived from logistic regression modelling, based on household composition to determine pet dog ownership and the type of house to determine pet cat ownership. Results are presented using chloropleth maps. There is a higher density of pet dog owning households in the east of Ireland and in the cities than the west of Ireland and rural areas. However, in urban districts there are a lower proportion of households owning pet dogs than in rural districts. There are more households with cats in the urban areas, but the proportion of households with cats is greater in rural areas. Conclusions The difference in spatial distribution of dog ownership is a reflection of a generally higher density of households in the east of Ireland and in major cities. The higher proportion of ownership in the west is understandable given the higher proportion of farmers and rural dwellings in this area. Spatial representation allows us to visualise the impact of human household distribution on the density of both pet dogs and pet cats on the island of Ireland. This information can be used when analysing risk of disease spread, for market research and for instigating veterinary care. PMID:21663606

  8. The spatial distribution of pet dogs and pet cats on the island of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Downes, Martin J; Clegg, Tracy A; Collins, Daniel M; McGrath, Guy; More, Simon J

    2011-06-10

    There is considerable international research regarding the link between human demographics and pet ownership. In several international studies, pet ownership was associated with household demographics including: the presence of children in the household, urban/rural location, level of education and age/family structure. What is lacking across all these studies, however, is an understanding of how these pets are spatially distributed throughout the regions under study. This paper describes the spatial distribution of pet dog and pet cat owning households on the island of Ireland. In 2006, there were an estimated 640,620 pet dog owning households and 215,542 pet cat owning households in Ireland. These estimates are derived from logistic regression modelling, based on household composition to determine pet dog ownership and the type of house to determine pet cat ownership. Results are presented using chloropleth maps. There is a higher density of pet dog owning households in the east of Ireland and in the cities than the west of Ireland and rural areas. However, in urban districts there are a lower proportion of households owning pet dogs than in rural districts. There are more households with cats in the urban areas, but the proportion of households with cats is greater in rural areas. The difference in spatial distribution of dog ownership is a reflection of a generally higher density of households in the east of Ireland and in major cities. The higher proportion of ownership in the west is understandable given the higher proportion of farmers and rural dwellings in this area. Spatial representation allows us to visualise the impact of human household distribution on the density of both pet dogs and pet cats on the island of Ireland. This information can be used when analysing risk of disease spread, for market research and for instigating veterinary care.

  9. Brief strategic therapy for obsessive–compulsive disorder: a clinical and research protocol of a one-group observational study

    PubMed Central

    Pietrabissa, Giada; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Gibson, Padraic; Boardman, Donald; Gori, Alessio; Castelnuovo, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling psychopathology. The mainstay of treatment includes cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) and medication management. However, individual suffering, functional impairments as well as the direct and indirect costs associated with the disease remain substantial. New treatment programmes are necessary and the brief strategic therapy (BST) has recently shown encouraging results in clinical practice but no quantitative study has as yet been conducted. Methods and analysis The clinical effectiveness of the OCD-specific BST protocol will be evaluated in a one-group observational study. Participants will be sequentially recruited from a state community psychotherapy clinic in Dublin, Ireland. Outcome measures will be the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Data will be collected at baseline, at treatment termination and at 3 month follow-up. The statistical significance of the post-treatment effect will be assessed by the paired-sample Student t test, while clinical significance will be evaluated by means of the equivalence testing method, which will be also used to assess the maintenance of effect at follow-up. Ethics/dissemination The present study is approved by the Hesed House Ethics Board in Dublin. Findings will enhance the evidence-based knowledge about the clinical effectiveness of BST in treating OCD symptoms, prior to assessing its efficacy in a randomised and controlled clinical trial, and will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. PMID:27013594

  10. Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) Quality Standards in the Republic of Ireland and the Republic of Serbia: Two Discourses of Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breneselovic, Dragana Pavlovic

    2015-01-01

    The paper provides a comparative analysis of establishing quality in early childhood education and care (ECEC) in the Republic of Ireland and the Republic of Serbia. The analysis is done through desk research of documents dealing with the standards of quality. The following dimensions were compared: 1) The way of preparing and adopting documents;…

  11. Supporting Parental Involvement in Children's Early Learning: Lessons from Community Childcare Centres in Dublin's Docklands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Share, Michelle; Kerrins, Liz

    2013-01-01

    Recently in Ireland attention has been placed on the importance of parental involvement in early childhood care and education settings as seen in the Síolta Quality Standards and Aistear Curriculum Framework. Yet there is little Irish empirical evidence on parental involvement in childcare settings; on the involvement models being used, or on the…

  12. Colonization of Ireland: revisiting 'the pygmy shrew syndrome' using mitochondrial, Y chromosomal and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, A D; Vega, R; Rambau, R V; Yannic, G; Herman, J S; Hayden, T J; Searle, J B

    2011-12-01

    There is great uncertainty about how Ireland attained its current fauna and flora. Long-distance human-mediated colonization from southwestern Europe has been seen as a possible way that Ireland obtained many of its species; however, Britain has (surprisingly) been neglected as a source area for Ireland. The pygmy shrew has long been considered an illustrative model species, such that the uncertainty of the Irish colonization process has been dubbed 'the pygmy shrew syndrome'. Here, we used new genetic data consisting of 218 cytochrome (cyt) b sequences, 153 control region sequences, 17 Y-intron sequences and 335 microsatellite multilocus genotypes to distinguish between four possible hypotheses for the colonization of the British Isles, formulated in the context of previously published data. Cyt b sequences from western Europe were basal to those found in Ireland, but also to those found in the periphery of Britain and several offshore islands. Although the central cyt b haplotype in Ireland was found in northern Spain, we argue that it most likely occurred in Britain also, from where the pygmy shrew colonized Ireland as a human introduction during the Holocene. Y-intron and microsatellite data are consistent with this hypothesis, and the biological traits and distributional data of pygmy shrews argue against long-distance colonization from Spain. The compact starburst of the Irish cyt b expansion and the low genetic diversity across all markers strongly suggests a recent colonization. This detailed molecular study of the pygmy shrew provides a new perspective on an old colonization question.

  13. Programmes in Social Care: A Comparison between the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway, and Ireland. Educational and Psychological Interactions, No. 118.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallstedt, Pelle; Hogstrom, Mats

    This comparative study of social care programs at four European colleges in Nijmegen (Netherlands), Malmo (Sweden), Sligo (Ireland), and Lillehammer (Norway) looks at whether graduates from one country would be qualified to work in social care in the other countries. The report is based on analysis of data from official documents, questionnaires…

  14. Preface - 'NANOSMAT-Paris 2017'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Ali, Nasar; Fierro, Giuseppe; Aliofkhazraei, Mahmood; Chipara, Mircea

    2018-07-01

    The "International Conference on Surfaces, Coatings and Nano-Structured Materials" (NANOSMAT) has rapidly emerged as the premier conference in the field of materials science, engineering, technology and all aspects of "nano". The 12th International Conference on Surfaces, Coatings and Nanostructured Materials (NANOSMAT) was held at the Pierre & Marie Curie University in Paris, France. This conference is in the NANOSMAT conference series. The first two NANOSMAT conferences were held in Portugal (2005, 2007), whereas, the subsequent NANOSMAT meetings were held in Barcelona (Spain), Rome (Italy), Reims (France), Krakow (Poland), Prague (Czech Republic), Granada (Spain), Dublin (Ireland), Manchester (UK) and Aveiro (Portugal).

  15. Phylogeographic, ancient DNA, fossil and morphometric analyses reveal ancient and modern introductions of a large mammal: the complex case of red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carden, Ruth F.; McDevitt, Allan D.; Zachos, Frank E.; Woodman, Peter C.; O'Toole, Peter; Rose, Hugh; Monaghan, Nigel T.; Campana, Michael G.; Bradley, Daniel G.; Edwards, Ceiridwen J.

    2012-05-01

    The problem of how and when the island of Ireland attained its contemporary fauna has remained a key question in understanding Quaternary faunal assemblages. We assessed the complex history and origins of the red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Ireland using a multi-disciplinary approach. Mitochondrial sequences of contemporary and ancient red deer (dating from c 30,000 to 1700 cal. yr BP) were compared to decipher possible source populations of red deer in Ireland, in addition to craniometric analyses of skulls from candidate regions to distinguish between different colonization scenarios. Radiocarbon dating was undertaken on all bone fragments that were previously undated. Finally, a comprehensive review of the scientific literature, unpublished reports and other sources of data were also searched for red deer remains within Irish palaeontological and archaeological contexts. Despite being present in Ireland prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), there is a notable scarcity of red deer from the Younger Dryas stadial period until the Neolithic. The presence of red deer in Irish archaeological sites then occurs more frequently relative to other species. One population in the southwest of Ireland (Co. Kerry) shared haplotypes with the ancient Irish specimens and molecular dating and craniometric analysis suggests its persistence in Ireland since the Neolithic period. The synthesis of the results from this multi-disciplinary study all indicate that red deer were introduced by humans during the Irish Neolithic period and that one of these populations persists today. In conjunction with recent results from other species, Neolithic people from Ireland's nearest landmass, Britain, played a vital role in establishing its contemporary fauna and flora.

  16. Reiterating "Asylum Archive": Documenting Direct Provision in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nedeljkovic, Vukasin

    2018-01-01

    Originally a coping mechanism for an artist housed in a Direct Provision Centres while seeking asylum in Ireland, "Asylum Archive" has become much more than that. In 2018, it is now a collaborative archive, interactive and intermedial online document, and a scholarly research project. This iteration includes five new images of Railway…

  17. The Neo-Liberal Turn in Understanding Teachers' and School Leaders' Work Practices in Curriculum Innovation and Change: A Critical Discourse Analysis of a Newly Proposed Reform Policy in Lower Secondary Education in the Republic of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmie, Geraldine Mooney

    2014-01-01

    The study in this article involved a critical discourse analysis of five policy documents in relation to a curriculum reform proposed for lower secondary education in the Republic of Ireland. It examined the (re)positioning of governance in relation to curriculum and teacher education. Findings indicate a predominant clinical discourse closely…

  18. Epidemiology and molecular typing of VRE bloodstream isolates in an Irish tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Ryan, L; O'Mahony, E; Wrenn, C; FitzGerald, S; Fox, U; Boyle, B; Schaffer, K; Werner, G; Klare, I

    2015-10-01

    Ireland has the highest rate of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) isolated from blood of nosocomial patients in Europe, which rose from 33% (110/330) in 2007 to 45% (178/392) in 2012. No other European country had a VREfm rate from blood cultures of >25%. Our aim was to elucidate the reasons for this significantly higher rate in Ireland. The epidemiology and molecular typing of VRE from bloodstream infections (BSIs) was examined in a tertiary care referral hospital and isolates were compared with those from other tertiary care referral centres in the region. The most common source of VRE BSIs was intra-abdominal sepsis, followed by line-related infection and febrile neutropenia. Most of the isolates were positive for vanA; 52% (43/83) possessed the esp gene and 12% (10/83) possessed the hyl gene. Genotyping by SmaI macrorestriction analysis (PFGE) of isolates revealed clonal relatedness between bloodstream isolates and environmental isolates. VRE BSI isolates from two other tertiary care hospitals in the Dublin region showed relatedness by PFGE analysis. MLST revealed four STs (ST17, ST18, ST78 and ST203), all belonging to the clonal complex of hospital-associated strains. Irish VRE BSI isolates have virulence factor profiles as previously reported from Europe. Typing analysis shows the spread of individual clones within the hospital and between regional tertiary care hospitals. Apart from transmission of VRE within the hospital and transfer of colonized patients between Irish hospitals, no other explanation for the persistently high VREfm BSI rate in Ireland has been found. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Keeping Dublin Core Simple: Cross-Domain Discovery or Resource Description?; First Steps in an Information Commerce Economy: Digital Rights Management in the Emerging E-Book Environment; Interoperability: Digital Rights Management and the Emerging EBook Environment; Searching the Deep Web: Direct Query Engine Applications at the Department of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagoze, Carl; Neylon, Eamonn; Mooney, Stephen; Warnick, Walter L.; Scott, R. L.; Spence, Karen J.; Johnson, Lorrie A.; Allen, Valerie S.; Lederman, Abe

    2001-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss Dublin Core metadata, digital rights management and electronic books, including interoperability; and directed query engines, a type of search engine designed to access resources on the deep Web that is being used at the Department of Energy. (LRW)

  20. Studying medicine – a cross-sectional questionnaire-based analysis of the motivational factors which influence graduate and undergraduate entrants in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Sulong, Saadah; McGrath, Deirdre; Finucane, Paul; Horgan, Mary; O’Flynn, Siún

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The number of places available in Ireland for graduate entry to medical school has steadily increased since 2006. Few studies have, however, characterized the motivational factors underlying decision to study medicine via this route. We compared the factors motivating graduate entrants versus undergraduate entry (UGE) students to choose medicine as a course of study. Design The present study was a quantitative cross-sectional questionnaire-based investigation. Setting The study was conducted in University College Cork and University of Limerick, Ireland. Participants It involved 185 graduate entry (GE) and 120 UGE students. Outcome measures Questionnaires were distributed to students addressing the following areas: demographic/academic characteristics; factors influencing the selection of academic institution and motivation to study medicine; and the role of career guidance in choice of study. Results When asked to list reasons for selecting medicine, both groups listed a wish to help and work with people, and a desire to prevent and cure disease. UGE students were significantly more motivated by intellectual satisfaction, encouragement by family/friends, financial reasons, and professional independence. Approximately half of GE students selected their first degree with a view to potentially studying medicine in the future. GE and UGE students differed significantly with respect to sources consulted for career guidance and source of study information. Conclusions This study is the first systematic examination of study and career motivation in GE medical students since the programme was offered by Irish universities and provides insight into the reasons why graduate entrants in Ireland choose to study medicine via this route. PMID:25057383

  1. Artificial milk-feeding women׳s views of their feeding choice in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Margaret; Gallagher, Louise; Clarke, Mike; Millar, Sally; Begley, Cecily

    2015-06-01

    despite the well-documented benefits of breast feeding to both mother and child, breast-feeding initiation rates in Ireland are the second lowest in Europe. This study set out to explore the views of women from low socio-economic groups in Ireland on their choice to feed their infants artificial milk, and to elicit factors that may encourage these women to breast feed in the future. a qualitative descriptive approach was used. data were collected through recorded focus groups and individual interviews, using a semi-structured interview schedule. Data were transcribed verbatim. interviews took place in two regions in the Republic of Ireland, north and south. a purposive sample was drawn from the population of 2572 women taking part in the Irish Infant Feeding Study who had never breast fed previously, had intended to, and had, fed this infant artificial milk and who had completed their education before they were 18 years of age. Two focus groups with two women in each were conducted and six women took part in individual interviews. constant comparative analysis was performed to construct the categories and concepts that led to the final themes. these artificial milk-feeding women based their infant feeding decision on many social and experiential factors. The major influences on their decisions were: personal attitudes toward feeding methods, and external influences on infant feeding methods. Attitudes towards other women and feeding future infants reinforced a strong preference towards artificial milk feeding. it is apparent that a prevailing culture that is unreceptive to breast feeding and the lack of positive breast-feeding role models, contributed to a strong commitment to artificial milk feeding for these participants. Promotion of breast feeding must take account of the complex contexts in which women make decisions. Advice regarding breast feeding should take account of women׳s feelings and avoid undue pressure, while still promoting the benefits of breast

  2. From Dialogue to Governance: A Critical Analysis of the School Completion Programme in the Republic of Ireland 2002 to 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Kenna, Declan; Mooney Simmie, Geraldine

    2017-01-01

    The School Completion Programme (SCP) was first established in Ireland in 2002 with what appeared to resemble a "bottom up" model of support. The programme was based on authentic effort at partnership with schools, parents and relevant agencies through local management committees and enjoyed a fair share of autonomy in how they would…

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis infection and sexual behaviour among female students attending higher education in the Republic of Ireland

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Emer; Brennan, Wendy; Cormican, Martin; Glacken, Marita; O'Donovan, Diarmuid; Vellinga, Akke; Cahill, Niall; Lysaght, Fionnguala; O'Donnell, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Background There are no prevalence data on Chlamydia trachomatis relating to female students attending higher education available for the Republic of Ireland. This information is required to guide on the necessity for Chlamydia screening programmes in higher education settings. This research aimed to determine the prevalence of and predictive risk factors for Chlamydia trachomatis genital infection among female higher education students in Ireland. Methods All females presenting during one-day periods at Student Health Units in three higher education institutions in two cities in the Republic of Ireland were invited to participate. Participants completed a questionnaire on lifestyle and socio-demographic factors and provided a urine sample. Samples were tested for C. trachomatis DNA by a PCR based technique (Cobas Amplicor, Roche). To examine possible associations between a positive test and demographic and lifestyle risk factors, a univariate analysis was performed. All associations with a p value < 0.05 were included in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Of the 460 sexually active participants 22 tested positive (prevalence 4.8%; 95% CI 3.0 to 7.1%). Variables associated with significantly increased risk were current suggestive symptoms, two or more one-night stands and three or more lifetime sexual partners. The students displayed high-risk sexual behaviour. Conclusion The prevalence of C. trachomatis infection and the lack of awareness of the significance of suggestive symptoms among sexually experienced female students demonstrate the need for a programme to test asymptomatic or non-presenting higher education students. The risk factors identified by multivariate analysis may be useful in identifying those who are most likely to benefit from screening. Alcohol abuse, condom use, sexual behaviour (at home and abroad) and, knowledge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (including asymptomatic nature or relevant symptoms) were identified as

  4. Career Guidance in Northern Ireland: Retrospect and Prospect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Moira; Millar, Rob

    2006-01-01

    The history of careers guidance in Northern Ireland has many similarities but also many differences from experiences in other parts of the UK. The Careers Service has remained within central government for the duration, and this has provided a degree of consistency in service provision over time. In line with the Department for Employment and…

  5. Discover Primary Science: Developing Primary Science in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Margaret; Palmer, Marion

    2007-01-01

    "Discover Primary Science" is a major project in primary science education in Ireland. In 2006-2007 it involves 2400 primary schools, 45 host centres, and two government departments. However, it started out as a local initiative taken by one state agency in 2002 involving four Institutes of Technology and 40 primary schools. The aim of…

  6. Early Childhood Education in Ireland: Change and Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Rosaleen

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood care and education in Ireland has come under increasing scrutiny in recent years, as a result of public concern about standards in some early years services. Services for children before they enter primary school are largely the responsibility of the department of health, while children in the formal school system are the…

  7. An Examination of Health Promoting Schools in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moynihan, Sharon; Jourdan, Didier; Mannix McNamara, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a national survey that examined the extent of implementation of Health Promoting Schools (HPS) in Ireland. Design/methodology/approach: A quantitative research design was adopted. A questionnaire was administered to all post-primary schools in the country (n = 704). Data were analysed…

  8. Let's talk about health: shoppers' discourse regarding health while food shopping.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Michelle C; McConnon, Aine; Hollywood, Lynsey E; Cuskelly, Geraldine J; Barnett, Julie; Raats, Monique; Dean, Moira

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to examine the role of health in consumers' food purchasing decisions through investigating the nature of people's discourse regarding health while conducting their food shopping. The study employed the think-aloud technique as part of an accompanied shop. All mentions of health and terms relating to health were identified from the data set. Inductive thematic analysis was conducted to examine how health was talked about in relation to people's food choice decisions. Supermarkets in Dublin, Republic of Ireland and Belfast, Northern Ireland. Participants (n 50) were aged over 18 years and represented the main household shopper. Responsibility for others and the perceived need to illicit strict control to avoid 'unhealthy' food selections played a dominant role in how health was talked about during the accompanied shop. Consequently healthy shopping was viewed as difficult and effort was required to make the healthy choice, with shoppers relating to product-based inferences to support their decisions. This qualitative exploration has provided evidence of a number of factors influencing the consideration of health during consumers' food shopping. These results highlight opportunities for stakeholders such as public health bodies and the food industry to explore further ways to help enable consumers make healthy food choices.

  9. Dissemination of clonally related multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Morris, D; O'Connor, M; Izdebski, R; Corcoran, M; Ludden, C E; McGrath, E; Buckley, V; Cryan, B; Gniadkowski, M; Cormican, M

    2016-01-01

    In October 2012, an outbreak of gentamicin-resistant, ciprofloxacin non-susceptible extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae occurred in a neonatal intensive care unit in Ireland. In order to determine whether the outbreak strain was more widely dispersed in the country, 137 isolates of K. pneumoniae with this resistance phenotype collected from 17 hospitals throughout Ireland between January 2011 and July 2013 were examined. ESBL production was confirmed phenotypically and all isolates were screened for susceptibility to 19 antimicrobial agents and for the presence of genes encoding bla TEM, bla SHV, bla OXA, and bla CTX-M; 22 isolates were also screened for bla KPC, bla NDM, bla VIM, bla IMP and bla OXA-48 genes. All isolates harboured bla SHV and bla CTX-M and were resistant to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and cefpodoxime; 15 were resistant to ertapenem, seven to meropenem and five isolates were confirmed as carbapenemase producers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of all isolates identified 16 major clusters, with two clusters comprising 61% of the entire collection. Multilocus sequence typing of a subset of these isolates identified a novel type, ST1236, a single locus variant of ST48. Data suggest that two major clonal groups, ST1236/ST48 (CG43) and ST15/ST14 (CG15) have been circulating in Ireland since at least January 2011.

  10. Genetic basis of benzimidazole resistance in Teladorsagia circumcincta in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Jason D; Good, Barbara; de Waal, Theo; Fanning, June; Keane, Orla M

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to benzimidazole (BZ) anthelmintics is common in ovine nematodes of economic importance. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at three positions in the isotype 1 β- tubulin gene have been associated with BZ resistance and molecular tests for the detection of BZ resistance have been developed. In order to determine if such tests are practicable in Ireland the polymorphisms associated with BZ resistance must be identified. To this end, BZ-resistant nematodes were recovered from four farms in Ireland. Resistant Teladorsagia circumcincta , Cooperia curticei and Trichostrongylus colubriformis were recovered, with resistant T. circumcincta the most common and the only species studied further. Sequencing of the isotype 1 β-tubulin gene from resistant T. circumcincta identified a T - A transition, resulting in an F200Y substitution known to be responsible for BZ-resistance, on three of the farms. However, on the fourth farm the frequency of the resistant A allele was only 0.33 indicating another BZ resistance mechanism may be present on this farm. An additional polymorphism resulting in a substitution of glutamate for leucine (E198L) was also found on this farm at low frequency (0.17). No polymorphisms at position 167 were identified on any farm. Therefore, molecular tests to detect BZ resistance in T. circumcincta in Ireland could prove useful; however, they may result in some instances of resistance remaining undetected.

  11. Study in the United Kingdom and Ireland. An IIE Guide to Study Abroad. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Edrice Marguerite, Ed.

    Information on 828 study programs taking place in England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland is provided. Many are academic offerings of United States, British, and Irish colleges, universities, and polytechnics, and the remainder are offered by a variety of organizations such as adult education centers, vocational…

  12. English as an Additional Language and Initial Teacher Education: Views and Experiences from Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses training for teaching English as an Additional Language (EAL) at initial teacher education (ITE) level in Northern Ireland. This small-scale qualitative study describes 15 primary and post-primary teachers' perspectives on their preparation for teaching EAL in Northern Ireland. It explores reflections on EAL content in ITE…

  13. Quantitative trace analysis of polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) in ambient air samples from Mace Head (Ireland): A method intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Annika; Barber, Jonathan L.; Jones, Kevin C.; Temme, Christian

    A method intercomparison study of analytical methods for the determination of neutral, volatile polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) was carried out in March, 2006. Environmental air samples were collected in triplicate at the European background site Mace Head on the west coast of Ireland, a site dominated by 'clean' westerly winds coming across the Atlantic. Extraction and analysis were performed at two laboratories active in PFAS research using their in-house methods. Airborne polyfluorinated telomer alcohols (FTOHs), fluorooctane sulfonamides and sulfonamidoethanols (FOSAs/FOSEs) as well as additional polyfluorinated compounds were investigated. Different native and isotope-labelled internal standards (IS) were applied at various steps in the analytical procedure to evaluate the different quantification strategies. Field blanks revealed no major blank problems. European background concentrations observed at Mace Head were found to be in a similar range to Arctic data reported in the literature. Due to trace-levels at the remote site, only FTOH data sets were complete and could therefore be compared between the laboratories. Additionally, FOSEs could partly be included. Data comparison revealed that despite the challenges inherent in analysis of airborne PFAS and the low concentrations, all methods applied in this study obtained similar results. However, application of isotope-labelled IS early in the analytical procedure leads to more precise results and is therefore recommended.

  14. Surface-wave tomography of Ireland and surroundings using ambient noise and teleseismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadio, Raffaele; Arroucau, Pierre; Lebedev, Sergei; Meier, Thomas; Schaeffer, Andrew; Licciardi, Andrea; Piana Agostinetti, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Ireland's geology is dominated by northeast-southwest structural trends and suture zones, mostly inferred from geological mapping and a few active source seismic experiments. However, their geometry and extent at depth and their continuity across the Irish Sea are still poorly known. Important questions also remain unanswered regarding the thickness and bulk properties of the sedimentary cover at the regional scale, the deformation and flow of the deep crust during the formation of Ireland, the thickness of Ireland's lithosphere today, and the thermal structure and dynamics of the asthenosphere beneath Ireland. In this work, we take advantage of abundant, newly available broadband data from temporary array deployments and permanent seismic networks in Ireland and Great Britain to produce high-resolution models of seismic velocity structure and anisotropy of the lithosphere. We combine Rayleigh and Love phase velocity measurements from waveform cross-correlation using both ambient noise and teleseismic data in order to produce high-quality dispersion curves for periods ranging from 1 to 300 s. The phase velocity measurement procedures are adapted from Meier et al.[2], Lebedev et al.[1] and Soomro et al.[3] and are automated in order to deal with the large amount of data and ensure consistency and reproducibility. For the nearly 200 stations used in this study, we obtain a very large number of dispersion curves from both ambient noise and teleseimic data. Dispersion measurements are then inverted in a tomographic procedure for surface-wave phase velocity maps in a very broad period range. The maps constrain the 3D seismic-velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle underlying Ireland and the Irish Sea. {9} Lebedev, S., T. Meier, R. D. van der Hilst. Asthenospheric flow and origin of volcanism in the Baikal Rift area, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 249, 415-424, 2006. Meier, T., K. Dietrich, B. Stockhert, H.P. Harjes, One-dimensional models of shear wave velocity for

  15. Could brown bears (Ursus arctos) have survived in Ireland during the Last Glacial Maximum?

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Saoirse A.; Risley, Claire L.; Turvey, Samuel T.

    2013-01-01

    Brown bears are recorded from Ireland during both the Late Pleistocene and early–mid Holocene. Although most of the Irish landmass was covered by an ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), Irish brown bears are known to have hybridized with polar bears during the Late Pleistocene, and it is suggested that the Irish brown bear population did not become extinct but instead persisted in situ through the LGM in a southwestern ice-free refugium. We use historical population modelling to demonstrate that brown bears are highly unlikely to have survived through the LGM in Ireland under any combination of life-history parameters shown by living bear populations, but instead would have rapidly become extinct following advance of the British–Irish ice sheet, and probably recolonized Ireland during the end-Pleistocene Woodgrange Interstadial from a closely related nearby source population. The time available for brown bear–polar bear hybridization was therefore restricted to narrow periods at the beginning or end of the LGM. Brown bears would have been extremely vulnerable to extinction in Quaternary habitat refugia and required areas substantially larger than southwestern Ireland to survive adverse glacial conditions. PMID:23676655

  16. Could brown bears (Ursus arctos) have survived in Ireland during the Last Glacial Maximum?

    PubMed

    Leonard, Saoirse A; Risley, Claire L; Turvey, Samuel T

    2013-08-23

    Brown bears are recorded from Ireland during both the Late Pleistocene and early-mid Holocene. Although most of the Irish landmass was covered by an ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), Irish brown bears are known to have hybridized with polar bears during the Late Pleistocene, and it is suggested that the Irish brown bear population did not become extinct but instead persisted in situ through the LGM in a southwestern ice-free refugium. We use historical population modelling to demonstrate that brown bears are highly unlikely to have survived through the LGM in Ireland under any combination of life-history parameters shown by living bear populations, but instead would have rapidly become extinct following advance of the British-Irish ice sheet, and probably recolonized Ireland during the end-Pleistocene Woodgrange Interstadial from a closely related nearby source population. The time available for brown bear-polar bear hybridization was therefore restricted to narrow periods at the beginning or end of the LGM. Brown bears would have been extremely vulnerable to extinction in Quaternary habitat refugia and required areas substantially larger than southwestern Ireland to survive adverse glacial conditions.

  17. Establishment of a national database to link epidemiological and molecular data from norovirus outbreaks in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S; Foley, B; Dunford, L; Coughlan, S; Tuite, G; Duffy, M; Mitchell, S; Smyth, B; O'Neill, H; McKeown, P; Hall, W; Lynch, M

    2008-11-01

    A prospective study of norovirus outbreaks in Ireland was carried out over a 1-year period from 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2005. Epidemiological and molecular data on norovirus outbreaks in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and Northern Ireland (NI) were collected and combined in real time in a common database. Most reported outbreaks occurred in hospitals and residential institutions and person-to-person spread was the predominant mode of transmission. The predominant circulating norovirus strain was the GII.4-2004 strain with a small number of outbreaks due to GII.2. This study represents the first time that enhanced epidemiological and virological data on norovirus outbreaks in Ireland have been described. The link established between the epidemiological and virological institutions during the course of this study has been continued and the data is being used as a source of data for the Foodborne Viruses in Europe Network (DIVINE-NET).

  18. Media Technologies and Language Learning. Proceedings of an IRAAL Seminar (Dublin, Ireland, November 25, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, David, Ed.; O Meadhra, Bebhinn, Ed.

    A seminar sponsored by the Irish Association for Applied Linguistics on the role of media and media technologies in second and foreign language learning is reported. The organization of this report reflects the program of the seminar. Four plenary papers established some broad applied linguistic perspectives and presented an overview of recent…

  19. The Economic Impact of Higher Education Institutions in Ireland: Evidence from Disaggregated Input-Output Tables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Qiantao; Larkin, Charles; Lucey, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    While there has been a long history of modelling the economic impact of higher education institutions (HEIs), little research has been undertaken in the context of Ireland. This paper provides, for the first time, a disaggregated input-output table for Ireland's higher education sector. The picture painted overall is a higher education sector that…

  20. Colonization of Ireland: revisiting ‘the pygmy shrew syndrome' using mitochondrial, Y chromosomal and microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, A D; Vega, R; Rambau, R V; Yannic, G; Herman, J S; Hayden, T J; Searle, J B

    2011-01-01

    There is great uncertainty about how Ireland attained its current fauna and flora. Long-distance human-mediated colonization from southwestern Europe has been seen as a possible way that Ireland obtained many of its species; however, Britain has (surprisingly) been neglected as a source area for Ireland. The pygmy shrew has long been considered an illustrative model species, such that the uncertainty of the Irish colonization process has been dubbed ‘the pygmy shrew syndrome'. Here, we used new genetic data consisting of 218 cytochrome (cyt) b sequences, 153 control region sequences, 17 Y-intron sequences and 335 microsatellite multilocus genotypes to distinguish between four possible hypotheses for the colonization of the British Isles, formulated in the context of previously published data. Cyt b sequences from western Europe were basal to those found in Ireland, but also to those found in the periphery of Britain and several offshore islands. Although the central cyt b haplotype in Ireland was found in northern Spain, we argue that it most likely occurred in Britain also, from where the pygmy shrew colonized Ireland as a human introduction during the Holocene. Y-intron and microsatellite data are consistent with this hypothesis, and the biological traits and distributional data of pygmy shrews argue against long-distance colonization from Spain. The compact starburst of the Irish cyt b expansion and the low genetic diversity across all markers strongly suggests a recent colonization. This detailed molecular study of the pygmy shrew provides a new perspective on an old colonization question. PMID:21673740

  1. Detecting internet search activity for mouth cancer in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Murray, G; O'Rourke, C; Hogan, J; Fenton, J E

    2016-02-01

    Mouth Cancer Awareness Day in Ireland was launched in September 2010 by survivors of the disease to promote public awareness of suspicious signs of oral cancer and to provide free dental examinations. To find out whether its introduction had increased public interest in the disease, we used Google Trends to find out how often users in Ireland had searched for "oral cancer" and "mouth cancer" across all Google domains between January 2005 and December 2013. The number of internet searches for these cancers has increased significantly (p <0.001) and has peaked each September since the awareness day was launched in 2010. More people searched for "mouth cancer" than for "oral cancer". These findings may have valuable clinical implications, as an increase in public awareness of mouth cancer could result in earlier presentation and better prognosis. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Local food activity in the Republic of Ireland and Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Ricketts Hein, Jane; Watts, David

    2010-01-01

    Recent changes in local food supply systems have attracted substantial research interest, but little consideration has been paid to exactly where they occur. This article combines data from three studies to compare local food system development in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland using a single index of food relocalisation, thereby exploring the usefulness of the Index across different social and political contexts. Four diagnostic indicators suggest that local food systems in the south west of Ireland and Britain are particularly well developed. The Index itself is a useful tool for making international comparisons, being easy to replicate and allowing the integration of different data sets. Perhaps its greatest utility is that it opens up new avenues for further research.

  3. Reviving a Community, Modernizing an Industry: Ireland's Furniture College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Technology Strategies, Inc., Carrboro, NC.

    Connemara, a rural region in Ireland, is characterized by high unemployment, high emigration, poor infrastructure, inadequate public services, and a low rate of transfer to third-level education. To address the situation, the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology (GMIT), joined forces with Connemara West (a community-owned development organization…

  4. Academic Regulation of EFL in Ireland: Developments since 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruane, Mary

    1995-01-01

    Changes in educational policy concerning the teaching of English as a foreign language (EFL) in Ireland, and events surrounding those changes, are chronicled. The evolution of public agencies and private organizations, including teacher associations, and their roles in effecting change are described. Pressures leading to the formal announcement in…

  5. Bereavement Counselling in Uganda and Northern Ireland: A Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Lorna; Owen-Pugh, Valerie

    2018-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions for bereavement in Northern Ireland and in the Sub-Saharan African country of Uganda are compared. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with Ugandan (n = 18) and Northern Irish (n = 20) therapists. These were thematically analysed. The findings focused on: the counselling context, the characteristics of counsellors,…

  6. A qualitative study investigating the barriers to returning to work for breastfeeding mothers in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Deirdre; Meaney, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that mothers exclusively breastfeed for the first 6 months of an infant's life. In Ireland, currently paid maternity leave is 26 weeks and the expectant mother is required by law to finish work 2 weeks before her expected delivery date. Mothers wishing to exclusively breastfeed for 6 months or longer find themselves having to take holiday leave or unpaid leave from work in order to meet the WHO's guidelines. The aim of this study is to explore women's experiences of breastfeeding after their return to work in Ireland. This study was carried out utilizing a qualitative design. Initially 25 women who returned to the workforce while continuing to breastfeed were contacted, 16 women returned consent forms and were subsequently contacted to take part in an interview. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was employed to establish recurring patterns and themes throughout the interviews. Women noted that cultural attitudes in Ireland coupled with inadequate or inconsistent advice from health professionals posed the biggest challenge they had to overcome in order to achieve to 6 months exclusive breastfeeding. The findings of this study illustrate that mothers with the desire to continue to breastfeed after their return to work did so with some difficulty. Many did not disclose to their employers that they were breastfeeding and did not make enquiries about being facilitated to continue to breastfeed after their return to the workplace. The perceived lack of support from their employers as well as embarrassment about their breastfeeding status meant many women concealed that they were breastfeeding after their return to the workplace. While it has been suggested that WHO guidelines for exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months may be unattainable for many women due to work commitments, a different problem exists in Ireland. Mothers struggle to overcome cultural and societal obstacles coupled

  7. Establishment of a national database to link epidemiological and molecular data from norovirus outbreaks in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    KELLY, S.; FOLEY, B.; DUNFORD, L.; COUGHLAN, S.; TUITE, G.; DUFFY, M.; MITCHELL, S.; SMYTH, B.; O'NEILL, H.; McKEOWN, P.; HALL, W.; LYNCH, M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A prospective study of norovirus outbreaks in Ireland was carried out over a 1-year period from 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2005. Epidemiological and molecular data on norovirus outbreaks in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) and Northern Ireland (NI) were collected and combined in real time in a common database. Most reported outbreaks occurred in hospitals and residential institutions and person-to-person spread was the predominant mode of transmission. The predominant circulating norovirus strain was the GII.4-2004 strain with a small number of outbreaks due to GII.2. This study represents the first time that enhanced epidemiological and virological data on norovirus outbreaks in Ireland have been described. The link established between the epidemiological and virological institutions during the course of this study has been continued and the data is being used as a source of data for the Foodborne Viruses in Europe Network (DIVINE-NET). PMID:18252027

  8. Arsenic contamination of drinking water in Ireland: A spatial analysis of occurrence and potential risk.

    PubMed

    McGrory, Ellen R; Brown, Colin; Bargary, Norma; Williams, Natalya Hunter; Mannix, Anthony; Zhang, Chaosheng; Henry, Tiernan; Daly, Eve; Nicholas, Sarah; Petrunic, Barbara M; Lee, Monica; Morrison, Liam

    2017-02-01

    The presence of arsenic in groundwater has become a global concern due to the health risks from drinking water with elevated concentrations. The Water Framework Directive (WFD) of the European Union calls for drinking water risk assessment for member states. The present study amalgamates readily available national and sub-national scale datasets on arsenic in groundwater in the Republic of Ireland. However, due to the presence of high levels of left censoring (i.e. arsenic values below an analytical detection limit) and changes in detection limits over time, the application of conventional statistical methods would inhibit the generation of meaningful results. In order to handle these issues several arsenic databases were integrated and the data modelled using statistical methods appropriate for non-detect data. In addition, geostatistical methods were used to assess principal risk components of elevated arsenic related to lithology, aquifer type and groundwater vulnerability. Geographic statistical methods were used to overcome some of the geographical limitations of the Irish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sample database. Nearest-neighbour inverse distance weighting (IDW) and local indicator of spatial association (LISA) methods were used to estimate risk in non-sampled areas. Significant differences were also noted between different aquifer lithologies, indicating that Rhyolite, Sandstone and Shale (Greywackes), and Impure Limestone potentially presented a greater risk of elevated arsenic in groundwaters. Significant differences also occurred among aquifer types with poorly productive aquifers, locally important fractured bedrock aquifers and regionally important fissured bedrock aquifers presenting the highest potential risk of elevated arsenic. No significant differences were detected among different groundwater vulnerability groups as defined by the Geological Survey of Ireland. This research will assist management and future policy directions of

  9. Paediatric renal transplantation in Northern Ireland (1984-1998).

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, C.; Savage, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last 20 years a comprehensive paediatric nephrology service has been developed in Northern Ireland, based in the academic medical unit at the Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children (RBHSC). In the 15 years 1984-1998 a total of 77 renal transplants have taken place in patients aged 18 years and under. Initially transplants were only considered in children over five years of age but in the past eight years children as young as two years have successfully received kidneys. Aggressive nutritional support combined with peritoneal dialysis has enabled survival to a size when transplantation is feasible. The 5 year graft survival was 64%, with two children dying following transplantation. The complexity of managing this age group is reflected by the fact that a total of 10 transplants (13%) failed in the first 30 days. These figures compare favourably with statistics reported by similar paediatric centres from across the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, and with local results in adult patients. This demonstrates that a successful end stage renal replacement programme for children is achievable in a relatively small population, which is geographically isolated. PMID:11196737

  10. Treatment strategies and survival of older breast cancer patients - an international comparison between the Netherlands and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Kiderlen, Mandy; Walsh, Paul M; Bastiaannet, Esther; Kelly, Maria B; Audisio, Riccardo A; Boelens, Petra G; Brown, Chris; Dekkers, Olaf M; de Craen, Anton J M; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Forty percent of breast cancers occur among older patients. Unfortunately, there is a lack of evidence for treatment guidelines for older breast cancer patients. The aim of this study is to compare treatment strategy and relative survival for operable breast cancer in the elderly between The Netherlands and Ireland. From the Dutch and Irish national cancer registries, women aged ≥65 years with non-metastatic breast cancer were included (2001-2009). Proportions of patients receiving guideline-adherent locoregional treatment, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy were calculated and compared between the countries by stage. Secondly, 5-year relative survival was calculated by stage and compared between countries. Overall, 41,055 patients from The Netherlands and 5,826 patients from Ireland were included. Overall, more patients received guideline-adherent locoregional treatment in The Netherlands, overall (80% vs. 68%, adjusted p<0.001), stage I (83% vs. 65%, p<0.001), stage II (80% vs. 74%, p<0.001) and stage III (74% vs. 57%, P<0.001) disease. On the other hand, more systemic treatment was provided in Ireland, where endocrine therapy was prescribed to 92% of hormone receptor-positive patients, compared to 59% in The Netherlands. In The Netherlands, only 6% received chemotherapy, as compared 24% in Ireland. But relative survival was poorer in Ireland (5 years relative survival 89% vs. 83%), especially in stage II (87% vs. 85%) and stage III (61% vs. 58%) patients. Treatment for older breast cancer patients differed significantly on all treatment modalities between The Netherlands and Ireland. More locoregional treatment was provided in The Netherlands, and more systemic therapy was provided in Ireland. Relative survival for Irish patients was worse than for their Dutch counterparts. This finding should be a strong recommendation to study breast cancer treatment and survival internationally, with the ultimate goal to equalize the survival rates for breast cancer

  11. Digital Libraries and the Problem of Purpose [and] On DigiPaper and the Dissemination of Electronic Documents [and] DFAS: The Distributed Finding Aid Search System [and] Best Practices for Digital Archiving: An Information Life Cycle Approach [and] Mapping and Converting Essential Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Metadata into MARC21 and Dublin Core: Towards an Alternative to the FGDC Clearinghouse [and] Evaluating Website Modifications at the National Library of Medicine through Search Log analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, David M.; Huttenlocher, Dan; Moll, Angela; Smith, MacKenzie; Hodge, Gail M.; Chandler, Adam; Foley, Dan; Hafez, Alaaeldin M.; Redalen, Aaron; Miller, Naomi

    2000-01-01

    Includes six articles focusing on the purpose of digital public libraries; encoding electronic documents through compression techniques; a distributed finding aid server; digital archiving practices in the framework of information life cycle management; converting metadata into MARC format and Dublin Core formats; and evaluating Web sites through…

  12. Exclusion in Schools in Northern Ireland: The Pupils' Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipe, Damian; Reynolds, Margaret; Milner, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Education in Northern Ireland has been reviewing the procedures for suspending and expelling pupils from school. This article reports the views of a random sample of 114 children (11-16 years) towards the proposed changes. Pupils' thoughts on: dealing with misbehaviour; setting rules; the decision-making process; appropriate…

  13. Institutional Collaborations in Ireland: Leveraging an Increased International Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights how shifts in policy within Ireland toward increased global rankings and quality of educational programs and a heightened interest in research have been operationalized on the ground. The Higher Education Authority initiated a Programme for Research in Third-Level Institutions (PRTLI) to provide seed money for research…

  14. Cold spring prolongs Nematodirus infective period in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    2013-08-10

    Nematodirosis in lambs Jejunal haemorrhagic syndrome in a heifer Epitheliogenesis imperfecta in a bovine fetus Plant poisoning in cattle and sheep Abomasal emptying defect in a ewe Cholangiocellular carcinoma in a duck These are among matters discussed in the Northern Ireland animal disease surveillance quarterly report for April to June 2013.

  15. Dental caries and enamel fluorosis among the fluoridated population in the Republic of Ireland and non fluoridated population in Northern Ireland in 2002.

    PubMed

    Whelton, H; Crowley, E; O'Mullane, D; Donaldson, M; Cronin, M; Kelleher, V

    2006-03-01

    An all Ireland/North South survey of Oral Health was carried out in 2001/2002. To compare levels of dental caries and enamel fluorosis among children and adolescents in the fluoridated Republic of Ireland (RoI) with those in the non fluoridated North of Ireland (NI). Cross sectional oral health survey of a representative, random, stratified sample of 5-, 8-, 12- and 15-year-olds in Rol and in NI (N = 19,950). WHO examination criteria with the addition of visible, non cavitated dentine caries were used for recording caries. Fluorosis was measured using Dean's Index. In the RoI, the mean d(3c)mft / D(3c)MFT for 5-, 8-, 12-, and 15-year-olds with full domestic water fluoridation (n = 9,975), was 1.0, 0.3, 1.1 and 2.1 respectively. The corresponding means in non fluoridated NI (n = 1,475) were 1.8, 0.3, 1.5 and 3.6 respectively. (p < 0.0001, NS, p < 0.0005 and p < 0.0001). The prevalence of enamel fluorosis has increased in RoI since 1984, 23% and 36% of 8- and 15-year olds respectively in fluoridated areas had Dean's Index scores at the questionable or greater level in 2002 compared with 6% and 5% respectively in 1984. In 2002 apart from 8-year-olds, caries levels were lower amongst children resident in fluoridated communities in RoI than amongst corresponding age groups in non-fluoridated NI. Caries has declined in fluoridated and non fluoridated groups in both jurisdictions since the early 1960s. In RoI fluorosis levels were higher amongst lifetime residents of fluoridated communities and have increased since 1984.

  16. Bilateral comparison of 10 V standards between the NSAI-NML (Ireland) and the BIPM, February to March 2012 (part of the ongoing BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, O.; Solve, S.; Chayramy, R.; Stock, M.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the on-going BIPM key comparison BIPM.EM-K11.b, a comparison of the 10 V voltage reference standards of the BIPM and the National Standards Authority of Ireland-National Metrology Laboratory (NSAI-NML), Dublin, Ireland, was carried out from February to March 2012. Two BIPM Zener diode-based travelling standards (Fluke 732B), BIPM_C (ZC) and BIPM_D (ZD), were transported by freight to NSAI-NML. At NSAI-NML, the reference standard for DC voltage at the 10 V level consists of a group of characterized Zener diode-based electronic voltage standards. The output EMF (electromotive force) of each travelling standard was measured by direct comparison with the group standard. At the BIPM the travelling standards were calibrated, before and after the measurements at NSAI-NML, with the Josephson voltage standard. Results of all measurements were corrected for the dependence of the output voltages on internal temperature and ambient atmospheric pressure. The final result of the comparison is presented as the difference between the value assigned to DC voltage standard by NSAI-NML, at the level of 10 V, at NSAI-NML, UNML, and that assigned by the BIPM, at the BIPM, UBIPM, at the reference date of 23 February 2012. UNML - UBIPM = +0.83 µV, uc = 1.35 µV, at 10 V where uc is the combined standard uncertainty associated with the measured difference, including the uncertainty of the representation of the volt at the BIPM and at NSAI-NML, based on KJ-90, and the uncertainty related to the comparison. The final result is impacted by the anomalous offset between the NSAI-NML results for the two transfer standards. The reason for this offset hasn't been determined. However, the difference remains within the total combined standard uncertainty. Therefore, the comparison result shows that the voltage standards maintained by NSAI-NML and the BIPM were equivalent, within their stated expanded uncertainties, on the mean date of the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of

  17. The Determinants of Training in SMEs in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Renee S.; Harris, Richard I. D.

    2002-01-01

    This study looks at SME spending on training in Northern Ireland. We include a range of human resource management functions, as well as workforce characteristics, the external environment, size, and the impact of changes in ownership status as important determinants of training expenditure in SMEs. Particular attention is also paid to the…

  18. Too Much Freedom and Autonomy in the Enactment of Assessment? Assessment in Physical Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail, Ann; Murphy, Frances

    2017-01-01

    This paper sets out to outline current discussions in Ireland around teachers being responsible for assessing their own students' work, and the subsequent impact such a perspective is having (or not) on the delivery and assessment of physical education in Ireland. Our intention is to contribute to assessment considerations, while acknowledging the…

  19. Eskers in Ireland, analogs for sinuous ridges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicer, Xavier; Bourke, Mary

    2014-05-01

    Sinuous ridges on the surface of Mars are often inferred as putative esker ridges. Eskers cover several hundred kilometers of the Irish landscape and are one of the dominant landforms in the Irish Midlands. Well exposed stratigraphic sections and the body of existing knowledge due to extensive research carried out on these landforms make the Irish eskers an excellent analog for sinuous ridges on Mars. The Irish Eskers are sinuous ridges 0.1 - 80 km long, 20 - 500 m wide and 4 - 50 m high laid down by glacial meltwater in tunnels and crevasses in stationary or retreating ice sheets. They are commonly composed of sands and gravels with rounded boulders and cobbles. The gravels are usually bedded and the beds often slump towards the flank of the esker, indicating collapse as the confining ice walls melt. Four types of eskers have been identified in Ireland: (i) Continuous subglacial tunnel fill represents deposition within tunnels underneath or within an ice body originally used as water escape conduits; (ii) Continuous fluvial ice-channel fill deposit in channels cut into the ice on top of the glacier or down to the substrate subsequently infilled by sediments; (iii) Long beads - subglacial tunnel fill are segmented ridges, with a length-width ratio of 5:1 to 10:1, representing sequential deposition near or at the ice margin as the ice sheet retreats; (iv) Short beads are glaciolacustrine deposits interpreted as sequential deposition of ice-contact subaqueous outwash fans. Irish eskers have significant morphological similarities with those identified on Mars providing an opportunity for an insightful morphological and morphometric analysis to determine potential formative environments on Mars. Putative Martian eskers are 2-300 km long, 50-3000 m wide and 10-150 m high. The Irish eskers are similar in scale and present dimensions within these ranges. Eskers in Ireland are composed of sand and gravel with cobbles and boulders. Mars esker-like ridges observed in high

  20. The health of hospitals and lessons from history: public health and sanitary reform in the Dublin hospitals, 1858-1898.

    PubMed

    Fealy, Gerard M; McNamara, Martin S; Geraghty, Ruth

    2010-12-01

    The aim was to examine, critically, 19th century hospital sanitary reform with reference to theories about infection and contagion. In the nineteenth century, measures to control epidemic diseases focused on providing clean water, removing waste and isolating infected cases. These measures were informed by the ideas of sanitary reformers like Chadwick and Nightingale, and hospitals were an important element of sanitary reform. Informed by the paradigmatic tradition of social history, the study design was a historical analysis of public health policy. Using the methods of historical research, documentary primary sources, including official reports and selected hospital archives and related secondary sources, were consulted. Emerging theories about infection were informing official bodies like the Board of Superintendence of Dublin Hospitals in their efforts to improve hospital sanitation. The Board secured important reforms in hospital sanitation, including the provision of technically efficient sanitary infrastructure. Public health measures to control epidemic infections are only as effective as the state of knowledge of infection and contagion and the infrastructure to support sanitary measures. Today, public mistrust about the safety of hospitals is reminiscent of that of 150 years ago, although the reasons are different and relate to a fear of contracting antimicrobial-resistant infections. A powerful historical lesson from this study is that resistance to new ideas can delay progress and improved sanitary standards can allay public mistrust. In reforming hospital sanitation, policies and regulations were established--including an inspection body to monitor and enforce standards--the benefits of which provide lessons that resonate today. Such practices, especially effective independent inspection, could be adapted for present-day contexts and re-instigated where they do not exist. History has much to offer contemporary policy development and practice reform and

  1. Adult Education and Community Development in the West of Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Cinneide, Micheal S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes adult educational program by University College Galway in rural West Ireland, following significant out-migration of young people. Aim is to encourage development initiatives, community participation, and self help. Program includes lectures, seminars, and class projects. Program's successes noted. (Author/TES)

  2. A review of African horse sickness and its implications for Ireland.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Geoffrey M; Jess, Stephen; Murchie, Archie K

    2012-07-05

    African horse sickness is an economically highly important non-contagious but infectious Orbivirus disease that is transmitted by various species of Culicoides midges. The equids most severely affected by the virus are horses, ponies, and European donkeys; mules are somewhat less susceptible, and African donkeys and zebra are refractory to the devastating consequences of infection. In recent years, Bluetongue virus, an Orbivirus similar to African horse sickness, which also utilises Culicoides spp. as its vector, has drastically increased its range into previously unaffected regions in northern Europe, utilising indigenous vector species, and causing widespread economic damage to the agricultural sector. Considering these events, the current review outlines the history of African horse sickness, including information concerning virus structure, transmission, viraemia, overwintering ability, and the potential implications that an outbreak would have for Ireland. While the current risk for the introduction of African horse sickness to Ireland is considered at worst 'very low', it is important to note that prior to the 2006 outbreak of Bluetongue in northern Europe, both diseases were considered to be of equal risk to the United Kingdom ('medium-risk'). It is therefore likely that any outbreak of this disease would have serious socio-economic consequences for Ireland due to the high density of vulnerable equids and the prevalence of Culicoides species, potentially capable of vectoring the virus.

  3. The FEBS Journal in 2018 - putting a bit of color in your life, and your figures.

    PubMed

    Martin, Seamus J

    2018-01-01

    Seamus Martin holds the Smurfit Chair of Medical Genetics at the Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. He works on all aspects of cell death control and is especially interested in the links between cell death, cell stress and inflammation. He received the GlaxoSmithKline Award of The Biochemical Society (2006) and The RDS-Irish Times Boyle Medal (2015) for his work on the role of caspases in apoptosis and was elected to the Royal Irish Academy in 2006 and EMBO in 2009. He is the Editor-in-Chief of The FEBS Journal since 2014. © 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Drug smuggling using clothing impregnated with cocaine.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Seán D; Power, John D

    2005-11-01

    A case study is presented where a woman travelling from South America to the Republic of Ireland was detained at Dublin Airport and articles of clothing she had in her luggage were found to be impregnated with cocaine. The study shows that the amount of powder recovered from the garments was approximately 14% of the total weight of the garments. The cocaine was in the form of cocaine hydrochloride and the purity was approximately 80%. An examination of the garments under filtered light highlighted the areas exposed to cocaine and indicated that the method of impregnation was by pouring liquid containing cocaine onto the clothing.

  5. Public awareness, behaviours and attitudes towards domestic wastewater treatment systems in the Republic of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, O.; Hynds, P. D.

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted and quantified the role of domestic wastewater treatment systems (DWWTSs) as significant sources of human-specific aquatic contaminants in both developed and developing regions, particularly with respect to private and municipal groundwater supplies. However, from a socio-hydrological perspective, little work has focused on these systems and the potential environmental and human burden posed. This is of particular relevance in the Republic of Ireland, where approximately one third of the population is serviced by DWWTSs. The objective of the current study was to examine levels of awareness and subsequent behavioural tendencies among owners and users of DWWTSs in the Republic of Ireland, particularly in light of recent and future (national and EU) legislative amendments. Structured questionnaires were completed bi-modally with 1106 Irish respondents. Analysis identified a number of significant knowledge gaps which currently exist among DWWTS users in Ireland. These were associated with environmentally inadvisable behavioural practises, potentially leading to increased contamination vulnerability and subsequently, increased human exposure to waterborne contaminants. Household water supply type was significantly associated with DWWTS threat acknowledgement (p = 0.014), with unregulated private groundwater users exhibited the lowest awareness of DWWTS as a potential source of aquatic contaminants despite being the group at greatest risk. A bi-modal clustering approach was employed, with respondents found to fall into one of three distinct “attitudinal” clusters. Future engagement strategies should strive to provide guidance regarding the role of people and their activities within the hydrological cycle. The current study reinforces this conclusion, while providing evidence-based recommendations regarding provision of demographically focused educational strategies; these will further increase environmental policy compliance, and in

  6. PFGE analysis of Listeria monocytogenes isolates of clinical, animal, food and environmental origin from Ireland.

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward M; deLappe, Niall; Garvey, Patricia; McKeown, Paul; Cormican, Martin; Leonard, Nola; Jordan, Kieran

    2012-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne human pathogen. Human infection is associated with high mortality rates. Epidemiological investigation and molecular subtyping can be useful in linking human illness with specific sources of infection. This retrospective study describes the use of PFGE to examine relationships of 222 isolates from human and non-human sources in Ireland. Human clinical isolates from other countries were also examined. Eight small clusters of human and non-human isolates (mostly serotype 4b) that were indistinguishable from one another were detected, suggesting potential sources for human infection. For non-human isolates, some PFGE types appeared to be exclusively associated with a single source, whereas other PFGE-types appeared to be more widely disseminated. Indistinguishable, or highly related clusters of isolates of Irish and non-Irish origin suggest that some PFGE patterns may be globally distributed.

  7. Matrimonial and Family Proceedings (Northern Ireland) Order, 1989 (S.I. No. 677 of 1989 [N.I. 4]).

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    This Northern Ireland Order 1) replaces the present restriction on the presentation of a petition for divorce within 3 years of marriage without the leave of the court with an absolute bar on the presentation of a petition within 2 years of marriage; 2) provides for the extension of the 3-year period within which certain petitions for a decree of nullity must be presented in cases where the petitioner suffers from mental disorder; 3) amends the Matrimonial Causes (Northern Ireland) Order 1978 (N.I. 15) and the Domestic Proceedings (Northern Ireland) Order 1980 (N.I. 5) in relation to the powers of courts to provide for financial relief in matrimonial and certain other family proceedings; 4) confers new powers on the High Court to grant financial relief to a party to a marriage following a divorce, annulment, or legal separation granted in an overseas country which is recognized as valid in Northern Ireland; 5) makes fresh provision as to the powers of courts to make declarations relating to the status of a person; 6) abolishes the right to petition for jactitation of marriage; and 7) reenacts with amendments Sched. 2 to the Rent (Northern Ireland) Order 1978 (N.I. 20).

  8. Epidemiology of chronic hepatitis B virus in Ireland using routinely collected surveillance and administrative data, 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    van Gemert, Caroline E; Murphy, Niamh; Mitchell, Tara A; Hellard, Margaret E; Thornton, Thornton

    2017-12-09

    Ireland has a low prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection; however, there are limited recently published epidemiological data. This study aimed to describe the epidemiology of chronic HBV in Ireland between 2004 and 2014 using routine surveillance data and identify and interrogate additional data sources in Ireland to complement the interpretation of HBV surveillance data. Routinely collected passive surveillance data of notified cases of HBV infection were collated for 2004-2014. Additional data sources relating to primary liver cancer and cirrhosis were collated, including hospital discharge data (2005-2013), diagnoses of primary liver cancer (2004-2013), and deaths (2007-2014). Publicly available immigration (2004-2014) data were also collated. Between 2004 and 2014, a total of 7463 notifications of HBV were made in Ireland; the majority (91%) were classified as chronic cases. Notifications peaked in 2008 and decreased until 2013. Hospital discharges, new cancer registrations, and deaths from primary liver cancer and hospital discharges from cirrhosis have increased each year. The epidemiology of HBV in Ireland mirrors immigration patterns. Without a coordinated screening and care programme for priority populations, particularly for immigrants from high prevalence countries, it is likely that hospitalisations and deaths from HBV-attributable cirrhosis and primary liver cancer will continue to rise, with considerable associated public health expense.

  9. Reducing SCADA System Nuisance Alarms in the Water Industry in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Nigel; Phillips, Debra H; Nicell, Ciaran

    2015-08-01

    The advancement of telemetry control for the water industry has increased the difficulty of managing large volumes of nuisance alarms (i.e., alarms that do not require a response). The aim of this study was to identify and reduce the number of nuisance alarms that occur for Northern Ireland (NI) Water by carrying out alarm duration analysis to determine the appropriate length of persistence (an advanced alarm management tool) that could be applied. All data were extracted from TelemWeb (NI Water's telemetry monitoring system) and analyzed in Excel. Over a 6-week period, an average of 40 000 alarms occurred per week. The alarm duration analysis, which has never been implemented before by NI Water, found that an average of 57% of NI Water alarms had a duration of <5 minutes. Applying 5-minute persistence, therefore, could prevent an average 26 816 nuisance alarms per week. Most of these alarms were from wastewater assets.

  10. An assessment of the performance and quality control procedures of PACS workstation monitors used in Irish radiology departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Cherrie; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mc Entee, Mark F.

    2005-04-01

    Diagnostic efficacy in soft-copy reporting relies heavily on the quality of workstation monitors and an investigation performed in 2002 demonstrated that CRT monitors in Dublin imaging departments were not operating at optimal levels. The current work examines the performance of CRTs being used in Dublin and other parts of Ireland to establish if problems reported in the earlier work have been rectified. All hospitals performing soft-copy reporting for general radiology using CRTs were included in the work. Examination of ambient lighting, calibration of monitors and analysis of CRT performance using the SMPTE test pattern and a selection of the AAPM test images was performed. Maximum luminance, spatial uniformity of luminance, temporal luminance stability, gamma, geometry, sharpness, veiling glare and spatial resolution of each monitor was evaluated. Ambient lighting in all reporting areas was within recommended levels. All the monitors were calibrated appropriately and were performing at acceptable levels for maximum luminance and temporal stability and only one of the thirty-three investigated failed to reach the standard for spatial uniformity. In contrast a number of the CRTs investigated showed poor adherence to acceptable levels for geometrical distortions, veiling glare and spatial resolution all of which are important influencers of image quality. Gamma values also appeared to be low for a number of monitors but this interpretation is provisional and subject to the establishment of ratified guideline values. The results demonstrate that although some improvement on the previous situation is evident, greater adherence to acceptable levels is required for certain parameters.

  11. Counselors Abroad: Outcomes of an International Counseling Institute in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guth, Lorraine J.; McAuliffe, Garrett; Michalak, Megan

    2014-01-01

    As the counseling profession continues to build an international community, the need to examine cultural competence training also increases. This quantitative study examined the impact of the Diversity and Counseling Institute in Ireland (DCII) on participants' multicultural counseling competencies. Two instruments were utilized to examine…

  12. Primary Education in Ireland, 1897-1990. Rethinking Education. Volume 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This book critically examines the context, origins, development and implementation of successive primary school curricula in Ireland between 1897 and 1990. It focuses on three particular policy changes during the period: the "Revised Programme of Instruction" introduced in 1900, the curricular provisions implemented following the…

  13. Blooming Seas West of Ireland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    For several weeks in May and early June, daily satellite images of the North Atlantic Ocean west of Ireland have captured partial glimpses of luxuriant blooms of microscopic marine plants between patches of clouds. On June 4, 2007, the skies over the ocean cleared, displaying the sea's spring bloom in brilliant color. A bright blue bloom stretches north from the Mouth of the River Shannon and tapers off like a plume of blue smoke north of Clare Island. (In the large image, a second bloom is visible to the north, wrapping around County Donegal, on the island's northwestern tip.) The image was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite. Cold, nutrient-stocked water often wells up to the surface from the deeper ocean along coastal shelves and at the edges of ocean currents. When it does, it delivers a boost of nutrients that fuel large blooms of single-celled plants collectively known as phytoplankton. The plants are the foundation of the marine food web, and their proliferation in this area of the North Atlantic explains why the waters of western Ireland support myriad fisheries and populations of large mammals like seals, whales, and dolphins. Like plants on land, phytoplankton make their food through photosynthesis, harnessing sunlight for energy using chlorophyll and other light-capturing pigments. The pigments change the way light reflects off the surface water, appearing as colorful swirls of turquoise and green against the darker blue of the ocean. Though individually tiny, collectively these plants play a big role in Earth's carbon and climate cycles; worldwide, they remove about as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis as land plants do. Satellites are the only way to map the occurrence of phytoplankton blooms across the global oceans on a regular basis. That kind of information is important not only to scientists who model carbon and climate, but also to biologists and fisheries

  14. The Career Paths of Primary School Principals in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ummanel, Azize; McNamara, Gerry; Stynes, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The key purpose of this paper is to offer an exploration of the career paths of a number of Irish school principals. The information presented is part of a comparative study in the area, involving three island states: Cyprus, Malta and Ireland. The study provides an insight into how individuals become principals and how they perceive themselves in…

  15. Sex Education in Northern Ireland Schools: A Critical Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolston, Bill; Schubotz, Dirk; Simpson, Audrey

    2005-01-01

    To date there has been little research on young people and sexuality in Northern Ireland. This paper draws on the first major study in this area to analyse the delivery of formal sex education in schools. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to access young people's opinions about the quality of the sex education they had received…

  16. Complex Contexts: Women and Community-Higher-Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Aideen; McAuliffe, Mary; Barry, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Education is not a neutral process, it can be used to establish and maintain conformity or be part of a process of liberation and social change (Freire, 1979; hooks, 1994). The Irish State's failure to acknowledge this lack of neutrality has characterised the formal education system in Ireland since its inception. From the introduction of the…

  17. INFOMAR - Ireland's National Seabed Mapping Programme: A Tool For Marine Spatial Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    INFOMAR is Ireland's national seabed mapping programme and is a key action in the national integrated marine plan, Harnessing Our Ocean Wealth. It comprises a multi-platform approach to delivering marine integrated mapping in 2 phases, over a projected 20 year timeline (2006-2026). The programme has three work strands; Data Acquisition, Data Exchange and Integration, and Value Added Exploitation. The Data Acquisition strand includes collection of hydrographic, oceanographic, geological, habitat and heritage datasets that will underpin future sustainable development and management of Ireland's marine resource. INFOMAR outputs are delivered through the Data Exchange and Integration strand. Uses of these outputs are wide ranging and multipurpose, from management plans for fisheries, aquaculture and coastal protection works, to environmental impact assessments, ocean renewable development and integrated coastal zone management. In order to address the evolution and diversification of maritime user requirements, the programme has realigned and developed outputs and new products, in part, through an innovative research funding initiative. Development is also fostered through the Value Added Exploitation strand. INFOMAR outputs and products serve to underpin delivery of Ireland's statutory obligations and enhance compliance with EU and national legislation. This is achieved through co-operation with the agencies responsible for supporting Ireland's international obligations and for the implementation of marine spatial planning. A strategic national seabed mapping programme such as INFOMAR, provides a critical baseline dataset which underpins development of the marine economy, and improves our understanding of the response of marine systems to pressures, and the effect of cumulative impacts. This paper will focus on the evolution and scope of INFOMAR, and look at examples of outputs being harnessed to serve approaches to the management of activities having an impact on the

  18. Digital Preservation and Deep Infrastructure; Dublin Core Metadata Initiative Progress Report and Workplan for 2002; Video Gaming, Education and Digital Learning Technologies: Relevance and Opportunities; Digital Collections of Real World Objects; The MusArt Music-Retrieval System: An Overview; eML: Taking Mississippi Libraries into the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Stewart; Dekkers, Makx; Weibel, Stuart L.; Kirriemuir, John; Lensch, Hendrik P. A.; Goesele, Michael; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Birmingham, William; Pardo, Bryan; Meek, Colin; Shifrin, Jonah; Goodvin, Renee; Lippy, Brooke

    2002-01-01

    One opinion piece and five articles in this issue discuss: digital preservation infrastructure; accomplishments and changes in the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative in 2001 and plans for 2002; video gaming and how it relates to digital libraries and learning technologies; overview of a music retrieval system; and the online version of the…

  19. My Space- a collaboration between Arts & Science to create a suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Niamh, , Dr.; McSweeney, Clair; Smith, Niall, , Dr.; O'Neill, Stephanie; Foley, Cathy; Crawley, Joanna; Phelan, Ronan; Colley, Dan; Henderson, Clare; Conroy, Lorraine

    2015-04-01

    A suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives, entitled 'MySpace' was created, to promote the importance of Earth science and Space exploration, to ignite curiosity and discover new and engaging platforms for science in the Arts & in STEM Education, and to increase awareness of careers in Ireland's Space and Earth Science industries. Site visits to research centres in Ireland & abroad, interviews with scientists, engineers, and former astronauts were conducted over a 6 month period. A suite of performance pieces emerged from this development phase, based on Dr. Shaw's personal documented journey and the dissemination of her research. These included: 1. 'To Space'- A live multimedia theatre performance aimed at the general public & young adult. Initially presented as a 'Work In Progress' event at The Festival of Curiosity, the full theatre show 'To Space' premiered at Science Gallery, Dublin as part of Tiger Dublin Fringe Arts Festival. Response to the piece was very strong, indicated by audience response, box office sales and theatre reviews in national press and online. A national and international tour is in place for 2015. To Space was performed a total of 10 times and was seen by 680 audiences. 2. An adapted piece for 13-17 year old students -'ToSpace for Secondary Schools'- to increase awareness of Ireland's involvement in Space Exploration & to encourage school leavers to dream big. This show toured nationally as part of World Space week and Science week events in conjunction with ESERO Ireland, CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory, Cork, Armagh Planetarium & Dunsink Observatory. It was performed 12 times and was seen by 570 students. 3. 'My Place in Space', created for families from the very old (60 +) to the very young (3yrs +), this highly interactive workshop highlighted the appeal of science through the wonders of our planet and its place in Space. Presented at Festival of Curiosity, the Mallow Science Fair and at Science week 2014, this

  20. Women's right to health and Ireland's abortion laws.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Maeve

    2015-07-01

    The provision of the Irish Constitution that guarantees "the unborn" a right to life equal to that of a pregnant woman has consequences for access to abortion and the care of women in pregnancy generally. Long-awaited legislation to give effect to the narrow constitutional right to abortion was enacted into law in 2013. In 2014, a guidance document for health professionals' implementation of the legislation was published. However, the legislation and guidance document fall far short of international human rights bodies' recommendations: they fail to deliver effective procedural rights to all of the women eligible for lawful abortion within the state and create new legal barriers to women's reproductive rights. At the same time, cases continue to highlight that the Irish Constitution imposes an unethical and rights-violating legal regime in non-abortion-related contexts. Recent developments suggest that both the failure to put guidelines in place and the development of guidelines that are not centered on women or based on rights further reduce women's access to rights and set unacceptable limitations on women's reproductive autonomy. Nevertheless, public and parliamentary scrutiny of cases involving Ireland's abortion laws is increasingly focusing on the need for reform. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.