Science.gov

Sample records for analysis e-food exchange

  1. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of

  2. Testing and analysis of immersed heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

    1986-08-01

    The objectives were to determine the performance of four immersed, ''supply-side'' heat exchangers used in solar domestic-hot-water systems; to examine the effects of flow rate, temperature difference, and coil configuration on performance; and to develop a simple model to predict the performance of immersed heat exchangers. We tested four immersed heat exchangers: a smooth coil, a finned spiral, a single-wall bayonet, and a double-wall bayonet. We developed two analyticl models and a simple finite difference model. We experimentally verified that the performance of these heat exchangers depends on the flow rate through them; we also showed that the temperature difference between the heat exchanger's inlet and the storage tank can strongly affect a heat exchanger's performance. We also compared the effects of the heat exchanger's configuration and correlated Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for each heat exchanger tested. The smooth coil had a higher effectiveness than the others, while the double-wall bayonet had a very low effectiveness. We still do not know the long-term effectiveness of heat exchangers regarding scale accumulation, nor do we know the effects of very low flow rates on a heat exchanger's performance.

  3. Scaling analysis on Indian foreign exchange market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, A.; Barat, P.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the scaling behavior of the average daily exchange rate returns of the Indian Rupee against four foreign currencies: namely, US Dollar, Euro, Great Britain Pound and Japanese Yen. The average daily exchange rate return of the Indian Rupee against US Dollar is found to exhibit a persistent scaling behavior and follow Levy stable distribution. On the contrary, the average daily exchange rate returns of the other three foreign currencies do not show persistency or antipersistency and follow Gaussian distribution.

  4. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  5. Analysis of a Flooded Heat Exchanger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Aaron H.; Luyben, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Flooded heat exchangers are often used in industry to reduce the required heat-transfer area and the size of utility control valves. These units involve a condensing vapor on the hot side that accumulates as a liquid phase in the lower part of the vessel. The heat transfer occurs mostly in the vapor space, but the condensate becomes somewhat…

  6. Evolutionary inferences from the analysis of exchangeability

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Andrew P.; Kaeuffer, Renaud; Crispo, Erika; Peichel, Catherine L.; Bolnick, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary inferences are usually based on statistical models that compare mean genotypes and phenotypes (or their frequencies) among populations. An alternative is to use the actual distribution of genotypes and phenotypes to infer the “exchangeability” of individuals among populations. We illustrate this approach by using discriminant functions on principal components to classify individuals among paired lake and stream populations of threespine stickleback in each of six independent watersheds. Classification based on neutral and non-neutral microsatellite markers was highest to the population of origin and next-highest to populations in the same watershed. These patterns are consistent with the influence of historical contingency (separate colonization of each watershed) and subsequent gene flow (within but not between watersheds). In comparison to this low genetic exchangeability, ecological (diet) and morphological (trophic and armor traits) exchangeability was relatively high – particularly among populations from similar habitats. These patterns reflect the role of natural selection in driving parallel changes adaptive changes when independent populations colonize similar habitats. Importantly, however, substantial non-parallelism was also evident. Our results show that analyses based on exchangeability can confirm inferences based on statistical analyses of means or frequencies, while also refining insights into the drivers of – and constraints on – evolutionary diversification. PMID:24299398

  7. Multiphase complete exchange: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, Shahid H.

    1993-01-01

    Complete Exchange requires each of N processors to send a unique message to each of the remaining N-1 processors. For a circuit switched hypercube with N = 2(sub d) processors, the Direct and Standard algorithms for Complete Exchange are optimal for very large and very small message sizes, respectively. For intermediate sizes, a hybrid Multiphase algorithm is better. This carries out Direct exchanges on a set of subcubes whose dimensions are a partition of the integer d. The best such algorithm for a given message size m could hitherto only be found by enumerating all partitions of d. The Multiphase algorithm is analyzed assuming a high performance communication network. It is proved that only algorithms corresponding to equipartitions of d (partitions in which the maximum and minimum elements differ by at most 1) can possibly be optimal. The run times of these algorithms plotted against m form a hull of optimality. It is proved that, although there is an exponential number of partitions, (1) the number of faces on this hull is Theta(square root of d), (2) the hull can be found in theta(square root of d) time, and (3) once it has been found, the optimal algorithm for any given m can be found in Theta(log d) time. These results provide a very fast technique for minimizing communication overhead in many important applications, such as matrix transpose, Fast Fourier transform, and ADI.

  8. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  9. Physical explosion analysis in heat exchanger network design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, M.; Zaini, D.; Shariff, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The failure of shell and tube heat exchangers is being extensively experienced by the chemical process industries. This failure can create a loss of production for long time duration. Moreover, loss of containment through heat exchanger could potentially lead to a credible event such as fire, explosion and toxic release. There is a need to analyse the possible worst case effect originated from the loss of containment of the heat exchanger at the early design stage. Physical explosion analysis during the heat exchanger network design is presented in this work. Baker and Prugh explosion models are deployed for assessing the explosion effect. Microsoft Excel integrated with process design simulator through object linking and embedded (OLE) automation for this analysis. Aspen HYSYS V (8.0) used as a simulation platform in this work. A typical heat exchanger network of steam reforming and shift conversion process was presented as a case study. It is investigated from this analysis that overpressure generated from the physical explosion of each heat exchanger can be estimated in a more precise manner by using Prugh model. The present work could potentially assist the design engineer to identify the critical heat exchanger in the network at the preliminary design stage.

  10. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate. PMID:26222702

  11. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate. PMID:26222702

  12. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate.

  13. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimum combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.

  14. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimummore » combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.« less

  15. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  16. Multivariate Comparative Analysis of Stock Exchanges: The European Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralun-Bereźnicka, Julia

    The aim of the research is to perform a multivariate comparative analysis of 20 European stock exchanges in order to identify the main similarities between the objects. Due to the convergence process of capital markets in Europe the similarities between stock exchanges could be expected to increase over time. The research is meant to show whether and how these similarities change. Consequently, the distances between clusters of similar stock exchanges should become less significant, which the analysis also aims at verifying. The basis of comparison is a set of 48 monthly variables from the period January, 2003 to December, 2006. The variables are classified into three categories: size of the market, equity trading and bonds. The paper aims at identifying the clusters of alike stock exchanges and at finding the characteristic features of each of the distinguished groups. The obtained categorization to some extent corresponds with the division of the European Union into “new” and “old” member countries. Clustering method, performed for each quarter separately, also reveals that the classification is fairly stable in time. The factor analysis, which was carried out to reduce the number of variables, reveals three major factors behind the data, which are related with the earlier mentioned categories of variables.

  17. Low heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.; Kmiec, T. D.; Peckham, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, a derivative of the RLIO, is capable of multi-mode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for log-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine at THI and PI thrust levels can be accomplished by providing gaseous oxygen at the propellant injector. Using gaseous hydrogen from the thrust chamber jacket as an energy source, a heat exchanger can be used to vaporize liquid oxygen without creating flow instability. This report summarizes the design and analysis of a United Aircraft Products (UAP) low-rate heat transfer heat exchanger concept for the RL10-IIB rocket engine. The design represents a second iteration of the RL10-IIB heat exchanger investigation program. The design and analysis of the first heat exchanger effort is presented in more detail in NASA CR-174857. Testing of the previous design is detailed in NASA CR-179487.

  18. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm. PMID:26748867

  19. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following news headlines: ADPE acquisition process made easy with SRP; scientific reference material available; ORPS WordPerfect macro setup procedure; system managed storage is here; LIBSPOOL for MVS mainframe end-users; training center course schedule for February 1993; enjoy NJOY; scientific user services staff decreased; new release of Forwarn, a static source code analysis tool for FORTRAN programs; out of the cold with HEAT; coping cells from one table to another in word perfect; used PC equipment pool; and video training.

  20. Heat exchanger analysis on a Microvax II/GPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haught, Alan F.

    1988-12-01

    The finite element code FIDAP was used to examine the fluid flow path within a flat plate tube/fin heat exchanger and the resulting heat transfer from the fins and tube walls. The mathematical formulation, mesh development and analysis procedure are presented, and the results obtained are compared with experimental observations of the fluid flow and measurements of the fluid heating. This problem illustrates the capabilities of finite element techniques for analyzing complex three-dimensional convection-dominated heat transfer, and demonstrates the scope of problems which can be addressed on a Micro VAX II/GPX workstation.

  1. Plutonium metal exchange program : current status and statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, L.; Eglin, J. L.; Michalak, S. E.; Picard, R. R.; Temer, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plutonium (Pu) Metal Sample Exchange program was conducted to insure the quality and intercomparability of measurements such as Pu assay, Pu isotopics, and impurity analyses. The Rocky Flats program was discontinued in 1989 after more than 30 years. In 2001, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) reestablished the Pu Metal Exchange program. In addition to the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) at Aldermaston, six Department of Energy (DOE) facilities Argonne East, Argonne West, Livermore, Los Alamos, New Brunswick Laboratory, and Savannah River are currently participating in the program. Plutonium metal samples are prepared and distributed to the sites for destructive measurements to determine elemental concentration, isotopic abundance, and both metallic and nonmetallic impurity levels. The program provides independent verification of analytical measurement capabilies for each participating facility and allows problems in analytical methods to be identified. The current status of the program will be discussed with emphasis on the unique statistical analysis and modeling of the data developed for the program. The discussion includes the definition of the consensus values for each analyte (in the presence and absence of anomalous values and/or censored values), and interesting features of the data and the results.

  2. The CLAS Two Photon Exchange Experiment: Analysis Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimal, Dipak; Raue, Brian; Khetarpal, Puneet; CLAS Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The two photon exchange contribution to the elastic electron proton scattering has been suggested as the most likely explanation for the discrepancy observed between Rosenbluth and the polarization transfer methods in the measurement of proton electric-to-magnetic form factor ratio of the proton (GEp /GMp). The Two Photon Exchange (TPE) experiment recently completed data taking in Jefferson Lab's Hall-B and will directly measure, with high precision, the TPE contribution to elastic scattering by comparing the ratio of cross sections for electron-proton to positron-proton elastic scattering. The data were collected using a primary electron beam of 5.6 GeV to produce a photon beam, which in turn was used to produce a mixed e+ /e- beam that was incident upon an LH2 target. The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) was used to detect both the scattered leptons and protons. The resulting data span Q2 up to 2.5 GeV2 and nearly the entire epsilon range. The analysis techniques will be discussed along with some preliminary results. Supported in part by the U.S. D.O.E.

  3. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E.; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R.; Brown, Jeffery M.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra.

  4. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients

  5. Reliability analysis on a shell and tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingeswara, S.; Omar, R.; Mohd Ghazi, T. I.

    2016-06-01

    A shell and tube heat exchanger reliability was done in this study using past history data from a carbon black manufacturing plant. The heat exchanger reliability study is vital in all related industries as inappropriate maintenance and operation of the heat exchanger will lead to major Process Safety Events (PSE) and loss of production. The overall heat exchanger coefficient/effectiveness (Uo) and Mean Time between Failures (MTBF) were analyzed and calculated. The Aspen and down time data was taken from a typical carbon black shell and tube heat exchanger manufacturing plant. As a result of the Uo calculated and analyzed, it was observed that the Uo declined over a period caused by severe fouling and heat exchanger limitation. This limitation also requires further burn out period which leads to loss of production. The MTBF calculated is 649.35 hours which is very low compared to the standard 6000 hours for the good operation of shell and tube heat exchanger. The guidelines on heat exchanger repair, preventive and predictive maintenance was identified and highlighted for better heat exchanger inspection and repair in the future. The fouling of heat exchanger and the production loss will be continuous if proper heat exchanger operation and repair using standard operating procedure is not followed.

  6. Analysis of the heat transfer in double and triple concentric tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rădulescu, S.; Negoiţă, L. I.; Onuţu, I.

    2016-08-01

    The tubular heat exchangers (shell and tube heat exchangers and concentric tube heat exchangers) represent an important category of equipment in the petroleum refineries and are used for heating, pre-heating, cooling, condensation and evaporation purposes. The paper presents results of analysis of the heat transfer to cool a petroleum product in two types of concentric tube heat exchangers: double and triple concentric tube heat exchangers. The cooling agent is water. The triple concentric tube heat exchanger is a modified constructive version of double concentric tube heat exchanger by adding an intermediate tube. This intermediate tube improves the heat transfer by increasing the heat area per unit length. The analysis of the heat transfer is made using experimental data obtained during the tests in a double and triple concentric tube heat exchanger. The flow rates of fluids, inlet and outlet temperatures of water and petroleum product are used in determining the performance of both heat exchangers. Principally, for both apparatus are calculated the overall heat transfer coefficients and the heat exchange surfaces. The presented results shows that triple concentric tube heat exchangers provide better heat transfer efficiencies compared to the double concentric tube heat exchangers.

  7. Modeling Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index Using Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayo, W. S.; Urrutia, J. D.; Temple, J. M. F.; Sandoval, J. R. D.; Sanglay, J. E. A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a time series model of the Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index and its volatility using the finite mixture of ARIMA model with conditional variance equations such as ARCH, GARCH, EG ARCH, TARCH and PARCH models. Also, the study aimed to find out the reason behind the behaviorof PSEi, that is, which of the economic variables - Consumer Price Index, crude oil price, foreign exchange rate, gold price, interest rate, money supply, price-earnings ratio, Producers’ Price Index and terms of trade - can be used in projecting future values of PSEi and this was examined using Granger Causality Test. The findings showed that the best time series model for Philippine Stock Exchange Composite index is ARIMA(1,1,5) - ARCH(1). Also, Consumer Price Index, crude oil price and foreign exchange rate are factors concluded to Granger cause Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index.

  8. A Spacebased Ocean Surface Exchange Data Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Wenqing; Liu, W. Timothy

    2000-01-01

    Emerging technologies have provided unprecedented opportunities to transform information into knowledge and disseminate them in a much faster, cheaper, and userfriendly mode. We have set up a system to produce and disseminate high level (gridded) ocean surface wind data from the NASA Scatterometer and European Remote Sensing missions. The data system is being expanded to produce real-time gridded ocean surface winds from an improved sensor SeaWinds on the Quikscat Mission. The wind field will be combined with hydrologic parameters from the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission to monitor evolving weather systems and natural hazard in real time. It will form the basis for spacebased Ocean Surface Exchange Data Analysis System (SOSEDAS) which will include the production of ocean surface momentum, heat, and water fluxes needed for interdisciplinary studies of ocean-atmosphere interaction. Various commercial or non-commercial software tools have been compared and selected in terms of their ability in database management, remote data accessing, graphical interface, data quality, storage needs and transfer speed, etc. Issues regarding system security and user authentication, distributed data archiving and accessing, strategy to compress large-volume geophysical and satellite data/image. and increasing transferring speed are being addressed. A simple and easy way to access information and derive knowledge from spacebased data of multiple missions is being provided. The evolving 'knowledge system' will provide relevant infrastructure to address Earth System Science, make inroads in educating an informed populace, and illuminate decision and policy making.

  9. Optimization of heat exchanger design in a thermoacoustic engine using a second law analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, H.; Hobson, P.A.

    1996-05-01

    An analysis for the time averaged entropy generation due to both flow and heat transfer losses in the heat exchangers of a thermoacoustic engine has been developed. An expression for the optimum dimensionless heat exchanger area corresponding to minimum entropy generation has been determined in terms of three other dimensionless parameters. Optimum heat exchanger areas were calculated for three thermoacoustic devices. For the prime mover components of the thermoacoustic devices investigated where the temperature differences across the regenerator stacks were high, the analysis developed indicated that the heat exchanger at the hot end of the regenerator stack should be smaller than that at the cold end.

  10. Bayesian Analysis for Exponential Random Graph Models Using the Adaptive Exchange Sampler*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ick Hoon; Yuan, Ying; Liang, Faming

    2014-01-01

    Exponential random graph models have been widely used in social network analysis. However, these models are extremely difficult to handle from a statistical viewpoint, because of the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy. In this paper, we consider a fully Bayesian analysis for exponential random graph models using the adaptive exchange sampler, which solves the intractable normalizing constant and model degeneracy issues encountered in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations. The adaptive exchange sampler can be viewed as a MCMC extension of the exchange algorithm, and it generates auxiliary networks via an importance sampling procedure from an auxiliary Markov chain running in parallel. The convergence of this algorithm is established under mild conditions. The adaptive exchange sampler is illustrated using a few social networks, including the Florentine business network, molecule synthetic network, and dolphins network. The results indicate that the adaptive exchange algorithm can produce more accurate estimates than approximate exchange algorithms, while maintaining the same computational efficiency. PMID:24653788

  11. Analysis of sensible heat exchanges from a thermal manikin.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Divo; Gaspar, Adélio; Borges, Carlos

    2004-09-01

    The present work is dedicated to the analysis of dry heat exchanges as measured by a thermal manikin placed in still air. We believe that the understanding of some fundamental aspects governing fluid flow and heat transfer around three-dimensional bodies such as human beings deserves appropriate attention. This should be of great significance for improving physiological models concerned with thermal exposures. The potential interest of such work can be directed towards quite distinct targets such as working conditions, sports, the military, or healthcare personnel and patients. In the present study, we made use of a climate chamber and an articulated thermal manikin of the Pernille type, with 16 body parts. The most common occidental postures (standing, sitting and lying) were studied. In order to separate heat losses due to radiation and convection, the radiative heat losses of the manikin were significantly reduced by means of a shiny aluminium coating, which was carefully applied to the artificial skin. The air temperature within the test chamber was varied between 13 degrees C and 29 degrees C. The corresponding mean differences between the skin and the operative temperatures changed from 3.8 degrees C up to 15.8 degrees C. The whole-body heat transfer coefficients by radiation and convection for both standing and sitting postures are in good agreement with those in the published literature. The lying posture appears to be more efficient for losing heat by convection. This is confirmed when the heat losses of each individual part are considered. The proposed correlations for the whole body suggest that natural convection is mainly laminar.

  12. Analysis of high-resolution foreign exchange data of USD-JPY for 13 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Takayuki; Kurihara, Shoko; Takayasu, Misako; Takayasu, Hideki

    2003-06-01

    We analyze high-resolution foreign exchange data consisting of 20 million data points of USD-JPY for 13 years to report firm statistical laws in distributions and correlations of exchange rate fluctuations. A conditional probability density analysis clearly shows the existence of trend-following movements at time scale of 8-ticks, about 1 min.

  13. A multifractal analysis of Asian foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Eom, C.; Havlin, S.; Jung, W.-S.; Wang, F.; Stanley, H. E.; Kim, S.

    2012-06-01

    We analyze the multifractal spectra of daily foreign exchange rates for Japan, Hong-Kong, Korea, and Thailand with respect to the United States in the period from 1991 until 2005. We find that the return time series show multifractal spectrum features for all four cases. To observe the effect of the Asian currency crisis, we also estimate the multifractal spectra of limited series before and after the crisis. We find that the Korean and Thai foreign exchange markets experienced a significant increase in multifractality compared to Hong-Kong and Japan. We also show that the multifractality is stronger related to the presence of high values of returns in the series.

  14. Child Language Data Exchange System Tools for Clinical Analysis.

    PubMed

    MacWhinney, Brian; Fromm, Davida

    2016-05-01

    The Child Language Data Exchange System Project has developed methods for analyzing many aspects of child language development, including grammar, lexicon, discourse, gesture, phonology, and fluency. This article will describe the methods available for each of these six fields, and how they can be used for assessment in the clinical setting. PMID:27111267

  15. Thermal Analysis for Ion-Exchange Column System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si Y.; King, William D.

    2012-12-20

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium either in a column configuration or distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the design and operation of a waste treatment process focused on treating dissolved, high-sodium salt waste solutions for the removal of specific radionuclides. The ion exchange column will be installed inside a high level waste storage tank at the Savannah River Site. After cesium loading, the ion exchange media may be transferred to the waste tank floor for interim storage. Models were used to predict temperature profiles in these areas of the system where the cesium-loaded media is expected to lead to localized regions of elevated temperature due to radiolytic decay. Normal operating conditions and accident scenarios (including loss of solution flow, inadvertent drainage, and loss of active cooling) were evaluated for the ion exchange column using bounding conditions to establish the design safety basis. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. In-tank modeling results revealed that an idealized hemispherical mound shape leads to the highest tank floor temperatures. In contrast, even large volumes of CST distributed in a flat layer with a cylindrical shape do not result in significant floor heating.

  16. A quantitative analysis of electrolyte exchange in the salivary duct

    PubMed Central

    Catalán, Marcelo A.; Melvin, James E.; Yule, David I.; Crampin, Edmund J.; Sneyd, James

    2012-01-01

    A healthy salivary gland secretes saliva in two stages. First, acinar cells generate primary saliva, a plasma-like, isotonic fluid high in Na+ and Cl−. In the second stage, the ducts exchange Na+ and Cl− for K+ and HCO3−, producing a hypotonic final saliva with no apparent loss in volume. We have developed a tool that aims to understand how the ducts achieve this electrolyte exchange while maintaining the same volume. This tool is part of a larger multiscale model of the salivary gland and can be used at the duct or gland level to investigate the effects of genetic and chemical alterations. In this study, we construct a radially symmetric mathematical model of the mouse salivary gland duct, representing the lumen, the cell, and the interstitium. For a given flow and primary saliva composition, we predict the potential differences and the luminal and cytosolic concentrations along a duct. Our model accounts well for experimental data obtained in wild-type animals as well as knockouts and chemical inhibitors. Additionally, the luminal membrane potential of the duct cells is predicted to be very depolarized compared with acinar cells. We investigate the effects of an electrogenic vs. electroneutral anion exchanger in the luminal membrane on concentration and the potential difference across the luminal membrane as well as how impairing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel affects other ion transporting mechanisms. Our model suggests the electrogenicity of the anion exchanger has little effect in the submandibular duct. PMID:22899825

  17. Secret Snowflake: Analysis of a Holiday Gift Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turton, Roger W.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes several methods from discrete mathematics used to simulate and solve an interesting problem occurring at a holiday gift exchange. What is the probability that two people will select each other's names in a random drawing, and how does this result vary with the total number of participants? (Contains 5 figures.)

  18. Carbon charge exchange analysis in the ITER-like wall environment

    SciTech Connect

    Menmuir, S.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Biewer, T. M.; Coffey, I. H.; Delabie, E.; Sertoli, M.

    2014-11-15

    Charge exchange spectroscopy has long been a key diagnostic tool for fusion plasmas and is well developed in devices with Carbon Plasma-Facing Components. Operation with the ITER-like wall at JET has resulted in changes to the spectrum in the region of the Carbon charge exchange line at 529.06 nm and demonstrates the need to revise the core charge exchange analysis for this line. An investigation has been made of this spectral region in different plasma conditions and the revised description of the spectral lines to be included in the analysis is presented.

  19. Carbon charge exchange analysis in the ITER-like wall environment.

    PubMed

    Menmuir, S; Giroud, C; Biewer, T M; Coffey, I H; Delabie, E; Hawkes, N C; Sertoli, M

    2014-11-01

    Charge exchange spectroscopy has long been a key diagnostic tool for fusion plasmas and is well developed in devices with Carbon Plasma-Facing Components. Operation with the ITER-like wall at JET has resulted in changes to the spectrum in the region of the Carbon charge exchange line at 529.06 nm and demonstrates the need to revise the core charge exchange analysis for this line. An investigation has been made of this spectral region in different plasma conditions and the revised description of the spectral lines to be included in the analysis is presented.

  20. Thermal analysis for ion-exchange column system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; King, W. D.

    2012-07-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silico-titanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. (authors)

  1. Performance analysis of a medical record exchanges model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ean-Wen; Liou, Der-Ming

    2007-03-01

    Electronic medical record exchange among hospitals can provide more information for physician diagnosis and reduce costs from duplicate examinations. In this paper, we proposed and implemented a medical record exchange model. According to our study, exchange interface servers (EISs) are designed for hospitals to manage the information communication through the intra and interhospital networks linked with a medical records database. An index service center can be given responsibility for managing the EIS and publishing the addresses and public keys. The prototype system has been implemented to generate, parse, and transfer the health level seven query messages. Moreover, the system can encrypt and decrypt a message using the public-key encryption algorithm. The queuing theory is applied to evaluate the performance of our proposed model. We estimated the service time for each queue of the CPU, database, and network, and measured the response time and possible bottlenecks of the model. The capacity of the model is estimated to process the medical records of about 4000 patients/h in the 1-MB network backbone environments, which comprises about the 4% of the total outpatients in Taiwan.

  2. Numerical analysis of the steam flow field in shell and tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoszewicz, Jarosław; Bogusławski, Leon

    2016-06-01

    In the paper, the results of numerical simulations of the steam flow in a shell and tube heat exchanger are presented. The efficiency of different models of turbulence was tested. In numerical calculations the following turbulence models were used: k-ɛ, RNG k-ɛ, Wilcox k-ω, Chen-Kim k-ɛ, and Lam-Bremhorst k-ɛ. Numerical analysis of the steam flow was carried out assuming that the flow at the inlet section of the heat exchanger were divided into three parts. The angle of steam flow at inlet section was determined individually in order to obtain the best configuration of entry vanes and hence improve the heat exchanger construction. Results of numerical studies were verified experimentally for a real heat exchanger. The modification of the inlet flow direction according to theoretical considerations causes the increase of thermal power of a heat exchanger of about 14%.

  3. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-05-23

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature.

  4. Analysis of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger gene family within the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; O'Halloran, Damien M

    2014-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are low affinity, high capacity transporters that rapidly transport calcium at the plasma membrane, mitochondrion, endoplasmic (and sarcoplasmic) reticulum, and the nucleus. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are widely expressed in diverse cell types where they contribute homeostatic balance to calcium levels. In animals, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are divided into three groups based upon stoichiometry: Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCX), Na+/Ca2+/K+ exchangers (NCKX), and Ca2+/Cation exchangers (CCX). In mammals there are three NCX genes, five NCKX genes and one CCX (NCLX) gene. The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains ten Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes: three NCX; five CCX; and two NCKX genes. Here we set out to characterize structural and taxonomic specializations within the family of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers across the phylum Nematoda. In this analysis we identify Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes from twelve species of nematodes and reconstruct their phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships. The most notable feature of the resulting phylogenies was the heterogeneous evolution observed within exchanger subtypes. Specifically, in the case of the CCX exchangers we did not detect members of this class in three Clade III nematodes. Within the Caenorhabditis and Pristionchus lineages we identify between three and five CCX representatives, whereas in other Clade V and also Clade IV nematode taxa we only observed a single CCX gene in each species, and in the Clade III nematode taxa that we sampled we identify NCX and NCKX encoding genes but no evidence of CCX representatives using our mining approach. We also provided re-annotation for predicted CCX gene structures from Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Caenorhabditis japonica by RT-PCR and sequencing. Together, these findings reveal a complex picture of Na+/Ca2+ transporters in nematodes that suggest an incongruent evolutionary history of proteins that provide central control of calcium dynamics.

  5. Multiply Controlled Verbal Operants: An Analysis and Extension to the Picture Exchange Communication System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondy, A.; Tincani, M.; Frost, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior as a framework for understanding language acquisition in children with autism. We describe Skinner's analysis of pure and impure verbal operants and illustrate how this analysis may be applied to the design of communication training programs. The picture exchange communication system…

  6. Analysis of radionuclide release from spent ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Su, S.I.; Yim, M.S.

    2000-04-01

    Ion-exchange resins represent one of the most important waste streams in low-level waste management due to the unstabilized nature of the waste form and the large amount of radioactivity contained. To describe the release of radionuclides from ion-exchange resins stored in a disposal facility, a mechanistic release model was developed. The model is based on description of radionuclide migration both in the resin bead phase and the bulk pore water phase within waste containers. This modeling setup provides the capability to describe all the major physical processes taking place for the release of radionuclides. Because of the difficulty in obtaining analytical solutions, the numerical solution approach was employed in this model. The new resin release model was used to examine key processes and parameters in describing radionuclide release. These were found to be diffusion within the bulk pore water phase, flow rate of infiltrating leachant water, concentration of counterions of the leachant water, and sorption during the transport in the bulk pore water phase. Some parameters were found to have little impact in describing the release. These include the interdiffusion coefficient within resin beads and the density and radius of resin beads. Existing simplified modeling approaches were also compared with the new resin release model, and validities of using these simplified models are discussed.

  7. Determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite by simultaneous thermal analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeva, N. M.; Bocharnikova, Yu. I.; Belousov, P. E.; Zhigarev, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    A way of determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite by simultaneous thermal analysis is developed using as an example the bentonites of the 10th Khutor deposit (Republic of Khakassia) and the Vodopadnyi area (Sakhalin Island). A correlation is established between the cation exchange capacity of smectite and its weight loss upon heating in the range of dehydration; the enthalpy of dehydration of montmorillonite; and the weight loss and the enthalpy of thermal dissociation of ethylene glycol contained in the interlayer space of the mineral's crystal structure. These data open up new possibilities for determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite, the most important technological indicator of the natural clay nanomineral.

  8. Thermal/Fluid Analysis of a Composite Heat Exchanger for Use on the RLV Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Dalton

    2002-01-01

    As part of efforts to design a regeneratively cooled composite nozzle ramp for use on the reusable vehicle (RLV) rocket engine, an C-SiC composites heat exchanger concept was proposed for thermal performance evaluation. To test the feasibility of the concept, sample heat exchanger panels were made to fit the Glenn Research Center's cell 22 for testing. Operation of the heat exchanger was demonstrated in a combustion environment with high heat fluxes similar to the RLV Aerospike Ramp. Test measurements were reviewed and found to be valuable for the on going fluid and thermal analysis of the actual RLV composite ramp. Since the cooling fluid for the heat exchanger is water while the RLV Ramp cooling fluid is LH2, fluid and thermal models were constructed to correlate to the specific test set-up. The knowledge gained from this work will be helpful for analyzing the thermal response of the actual RLV Composite Ramp. The coolant thermal properties for the models are taken from test data. The heat exchanger's cooling performance was analyzed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). Temperatures of the heat exchanger's structure were predicted in finite element models using Patran and Sinda. Results from the analytical models and the tests show that RSC's heat exchanger satisfied the combustion environments in a series of 16 tests.

  9. Thermal/Fluid Analysis of a Composite Heat Exchanger for Use on the RLV Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Dalton; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As part of efforts to design a regeneratively cooled composite nozzle ramp for use on the reusable vehicle (RLV) rocket engine, a C-SiC composite heat exchanger concept was proposed for thermal performance evaluation. To test the feasibility of the concept, sample heat exchanger panels were made to fit the Glenn Research Center's cell 22 for testing. Operation of the heat exchanger was demonstrated in a combustion environment with high heat fluxes similar to the RLV Aerospike Ramp. Test measurements were reviewed and found to be valuable for the on-going fluid and thermal analysis of the actual RLV composite ramp. Since the cooling fluid for the heat exchanger is water while the RLV Ramp cooling fluid is LH2, fluid and therma models were constructed to correlate to the specific test set-up. The knowledge gained from this work will be helpful for analyzing the thermal response of the actual RLV Composite Ramp. The coolant thermal properties for the models are taken from test data. The heat exchanger's cooling performance was analyzed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). Temperatures of the heat exchanger's structure were predicted in finite element models using Patran and Sinda. Results from the analytical models and the tests show that RSC's heat exchanger satisfied the combustion environments in a series of 16 tests.

  10. Bi-directional exchange of ammonia in a pine forest ecosystem - a model sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, Alexander; Hrdina, Amy; Murphy, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key component in the global nitrogen cycle and of great importance for atmospheric chemistry, neutralizing atmospheric acids and leading to the formation of aerosol particles. For understanding the role of NH3 in both natural and anthropogenically influenced environments, the knowledge of processes regulating its exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere is essential. A two-layer canopy compensation point model is used to evaluate the NH3 exchange in a pine forest in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The net flux comprises the NH3 exchange of leaf stomata, its deposition to leaf cuticles and exchange with the forest ground. As key parameters the model uses in-canopy NH3 mixing ratios as well as leaf and soil emission potentials measured at the site in summer 2015. A sensitivity analysis is performed to evaluate the major exchange pathways as well as the model's constraints. In addition, the NH3 exchange is examined for an extended range of environmental conditions, such as droughts or varying concentrations of atmospheric pollutants, in order to investigate their influence on the overall net exchange.

  11. An Exchange Structure Analysis of the Development of Online Intercultural Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitade, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Internet-mediated intercultural discussions have been adopted for intercultural and second-language learning. However, the notion of community development in this context has received less attention. This study employs exchange structure (ES) analysis (Stubbs, M. (1983). "Discourse analysis." Oxford: Basil Blackwell) to investigate the dialogic…

  12. Analysis of induced temperature anomalies along borehole heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Michael; Schelenz, Sophie; Stollberg, Reiner; Gossel, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Over the last years, the thermal use of the shallow subsurface for heat generation, cooling, and thermal energy storage has increased. However, the injection or extraction of heat potentially drives changes in the subsurface temperature regime; especially in urban areas. The presented case study investigates the intensive use of borehole heat exchangers (BHE) and their potential thermal impacts on subsurface temperatures, as well as thermal interactions between individual BHE's for a residential neighborhood in Cologne, Germany. Based on on-site subsurface parameterization, a 3D subsurface model was designed, using the finite element software FEFLOW (DHI WASY). The model contains five BHE, extracting 8.2 kW, with a maximum BHE depth of 38 m, whereby the thickness of the unsaturated zone is 22 m. The simulated time span is 10 years. This study focusses on two questions: How will different BHE arrangements vary in terms of temperature plume formation and potential system interaction and what is the influence of seasonal subsurface heat storage on soil and ground water temperatures.

  13. Analysis of Proton Exchanged Channel Waveguides in LiNbO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, N. A...; Lee, W. E.

    1985-09-01

    Channel waveguides fabricated by proton exchange in x-cut plates of LiNbO3 have been examined using mode effective indices, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Effective indices measured over a wavelength range from 480 to 1320nm, and inverted with a step index approximation, reveals the dispersion of the proton exchanged layer. The index step,4Lne, depends also on the (Cr) diffusion aperture width used to define the channel; the surface One for 3-5/Am wide channels are 5-10% less than for those lOpm and wider for wavelengths above 632nm. Common 5 minute exchange times at 249C in pure benzoic acid were used throughout. Corroborative evidence, using SIMS, shows reduced Li depletion in narrower guides. Finally, TEM analysis of thinned waveguide samples strongly suggest instabilities observed in proton exchanged waveguides is primarily due to dehydration.

  14. Analysis of carbohydrates by anion exchange chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, Cees; Maurer, Rolf; Herrmann, Heiko; Cavalli, Silvano; Hoefler, Frank

    2005-08-26

    A versatile liquid chromatographic platform has been developed for analysing underivatized carbohydrates using high performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) followed by an inert PEEK splitter that splits the effluent to the integrated pulsed amperometric detector (IPAD) and to an on-line single quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS). Common eluents for HPAEC such as sodium hydroxide and sodium acetate are beneficial for the amperometric detection but not compatible with electrospray ionisation (ESI). Therefore a membrane-desalting device was installed after the splitter and prior to the ESI interface converting sodium hydroxide into water and sodium acetate into acetic acid. To enhance the sensitivity for the MS detection, 0.5 mmol/l lithium chloride was added after the membrane desalter to form lithium adducts of the carbohydrates. To compare sensitivity of IPAD and MS detection glucose, fructose, and sucrose were used as analytes. A calibration with external standards from 2.5 to 1000 pmole was performed showing a linear range over three orders of magnitude. Minimum detection limits (MDL) with IPAD were determined at 5 pmole levels for glucose to be 0.12 pmole, fructose 0.22 pmole and sucrose 0.11 pmole. With MS detection in the selected ion mode (SIM) the lithium adducts of the carbohydrates were detected obtaining MDL's for glucose of 1.49 pmole, fructose 1.19 pmole, and sucrose 0.36 pmole showing that under these conditions IPAD is 3-10 times more sensitive for those carbohydrates. The applicability of the method was demonstrated analysing carbohydrates in real world samples such as chicory inulin where polyfructans up to a molecular mass of 7000 g/mol were detected as quadrupoly charged lithium adducts. Furthermore mono-, di-, tri-, and oligosaccharides were detected in chicory coffee, honey and beer samples. PMID:16106855

  15. NASA Li/CF(x) cell problem analysis: Anion exchange chromatography analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bytella, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An analysis was made of wiper samples used to wipe down lithium/chlorine fluorine battery components and production equipment. These components and equipment were potentially exposed to thionyl chloride vapors. In the presence of moisture, thionyl chloride decomposes to sulfur dioxide and hydrogen chloride. The wiper samples were analyzed for soluble chlorides and fluorides by anion exchange chromatography. During the examination of the test chromatographs, fluoride contamination was discovered in wiper samples from the test equipment. An analytical method to determine fluoride was developed. The first 3 extracts from the potentially exposed and clean wiper samples were tested, and the total fluoride from both groups determined. A comparison of the results from both groups was made to determine the extent of fluoride contamination.

  16. Network Analysis: A Selected Bibliography. Exchange Bibliography No. 165.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Budd H.; Murphy, Elaine

    This bibliography presents a series of studies that focus on the topic of networks and on the manner in which they have been considered in the literature. Each section of the bibliography provides a working set of references for one of the five major areas of research in which network analysis has been used. The first section deals primarily with…

  17. Nickel-Catalyzed Proton-Deuterium Exchange (HDX) Procedures for Glycosidic Linkage Analysis of Complex Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Price, Neil P J; Hartman, Trina M; Vermillion, Karl E

    2015-07-21

    The structural analysis of complex carbohydrates typically requires the assignment of three parameters: monosaccharide composition, the position of glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and the position and nature of noncarbohydrate substituents. The glycosidic linkage positions are often determined by permethylation analysis, but this can be complicated by high viscosity or poor solubility, resulting in under-methylation. This is a drawback because an under-methylated position may be misinterpreted as the erroneous site of a linkage or substituent. Here, we describe an alternative approach to linkage analysis that makes use of a nonreversible deuterium exchange of C-H protons on the carbohydrate backbone. The exchange reaction is conducted in deuterated water catalyzed by Raney nickel, and results in the selective exchange of C-H protons adjacent to free hydroxyl groups. Hence, the position of the residual C-H protons is indicative of the position of glycosidic linkages or other substituents and can be readily assigned by heteronuclear single quantum coherence-nuclear magnetic resonance (HSQC-NMR) or, following suitable derivatization, by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis. Moreover, because the only changes to the parent sugar are proton/deuterium exchanges, the composition and linkage analysis can be determined in a single step.

  18. Nickel-Catalyzed Proton-Deuterium Exchange (HDX) Procedures for Glycosidic Linkage Analysis of Complex Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Price, Neil P J; Hartman, Trina M; Vermillion, Karl E

    2015-07-21

    The structural analysis of complex carbohydrates typically requires the assignment of three parameters: monosaccharide composition, the position of glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and the position and nature of noncarbohydrate substituents. The glycosidic linkage positions are often determined by permethylation analysis, but this can be complicated by high viscosity or poor solubility, resulting in under-methylation. This is a drawback because an under-methylated position may be misinterpreted as the erroneous site of a linkage or substituent. Here, we describe an alternative approach to linkage analysis that makes use of a nonreversible deuterium exchange of C-H protons on the carbohydrate backbone. The exchange reaction is conducted in deuterated water catalyzed by Raney nickel, and results in the selective exchange of C-H protons adjacent to free hydroxyl groups. Hence, the position of the residual C-H protons is indicative of the position of glycosidic linkages or other substituents and can be readily assigned by heteronuclear single quantum coherence-nuclear magnetic resonance (HSQC-NMR) or, following suitable derivatization, by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis. Moreover, because the only changes to the parent sugar are proton/deuterium exchanges, the composition and linkage analysis can be determined in a single step. PMID:26075577

  19. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell conductivity and system analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qian

    A fuel cell converts chemical energy to electrical energy. It is a device that uses the electrochemical reaction of hydrogen and an oxidant, to produce electrical energy silently, without combustion. The role of the electrolyte in a PEM fuel cell is played by a proton exchange membrane. NafionRTM and its derivatives are the most widely used and studied polymers. Percolation theory holds a key to understanding the behavior of these polymers. In this dissertation, the percolation phenomenon was first simulated for the thermal conductivity of a representative polymer material. The simulation program was based on the finite element method, using Ansys software, which not only simplifies the method of calculation, but also increases the accuracy of the result. Ansys programs were developed to study the effects of matrix thickness, filler particle volume percentage, and various conductivities of the base material and filler particles. Comparison with existing experimental results and other models showed that the results from the finite element method were more accurate than the other models, especially the three-dimensional model. A similar Ansys program was utilized to predict the percolation threshold for the polymer electric conductivity, and its relationship with extra water content over the studied temperature range. The result showed that the percolation threshold varied with temperature and is in the range of 22% to 26% at room temperature, and matches the experimental data within 10% error margin. A natural gas fuel cell (NGFC) is a direct-energy conversion system which uses natural gas as the hydrogen carrier. A parametric model was developed to predict the overall system performance of a natural-gas-fueled PEM fuel cell system sized for a residential or small commercial building. The model accounts for interactions between various operating parameters: fuel consumption, air and water requirements, power produced, and heat and waste water discharge. For example

  20. Exergy destruction analysis of a vortices generator in a gas liquid finned tube heat exchanger: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazikhani, M.; Khazaee, I.; Monazzam, S. M. S.; Takdehghan, H.

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the effect of using different shapes of vortices generator (VG) on a gas liquid finned heat exchanger is investigated experimentally with irreversibility analysis. In this project the ambient air with mass flow rates of 0.047-0.072 kg/s is forced across the finned tube heat exchanger. Hot water with constant flow rate of 240 L/h is circulated inside heat exchanger tubes with inlet temperature range of 45-73 °C. The tests are carried out on the flat finned heat exchanger and then repeated on the VG finned heat exchanger. The results show that using the vortex generator can decrease the ratio of air side irreversibility to heat transfer (ASIHR) of the heat exchanger. Also the results show that the IASIHR is >1.05 for all air mass flow rates, which means that ASIHR for the initial heat exchanger is higher than 5 % greater than that of improved heat exchanger.

  1. Exergy destruction analysis of a vortices generator in a gas liquid finned tube heat exchanger: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazikhani, M.; Khazaee, I.; Monazzam, S. M. S.; Takdehghan, H.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the effect of using different shapes of vortices generator (VG) on a gas liquid finned heat exchanger is investigated experimentally with irreversibility analysis. In this project the ambient air with mass flow rates of 0.047-0.072 kg/s is forced across the finned tube heat exchanger. Hot water with constant flow rate of 240 L/h is circulated inside heat exchanger tubes with inlet temperature range of 45-73 °C. The tests are carried out on the flat finned heat exchanger and then repeated on the VG finned heat exchanger. The results show that using the vortex generator can decrease the ratio of air side irreversibility to heat transfer (ASIHR) of the heat exchanger. Also the results show that the IASIHR is >1.05 for all air mass flow rates, which means that ASIHR for the initial heat exchanger is higher than 5 % greater than that of improved heat exchanger.

  2. Generalization of Logarithmic Mean Temperature Difference Method for Heat Exchanger Performance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Nikitin, Konstantin; Kato, Yasuyoshi

    A generalized mean temperature difference (GMTD) method for heat exchangers is proposed. In the analysis of the performance of heat exchangers logarithmic temperature difference (LMTD) method has been widely used. This method, however, limits its application to those heating media with constant physical property. In turn GMTD method allows analysis with physical property distributed in an entire heat exchanger. Temperature profiles of the heat exchanger taken as function of heat load in place of axial position, mean temperature difference is evaluated numerically. It is mathematically demonstrated that LMTD method is an extremity of the GMTD method in the case of constant physical property. The GMTD method is applied to a hot water supplier with supercritical carbon dioxide as a heating media which is attracting attention as energy saving tactics. The hot water supplier operates under the condition of pseudo critical point of carbon dioxide where specific heat behaves anomaly. Incorporating GMTD method averaged overall heat transfer coefficient and subsequently formula of local Nusselt number are successfully derived for microchannel heat exchanger while formal application of LMTD method is found to give poor results i.e. two times less value with a larger error. This proves the validity of GMTD method.

  3. Quantitative Synthesis and Component Analysis of Single-Participant Studies on the Picture Exchange Communication System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tincani, Matt; Devis, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The "Picture Exchange Communication System" (PECS) has emerged as the augmentative communication intervention of choice for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with a supporting body of single-participant studies. This report describes a meta-analysis of 16 single-participant studies on PECS with percentage of nonoverlapping data…

  4. Analysis and test of a breadboard cryogenic hydrogen/Freon heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, L. F.; Hooper, J.

    1973-01-01

    System studies required to verify a tube-in-tube cryogenic heat exchanger as optimum for the space shuttle mission are described. Design of the optimum configuration, which could be fabricated from commercially available hardware, is discussed. Finally, testing of the proposed configuration with supercritical hydrogen and Freon 21 is discussed and results are compared with thermal and dynamic analysis.

  5. Longitudinal hydraulic analysis of river-aquifer exchanges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    A longitudinal analysis of transient flow between a river and an underlying aquifer is developed to calculate flow rates between the river and the aquifer and the location of groundwater seepage into the river as it changes over time. Two flow domains are defined in the analysis: an upstream domain of fluvial recharge, where water flows vertically from the river into the unsaturated portion of the aquifer and horizontally in saturated parts of the aquifer, and a downstream domain of groundwater seepage to the river, where groundwater flows parallel to the underlying impermeable base. The river does not necessarily penetrate completely through the aquifer. A one-dimensional, unsteady flow equation is derived from mass conservation, Darcy's law, and the geometry of the river-aquifer system to calculate the water table position and the groundwater seepage rate into the river. Models based on numerical and analytical solutions of the flow equation were applied to a reach of the Methow River in north central Washington. The calibrated models simulated groundwater seepage with a root-mean-square error less than 5% of the mean groundwater seepage rates for three low-flow evaluation periods. The analytical model provides a theoretical basis for a nonlinear exponential base flow recession generated by a draining aquifer, but not an explicit functional form for the recession. Unlike cross-sectional approaches, the longitudinal approach allows the analysis of the length and location of groundwater seepage to a river, which have important ecological implications in many rivers. In the numerical simulations, the length of the groundwater seepage varied seasonally by about 4 km and the upstream boundary of groundwater seepage was within 689 m of its location at a stream gage on 9 September 2001 and within 91 m of its location on 6 October 2002. To demonstrate its utility in ecological applications, the numerical model was used to calculate differences in length of groundwater

  6. Multifractal analysis of managed and independent float exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stošić, Darko; Stošić, Dusan; Stošić, Tatijana; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2015-06-01

    We investigate multifractal properties of daily price changes in currency rates using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). We analyze managed and independent floating currency rates in eight countries, and determine the changes in multifractal spectrum when transitioning between the two regimes. We find that after the transition from managed to independent float regime the changes in multifractal spectrum (position of maximum and width) indicate an increase in market efficiency. The observed changes are more pronounced for developed countries that have a well established trading market. After shuffling the series, we find that the multifractality is due to both probability density function and long term correlations for managed float regime, while for independent float regime multifractality is in most cases caused by broad probability density function.

  7. Steady state thermal radiation analysis between the TOPAZ-II radiator and a heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Maveety, J.G.; Wold, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    In this study the authors investigate the feasibility and efficiency of coupling a single-pass heat exchanger to the TOPAZ-II space power system operating at steady state conditions. A first and second law analysis was performed in order to determine the optimal operating conditions which minimize the pumping power and maximize the flow exergy of the working fluid. The results of this study show that (1) the space power system is basically unaffected by the addition of this heat exchanger and (2) as much as 60% of the availability is destroyed by irreversibilities while operating at optimal flow conditions.

  8. Numerical Analysis of a Multi-Row Multi-Column Compact Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, Ashkan; Pacheco-Vega, Arturo; Rafael Pacheco, J.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study we carry out three-dimensional fluid flow and heat transfer simulations on the external side of a compact heat exchanger to analyze the interaction between the fluid and its geometry. The overall objective is to use the resulting information for the design of more compact devices. The type of heat exchanger considered here is the common plain-fin and tube, with air flowing over the tubes and water as the inner-tube fluid. Two heat exchanger configurations, in which the tube arrangement is either in-line or staggered, conform the basic geometries. The size of the heat exchanger -regardless of the type of arrangement- which serves as the baseline for the parametric analysis, is defined by fixing its length; i.e., the number of rows in the flow direction. For the two heat exchanger configurations examined here, the dimensional form of the governing equations, along with the corresponding boundary conditions, are solved under specific flow and temperature values using a finite element method to compute the velocity, pressure and temperature fields. From these, the heat transfer rate and pressure drop are then calculated. The computations are performed for a range in the values of the Reynolds number within the laminar regime. For all cases considered, results from this investigation indicate that the geometrical arrangement plays a major role in the amount of heat being exchanged and that, for a given device, the length needed to exchange 99% of the corresponding amount of energy that may be transferred by the baseline model, is confined to less than 30% of the size of the original device.

  9. Sister chromatid exchange analysis to monitor genotoxic chemicals. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis for toxicological studies. SCE analysis are very sensitive measures of genotoxic damage to chromosomes. SCE toxicological studies analyzing ionizing radiation, chromium compounds, styrene, paint thinner, mercury, cigarette smoke, coal dust, fuel oil, insecticides, ethylene oxide, diesel exhaust, and polychlorinated biphenyls are discussed. SCE studies using both human and animal tissue cultures are described. (Contains a minimum of 191 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. The effectiveness of China's RMB exchange rate reforms: An insight from multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jing; Lu, Xinsheng; Zhou, Ying; Qu, Ling

    2015-03-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of the RMB regime reforms on market efficiency improving for the mainland onshore market and Hong Kong offshore market. Based on multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA), we study the multifractal properties as well as multifractality degree of RMB/USD and RMB/HKD exchange markets. Our empirical results show that, the first RMB regime reform undertaken on July 21, 2005 has a greater impact on RMB/USD exchange market in the short term, while the second RMB exchange reform undertaken on June 19, 2010 exerts the long-term influences on the efficiency of both RMB/USD and RMB/HKD markets. Further, RMB/HKD market is found to work more efficiently, although both mainland onshore market and Hong Kong offshore market have achieved a higher level of efficiency post reforms.

  11. Value at risk estimation with entropy-based wavelet analysis in exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kaijian; Wang, Lijun; Zou, Yingchao; Lai, Kin Keung

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, exchange markets are increasingly integrated together. Fluctuations and risks across different exchange markets exhibit co-moving and complex dynamics. In this paper we propose the entropy-based multivariate wavelet based approaches to analyze the multiscale characteristic in the multidimensional domain and improve further the Value at Risk estimation reliability. Wavelet analysis has been introduced to construct the entropy-based Multiscale Portfolio Value at Risk estimation algorithm to account for the multiscale dynamic correlation. The entropy measure has been proposed as the more effective measure with the error minimization principle to select the best basis when determining the wavelet families and the decomposition level to use. The empirical studies conducted in this paper have provided positive evidence as to the superior performance of the proposed approach, using the closely related Chinese Renminbi and European Euro exchange market.

  12. An Effective Deuterium Exchange Method for Neutron Crystal Structure Analysis with Unfolding-Refolding Processes.

    PubMed

    Kita, Akiko; Morimoto, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    A method of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange with an unfolding-refolding process has been applied to hen egg-white lysozyme (HWL), and accurate evaluation of its deuteration was carried out by time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. Neutron crystallography requires a suitable crystal with enough deuterium exchanged in the protein to decrease incoherent scattering from hydrogens. It is very expensive to prepare a fully deuterated protein, and therefore a simple H/D exchange technique is desirable for this purpose. Acid or base addition to protein solutions with heating effectively increased the number of deuterium up to more than 20 % of that of all hydrogen atoms, and refolded structures were determined by X-ray structure analysis at 1.8 Å resolution. Refolded HWL had increased deuterium content in its protein core and its native structure, determined at atomic resolution, was fully preserved. PMID:26718545

  13. A meta-analysis of leaf gas exchange and water status responses to drought.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weiming; Zhong, Yangquanwei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Drought is considered to be one of the most devastating natural hazards, and it is predicted to become increasingly frequent and severe in the future. Understanding the plant gas exchange and water status response to drought is very important with regard to future climate change. We conducted a meta-analysis based on studies of plants worldwide and aimed to determine the changes in gas exchange and water status under different drought intensities (mild, moderate and severe), different photosynthetic pathways (C3 and C4) and growth forms (herbs, shrubs, trees and lianas). Our results were as follows: 1) drought negatively impacted gas exchange and water status, and stomatal conductance (gs) decreased more than other physiological traits and declined to the greatest extent in shrubs and C3 plants. Furthermore, C4 plants had an advantage compared to C3 plants under the same drought conditions. 2) The decrease in gs mainly reduced the transpiration rate (Tr), and gs could explain 55% of the decrease in the photosynthesis (A) and 74% of the decline in Tr. 3). Finally, gas exchange showed a close relationship with the leaf water status. Our study provides comprehensive information about the changes in plant gas exchange and water status under drought. PMID:26868055

  14. A meta-analysis of leaf gas exchange and water status responses to drought

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Weiming; Zhong, Yangquanwei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Drought is considered to be one of the most devastating natural hazards, and it is predicted to become increasingly frequent and severe in the future. Understanding the plant gas exchange and water status response to drought is very important with regard to future climate change. We conducted a meta-analysis based on studies of plants worldwide and aimed to determine the changes in gas exchange and water status under different drought intensities (mild, moderate and severe), different photosynthetic pathways (C3 and C4) and growth forms (herbs, shrubs, trees and lianas). Our results were as follows: 1) drought negatively impacted gas exchange and water status, and stomatal conductance (gs) decreased more than other physiological traits and declined to the greatest extent in shrubs and C3 plants. Furthermore, C4 plants had an advantage compared to C3 plants under the same drought conditions. 2) The decrease in gs mainly reduced the transpiration rate (Tr), and gs could explain 55% of the decrease in the photosynthesis (A) and 74% of the decline in Tr. 3). Finally, gas exchange showed a close relationship with the leaf water status. Our study provides comprehensive information about the changes in plant gas exchange and water status under drought. PMID:26868055

  15. Educator Exchange Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Cris; Rodriguez, Victor

    This resource guide was developed for teachers and administrators interested in participating in intercultural and international exchange programs or starting an exchange program. An analysis of an exchange program's critical elements discusses exchange activities; orientation sessions; duration of exchange; criteria for participation; travel,…

  16. Investigation on non-exchange spring behaviour and exchange spring behaviour: A first order reversal curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debangsu; Sreenivasulu, K. V.; Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2013-11-01

    The First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) method has been utilised to understand the magnetization reversal and the extent of the irreversible magnetization of the soft CoFe2O4-hard SrFe12O19 nanocomposite in the nonexchange spring and the exchange spring regime. The single peak switching behaviour in the FORC distribution of the exchange spring composite confirms the coherent reversal of the soft and hard phases. The onset of the nucleation field and the magnetization reversal by domain wall movement are also evident from the FORC measurements.

  17. Experimental performance investigation of a shell and tube heat exchanger by exergy based sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Suha Orçun; Reis, Alper

    2016-06-01

    Heat exchangers are used extensively in many industrial branches, primarily so in chemical and energy sectors. They also have important household usage as they are used in central and local heating systems. Any betterment on heat exchangers will serve greatly in preserving our already dwindling and costly energy resources. Strong approach of exergy analysis -which helps find out where the first steps should be taken in determining sources of inefficiencies and how to remedy them- will be used as a means to this end. The maximum useful work that can be harnessed from systems relationships with its environment is defined as exergy. In this study, the inlet and outlet flow rate values of fluids and temperature of hot stream both on shell and tube parts of a shell-tube heat exchange system have been inspected and their effects on the exergy efficiency of this thermal system have been analyzed. It is seen that the combination of high tube side inlet temperature, low shell side flow rate and high tube side flow rate are found to be the optimum for this experimental system with reaching 75, 65, and 32 % efficiencies respectively. Selecting operating conditions suitable to this behavior will help to increase the overall efficiency of shell-tube heat exchange systems and cause an increment in energy conservation.

  18. Multifactorial analysis of exchanger efficiency and liquid conservation during perfluorochemical liquid-assisted ventilation.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, M R; Miller, T F; Peck, G; Shaffer, T H

    1999-01-01

    Liquid-assisted ventilation (LAV) of the lung with perfluorochemical (PFC) requires a method of oxygenating and removing CO2 from the liquid. Current PFC LAV techniques consist of total liquid ventilation, PFC lavage, and partial liquid ventilation. Because PFC liquid is volatile, it may be lost from the lung or ventilator circuit in the expired gas. This study evaluated the efficiencies of two types of exchangers (spray bubbler and membrane oxygenator) with respect to CO2 elimination from the PFC liquid and prevention of the loss of PFC liquid. A multifactorial analysis of exchanger efficiency was performed with respect to liquid conservation and CO2 removal. PFC losses and relative efficiencies of two types of exchangers to eliminate CO2 from expired PFC liquid were evaluated, along with two types of PFC liquids. Gas (100% O2 at 4 and 8 L/min) and PFC liquid were circulated countercurrently through the exchangers (oxygenator and bubbler) through a temperature-controlled (25 degrees or 37 degrees C) open circuit. To evaluate effectiveness of CO2 elimination, an exchanger efficiency index (EEI) for CO2 was calculated applying mass-transfer theory to characterize gas transport down a concentration gradient where EEI equals: [PPFCCO2 out--PPFCCO2 in]/PgasCO2 in--PPFCCO2 in]. Rate of PFC loss from the circuit was calculated from mixed expired gas samples using a thermal detector analyzer. EEI and PFC loss rate were analyzed with respect to gas: PFC liquid flow ratios (analogous to the V/Q ratio). The results showed that 1) PFC loss rate and exchanger efficiency to remove CO2 increased with increasing gas: PFC liquid flow rates independent of the type of exchanger or PFC liquid; 2) PFC loss rate at any gas or liquid flow rate was greater for the bubbler than for the oxygenator; 3) the oxygenator was more efficient than the bubbler with respect to CO2 elimination; 4) although PFC loss rate increased with temperature and vapor pressure, there was little difference in the

  19. Large-scale asynchronous and distributed multidimensional replica exchange molecular simulations and efficiency analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F; Gallicchio, Emilio; Zhang, Bin W; He, Peng; Tan, Zhiqiang; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-09-01

    We describe methods to perform replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations asynchronously (ASyncRE). The methods are designed to facilitate large scale REMD simulations on grid computing networks consisting of heterogeneous and distributed computing environments as well as on homogeneous high-performance clusters. We have implemented these methods on NSF (National Science Foundation) XSEDE (Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) clusters and BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) distributed computing networks at Temple University and Brooklyn College at CUNY (the City University of New York). They are also being implemented on the IBM World Community Grid. To illustrate the methods, we have performed extensive (more than 60 ms in aggregate) simulations for the beta-cyclodextrin-heptanoate host-guest system in the context of one- and two-dimensional ASyncRE, and we used the results to estimate absolute binding free energies using the binding energy distribution analysis method. We propose ways to improve the efficiency of REMD simulations: these include increasing the number of exchanges attempted after a specified molecular dynamics (MD) period up to the fast exchange limit and/or adjusting the MD period to allow sufficient internal relaxation within each thermodynamic state. Although ASyncRE simulations generally require long MD periods (>picoseconds) per replica exchange cycle to minimize the overhead imposed by heterogeneous computing networks, we found that it is possible to reach an efficiency similar to conventional synchronous REMD, by optimizing the combination of the MD period and the number of exchanges attempted per cycle. PMID:26149645

  20. Time-Resolved Structural Analysis of Cation Exchange Reactions in Birnessite Using Synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopano, C. L.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Hanson, J. C.; Lee, Y.; Komarneni, S.

    2002-12-01

    Birnessite ((Na,Ca,Mn2+) Mn7O142.8H2O) is a layered Mn-oxide with a 7.2Å spacing between the Mn octahedral sheets. Since birnessite is an abundant phase in soils, desert varnishes, and ocean nodules, it plays a significant role in soil and groundwater chemistry. Experiments by Golden et al. (1986,1987) have demonstrated that Na-buserite (hydrated birnessite) readily exchanges Na+ for a variety of other cations, including K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Ni2+, and Sr2+. In light of its high cation exchange capacity, birnessite is industrially important for ion and molecular sieves and cathodic materials. In addition, birnessite serves as a precursor in the synthesis of todorokite, which has a 3x3 tunnel structure and is used as an octahedral sieve. We monitored cation-exchange reactions in birnessite by time-resolved X-ray powder diffraction with a simple flow-through cell at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The flow-through cell was developed by Lee and Parise at SUNY-Stony Brook, and this work represents its first application to Mn oxides. A series of synthetic Na-birnessite samples were saturated with chloride solutions containing dissolved K+, Mg2+, and Ba2+, ranging from 0.1M to 0.001M. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected every ~ 3 minutes. The synchrotron experiments revealed that complete cation exchange occurs within three hours, and significant modifications of the arrangements of interlayer cations and water molecules accompany the exchange. Specifically, the replacement of Na by Mg resulted in the continuous growth of a discrete buserite-like phase with a 10Å layer spacing, while replacement of Na by K and Ba retained the 7Å spacing. K replacement of Na resulted in gradually decreasing peak intensity and peak merging. The Ba exchange yielded an abrupt decrease in diffraction intensities followed by a more gradual lattice change over the last 2 hours. Rietveld analysis led to the first determination of the structure of Ba-birnessite in space

  1. HDX Workbench: Software for the Analysis of H/D Exchange MS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Bruce D.; Willis, Scooter; Lauer, Janelle L.; Landgraf, Rachelle R.; West, Graham M.; Marciano, David; Novick, Scott; Goswami, Devrishi; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2012-09-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is an established method for the interrogation of protein conformation and dynamics. While the data analysis challenge of HDX-MS has been addressed by a number of software packages, new computational tools are needed to keep pace with the improved methods and throughput of this technique. To address these needs, we report an integrated desktop program titled HDX Workbench, which facilitates automation, management, visualization, and statistical cross-comparison of large HDX data sets. Using the software, validated data analysis can be achieved at the rate of generation. The application is available at the project home page http://hdx.florida.scripps.edu.

  2. Sister chromatid exchange analysis to monitor genotoxic chemicals. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis for toxicological studies. SCE analysis are very sensitive measures of genotoxic damage to chromosomes. SCE toxicological studies analyzing ionizing radiation, chromium compounds, styrene, paint thinner, mercury, cigarette smoke, coal dust, fuel oil, insecticides, ethylene oxide, diesel exhaust, and polychlorinated biphenyls are discussed. SCE studies using both human and animal tissue cultures are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Capillary ion-exchange chromatography with nanogram sensitivity for the analysis of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rea, Jennifer C; Freistadt, Benny S; McDonald, Daniel; Farnan, Dell; Wang, Yajun Jennifer

    2015-12-11

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) is widely used for profiling the charge heterogeneity of proteins, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Despite good resolving power and robustness, ionic strength-based ion-exchange separations are generally product specific and can be time consuming to develop. In addition, conventional analytical scale ion-exchange separations require tens of micrograms of mAbs for each injection, amounts that are often unavailable in sample-limited applications. We report the development of a capillary IEC (c-IEC) methodology for the analysis of nanogram amounts of mAb charge variants. Several key modifications were made to a commercially available liquid chromatography system to perform c-IEC for charge variant analysis of mAbs with nanogram sensitivity. We demonstrate the method for multiple monoclonal antibodies, including antibody fragments, on different columns from different manufacturers. Relative standard deviations of <10% were achieved for relative peak areas of main peak, acidic and basic regions, which are common regions of interest for quantifying monoclonal antibody charge variants using IEC. The results herein demonstrate the excellent sensitivity of this c-IEC characterization method, which can be used for analyzing charge variants in sample-limited applications, such as early-stage candidate screening and in vivo studies.

  4. Optimal Shape Design of Compact Heat Exchangers Based on Adjoint Analysis of Momentum and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Suzuki, Yuji; Kasagi, Nobuhide

    An adjoint-based shape optimization method of heat exchangers, which takes into account the heat transfer performance with the pressure loss penalty, is proposed, and its effectiveness is examined through a series of numerical simulation. Undulated heat transfer surface is optimized under an isothermal heated condition based on the variational method with the first derivative of the cost function, which is determined by an adjoint analysis of momentum and heat transfer. When applied to a modeled heat-exchanger passage with a pair of oblique wavy walls, the present optimization method refines the duct shape so as to enhance the heat transfer while suppressing the flow separation. It is shown that the j/f factor is further increased by 4% from the best value of the initial obliquely wavy duct. The effects of the initial wave amplitude upon the shape evolution process are also investigated.

  5. Neutron activation analysis of nickel purified by floating zone-refining and anion exchange.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, M; Yakushiji, K; Kikuchi, T; Sato, M; Yanagisawa, E; Igaki, K; Mizohata, A; Mamuro, T; Tsujimoto, T

    1981-04-01

    Nondestructive neutron activation analysis was performed on the nickel purified by floating zone-refining and anion exchange. It is found that floating zone-refining in vacuum is effective to remove Na, Sc, Cr, Zn, As, Ag, Sb and Hg through vaporization in addition to elimination of Se, Sb, Ta, Sm and Tb through segregation. Anion exchange method is also effective to separate Fe, Co, Zn, Mo, Hg, Th and U usually contained in the commercial nickel sources. It is concluded that combination of these two purification methods is required to obtain high purity nickel, since floating zone-refining is known ineffective to eliminate Fe and Co, main impurities in commercial nickel sources. PMID:7291628

  6. SPECIAL ANALYSIS FOR SLIT TRENCH DISPOSAL OF THE REACTOR PROCESS HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.; Collard, L.; Aleman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Butcher, T.

    2012-06-18

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), in response to a request from Solid Waste Management (SWM), conducted a Special Analysis (SA) to evaluate the performance of nineteen heat exchangers that are to be disposed in the E-Area low level waste facility Slit Trench 9 (ST 9). Although these nineteen heat exchangers were never decontaminated, the majority of the radionuclides in the heat exchanger inventory list were determined to be acceptable for burial because they are less than the 'generic' waste form inventory limits given in the 2008 Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC, 2008). However, as generic waste, the H-3 and C-14 inventories resulted in unacceptable sum-of-fractions (SOFs). Initial scoping analyses performed by SRNL indicated that if alterations were made to certain external nozzles to mitigate various potential leak paths, acceptable SOFs could be achieved through the use of a 'Special' waste form. This SA provides the technical basis for this new 'Special' waste form and provides the inventory limits for H-3 and C-14 for these nineteen heat exchangers such that the nineteen heat exchangers can be disposed in ST 9. This 'Special' waste form is limited to these nineteen heat exchangers in ST 9 and applies for H-3 and C-14, which are designated as H-3X and C-14X, respectively. The SA follows the same methodology used in the 2008 PA and the 2008 SA except for the modeling enhancements noted below. Infiltration rates above the heat exchangers are identical to those used in the 2008 PA; however, flow through the heat exchangers is unique. Because it is unknown exactly how sealed heat exchanger openings will perform and how surface and embedded contaminants will be released, multiple base cases or scenarios were established to investigate a set of performances. Each scenario consists of flow options (based on the performance of sealed openings) and a near-field release of contaminants (based on corrosion and diffusion performance). Two disposal

  7. High heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis. [RL10-2B engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, Thomas D.; Kanic, Paul G.; Peckham, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-2B engine, a derivative of the RL10, is capable of multimode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2% of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10% of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-2B engine during the low thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidizer heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. The design, concept verification testing and analysis for such a heat exchanger is discussed. The design presented uses a high efficiency compact core to vaporize the oxygen, and in the self-contained unit, attenuates any pressure and flow oscillations which result from unstable boiling in the core. This approach is referred to as the high heat transfer design. An alternative approach which prevents unstable boiling of the oxygen by limiting the heat transfer is referred to as the low heat transfer design and is reported in Pratt & Whitney report FR-19135-2.

  8. A Model for Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Tether Momentum Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen; Johnson, David; Sorensen, Kirk; Welzyn, Ken; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems may enable high-energy missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by serving as an 'upper stage in space'. Existing rockets that use an MXER tether station could double their capability to launch communications satellites and help improve US competitiveness. A MXER tether station would boost spacecraft from low Earth orbit to a high-energy orbit quickly, like a high-thrust rocket. Then, using the same principles that make an electric motor work, it would slowly rebuild its orbital momentum by pushing against the Earth's magnetic field-without using any propellant. One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost tether systems is in the analysis and design of the capture mechanism and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. This paper will present a model for a momentum-exchange tether system that can simulate and evaluate the performance and requirements of such a system.

  9. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE WASTE REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2010-07-12

    The small column ion exchange (SCIX) process treats low curie salt (LCS) waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into the CST bed. A CST column loaded with radioactive cesium will generate significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs of the CST sorption column can not handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally within the column and degrade the performance of the ion-exchange process. The CST starts to degrade at about 80 to 85 C, and the CST completely changes to another material above 120 C. In addition, the process solution will boil around 130 C. If the column boiled dry, the sorbent could plug the column and require replacement of the column module. The objective of the present work is to compute temperature distributions across the column as a function of transit time after the initiation of accidents when there is loss of the salt solution flow in the CST column under abnormal conditions of the process operations. In this situation, the customer requested that the calculations should be conservative in that the model results would show the maximum centerline temperatures achievable by the CST design configurations. The thermal analysis results will be used to evaluate the fluid temperature distributions and the process component temperatures within the ion exchange system. This information will also assist in the system design and maintenance.

  10. Horizontal Heat Exchanger Design and Analysis for Passive Heat Removal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vierow, Karen

    2005-08-29

    This report describes a three-year project to investigate the major factors of horizontal heat exchanger performance in passive containment heat removal from a light water reactor following a design basis accident LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The heat exchanger studied in this work may be used in advanced and innovative reactors, in which passive heat removal systems are adopted to improve safety and reliability The application of horizontal tube-bundle condensers to passive containment heat removal is new. In order to show the feasibility of horizontal heat exchangers for passive containment cooling, the following aspects were investigated: 1. the condensation heat transfer characteristics when the incoming fluid contains noncondensable gases 2. the effectiveness of condensate draining in the horizontal orientation 3. the conditions that may lead to unstable condenser operation or highly degraded performance 4. multi-tube behavior with the associated secondary-side effects This project consisted of two experimental investigations and analytical model development for incorporation into industry safety codes such as TRAC and RELAP. A physical understanding of the flow and heat transfer phenomena was obtained and reflected in the analysis models. Two gradute students (one funded by the program) and seven undergraduate students obtained research experience as a part of this program.

  11. The use of multiobjective calibration and regional sensitivity analysis in simulating hyporheic exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Stone, Mark; Davis, Clinton; McKay, Alan

    2012-01-01

    We describe an approach for calibrating a two-dimensional (2-D) flow model of hyporheic exchange using observations of temperature and pressure to estimate hydraulic and thermal properties. A longitudinal 2-D heat and flow model was constructed for a riffle-pool sequence to simulate flow paths and flux rates for variable discharge conditions. A uniform random sampling approach was used to examine the solution space and identify optimal values at local and regional scales. We used a regional sensitivity analysis to examine the effects of parameter correlation and nonuniqueness commonly encountered in multidimensional modeling. The results from this study demonstrate the ability to estimate hydraulic and thermal parameters using measurements of temperature and pressure to simulate exchange and flow paths. Examination of the local parameter space provides the potential for refinement of zones that are used to represent sediment heterogeneity within the model. The results indicate vertical hydraulic conductivity was not identifiable solely using pressure observations; however, a distinct minimum was identified using temperature observations. The measured temperature and pressure and estimated vertical hydraulic conductivity values indicate the presence of a discontinuous low-permeability deposit that limits the vertical penetration of seepage beneath the riffle, whereas there is a much greater exchange where the low-permeability deposit is absent. Using both temperature and pressure to constrain the parameter estimation process provides the lowest overall root-mean-square error as compared to using solely temperature or pressure observations. This study demonstrates the benefits of combining continuous temperature and pressure for simulating hyporheic exchange and flow in a riffle-pool sequence. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Thermal sensors utilizing thin layer technology applied to the analysis of aeronautical thermal exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godefroy, J. C.; Gageant, C.; Francois, D.

    Thin film surface thermometers and thermal gradient fluxmeters developed by ONERA to monitor thermal exchanges in aircraft engines to predict the remaining service life of the components are described. The sensors, less than 80 microns thick, with flexible Kapton dielectric layers and metal substrates, are integrated into the shape of the surface being monitored. Features of Cu-n, Ni-, Au-, and Cr-based films, including mounting and circuitry methods that permit calibration and accurate signal analysis, are summarized. Results are discussed from sample applications of the devices on a symmetric NACA 65(1)-012 airfoil and on a turbine blade.

  13. Evolution of the Tropical Cyclone Integrated Data Exchange And Analysis System (TC-IDEAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turk, J.; Chao, Y.; Haddad, Z.; Hristova-Veleva, S.; Knosp, B.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Li, P.; Licata, S.; Poulsen, W.; Su, H.; Tanelli, S.; Vane, D.; Vu, Q.; Goodman, H. M.; Blakeslee, R.; Conover, H.; Hall, J.; He, Y.; Regner, K.; Knapp, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The Tropical Cyclone Integrated Data Exchange and Analysis System (TC-IDEAS) is being jointly developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as part of NASA's Hurricane Science Research Program. The long-term goal is to create a comprehensive tropical cyclone database of satellite and airborne observations, in-situ measurements and model simulations containing parameters that pertain to the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storms; the air-sea interaction processes; and the large-scale environment.

  14. Analysis of charge-exchange spectroscopy data by combining genetic and Gauss-Newton algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ma; Haoyi, Zuo; Yanling, Wei; Liang, Liu; Wenjin, Chen; Xiaoxue, He; Shirong, Luo

    2015-11-01

    The temperature and rotation velocity profile of ions in a tokamak are two characteristic parameters that reflect the plasma's behavior. Measurement of the two parameters relies on analyzing an active charge exchange spectroscopy diagnostic. However, a very challenging problem in such a diagnostic is the existence of interfering spectral lines, which can mislead the spectrum analysis process. This work proposes combining a genetic algorithm with the Gauss-Newton method (GAGN) to address this problem. Using this GAGN algorithm, we can effectively distinguish between the useful spectrum line and the interfering spectral lines within the spectroscopic output. The accuracy and stability of this algorithm are verified using both numerical simulation and actual measurements.

  15. Analysis and Perspective from the Complex Aerospace Systems Exchange (CASE) 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Parker, Peter A.; Detweiler, Kurt N.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Dress, David A.; Kimmel, William M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center embedded four rapporteurs at the Complex Aerospace Systems Exchange (CASE) held in August 2013 with the objective to capture the essence of the conference presentations and discussions. CASE was established to provide a discussion forum among chief engineers, program managers, and systems engineers on challenges in the engineering of complex aerospace systems. The meeting consists of invited presentations and panels from industry, academia, and government followed by discussions among attendees. This report presents the major and reoccurring themes captured throughout the meeting and provides analysis and insights to further the CASE mission.

  16. Ion Exchange Equilibrium and Kinetic Properties of Polyacrylate Films and Applications to Chemical Analysis and Environmental Decontamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    One of the goals of the original proposal was to study how cross-linking affects the properties of an ion exchange material(IEM) developed at Lewis Research Center. However, prior to the start of this work, other workers at LERC investigated the effect of cross-linking on the properties of this material. Other than variation in the ion exchange capacity, the chemical characteristics were shown to be independent of the cross-linking agent, and the degree of cross-linking. New physical forms of the film were developed (film, supported film, various sizes of beads, and powder). All showed similar properties with respect to ion exchange equilibria but the kinetics of ion exchange depended on the surface area per unit mass; the powder form of the IEM exchanging much more rapidly than the other forms. The research performed under this grant was directed towards the application of the IEM to the analysis of metal ions at environmental concentrations.

  17. Estimation of Hydrogen-Exchange Protection Factors from MD Simulation Based on Amide Hydrogen Bonding Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hee; Venable, John D; Steckler, Caitlin; Cellitti, Susan E; Lesley, Scott A; Spraggon, Glen; Brock, Ansgar

    2015-09-28

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) studies have provided critical insight into our understanding of protein folding, structure, and dynamics. More recently, hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) has become a widely applicable tool for HX studies. The interpretation of the wealth of data generated by HX-MS experiments as well as other HX methods would greatly benefit from the availability of exchange predictions derived from structures or models for comparison with experiment. Most reported computational HX modeling studies have employed solvent-accessible-surface-area based metrics in attempts to interpret HX data on the basis of structures or models. In this study, a computational HX-MS prediction method based on classification of the amide hydrogen bonding modes mimicking the local unfolding model is demonstrated. Analysis of the NH bonding configurations from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation snapshots is used to determine partitioning over bonded and nonbonded NH states and is directly mapped into a protection factor (PF) using a logistics growth function. Predicted PFs are then used for calculating deuteration values of peptides and compared with experimental data. Hydrogen exchange MS data for fatty acid synthase thioesterase (FAS-TE) collected for a range of pHs and temperatures was used for detailed evaluation of the approach. High correlation between prediction and experiment for observable fragment peptides is observed in the FAS-TE and additional benchmarking systems that included various apo/holo proteins for which literature data were available. In addition, it is shown that HX modeling can improve experimental resolution through decomposition of in-exchange curves into rate classes, which correlate with prediction from MD. Successful rate class decompositions provide further evidence that the presented approach captures the underlying physical processes correctly at the single residue level. This assessment is further strengthened in a comparison of

  18. Quantitative analysis of intra-Golgi transport shows intercisternal exchange for all cargo

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Rao, Madan; Sens, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling the transport of proteins through the Golgi stack of mammalian and plant cells is the subject of intense debate, with two models, cisternal progression and intercisternal exchange, emerging as major contenders. A variety of transport experiments have claimed support for each of these models. We reevaluate these experiments using a single quantitative coarse-grained framework of intra-Golgi transport that accounts for both transport models and their many variants. Our analysis makes a definitive case for the existence of intercisternal exchange both for small membrane proteins and large protein complexes––this implies that membrane structures larger than the typical protein-coated vesicles must be involved in transport. Notwithstanding, we find that current observations on protein transport cannot rule out cisternal progression as contributing significantly to the transport process. To discriminate between the different models of intra-Golgi transport, we suggest experiments and an analysis based on our extended theoretical framework that compare the dynamics of transiting and resident proteins. PMID:24019488

  19. A 2-D oscillating flow analysis in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional oscillating flow analysis was conducted, simulating the gas flow inside Stirling heat exchangers. Both laminar and turbulent oscillating pipe flow were investigated numerically for Re(max) = 1920 (Va = 80), 10800 (Va = 272), 19300 (Va = 272), and 60800 (Va = 126). The results are compared with experimental results of previous investigators. Also, predictions of the flow regime on present oscillating flow conditions were checked by comparing velocity amplitudes and phase differences with those from laminar theory and quasi-steady profile. A high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was used for turbulent oscillating pipe flow. Finally, performance evaluation of the K-epsilon model was made to explore the applicability of quasi-steady turbulent models to unsteady oscillating flow analysis.

  20. A 2-D oscillating flow analysis in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1991-01-01

    A two dimensional oscillating flow analysis was conducted, simulating the gas flow inside Stirling heat exchangers. Both laminar and turbulent oscillating pipe flow were investigated numerically for Re(max) = 1920 (Va = 80), 10800 (Va = 272), 19300 (Va = 272), and 60800 (Va = 126). The results are compared with experimental results of previous investigators. Also, predictions of the flow regime on present oscillating flow conditions were checked by comparing velocity amplitudes and phase differences with those from laminar theory and quasi-steady profile. A high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was used for turbulent oscillating pipe flow. Finally, performance evaluation of the K-epsilon model was made to explore the applicability of quasi-steady turbulent models to unsteady oscillating flow analysis.

  1. Fluid Analysis and Improved Structure of an ATEG Heat Exchanger Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. B.; Deng, Y. D.; Su, C. Q.; Yuan, X. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a numerical model has been employed to analyze the internal flow field distribution in a heat exchanger applied for an automotive thermoelectric generator based on computational fluid dynamics. The model simulates the influence of factors relevant to the heat exchanger, including the automotive waste heat mass flow velocity, temperature, internal fins, and back pressure. The result is in good agreement with experimental test data. Sensitivity analysis of the inlet parameters shows that increase of the exhaust velocity, compared with the inlet temperature, makes little contribution (0.1 versus 0.19) to the heat transfer but results in a detrimental back pressure increase (0.69 versus 0.21). A configuration equipped with internal fins is proved to offer better thermal performance compared with that without fins. Finally, based on an attempt to improve the internal flow field, a more rational structure is obtained, offering a more homogeneous temperature distribution, higher average heat transfer coefficient, and lower back pressure.

  2. THERMAL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR SMALL ION-EXCHANGE CESIUM REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2009-12-29

    The In-Riser Ion Exchange program focuses on the development of in-tank systems to decontaminate high level waste (HLW) salt solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Hanford Site. Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) treatment for cesium removal is a primary in-riser technology for decontamination prior to final waste immobilization in Saltstone. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed onto the ion exchange media which is packed within a flow-through column. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) is being considered as the ion exchange media for the application of this technology at both sites. A packed column loaded with media containing radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. Under normal operating conditions, process fluid flow through the column can provide adequate heat removal from the columns. However, in the unexpected event of loss of fluid flow or fluid drainage from the column, the design must be adequate to handle the thermal load to avoid unacceptable temperature excursions. Otherwise, hot spots may develop locally which could degrade the performance of the ion-exchange media or the temperature could rise above column safety limits. Data exists which indicates that performance degradation with regard to cesium removal occurs with RF at 65C. In addition, the waste supernate solution will boil around 130C. As a result, two temperature limits have been assumed for this analysis. An additional upset scenario was considered involving the loss of the supernate solution due to inadvertent fluid drainage through the column boundary. In this case, the column containing the loaded media could be completely dry. This event is expected to result in high temperatures that could damage the column or cause the RF sorbent material to undergo undesired physical changes. One objective of these calculations is to determine the range of temperatures that should be evaluated during testing with the RF

  3. Vibration mode analysis of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Liu, L. F.; Wei, M. Y.; Wu, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks usually undergo vibration during packing, transportation, and serving time, in particular for those used in the automobiles or portable equipment. To study the stack vibration response, based on finite element method (FEM), a mode analysis is carried out in the present paper. Using this method, we can distinguish the local vibration from the stack global modes, predict the vibration responses, such as deformed shape and direction, and discuss the effects of the clamping configuration and the clamping force magnitude on vibration modes. It is found that when the total clamping force remains the same, increasing the bolt number can strengthen the stack resistance to vibration in the clamping direction, but cannot obviously strengthen stack resistance to vibration in the translations perpendicular to clamping direction and the three axis rotations. Increasing the total clamping force can increase both of the stack global mode and the bolt local mode frequencies, but will decrease the gasket local mode frequency.

  4. Dehydration enthalpy of alkali-cations-exchanged montmorillonite from thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, M; Balme, S; Henn, F; Giuntini, J C; Belarbi, H; Haouzi, A

    2009-01-15

    Dehydration of a series of homoionic alkali-exchanged montmorillonites is studied at different treatment temperatures by means of thermogravimetric analysis. More specifically, we investigate the last stages of dehydration when the number of adsorbed water molecules corresponds, at maximum, to a monolayer. Weight losses are measured at several constant temperatures as a function of time. Application of Van't Hoff's law yields the dehydration enthalpy. Trends and data similar to those reported from other experimental conditions are found. Comparison with X-ray data and with the dissociation enthalpy of alkali cation/water complexes shows that dehydration of weakly hydrated homoionic alkali montmorillonites results from the competition between opposite energy contributions due to (i) the cation solvation, (ii) the hydration of the silicate interlayer surface, and (iii) the structural swelling. So, depending on the balance between these various energy contributions, different behaviors are observed according to the nature of the alkali cations. PMID:18973904

  5. Analysis and Exchange of Multimedia Laboratory Data Using the Brain Database

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Steven L.

    1990-01-01

    Two principal goals of the Brain Database are: 1) to support laboratory data collection and analysis of multimedia information about the nervous system and 2) to support exchange of these data among researchers and clinicians who may be physically distant. This has been achieved by an implementation of experimental and clinical records within a relational database. An Image Series Editor has been created that provides a graphical interface to these data for the purposes of annotation, quantification and other analyses. Cooperating laboratories each maintain their own copies of the Brain Database to which they may add private data. Although the data in a given experimental or patient record will be distributed among many tables and external image files, the user can treat each record as a unit that can be extracted from the local database and sent to a distant colleague.

  6. Virtual DNA analysis as a platform for interlaboratory data exchange of HLA DNA typing results.

    PubMed

    Helmberg, W; Zahn, R; Keller, E; Weinmair, B; Lanzer, G; Albert, E

    1999-10-01

    In 1998, the German DNA Exchange offered the possibility to report typing data as virtual DNA. Participating labs have been equipped with software based on the principle of Virtual DNA Analysis (VDA). This approach allows the combination of sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO), sequence-specific primer (SSP) and sequence-based typing (SBT) results. The use of all types of test kits has been allowed without any limitations, as long as basic sequence information on SSOs or SSPs was available, at least the sequence and the position of the detected motif on the sample DNA. Typing raw data of the actual SSO-SSP and, if performed, SBT information was collected. Participating labs received 20 DNA samples to type. Fourteen labs returned data on 1,250 single-locus testings. Reported data consisted of 317 SBT data, 452 SSO kits and 1,795 SSP kits with 43,312 single SSO/ SSP reactivities. One hundred and twenty-six different typing kits (unique laboratory-specific kits, commercial kits from 7 companies) have been used. In 30 (2.4%) single-locus testings, at least one single SSO/SSP reactivity has been false-positive or -negative, thus not leading to a valid result on primary evaluation. Eight of these 30 cases were due to the presence of a new DRB1*14 allele in sample no. 2. Thirty-five tests (2.8%) showed wrong allele assignments. This first attempt to collect raw typing data instead of typing interpretation on a larger scale shows the advantages of Virtual DNA Analysis like interlaboratory data exchange without loss of information, transparency of typing interpretation and reinterpretation of typing data with an updated allele database. The VDA format is a useful tool for workshops and bone marrow donor registries. PMID:10551421

  7. Virtual DNA analysis as a platform for interlaboratory data exchange of HLA DNA typing results.

    PubMed

    Helmberg, W; Zahn, R; Keller, E; Weinmair, B; Lanzer, G; Albert, E

    1999-10-01

    In 1998, the German DNA Exchange offered the possibility to report typing data as virtual DNA. Participating labs have been equipped with software based on the principle of Virtual DNA Analysis (VDA). This approach allows the combination of sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO), sequence-specific primer (SSP) and sequence-based typing (SBT) results. The use of all types of test kits has been allowed without any limitations, as long as basic sequence information on SSOs or SSPs was available, at least the sequence and the position of the detected motif on the sample DNA. Typing raw data of the actual SSO-SSP and, if performed, SBT information was collected. Participating labs received 20 DNA samples to type. Fourteen labs returned data on 1,250 single-locus testings. Reported data consisted of 317 SBT data, 452 SSO kits and 1,795 SSP kits with 43,312 single SSO/ SSP reactivities. One hundred and twenty-six different typing kits (unique laboratory-specific kits, commercial kits from 7 companies) have been used. In 30 (2.4%) single-locus testings, at least one single SSO/SSP reactivity has been false-positive or -negative, thus not leading to a valid result on primary evaluation. Eight of these 30 cases were due to the presence of a new DRB1*14 allele in sample no. 2. Thirty-five tests (2.8%) showed wrong allele assignments. This first attempt to collect raw typing data instead of typing interpretation on a larger scale shows the advantages of Virtual DNA Analysis like interlaboratory data exchange without loss of information, transparency of typing interpretation and reinterpretation of typing data with an updated allele database. The VDA format is a useful tool for workshops and bone marrow donor registries.

  8. Thermal and economic analysis of plastic heat exchangers for solar water heating

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Davidson, J.; Raman, R.; Mantell, S.

    1999-07-01

    The feasibility of polymer heat exchangers for solar water heaters is examined in terms of thermal performance and cost of tube-in-shell and immersed designs. High temperature nylon and cross-linked polyethylene were identified as suitable polymers for this application. These materials can meet the high temperature and pressure requirements of a domestic potable hot water system. The heat exchanger designs are compared for heat transfer area required to provide 3,000 and 6,000 W. A nylon tube-in-shell heat exchanger, sized for a 3,000 W load, is approximately 80% of the cost of a copper tube-in-shell heat exchanger. For an immersed heat exchanger, a high temperature nylon tube bank design has the lowest cost. The nylon tube bank heat exchanger, sized for a 3,000 W load, is approximately 80% the cost of an immersed coiled copper tube heat exchanger.

  9. Application of artificial neural network models and principal component analysis method in predicting stock prices on Tehran Stock Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Javad; Rounaghi, Mohammad Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    Stock price changes are receiving the increasing attention of investors, especially those who have long-term aims. The present study intends to assess the predictability of prices on Tehran Stock Exchange through the application of artificial neural network models and principal component analysis method and using 20 accounting variables. Finally, goodness of fit for principal component analysis has been determined through real values, and the effective factors in Tehran Stock Exchange prices have been accurately predicted and modeled in the form of a new pattern consisting of all variables.

  10. Study on passive momentum exchange landing gear using two-dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Hara, Susumu; Otsuki, Masatsugu

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses a landing response control system based on the momentum exchange principle for planetary exploration spacecraft. In the past, landing gear systems with cantilever designs that incorporate honeycomb materials to dissipate shock energy through plastic deformation have been used, but once tested before launch, the system cannot be used in a real mission. The sky crane system used for the Mars Science Laboratory by NASA can achieve a safe and precise landing, but it is highly complex. This paper introduces a momentum exchange impact damper (MEID) that absorbs the controlled object's momentum with extra masses called damper masses. The MEID is reusable, which makes it easy to ensure the landing gear's reliability. In this system, only passive elements such as springs are needed. A single-axis (SA) model has already been used to verify the effectiveness of MEIDs through simulations and experiments measuring the rebound height of the spacecraft. However, the SA model cannot address the rotational motion and tipping of the spacecraft. This paper presents a two-landing-gear-system (TLGS) model in which multiple MEIDs are equipped for two-dimensional analysis. Unlike in the authors' previous studies, in this study each MEID is launched when the corresponding landing gear lands and the MEIDs do not contain active actuators. This mechanism can be used to realize advanced control specifications, and it is simply compared with previous mechanisms including actuators, in which all of the MEIDs are launched simultaneously. If each MEID works when the corresponding gear lands, the rebound height of each gear can be minimized, and tipping can be prevented, as demonstrated by the results of our simulations.

  11. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  12. DETAILED LOOP MODEL (DLM) ANALYSIS OF LIQUID SOLAR THERMOSIPHONS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mertol, A.; Place, W.; Webster, T.; Greif, R.

    1981-06-01

    An analytical Detailed Loop Model (DLM) has been developed to analyze the performance of solar thermosiphon water heaters with heat exchangers in storage tanks. The model has been used to study the performance of thermosiphons as a function of heat exchanger characteristics, heat transfer fluids, flow resistances, tank stratification, and tank elevation relative to the collector. The results indicate that good performance can be attained with these systems compared to thermosiphons without heat exchangers.

  13. [Theoretical analysis of factors affecting heat exchange stability of human body with environment].

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Wang, X

    1998-06-01

    Life could not be normal without the heat produced by metabolism of human body being transmitted into environment. This paper discussed the ways of heat exchange of human body with the environment, and analyzed their effects on the stability of heat exchange theoretically. In addition, factors that affects the stability of heat exchange were studied. The results indicate that the environmental temperature is the most important factor.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA FOR THE SMALL ION EXCHANGE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-09-12

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project is designed to accelerate closure of High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS tanks store HLW in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. An in-tank ion exchange process is being designed to treat supernate and dissolved saltcake waste. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed into Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. The waste supernate solution within the ion exchange bed will boil around 120 C. Solution superheating above the boiling point within the column could lead to violent hazardous energy releases. System heating from loaded CST is also of concern in other process modules, such as the waste tank. Due to tank structural integrity concerns, the wall temperature limit for the SRS waste tanks is 100 C. The transfer of cesium-loaded CST to the tank could result in localized hot spots on the tank floor and walls which may exceed this limit. As a result, thermal modeling calculations have been conducted to predict the maximum temperatures achievable both in the column and in the waste tank. As specified in the associated Technical Task Plan, one objective of the present work was to compute temperature distributions within the ion exchange column module under accident scenarios including loss of salt solution flow through the bed and loss of coolant system flow. The column modeling domain and the scope of the calculations in this case were broadened relative to previous two-dimensional calculations to include vertical temperature distributions within the packed bed of ion exchange media as well as the upper column plenum region containing only fluid. The baseline design conditions and in-column modeling domain for the ion-exchange column module are shown in Figure 1. These evaluations assumed the maximum

  15. Rapid analysis for theophylline in serum by use of high-pressure cation-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, M; Chidsey, C

    1975-06-01

    We have developed a quantitative assay for serum theophylline by high-pressure cation-exchange chromatography. As little as 0.1-ml aliquots of serum were prepared for analysis simply by diluting them with a solution of the internal standard (8-chlorotheophylline). Theophylline and the internal standard were eluted in 17 and 27.5 min, respectively, and the peaks for them were distinct from those of other xanthines and uric acids. We encountered no interference when we used: (a) plasma obtained from blood anticoagulated with citrate; (b) hemolyzed, lipemic, or icteric serum; or (c) 52 samples from patients who were receiving various other medications. An analysis of calibration suggested that errors greater than plus or minus 2.6 mg/liter, a clinically acceptable range, were highly unlikely. Sensitivity was sufficient to identify less than 2.5 mg/liter. This assay was compared with the usual method involving solvent extraction and absorbance measurement in the ultraviolet and found to have similar accuracy, although it is easier, faster, requires less sample, and potentially is more specific.

  16. Foreign exchange market data analysis reveals statistical features that predict price movement acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Ochiai, Tomoshiro

    2012-05-01

    Increasingly accessible financial data allow researchers to infer market-dynamics-based laws and to propose models that are able to reproduce them. In recent years, several stylized facts have been uncovered. Here we perform an extensive analysis of foreign exchange data that leads to the unveiling of a statistical financial law. First, our findings show that, on average, volatility increases more when the price exceeds the highest (or lowest) value, i.e., breaks the resistance line. We call this the breaking-acceleration effect. Second, our results show that the probability P(T) to break the resistance line in the past time T follows power law in both real data and theoretically simulated data. However, the probability calculated using real data is rather lower than the one obtained using a traditional Black-Scholes (BS) model. Taken together, the present analysis characterizes a different stylized fact of financial markets and shows that the market exceeds a past (historical) extreme price fewer times than expected by the BS model (the resistance effect). However, when the market does, we predict that the average volatility at that time point will be much higher. These findings indicate that any Markovian model does not faithfully capture the market dynamics.

  17. Confirmatory analysis of the AP1000 passive residual heat removal heat exchanger with 3-D computational fluid dynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schwall, James R.; Karim, Naeem U.; Thakkar, Jivan G.; Taylor, Creed; Schulz, Terry; Wright, Richard F.

    2006-07-01

    The AP1000 is an 1100 MWe advanced nuclear power plant that uses passive safety features to enhance plant safety and to provide significant and measurable improvements in plant simplification, reliability, investment protection and plant costs. The AP1000 received final design approval from the US-NRC in 2004. The AP1000 design is based on the AP600 design that received final design approval in 1999. Wherever possible, the AP1000 plant configuration and layout was kept the same as AP600 to take advantage of the maturity of the design and to minimize new design efforts. As a result, the two-loop configuration was maintained for AP1000, and the containment vessel diameter was kept the same. It was determined that this significant power up-rate was well within the capability of the passive safety features, and that the safety margins for AP1000 were greater than those of operating PWRs. A key feature of the passive core cooling system is the passive residual heat removal heat exchanger (PRHR HX) that provides decay heat removal for postulated LOCA and non-LOCA events. The PRHR HX is a C-tube heat exchanger located in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) above the core promoting natural circulation heat removal between the reactor cooling system and the tank. Component testing was performed for the AP600 PRHR HX to determine the heat transfer characteristics and to develop correlations to be used for the AP1000 safety analysis codes. The data from these tests were confirmed by subsequent integral tests at three separate facilities including the ROSA facility in Japan. Owing to the importance of this component, an independent analysis has been performed using the ATHOS-based computational fluid dynamics computer code PRHRCFD. Two separate models of the PRHR HX and IRWST have been developed representing the ROSA test geometry and the AP1000 plant geometry. Confirmation of the ROSA test results were used to validate PRHRCFD, and the AP1000 plant model

  18. Testing and analysis of load-side immersed heat exchangers for solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes work to determine the performance of load-side heat exchangers for use in residential solar domestic hot water systems. We measured the performance of four heat exchangers: a smooth coil and a finned coil having heat transfer areas of 2.5 m/sup 2/ (26 ft/sup 2/) and those having areas of 1.7 m/sup 2/ (19 ft/sup 2/). A numerical model using the thermal network program MITAS was constructed, and results were compared to the experimental results. Research showed a smooth coil with only 70% of the surface area of a finned coil performed better than the finned coil. Also, load-side heat exchangers can maintain and enhance stratification in storage tanks, permitting the use of control strategies that take advantage of stratified storage tanks to increase system performance. The analytical model, which agreed reasonably well with the experimental results, was used to vary heat exchanger flow rate and area and initial tank temperature for both a smooth- and a finned-coil heat exchanger. Increasing the heat exchanger flow rate and area results in higher heat transfer rates but not necessarily optimal performance. Lower initial tank temperatures resulted in reduced tank stratification. The smooth heat exchanger outperformed the finned heat exchanger with the same outside surface area. 15 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Thermographic analysis of flow distribution in compact heat exchangers for a Formula 1 car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffagni, E.; Levoni, P.; Piraccini, M.; Muscio, A.; Corticelli, M. A.; Barozzi, G. S.

    2007-01-01

    A non-intrusive approach is investigated to calculate the internal flow distribution in heat exchangers. In particular, the liquid flow rate can be determined in each tube of an air-liquid finned-tube heat exchanger. A purposely designed test bench impresses a sudden change of temperature of the liquid flowing through the heat exchanger. The thermal transient that follows is monitored by a thermographic camera. This measures the rise of surface temperature along each tube. The temperature evolution pattern is then correlated to the flow rate in the tube by simple mathematical processing. The heat exchanger is tested in still air. Modification is not required. The approach is tested on heat exchangers for a F1 race car, with encouraging results.

  20. Agricultural science in the wild: a social network analysis of farmer knowledge exchange.

    PubMed

    Wood, Brennon A; Blair, Hugh T; Gray, David I; Kemp, Peter D; Kenyon, Paul R; Morris, Steve T; Sewell, Alison M

    2014-01-01

    Responding to demands for transformed farming practices requires new forms of knowledge. Given their scale and complexity, agricultural problems can no longer be solved by linear transfers in which technology developed by specialists passes to farmers by way of extension intermediaries. Recent research on alternative approaches has focused on the innovation systems formed by interactions between heterogeneous actors. Rather than linear transfer, systems theory highlights network facilitation as a specialized function. This paper contributes to our understanding of such facilitation by investigating the networks in which farmers discuss science. We report findings based on the study of a pastoral farming experiment collaboratively undertaken by a group of 17 farmers and five scientists. Analysis of prior contact and alter sharing between the group's members indicates strongly tied and decentralized networks. Farmer knowledge exchanges about the experiment have been investigated using a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. Network surveys identified who the farmers contacted for knowledge before the study began and who they had talked to about the experiment by 18 months later. Open-ended interviews collected farmer statements about their most valuable contacts and these statements have been thematically analysed. The network analysis shows that farmers talked about the experiment with 192 people, most of whom were fellow farmers. Farmers with densely tied and occupationally homogeneous contacts grew their networks more than did farmers with contacts that are loosely tied and diverse. Thematic analysis reveals three general principles: farmers value knowledge delivered by persons rather than roles, privilege farming experience, and develop knowledge with empiricist rather than rationalist techniques. Taken together, these findings suggest that farmers deliberate about science in intensive and durable networks that have significant implications for theorizing

  1. Agricultural Science in the Wild: A Social Network Analysis of Farmer Knowledge Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Brennon A.; Blair, Hugh T.; Gray, David I.; Kemp, Peter D.; Kenyon, Paul R.; Morris, Steve T.; Sewell, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Responding to demands for transformed farming practices requires new forms of knowledge. Given their scale and complexity, agricultural problems can no longer be solved by linear transfers in which technology developed by specialists passes to farmers by way of extension intermediaries. Recent research on alternative approaches has focused on the innovation systems formed by interactions between heterogeneous actors. Rather than linear transfer, systems theory highlights network facilitation as a specialized function. This paper contributes to our understanding of such facilitation by investigating the networks in which farmers discuss science. We report findings based on the study of a pastoral farming experiment collaboratively undertaken by a group of 17 farmers and five scientists. Analysis of prior contact and alter sharing between the group’s members indicates strongly tied and decentralized networks. Farmer knowledge exchanges about the experiment have been investigated using a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. Network surveys identified who the farmers contacted for knowledge before the study began and who they had talked to about the experiment by 18 months later. Open-ended interviews collected farmer statements about their most valuable contacts and these statements have been thematically analysed. The network analysis shows that farmers talked about the experiment with 192 people, most of whom were fellow farmers. Farmers with densely tied and occupationally homogeneous contacts grew their networks more than did farmers with contacts that are loosely tied and diverse. Thematic analysis reveals three general principles: farmers value knowledge delivered by persons rather than roles, privilege farming experience, and develop knowledge with empiricist rather than rationalist techniques. Taken together, these findings suggest that farmers deliberate about science in intensive and durable networks that have significant implications for

  2. A student's analysis of the Moi University-Linköping University exchange programme.

    PubMed

    Mwenda, A S

    2012-11-01

    Introduction : Moi University College of Health Sciences was established in 1989. It is comprised of the schools of medicine, nursing, public health and dentistry. Since its inception, the college has been in collaboration with Linköping University in Sweden. This collaboration has taken the form of student and staff exchanges, as well as infrastructure and library improvements. This study was carried out to analyse the exchange programme and highlight some of the strengths that the exchange programme brings to the students' academic experience. Methods : A qualitative cross-sectional survey was conducted among the students who participated in the elective/exchange programme in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by the participants. Additional data were obtained from the recommendations and conclusions from the reports that the students wrote after their participation in the exchange programme. Focus group discussions and key informant interviews were also carried out. Results : A total of 46 students participated in the exchange programme: 27 from Moi University and 19 from Linköping University. The disciplines of students reflected the undergraduate courses offered by these universities. The exchange programme's strengths were exposing students to new cultural settings, different healthcare system organisation and influencing future academic and personal lives, as well as making education global. The main challenge facing the exchange programme was language. Discussion : This study shows the exchange programme as a strong pillar of the medical education curriculum, enabling students to get a global perspective on their education, while exposing them to significant cultural and healthcare organisation diversity. There is a need to expand the collaboration so that more students have the opportunity to experience the overseas exchange programme. PMID:23823594

  3. HDX Match Software for the Data Analysis of Top-Down ECD-FTMS Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) combined with mass spectrometry is a powerful technique for studying protein structure. The recently developed top-down ECD-FTMS HDX approach (Pan J. et al., JACS, 2008) allows determination of the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of a protein's amide bonds, down to the single residue resolution. One of the existing limitations of this technology has been the laborious manual analysis of the MS/MS spectra. Here we present a software program for processing the data from these experiments. This program assigns the c- and z-fragment ion series of the protein, and calculates the number of the exchanged amide protons for each fragment by fitting the theoretically predicted isotopic envelopes of the deuterated fragments to the experimental data.

  4. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI - omega plot analysis of RF-spillover-corrected inverse CEST ratio asymmetry for simultaneous determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhua; Xiao, Gang; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Ran, Chongzhao; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to labile proton concentration and exchange rate, thus allowing measurement of dilute CEST agent and microenvironmental properties. However, CEST measurement depends not only on the CEST agent properties but also on the experimental conditions. Quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis has been proposed to address the limitation of the commonly used simplistic CEST-weighted calculation. Recent research has shown that the concomitant direct RF saturation (spillover) effect can be corrected using an inverse CEST ratio calculation. We postulated that a simplified qCEST analysis is feasible with omega plot analysis of the inverse CEST asymmetry calculation. Specifically, simulations showed that the numerically derived labile proton ratio and exchange rate were in good agreement with input values. In addition, the qCEST analysis was confirmed experimentally in a phantom with concurrent variation in CEST agent concentration and pH. Also, we demonstrated that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (P < 0.01) while the pH-dependent exchange rate followed a dominantly base-catalyzed exchange relationship (P < 0.01). In summary, our study verified that a simplified qCEST analysis can simultaneously determine labile proton ratio and exchange rate in a relatively complex in vitro CEST system.

  5. Analysis of the Charge Exchange Between the Human Body and Ground: Evaluation of “Earthing” From an Electrical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlin, Kent; Smith, Wayne; Chirgwin, Christopher; Appasani, Seshank; Rioux, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate “earthing” from an electrical perspective through measurement and analysis of the naturally occurring electron flow between the human body or a control and ground as this relates to the magnitude of the charge exchange, the relationship between the charge exchange and body functions (respiration and heart rate), and the detection of other information that might be contained in the charge exchange. Methods Sensitive, low-noise instrumentation was designed and fabricated to measure low-level current flow at low frequencies. This instrumentation was used to record current flow between human subjects or a control and ground, and these measurements were performed approximately 40 times under varied circumstances. The results of these measurements were analyzed to determine if information was contained in the current exchange. Results The currents flowing between the human body and ground were small (nanoamperes), and they correlated with subject motion. There did not appear to be any information contained in this exchange except for information about subject motion. Conclusions This study showed that currents flow between the environment (earth) and a grounded human body; however, these currents are small (nanoamperes) and do not appear to contain information other than information about subject motion. PMID:25435837

  6. Water Phase Change Heat Exchanger System Level Analysis for Low Lunar Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Ungar, Eugene; Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    In low Lunar orbit (LLO) the thermal environment is cyclic - extremely cold in the eclipse and as warm as room temperature near the subsolar point. Phase change material heat exchangers (PCHXs) are the best option for long term missions in these environments. The Orion spacecraft will use a n-pentadecane wax PCHX for its envisioned mission to LLO. Using water as a PCM material is attractive because its higher heat of fusion and greater density result in a lighter, more compact PCHX. To assess the use of a water PCHX for a human spacecraft in a circular LLO, a system level analysis was performed for the Orion spacecraft. Three cases were evaluated: 1) A one-to-one replacement of the wax PCHX on the internal thermal control loop with a water PCHX (including the appropriate control modifications), 2) reducing the radiator return setpoint temperature below Orion's value to enhance PCHX freezing, and 3) placing the water PCM on the external loop. The model showed that the water PCHX could not be used as a drop-in replacement for the wax PCHX. It did not freeze fully during the eclipse owing to its low freezing point. To obtain equivalent performance, 40% more radiator area than the Orion baseline was required. The study shows that, although water PCHXs are attractive at a component level, system level effects mean that they are not the best choice for LLO.

  7. Differential hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of protein–ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Michael J; Busby, Scott A; Pascal, Bruce D; West, Graham M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    Functional regulation of ligand-activated receptors is driven by alterations in the conformational dynamics of the protein upon ligand binding. Differential hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled with mass spectrometry has emerged as a rapid and sensitive approach for characterization of perturbations in conformational dynamics of proteins following ligand binding. While this technique is sensitive to detecting ligand interactions and alterations in receptor dynamics, it also can provide important mechanistic insights into ligand regulation. For example, HDX has been used to determine a novel mechanism of ligand activation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ, perform detailed analyses of binding modes of ligands within the ligand-binding pocket of two estrogen receptor isoforms, providing insight into selectivity, and helped classify different types of estrogen receptor-α ligands by correlating their pharmacology with the way they interact with the receptor based solely on hierarchical clustering of receptor HDX signatures. Beyond small-molecule–receptor interactions, this technique has also been applied to study protein–protein complexes, such as mapping antibody–antigen interactions. In this article, we summarize the current state of the differential HDX approaches and the future outlook. We summarize how HDX analysis of protein–ligand interactions has had an impact on biology and drug discovery. PMID:21329427

  8. Molecular and genetic analysis of the gene encoding the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strand exchange protein Sep1.

    PubMed

    Tishkoff, D X; Johnson, A W; Kolodner, R D

    1991-05-01

    Vegetatively grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells contain an activity that promotes a number of homologous pairing reactions. A major portion of this activity is due to strand exchange protein 1 (Sep1), which was originally purified as a 132,000-Mr species (R. Kolodner, D. H. Evans, and P. T. Morrison, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:5560-5564, 1987). The gene encoding Sep1 was cloned, and analysis of the cloned gene revealed a 4,587-bp open reading frame capable of encoding a 175,000-Mr protein. The protein encoded by this open reading frame was overproduced and purified and had a relative molecular weight of approximately 160,000. The 160,000-Mr protein was at least as active in promoting homologous pairing as the original 132,000-Mr species, which has been shown to be a fragment of the intact 160,000-Mr Sep1 protein. The SEP1 gene mapped to chromosome VII within 20 kbp of RAD54. Three Tn10LUK insertion mutations in the SEP1 gene were characterized. sep1 mutants grew more slowly than wild-type cells, showed a two- to fivefold decrease in the rate of spontaneous mitotic recombination between his4 heteroalleles, and were delayed in their ability to return to growth after UV or gamma irradiation. Sporulation of sep1/sep1 diploids was defective, as indicated by both a 10- to 40-fold reduction in spore formation and reduced spore viability of approximately 50%. The majority of sep1/sep1 diploid cells arrested in meiosis after commitment to recombination but prior to the meiosis I cell division. Return-to-growth experiments showed that sep1/sep1 his4X/his4B diploids exhibited a five- to sixfold greater meiotic induction of His+ recombinants than did isogenic SEP1/SEP1 strains. sep1/sep1 mutants also showed an increased frequency of exchange between HIS4, LEU2, and MAT and a lack of positive interference between these markers compared with wild-type controls. The interaction between sep1, rad50, and spo13 mutations suggested that SEP1 acts in meiosis in a pathway that is

  9. Anion exchange SPE and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in GHB analysis.

    PubMed

    Elian, Albert A; Hackett, Jeffery

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the extraction of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) from urine using solid-phase extraction (SPE) is described. SPE was performed on anion exchange columns after samples of urine had been diluted with de-ionized water. After application of the diluted samples containing GHB-d(6) as an internal standard, the sorbent was washed with deionized water and methanol and dried. The GHB was eluted from the SPE column with a solvent consisting of methanol containing 6% glacial acetic acid. The eluent was collected, evaporated to dryness, and dissolved in mobile phase (100 μL) for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in negative multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Liquid chromatography was performed in gradient mode employing a biphenyl column and a mobile phase consisting of acetontitrile (containing 0.1% formic acid) and 0.1% aqueous formic acid. The total run time for each analysis was less than 5 min. The limits of detection/quantification for this method were determined to be 50 and 100 ng/mL, respectively. The method was found to be linear from 500 ng/mL to 10,000 ng/mL (r(2)>0.995). The recovery of GHB was found to be greater than 75%. In this report, results of authentic urine samples analyzed for GHB by this method are presented. GHB concentrations in these samples were found to be range from less than 500 ng/mL to 5110 ng/mL.

  10. Analysis of thermosyphon heat exchangers for use in solar domestic hot water heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Scott David

    1998-11-01

    A recent innovation in the solar industry is the use of thermosyphon heat exchangers. Determining the performance of these systems requires knowledge of how thermosyphon flow rate and heat exchanger performance vary with operating conditions. This study demonstrates that several thermosyphon heat exchanger designs operate in the laminar mixed convection regime. Empirical heat transfer and pressure drop correlations are obtained for three tube-in-shell heat exchangers (four, seven, and nine tube). Thermosyphon flow is on the shell side. Correlations are obtained with uniform heat flux on the tube walls and with a mixture of glycol and water circulating inside the tubes. Ranges of Reynolds, Prandtl, and Grashof numbers are 50 to 1800, 2.5 and 6.0, and 4×105 to 1×108, respectively. Nusselt number correlations are presented in a form that combines the contributions of forced and natural convection, Nu4Mixed=Nu4Forced+Nu4Natural. The Nusselt number is influenced by natural convection when the term Raq0.25/(Re0.5Pr0.33) is greater than unity. Pressure drop through these three designs is not significantly affected by mixed convection because most pressure drop losses are at the heat exchanger inlet and outlet. A comparison and discussion of the performance of several other heat exchanger designs (tube-in-shell and coil-in- shell designs) are presented. Generally, the coil-in- shell heat exchangers perform better than the tube-in- shell heat exchangers. Data from all heat exchanger designs is used to develop a new one-dimensional model for thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating systems. The model requires two empirically determined relationships, pressure drop as a function of water mass flow rate and the overall heat transfer coefficient-area product (UA) as a function of Reynolds, Prandtl, and Grashof number. A testing protocol is presented that describes the procedure to obtain the data for the correlations. Two new TRNSYS component models are presented

  11. Performance analysis of distributed and centralized models for electronic medical record exchanges.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ean-Wen; Lee, Chiung-San; Jiang, Wey-Wen; Chiou, Shwu-Fen; Liu, Fei-Ying; Liou, Der-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Electronic medical record exchanges can save time and reduce cost by eliminating redundant data and typing errors. The major steps of record exchange consist of querying information from database, encoding data into messages, and sending and decoding messages. Three medical-record-exchange models were proposed in the past, including the distributed, centralized, and indexed models. In this paper, the queuing theory is applied to evaluate the performance of the three models. We estimate the service time for each queue of the CPU, database and network, and predict the response time, probable bottlenecks and system capacities of each model.

  12. Heat-transfer analysis of double-pipe heat exchangers for indirect-cycle SCW NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thind, Harwinder

    SuperCritical-Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are being developed as one of the Generation-IV nuclear-reactor concepts. SuperCritical Water (SCW) Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are expected to have much higher operating parameters compared to current NPPs, i.e., pressure of about 25 MPa and outlet temperature up to 625 °C. This study presents the heat transfer analysis of an intermediate Heat exchanger (HX) design for indirect-cycle concepts of Pressure-Tube (PT) and Pressure-Vessel (PV) SCWRs. Thermodynamic configurations with an intermediate HX gives a possibility to have a single-reheat option for PT and PV SCWRs without introducing steam-reheat channels into a reactor. Similar to the current CANDU and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPPs, steam generators separate the primary loop from the secondary loop. In this way, the primary loop can be completely enclosed in a reactor containment building. This study analyzes the heat transfer from a SCW primary (reactor) loop to a SCW and Super-Heated Steam (SHS) secondary (turbine) loop using a double-pipe intermediate HX. The numerical model is developed with MATLAB and NIST REFPROP software. Water from the primary loop flows through the inner pipe, and water from the secondary loop flows through the annulus in the counter direction of the double-pipe HX. The analysis on the double-pipe HX shows temperature and profiles of thermophysical properties along the heated length of the HX. It was found that the pseudocritical region has a significant effect on the temperature profiles and heat-transfer area of the HX. An analysis shows the effect of variation in pressure, temperature, mass flow rate, and pipe size on the pseudocritical region and the heat-transfer area of the HX. The results from the numerical model can be used to optimize the heat-transfer area of the HX. The higher pressure difference on the hot side and higher temperature difference between the hot and cold sides reduces the pseudocritical-region length, thus

  13. Diffusional analysis of the adsorption of methyl iodide on silver exchanged mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.; Counce, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The removal of organic iodides from off-gas streams is an important step in controlling the release of radioactive iodine to the environment during the treatment of radioactive wastes or the processing of some irradiated materials. Nine-well accepted mass transfer models were evaluated for their ability to adequately explain the observed CH{sub 3}I uptake behavior onto the Ag{degrees}Z. Linear and multidimensional regression techniques were used to estimate the diffusion constants and other model parameters, which then permitted the selection of an appropriate mass transfer model. Although a number of studies have been conducted to evaluate the loading of both elemental and methyl iodide on silver-exchanged mordenite, these studies focused primarily on the macro scale (deep bed) while evaluating the material under a broad range of process conditions and contaminants for total bed loading at the time of breakthrough. A few studies evaluated equilibrium or maximum loading. Thus, to date, only bulk loading data exist for the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z. Hence this is believed to be the first study to quantify the controlling mass transfer mechanisms of this process, It can be concluded from the analysis of the experimental data obtained by the {open_quotes}single-pellet{close_quotes} type experiments and for the process conditions used in this study that the overall mass transfer rate associated with the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z is affected by both micropore and macropore diffusion. The macropore diffusion rate was significantly faster than the micropore diffusion, resulting in a two-step adsorption behavior which was adequately modeled by a bimodal pore distribution model. The micropore diffusivity was determined to be on the order of 2 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s. The system was also shown to be isothermal under all conditions of this study. 21 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws) ) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA): normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-04-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and radiofrequency (RF) irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (k(ws) ), with little dependence on bulk water T(1) , T(2) , RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments.

  15. Statistical analysis of entropy generation in longitudinally finned tube heat exchanger with shell side nanofluid by a single phase approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konchada, Pavan Kumar; Pv, Vinay; Bhemuni, Varaprasad

    2016-06-01

    The presence of nanoparticles in heat exchangers ascertained increment in heat transfer. The present work focuses on heat transfer in a longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger. Experimentation is done on longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger with pure water as working fluid and the outcome is compared numerically using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package based on finite volume method for different flow rates. Further 0.8% volume fraction of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanofluid is considered on shell side. The simulated nanofluid analysis has been carried out using single phase approach in CFD by updating the user-defined functions and expressions with thermophysical properties of the selected nanofluid. These results are thereafter compared against the results obtained for pure water as shell side fluid. Entropy generated due to heat transfer and fluid flow is calculated for the nanofluid. Analysis of entropy generation is carried out using the Taguchi technique. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results show that the inlet temperature on shell side has more pronounced effect on entropy generation.

  16. Expanded Analysis of Hot Isostatic Pressed Iodine-Loaded Silver-Exchanged Mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R. T.; Bruffey, S. H.; Patton, K. K.

    2014-09-30

    Reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z) is being evaluated as a potential material to control the release of radioactive iodine that is released during the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel into the plant off-gas streams. The purpose of this study was to determine if hot pressing could directly convert this iodine loaded sorbent into a waste form suitable for long-term disposition. The minimal pretreatment required for production of pressed pellets makes hot pressing a technically and economically desirable process. Initial scoping studies utilized hot uniaxial pressing (HUPing) to prepare samples of non-iodine-loaded reduced silver exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z). The resulting samples were very fragile due to the low pressure (~ 28 MPa) used. It was recommended that hot isostatic pressing (HIPing), performed at higher temperatures and pressures, be investigated. HIPing was carried out in two phases, with a third and final phase currently underway. Phase I evaluated the effects of pressure and temperature conditions on the manufacture of a pressed sample. The base material was an engineered form of silver zeolite. Six samples of Ag0Z and two samples of I-Ag0Z were pressed. It was found that HIPing produced a pressed pellet of high density. Analysis of each pressed pellet by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrophotometry (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrated that under the conditions used for pressing, the majority of the material transforms into an amorphous structure. The only crystalline phase observed in the pressed Ag0Z material was SiO2. For the samples loaded with iodine (I-Ag0Z) iodine was present as AgI clusters at low temperatures, and transformed into AgIO4 at high temperatures. Surface mapping and EDS demonstrate segregation between silver iodide phases and silicon dioxide phases. Based on the results of the Phase I study, an expanded test matrix was developed to examine the effects of multiple source materials, compositional

  17. Performance analysis of the “intelligent” Kirchhoff-Law-Johnson-Noise secure key exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smulko, Janusz

    2014-09-01

    The Kirchhoff-Law-Johnson-Noise (KLJN) secure key distribution system provides a way of exchanging information theoretic secure keys by measuring the random voltage and current through the wire connecting two different resistors at Alice's and Bob's ends. Recently new advanced protocols for the KLJN method have been proposed with enhanced performance. In this paper we analyze the KLJN system and compare with “intelligent” KLJN (iKLJN) scheme. This task requires the determination of the applied resistors and the identification of the various superpositions of known and unknown noise components. Some statistical tools to determine how the duration of the bit exchange window (averaging time) influences the performance of secure bit exchange will be explored.

  18. Calculation of Scattering Amplitude Without Partial Analysis. II; Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, Aaron; Shertzer, J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    There was a method for calculating the whole scattering amplitude, f(Omega(sub k)), directly. The idea was to calculate the complete wave function Psi numerically, and use it in an integral expression for f, which can be reduced to a 2 dimensional quadrature. The original application was for e-H scattering without exchange. There the Schrodinger reduces a 2-d partial differential equation (pde), which was solved using the finite element method (FEM). Here we extend the method to the exchange approximation. The S.E. can be reduced to a pair of coupled pde's, which are again solved by the FEM. The formal expression for f(Omega(sub k)) consists two integrals, f+/- = f(sub d) +/- f(sub e); f(sub d) is formally the same integral as the no-exchange f. We have also succeeded in reducing f(sub e) to a 2-d integral. Results will be presented at the meeting.

  19. CFD analysis of the plate heat exchanger - Mathematical modelling of mass and heat transfer in serial connection with tubular heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojko, Marian; Kocich, Radim

    2016-06-01

    Application of numerical simulations based on the CFD calculation when the mass and heat transfer between the fluid flows is essential component of thermal calculation. In this article the mathematical model of the heat exchanger is defined, which is subsequently applied to the plate heat exchanger, which is connected in series with the other heat exchanger (tubular heat exchanger). The present contribution deals with the possibility to use the waste heat of the flue gas produced by small micro turbine. Inlet boundary conditions to the mathematical model of the plate heat exchanger are obtained from the results of numerical simulation of the tubular heat exchanger. Required parameters such for example inlet temperature was evaluated from temperature field, which was subsequently imported to the inlet boundary condition to the simulation of plate heat exchanger. From the results of 3D numerical simulations are evaluated basic flow variables including the evaluation of dimensionless parameters such as Colburn j-factor and friction ft factor. Numerical simulation is realized by software ANSYS Fluent15.0.

  20. A Preliminary Analysis of Teaching Improvisation with the Picture Exchange Communication System to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marckel, Julie M.; Neef, Nancy A.; Ferreri, Summer J.

    2006-01-01

    Two young boys with autism who used the picture exchange communication system were taught to solve problems (improvise) by using descriptors (functions, colors, and shapes) to request desired items for which specific pictures were unavailable. The results of a multiple baseline across descriptors showed that training increased the number of…

  1. Dose consequence analysis for transporting Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) rupture loop ion exchange columns

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, H.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-03

    Ion exchange columns from the 309 Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor rupture loop must be shipped to the solid waste burial ground. The enclosed calculational note documents the calculations used to calculate the absorbed doses expected in the case of a postulated accident.

  2. Wheat gluten amino acid analysis by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Lamberts, Lieve; Celus, Inge; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes an accurate and user-friendly method for determining amino acid composition of wheat gluten proteins and their gliadin and glutenin fractions. The method consists of hydrolysis of the peptide bonds in 6.0 M hydrochloric acid solution at 110°C for 24 h, followed by evaporation of the acid and separation of the free amino acids by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection. In contrast to conventional methods, the analysis requires neither pre- or postcolumn derivatization, nor a time-consuming oxidation or derivatization step prior to hydrolysis. Correction factors account for incomplete release of Val and Ile even after hydrolysis for 24 h, and for losses of Ser during evaporation. Gradient conditions including an extra eluent allow multiple sequential sample analyses without risk of Glu accumulation on the anion-exchange column which otherwise would result from high Gln levels in gluten proteins.

  3. Modeling the dynamic operation of a small fin plate heat exchanger - parametric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motyliński, Konrad; Kupecki, Jakub

    2015-09-01

    Given its high efficiency, low emissions and multiple fuelling options, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer a promising alternative for stationary power generators, especially while engaged in micro-combined heat and power (μ-CHP) units. Despite the fact that the fuel cells are a key component in such power systems, other auxiliaries of the system can play a critical role and therefore require a significant attention. Since SOFC uses a ceramic material as an electrolyte, the high operating temperature (typically of the order of 700-900 °C) is required to achieve sufficient performance. For that reason both the fuel and the oxidant have to be preheated before entering the SOFC stack. Hot gases exiting the fuel cell stack transport substantial amount of energy which has to be partly recovered for preheating streams entering the stack and for heating purposes. Effective thermal integration of the μ-CHP can be achieved only when proper technical measures are used. The ability of efficiently preheating the streams of oxidant and fuel relies on heat exchangers which are present in all possible configurations of power system with solid oxide fuel cells. In this work a compact, fin plate heat exchanger operating in the high temperature regime was under consideration. Dynamic model was proposed for investigation of its performance under the transitional states of the fuel cell system. Heat exchanger was simulated using commercial modeling software. The model includes key geometrical and functional parameters. The working conditions of the power unit with SOFC vary due to the several factors, such as load changes, heating and cooling procedures of the stack and others. These issues affect parameters of the incoming streams to the heat exchanger. The mathematical model of the heat exchanger is based on a set of equations which are simultaneously solved in the iterative process. It enables to define conditions in the outlets of both the hot and the cold sides

  4. Room Temperature Cation Exchange Reaction in Nanocrystals for Ultrasensitive Speciation Analysis of Silver Ions and Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Xu, Kailai; Tang, Jie; Yang, Lu; Zhou, Jingrong; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and Ag(+) and gain deep insight into the transformation of AgNPs in the environment or organisms, ultrasensitive analytical methods are needed for their speciation analysis. About 40-fold of Cd(2+) in CdTe ionic nanocrystals can be "bombarded-and-exploded" (exchanged) in less than 1 min simply by mixing the nanocrystals with Ag(+) solution at room temperature, while this cation exchange reaction did not occur when only silver nanoparticles were present. On the basis of this striking difference, an ultrasensitive method was developed for speciation analysis of Ag(+) and AgNPs in complex matrices. The released Cd(2+) was reduced to its volatile species by sodium tetrahydroborate, which was separated and swept to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) or an atomic fluorescence spectrometer (AFS) for the indirect but ultrasensitive detection of Ag(+). Owing to the remarkable signal amplification via the cation exchange reaction and the advantages of chemical vapor generation for sampling, the limit of detection was 0.0003 μg L(-1) for Ag(+) by ICPMS, which was improved by 100-fold compared to the conventional method. Relative standard deviations are better than 2.5% at a concentration of 0.5 μg L(-1) Ag(+) or AgNPs regardless of the detector. The proposed method retains several unique advantages, including ultrahigh sensitivity, speciation analysis, simplicity and being organic reagent-free, and has been successfully utilized for speciation analysis of Ag(+) and AgNPs in environmental water samples and paramecium cells. PMID:26017198

  5. Comprehensive Analysis of the Therapeutic IgG4 Antibody Pembrolizumab: Hinge Modification Blocks Half Molecule Exchange In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Fengqiang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Larry; Antonenko, Svetlana; Zhang, Shuli; Zhang, Yi Wei; Tabrizifard, Mohammad; Ermakov, Grigori; Wiswell, Derek; Beaumont, Maribel; Liu, Liming; Richardson, Daisy; Shameem, Mohammed; Ambrogelly, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    IgG4 antibodies are evolving as an important class of cancer immunotherapies. However, human IgG4 can undergo Fab arm (half molecule) exchange with other IgG4 molecules in vivo. The hinge modification by a point mutation (S228P) prevents half molecule exchange of IgG4. However, the experimental confirmation is still expected by regulatory agencies. Here, we report for the first time the extensive analysis of half molecule exchange for a hinge-modified therapeutic IgG4 molecule, pembrolizumab (Keytruda) targeting programmed death 1 (PD1) receptor that was approved for advanced melanoma. Studies were performed in buffer or human serum using multiple exchange partners including natalizumab (Tysabri) and human IgG4 pool. Formation of bispecific antibodies was monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, exchange with Fc fragments, mixed mode chromatography, immunoassays, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The half molecule exchange was also examined in vivo in SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. Both in vitro and in vivo results indicate that the hinge modification in pembrolizumab prevented half molecule exchange, whereas the unmodified counterpart anti-PD1 wt showed active exchange activity with other IgG4 antibodies or self-exchange activity with its own molecules. Our work, as an example expected for meeting regulatory requirements, contributes to establish without ambiguity that hinge-modified IgG4 antibodies are suitable for biotherapeutic applications.

  6. Stability analysis of direct contact heat exchangers subject to system perturbations. Final report, Task 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This report includes a project summary, copies of two papers resulting from the work and the Ph.D. Dissertation of Dr. Mehdi Golafshani entitled, ''Stability of a Direct Contact Heat Exchanger''. Specifically, the work deals with the operational stability of a spray column type heat exchanger subject to disturbances typical of those which can occur for geothermal applications. A computer program was developed to solve the one-dimensional transient two-phase flow problem and it was applied to the design of a spray column. The operation and design of the East Mesa 500kW/sub e/ direct contactor was assessed. It is shown that the heat transfer is governed by the internal resistance of the dispersed phase. In fact, the performance is well-represented by diffusion of heat within the drops. 5 refs.

  7. Analysis of Realized Volatility for Nikkei Stock Average on the Tokyo Stock Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaishi, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We calculate realized volatility of the Nikkei Stock Average (Nikkei225) Index on the Tokyo Stock Exchange and investigate the return dynamics. To avoid the bias on the realized volatility from the non-trading hours issue we calculate realized volatility separately in the two trading sessions, i.e. morning and afternoon, of the Tokyo Stock Exchange and find that the microstructure noise decreases the realized volatility at small sampling frequency. Using realized volatility as a proxy of the integrated volatility we standardize returns in the morning and afternoon sessions and investigate the normality of the standardized returns by calculating variance, kurtosis and 6th moment. We find that variance, kurtosis and 6th moment are consistent with those of the standard normal distribution, which indicates that the return dynamics of the Nikkei Stock Average are well described by a Gaussian random process with time-varying volatility.

  8. Energy exchange analysis in droplet dynamics via the Navier–Stokes–Cahn–Hilliard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espath, L. F. R.; Sarmiento, A. F.; Vignal, P.; Varga, B. O. N.; Cortes, A. M. A.; Dalcin, L.; Calo, V. M.

    2016-06-01

    We develop the energy budget equation of the coupled Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard (NSCH) system. We use the NSCH equations to model the dynamics of liquid droplets in a liquid continuum. Buoyancy effects are accounted for through the Boussinesq assumption. We physically interpret each quantity involved in the energy exchange to further insight into the model. Highly resolved simulations involving density-driven flows and merging of droplets allow us to analyze these energy budgets. In particular, we focus on the energy exchanges when droplets merge, and describe flow features relevant to this phenomenon. By comparing our numerical simulations to analytical predictions and experimental results available in the literature, we conclude that modeling droplet dynamics within the framework of NSCH equations is a sensible approach worth further research.

  9. Impaired Gas Exchange at Birth and Risk of Intellectual Disability and Autism: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Mollon, Josephine; Boffetta, Paolo; Reichenberg, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    We conducted meta-analyses of 67 studies on the association between neonatal proxies of impaired gas exchange and intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Neonatal acidosis was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.55 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.23-5.49] for ID and an OR of 1.10 (95% CI 0.91-1.31) for ASD.…

  10. Conformational analysis of g protein-coupled receptor signaling by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Su Youn; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-01-01

    Conformational change and protein-protein interactions are two major mechanisms of membrane protein signal transduction, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon agonist binding, GPCRs change conformation, resulting in interaction with downstream signaling molecules such as G proteins. To understand the precise signaling mechanism, studies have investigated the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or electron paramagnetic resonance. In addition to these techniques, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently been used in GPCR studies. HDX-MS measures the rate at which peptide amide hydrogens exchange with deuterium in the solvent. Exposed or flexible regions have higher exchange rates and excluded or ordered regions have lower exchange rates. Therefore, HDX-MS is a useful tool for studying protein-protein interfaces and conformational changes after protein activation or protein-protein interactions. Although HDX-MS does not give high-resolution structures, it analyzes protein conformations that are difficult to study with X-ray crystallography or NMR. Furthermore, conformational information from HDX-MS can help in the crystallization of X-ray crystallography by suggesting highly flexible regions. Interactions between GPCRs and downstream signaling molecules are not easily analyzed by X-ray crystallography or NMR because of the large size of the GPCR-signaling molecule complexes, hydrophobicity, and flexibility of GPCRs. HDX-MS could be useful for analyzing the conformational mechanism of GPCR signaling. In this chapter, we discuss details of HDX-MS for analyzing GPCRs using the β2AR-G protein complex as a model system.

  11. Analysis of spectral radiative heat transfer using discrete exchange factor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinqiu; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1993-09-01

    A solution technique is developed for spectral radiative heat-transfer problems. The formulation is based on the discrete exchange factor (DEF) method and uses Edward's (1976) wide band model to obtain spectral data. The results of the analyses of three cases were found to be in excellent agreement with those of the zonal method and differ by less than 5 percent from those of the discrete-ordinates method.

  12. Theoretical analysis of triple concentric-tube heat exchangers. Part 1: Mathematical modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Uenal, A.

    1998-10-01

    A theoretical study consisting of two parts is conducted on triple concentric tube heat exchangers. This paper presents the first part of the study and deals with mathematical modeling. The model includes the derivation and possible solutions of the governing differential equations for both counter-flow and parallel-flow arrangements. In the second part of the study, which is under its way for publication, the results of several case studies will be presented.

  13. Measurement of frost characteristics on heat exchanger fins. Part 2: Data and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Thomas, L.; Besant, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Part 1 of this paper described the frost growth test facility and instrumentation. In Part 2, results are presented for typical operating conditions with frost growth on heat exchanger fins. Typical data are presented for frost height distributions on fins, increase in pressure loss for airflow through a finned test section, frost mass accumulation on fins, and heat rate. Special attention is given to the uncertainty in each of these measurements and calculations.

  14. Transmembrane Exchange of Hyperpolarized 13C-Urea in Human Erythrocytes: Subminute Timescale Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Guilhem; Puckeridge, Max; Liangfeng, Guo; Tan, Yee Ling; Jacob, Chacko; Garland, Marc; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    The rate of exchange of urea across the membranes of human erythrocytes (red blood cells) was quantified on the 1-s to 2-min timescale. 13C-urea was hyperpolarized and subjected to rapid dissolution and the previously reported (partial) resolution of 13C NMR resonances from the molecules inside and outside red blood cells in suspensions was observed. This enabled a stopped-flow type of experiment to measure the (initially) zero-trans transport of urea with sequential single-pulse 13C NMR spectra, every second for up to ∼2 min. Data were analyzed using Bayesian reasoning and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method with a set of simultaneous nonlinear differential equations that described nuclear magnetic relaxation combined with transmembrane exchange. Our results contribute to quantitative understanding of urea-exchange kinetics in the whole body; and the methodological approach is likely to be applicable to other cellular systems and tissues in vivo. PMID:24209840

  15. Evaluation of ion exchange resins and various enzymes in thiamine analysis.

    PubMed

    Ellefson, W C; Richter, E; Adams, M; Baillies, N T

    1981-11-01

    Four ion exchange resins and 9 enzyme preparations are evaluated for use in the official AOAC thiamine method because Decalso and Clarase or Mylase P either are no longer available or are available in a form that is not suitable for use in the assay. The enzymes are prepared in the same manner described for Clarase or Mylase P in the AOAC method and are compared with Clarase T300 for their effectiveness in releasing thiamine from thiamine phosphate, and their ability to produce similar results on samples. Rhozyme S is 90-100% as effective as Clarase T300 in both of these respects. The other enzymes tested were not satisfactory. Further study is necessary because Rhozyme S also is no longer manufactured. The ion exchange resins are prepared for use in the manner described for Decalso in the AOAC method. Recoveries of thiamine range from 95 to 100%, using Bio-Rex 70 (hydrogen form) ion exchange resin. The other resins tested were not satisfactory. PMID:7309654

  16. An improved method of ion exchange for nitrogen isotope analysis of water nitrate.

    PubMed

    Xing, Meng; Liu, Weiguo

    2011-02-01

    Nitrate nitrogen and oxygen isotopes have been widely used to trace the nitrogen biogeochemical cycle by identifying NO(3)(-) sources. An improved method of anion exchange was developed to measure δ(15)N-NO(3)(-) in fresh water by continuous-flow elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). We used a custom-built exchange resin column, a peristaltic pump and the oven-drying method in our experiments. Consequently, the amount of Ag(2)O used as a neutralizer was reduced, time was saved, and operation became simpler than before. Meanwhile, analytical precision remained identical to previous studies. KNO(3) solutions were prepared at 0.2, 5 and 25 mg-N L(-1) from KNO(3) standard salt (δ(15)N=+6.27‰), and the average δ(15)N values of the solutions after having been absorbed on and subsequently stripped from anion columns were +6.62±0.22‰ (n=6), +6.38±0.09‰ (n=6), and +6.26±0.07‰ (n=6), respectively. In addition, the "natural" water sample δ(15)N-NO(3)(-) showed consistency in comparison to standards, and the mean standard deviation by the different approaches was 0.08‰. Accordingly, by these improvements the anion exchange resin technique is demonstrated to be more suitable for measuring δ(15)N in NO(3)(-) than original techniques. PMID:21237315

  17. Supporting transparency and uncertainty analysis of derived hydrological data through development of common exchange formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Peter; Sheahan, Paul; Palmer, Doug; Hamilton, Stuart; Fry, Matt; Natschke, Michael; Blodgett, David; Briar, David; Valentine, David; Cox, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Many derived hydrological data sets, such as river discharge, are based on relationships (ratings) built up over time through observations of related phenomenon, such as river level. The derived data have often been treated as actual observations neglecting the underlying procedure used to develop the relationship1. There is an increased interest in exposing the underlying assumptions in derived hydrological data2, and more generally in environmental data3, with a view to more consistent estimation and understanding of the uncertainty in such data. It has been argued4 that the lack of available information on rating relationships, and the associated observational data, is one of the major contributors to the problem of transparency of hydrological models. Members of the joint WMO/OGC Hydrology Domain Working Group are developing an exchange format, WaterML2.0 part 2, to address exchange of rating tables, gaugings (observations) and cross-section information with a view to enhancing transparency of derived hydrological data. Improving the availability and definition of the rating relationships, and related metadata, will improve transparency, and support the estimation of uncertainty. The work thus far has focused on harmonizing structures for representing rating tables of sufficient resolution to allow linear interpolation between points. This choice was based on the complexity in the number of curve representations within the domain and across data holders. A reusable data-structure has been developed to express information critical to understanding uncertainty by representing metadata relating to measurement sites and phenomenon ranges. For example, changes in controlling channel bottom features over a range of river levels, or expressing upper and lower limits for extrapolation of a rating curve. The group is continuing to explore the essential information to include in data exchange to allow users to assess the uncertainty associated with rating curves; working

  18. Therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with neurological diseases: multicenter retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Emin; Keklik, Muzaffer; Sencan, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Keskin, Ali; Kiki, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Sivgin, Serdar; Korkmaz, Serdal; Okan, Vahap; Doğu, Mehmet Hilmi; Unal, Ali; Cetin, Mustafa; Altuntaş, Fevzi; Ilhan, Osman

    2013-06-01

    Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), is a procedure, changing pathologic substances in the plasma of patients with replacement fluid. TPE has an increasing list of indications in recent years such as neurological, connective tissue, hematological, nephrological, endocrinological and metabolic disorders. We report our multicenter data about therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with neurological diseases. Six University Hospitals' aphaeresis units medical records about neurologic diseases were reviewed retrospectively. Hundred and fifteen patients and 771 TPE sessions from six aphaeresis units' were included to this study. Of the 115 patients, 53 (46%) were men and 62 (54%) were women. The median age was 50 (range: 5-85) years. Of these patients 58.3% were Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), 17.4% were acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), 10.4% were chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), 7% were multiple sclerosis, 6.1% were myasthenia gravis (MG) and 0.9% were Wilson disease (WD). The median number of TPE sessions per patient was 5 (range 1-72). Human albumin was used as a replacement fluid in 66% and fresh frozen plasma was used in 34% of cases. TPE was done through central venous catheters in 66%, and peripheral venous access in 34% of patients. Some complications were seen in patients (18.3%) during TPE sessions. These complications were, complications related to catheter placement procedure (8.7%), hypotension (3.5%), hypocalcaemia (3.5%) and allergic reactions (1.7%). The complication ratios were 2.7% in total 771 TPE procedures. TPE procedure was terminated in 6% of sessions depending on these complications. Overall responses to TPE were noted in 89.5% of patients. In conclusion; Therapeutic plasma exchange is an effective treatment option in several neurologic diseases.

  19. Safe Affordable Fission Engine-(SAFE-) 100a Heat Exchanger Thermal and Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.

    2005-01-01

    A potential fission power system for in-space missions is a heat pipe-cooled reactor coupled to a Brayton cycle. In this system, a heat exchanger (HX) transfers the heat of the reactor core to the Brayton gas. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine- (SAFE-) 100a is a test program designed to thermally and hydraulically simulate a 95 Btu/s prototypic heat pipe-cooled reactor using electrical resistance heaters on the ground. This Technical Memorandum documents the thermal and structural assessment of the HX used in the SAFE-100a program.

  20. Sociological functionalism, exchange theory and life-cycle analysis: a call for more explicit theoretical bridges.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, V L; Dowd, J J

    There has been a notable lack of articulation between mainstream sociological theory and the work of social gerontologists. This paper suggests four reasons for this, and reviews the basic assumptions and applications to gerontology of two well-established frameworks in sociological theory: structural-functionalism and exchange. With more rigorous and systematic integration of gerontological data with social and social psychological theory, more comprehensive explanations of life course phenomena would result. Moreover, the age variable would be considerably by other sociologists as less of a control and more of a relevant variable in its own right.

  1. Ion Exchange Chromatography and Mass Spectrometric Methods for Analysis of Cadmium-Phytochelatin (II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Cernei, Natalia; Kominkova, Marketa; Zitka, Ondrej; Beklova, Miroslava; Zehnalek, Josef; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2013-01-01

    In this study, in vitro formed Cd-phytochelatin (PC2) complexes were characterized using ion exchange chromatography (IEC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The ratio of both studied compounds as well as experimental conditions were optimized. The highest yield of the complex was observed under an applied concentration of 100 µg·mL−1 PC2 and 100 µg·mL−1 of CdCl2. The data obtained show that IEC in combination with MALDI-TOF is a reliable and fast method for the determination of these complexes. PMID:23538727

  2. Structural Analysis of Diheme Cytochrome c by Hydrogen–Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry and Homology Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A lack of X-ray or nuclear magnetic resonance structures of proteins inhibits their further study and characterization, motivating the development of new ways of analyzing structural information without crystal structures. The combination of hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) data in conjunction with homology modeling can provide improved structure and mechanistic predictions. Here a unique diheme cytochrome c (DHCC) protein from Heliobacterium modesticaldum is studied with both HDX and homology modeling to bring some definition of the structure of the protein and its role. Specifically, HDX data were used to guide the homology modeling to yield a more functionally relevant structural model of DHCC. PMID:25138816

  3. THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR IN-TANK ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Frank02 Smith, F

    2009-01-05

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is stored in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. A small column ion-exchange (SCIX) process is being designed to treat dissolved saltcake waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. The waste is caustic with high concentrations of various sodium salts and lower concentrations of radionuclides. Two cation exchange media being considered are a granular form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and a spherical form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin. CST is an inorganic material highly selective for cesium that is not elutable. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into ion exchange media (either CST or RF) which is packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs cannot handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally which could degrade the performance of the ion-exchange media. Performance degradation with regard to cesium removal has been observed between 50 and 80 C for CST [1] and at 65 C for RF resin [2]. In addition, the waste supernate solution will boil around 130 C. If the columns boiled dry, the sorbent material could plug the column and lead to replacement of the entire column module. Alternatively, for organic resins such as RF there is risk of fire at elevated temperatures. The objective of the work is to compute temperature distributions across CST- and RF-packed columns immersed in waste supernate under accident scenarios involving loss of salt solution flow through the beds and, in some cases, loss of coolant system flow. For some cases, temperature distributions are determined as a function of time after the initiation of a given accident scenario and in other cases only the final steady-state temperature distributions are calculated. In general, calculations are conducted to ensure conservative and

  4. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) - Normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, CEST MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and RF irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the CEST MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work here extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (kws), with little dependence on bulk water T1, T2, RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments. PMID:21842497

  5. Quantitative H-1 NMR Analysis of Chemical Stabilities in Anion-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, SA; Hickner, MA

    2013-01-01

    We compared the alkaline stability of three classes of anion exchange membranes that are leading candidates for applications in platinum-free fuel cells. A methodology is presented for the study of chemical stability of anion-exchange polymers in alkaline media that provides clear and quantitative H-1 NMR spectroscopic data of dissolved polymers containing benzyltrimethylammonium functionalities. Recent studies have investigated the stabilities of benzimidazolium- and alkylimidazolium-bearing polymers using periodic H-1 NMR sampling. These studies included varying alkaline concentrations, external heating sources, and excessive processing and contained no internal standard for absolute measurements. Key aspects of our time-resolved H-1 NMR method include in situ heating and sampling within the spectrometer, fixed Stoichiometric relationships between the benzyltrimethylammonium functionalities of each polymer and potassium deuteroxide (KOD), and the incorporation of an internal standard for the absolute measurement of the polymer degradation. In addition, our method permits the identification of the degradation products to find the underlying cause of chemical lability. Our results demonstrate that a styrene-based polymer containing benzyltrimethylammonium functional groups is remarkably stable when exposed to 20 equivalents per cation of KOD at 80 degrees C with a half-life (t(1/2)) of 231 h. Under these standard conditions, functionalized poly(phenylene oxide) and poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers, both bearing benzyltrimethylammonium functionalities were found to degrade with a half-lives of 57.8 and 2.7 h, respectively.

  6. A global analysis of stratospheric-tropospheric exchange during northern winter

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerling, M.P. ); Schaack, T.K.; Lenzen, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical formulation of stratospheric-tropospheric exchange was used to globally diagnose the cross-tropopause mass flux for January 1979. Contributions by physical mechanisms were evaluated. Two regions of zonally integrated mass flux into the stratosphere were found, one over tropical latitudes associated with diabatic transports, and a second over subpolar latitude associated with abiabatic transports. The ingress to the stratosphere in each of the latitude bands 50[degrees]-70[degrees]N and 40[degrees]-70[degrees]S was as intense as that occurring over the tropics, a feature of the global budget not previously documented. Compensating mass outflow from the stratosphere occured mainly over midlatitudes near axes of strong upper-level westerlies. Large zonal asymmetries were found in the regional patterns of the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange. Tropical inflow to the statosphere was maximized over the Australasian monsoon. The midlatitude mass outflow was concentrated along stationary wave troughs. Mass transport into the stratosphere occurred downstream and poleward relative to the troughs. The extratropical pattern of time-averaged cross-tropopause mass flux was interpretable within the context of physical models of three-dimensional airmass trajectories in baroclinic disturbances. The findings of mass inflow to the stratosphere at subpolar latitudes were consistent with satellite and aircraft measurements of high water vapor mixing ratios in the low stratosphere over these regions. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  7. The temporal structure of intergenerational exchange: a within-family analysis of parent-child reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Thomas; Raab, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies of parent-child reciprocity have focused either on the long term (generalized exchange over the life course) or on the short term (concurrent exchange in later life). The purpose of this research was to investigate the linkage between both temporal patterns of reciprocity within an integrative conceptual framework. We assessed whether long-term and short-term reciprocity operated as interdependent mechanisms that initially selected and subsequently relieved intergenerational caregiving relationships. We used data from the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old study (AHEAD) provided by frail, single-living parents of at least two children (N=1010 respondents comprising 3768 parent-child dyads). Fixed-effects conditional logit models estimated between-sibling differences in assistance provided to parents, measured by instrumental help (i.e., assistance with IADLs) and hands-on care (i.e., assistance with ADLs). Key predictors were two measures of financial transfers given to children referring to longer and shorter recall periods. Receiving earlier and current financial transfers increased adult children's propensity to support their parents in later life. The effect of earlier transfers pertained to help rather than care whereas the reverse was true for the effect of current transfers. We found no evidence for a linkage between long-term and short-term reciprocity. Overall, the results indicate that adult children might balance long-term support accounts relative to their siblings, suggesting an intra-generational orientation on equity.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waelbroek, C.; Louis, J.-F.

    1995-01-01

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO2 flux to perturbation in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model's main parameters describing current seasonal CO2 exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO2 flux is most sensitive to parameters characterizing litter chemical composition and more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO2 exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO2-induced warming is a significant increase in CO2 emission, creating a positive feedback to atmosphreic CO2 accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO2, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO2 flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroek, C.; Louis, J.F. |

    1995-02-01

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO2 flux to perturbation in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model`s main parameters describing current seasonal CO2 exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO2 flux is most sensitive to parameters characterizing litter chemical composition and more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO2 exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO2-induced warming is a significant increase in CO2 emission, creating a positive feedback to atmosphreic CO2 accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO2, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO2 flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results.

  10. Differential radiolabeling of opposite microtubule ends: methodology, equilibrium exchange-flux analysis, and drug poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, M.A.; Farrell, K.W.

    1983-04-01

    We describe a method which allows opposite microtubule ends to be distinguished by differentially labeling the microtubules with (/sup 3/H)- and (/sup 14/C)guanine nucleotides. Assembly-disassembly reaction at opposite microtubule ends can therefore be measured simultaneously and without modification of the tubulin dimers or microtubules. The method is predicated on experimental observations wich demonstated that net dimer addition to steady-state microtubules mst be predominantly unidirectional. This does not preclude, however, some bidirectional dimer addition to steady-state microtubules by an equilibrium-exchange mechanism. We therefore calculated the relative contribution to dimer incorporation of bidirectional equilibrium exchange in a unidirectional microtubule system (s=0.06). Under our conditions bidirectional dimer incorporation is negligible; net dimer additional to steady-state microtubules is overwhelmingly unidirectional. We used this method to study the effects of colchicine and podophyllotoxin on assembly-disassembly at opposite microtubule ends. Both drugs inhibit substoichiometrically net dimer addition to one microtubule end and, to a lesser extent, net dimer loss from the opposite end.

  11. Quantitative analysis of conformational exchange contributions to 1H-15N multiple-quantum relaxation using field-dependent measurements. Time scale and structural characterization of exchange in a calmodulin C-terminal domain mutant.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Patrik; Akke, Mikael

    2004-01-28

    Multiple-quantum spin relaxation is a sensitive probe for correlated conformational exchange dynamics on microsecond to millisecond time scales in biomolecules. We measured differential 1H-15N multiple-quantum relaxation rates for the backbone amide groups of the E140Q mutant of the C-terminal domain of calmodulin at three static magnetic field strengths. The differential multiple-quantum relaxation rates range between -88.7 and 92.7 s(-1), and the mean and standard deviation are 7.0 +/- 24 s(-1), at a static magnetic field strength of 14.1 T. Together with values of the 1H and 15N chemical shift anisotropies (CSA) determined separately, the field-dependent data enable separation of the different contributions from dipolar-dipolar, CSA-CSA, and conformational exchange cross-correlated relaxation mechanisms to the differential multiple-quantum relaxation rates. The procedure yields precise quantitative information on the dominant conformational exchange contributions observed in this protein. The field-dependent differences between double- and zero-quantum relaxation rates directly benchmark the rates of conformational exchange, showing that these are fast on the chemical shift time scale for the large majority of residues in the protein. Further analysis of the differential 1H-15N multiple-quantum relaxation rates using previously determined exchange rate constants and populations, obtained from 15N off-resonance rotating-frame relaxation data, enables extraction of the product of the chemical shift differences between the resonance frequencies of the 1H and 15N spins in the exchanging conformations, deltasigma(H)deltasigma(N). Thus, information on the 1H chemical shift differences is obtained, while circumventing complications associated with direct measurements of conformational exchange effects on 1H single-quantum coherences in nondeuterated proteins. The method significantly increases the information content available for structural interpretation of the

  12. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the local condensation heat transfer in a plate heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabenstein, V.; Kabelac, S.

    2012-11-01

    Plate heat exchanger (PHE) are today widely used in industrial heat transfer applications due to their good thermal performance, modest space requirement, easy accessibility to all areas and their lower capital and operating costs as compared to shell-and-tube heat exchangers. Although authoritative models for the design of PHE used as condensers are missing, the number of applications where a PHE is operating as a condenser increases. On the way to a reliable model based on physical approaches for the prediction of heat transfer and pressure drop during the condensation process inside a PHE, the flow and heat interactions as well as their dependence on the geometrical parameters of the corrugated plates and the operating conditions must be studied in detail. In this work the stepwise procedure for the fundamental construction of such a model is described. An experimental setup was built to analyze the characteristics of the two-phase-flow in PHE. A single gap, consisting of two transparent corrugated plates, was tested with a two-phase flow of air/water and also with boiling refrigerant R365mfc. Flow pattern maps were constructed for plates with corrugation angles of 27 and 63 degrees relative to the direction of flow. Investigations of the local heat transfer coefficients and the pressure drop were done with the same plates. The measurement of the local heat transfer coefficients was carried out by the use of the "Temperature Oscillation InfraRed Thermography" (TOIRT) method. Based on these results three main flow patterns are defined: film flow, bubbly flow and slug flow. For each of the three flow patterns an own model for the heat transfer and pressure drop mechanism are developed and the heat transfer coefficient and the friction factor is calculated with different equations depending on the actual steam quality, mass flow and geometrical parameters by means of a flow pattern map. The theory of the flow pattern based prediction models is proved with own

  13. Analysis of Hydrogen Isotopic Exchange: Lava Creek Tuff Ash and Isotopically Labeled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. M.; Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Nolan, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Nolan and Bindeman (2013) placed secondarily hydrated ash from the 7.7 ka eruption of Mt. Mazama (δD=-149‰, 2.3wt% H2Ot) in isotopically labeled water (+650 ‰ δD, +56 ‰ δ18O) and observed that the H2Ot and δ18O values remained constant, but the δD values of ash increased with the surrounding water at 20, 40 and 70 °C. We expand on this work by conducting a similar experiment with ash from the 640 ka Lava Creek Tuff (LCT, δD of -128 ‰; 2.1 wt.% H2Ot) eruption of Yellowstone to see if significantly older glass (with a hypothesized gel layer on the surface shielding the interior from alteration) produces the same results. We have experiments running at 70, 24, and 5 °C, and periodically remove ~1.5 mg of glass to measure the δD (‰) and H2Ot (wt.%) of water extracted from the glass on a TC/EA MAT 253 continuous flow system. After 600 hours, the δD of the samples left at 5 and 24 °C remains at -128 ‰, but increased 8‰ for the 70 °C run series. However, there is no measurable change in wt.% of H2Ot, indicating that hydrogen exchange is not dictated by the addition of water. We are measuring and will report further progress of isotope exchange. We also plan to analyze the water in the LCT glass for δ18O (‰) to see if, as is the case for the Mt. Mazama glass, the δ18O (‰) remains constant. We also analyzed Mt. Mazama glass from the Nolan and Bindeman (2013) experiments that have now been sitting in isotopically labeled water at room temperature for ~5 years. The water concentration is still unchanged (2.3 wt.% H2Ot), and the δD of the water in the glass is now -111 ‰, causing an increase of 38 ‰. Our preliminary results show that exchange of hydrogen isotopes of hydrated glass is not limited by the age of the glass, and that the testing of hydrogen isotopes of secondarily hydrated glass, regardless of age, may not be a reliable paleoclimate indicator.

  14. Numerical analysis of heat exchange processes for the ground source heat pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Muto, H.; Moritani, S.; Kohgo, Y.; Hamamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Ohnishi, J.; Komatsu, T.

    2012-12-01

    Ground source heat pump systems (GSHP) use ground or groundwater as a heat source. They can achieve much higher coefficient of performance (COP) than conventional air source heat pump systems because the temperature of the ground is much more stable than that of the air. Heat energy in the ground is then viewed as one of the renewable energy sources. GSHP has been receiving great interests among countries in North America and Western Europe, as well as some developed countries in Asia because it can potentially reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission. While GSHP can inject heat from the buildings to the ground for cooling during the summer, it can pump heat stored in the ground for heating during the winter. As some physical, chemical, and biological properties of the ground and groundwater are temperature dependent, running GSHP can eventually affect groundwater quality. The main objective of this project was to develop a model that allows predicting not only ground and groundwater temperatures but also changes in physical, chemical, and biological properties of ground and groundwater with GSHP under operations. This particular study aims at simulating heat exchange and transfer processes in the ground for a vertical-loop closed GSHP system. In the closed GSHP system, an anti-freezing solution is circulated inside the closed-loop tube, called U-tube, that is buried in the ground. Heat is then transferred to the anti-freezing solution in the U-tube by a heat exchanger. In this study we used HYDRUS to predict temperature of the anti-freezing solution, as well as that of the ground. HYDRUS allows one to simulate variably-saturated water flow and solute and heat transport in porous media numerically in two- and three-dimensional domains with great flexibility in defining boundary conditions. At first changes in anti-freezing solution temperatures measured were predicted in response to Thermal Response Test (TRT) conducted at our study site. Then, heat

  15. Hyporheic Exchange: Analysis of Aquifer Heterogeneity, Channel Morphology and Bedforms- 2D and 3D Simulations Using MODFLOW and MODPATH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, J. R.; Welty, C.; Packman, A.

    2005-12-01

    The main purpose of the simulations in this research is the analysis of three-dimensional surface-groundwater interchange in heterogeneous systems. The effects of channel pattern, bed forms and aquifer heterogeneity on flow interactions between stream and groundwater systems are examined in order to contribute for a better understanding of the hyporheic process. A two-dimensional approach was also adopted to allow comparisons with the three-dimensional results. The grid was designed using the correlation scales of the heterogeneous fields and the scale of the stream meanders. MODFLOW and MODPATH were used to evaluate magnitude, direction and spatial distribution of the exchange flow. PMWIN and PMPATH were used as pre and post-processors during the construction of the models and analysis of results. Gaining and losing streams as well as parallel flow and flow across streams were simulated as idealized cases intended to describe how properties of the streambed and aquifer in low-gradient lowland streams contribute to hyporheic exchange. At first a straight river was analyzed then meandering streams were created with a sine curve and variations on wavelength and amplitude. Bed forms were simulated assuming a sinusoidal distribution of pressure head in the bed surface. Aspects of the influence of bedforms on mechanisms such as "pumping" and "turnover" are expected to be addressed with simulations. Flow velocities between 20 and 40 cm/s in the channel were tested with the objective of showing the influence of river morphology and natural bed forms on the flow exchange in the hyporheic zone. Several meander cycles and four levels of hydraulic conductivity variance were analyzed. Results of flow variances along the cross-sections and wetted perimeter show the increasing on hyporheic exchange as the degree of heterogeneity increases. Particle tracking was performed to define hyporheic residence time distributions. When comparing the homogeneous fields with all degrees of

  16. Ion temperature by charge exchange neutral analysis from vertical sightlines on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, C.L.; Medley, S.S.; Hammett, G.W.; Kaita, R.; Scott, S.D.

    1987-12-01

    The Fokker-Planck code FPPRF is used to calculate the expected deuterium charge exchange flux along vertical sighlines from TFTR neutral-beam-injected discharges. The feasibility of obtaining central ion temperature measurements by fitting the spectra obtained from these sightlines at two energy regions--above the highest neutral beam injection energy (> 100 keV) and from 20-80 keV--is investigated. It is demonstrated that the central ion temperature can be obtained from the central vertical slightline for fitting the high energy data. The deuterium neutral particle flux energy distribution below the neutral beam injection energy is insentive to the code input ion temperature, however. 6 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  17. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2010-11-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds

  18. Analysis of effect of the solubility on gas exchange in nonhomogeneous lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, W. E., Jr.; Evans, J. W.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison is made of the gas exchange in nonhomogeneous lung models and in homogeneous lung models with the same total blood flow and ventilation. It is shown that the ratio of the rate of gas transfer of the inhomogeneous lung model over the rate of gas transfer of the homogeneous lung model as a function of gas solubility always has the qualitative features for gases with linear dissociation curves. This ratio is 1 for a gas with zero solubility and decreases to a single minimum. It subsequently rises to approach 1 as the solubility tends to infinity. The early portion of the graph of this function is convex, then after a single inflection point it is concave.

  19. Ion exchange separation of chromium from natural water matrix for stable isotope mass spectrometric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Bassett, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for separating the Cr dissolved in natural water from matrix elements and determination of its stable isotope ratios using solid-source thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The separation method takes advantage of the existence of the oxidized form of Cr as an oxyanion to separate it from interfering cations using anion-exchange chromatography, and of the reduced form of Cr as a positively charged ion to separate it from interfering anions such as sulfate. Subsequent processing of the separated sample eliminates residual organic material for application to a solid source filament. Ratios for 53Cr/52Cr for National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 979 can be measured using the silica gel-boric acid technique with a filament-to-filament standard deviation in the mean 53Cr/52Cr ratio for 50 replicates of 0.00005 or less. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ion distribution in copper exchanged zeolites by using Si-29 spin lattice relaxation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamara, Joseph; Seidel, Karsten; Moini, Ahmad; Prasad, Subramanian

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal-containing zeolites, particularly those with smaller pore size, have found extensive application in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of environmental pollutants containing nitrogen oxides. We report these zeolites have dramatically faster silicon-29 (Si-29) spin lattice relaxation times (T1) compared to their sodium-containing counterparts. Paramagnetic doping allows one to acquire Si-29 MAS spectra in the order of tens of seconds without significantly affecting the spectral resolution. Moreover, relaxation times depend on the method of preparation and the next-nearest neighbor silicon Qn(mAl) sites, where n = 4 and m = 0-4, respectively. A clear trend is noted between the effectiveness of Cu exchange and the Si-29 NMR relaxation times. It is anticipated that the availability of this tool, and the enhanced understanding of the nature of the active sites, will provide the means for designing improved SCR catalysts.

  1. Ion distribution in copper exchanged zeolites by using Si-29 spin lattice relaxation analysis.

    PubMed

    Palamara, Joseph; Seidel, Karsten; Moini, Ahmad; Prasad, Subramanian

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal-containing zeolites, particularly those with smaller pore size, have found extensive application in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of environmental pollutants containing nitrogen oxides. We report these zeolites have dramatically faster silicon-29 (Si-29) spin lattice relaxation times (T1) compared to their sodium-containing counterparts. Paramagnetic doping allows one to acquire Si-29 MAS spectra in the order of tens of seconds without significantly affecting the spectral resolution. Moreover, relaxation times depend on the method of preparation and the next-nearest neighbor silicon Qn(mAl) sites, where n=4 and m=0-4, respectively. A clear trend is noted between the effectiveness of Cu exchange and the Si-29 NMR relaxation times. It is anticipated that the availability of this tool, and the enhanced understanding of the nature of the active sites, will provide the means for designing improved SCR catalysts. PMID:27055207

  2. Hierarchical cluster-tendency analysis of the group structure in the foreign exchange market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin-Ye; Zheng, Zhi-Gang

    2013-08-01

    A hierarchical cluster-tendency (HCT) method in analyzing the group structure of networks of the global foreign exchange (FX) market is proposed by combining the advantages of both the minimal spanning tree (MST) and the hierarchical tree (HT). Fifty currencies of the top 50 World GDP in 2010 according to World Bank's database are chosen as the underlying system. By using the HCT method, all nodes in the FX market network can be "colored" and distinguished. We reveal that the FX networks can be divided into two groups, i.e., the Asia-Pacific group and the Pan-European group. The results given by the hierarchical cluster-tendency method agree well with the formerly observed geographical aggregation behavior in the FX market. Moreover, an oil-resource aggregation phenomenon is discovered by using our method. We find that gold could be a better numeraire for the weekly-frequency FX data.

  3. Physical properties of the Atlantic - Arctic water exchange formation. Modelling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshonkin, Sergey; Gusev, Anatoly; Bagno, Alexey; Zalesny, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Physical mechanisms of water exchange between North Atlantic (NA) and Arctic Oceans (AO) in 1958-2009 are analyzed using results of numerical experiments with the eddy-permitting ocean circulation model INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model). Changes of heat and salt transports by West Spitsbergen and East Greenland currents caused by atmospheric forcing produce the baroclinic modes of velocity anomalies in the layer 0-300m, stabilizing ocean response on the atmospheric forcing, which stimulates keeping water exchange between NA and AO at the certain climatological level. We revealed the quick response of dense water outflow by near-bottom current in the deep NA layers through the Denmark Strait at monthly timescale on the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO) index change, as well as the response at the scale 39 months. The quick response on NAO is broken in 1969-1978, which is caused by the Great Salinity Anomaly. Transverse oscillations of the Norwegian current front have the great influence on the formation of the intermediate dense waters of Greenland and Norwegian Seas (GNS). Dense water outflow to the NA deep layers through the Faroe Channels with the time lag of 1 year respond to the transverse oscillations of the front. The mass transport of by near-bottom current through Faroe Channels to the NA can be used as the integral index of formation and discharge of new high-density water portions generated due to mixing of salt warm Atlantic waters and freshened cold Arctic waters in GNS. The research was supported by the Council on the Russian Federation President Grants (grant № MK-3241.2015.5)

  4. The Inter-Annual Variability Analysis of Carbon Exchange in Low Artic Fen Uncovers The Climate Sensitivity And The Uncertainties Around Net Ecosystem Exchange Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, E. L.; Lund, M.; Williams, M. D.; Christensen, T. R.; Tamstorf, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    An improvement in our process-based understanding of CO2 exchanges in the Arctic, and their climate sensitivity, is critical for examining the role of tundra ecosystems in changing climates. Arctic organic carbon storage has seen increased attention in recent years due to large potential for carbon releases following thaw. Our knowledge about the exact scale and sensitivity for a phase-change of these C stocks are, however, limited. Minor variations in Gross Primary Production (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (Reco) driven by changes in the climate can lead to either C sink or C source states, which likely will impact the overall C cycle of the ecosystem. Eddy covariance data is usually used to partition Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) into GPP and Reco achieved by flux separation algorithms. However, different partitioning approaches lead to different estimates. as well as undefined uncertainties. The main objectives of this study are to use model-data fusion approaches to (1) determine the inter-annual variability in C source/sink strength for an Arctic fen, and attribute such variations to GPP vs Reco, (2) investigate the climate sensitivity of these processes and (3) explore the uncertainties in NEE partitioning. The intention is to elaborate on the information gathered in an existing catchment area under an extensive cross-disciplinary ecological monitoring program in low Arctic West Greenland, established under the auspices of the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring (GEM) program. The use of such a thorough long-term (7 years) dataset applied to the exploration in inter-annual variability of carbon exchange, related driving factors and NEE partition uncertainties provides a novel input into our understanding about land-atmosphere CO2 exchange.

  5. Development of robotic analysis for input solution sample by ion-exchange separation and isotope dilution method

    SciTech Connect

    Uchikoshi, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Kato, Y.; Ito, M.; Adachi, T.

    1993-12-31

    An automated analytical system for input solution samples has been developed to increase analytical capability and to improve timeliness of measurements in a future large scale reprocessing plant. The original automated analytical system for input solution samples was composed of three subsystems for sample preparation together with a mass spectrometer and an alpha-ray spectrometer. This system was modified to meet the specifications for a large scale reprocessing plant and for the practical use of LSD (Large Size Dry) spike in input analysis. By adding the functions of subsystem 2 (ion-exchange separation) to the original subsystem 1, the latter was modified to work from sample aliquoting to ion-exchange separation. The components included in the modified subsystem 1+2 are contained in an envelope the size of the original subsystem 1. This was accomplished by miniaturizing the equipment and making the preparation procedures more effective. The subsystems basically consist of Cartesian robots with other necessary components. In subsystem 1+2, small duplicate samples are placed into two beakers, one of which contains an LSD spike. The valency state of plutonium in the samples is subsequently adjusted to be tetravalent. Uranium in the samples is then separated from the plutonium by an anion exchange separation technique. In subsystem 3, a small quantity of each separated fraction is placed on a mass spectrometer filament by a loading device where the fraction is automatically dried. In addition, a small quantity of the plutonium fraction is deposited on a counting dish for alpha-ray spectrometry. Using precisely known amounts of uranium and plutonium mixtures, the analytical results for concentrations of both elements obtained by this system exhibited 0.4 to 0.6% in both precision and accuracy. After modification, the time required for sample preparation was shortened from 18 to 10 hours.

  6. Transient thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical analysis of a counter flow offset strip fin intermediate heat exchanger using an effective porous media approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquiza, Eugenio

    This work presents a comprehensive thermal hydraulic analysis of a compact heat exchanger using offset strip fins. The thermal hydraulics analysis in this work is followed by a finite element analysis (FEA) to predict the mechanical stresses experienced by an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) during steady-state operation and selected flow transients. In particular, the scenario analyzed involves a gas-to-liquid IHX operating between high pressure helium and liquid or molten salt. In order to estimate the stresses in compact heat exchangers a comprehensive thermal and hydraulic analysis is needed. Compact heat exchangers require very small flow channels and fins to achieve high heat transfer rates and thermal effectiveness. However, studying such small features computationally contributes little to the understanding of component level phenomena and requires prohibitive computational effort using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). To address this issue, the analysis developed here uses an effective porous media (EPM) approach; this greatly reduces the computation time and produces results with the appropriate resolution [1]. This EPM fluid dynamics and heat transfer computational code has been named the Compact Heat Exchanger Explicit Thermal and Hydraulics (CHEETAH) code. CHEETAH solves for the two-dimensional steady-state and transient temperature and flow distributions in the IHX including the complicating effects of temperature-dependent fluid thermo-physical properties. Temperature- and pressure-dependent fluid properties are evaluated by CHEETAH and the thermal effectiveness of the IHX is also calculated. Furthermore, the temperature distribution can then be imported into a finite element analysis (FEA) code for mechanical stress analysis using the EPM methods developed earlier by the University of California, Berkeley, for global and local stress analysis [2]. These simulation tools will also allow the heat exchanger design to be improved through an

  7. Bacterial spore detection and analysis using hyperpolarized 129Xe chemical exchange saturation transfer (Hyper-CEST) NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yubin; Wang, Yanfei; Goulian, Mark; Driks, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported hyperpolarized 129Xe chemical exchange saturation transfer (Hyper-CEST) NMR techniques for the ultrasensitive (i.e., 1 picomolar) detection of xenon host molecules known as cryptophane. Here, we demonstrate a more general role for Hyper-CEST NMR as a spectroscopic method for probing nanoporous structures, without the requirement for cryptophane or engineered xenon-binding sites. Hyper-CEST 129Xe NMR spectroscopy was employed to detect Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis spores in solution, and interrogate the layers that comprise their structures. 129Xe-spore samples were selectively irradiated with radiofrequency pulses; the depolarized 129Xe returned to aqueous solution and depleted the 129Xe-water signal, providing measurable contrast. Removal of the outermost spore layers in B. anthracis and B. subtilis (the exosporium and coat, respectively) enhanced 129Xe exchange with the spore interior. Notably, the spores were invisible to hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR direct detection methods, highlighting the lack of high-affinity xenon-binding sites, and the potential for extending Hyper-CEST NMR structural analysis to other biological and synthetic nanoporous structures. PMID:25089181

  8. Analysis of heat transfer in a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) with the OpenGeoSys model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, B.; Park, C.; Kim, H.; LEE, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We simulated thermal dispersion of a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) with a thermal response test (TRT) data by using the OpenGeoSys model. The analysis of the heat transfer is critical for the design of ground source heat pump (GSHP) system because the system performance is related mostly to the geometry of BHE and the thermal properties of each material. The adapted system is double U-tube type and the borehole depth is 200 m and a model was set up according to the BHE specification in 40 x 40 m in x, y scale. Inside area of two inlet and two outlet fluid pipes, different temperature of circulation fluid were determined according to the test data. The simulated temperature variation around the well and borehole wall is compared with the temperature distribution obtained by the line source model. The differences were studied to evaluate the developed model and heat exchange rates were calculated during an operation period. As well as the heat transfer simulation by the ground water flow in fracture were conducted.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of pharmaceutical products using simultaneous mixed-mode (ion-exchange/reversed-phase) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Soisungnoen, Phimpha; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax; Paull, Brett

    2014-08-01

    Liquid chromatographic assays were developed using a mixed-mode column coupled in sequence with a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column to allow the simultaneous comprehensive analysis of inorganic/organic anions and cations, active pharmaceutical ingredients, and excipients (carbohydrates). The approach utilized dual sample injection and valve-mediated column switching and was based upon a single high-performance liquid chromatography gradient pump. The separation consisted of three distinct sequential separation mechanisms, namely, (i) ion-exchange, (ii) mixed-mode interactions under an applied dual gradient (reversed-phase/ion-exchange), and (iii) hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Upon first injection, the Scherzo SS C18 column (Imtakt) provided resolution of inorganic anions and cations under isocratic conditions, followed by a dual organic/salt gradient to elute active pharmaceutical ingredients and their respective organic counterions and potential degradants. At the top of the mixed-mode gradient (high acetonitrile content), the mobile phase flow was switched to a preconditioned hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column, and the standard/sample was reinjected for the separation of hydrophilic carbohydrates, some of which are commonly known excipients in drug formulations. The approach afforded reproducible separation and resolution of up to 23 chemically diverse solutes in a single run. The method was applied to investigate the composition of commercial cough syrups (Robitussin®), allowing resolution and determination of inorganic ions, active pharmaceutical ingredients, excipients, and numerous well-resolved unknown peaks. PMID:24890905

  10. Wheat gluten amino acid composition analysis by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Ine; Lamberts, Lieve; Celus, Inge; Lagrain, Bert; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2009-07-17

    A simple accurate method for determining amino acid composition of wheat gluten proteins and their gliadin and glutenin fractions using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection is described. In contrast to most conventional methods, the analysis requires neither pre- or post-column derivatization, nor oxidation of the sample. It consists of hydrolysis (6.0M hydrochloric acid solution at 110 degrees C for 24h), evaporation of hydrolyzates (110 degrees C), and chromatographic separation of the liberated amino acids. Correction factors (f) accounted for incomplete cleavage of peptide bonds involving Val (f=1.07) and Ile (f=1.13) after hydrolysis for 24h and for Ser (f=1.32) losses during evaporation. Gradient conditions including an extra eluent (0.1M acetic acid solution) allowed multiple sequential sample analyses without risk of Glu contamination on the anion-exchange column. While gluten amino acid compositions by the present method were mostly comparable to those obtained by a conventional method involving oxidation, acid hydrolysis and post-column ninhydrin derivatization, the latter method underestimated Tyr, Val and Ile levels. Results for the other amino acids obtained by the different methods were linearly correlated (r>0.99, slope=1.03).

  11. Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method: Hamiltonian Replica Exchange with Torsional Flattening for Binding Mode Prediction and Binding Free Energy Estimation.

    PubMed

    Mentes, Ahmet; Deng, Nan-Jie; Vijayan, R S K; Xia, Junchao; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-05-10

    Molecular dynamics modeling of complex biological systems is limited by finite simulation time. The simulations are often trapped close to local energy minima separated by high energy barriers. Here, we introduce Hamiltonian replica exchange (H-REMD) with torsional flattening in the Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM), to reduce energy barriers along torsional degrees of freedom and accelerate sampling of intramolecular degrees of freedom relevant to protein-ligand binding. The method is tested on a standard benchmark (T4 Lysozyme/L99A/p-xylene complex) and on a library of HIV-1 integrase complexes derived from the SAMPL4 blind challenge. We applied the torsional flattening strategy to 26 of the 53 known binders to the HIV Integrase LEDGF site found to have a binding energy landscape funneled toward the crystal structure. We show that our approach samples the conformational space more efficiently than the original method without flattening when starting from a poorly docked pose with incorrect ligand dihedral angle conformations. In these unfavorable cases convergence to a binding pose within 2-3 Å from the crystallographic pose is obtained within a few nanoseconds of the Hamiltonian replica exchange simulation. We found that torsional flattening is insufficient in cases where trapping is due to factors other than torsional energy, such as the formation of incorrect intramolecular hydrogen bonds and stacking. Work is in progress to generalize the approach to handle these cases and thereby make it more widely applicable.

  12. Analysis of isomeric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by charge-exchange chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsick, W.J. Jr.; Hites, R.A.

    1984-12-01

    Charge-exchange chemical ionization mass spectrometry (using a 15% mixture of methane in argon) yields abundant M/sup +/, M + H/sup +/, M + C/sub 2/H/sub 5//sup +/ ions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). On the basis of the relative intensities of the M + H/sup +/ ion to the M/sup +/ ion, this technique can differentiate, in a predictable manner, isomeric structures of PAH. The operating conditions were evaluated and optimized; the most significant contributions to the variations in the (M + H)/sup +//M/sup +/ ratios are the temperature, pressure, and condition of the ion source. The optimum ion source temperature (250/sup 0/C) and pressure (0.8 torr) are easily controlled and regulated. The variable contamination of the ion source is compensated by an internal standard 1,2,3,5-tetrafluorobenzene. The analyses of Standard Reference Materials 1648 and 1649 (air particulate samples) and a carbon black extract are reported. Triphenylene and chrysene, although not chromatographically resolved, can be quantitated by using this technique. The identification of acephenanthrylene based on the measurement of ratios and calculated ionization potentials is also presented.

  13. Analysis and design of a friction brake for momentum exchange propulsion tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennert, Simone; Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an engineering assessment of a proposal for a deployment brake for a momentum exchange tether. Tethers have attracted considerable interest amongst the propulsion community for many years for orbit raising, energy conversion, de-orbiting, and injection into interplanetary transfers, and the motivation for the work described in the paper is directly mission-oriented. The YES2 SpaceMail mission has been planned as a low-cost international effort to provide a facility for the return of small samples from the ISS back to Earth, based on an inflatable re-entry capsule and a mechanical tether system. The system will be lofted into orbit as part of a payload on a Foton/Bion rocket launcher. The brake design concept is based on the use of friction between the deploying tether and a short pole onto which several turns are wound, and the paper summarises the modelling work that has been done, and then discusses an experiment in which the premise was tested in the laboratory. The paper concludes with certain practical proposals for implementation.

  14. Analysis and design of a friction brake for momentum exchange propulsion tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennert, Simone; Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an engineering assessment of a proposal for a deployment brake for a momentum exchange tether. Tethers have attracted considerable interest amongst the propulsion community for many years for orbit raising, energy conversion, de-orbiting, and injection into interplanetary transfers, and the motivation for the work described in the paper is directly mission-oriented. The YES2 SpaceMail mission has been planned as a low-cost international effort to provide a facility for the return of small samples from the ISS back to Earth, based on an inflatable re-entry capsule and a mechanical tether system. The system will be lofted into orbit as part of a payload on a Foton/Bion rocket launcher. The brake design concept is based on the use of friction between the deploying tether and a short pole onto which several turns are wound, and the paper summarises the modelling work that has been done, and then discusses an experiment in which the premise was tested in the laboratory. The paper concludes with certain practical proposals for implementation.

  15. Structural analysis of autoinhibition in the Ras-specific exchange factor RasGRP1

    PubMed Central

    Iwig, Jeffrey S; Vercoulen, Yvonne; Das, Rahul; Barros, Tiago; Limnander, Andre; Che, Yan; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Roose, Jeroen P; Kuriyan, John

    2013-01-01

    RasGRP1 and SOS are Ras-specific nucleotide exchange factors that have distinct roles in lymphocyte development. RasGRP1 is important in some cancers and autoimmune diseases but, in contrast to SOS, its regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Activating signals lead to the membrane recruitment of RasGRP1 and Ras engagement, but it is unclear how interactions between RasGRP1 and Ras are suppressed in the absence of such signals. We present a crystal structure of a fragment of RasGRP1 in which the Ras-binding site is blocked by an interdomain linker and the membrane-interaction surface of RasGRP1 is hidden within a dimerization interface that may be stabilized by the C-terminal oligomerization domain. NMR data demonstrate that calcium binding to the regulatory module generates substantial conformational changes that are incompatible with the inactive assembly. These features allow RasGRP1 to be maintained in an inactive state that is poised for activation by calcium and membrane-localization signals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00813.001 PMID:23908768

  16. Forensic analysis of hallucinogenic mushrooms and khat (Catha edulis Forsk) using cation-exchange liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Laussmann, Tim; Meier-Giebing, Sigrid

    2010-02-25

    Hallucinogenic mushrooms (e.g. Psilocybe and Panaeolus species) as well as leaves and young shoots of the khat tree (Catha edulis Forsk) are illicit drugs in many countries. The exact concentration of the hallucinogenic alkaloids psilocin and psilocybin in mushrooms and the sympathomimetic alkaloids cathinone and cathine in khat is usually essential for jurisdiction. Facing an increasing number of mushroom and khat seizures by German customs authorities, a convenient comprehensive quantitative HPLC method based on cation-exchange liquid chromatography for these rather "exotic" drugs has been developed which avoids time-consuming multi-step sample preparation or chemical derivatization procedures. Using this method a number of different hallucinogenic fungi species and products that are mainly distributed via the internet have been analysed (dried and fresh Psilocybe cubensis Singer as well as P. cubensis collected from "grow boxes", Panaeolus cyanescens Berkeley and Broome and so-called "philosopher stones" (sclerotia of Psilocybe species)). Highest total amounts of psilocin have been detected in dried P. cyanescens reaching up to 3.00+/-0.24 mg per 100 mg. The distribution of khat alkaloids in different parts of the khat shoots has been studied. High concentrations of cathinone have not only been detected in leaves but also in green parts and barks of stalks. Additionally, the sample treatment for fresh mushroom and khat samples has been optimised. Highest amounts of alkaloids were found when fresh material was freeze-dried.

  17. An improved method for analysis of biomass sugars and galacturonic acid by anion exchange chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the most accurate method for analysis of sugars in biomass is based on gas chromatography of trimethylsilane or alditol acetate derivitives of sugars, the derivation method is time consuming and laborious. In comparison, sample preparation for sugar analysis using liquid chromatography is a si...

  18. Simultaneous experimental determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency power-dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents owing to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis.

  19. Simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency (RF) power dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents due to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis. PMID:23606428

  20. Analysis of x-ray emission spectra in charge-exchange collisions of C6 + with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6 +-He and -H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method for low to intermediate projectile energies. Within the independent electron model, we calculate capture cross sections and perform a radiative cascade analysis to obtain Lyman line-emission ratios. Single capture is considered for the C6 +-He system, while both single capture and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6 +-H2 system. Effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of capture cross sections and the line-emission ratios are examined as well. Calculated line-emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are in satisfactory agreement with previous measurements.

  1. A comparison of positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) methods for analysis of a tube-in-shell heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Cody; Patel, Nitant; Ruggles, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    A positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) study of a stainless steel tube-in-shell heat exchanger is performed. Studies are performed using two different energy window settings. A new multiple particle tracking technique is introduced and used in this analysis. Results are compared to those obtained with previously established multiple particle tracking technique. Both techniques are found to be capable of flow imaging through opaque surfaces. No significant difference is observed between energy window settings using either method. Results from both methods are found to be qualitatively similar; however, it is observed that the new method exhibits consistently lower measurement uncertainty across the field of view of the scanner and is robust against the adverse effects of stationary particles in the flow field.

  2. The technical analysis of the stock exchange and physics: Japanese candlesticks for solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dineva, C.; Atanasov, V.

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we use the Japanese candlesticks, a method popular in the technical analysis of the Stock/Forex markets and apply it to a variable in physics-the solar activity. This method is invented and used exclusively for economic analysis and its application to a physical problem produced unexpected results. We found that the Japanese candlesticks are convenient tool in the analysis of the variables in the physics of the Sun. Based on our observations, we differentiated a new cycle in the solar activity.

  3. Uncertainty analysis of gross primary production partitioned from net ecosystem exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Rahul; Hamm, Nicholas Alexander Samuel; van der Tol, Christiaan; Stein, Alfred

    2016-03-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) can be separated from flux tower measurements of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. This is used increasingly to validate process-based simulators and remote-sensing-derived estimates of simulated GPP at various time steps. Proper validation includes the uncertainty associated with this separation. In this study, uncertainty assessment was done in a Bayesian framework. It was applied to data from the Speulderbos forest site, The Netherlands. We estimated the uncertainty in GPP at half-hourly time steps, using a non-rectangular hyperbola (NRH) model for its separation from the flux tower measurements. The NRH model provides a robust empirical relationship between radiation and GPP. It includes the degree of curvature of the light response curve, radiation and temperature. Parameters of the NRH model were fitted to the measured NEE data for every 10-day period during the growing season (April to October) in 2009. We defined the prior distribution of each NRH parameter and used Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation to estimate the uncertainty in the separated GPP from the posterior distribution at half-hourly time steps. This time series also allowed us to estimate the uncertainty at daily time steps. We compared the informative with the non-informative prior distributions of the NRH parameters and found that both choices produced similar posterior distributions of GPP. This will provide relevant and important information for the validation of process-based simulators in the future. Furthermore, the obtained posterior distributions of NEE and the NRH parameters are of interest for a range of applications.

  4. Human body area factors for radiation exchange analysis: standing and walking postures.

    PubMed

    Park, Sookuk; Tuller, Stanton E

    2011-09-01

    Effective radiation area factors (f (eff)) and projected area factors (f (p)) of unclothed Caucasians' standing and walking postures used in estimating human radiation exchange with the surrounding environment were determined from a sample of adults in Canada. Several three-dimensional (3D) computer body models were created for standing and walking postures. Only small differences in f (eff) and f (p) values for standing posture were found between gender (male or female) and body type (normal- or over-weight). Differences between this study and previous studies were much larger: ≤0.173 in f (p) and ≤0.101 in f (eff). Directionless f (p) values for walking posture also had only minor differences between genders and positions in a stride. However, the differences of mean directional f (p) values of the positions dependent on azimuth angles were large enough, ≤0.072, to create important differences in modeled radiation receipt. Differences in f (eff) values were small: 0.02 between the normal-weight male and female models and up to 0.033 between positions in a stride. Variations of directional f (p) values depending on solar altitudes for walking posture were narrower than those for standing posture. When both standing and walking postures are considered, the mean f (eff) value, 0.836, of standing (0.826) and walking (0.846) could be used. However, f (p) values should be selected carefully because differences between directional and directionless f (p) values were large enough that they could influence the estimated level of human thermal sensation.

  5. PFG-NMR analysis of intercompartment exchange and inner droplet size distribution of W/O/W emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hindmarsh, Jason P; Su, Jiahong; Flanagan, John; Singh, Harjinder

    2005-09-27

    Presented is a novel application of pulsed field gradient (PFG)-NMR to the analysis of intercompartment exchange and the inner compartment droplet size distribution of a W/O/W multiple emulsion. The method involves monitoring the diffusional behavior of different components of the emulsion. Pfeuffer et al. [Pfeuffer, J.; Flogel, U.; Dreher, W.; Leibfritz, D. NMR Biomed. 1998, 11(1), 19-31.](1) and Price et al. [Price, W. S.; Barzykin, A. V.; Hayamizu, K.; Tachiya, M. Biophys. J. 1998, 74(5), 2259-2271.](2) proposed methods to extend Kärger's PFG-NMR model of exchange between two compartments to accommodate spherical inner compartments. Each model enables the prediction of the oil membrane permeability, the inner compartment volume fraction, and a representation of the inner compartment droplet size distribution. The models were fitted to PFG-NMR experimental data of W/O/W emulsions. The Pfeuffer et al. model provided the best description of the observed experimental data. Predicted values of permeability and swelling were consistent with those reported in the literature for W/O/W emulsions. The addition of sorbitol to either the inner or outer water compartment resulted in an increase in the oil membrane permeability. Inner compartment droplet size distribution measurements indicate that swelling, rupture, and coalescence are likely to have occurred during the secondary emulsification and emulsion ripening. In its present form, the method still constitutes a fast, noninvasive (no addition of a tracer), and in situ method for comparative analysis of the permeability, stability, and yield of different formulations of multiple emulsions with a single PFG-NMR experiment. PMID:16171335

  6. Nickel-catalyzed proton-deuterium exchange (HDX) procedures for glycosidic linkage analysis of complex carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structural analysis of complex carbohydrates typically requires the assignment of three parameters: monosaccharide composition, the position of glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and the position and nature of non-carbohydrate substituents. The glycosidic linkage positions are often de...

  7. Two-step ion-exchange chromatographic purification combined with reversed-phase chromatography to isolate C-peptide for mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kabytaev, Kuanysh; Durairaj, Anita; Shin, Dmitriy; Rohlfing, Curt L; Connolly, Shawn; Little, Randie R; Stoyanov, Alexander V

    2016-02-01

    A liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry on-line platform that includes the orthogonal techniques of ion exchange and reversed phase chromatography is applied for C-peptide analysis. Additional improvement is achieved by the subsequent application of cation- and anion-exchange purification steps that allow for isolating components that have their isoelectric points in a narrow pH range before final reversed-phase mass spectrometry analysis. The utility of this approach for isolating fractions in the desired "pI window" for profiling complex mixtures is discussed.

  8. Analysis and Test of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Power System for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Varanauski, Donald; Clark, Robert, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop a prototype Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell breadboard system for fuhlre space applications. This prototype will be used to develop a comprehensive design basis for a space-rated PEM fuel cell powerplant. The prototype system includes reactant pressure regulators, ejector-based reactant pumps, a 4-kW fuel cell stack and cooling system, and a passive, membranebased oxygen / water separator. A computer model is being developed concurrently to analytically predict fluid flow in the oxidant reactant system. Fuel cells have historically played an important role in human-rated spacecraft. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used fuel cells for vehicle electrical power. The Space Shuttle currently uses three Alkaline Fuel Cell Powerplants (AFCP) to generate all of the vehicle's 15-20kW electrical power. Engineers at the Johnson Space Center have leveraged off the development effort ongoing in the commercial arena to develop PEM fuel cel ls for terrestrial uses. The prototype design originated from efforts to develop a PEM fuel cell replacement for the current Space Shuttle AFCP' s. In order to improve on the life and an already excellent hi storical record of reliability and safety, three subsystems were focused on. These were the fuel cell stack itself, the reactant circulation devices, and reactant / product water separator. PEM fuel cell stack performance is already demonstrating the potential for greater than four times the useful life of the current Shuttle's AFCP. Reactant pumping for product water removal has historically been accomplished with mechanical pumps. Ejectors offer an effective means of reactant pumping as well as the potential for weight reduction, control simplification, and long life. Centrifugal water separation is used on the current AFCP. A passive, membrane-based water separator offers compatibility with the micro-gravity environment of space, and the potential for control simplification, elimination of

  9. A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T. Arble, Chris; Goodwin, Chris; Khalifa, Yehia; Broderick, Alicia; Åhlund, John

    2015-08-15

    Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) is a powerful spectroscopy tool that is inherently surface sensitive, elemental, and chemical specific, with the ability to probe sample surfaces under Torr level pressures. Herein, we describe the design of a new lab-based APXPS system with the ability to swap small volume analysis chambers. Ag 3d(5/2) analyses of a silver foil were carried out at room temperature to determine the optimal sample-to-aperture distance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis spot size, relative peak intensities, and peak full width at half maximum of three different electrostatic lens modes: acceleration, transmission, and angular. Ag 3d(5/2) peak areas, differential pumping pressures, and pump performance were assessed under varying N{sub 2}(g) analysis chamber pressures up to 20 Torr. The commissioning of this instrument allows for the investigation of molecular level interfacial processes under ambient vapor conditions in energy and environmental research.

  10. Effect of molecular exchange on water droplet size analysis in W/O emulsions as determined by diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Vermeir, Lien; Sabatino, Paolo; Balcaen, Mathieu; Declerck, Arnout; Dewettinck, Koen; Martins, José C; Van der Meeren, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Using NMR diffusometry, the diffusion of water and tetramethylammonium chloride was recorded in order to determine the water droplet size distribution in W/O emulsions. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of extradroplet diffusion of water on the estimated droplet size distribution upon comparison to the real droplet size distribution. The latter originated from the diffusion behavior of the tetramethylammonium cation (TMA+), which is known to have a much lower permeability through the oil phase as compared to water. Whereas both low-resolution and high-resolution pulsed field gradient NMR revealed that the water droplet size overestimation could be reduced selecting either a lower measurement temperature during diffusion analysis, or a smaller diffusion delay value Δ, still comparison to TMA+ diffusion indicated that artefacts were unavoidable even at low Δ and temperature. In order to correct for this extradroplet water diffusion phenomenon, different data analysis methods were evaluated. The previously described Pfeuffer exchange model could only partly compensate for the effect of extradroplet diffusion on the water droplet size determination. On the other hand, accurate water droplet size analysis results were obtained by correcting the experimentally determined diffusion distances based on Einstein's diffusion law. As such, reliable data could be obtained by low resolution NMR based on water diffusion at or even above room temperature. PMID:26520819

  11. Using Exchange Structure Analysis to Explore Argument in Text-Based Computer Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, Sarah; Coffin, Caroline; Hewings, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Computer conferencing provides a new site for students to develop and rehearse argumentation skills, but much remains to be learnt about how to encourage and support students in this environment. Asynchronous text-based discussion differs in significant ways from face-to-face discussion, creating a need for specially designed schemes for analysis.…

  12. Nickel-catalyzed proton-deuterium exchange (HDX) for linkage analysis of complex carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structural assignment of complex carbohydrates typically requires the analysis of at least three parameters: 1. composition; 2. linkage; and 3. substituents. These are often assigned on a small scale by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Linkage positions are determined by permethylat...

  13. Using Participatory Analysis for Community Action: Idea Book. Information Collection and Exchange Publication No. M0086

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This idea book addresses key concepts in two earlier Peace Corps' publications, "Participatory Analysis for Community Action (PACA) Manual" [ICE No. M0053], and the "Gender and Development Training Manual" [ICE No. M0054]. These previous resources were large training manuals that introduced PACA to staff and Volunteers in the context of the Peace…

  14. Direct Observation and Quantitative Analysis of Lck Exchange between Plasma Membrane and Cytosol in Living T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Lars; Paster, Wolfgang; Weghuber, Julian; Eckerstorfer, Paul; Stockinger, Hannes; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Palmitoylation represents a common motif for anchorage of cytosolic proteins to the plasma membrane. Being reversible, it allows for controlled exchange between cytosolic and plasma membrane-bound subpopulations. In this study, we present a live cell single molecule approach for quantifying the exchange kinetics of plasma membrane and cytosolic populations of fluorescently labeled Lck, the key Src family kinase involved in early T cell signaling. Total internal reflection (TIR) fluorescence microscopy was employed for confining the analysis to membrane-proximal molecules. Upon photobleaching Lck-YFP in TIR configuration, fluorescence recovery proceeds first via the cytosol outside of the evanescent field, so that in the early phase fluorescence signal arises predominantly from membrane-proximal cytosolic Lck. The diffusion constant of each molecule allowed us to distinguish whether the molecule has already associated with the plasma membrane or was still freely diffusing in the cytosol. From the number of molecules that inserted during the recovery time we quantified the insertion kinetics: on average, membrane-proximal molecules within the evanescent field needed ∼400 ms to be inserted. The average lifetime of Lck in the plasma membrane was estimated at 50 s; together with the mobility of 0.26 μm2/s this provides sufficient time to explore the surface of the whole T cell before dissociation into the cytosol. Experiments on palmitoylation-deficient Lck mutants yielded similar on-rates, but substantially increased off-rates. We discuss our findings based on a model for the plasma membrane association and dissociation kinetics of Lck, which accounts for reversible palmitoylation on cysteine 3 and 5. PMID:20040600

  15. Full QED calculations of two-photon exchange for heliumlike systems: Analysis in the Coulomb and Feynman gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Persson, Hans; Salomonson, Sten; Labzowsky, Leonti

    1995-02-01

    A complete, numerical calculation of the effect of the exchange of two virtual photons between the electrons in the ground states of heliumlike systems is presented. Feynman diagrams with uncrossed and crossed photons are evaluated, using the Furry interaction picture [Phys. Rev. 81, 115 (1951)], neglecting nuclear recoil. The calculations are carried out in the Feynman gauge as well as in the Coulomb gauge, and the gauge invariance of this set of diagrams is verified with high numerical accuracy. The numerical technique employed is similar to that recently developed for our self-energy calculations. [H. Persson, I. Lindgren, and S. Salomonson, Phys. Scrip. T 46, 125 (1993); I. Lindgren, H. Persson, S. Salomonson, and A. Ynnerman, Phys. Rev. A 47, R4555 (1993)]. An explicit summation is performed over a complete set of intermediate states with positive and negative energy, generated with the technique of discretization. The photon propagators are expanded in spherical waves, and the radial integrations are performed numerically using analytical Bessel functions. Moreover, the integration over the photon energy is performed numerically. The calculations are performed for different values of the nuclear charge in the range Z=2-92. Corresponding calculations are also performed without retardation and neglecting the effect of negative-energy states (virtual electron-positron pairs), thus simulating relativsitic many-body calculations in the no-virtual-pair approximation. The difference, which in this way is obtained with high numerical accuracy, represents the ``quantum electrodynamics (QED) correction,'' which should be added to the many-body result in a combined QED-many-body procedure. The various contributions to the two-photon exchange have been analyzed in detail and compared with the analytical results to order (Zα)3 of Sucher [Phys. Rev. 109, 1010 (1958)]. From our analysis, general conclusions can also be drawn concerning the accuracy of various relativistic

  16. Reverse process of usual optical analysis of boson-exchange superconductors: impurity effects on s- and d-wave superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2015-03-01

    We performed a reverse process of the usual optical data analysis of boson-exchange superconductors. We calculated the optical self-energy from two (MMP and MMP+peak) input model electron-boson spectral density functions using Allen's formula for one normal and two (s- and d-wave) superconducting cases. We obtained the optical constants including the optical conductivity and the dynamic dielectric function from the optical self-energy using an extended Drude model, and finally calculated the reflectance spectrum. Furthermore, to investigate impurity effects on optical quantities we added various levels of impurities (from the clean to the dirty limit) in the optical self-energy and performed the same reverse process to obtain the optical conductivity, the dielectric function, and reflectance. From these optical constants obtained from the reverse process we extracted the impurity-dependent superfluid densities for two superconducting cases using two independent methods (the Ferrel-Glover-Tinkham sum rule and the extrapolation to zero frequency of -ϵ1(ω)ω(2)); we found that a certain level of impurities is necessary to get a good agreement on results obtained by the two methods. We observed that impurities give similar effects on various optical constants of s- and d-wave superconductors; the greater the impurities the more distinct the gap feature and the lower the superfluid density. However, the s-wave superconductor gives the superconducting gap feature more clearly than the d-wave superconductor because in the d-wave superconductors the optical quantities are averaged over the anisotropic Fermi surface. Our results supply helpful information to see how characteristic features of the electron-boson spectral function and the s- and d-wave superconducting gaps appear in various optical constants including raw reflectance spectrum. Our study may help with a thorough understanding of the usual optical analysis process. Further systematic study of experimental

  17. Conformational Analysis of Proteins in Highly Concentrated Solutions by Dialysis-Coupled Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houde, Damian; Nazari, Zeinab E.; Bou-Assaf, George M.; Weiskopf, Andrew S.; Rand, Kasper D.

    2016-04-01

    When highly concentrated, an antibody solution can exhibit unusual behaviors, which can lead to unwanted properties, such as increased levels of protein aggregation and unusually high viscosity. Molecular modeling, along with many indirect biophysical measurements, has suggested that the cause for these phenomena can be due to short range electrostatic and/or hydrophobic protein-protein interactions. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for investigating protein conformation, dynamics, and interactions. However, "traditional" continuous dilution labeling HDX-MS experiments have limited utility for the direct analysis of solutions with high concentrations of protein. Here, we present a dialysis-based HDX-MS (di-HDX-MS) method as an alternative HDX-MS labeling format, which takes advantage of passive dialysis rather than the classic dilution workflow. We applied this approach to a highly concentrated antibody solution without dilution or significant sample manipulation, prior to analysis. Such a method could pave the way for a deeper understanding of the unusual behavior of proteins at high concentrations, which is highly relevant for development of biopharmaceuticals in industry.

  18. Ion-exchange-membrane-based enzyme micro-reactor coupled online with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhigui; Yang, Youyou; Zhang, Jialing; Zhang, Zhengxiang; Bai, Yu; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we developed a membrane-based enzyme micro-reactor by directly using commercial polystyrene-divinylbenzene cation-exchange membrane as the support for trypsin immobilization via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and successfully applied it for protein digestion. The construction of the reactor can be simply achieved by continuously pumping trypsin solution through the reactor for only 2 min, which was much faster than the other enzyme immobilization methods. In addition, the membrane reactor could be rapidly regenerated within 35 min, resulting in a "new" reactor for the digestion of every protein sample, completely eliminating the cross-interference of different protein samples. The amount and the activity of immobilized trypsin were measured, and the repeatability of the reactor was tested, with an RSD of 3.2% for the sequence coverage of cytochrome c in ten digestion replicates. An integrated platform for protein analysis, including online protein digestion and peptide separation and detection, was established by coupling the membrane enzyme reactor with liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The performance of the platform was evaluated using cytochrome c, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin, showing that even in the short digestion time of several seconds the obtained sequence coverages was comparable to or higher than that with in-solution digestion. The system was also successfully used for the analysis of proteins from yeast cell lysate.

  19. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  20. rBEFdata: documenting data exchange and analysis for a collaborative data management platform.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Claas-Thido; König-Ries, Birgitta; Lang, Anne C; Ratcliffe, Sophia; Wirth, Christian; Man, Xingxing; Nadrowski, Karin

    2015-07-01

    We are witnessing a growing gap separating primary research data from derived data products presented as knowledge in publications. Although journals today more often require the underlying data products used to derive the results as a prerequisite for a publication, the important link to the primary data is lost. However, documenting the postprocessing steps of data linking, the primary data with derived data products has the potential to increase the accuracy and the reproducibility of scientific findings significantly. Here, we introduce the rBEFdata R package as companion to the collaborative data management platform BEFdata. The R package provides programmatic access to features of the platform. It allows to search for data and integrates the search with external thesauri to improve the data discovery. It allows to download and import data and metadata into R for analysis. A batched download is available as well which works along a paper proposal mechanism implemented by BEFdata. This feature of BEFdata allows to group primary data and metadata and streamlines discussions and collaborations revolving around a certain research idea. The upload functionality of the R package in combination with the paper proposal mechanism of the portal allows to attach derived data products and scripts directly from R, thus addressing major aspects of documenting data postprocessing. We present the core features of the rBEFdata R package along an ecological analysis example and further discuss the potential of postprocessing documentation for data, linking primary data with derived data products and knowledge.

  1. rBEFdata: documenting data exchange and analysis for a collaborative data management platform

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Claas-Thido; König-Ries, Birgitta; Lang, Anne C; Ratcliffe, Sophia; Wirth, Christian; Man, Xingxing; Nadrowski, Karin

    2015-01-01

    We are witnessing a growing gap separating primary research data from derived data products presented as knowledge in publications. Although journals today more often require the underlying data products used to derive the results as a prerequisite for a publication, the important link to the primary data is lost. However, documenting the postprocessing steps of data linking, the primary data with derived data products has the potential to increase the accuracy and the reproducibility of scientific findings significantly. Here, we introduce the rBEFdata R package as companion to the collaborative data management platform BEFdata. The R package provides programmatic access to features of the platform. It allows to search for data and integrates the search with external thesauri to improve the data discovery. It allows to download and import data and metadata into R for analysis. A batched download is available as well which works along a paper proposal mechanism implemented by BEFdata. This feature of BEFdata allows to group primary data and metadata and streamlines discussions and collaborations revolving around a certain research idea. The upload functionality of the R package in combination with the paper proposal mechanism of the portal allows to attach derived data products and scripts directly from R, thus addressing major aspects of documenting data postprocessing. We present the core features of the rBEFdata R package along an ecological analysis example and further discuss the potential of postprocessing documentation for data, linking primary data with derived data products and knowledge. PMID:26306174

  2. Effectiveness of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) on Communication and Speech for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flippin, Michelle; Reszka, Stephanie; Watson, Linda R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a popular communication-training program for young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This meta-analysis reviews the current empirical evidence for PECS in affecting communication and speech outcomes for children with ASD. Method: A systematic review of the literature on PECS…

  3. Numerical Analysis on Optimization of a Fin and Tube Type Adsorber/Desorber Heat Exchanger using ACF/C2H5OH Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, Keishi; Kuwahara, Ken; Koyama, Shigeru

    This study deals with a two dimensional numerical analysis of the fin and tube type adsorber/desorber heat exchanger design such as fin height, fin pitch, fin thickness and tube diameter effect on the performance of closed adsorption cooling system with activated carbon fiber (ACF) of type A-20, which has relatively higher surface area, and ethanol pair. The simulation results show that the fin tube diameter is effective on the performance of the heat exchanger. It is also found that the cycle COP can be optimized in the condition of fin pitch 4.5mm and fin height 20mm, respectively when other parameters are fixed.

  4. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Pad B Catenary Capability Analysis and Technical Exchange Meeting (TEM) Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Kichak, Robert; Rakov, Vladimir; Kithil, Richard, Jr.; Sargent, Noel B.

    2009-01-01

    The existing lightning protection system at Pad 39B for the Space Shuttle is an outgrowth of a system that was put in place for the Apollo Program. Dr. Frank Fisher of Lightning Technologies was a key participant in the design and implementation of that system. He conveyed to the NESC team that the catenary wire provision was put in place quickly (as assurance against possible vehicle damage causing critical launch delays) rather than being implemented as a comprehensive system designed to provide a high degree of guaranteed protection. Also, the technology of lightning protection has evolved over time with considerable work being conducted by groups such as the electric utilities companies, aircraft manufacturers, universities, and others. Several accepted present-day methods for analysis of lightning protection were used by Drs. Medelius and Mata to study the expected lightning environment for the Pad 39B facility and to analyze the degree of protection against direct lightning attachment to the Space Shuttle. The specific physical configuration directly affects the vulnerability, so cases that were considered included the RSS next to and rolled back from the Space Shuttle, and the GOx Vent Arm both extended and withdrawn from the ET. Elements of the lightning protection system at Pad 39B are shown in Figure 6.0-1 and consist of an 80 foot insulating mast on top of the Fixed Support Structure (FSS), a catenary wire system that runs from the mast in a North/South direction to grounds 1000 feet away on each side of the mast, the RSS which can either be next to or away from the Space Shuttle, and a GOx vent that can either be extended or retracted from the top of the ET.

  5. Sister chromatid exchange analysis to monitor genotoxic chemicals. March 1978-July 1989 (A Bibliography from Pollution Abstracts). Report for March 1978-July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis for toxicological studies. SCE analysis are very sensitive measures of genotoxic damage to chromosomes. SCE toxicological studies analyzing ionizing radiation, chromium compounds, styrene, paint thinner, mercury, cigarette smoke, coal dust, fuel oil, insecticides, ethylene oxide, diesel exhaust, and polychlorinated biphenyls are discussed. SCE studies using both human and animal tissue cultures are described. (Contains 150 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  6. Improvement of sugar analysis sensitivity using anion-exchange chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with sheath liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian-Bing; Liu, Ding-Bo; Guo, Xiao Ming; Yu, Shu-Juan; Yu, Pei

    2014-10-31

    A novel interface that enables high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) to be coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is reported. A sheath liquid consisting of 50mM NH4Ac in isopropanol with 0.05% acetic acid, infused at a flow rate of 3μL/min at the tip of the electrospray probe, requires less ESI source cleaning and promotes efficient ionization of mono- and di-carbohydrates. The results suggest that use of a sheath liquid interface rather than a T-joint allows volatile ammonium salts to replace non-volatile metal salts as modifiers for improving sugar ESI signals. The efficient ionization of mono- and di-carbohydrates in the ESI source is affected by the sheath liquid properties such as buffer concentration and type of organic solvent. HPAEC-ESI-MS was used for the analysis of monocarbohydrates in pectins, particularly co-eluted sugars, and the performance was evaluated. Addition of a make-up solution through the sheath liquid interface proved to be an efficient tool for enhancing the intensities of sugars analyzed using HPAEC-ESI-MS.

  7. Multivariate analysis of the transport in an ion exchange membrane bioreactor for removal of anionic micropollutants from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, A R; Velizarov, S; Crespo, J G; Reis, M A M

    2011-01-01

    The present study focuses on investigating the effects of biological compartment conditions on the transport of nitrate and perchlorate in an Ion Exchange Membrane Bioreactor (IEMB). In this hybrid process, the transport depends not only on the membrane properties but also on the biological compartment conditions. The experiments were planned according to the Plackett-Burman statistical design in order to cover a broader range of experimental conditions, under which a previously developed mechanistic transport model was not able to predict correctly the transport fluxes of the target pollutants. Using Principal Component Analysis, it was possible to identify not only the concentrations of target (nitrate and perchlorate) and of major driving counter-ion (chloride) but also those of some biomedium components (e.g. ammonia, ethanol and sulphate) as variables that affect the transport rate of micropollutants across the membrane. These conclusions are based on the loadings of the two first principal components that describe 84% of the data variance. The present study also revealed that the hydraulic retention time and the hydrodynamic conditions in the biocompartment have a minor contribution to the micropollutants transport. The results obtained are important for process optimization purposes. PMID:21977639

  8. Multivalent sialylation of β-thio-glycoclusters by Trypanosoma cruzi trans sialidase and analysis by high performance anion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Agustí, Rosalía; Cano, María Emilia; Cagnoni, Alejandro J; Kovensky, José; de Lederkremer, Rosa M; Uhrig, María Laura

    2016-10-01

    The synthesis of multivalent sialylated glycoclusters is herein addressed by a chemoenzymatic approach using the trans-sialidase of Trypanosoma cruzi (TcTS). Multivalent β-thio-galactopyranosides and β-thio-lactosides were used as acceptor substrates and 3'-sialyllactose as the sialic acid donor. High performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) was shown to be an excellent technique for the analysis of the reaction products. Different eluting conditions were optimized to allow the simultaneous resolution of the sialylated species, as well as their neutral precursors. The TcTS efficiently transferred sialyl residues to di, tri, tetra and octa β-thiogalactosides. In the case of an octavalent thiolactoside, up to six polysialylated compounds could be resolved. Preparative sialylation reactions were performed using the tetravalent and octavalent acceptor substrates. The main sialylated derivatives could be unequivocally assigned by MALDI mass spectrometry. Inhibition of the transfer to the natural substrate, N-acetyllactosamine, was also studied. The octalactoside caused 82 % inhibition of sialic acid transfer when we used equimolar concentrations of donor, acceptor and inhibitor.

  9. Genotoxic assessment in peripheral blood lymphocytes of post-polio individuals using sister chromatid exchange analysis and micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Saurabh Kumar; Saraswathy, Radha; Sivakumar, E

    2011-07-01

    Environmental pollution is a complex issue because of the diversity of anthropogenic agents, both chemical and physical, that have been detected and catalogued. The consequences to biota from exposure to genotoxic agents present an additional problem because of the potential for these agents to produce adverse change at the cellular and organism levels. Past studies in virus have focused on structural damage to the DNA of environmental species that may occur after exposure to genotoxic agents and the use of this information to document exposure and to monitor remediation. In an effort to predict effects at the population, community and ecosystem levels, in the present study, we attempt to characterize damage occurring through genotoxic agents like 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, BrdU, using sister chromatid exchange technique and the formation of micronuclei (MN) in the peripheral lymphocytes of the post-polio syndrome sequelae affected by poliovirus. Analysis of structural chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and involvement of the specific chromosome break were pursued in this study. They revealed a significantly higher incidence of CAs (chromatid and chromosome breaks) in patients compared with controls, where the specific chromosome break has emerged as specific. Also, the maximum numbers of breaks were found to be in chromosome 1 at the position 1p36.1. The results also suggest a correlation between CAs and content of MN.

  10. Design and experimental analysis of counter-flow heat and mass exchanger incorporating (M-cycle) for evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Omar; Butt, Zubair; Tanveer, Waqas; Rao, Hasan Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the functioning of dew-point cooler is improved in terms of its thermal effectiveness. For this reason, a heat and mass exchanger has been designed by using a counter-flow pattern incorporating Maisotsenko cycle (M-cycle) having effective absorbing material called Kraft paper on wet channel side and improved width to height ratio. Experimentation has been performed under various inlet air working parameters such as humidity, velocity and temperature in addition with changing feed water temperature. The results from the experiments specify that the dew-point and the wet-bulb effectiveness is achieved between 67-87 % and 104-120 % respectively. Analysis is performed with temperature variation between 25 and 45 °C at different absolute humidity levels ranging from 14.4 to 18 g/kg, while the inlet air velocity is varied between 0.88 and 1.50 m/s. Thus, the working ability of the improved design has been found 5 % more effective in terms of wet bulb effectiveness as compared to previous counter-flow designs.

  11. Analysis of the control structures for an integrated ethanol processor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biset, S.; Nieto Deglioumini, L.; Basualdo, M.; Garcia, V. M.; Serra, M.

    The aim of this work is to investigate which would be a good preliminary plantwide control structure for the process of Hydrogen production from bioethanol to be used in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) accounting only steady-state information. The objective is to keep the process under optimal operation point, that is doing energy integration to achieve the maximum efficiency. Ethanol, produced from renewable feedstocks, feeds a fuel processor investigated for steam reforming, followed by high- and low-temperature shift reactors and preferential oxidation, which are coupled to a polymeric fuel cell. Applying steady-state simulation techniques and using thermodynamic models the performance of the complete system with two different control structures have been evaluated for the most typical perturbations. A sensitivity analysis for the key process variables together with the rigorous operability requirements for the fuel cell are taking into account for defining acceptable plantwide control structure. This is the first work showing an alternative control structure applied to this kind of process.

  12. Dynamic analysis and linear control strategies for proton exchange membrane fuel cell using a distributed parameter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methekar, R. N.; Prasad, V.; Gudi, R. D.

    To satisfy high power density demand in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), a robust control strategy is essential. A linear ratio control strategy is examined in this work. The manipulated variables are selected using steady-state relative gain array (RGA) analysis to be the inlet molar flow rates of hydrogen and coolant, and the controlled variables are average power density and average solid temperature, respectively. By selecting proper manipulated variables, the PEMFC does not exhibit sign change in gain and hence can be controlled by using a linear controller. Transfer function models obtained from step tests on the distributed parameter PEMFC model are used to design controllers for the multiple input-multiple output (MIMO) system. In addition, a ratio control strategy is proposed and evaluated, where the inlet molar flow rate of oxygen is used as a dependent manipulated variable and changed in a constant ratio with respect to the inlet molar flow rate of hydrogen. Simulation results show that the ratio control strategy provides a faster response than a MIMO control strategy. This ratio control strategy is able to circumvent the problem of oxygen starvation, and the increase in average solid temperature is small as compared to the MIMO control strategy.

  13. Analysis of x-ray emission in charge-exchange collisions of C6+ ions with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6+-He and - H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. The analysis examines the two collision systems for low to intermediate projectile energies. We perform capture cross section and radiative cascade calculations to obtain Lyman line emission ratios which can be compared to measurements that were carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Multicharged Ion Research Facility. Single-electron capture is considered for the C6+-He system while both single and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6+- H2 system. We also examine the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of the capture cross sections and the emission ratios. Calculated line emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are found to be in satisfactory agreement with the measurements. Work supported by SHARCNET, OGS, and NSERC, Canada

  14. Forecasting of magnitude and duration of currency crises based on the analysis of distortions of fractal scaling in exchange rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritskaya, Olga Y.

    2005-05-01

    Results of fractal stability analysis of daily exchange rate fluctuations of more than 30 floating currencies for a 10-year period are presented. It is shown for the first time that small- and large-scale dynamical instabilities of national monetary systems correlate with deviations of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) exponent from the value 1.5 predicted by the efficient market hypothesis. The observed dependence is used for classification of long-term stability of floating exchange rates as well as for revealing various forms of distortion of stable currency dynamics prior to large-scale crises. A normal range of DFA exponents consistent with crisis-free long-term exchange rate fluctuations is determined, and several typical scenarios of unstable currency dynamics with DFA exponents fluctuating beyond the normal range are identified. It is shown that monetary crashes are usually preceded by prolonged periods of abnormal (decreased or increased) DFA exponent, with the after-crash exponent tending to the value 1.5 indicating a more reliable exchange rate dynamics. Statistically significant regression relations (R=0.99, p<0.01) between duration and magnitude of currency crises and the degree of distortion of monofractal patterns of exchange rate dynamics are found. It is demonstrated that the parameters of these relations characterizing small- and large-scale crises are nearly equal, which implies a common instability mechanism underlying these events. The obtained dependences have been used as a basic ingredient of a forecasting technique which provided correct in-sample predictions of monetary crisis magnitude and duration over various time scales. The developed technique can be recommended for real-time monitoring of dynamical stability of floating exchange rate systems and creating advanced early-warning-system models for currency crisis prevention.

  15. Soluble CD8 stabilizes the HLA class I molecule by promoting beta2M exchange: analysis in real-time.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C L; Price, C P; Cohen, S B; Madrigal, J A; Newman, D J

    1999-05-01

    Human soluble CD8 (sCD8) is secreted by activated CD8+/- cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The immunological role of sCD8 is poorly defined, however. We have studied the influence of sCD8 on HLA class I interactions by real-time analysis. Using an optical biosensor we demonstrated that the binding of sCD8 to HLA-A2 promotes exchange of beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) in order to stabilize the complex. Kinetic analysis showed that sCD8 significantly increased the affinity (K(A)) of HLA-A2 for immobilized human beta2m; from 1.14 +/- 0.04 x 10(9) M(-1) in its absence, to 2.18 +/- 0.21 x 10(9) M(-1) following preincubation with sCD8. This suggests that the sCD8:HLA class I complex is unlikely to be degraded at the cell surface. Even in the presence of exogenous peptide (HLA-A2 specific or nonspecific), sCD8 has a stabilizing influence on the HLA class I molecule. These findings point to an immunosuppressive role for sCD8, because the binding of sCD8 to HLA class I would block the binding site for CTL-bound CD8 and, therefore, interfere with T cell activation and proliferation. This may have particular significance in pathological situations where elevated levels of sCD8 are found in extracellular fluids, and sCD8 may provide an alternative approach for immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:10447404

  16. A Mean Field Analysis of the Exchange Coupling (J) For 2- and 3-D Structured Tetracyanoethylenide (TCNE -)-based Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Amber C.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Miller, Joel S.

    2012-01-01

    Mean field expressions based on the simple Heisenberg model were derived to correlate the inter- and intralayer exchange coupling to the critical temperatures, Tc, for several TCNE (tetracyanoethylene) based magnets with extended 2- and 3-D structure types. These expressions were used to estimate the exchange coupling, J, for 2-D ferrimagnetic [MII(TCNE)(NCMe)2]+ (M = Mn, Fe), 3-D antiferromagnetic MnII(TCNE)[C4(CN)8]1/2, and 3-D ferrimagnetic MnII(TCNE)3/2(I3)1/2. The sign and magnitude of the exchange coupling are in accord with previously reported magnetic data.

  17. Comparative analysis of crossover exchanges and chiasmata in Allium cepa x fistulosum after genomic in situ hybridization (GISH).

    PubMed

    Stevenson, M; Armstrong, S J; Ford-Lloyd, B V; Jones, G H

    1998-11-01

    Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) successfully differentiated homoeologous genomes in the inter-specific hybrid Allium cepa x fistulosum, thus allowing the detection of reciprocal crossover events as label exchanges in separating anaphase I chromosomes. Three of the eight chromosome pairs were positively identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to rDNA sequences. There was a general similarity of the GISH-based label exchange frequencies and metaphase I chiasma frequencies, but with a 20% deficit of chiasmata. Reasons for this apparent deficit are discussed. The locations of chiasmata and label exchanges are in broad agreement. PMID:9886776

  18. Heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-02-02

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections.

  19. Manitoba Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coss, Maurice

    Planning ideas and follow-up activities are described for a reciprocal exchange program between groups of 5th and 6th grade students in Manitoba who are "twinned" with another school in the province. Emphasis is on providing learning experiences which help students become familiar with the economic activity in the area, with the local government…

  20. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, Walter

    1976-01-06

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

  1. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  2. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  3. Anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with post-column detection for the analysis of phytic acid and other inositol phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rounds, M. A.; Nielsen, S. S.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The use of gradient anion-exchange HPLC, with a simple post-column detection system, is described for the separation of myo-inositol phosphates, including "phytic acid" (myo-inositol hexaphosphate). Hexa-, penta-, tetra-, tri- and diphosphate members of this homologous series are clearly resolved within 30 min. This method should facilitate analysis and quantitation of "phytic acid" and other inositol phosphates in plant, food, and soil samples.

  4. Information exchange between registered nurses and district nurses during the discharge planning process: cross-sectional analysis of survey data.

    PubMed

    Nordmark, Sofi; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Discharge planning is an important care process for managing transitions from the hospital to the community. It has been studied for >20 years, but few studies clarify the information exchanged between healthcare providers. This study aimed to describe nurses' experiences and perceptions of information exchange during the discharge planning process, focused on what, when and how information is exchanged between the hospital and primary healthcare. Method: A web-based census survey was used to collect data; the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-squared test. A questionnaire was distributed to 194 registered nurses (129 respondents) from a central county hospital and 67 district nurses (42 respondents) working in 13 primary healthcare centres. Results: The results show a significant difference between given and received information between the two groups. Both groups thought the information exchange worked best when all participants met at the discharge planning conference and that the electronic information system was difficult to use. Conclusion: This study shows difficulties knowing what patient-related information needs to give and not receiving the expected information. These results can be used to develop knowledge about roles, work tasks and needs to enhance the outcome of the process and the information exchanged.

  5. CFD analysis of the two-phase bubbly flow characteristics in helically coiled rectangular and circular tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Alamin; Fsadni, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to their ease of manufacture, high heat transfer efficiency and compact design, helically coiled heat exchangers are increasingly being adopted in a number of industries. The higher heat transfer efficiency over straight pipes is due to the secondary flow that develops as a result of the centrifugal force. In spite of the widespread use of helically coiled heat exchangers, and the presence of bubbly two-phase flow in a number of systems, very few studies have investigated the resultant flow characteristics. This paper will therefore present the results of CFD simulations for the two-phase bubbly flow in helically coiled heat exchangers as a function of the volumetric void fraction and the tube cross-section design. The CFD results are compared to the scarce flow visualisation experimental results available in the open literature.

  6. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: I. Chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the first part of a theoretical and experimental work aiming at modeling the chemo-mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C3S). Because of ion exchange processes, the volume change of the IER may cause internal pressures leading to the degradation of the material. In this study, a predictive modeling is developed for describing the chemical behavior of such material. It is based on thermodynamic equilibria to determine the evolution of the ion exchange processes, and the potential precipitation of portlandite in the composite. In parallel, a phenomenological study has been set up to understand chemical phenomena related to the swelling mechanisms. The model created has been finally implemented in a finite elements software; the simulation of a laboratory test has been performed and the results compared to experimental data.

  7. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Leland

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) methods can reveal much about the structure, energetics, and dynamics of proteins. The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) to an earlier fragmentation-separation HX analysis now extends HX studies to larger proteins at high structural resolution and can provide information not available before. This chapter discusses experimental aspects of HX labeling, especially with respect to the use of MS and the analysis of MS data.

  8. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized.

  9. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-02-28

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4kA was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized herein.

  10. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summary herein.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of transcytolemmal water exchange analysis for therapeutic response assessment using DCE-MRI: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhao; Subashi, Ergys; Liang, Xiao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chang, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    This study compares the shutter-speed (SS) and the Tofts models as used in assessing therapeutic response in a longitudinal DCE-MRI experiment. Sixteen nu/nu mice with implanted colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (LS-174T) were randomly assigned into treatment/control groups (n  =  8/group) and received bevacizumab/saline twice weekly (Day1/Day4/Day8). All mice were scanned at one pre- (Day0) and two post-treatment (Day2/Day9) time points using a high spatiotemporal resolution DCE-MRI pulse sequence. The CA extravasation rate constant [Formula: see text] from the Tofts/SS model and the mean intracellular water residence time [Formula: see text] from the SS model were analyzed. A biological subvolume (BV) within the tumor was identified based on the [Formula: see text] intensity distribution, and the SS model parameters within the BV ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) were analyzed. It is found that [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] have a similar spatial distribution in the tumor volume. The Bayesian information criterion results show that the SS model was a better fit for all scans. At Day9, the treatment group had significantly higher tumor mean [Formula: see text] (p  =  0.021), [Formula: see text] (p  =  0.021) and [Formula: see text] (p  = 0.045). When BV from transcytolemmal water exchange analysis was adopted, the treatment group had higher mean [Formula: see text] at both Day2 (p  =  0.038) and Day9 (p  =  0.007). Additionally, at Day9, the treatment group had higher mean [Formula: see text] (p  =  0.045) and higher [Formula: see text] spatial heterogeneity indices (Rényi dimensions) d 1 (p  = 0.010) and d 2 (p  = 0.021). When mean [Formula: see text] and its coefficient of variation (CV) were used to separate treatment/control group samples using supporting vector machine, the accuracy of treatment/control classification was 68.8% at Day2 and 87.5% at Day9; in contrast, the

  12. Similarity, Clustering, and Scaling Analyses for the Foreign Exchange Market ---Comprehensive Analysis on States of Market Participants with High-Frequency Financial Data---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, A.; Sakai, H.; Nishimura, M.; Holyst, J. A.

    This article proposes mathematical methods to quantify states of marketparticipants in the foreign exchange market (FX market) and conduct comprehensive analysis on behavior of market participants by means of high-frequency financial data. Based on econophysics tools and perspectives we study similarity measures for both rate movements and quotation activities among various currency pairs. We perform also clustering analysis on market states for observation days, and find scaling relationship between mean values of quotation activities and their standard deviations. Using these mathematical methods we can visualize states of the FX market comprehensively. Finally we conclude that states of market participants temporally vary due to both external and internal factors.

  13. Picture Exchange Communication System with Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: A Meta-Analysis of Single Subject Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Stephanie L.; Banda, Devender R.

    2010-01-01

    Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a picture-based communication strategy used to teach communication skills to persons with developmental disabilities including autism. This article systematically reviews 13 published single-subject studies to examine the effectiveness of PECS, the effects of PECS on speech and problem behaviors,…

  14. A homogeneous quenching resonance energy transfer assay for the kinetic analysis of the GTPase nucleotide exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Kari; Ligabue, Alessio; Wang, Qi; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Veltel, Stefan; van Adrichem, Arjan J; Hänninen, Pekka; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2014-07-01

    A quenching resonance energy transfer (QRET) assay for small GTPase nucleotide exchange kinetic monitoring is demonstrated using nanomolar protein concentrations. Small GTPases are central signaling proteins in all eukaryotic cells acting as a "molecular switches" that are active in the GTP-state and inactive in the GDP-state. GTP-loading is highly regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In several diseases, most prominently cancer, this process in misregulated. The kinetics of the nucleotide exchange reaction reports on the enzymatic activity of the GEF reaction system and is, therefore, of special interest. We determined the nucleotide exchange kinetics using europium-labeled GTP (Eu-GTP) in the QRET assay for small GTPases. After GEF catalyzed GTP-loading of a GTPase, a high time-resolved luminescence signal was found to be associated with GTPase bound Eu-GTP, whereas the non-bound Eu-GTP fraction was quenched by soluble quencher. The association kinetics of the Eu-GTP was measured after GEF addition, whereas the dissociation kinetics could be determined after addition of unlabeled GTP. The resulting association and dissociation rates were in agreement with previously published values for H-Ras(Wt), H-Ras(Q61G), and K-Ras(Wt), respectively. The broader applicability of the QRET assay for small GTPases was demonstrated by determining the kinetics of the Ect2 catalyzed RhoA(Wt) GTP-loading. The QRET assay allows the use of nanomolar protein concentrations, as more than 3-fold signal-to-background ratio was achieved with 50 nM GTPase and GEF proteins. Thus, small GTPase exchange kinetics can be efficiently determined in a HTS compatible 384-well plate format.

  15. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of branches in dextran using high-performance anion exchange chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lin; Ouyang, Yilan; Sun, Xue; Xu, Naiyu; Linhardt, Robert J; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2015-12-01

    Dextran, a family of natural polysaccharides, consists of an α (1→6) linked-glucose main (backbone) chain having a number of branches. The determination of the types and the quantities of branches in dextran is important in understanding its various biological roles. In this study, a hyphenated method using high-performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) in parallel with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) and mass spectrometry (MS) was applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of dextran branches. A rotary cation-exchange cartridge array desalter was used for removal of salt from the HPAEC eluent making it MS compatible. MS and MS/MS were used to provide structural information on the enzymatically prepared dextran oligosaccharides. PAD provides quantitative data on the ratio of enzyme-resistant, branched dextran oligosaccharides. Both the types and degree of branching found in a variety of dextrans could be simultaneously determined online using this method.

  16. Quantitative analysis of spin exchange interactions to identify β strand and turn regions in Ure2 prion domain fibrils with site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Sam; Chiang, Vicky; Guo, Zhefeng

    2012-11-01

    Amyloid formation is associated with a range of debilitating human disorders including Alzheimer's and prion diseases. The amyloid structure is essential for understanding the role of amyloids in these diseases. Amyloid formation of Ure2 protein underlies the yeast prion [URE3]. Here we use site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of amyloid fibrils formed by the Ure2 prion domain. The Ure2 prion domain under study contains a Sup35M domain at C-terminus as a solubilization element. We introduced spin labels at every residue from positions 2-15, and every 5th residue from positions 20-80 in Ure2 prion domain. EPR spectra at most labeling sites show strong spin exchange interactions, suggesting a parallel in-register β structure. With quantitative analysis of spin exchange interactions, we show that residues 8-12 form the first β strand, followed by a turn at residues 13-14, and then the second β strand from residue 15 to at least residue 20. Comparison of the spin exchange frequency for the fibrils formed under quiescent and agitated conditions also revealed differences in the fibril structures. Currently there is a lack of techniques for in-depth structural studies of amyloid fibrils. Detailed structural information is obtained almost exclusively from solid-state NMR. The identification of β-strand and turn regions in this work suggests that quantitative analysis of spin exchange interactions in spin-labeled amyloid fibrils is a powerful approach for identifying the β-strand and turn/loop residues and for studying structural differences of different fibril polymorphs.

  17. Analysis of the influence of climatic and physiological parameters on the net ecosystem carbon exchange of an apple orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotelli, Damiano; Montagnani, Leonardo; Scandellari, Francesca; Tagliavini, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) of an apple orchard located in South Tyrol (Caldaro, Bolzano, Italy) was monitored continuously since March 2009 via eddy covariance technique. Contemporary measurements of the main environmental parameters (temperature, photosynthetic active photon flux density, soil water content, vapor pressure deficit) were taken at the same field site. Leaf Area Index was also determined biometrically starting from spring 2010. Objectives of this work were (i) to assess the influence of these environmental and physiological parameters on NEE, (ii) to set up a model capable to fill large gap occurring in the dataset and (iii) predict inter-annual variability of fluxes based on the measurements of the selected explanatory variables. Daily cumulated values of the response variable (NEE, g C d-1) and mean daily value of the five explanatory variables considered (air T, ° C; SWC, m3m-3; PPFD, μmol m-2s-1; VPD, hPa, LAI m2m-2) were used in this analysis. The complex interactions between the explanatory variables and NEE were analyzed with the tree model approach which draws a picture of the complexity of data structure and highlights the explanatory variable that explain the greater amount of deviance of the response variable. NEE variability was mostly explained by LAI and PPFD. The most positive values of NEE occurred below the LAI threshold of 1.16 m2m-2 while above that LAI threshold and with an average daily PPFD above 13.2 μmol m-2s-1, the orchard resulted always a sink of carbon (negative daily NEE). On half of the available data (only alternate months of the considered period were considered), a stepwise multiple regression approach was used to model NEE using the variables indicated above. Simplification by deletion of the non-significant terms was carried out until all parameters where highly significant (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in deviance was observed when deleting further variables. Since heteroscedasticity and non

  18. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbara, Thomas M.

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Ion-exchange method in the collection of nitrate from freshwater ecosystems for nitrogen and oxygen isotope analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Bing; Song, Yao-Bin; Xu, Hong-Ke; Chen, Ling-Yun; Dai, Wen-Hong; Dong, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) contamination of freshwater is considered one of the most prevalent global environmental problems. Dual stable isotopic compositions (δ(15)N and δ(18)O) of NO3(-) can provide helpful information and have been well documented as being a powerful tool to track the source of NO3(-) in freshwater ecosystems. The ion-exchange method is a reliable and precise technique for measuring the δ(15)N and δ(18)O of NO3(-) and has been widely employed to collect NO3(-) from freshwater ecosystems. This review summarizes and presents the principles, affecting factors and corresponding significant improvements of the ion-exchange method. Finally, potential improvements and perspectives for the applicability of this method are also discussed, as are suggestions for further research and development drawn from the overall conclusions.

  20. Synonym-based word frequency analysis to support the development and presentation of a public health quality improvement taxonomy in an online exchange.

    PubMed

    Pina, Jamie; Chester, Kelley; Danoff, Diana; Koyanagi, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Word frequency analysis has not been fully explored as an input to public health taxonomy development. We used document analysis, expert review, and user-centered design to develop a taxonomy of public health quality improvement concepts for an online exchange of quality improvement work (www.phqix.org). Online entries were made searchable using a faceted search approach. To present the most relevant facets to users, we analyzed 334 published public health quality improvement documents using word frequency analysis to identify the most prevalent clusters of word meanings. We reviewed the highest-weighted concepts and identified their relationships to quality improvement details in our taxonomy. The meanings were mapped to items in our taxonomy, and presented in order of their weighted percentages in the data. Using this combination of methods, we developed and sorted concepts in the faceted search presentation so that relevant search criteria were accessible to users of the online exchange. Word frequency analysis may be a useful method to incorporate in other taxonomy development and presentationwhen relevant data is available.

  1. Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry with Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange and Top-Down MS for Peptide Ion Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Maleki, Hossein; Arndt, James R.; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2014-12-01

    The gas-phase conformations of electrosprayed ions of the model peptide KKDDDDIIKIIK have been examined by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. [M+4H]4+ ions exhibit two conformers with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 471 Å2. [M+3H]3+ ions exhibit a predominant conformer with a collision cross section of 340 Å2 as well as an unresolved conformer (shoulder) with a collision cross section of ~367 Å2. Maximum HDX levels for the more compact [M+4H]4+ ions and the compact and partially-folded [M+3H]3+ ions are ~12.9, ~15.5, and ~14.9, respectively. Ion structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) suggest that this ordering of HDX level results from increased charge-site/exchange-site density for the more compact ions of lower charge. Additionally, a new model that includes two distance calculations (charge site to carbonyl group and carbonyl group to exchange site) for the computer-generated structures is shown to better correlate to the experimentally determined per-residue deuterium uptake. Future comparisons of IMS-HDX-MS data with structures obtained from MDS are discussed with respect to novel experiments that will reveal the HDX rates of individual residues.

  2. Climatic and management drivers of CO2 exchanges by a production crop: analysis over three successive 4-year cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buysse, Pauline; Moureaux, Christine; Bodson, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchanges between crops and the atmosphere are influenced by both climatic and crop management drivers. The investigated crop, situated at the Lonzée Terrestrial Observatory (candidate ICOS site) in the Hesbaye region in Belgium and managed for more than 70 years using conventional farming practices, was monitored over three complete sugar beet/winter wheat/potato/winter wheat rotation cycles from 2004 to 2016. Eddy covariance, automatic and manual soil chambers, leaf diffusion and biomass measurements were performed continuously in order to obtain the daily and seasonal Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), total Ecosystem Respiration (TER), Net Primary Productivity (NPP), autotrophic respiration, heterotrophic respiration and Net Biome Production (NBP). Meteorological data and crop management practices were also recorded. Climatic and seasonal evolutions of the carbon balance components were studied and crop carbon budgets were computed both at the yearly and crop rotation cycle scales. On average over the 12 years, NEE was negative but NBP was positive, i.e. as far as carbon exportation by harvest are included in the budget, the site behaved as a carbon source. Impacts of both meteorological drivers and crop management operations on CO2 exchanges were analyzed and compared between crop types, years, and rotation cycles. The uncertainties associated to the carbon fluxes were also evaluated and discussed.

  3. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H]4+ ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 446 Å2; the [M + 3H]3+ ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å2 and 367 Å2. Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H]3+ ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H]4+ ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H]4+ ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  4. A Water Balance Model for Hill reservoir - Aquifer Exchange Water Flux Quantification and Uncertainty Analysis - Application to the Kamech catchment, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouteffeha, Maroua; Dagès, Cécile; Bouhlila, Rachida; Raclot, Damien; Molénat, Jérôme

    2013-04-01

    hydrological years (09/2009-08/2010 and 09/2010-08/2011) shows that the net surface-subsurface exchange flux is positive, i.e. the infiltration from the hill reservoir to the aquifer predominates the discharge from the aquifer to the reservoir. Moreover the surface-subsurface exchange constitutes the main output component in the water balance. The annual surface-subsurface exchange flux appeared almost constant from one year to the other one whatever the hydrological conditions variability over the catchment. Moreover, the analysis of the intra-annual variability shows that the flux was nearly constant within every year. Reference: Voltz , M. and Albergel , J., 2002. OMERE : Observatoire Méditerranéen de l'Environnement Rural et de l'Eau - Impact des actions anthropiques sur les transferts de masse dans les hydrosystèmes méditerranéens ruraux. Proposition d'Observatoire de Recherche en Environnement, Ministère de la Recherche.

  5. Analysis of Radiation-natural Convection Interactions in 1-g and low-g Environments using the Discrete Exchange Factor Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1993-01-01

    A new numerical method is presented for the analysis of combined natural convection and radiation heat transfer with applications in many engineering situations such as materials processing, combustion and fire research. Because of the recent interest in the low gravity environment of space, attention is devoted to both 1-g and low-g applications. The two-dimensional mathematical model is represented by a set of coupled nonlinear integro-partial differential equations. Radiative exchange is formulated using the Discrete Exchange Factor method (DEF). This method considers point to point exchange and provides accurate results over a wide range of radiation parameters. Numerical results show that radiation significantly influences the flow and heat transfer in both low-g and 1-g applications. In the low-g environment, convection is weak, and radiation can easily become the dominant heat transfer mode. It is also shown that volumetric heating by radiation gives rise to an intricate cell pattern in the top heated enclosure.

  6. Optimization of UA of heat exchangers and BOG compressor exit pressure of LNG boil-off gas reliquefaction system using exergy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochunni, Sarun Kumar; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2015-12-01

    Boil-off gas (BOG) generation and its handling are important issues in Liquefied natural gas (LNG) value chain because of economic, environment and safety reasons. Several variants of reliquefaction systems of BOG have been proposed by researchers. Thermodynamic analyses help to configure them and size their components for improving performance. In this paper, exergy analysis of reliquefaction system based on nitrogen-driven reverse Brayton cycle is carried out through simulation using Aspen Hysys 8.6®, a process simulator and the effects of heat exchanger size with and without related pressure drop and BOG compressor exit pressure are evaluated. Nondimensionalization of parameters with respect to the BOG load allows one to scale up or down the design. The process heat exchanger (PHX) requires much higher surface area than that of BOG condenser and it helps to reduce the quantity of methane vented out to atmosphere. As pressure drop destroys exergy, optimum UA of PHX decreases for highest system performance if pressure drop is taken into account. Again, for fixed sizes of heat exchangers, as there is a range of discharge pressures of BOG compressor at which the loss of methane in vent minimizes, the designer should consider choosing the pressure at lower value.

  7. Evaluation of the effect of transcytolemmal water exchange analysis for therapeutic response assessment using DCE-MRI: a comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhao; Subashi, Ergys; Liang, Xiao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chang, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    This study compares the shutter-speed (SS) and the Tofts models as used in assessing therapeutic response in a longitudinal DCE-MRI experiment. Sixteen nu/nu mice with implanted colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (LS-174T) were randomly assigned into treatment/control groups (n  =  8/group) and received bevacizumab/saline twice weekly (Day1/Day4/Day8). All mice were scanned at one pre- (Day0) and two post-treatment (Day2/Day9) time points using a high spatiotemporal resolution DCE-MRI pulse sequence. The CA extravasation rate constant K\\text{T}\\text{trans}/K\\text{S}\\text{trans} from the Tofts/SS model and the mean intracellular water residence time {τ\\text{i}} from the SS model were analyzed. A biological subvolume (BV) within the tumor was identified based on the {τ\\text{i}} intensity distribution, and the SS model parameters within the BV (K\\text{S,BV}\\text{trans} and {τ\\text{i,BV}} ) were analyzed. It is found that K\\text{S}\\text{trans} and K\\text{T}\\text{trans} have a similar spatial distribution in the tumor volume. The Bayesian information criterion results show that the SS model was a better fit for all scans. At Day9, the treatment group had significantly higher tumor mean K\\text{T}\\text{trans} (p  =  0.021), K\\text{S}\\text{trans} (p  =  0.021) and {τ\\text{i}} (p  = 0.045). When BV from transcytolemmal water exchange analysis was adopted, the treatment group had higher mean K\\text{S,BV}\\text{trans} at both Day2 (p  =  0.038) and Day9 (p  =  0.007). Additionally, at Day9, the treatment group had higher mean {τ\\text{i,BV}} (p  =  0.045) and higher K\\text{S,BV}\\text{trans} spatial heterogeneity indices (Rényi dimensions) d 1 (p  = 0.010) and d 2 (p  = 0.021). When mean K\\text{S,BV}\\text{trans} and its coefficient of variation (CV) were used to separate treatment/control group samples using supporting vector machine, the accuracy of treatment/control classification was

  8. Heat exchanger leakage problem location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejčík, Jiří; Jícha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Recent compact heat exchangers are very often assembled from numerous parts joined together to separate heat transfer fluids and to form the required heat exchanger arrangement. Therefore, the leak tightness is very important property of the compact heat exchangers. Although, the compact heat exchangers have been produced for many years, there are still technological problems associated with manufacturing of the ideal connection between the individual parts, mainly encountered with special purpose heat exchangers, e.g. gas turbine recuperators. This paper describes a procedure used to identify the leakage location inside the prime surface gas turbine recuperator. For this purpose, an analytical model of the leaky gas turbine recuperator was created to assess its performance. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data which were acquired during the recuperator thermal performance analysis. The differences between these two data sets are used to indicate possible leakage areas.

  9. Ratiometric analysis in hyperpolarized NMR (I): test of the two-site exchange model and the quantification of reaction rate constants.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin Z; Kadlececk, Stephen; Xu, He N; Daye, Dania; Pullinger, Benjamin; Profka, Harrilla; Chodosh, Lewis; Rizi, Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for the analysis of in vivo hyperpolarized (13) C NMR data from the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction usually make assumptions on the stability of rate constants and/or the validity of the two-site exchange model. In this study, we developed a framework to test the validity of the assumption of stable reaction rate constants and the two-site exchange model in vivo via ratiometric fitting of the time courses of the signal ratio L(t)/P(t). Our analysis provided evidence that the LDH enzymatic kinetics observed by hyperpolarized NMR are in near-equilibrium and satisfy the two-site exchange model for only a specific time window. In addition, we quantified both the forward and reverse exchange rate constants of the LDH reaction for the transgenic and mouse xenograft models of breast cancer using the ratio fitting method developed, which includes only two modeling parameters and is less sensitive to the influence of instrument settings/protocols, such as flip angles, degree of polarization and tracer dosage. We further compared the ratio fitting method with a conventional two-site exchange modeling method, i.e. the differential equation fitting method, using both the experimental and simulated hyperpolarized NMR data. The ratio fitting method appeared to fit better than the differential equation fitting method for the reverse rate constant on the mouse tumor data, with less relative errors on average, whereas the differential equation fitting method also resulted in a negative reverse rate constant for one tumor. The simulation results indicated that the accuracy of both methods depends on the width of the transport function, noise level and rate constant ratio; one method may be more accurate than the other based on the experimental/biological conditions aforementioned. We were able to categorize our tumor models into specific conditions of the computer simulation and to estimate the errors of rate quantification. We also discussed possible

  10. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  11. Use of ion exchange resins in the analysis of rocks and minerals: Separation of sodium and potassium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichen, L.E.

    1958-01-01

    This procedure was developed primarily for analyses in which limited amounts of sample are available. Sodium and potassium can be separated from the other constituents of silicate rocks by cation exchange resin (Amberlite IR-120). The sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric and sulfuric acids and passed through the resin bed after expulsion of the fluorine. The column is eluted with 0.12N hydrochloric acid at a fast flow rate of 4 ml. per sq. cm. per minute and the sodium and potassium are recovered together within a reasonable time. Other constituents of the sample, except silica, can be determined on the same portion of sample.

  12. Direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Sakurai, Hiromu; Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Günther, Detlef

    2015-09-01

    An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique was applied to the direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in ambient air. The ultra-trace semiconductor gases such as arsine (AsH3) and phosphine (PH3) were converted to particles by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonia (NH3) gases within a gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The converted particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS through a gas exchange device (GED), which could penetrate the particles as well as exchange to Ar from either non-reacted gases such as an air or remaining gases of O3 and NH3. The particle size distribution of converted particles was measured by scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and the results supported the elucidation of particle agglomeration between the particle converted from semiconductor gas and the particle of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which was produced as major particle in GPD. Stable time-resolved signals from AsH3 and PH3 in air were obtained by GPD-GED-ICPMS with continuous gas introduction; however, the slightly larger fluctuation, which could be due to the ionization fluctuation of particles in ICP, was observed compared to that of metal carbonyl gas in Ar introduced directly into ICPMS. The linear regression lines were obtained and the limits of detection (LODs) of 1.5 pL L(-1) and 2.4 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, were estimated. Since these LODs revealed sufficiently lower values than the measurement concentrations required from semiconductor industry such as 0.5 nL L(-1) and 30 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, the GPD-GED-ICPMS could be useful for direct and high sensitive analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in air.

  13. Gas exchange in Quercus rubra (northern red oak) during a drought: analysis of relations among photosynthesis, transpiration, and leaf conductance.

    PubMed

    Weber, J. A.; Gates, D. M.

    1990-12-01

    Development of water stress in leaves of mature Quercus rubra L. caused a marked midday depression in photosynthesis (A) and transpiration (E). At external CO(2) partial pressures of 100-110 Pa, a constant temperature of 30 degrees C and a constant photosynthetic photon flux density of about 1000 micromol m(-2) s(-1), A was 8 micromol m(-2) at low leaf water potentials (-1.5 to -2.0 MPa), whereas it was 20 micromol m(-2) s(-1) in non-stressed leaves (-1.0 MPa). At lower external CO(2) partial pressures, the effect of low leaf water potential on A was less. The midday depression in gas exchange was relieved by an overnight rain of 2.5 cm. No difference in carboxylation efficiency or CO(2) compensation point was found between leaves before and after rain, The relationship between A and E was linear for a given external CO(2) partial pressure, but the slope varied with CO(2) concentration. Modification of the model of stomatal response proposed by Ball et al. (1987) produced a linear relationship between leaf conductance and a factor incorporating A, relative humidity, and CO(2). The data indicate that gas exchange in leaves of mature northern red oak respond rapidly to relief of drought with no indication of long-term photoinhibition. PMID:14972919

  14. Experimental and numerical study of nanofluid in heat exchanger fitted by modified twisted tape: exergy analysis and ANN prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddah, Heydar; Ghasemi, Nahid; Keyvani, Bahram; Cheraghali, Ramin

    2016-09-01

    Present study provides an experimental investigation of the exergetic efficiency due to the flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in different geometries and flow regimes of the double pipe heat exchangers. The experiments with different Geometrical Progression Ratio (GPR) of twists as the new modified twisted tapes and different nanofluid concentration were performed under similar operation condition. Pitch length of the proposed twisted tapes and consequently the twist ratios changed along the twists with respect to the Geometrical Progression Ratio (GPR) whether reducer (RGPR < 1) or increaser (IGPR > 1). Regarding the experimental data, utilization of RGPR twists together with nanofluids tends to increase exergetic efficiency. Since the Prediction of exergetic efficiency from experimental process is complex and time consuming, artificial neural networks for identification of the relationship, which may exist between the thermal and flow parameters and exergetic efficiency, have been utilized. The network input consists of five parameters (Re,Pr ,φ, Tr, GPR) that crucially dominate the heat transfer process. The results proved that the introduced ANN model is reliable and capable in proposing a proper development plan for a heat exchanger and/or to determine the optimal plan of operation for heat transfer process.

  15. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: II. Mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the second part of a study aiming at modelling the mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C3S). Such composites may be subjected to internal pressures due to ion exchange processes between ionic species which are in IER and interstitial solution of the cement paste. The reactive transport model developed in the companion paper is coupled in this study to a multi-scale approach describing the mechanical behavior of the material. It is based on an analogy with thermomechanics for taking in account the IER internal pressures, and on Eshelby-based homogenization techniques to estimate both mechanical and coupling parameters. A laboratory test has been set up to measure the macroscopic strain caused by the swelling phenomenon. The model has been finally implemented in a finite elements software. The simulation of the laboratory tests has been performed and the results have been analyzed and compared to experimental data.

  16. Effect of the shape on the spin state and exchange in quantum dots. Feynman path integral analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    The ab initio computer simulation of the mixed quantum states of 1–5-nm model ellipsoid quantum dots with “soft” walls containing two and three quantum-indistinguishable nonrelativistic electrons has been performed by the path integral method. The calculation has been carried out beyond the single-electron and mean-field approximations with the fundamentally exact inclusion of Coulomb and exchange correlations of all orders and the spin variable. Distributions over the eigenfunctions of the spin-squared operator, as well as the equilibrium spin numbers, have been obtained depending on the shape of a quantum dot and the temperature. The complete set of basis functions symmetrized in permutations according to the spin of the system has been obtained by application of the Young symmetry operators. The dependence of the energy on the shape of the quantum dot corresponds to the negative sign of the surface tension at its boundary. The calculation indicates that the spin magnetic susceptibility in the system of two electrons decreases strongly for spherical quantum dots (“pairing” of spins) and the temperature dependences have a pronounced maximum whose position depends on the shape of the quantum dot. For three electrons in an oblate quantum dot, the inversion of the energy levels of spin states is observed and affects the spin magnetic susceptibility. The results indicate a strong dependence of the energy of collective spin states of electrons on the detailed inclusion of exchange and Coulomb spatial correlations.

  17. Analysis of cutaneous and internal gill gas exchange morphology in early larval amphibians, Pseudophryne bibronii and Crinia georgiana.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Casey A; Seymour, Roger S

    2012-08-01

    This study uses stereological techniques to examine body, internal gill and cardiovascular morphology of two larval amphibians, Pseudophryne bibronii and Crinia georgiana, to evaluate the roles of diffusive and convective gas exchange. Gosner stage 27 specimens were prepared for light microscopy and six parallel sections of equal distance taken through the body as well as a further six through the heart and internal gills. Body, internal gill and heart volume as well as body and internal gill surface areas were determined. The harmonic mean distance across the internal gills was also measured and used to estimate oxygen diffusive conductance, DO₂. The species were of similar body size and surface area, but the heart and internal gills were larger in P. bibronii, which may represent precursors for greater growth of the species beyond stage 27. The much larger surface area of the skin compared to the internal gills in both species suggests it is the main site for gas exchange, with the gills supplementing oxygen uptake. The sparse cutaneous capillary network suggests diffusion is the main oxygen transport mechanism across the skin and directly into deeper tissues. A numerical model that simplifies larval shape, and has an internal (axial vessels) and external oxygen source, confirms that diffusion is able to maintain tissue oxygen with limited convective input.

  18. Isolation of saccharides in dairy and soy products by solid-phase extraction coupled with analysis by ligand-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Brereton, Kelsey R; Green, David B

    2012-10-15

    The present study reports an improved method to quickly and reproducibly isolate the saccharides from a variety of dairy and soy products utilizing reversed-phase solid-phase extraction to quantitatively remove fats, fatty acids, and lipids followed by desalination and deproteinization by ion-exchange solid-phase extraction with no loss of saccharides during extraction. Analysis of the isolated saccharides was performed by ligand-exchange HPLC. The method presented requires no prolonged heating (thus protecting the saccharides from hydrolysis or isomerization), uses benign reagents, and realizes a significant time savings over existing methods. The isolation and analysis of monosaccharides (glucose, galactose and fructose), disaccharides (lactose and sucrose), and polysaccharides (raffinose and stachyose) from dairy products (whole, reduced fat, and lactose-free milk and yogurt), infant formula (powdered and premixed), and soy beverages were studied in this investigation with recoveries ranging from 88% to 110% in all products studied. We also applied the method to quickly discriminate authentic soy milk from a soy beverage, branded as soy milk.

  19. Two phase heat exchanger symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J.T.; Kitto, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book compiles the papers presented at the conference on the subject of heat transfer mechanics and instrumentation. Theoretical and experimental data are provided in each paper. The topics covered are: temperature effects of steel; optimization of design of two-phase heat exchanges; thermosyphon system and low grade waste heat recovery; condensation heat transfer in plate heat exchangers; forced convective boiling; and performance analysis of full bundle submerged boilers.

  20. Leader-member exchange (LMX) and culture: a meta-analysis of correlates of LMX across 23 countries.

    PubMed

    Rockstuhl, Thomas; Dulebohn, James H; Ang, Soon; Shore, Lynn M

    2012-11-01

    This study extends leader-member exchange (LMX) research by meta-analyzing the role of national culture in moderating relationships between LMX and its correlates. Results based on 282 independent samples (N = 68,587) from 23 countries and controlling for extreme response style differences indicate that (a) relationships of LMX with organizational citizenship behavior, justice perceptions, job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and leader trust are stronger in horizontal-individualistic (e.g., Western) contexts than in vertical-collectivistic (e.g., Asian) contexts; and (b) national culture does not affect relationships of LMX with task performance, organizational commitment, and transformational leadership. These findings highlight that although members are universally sensitive to how their leaders treat them, members' responses in Asian contexts may also be influenced by collective interests and role-based obligations.

  1. 3D Numerical heat transfer and fluid flow analysis in plate-fin and tube heat exchangers with electrohydrodynamic enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Wen; Jang, Jiin-Yuh

    2005-05-01

    Three-dimensional laminar fluid flow and heat transfer over a four-row plate-fin and tube heat exchanger with electrohydrodynamic (EHD) wire electrodes are studied numerically. The effects of different electrode arrangements (square and diagonal), tube pitch arrangements (in-line and staggered) and applied voltage (VE=0-16 kV) are investigated in detail for the Reynolds number range (based on the fin spacing and frontal velocity) ranging from 100 to 1,000. It is found that the EHD enhancement is more effective for lower Re and higher applied voltage. The case of staggered tube pitch with square wire electrode arrangement gives the best heat transfer augmentation. For VE=16 kV and Re = 100, this study identifies a maximum improvement of 218% in the average Nusselt number and a reduction in fin area of 56% as compared that without EHD enhancement.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Cations in Solutions Using ion Exchange Filter Paper by X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, Y.; Fujimaki, H.

    2007-12-01

    The strong acid cation exchange filter, CP-1, were applied to X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for trace elements in aqueous solution. In this study, the objective elements were Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd. The measurement of the X-ray intensity determined the optimum methods of XRF analyses using the CP-1 filter. The optimum area that sample solutions penetrated was inside the determining area. The proper material to underlay CP-1 filter was glass bead. The calibration curves that determined by this study calculated the limit values of determination. These values were 0.72 micro gram for Cu and Zn. The method of separation and concentration using the CP-1 filter enable the quantitative analyses of trace heavy metals easily.

  3. Leader-member exchange (LMX) and culture: a meta-analysis of correlates of LMX across 23 countries.

    PubMed

    Rockstuhl, Thomas; Dulebohn, James H; Ang, Soon; Shore, Lynn M

    2012-11-01

    This study extends leader-member exchange (LMX) research by meta-analyzing the role of national culture in moderating relationships between LMX and its correlates. Results based on 282 independent samples (N = 68,587) from 23 countries and controlling for extreme response style differences indicate that (a) relationships of LMX with organizational citizenship behavior, justice perceptions, job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and leader trust are stronger in horizontal-individualistic (e.g., Western) contexts than in vertical-collectivistic (e.g., Asian) contexts; and (b) national culture does not affect relationships of LMX with task performance, organizational commitment, and transformational leadership. These findings highlight that although members are universally sensitive to how their leaders treat them, members' responses in Asian contexts may also be influenced by collective interests and role-based obligations. PMID:22985117

  4. Ion exchanger in the brain: Quantitative analysis of perineuronally fixed anionic binding sites suggests diffusion barriers with ion sorting properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Markus; Reinert, Tilo; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Wagner, Friedrich E.; Tröger, Wolfgang; Reinert, Anja; Jäger, Carsten; Brückner, Gert; Arendt, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) are a specialized form of brain extracellular matrix, consisting of negatively charged glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins and proteoglycans in the direct microenvironment of neurons. Still, locally immobilized charges in the tissue have not been accessible so far to direct observations and quantifications. Here, we present a new approach to visualize and quantify fixed charge-densities on brain slices using a focused proton-beam microprobe in combination with ionic metallic probes. For the first time, we can provide quantitative data on the distribution and net amount of pericellularly fixed charge-densities, which, determined at 0.4-0.5 M, is much higher than previously assumed. PNs, thus, represent an immobilized ion exchanger with ion sorting properties high enough to partition mobile ions in accord with Donnan-equilibrium. We propose that fixed charge-densities in the brain are involved in regulating ion mobility, the volume fraction of extracellular space and the viscosity of matrix components.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO{sub 2} exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, C.; Louis, J.F.

    1995-02-20

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO{sub 2} flux to perturbations in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model`s main parameters describing current seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO{sub 2} flux is more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO{sub 2} exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO{sub 2}-induced warming is a significant increase in CO{sub 2} emission, creating a positive feedback to atmospheric CO{sub 2} accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO{sub 2}, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO{sub 2} flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results. 38 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  7. Improving policy and practice to promote equity and social justice - a qualitative comparative analysis building on key learnings from a twinning exchange between England and the US.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Claire; Narle, Ginder; Gibbs, Martin; Ruddock, Charmaine; Grady, Michael; Brookes, Chris; Hopkins, Trevor; Norwood, Jayne

    2013-12-01

    Community health promotion interventions, targeted at marginalised populations and focusing on addressing the social determinants of health (SDH) to reduce health inequalities and addressing the processes of exclusion, are an important strategy to prevent and control non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and promote the health of underprivileged and under-resourced groups. This article builds on key lessons learnt from a learning exchange between Communities for Health in England and the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health across the US (REACH US) communities that are tackling health inequities. It presents a qualitative analysis further capturing information about specific community interventions involved in the exchange and identifying lessons learnt. This exchange was led by a partnership between the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the International Union for Health Promotion and Education, the Department of Health of England, Health Action Partnership International, and Learning for Public Health West Midlands. These efforts provide interesting insights for further research, priority areas of action for policy and practice to address the SDH and to promote and sustain equity and social justice globally. The article highlights some key lessons about the use of data, assets-based community interventions and the importance of good leadership in times of crisis and adversity. Whilst complex and time-consuming to arrange, such programmes have the potential to offer other countries including the global south new insights and perspectives that will in turn contribute to the SDH field and provide concrete strategies and actions that effectively reduce inequities and promote the health of our societies. The key learnings have the potential to contribute to the global community and growing documentation on evidence of effective efforts in the reduction of health inequities. PMID:24722742

  8. Improving policy and practice to promote equity and social justice - a qualitative comparative analysis building on key learnings from a twinning exchange between England and the US.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Claire; Narle, Ginder; Gibbs, Martin; Ruddock, Charmaine; Grady, Michael; Brookes, Chris; Hopkins, Trevor; Norwood, Jayne

    2013-12-01

    Community health promotion interventions, targeted at marginalised populations and focusing on addressing the social determinants of health (SDH) to reduce health inequalities and addressing the processes of exclusion, are an important strategy to prevent and control non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and promote the health of underprivileged and under-resourced groups. This article builds on key lessons learnt from a learning exchange between Communities for Health in England and the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health across the US (REACH US) communities that are tackling health inequities. It presents a qualitative analysis further capturing information about specific community interventions involved in the exchange and identifying lessons learnt. This exchange was led by a partnership between the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the International Union for Health Promotion and Education, the Department of Health of England, Health Action Partnership International, and Learning for Public Health West Midlands. These efforts provide interesting insights for further research, priority areas of action for policy and practice to address the SDH and to promote and sustain equity and social justice globally. The article highlights some key lessons about the use of data, assets-based community interventions and the importance of good leadership in times of crisis and adversity. Whilst complex and time-consuming to arrange, such programmes have the potential to offer other countries including the global south new insights and perspectives that will in turn contribute to the SDH field and provide concrete strategies and actions that effectively reduce inequities and promote the health of our societies. The key learnings have the potential to contribute to the global community and growing documentation on evidence of effective efforts in the reduction of health inequities.

  9. The Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blain, Mary P., Ed.; Pintavalle, Steven J., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Presents 10 activities in biology, chemistry, physical science, and general science. Activities focus on: alfalfa sprouts; soap test; density; skating on cold ice; Kirlian photography; titration analysis (with program listing); radioactive decay; and others. Each activity includes suggested grade level(s) and procedures. (DH)

  10. Single column comprehensive analysis of pharmaceutical preparations using dual-injection mixed-mode (ion-exchange and reversed-phase) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Taylor, Mark R; Haddad, Paul R; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2013-12-01

    The comprehensive separation and detection of hydrophobic and hydrophilic active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), their counter-ions (organic, inorganic) and excipients, using a single mixed-mode chromatographic column, and a dual injection approach is presented. Using a mixed-mode Thermo Fisher Acclaim Trinity P1 column, APIs, their counter-ions and possible degradants were first separated using a combination of anion-exchange, cation-exchange and hydrophobic interactions, using a mobile phase consisting of a dual organic modifier/salt concentration gradient. A complementary method was also developed using the same column for the separation of hydrophilic bulk excipients, using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) under high organic solvent mobile phase conditions. These two methods were then combined within a single gradient run using dual sample injection, with the first injection at the start of the applied gradient (mixed-mode retention of solutes), followed by a second sample injection at the end of the gradient (HILIC retention of solutes). Detection using both ultraviolet absorbance and refractive index enabled the sensitive detection of APIs and UV-absorbing counter-ions, together with quantitative determination of bulk excipients. The developed approach was applied successfully to the analysis of a dry powder inhalers (Flixotide(®), Spiriva(®)), enabling comprehensive quantification of all APIs and excipients in the sample.

  11. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part II: Bias and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) and micrometeorological (MM) methods are extensively deployed for gauging air-surface Hg0 gas exchange. However, a systematic evaluation of the precision of the contemporary Hg0 flux quantification methods is not available. In this study, the uncertainty in Hg0 flux measured by the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method, the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM), the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method, as well as DFC of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs, are assessed using a robust data set from two field intercomparison campaigns. The absolute precision in Hg0 concentration difference (ΔC) measurements is estimated at 0.064 ng m-3 for the gradient-based MBR and AGM systems. For the REA system, the parameter is Hg0 concentration (C) dependent at 0.069 + 0.022C. During the campaigns, 57 and 62 % of the individual vertical gradient measurements are found to be significantly different from 0, while for the REA technique, the percentage of significant observations is lower. For the chambers, non-significant fluxes are confined to a few night-time periods with varying ambient Hg0 concentrations. Relative bias for DFC-derived fluxes is estimated to be ~ ±10, and ~ 85% of the flux bias is within ±2 ng m-2 h-1 in absolute terms. The DFC flux bias follows a diurnal cycle, which is largely affected by the forced temperature and irradiation bias in the chambers. Due to contrasting prevailing micrometeorological conditions, the relative uncertainty (median) in turbulent exchange parameters differs by nearly a factor of 2 between the campaigns, while that in ΔC measurement is fairly consistent. The estimated flux uncertainties for the triad of MM techniques are 16-27, 12-23 and 19-31% (interquartile range) for the AGM, MBR and REA methods, respectively. This study indicates that flux-gradient-based techniques (MBR and AGM) are preferable to REA in quantifying Hg0 flux over ecosystems with low vegetation height. A limitation of all Hg0 flux

  12. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part II: Bias and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) and micrometeorological (MM) methods are extensively deployed for gauging air-surface Hg0 gas exchange. However, a systematic evaluation of the precision of the contemporary Hg0 flux quantification methods is not available. In this study, the uncertainty in Hg0 flux measured by relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method, aerodynamic gradient method (AGM), modified Bowen-ratio (MBR) method, as well as DFC of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs is assessed using a robust data-set from two field intercomparison campaigns. The absolute precision in Hg0 concentration difference (Δ C) measurements is estimated at 0.064 ng m-3 for the gradient-based MBR and AGM system. For the REA system, the parameter is Hg0 concentration (C) dependent at 0.069+0.022C. 57 and 62% of the individual vertical gradient measurements were found to be significantly different from zero during the campaigns, while for the REA-technique the percentage of significant observations was lower. For the chambers, non-significant fluxes are confined to a few nighttime periods with varying ambient Hg0 concentration. Relative bias for DFC-derived fluxes is estimated to be ~ ±10%, and ~ 85% of the flux bias are within ±2 ng m-2 h-1 in absolute term. The DFC flux bias follows a diurnal cycle, which is largely dictated by temperature controls on the enclosed volume. Due to contrasting prevailing micrometeorological conditions, the relative uncertainty (median) in turbulent exchange parameters differs by nearly a factor of two between the campaigns, while that in Δ C measurements is fairly stable. The estimated flux uncertainties for the triad of MM-techniques are 16-27, 12-23 and 19-31% (interquartile range) for the AGM, MBR and REA method, respectively. This study indicates that flux-gradient based techniques (MBR and AGM) are preferable to REA in quantifying Hg0 flux over ecosystems with low vegetation height. A limitation of all Hg0 flux measurement systems investigated

  13. Consider nonfouling fluidized bed exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Klaren, D.G.; Baiiie, R.E. )

    1989-07-01

    Applications for fluidized bed heat exchangers in various industries, their operating principles and a detailed analysis of their suitability for replacing double-pipe scraped-surface heat exchangers in lube oil plants are discussed. Development of the fluidized bed heat exchanger started in the early 70s and was totally dedicated to improvement of the multistage flash evaporator for sea water desalination. This resulted in a demonstration plant with a fluidized bed heat exchanger with a total heat transfer surface of over 1,000 m/sup 2/. Over an operating period of more than 15,000 hours untreated sea water was heated to more than 120{sup 0}C without any fouling in the tubes due to scale deposits.

  14. Heat exchangers: Selection, rating, and thermal design

    SciTech Connect

    Kakac, S.; Liu, H.

    1998-01-01

    This book takes a systematic approach to the subject, focusing on the selection, design, rating, and operational challenges of various types of heat exchangers. Written by well-known authors in the field of heat transfer, this book covers all the most commonly used types of heat exchangers, including condensers and evaporators. The text begins with the classification of the different types of heat exchangers and discusses methods for their sizing and rating. Single phase forced convection correlations in ducts and pressure drop and pumping power analysis are also covered. A chapter is devoted to the special problem of fouling. Thermal design methods and processes, including designs for condensers and evaporators, complete this thorough introduction to the subject. The appendix provides information on the thermophysical properties of fluids, including the new refrigerants. Every topic features worked examples to illustrate the methods and procedures presented, and additional problems are included at the end of each chapter, with examples to be used as a student design project. An instructor's manual is available, including complete solutions to selected problems in the text. The contents include: classification of heat exchangers; basic design methods of heat exchangers; forced convection correlations for single-phase side of heat exchangers; heat exchanger pressure drop and pumping power; fouling of heat exchangers; double-pipe heat exchangers; design correlations for condensers and evaporators; shell-and-tube heat exchangers; compact heat exchangers; gasketed-plate heat exchangers; and condensers and evaporators.

  15. Separation of low concentration of cesium ion from wastewater by electrochemically switched ion exchange method: experimental adsorption kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Hao, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Zhong-De; Guan, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Li, Yi-Bin; Liu, Shi-Bin

    2012-09-30

    A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the continuous separation of cesium based on an electrochemically switched ion exchange (ESIX) process using a diaphragm-isolated reactor with two identical nickel hexacyanoferrate/porous three-dimensional carbon felt (NiHCF/PTCF) electrodes as working electrodes. The effects of applied potential, initial concentrations and pH values of the simulation solutions on the adsorption of cesium ion were investigated. The adsorption rate of cesium ion in the ESIX process was fitted by a pseudo-first-order reaction model. The experiments revealed that the introduction of applied potential on the electrodes greatly enhanced the adsorption/desorption rate of Cs(+) and increased the separation efficiency. H(3)O(+) was found to play a dual role of electrolyte and competitor, and the adsorption rate constant showed a curve diversification with an increase in pH value. Also, it was found that the electrochemically switched adsorption process of Cs(+) by NiHCF/PTCF electrodes proceeded in two main steps, i.e., an ESIX step with a fast adsorption rate and an ion diffusion step with a slow diffusion rate. Meanwhile, the NiHCF/PTCF film electrode showed adsorption selectivity for Cs(+) in preference to Na(+).

  16. Cl-HCO3 exchange in choroid plexus: analysis by the DMO method for cell pH

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, C.E.; Parandoosh, Z.; Smith, Q.R.

    1985-10-01

    ( UC)DMO distribution was used to measure steady-state intracellular pH (pHi) and (HCO3)i in adult rat choroid plexus (CP) incubated in synthetic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for 30 min. In controls at 37 degrees C, mean pHi (6.95 at PCO2 = 30 mmHg) was close to corresponding in vivo values; and (HCO3)i/(HCO3)csf, i.e., rHCO3, was 0.37. At normal (HCO3)csf = 18 mM, cell HCO3 was accumulated threefold above electrochemical equilibrium. (HCO3)i decreased proportionally with (HCO3)csf, as the latter was altered from 47 to 9 mM; in severe extracellular acidosis (( HCO3)csf = 3.7 mM), (HCO3)i was not reduced further and so rHCO3 rose to 0.66. Except in low (HCO3)csf, acetazolamide and ouabain (10(-4) M) caused small depletion of cell HCO3. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid lowered (HCO3)i by 60%, thus decreasing rHCO3 (0.16) and rCl (0.25) to values close to estimated equilibrium distribution (0.15). Augmented PCO2 associated with temperature reduction to 15 degrees C elevated (HCO3)i, thereby increasing rHCO3 (to 0.66) as well as rCl. Anion distribution ratios indicate heteroanion exchange in mammalian CP.

  17. Ion exchanger in the brain: Quantitative analysis of perineuronally fixed anionic binding sites suggests diffusion barriers with ion sorting properties

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Markus; Reinert, Tilo; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Wagner, Friedrich E.; Tröger, Wolfgang; Reinert, Anja; Jäger, Carsten; Brückner, Gert; Arendt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) are a specialized form of brain extracellular matrix, consisting of negatively charged glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins and proteoglycans in the direct microenvironment of neurons. Still, locally immobilized charges in the tissue have not been accessible so far to direct observations and quantifications. Here, we present a new approach to visualize and quantify fixed charge-densities on brain slices using a focused proton-beam microprobe in combination with ionic metallic probes. For the first time, we can provide quantitative data on the distribution and net amount of pericellularly fixed charge-densities, which, determined at 0.4–0.5 M, is much higher than previously assumed. PNs, thus, represent an immobilized ion exchanger with ion sorting properties high enough to partition mobile ions in accord with Donnan-equilibrium. We propose that fixed charge-densities in the brain are involved in regulating ion mobility, the volume fraction of extracellular space and the viscosity of matrix components. PMID:26621052

  18. Gas-exchange chamber analysis of elemental mercury deposition/emission to alluvium, ore, and mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthieu B; Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2015-07-01

    Deposition of mercury (Hg) from the atmosphere is an important source of this contaminant to terrestrial ecosystems. Once deposited, all forms of Hg can be retained or emitted back to the atmosphere. Distinguishing between volatilization of geogenic or indigenous Hg and that deposited from the atmosphere is difficult. Field flux measurements in the general area of two industrial scale gold mining operations, showed local deposition of Hg emitted from point and nonpoint sources, and subsequent re-emission. The work presented in this paper investigated deposition/emission of elemental Hg to and from alluvium and two mine materials before, during, and after exposure to high air concentrations, for both wet and dry conditions, using a laboratory gas exchange chamber and a Hg permeation source. In general, results showed a range in mean elemental Hg deposition velocities ranging from 0.13 to 0.46 cm s(-1) that varied with material. A significant influence of atmospheric ozone (O3) on flux was observed that depended on the material and whether wet or dry. A synergistic relationship existed between O3 and light promoting Hg flux, and flux was also influenced by material grain size, chemistry, and primary mineralogy.

  19. Separation of low concentration of cesium ion from wastewater by electrochemically switched ion exchange method: experimental adsorption kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Hao, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Zhong-De; Guan, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Li, Yi-Bin; Liu, Shi-Bin

    2012-09-30

    A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the continuous separation of cesium based on an electrochemically switched ion exchange (ESIX) process using a diaphragm-isolated reactor with two identical nickel hexacyanoferrate/porous three-dimensional carbon felt (NiHCF/PTCF) electrodes as working electrodes. The effects of applied potential, initial concentrations and pH values of the simulation solutions on the adsorption of cesium ion were investigated. The adsorption rate of cesium ion in the ESIX process was fitted by a pseudo-first-order reaction model. The experiments revealed that the introduction of applied potential on the electrodes greatly enhanced the adsorption/desorption rate of Cs(+) and increased the separation efficiency. H(3)O(+) was found to play a dual role of electrolyte and competitor, and the adsorption rate constant showed a curve diversification with an increase in pH value. Also, it was found that the electrochemically switched adsorption process of Cs(+) by NiHCF/PTCF electrodes proceeded in two main steps, i.e., an ESIX step with a fast adsorption rate and an ion diffusion step with a slow diffusion rate. Meanwhile, the NiHCF/PTCF film electrode showed adsorption selectivity for Cs(+) in preference to Na(+). PMID:22819476

  20. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-01-01

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  1. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-05-05

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  2. Nonlocal exchange correlation in screened-exchange densityfunctional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang; Spataru, Catalin D.; Louie,Steven G.

    2007-04-22

    We present a systematic study on the exchange-correlationeffects in screened-exchange local density functional method. Toinvestigate the effects of the screened-exchange potential in the bandgap correction, we have compared the exchange-correlation potential termin the sX-LDA formalism with the self-energy term in the GWapproximation. It is found that the band gap correction of the sX-LDAmethod primarily comes from the downshift of valence band states,resulting from the enhancement of bonding and the increase of ionizationenergy. The band gap correction in the GW method, on the contrary, comesin large part from the increase of theconduction band energies. We alsostudied the effects of the screened-exchange potential in the totalenergy by investigating the exchange-correlation hole in comparison withquantum Monte Carlo calculations. When the Thomas-Fermi screening isused, the sX-LDA method overestimates (underestimates) theexchange-correlation hole in short (long) range. From theexchange-correlation energy analysis we found that the LDA method yieldsbetter absolute total energy than sX-LDA method.

  3. Analysis of modern and Pleistocene hydrologic exchange between Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron) and the Saginaw Lowlands area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoaglund, J. R., III; Kolak, J.J.; Long, D.T.; Larson, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Two numerical models, one simulating present groundwater flow conditions and one simulating ice-induced hydraulic loading from the Port Huron ice advance, were used to characterize both modern and Pleistocene groundwater exchange between the Michigan Basin and near-surface water systems of Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron) and the surrounding Saginaw Lowlands area. These models were further used to constrain the origin of saline, isotopically light groundwater, and porewater from the study area. Output from the groundwater-flow model indicates that, at present conditions, head in the Marshall aquifer beneath Saginaw Bay exceeds the modern lake elevation by as much as 21 m. Despite this potential for flow, simulated groundwater discharge through the Saginaw Bay floor constitutes only 0.028 m3 s-1 (???1 cfs). Bedrock lithology appears to regulate the rate of groundwater discharge, as the portion of the Saginaw Bay floor underlain by the Michigan confining unit exhibits an order of magnitude lower flux than the portion underlain by the Saginaw aquifer. The calculated shoreline discharge of groundwater to Saginaw Bay is also relatively small (1.13 m3 s-1 or ???40 cfs) because of low gradients across the Saginaw Lowlands area and the low hydraulic conductivities of lodgement tills and glacial-lake clays surrounding the bay. In contrast to the present groundwater flow conditions, the Port Huron ice-induced hydraulic-loading model generates a groundwater-flow reversal that is localized to the region of a Pleistocene ice sheet and proglacial lake. This area of reversed vertical gradient is largely commensurate with the distribution of isotopically light groundwater presently found in the study area. Mixing scenarios, constrained by chloride concentrations and ??18O values in porewater samples, demonstrate that a mixing event involving subglacial recharge could have produced the groundwater chemistry currently observed in the Saginaw Lowlands area. The combination of models and

  4. In situ redox speciation analysis of chromium in water by diffusive gradients in thin films using a DE81 anion exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Carlos A; de Simone, Thays V; Menegário, Amauri A; Rolisola, Ana M C M; Luko, Karen S; Gastmans, Didier; da Conceição, Fabiano T; Kiang, Chang H

    2016-07-01

    A method for the in situ redox speciation analysis of chromium in water by the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique using a DE81 anion exchange membrane was successfully developed. For the selective uptake of Cr(VI), a DGT device containing an anion exchange membrane DE81 (cellulose acetate chromatographic paper) was used (DE81-DGT), while selective uptake of Cr(III) was carried out using DGT devices containing the Chelex-100 resin (Chelex-100-DGT). A correlation coefficient of 0.993 was obtained for the linearity of the immersion curves (mass versus time) using DE81-DGT. The diffusion coefficient values for Cr(VI) through the agarose diffusive layer were equal to 4.89±0.5×10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) and 3.95±0.02×10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) (T=23±1°C, I=0.03molL(-1) NaNO3) were obtained by using diffusion cell and immersion curves, respectively. The retention of Cr(VI) by the DE81 membrane in a synthetic sample and river water was not affected by the pH over a wide range 4-9). Recoveries of Cr(VI) between 90% and 120% from solutions of ionic strength ranging from 0.01 to 0. 5molL(-1) NaNO3 were achieved. Finally, the redox speciation analysis of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spiked river water and synthetic samples was performed with recoveries greater than 80% and 87% by using Chelex-100-DGT and DE81-DGT devices, respectively. Those results were in excellent agreement with the diphenylcarbazide spectrophotometric method. PMID:27154678

  5. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  6. Uncertainty Analysis of Gross Primary Production Separated from Net Ecosystem Exchange Measurements at Speulderbos Forest, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Rahul; Hamm, Nicholas Alexander Samuel; van der Tol, Christiaan; Stein, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    Gross primary production (GPP), separated from the flux tower measurements of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2, is used increasingly to validate process-based simulators and remote sensing-derived estimates of simulated GPP at various time scales. Proper implementation of validation requires knowledge of the uncertainty associated with the separated GPP at different time scales so that the propagated uncertainty can be determined. We estimate the uncertainty in GPP at half-hourly to yearly time scales. Flux tower measurements of NEE results from two major fluxes GPP and ecosystem respiration (Reco) as NEE = GPP - Reco and therefore GPP can be separated from NEE. We used a non-rectangular hyperbola (NRH) model to separate half-hourly GPP from the three years of continuous flux tower measurements of half-hourly NEE at the Speulderbos forest site, The Netherlands. NRH includes the variables that influence GPP, in particular radiation, vapor pressure deficit, and temperature. In addition, NRH model provides a robust empirical relationship between radiation and GPP by including the degree of curvature of light response curve. NRH was fitted to the measured NEE data on a daily basis. Variation in the parameters of this model was studied within each year. We did not obtain a single optimized value of each parameter of NRH model, instead we defined the prior distribution of each parameters based on literature search. We adopted a Bayesian approach, which was implemented using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation to update the prior distribution of each parameter on a daily basis. This allowed us to estimate the uncertainty in the separated GPP at the half-hourly time scale. The results of this approach generated the empirical distribution of GPP at each half-hour, which are a measure of uncertainty. The time series of empirical distributions of half-hourly GPP values also allowed us to estimate the uncertainty at daily, monthly and yearly time scales. Our research

  7. Increasing productivity for the analysis of trace contaminants in food by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using automated liner exchange, backflushing and heart-cutting.

    PubMed

    David, Frank; Tienpont, Bart; Devos, Christophe; Lerch, Oliver; Sandra, Pat

    2013-10-25

    Laboratories focusing on residue analysis in food are continuously seeking to increase sample throughput by minimizing sample preparation. Generic sample extraction methods such as QuEChERS lack selectivity and consequently extracts are not free from non-volatile material that contaminates the analytical system. Co-extracted matrix constituents interfere with target analytes, even if highly sensitive and selective GC-MS/MS is used. A number of GC approaches are described that can be used to increase laboratory productivity. These techniques include automated inlet liner exchange and column backflushing for preservation of the performance of the analytical system and heart-cutting two-dimensional GC for increasing sensitivity and selectivity. The application of these tools is illustrated by the analysis of pesticides in vegetables and fruits, PCBs in milk powder and coplanar PCBs in fish. It is demonstrated that considerable increase in productivity can be achieved by decreasing instrument down-time, while analytical performance is equal or better compared to conventional trace contaminant analysis. PMID:23891373

  8. Increasing productivity for the analysis of trace contaminants in food by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using automated liner exchange, backflushing and heart-cutting.

    PubMed

    David, Frank; Tienpont, Bart; Devos, Christophe; Lerch, Oliver; Sandra, Pat

    2013-10-25

    Laboratories focusing on residue analysis in food are continuously seeking to increase sample throughput by minimizing sample preparation. Generic sample extraction methods such as QuEChERS lack selectivity and consequently extracts are not free from non-volatile material that contaminates the analytical system. Co-extracted matrix constituents interfere with target analytes, even if highly sensitive and selective GC-MS/MS is used. A number of GC approaches are described that can be used to increase laboratory productivity. These techniques include automated inlet liner exchange and column backflushing for preservation of the performance of the analytical system and heart-cutting two-dimensional GC for increasing sensitivity and selectivity. The application of these tools is illustrated by the analysis of pesticides in vegetables and fruits, PCBs in milk powder and coplanar PCBs in fish. It is demonstrated that considerable increase in productivity can be achieved by decreasing instrument down-time, while analytical performance is equal or better compared to conventional trace contaminant analysis.

  9. Your Laptop to the Rescue: Using the Child Language Data Exchange System Archive and CLAN Utilities to Improve Child Language Sample Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Nan Bernstein; MacWhinney, Brian

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we review the advantages of language sample analysis (LSA) and explain how clinicians can make the process of LSA faster, easier, more accurate, and more insightful than LSA done "by hand" by using free, available software programs such as Computerized Language Analysis (CLAN). We demonstrate the utility of CLAN analysis in studying the expressive language of a very large cohort of 24-month-old toddlers tracked in a recent longitudinal study; toddlers in particular are the most likely group to receive LSA by clinicians, but existing reference "norms" for this population are based on fairly small cohorts of children. Finally, we demonstrate how a CLAN utility such as KidEval can now extract potential normative data from the very large number of corpora now available for English and other languages at the Child Language Data Exchange System project site. Most of the LSA measures that we studied appear to show developmental profiles suggesting that they may be of specifically higher value for children at certain ages, because they do not show an even developmental trajectory from 2 to 7 years of age. PMID:27111268

  10. Predicting protein aggregation during storage in lyophilized solids using solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS).

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Schultz, Steven G; Kim, Sherry G; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-06-01

    Solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS) was used to assess the conformation of myoglobin (Mb) in lyophilized formulations, and the results correlated with the extent of aggregation during storage. Mb was colyophilized with sucrose (1:1 or 1:8 w/w), mannitol (1:1 w/w), or NaCl (1:1 w/w) or in the absence of excipients. Immediately after lyophilization, samples of each formulation were analyzed by ssHDX-MS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to assess Mb conformation, and by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to determine the extent of aggregation. The remaining samples were then placed on stability at 25 °C and 60% RH or 40 °C and 75% RH for up to 1 year, withdrawn at intervals, and analyzed for aggregate content by SEC and DLS. In ssHDX-MS of samples immediately after lyophilization (t = 0), Mb was less deuterated in solids containing sucrose (1:1 and 1:8 w/w) than in those containing mannitol (1:1 w/w), NaCl (1:1 w/w), or Mb alone. Deuterium uptake kinetics and peptide mass envelopes also indicated greater Mb structural perturbation in mannitol, NaCl, or Mb-alone samples at t = 0. The extent of deuterium incorporation and kinetic parameters related to rapidly and slowly exchanging amide pools (Nfast, Nslow), measured at t = 0, were highly correlated with the extent of aggregation on storage as measured by SEC. In contrast, the extent of aggregation was weakly correlated with FTIR band intensity and peak position measured at t = 0. The results support the use of ssHDX-MS as a formulation screening tool in developing lyophilized protein drug products.

  11. Analysis of cardiac mitochondrial Na+–Ca2+ exchanger kinetics with a biophysical model of mitochondrial Ca2+ handing suggests a 3: 1 stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ranjan K; Beard, Daniel A

    2008-01-01

    Calcium is a key ion and is known to mediate signalling pathways between cytosol and mitochondria and modulate mitochondrial energy metabolism. To gain a quantitative, biophysical understanding of mitochondrial Ca2+ regulation, we developed a thermodynamically balanced model of mitochondrial Ca2+ handling and bioenergetics by integrating kinetic models of mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (CU), Na+–Ca2+ exchanger (NCE), and Na+–H+ exchanger (NHE) into an existing computational model of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Kinetic flux expressions for the CU, NCE and NHE were developed and individually parameterized based on independent data sets on flux rates measured in purified mitochondria. While available data support a wide range of possible values for the overall activity of the CU in cardiac and liver mitochondria, even at the highest estimated values, the Ca2+ current through the CU does not have a significant effect on mitochondrial membrane potential. This integrated model was then used to analyse additional data on the dynamics and steady-states of mitochondrial Ca2+ governed by mitochondrial CU and NCE. Our analysis of the data on the time course of matrix free [Ca2+] in respiring mitochondria purified from rabbit heart with addition of different levels of Na+ to the external buffer medium (with the CU blocked) with two separate models – one with a 2: 1 stoichiometry and the other with a 3: 1 stoichiometry for the NCE – supports the hypothesis that the NCE is electrogenic with a stoichiometry of 3: 1. This hypothesis was further tested by simulating an additional independent data set on the steady-state variations of matrix free [Ca2+] with respect to the variations in external free [Ca2+] in purified respiring mitochondria from rat heart to show that only the 3: 1 stoichiometry model predictions are consistent with the data. Based on these analyses, it is concluded that the mitochondrial NCE is electrogenic with a stoichiometry of 3: 1. PMID

  12. Lysozyme adsorption onto a cation-exchanger: mechanism of interaction study based on the analysis of retention chromatographic data.

    PubMed

    Marques, F S; Silva, G L; Thrash, M E; Dias-Cabral, A C

    2014-10-01

    In this study, based on the analysis of retention chromatographic data, we examined the adsorption of lysozyme onto carboxymethyl cellulose. Lysozyme retention data was collected at pH 5 and pH 8. The sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration in the mobile phase ranged from 300mM to 500mM and the temperature for this study varied from 288K to 308K. The retention measurements generated from these experimental conditions were analyzed with the Van't Hoff method, the preferential interaction model and the stoichiometric displacement model. Endothermic heats-of-adsorption and increases in entropy were observed under certain experimental conditions. These data suggest the presence of entropic driving forces such as the release of water and/or possibly structural changes in lysozyme molecules adsorbed to the surface of carboxymethyl cellulose. The modest observed exergonic adsorption ΔG° and the preferential interaction analysis corroborate the presence of water-release for this study. Additional analysis with the stoichiometric displacement model method revealed negligible changes in the structure of lysozyme molecules in contact with the surface of carboxymethyl cellulose. PMID:25193151

  13. Effective elimination of organic matter interference in boron isotopic analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of coral/foraminifera: micro-sublimation technology combined with ion exchange.

    PubMed

    He, Maoyong; Xiao, Yingkai; Ma, Yunqi; Jin, Zhangdong; Xiao, Jun

    2011-03-30

    In order to better estimate the effectiveness of micro-sublimation technology on the elimination of organic matter interference during boron isotopic analysis, a series of improved experiments was carried out using simple apparatus. Recovery rates after micro-sublimation were measured for boric acid solutions with different B contents or different B/organic matter ratios. The improved micro-sublimation procedure combined with ion-exchange technology was then used to test natural samples (coral and foraminifera) for the separation of boron. Our results show that the time taken for 100% recovery of different amounts of B differed and that the proportions of B/organic matter within the natural organic matter have little effect on the relationship between the recovery rates of B and the micro-sublimation times. The experiments further confirm that the organic matter does indeed have an effect on boron isotope analyses by positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry and that the use of micro-sublimation can effectively remove interferences from the organic matter during boron isotopic analysis. PMID:21337635

  14. Rapid analysis of charge variants of monoclonal antibodies using non-linear salt gradient in cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Varsha; Kumar, Vijesh; Rathore, Anurag S

    2015-08-01

    A method is proposed for rapid development of a short, analytical cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography method for analysis of charge heterogeneity in monoclonal antibody products. The parameters investigated and optimized include pH, shape of elution gradient and length of the column. It is found that the most important parameter for development of a shorter method is the choice of the shape of elution gradient. In this paper, we propose a step by step approach to develop a non-linear sigmoidal shape gradient for analysis of charge heterogeneity for two different monoclonal antibody products. The use of this gradient not only decreases the run time of the method to 4min against the conventional method that takes more than 40min but also the resolution is retained. Superiority of the phosphate gradient over sodium chloride gradient for elution of mAbs is also observed. The method has been successfully evaluated for specificity, sensitivity, linearity, limit of detection, and limit of quantification. Application of this method as a potential at-line process analytical technology tool has been suggested.

  15. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  16. Information Exchange Procedures: Overview and General Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romney, Leonard C.

    The Information Exchange Procedures (IEP) project creates the capability for exchange and reporting of that information, both financial and otherwise, necessary to calculate and evaluate costs (1) by discipline and course level, (2) by student major and student level, and (3) per unit of output. Most uses of comparable information and analysis can…

  17. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade. PMID

  18. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade.

  19. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  20. Structural analysis of kinetic folding intermediates for a TIM barrel protein, indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase, by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry and Gō model simulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenyu; Rao, Maithreyi K; Forsyth, William R; Finke, John M; Matthews, C Robert

    2007-11-23

    The structures of partially folded states appearing during the folding of a (betaalpha)(8) TIM barrel protein, the indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus (sIGPS), was assessed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) and Gō model simulations. HX-MS analysis of the peptic peptides derived from the pulse-labeled product of the sub-millisecond folding reaction from the urea-denatured state revealed strong protection in the (betaalpha)(4) region, modest protection in the neighboring (betaalpha)(1-3) and (betaalpha)(5)beta(6) segments and no significant protection in the remaining N and C-terminal segments. These results demonstrate that this species is not a collapsed form of the unfolded state under native-favoring conditions nor is it the native state formed via fast-track folding. However, the striking contrast of these results with the strong protection observed in the (betaalpha)(2-5)beta(6) region after 5 s of folding demonstrates that these species represent kinetically distinct folding intermediates that are not identical as previously thought. A re-examination of the kinetic folding mechanism by chevron analysis of fluorescence data confirmed distinct roles for these two species: the burst-phase intermediate is predicted to be a misfolded, off-pathway intermediate, while the subsequent 5 s intermediate corresponds to an on-pathway equilibrium intermediate. Comparison with the predictions using a C(alpha) Gō model simulation of the kinetic folding reaction for sIGPS shows good agreement with the core of the structure offering protection against exchange in the on-pathway intermediate(s). Because the native-centric Gō model simulations do not explicitly include sequence-specific information, the simulation results support the hypothesis that the topology of TIM barrel proteins is a primary determinant of the folding free energy surface for the productive folding reaction. The early misfolding reaction must involve aspects of

  1. Analysis of gas exchange, stomatal behaviour and micronutrients uncovers dynamic response and adaptation of tomato plants to monochromatic light treatments.

    PubMed

    O'Carrigan, Andrew; Babla, Mohammad; Wang, Feifei; Liu, Xiaohui; Mak, Michelle; Thomas, Richard; Bellotti, Bill; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Light spectrum affects the yield and quality of greenhouse tomato, especially over a prolonged period of monochromatic light treatments. Physiological and chemical analysis was employed to investigate the influence of light spectral (blue, green and red) changes on growth, photosynthesis, stomatal behaviour, leaf pigment, and micronutrient levels. We found that plants are less affected under blue light treatment, which was evident by the maintenance of higher A, gs, Tr, and stomatal parameters and significantly lower VPD and Tleaf as compared to those plants grown in green and red light treatments. Green and red light treatments led to significantly larger increase in the accumulation of Fe, B, Zn, and Cu than blue light. Moreover, guard cell length, width, and volume all showed highly significant positive correlations to gs, Tr and negative links to VPD. There was negative impact of monochromatic lights-induced accumulation of Mn, Cu, and Zn on photosynthesis, leaf pigments and plant growth. Furthermore, most of the light-induced significant changes of the physiological traits were partially recovered at the end of experiment. A high degree of morphological and physiological plasticity to blue, green and red light treatments suggested that tomato plants may have developed mechanisms to adapt to the light treatments. Thus, understanding the optimization of light spectrum for photosynthesis and growth is one of the key components for greenhouse tomato production.

  2. Analysis of ligand-protein exchange by Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs (CoLD-CoP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David A.; Chantova, Mihaela; Chaudhry, Saadia

    2015-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool in describing protein structures and protein activity for pharmaceutical and biochemical development. This study describes a method to determine weak binding ligands in biological systems by using hierarchic diffusion coefficient clustering of multidimensional data obtained with a 400 MHz Bruker NMR. Comparison of DOSY spectrums of ligands of the chemical library in the presence and absence of target proteins show translational diffusion rates for small molecules upon interaction with macromolecules. For weak binders such as compounds found in fragment libraries, changes in diffusion rates upon macromolecular binding are on the order of the precision of DOSY diffusion measurements, and identifying such subtle shifts in diffusion requires careful statistical analysis. The "CoLD-CoP" (Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs) method presented here uses SAHN clustering to identify protein-binders in a chemical library or even a not fully characterized metabolite mixture. We will show how DOSY NMR and the "CoLD-CoP" method complement each other in identifying the most suitable candidates for lysozyme and wheat germ acid phosphatase.

  3. Analysis of ligand-protein exchange by Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs (CoLD-CoP).

    PubMed

    Snyder, David A; Chantova, Mihaela; Chaudhry, Saadia

    2015-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool in describing protein structures and protein activity for pharmaceutical and biochemical development. This study describes a method to determine weak binding ligands in biological systems by using hierarchic diffusion coefficient clustering of multidimensional data obtained with a 400 MHz Bruker NMR. Comparison of DOSY spectrums of ligands of the chemical library in the presence and absence of target proteins show translational diffusion rates for small molecules upon interaction with macromolecules. For weak binders such as compounds found in fragment libraries, changes in diffusion rates upon macromolecular binding are on the order of the precision of DOSY diffusion measurements, and identifying such subtle shifts in diffusion requires careful statistical analysis. The "CoLD-CoP" (Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs) method presented here uses SAHN clustering to identify protein-binders in a chemical library or even a not fully characterized metabolite mixture. We will show how DOSY NMR and the "CoLD-CoP" method complement each other in identifying the most suitable candidates for lysozyme and wheat germ acid phosphatase.

  4. Preparation of sulfonic-functionalized graphene oxide as ion-exchange material and its application into electrochemiluminescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guifen; Zhai, Shengyong; Zhai, Yanling; Zhang, Ke; Yue, Qiaoli; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Jinsheng; Wang, Huaisheng; Liu, Jifeng; Jia, Jianbo

    2011-03-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) obtained from chemical oxidation of flake graphite was derivatized with sulfonic groups to form sulfonic-functionalized GO (GO-SO(3)(-)) through four sulfonation routes: through amide formation between the carboxylic group of GO and amine of sulfanilic acid (AA-GO-SO(3)(-)), aryl diazonium reaction of sulfanilic acid (AD-GO-SO(3)(-)), amide formation between the carboxylic group of GO and amine of cysteamine and oxidation by H(2)O(2) (CA-GO-SO(3)(-)), and alkyl diazonium reaction of cysteamine and oxidation by H(2)O(2) (CD-GO-SO(3)(-)). Results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectrospectrocopy showed that -SO(3)(-) groups were attached onto GO. Thermo gravimetric analysis showed that derivatization with sulfonic groups improved thermo stability of GO. X-ray diffraction results indicated that GO-SO(3)(-) had more ordered π-π stacking structure than the original GO. GO-SO(3)(-) and cationic polyelectrote, poly (diallyldimethylammoniumchloride) (PDDA) were adsorbed at indium tin oxide (ITO) glass surface through layer-by-layer assembling to form (GO-SO(3)(-)/PDDA)(n)/ITO multilayers. After tris-(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (II) dichloride (Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)) was incorporated into the multilayers, the obtained Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)/(GO-SO(3)(-)/PDDA)(n)/ITO electrodes can be used as electrochemiluminescence sensors for detection of organic amine with high sensitivity (limit of detection of 1 nM) and stability.

  5. Analysis of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rate within the scope of econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Kocakaplan, Yusuf; Keskin, Mustafa; Balcılar, Mehmet; Özdemir, Zeynel Abidin; Ersoy, Ersan

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we analyze the Turkish Lira/US Dollar (TRY/USD), Turkish Lira/Euro (TRY/EUR), Turkish Lira/Japanese Yen (TRY/JPY) and Turkish Lira/Swiss Franc (TRY/CHF) exchange rates in the global financial crisis period to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY by using a mathematical methodology developed by Watanabe et al. (2007). The methodology defines the bubbles and crashes in financial market price fluctuations by considering an exponential fitting of the associated data. This methodology is applied to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rates from January, 1, 2005 to December, 20, 2013. In this mathematical methodology, the whole period of bubbles and crashes can be determined purely from past data, and the start of bubbles and crashes can be identified even before its bursts. In this way, the periods of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF are determined, and the beginning and end points of these periods are detected. The results show that the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate are commonly finished earlier than in the other exchange rates; hence it is probable that the crashes in the other exchange rates would be finished soon when the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate ended. We also find that the periods of crashes in the TRY/EUR exchange rate take longer time than in the other exchange rates. This information can be used in risk management and/or speculative gain. The crashes' periods in the TRY/EUR and TRY/USD exchange rates are observed to be relatively longer than in the other exchange rates.

  6. Systematic Analysis of the Effect of Small Scale Permeability Heterogeneity on Hyporheic Exchange Flux and Residence Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, G.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) contributes significantly to whole stream biogeochemical cycling. Biogeochemical reactions within the HZ are often transport limited, thus, understanding these reactions requires knowledge about the magnitude of hyporheic fluxes (HF) and the residence time (RT) of these fluxes within the HZ. While the hydraulics of HF are relatively well understood, studies addressing the influence of permeability heterogeneity lack systematic analysis and have even produced contradictory results (e.g. [1] vs. [2]). In order to close this gap, this study uses a statistical numerical approach to elucidate the influence of permeability heterogeneity on HF and RT. We simulated and evaluated 3750 2D-scenarios of sediment heterogeneity by means of Gaussian random fields with focus on total HF and RT distribution. The scenarios were based on ten realizations of each of all possible combinations of 15 different correlation lengths, 5 dipping angles and 5 permeability variances. Roughly 500 hyporheic stream traces were analyzed per simulation, for a total of almost two million stream traces analyzed for correlations between permeability heterogeneity, HF, and RT. Total HF and the RT variance positively correlated with permeability variance while the mean RT negatively correlated with permeability variance. In contrast, changes in correlation lengths and dipping angles had little effect on the examined properties RT and HF. These results provide a possible explanation of the seemingly contradictory conclusions of recent studies, given that the permeability variances in these studies differ by several orders of magnitude. [1] Bardini, L., Boano, F., Cardenas, M.B, Sawyer, A.H, Revelli, R. and Ridolfi, L. "Small-Scale Permeability Heterogeneity Has Negligible Effects on Nutrient Cycling in Streambeds." Geophysical Research Letters, 2013. doi:10.1002/grl.50224. [2] Zhou, Y., Ritzi, R. W., Soltanian, M. R. and Dominic, D. F. "The Influence of Streambed Heterogeneity on

  7. Lipid exchange between membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Jähnig, F

    1984-01-01

    The exchange of lipid molecules between vesicle bilayers in water and a monolayer forming at the water surface was investigated theoretically within the framework of thermodynamics. The total number of exchanged molecules was found to depend on the bilayer curvature as expressed by the vesicle radius and on the boundary condition for exchange, i.e., whether during exchange the radius or the packing density of the vesicles remains constant. The boundary condition is determined by the rate of flip-flop within the bilayer relative to the rate of exchange between bi- and monolayer. If flip-flop is fast, exchange is independent of the vesicle radius; if flip-flop is slow, exchange increases with the vesicle radius. Available experimental results agree with the detailed form of this dependence. When the theory was extended to exchange between two bilayers of different curvature, the direction of exchange was also determined by the curvatures and the boundary conditions for exchange. Due to the dependence of the boundary conditions on flip-flop and, consequently, on membrane fluidity, exchange between membranes may partially be regulated by membrane fluidity. PMID:6518251

  8. Approximate strip exchanging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swapnoneel; Thakur, Ashok Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Genome rearrangements have been modelled by a variety of primitives such as reversals, transpositions, block moves and block interchanges. We consider such a genome rearrangement primitive Strip Exchanges. Given a permutation, the challenge is to sort it by using minimum number of strip exchanges. A strip exchanging move interchanges the positions of two chosen strips so that they merge with other strips. The strip exchange problem is to sort a permutation using minimum number of strip exchanges. We present here the first non-trivial 2-approximation algorithm to this problem. We also observe that sorting by strip-exchanges is fixed-parameter-tractable. Lastly we discuss the application of strip exchanges in a different area Optical Character Recognition (OCR) with an example.

  9. Simultaneous analysis of acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and aspirin metabolites by hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange capillary liquid chromatography coupled to amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minmin; Wu, Yimin; Lu, Lanxiang; Ding, Kang; Tang, Fengxiang; Lin, Zian; Wu, Xiaoping

    2011-08-01

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of polar nonsteroidal pharmaceuticals and metabolites, including acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and several aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid, salicyluric acid and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), by capillary liquid chromatography with amperometric detection. Using a capillary monolithic column with mixed mode stationary phases and a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and Tris buffer, rapid separation of six polar analytes was achieved within 8 min, and a hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange separation mechanism were exhibited. Method detection limits of six analytes ranged from 10 to 50 ng/mL. In terms of precision, the intra- and interday relative standard deviation values in all analytes never exceeded 3.1% for migration time and 8.9% for peak areas, respectively. This method provided a simple, rapid and cost-effective approach for the analysis of polar pharmaceuticals. The applicability of the method in pharmacokinetics was verified by spiking human serum samples with the compounds and analyzing the recoveries. PMID:21644253

  10. Gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Gunther, Detlef; Ohata, Masaki

    2014-10-21

    A novel gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for the direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was proposed and demonstrated in the present study. The technique is based on a transfer of gas into particle, which can be directly analyzed by ICPMS. Particles from metal carbonyl gases such as Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6 are formed by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonium (NH3) gases within a newly developed gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The reaction mechanism of the gas to particle conversion is based on either oxidation of metal carbonyl gas by O3 or agglomeration of metal oxide with ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which is generated by the reaction of O3 and NH3. To separate the reaction gases (remaining O3 and NH3) from the formed particles, a previously reported gas exchange device (GED) was used and the in argon stabilized analyte particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS. This new technique provided limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 pL L(-1) (0.32 ng m(-3)), 0.02 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)), and 0.01 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)) for Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6, respectively, which were 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than those conventional applied for detecting these gases, e.g., gas chromatography with electron captured detector (GC-ECD) as well as Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The achieved LODs were also similar or slightly better than those for ICPMS coupled to GC. Since the gas to particle conversion technique can achieve the direct measurement of metal carbonyl gases as well as the removal of reaction and ambient gases from metal carbonyl gases, the technique is considered to be well suited to monitor gas quality in semiconductor industry, engine exhaust gases, and or waste incineration products.

  11. Gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Gunther, Detlef; Ohata, Masaki

    2014-10-21

    A novel gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique for the direct analysis of metal carbonyl gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was proposed and demonstrated in the present study. The technique is based on a transfer of gas into particle, which can be directly analyzed by ICPMS. Particles from metal carbonyl gases such as Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6 are formed by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonium (NH3) gases within a newly developed gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The reaction mechanism of the gas to particle conversion is based on either oxidation of metal carbonyl gas by O3 or agglomeration of metal oxide with ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which is generated by the reaction of O3 and NH3. To separate the reaction gases (remaining O3 and NH3) from the formed particles, a previously reported gas exchange device (GED) was used and the in argon stabilized analyte particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS. This new technique provided limits of detection (LOD) of 0.15 pL L(-1) (0.32 ng m(-3)), 0.02 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)), and 0.01 pL L(-1) (0.07 ng m(-3)) for Cr(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and W(CO)6, respectively, which were 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than those conventional applied for detecting these gases, e.g., gas chromatography with electron captured detector (GC-ECD) as well as Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The achieved LODs were also similar or slightly better than those for ICPMS coupled to GC. Since the gas to particle conversion technique can achieve the direct measurement of metal carbonyl gases as well as the removal of reaction and ambient gases from metal carbonyl gases, the technique is considered to be well suited to monitor gas quality in semiconductor industry, engine exhaust gases, and or waste incineration products. PMID:25247610

  12. Simulation and economic analysis of a liquid-based solar system with a direct-contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger, in comparison to a system with a conventional heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, P.; Karaki, S.

    Using a solar computer simulation package called TRNSYS, simulations of the direct contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger (DCLLHE) solar system and a system with conventional shell-and-tube heat exchanger were developed, based in part on performance measurements of the actual systems. The two systems were simulated over a full year on an hour-by-hour basis at five locations; Boston, Massachusetts, Charleston, South Carolina, Dodge City, Kansas, Madison, Wisconsin, and Phoenix, Arizona. Typically the direct-contact system supplies slightly more heat for domestic hot water and space heating in all locations and about 5 percentage points more cooling as compared to the conventional system. Using a common set of economic parameters and the appropriate federal and state income tax credits, as well as property tax legislation for solar systems in the corresponding states, the results of the study indicate for heating-only systems, the DCLLHE system has a slight life-cycle cost disadvantage compared to the conventional system. For combined solar heating and cooling systems, the DCLLHE has a slight life-cycle cost advantage which varies with location and amounts to one to three percent difference from the conventional system.

  13. Online coupling of hydrophilic interaction/strong cation exchange/reversed-phase liquid chromatography with porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography for simultaneous proteomics and N-glycomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Law, Henry C H; Zhang, Zaijun; Lam, Herman C; Quan, Quan; Li, Guohui; Chu, Ivan K

    2015-10-01

    In this study we developed a fully automated three-dimensional (3D) liquid chromatography methodology-comprising hydrophilic interaction separation as the first dimension, strong cation exchange fractionation as the second dimension, and low-pH reversed-phase (RP) separation as the third dimension-in conjunction downstream with additional complementary porous graphitic carbon separation, to capture non-retained hydrophilic analytes, for both shotgun proteomics and N-glycomics analyses. The performance of the 3D system alone was benchmarked through the analysis of the total lysate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, leading to improved hydrophilic peptide coverage, from which we identified 19% and 24% more proteins and peptides, respectively, relative to those identified from a two-dimensional hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and low-pH RP chromatography (HILIC-RP) system over the same mass spectrometric acquisition time; consequently, the 3D platform also provided enhanced proteome and protein coverage. When we applied the integrated technology to analyses of the total lysate of primary cerebellar granule neurons, we characterized a total of 2201 proteins and 16,937 unique peptides for this primary cell line, providing one of its most comprehensive datasets. Our new integrated technology also exhibited excellent performance in the first N-glycomics analysis of cynomolgus monkey plasma; we successfully identified 122 proposed N-glycans and 135 N-glycosylation sites from 122 N-glycoproteins, and confirmed the presence of 38 N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing N-glycans, a rare occurrence in human plasma, through tandem mass spectrometry for the first time.

  14. Integrated strong cation-exchange hybrid monolith coupled with capillary zone electrophoresis and simultaneous dynamic pH junction for large-volume proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Yan, Xiaojing; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-06-01

    A sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange (SCX) monolith was synthesized at the proximal end of a capillary zone electrophoresis column and used for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample preconcentration. Sample was prepared in an acidic buffer and deposited onto the SCX-SPE monolith and eluted using a basic buffer. Electrophoresis was performed in an acidic buffer. This combination of buffers results in formation of a dynamic pH junction, which allows use of relatively large elution buffer volume while maintaining peak efficiency and resolution. All experiments were performed with a 50 µm ID capillary, a 1cm long SCX-SPE monolith, a 60cm long separation capillary, and a electrokinetically pumped nanospray interface. The volume of the capillary is 1.1 µL. By loading 21 µL of a 1×10(-7) M angiotensin II solution, an enrichment factor of 3000 compared to standard electrokinetic injection was achieved on this platform while retaining efficient electrophoretic performance (N=44,000 plates). The loading capacity of the sulfonate SCX hybrid monolith was determined to be ~15 pmol by frontal analysis with 10(-5) M angiotensin II. The system was also applied to the analysis of a 10(-4) mg/mL bovine serum albumin tryptic digest; the protein coverage was 12% and 11 peptides were identified. Finally, by loading 5.5 µL of a 10(-3) mg/mL E. coli digest, 109 proteins and 271 peptides were identified in a 20 min separation; the median separation efficiency generated by these peptides was 25,000 theoretical plates.

  15. Conformational sampling of oligosaccharides using Hamiltonian replica exchange with two-dimensional dihedral biasing potentials and the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM).

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingjun; MacKerel, Alexander D

    2015-02-10

    Oligosaccharides and polysaccharides exert numerous functional roles in biology through their structural diversity and conformational properties. To investigate their conformational properties using computational methods, Hamiltonian replica exchange (H-REX) combined with two-dimensional grid-based correction maps as biasing potentials (bpCMAP) significantly improves the sampling efficiency about glycosidic linkages. In the current study, we extend the application of H-REX with bpCMAP to complex saccharides and establish systematic procedures for bpCMAP construction, determination of replica distribution, and data analysis. Our main findings are that (1) the bpCMAP for each type of glycosidic linkage can be constructed from the corresponding disaccharide using gas-phase umbrella sampling simulations, (2) the replica distribution can be conveniently determined following the exact definition of the average acceptance ratio based on the assigned distribution of biasing potentials, and (3) the extracted free energy surface (or potential of mean force (PMF)) can be improved using the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) allowing for the inclusion of data from the excited state replicas in the calculated probability distribution. The method is applied to a branched N-glycan found on the HIV gp120 protein, and a linear N-glycan. Considering the general importance of N-glycans and the wide appreciation of the sampling problem, the present method represents an efficient procedure for the conformational sampling of complex oligo- and polysaccharides under explicit solvent conditions. More generally, the use of WHAM is anticipated to be of general utility for the calculation of PMFs from H-REX simulations in a wide range of macromolecular systems. PMID:25705140

  16. Direct contact heat exchangers for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taussig, R. T.; Thayer, W. J.; Lo, V. C. H.; Sakins, K. M.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1985-06-01

    Direct contact heat exchanger concepts have been investigated for use in space, including droplet vortex heat exchangers, coflowing droplet heat exchangers, electrostatically driven heat exchangers, and belt and disk heat exchangers. These concepts are characterized by a low heat exchanger mass per unit of heat transferred, low pressure losses, high reliability, and compactness in design. Operation in zero-G poses unique problems for those direct contact heat exchangers which require separation of two fluid media after heat transfer is completed. Other problems include maintenance of good heat transfer coefficients in the absence of buoyant forces, exposure of heat transfer media to vacuum conditions for certain applications, and materials compatibility. A preliminary systems analysis indicates the potential for substantial weight reductions in turbine Brayton cycle space power systems for output powers above several MW(e). Based on the status of current technology and the results of this analysis, recommendations are made for the most attractive applications and the R&D required to ready a direct contact heat exchanger for use in space.

  17. Nonsurvivable momentum exchange system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell (Inventor); Ahronovich, Eliezer (Inventor); Davis, III, Milton C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A demiseable momentum exchange system includes a base and a flywheel rotatably supported on the base. The flywheel includes a web portion defining a plurality of web openings and a rim portion. The momentum exchange system further includes a motor for driving the flywheel and a cover for engaging the base to substantially enclose the flywheel. The system may also include components having a melting temperature below 1500 degrees Celsius. The momentum exchange system is configured to demise on reentry.

  18. Text Exchange System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. V.; Hanson, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Text Exchange System (TES) exchanges and maintains organized textual information including source code, documentation, data, and listings. System consists of two computer programs and definition of format for information storage. Comprehensive program used to create, read, and maintain TES files. TES developed to meet three goals: First, easy and efficient exchange of programs and other textual data between similar and dissimilar computer systems via magnetic tape. Second, provide transportable management system for textual information. Third, provide common user interface, over wide variety of computing systems, for all activities associated with text exchange.

  19. Biomonitoring of exposure to urban air pollutants: analysis of sister chromatid exchanges and DNA lesions in peripheral lymphocytes of traffic policemen.

    PubMed

    Carere, A; Andreoli, C; Galati, R; Leopardi, P; Marcon, F; Rosati, M V; Rossi, S; Tomei, F; Verdina, A; Zijno, A; Crebelli, R

    2002-07-25

    In order to elucidate the health effects of occupational exposure to traffic fumes, a few biomarkers of early genetic effect were investigated in Rome traffic policemen. One hundred and ninety healthy subjects engaged in traffic control (133 subjects) or in office work (57 subjects) participated the study. For all subjects, detailed information on smoking habits and other potential confounders were recorded by questionnaires. Average exposure of the study groups to benzene and other aromatic hydrocarbons was evaluated in a parallel exposure survey. All workers were genotyped for the following metabolic polymorphisms: CYP1A1 (m1, m2, and m4 variants), CYP2E1 (PstI and RsaI), NQO1 (Hinf1), GSTM1 and GSTT1 (null variants). In this paper, the results of the analysis of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in peripheral lymphocytes, and DNA damage by alkaline (pH 13) comet assay in mononuclear blood cells are reported. No statistically significant difference in the frequency of SCE or high frequency cells (HFC) was observed between traffic wardens and office workers (controls), despite the significantly higher exposure to benzene of the former (average group exposure 9.5 versus 3.8microg/m(3), 7h TWA). Conversely, both SCE per cell and HFC were highly significantly (P<0.001) increased in smokers compared to nonsmokers, showing a significant correlation (P<0.001) with the number of cigarettes per day. Multiple regression analyses of data, with metabolic polymorphisms, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, age, gender, and family history of cancer as independent variables, showed that smoking habits, and possibly the CYP2E1 variant genotypes, were the main factors explaining the variance of both SCE and HFC. Within smokers, an association of borderline significance between the CYP1A1 variant genotypes and increased SCE (P=0.050) and HFC (P=0.090) was found. This effect was mainly observed in light smokers (<15 cigarettes per day). The analysis of DNA damage by comet assay did

  20. Biomonitoring of exposure to urban air pollutants: analysis of sister chromatid exchanges and DNA lesions in peripheral lymphocytes of traffic policemen.

    PubMed

    Carere, A; Andreoli, C; Galati, R; Leopardi, P; Marcon, F; Rosati, M V; Rossi, S; Tomei, F; Verdina, A; Zijno, A; Crebelli, R

    2002-07-25

    In order to elucidate the health effects of occupational exposure to traffic fumes, a few biomarkers of early genetic effect were investigated in Rome traffic policemen. One hundred and ninety healthy subjects engaged in traffic control (133 subjects) or in office work (57 subjects) participated the study. For all subjects, detailed information on smoking habits and other potential confounders were recorded by questionnaires. Average exposure of the study groups to benzene and other aromatic hydrocarbons was evaluated in a parallel exposure survey. All workers were genotyped for the following metabolic polymorphisms: CYP1A1 (m1, m2, and m4 variants), CYP2E1 (PstI and RsaI), NQO1 (Hinf1), GSTM1 and GSTT1 (null variants). In this paper, the results of the analysis of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in peripheral lymphocytes, and DNA damage by alkaline (pH 13) comet assay in mononuclear blood cells are reported. No statistically significant difference in the frequency of SCE or high frequency cells (HFC) was observed between traffic wardens and office workers (controls), despite the significantly higher exposure to benzene of the former (average group exposure 9.5 versus 3.8microg/m(3), 7h TWA). Conversely, both SCE per cell and HFC were highly significantly (P<0.001) increased in smokers compared to nonsmokers, showing a significant correlation (P<0.001) with the number of cigarettes per day. Multiple regression analyses of data, with metabolic polymorphisms, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, age, gender, and family history of cancer as independent variables, showed that smoking habits, and possibly the CYP2E1 variant genotypes, were the main factors explaining the variance of both SCE and HFC. Within smokers, an association of borderline significance between the CYP1A1 variant genotypes and increased SCE (P=0.050) and HFC (P=0.090) was found. This effect was mainly observed in light smokers (<15 cigarettes per day). The analysis of DNA damage by comet assay did

  1. Variability in net ecosystem exchange from hourly to inter-annual time scales at adjacent pine and hardwood forests: a wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Stoy, Paul C; Katul, Gabriel G; Siqueira, Mario B S; Juang, Jehn-Yih; McCarthy, Heather R; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Oishi, A Christopher; Oren, Ram

    2005-07-01

    Orthonormal wavelet transformation (OWT) is a computationally efficient technique for quantifying underlying frequencies in nonstationary and gap-infested time series, such as eddy-covariance-measured net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE). We employed OWT to analyze the frequency characteristics of synchronously measured and modeled NEE at adjacent pine (PP) and hardwood (HW) ecosystems. Wavelet cospectral analysis showed that NEE at PP was more correlated to light and vapor pressure deficit at the daily time scale, and NEE at HW was more correlated to leaf area index (LAI) and temperature, especially soil temperature, at seasonal time scales. Models were required to disentangle the impacts of environmental drivers on the components of NEE, ecosystem carbon assimilation (Ac) and ecosystem respiration (RE). Sensitivity analyses revealed that using air temperature rather than soil temperature in RE models improved the modeled wavelet spectral frequency response on time scales longer than 1 day at both ecosystems. Including LAI improved RE model fit on seasonal time scales at HW, and incorporating parameter variability improved the RE model response at annual time scales at both ecosystems. Resolving variability in canopy conductance, rather than leaf-internal CO2, was more important for modeling Ac at both ecosystems. The PP ecosystem was more sensitive to hydrologic variables that regulate canopy conductance: vapor pressure deficit on weekly time scales and soil moisture on seasonal to interannual time scales. The HW ecosystem was sensitive to water limitation on weekly time scales. A combination of intrinsic drought sensitivity and non-conservative water use at PP was the basis for this response. At both ecosystems, incorporating variability in LAI was required for an accurate spectral representation of modeled NEE. However, nonlinearities imposed by canopy light attenuation were of little importance to spectral fit. The OWT revealed similarities and differences in

  2. Monoclonal antibody heterogeneity analysis and deamidation monitoring with high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing using simple, two component buffer systems.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xuezhen; Kutzko, Joseph P; Hayes, Michael L; Frey, Douglas D

    2013-03-29

    The use of either a polyampholyte buffer or a simple buffer system for the high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing of monoclonal antibodies is demonstrated for the case where the pH gradient is produced entirely inside the column and with no external mixing of buffers. The simple buffer system used was composed of two buffering species, one which becomes adsorbed onto the column packing and one which does not adsorb, together with an adsorbed ion that does not participate in acid-base equilibrium. The method which employs the simple buffer system is capable of producing a gradual pH gradient in the neutral to acidic pH range that can be adjusted by proper selection of the starting and ending pH values for the gradient as well as the buffering species concentration, pKa, and molecular size. By using this approach, variants of representative monoclonal antibodies with isoelectric points of 7.0 or less were separated with high resolution so that the approach can serve as a complementary alternative to isoelectric focusing for characterizing a monoclonal antibody based on differences in the isoelectric points of the variants present. Because the simple buffer system used eliminates the use of polyampholytes, the method is suitable for antibody heterogeneity analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. The method can also be used at the preparative scale to collect highly purified isoelectric variants of an antibody for further study. To illustrate this, a single isoelectric point variant of a monoclonal antibody was collected and used for a stability study under forced deamidation conditions.

  3. Isolation and analysis of the faciogenital dysplasia (Aarskog-Scott syndrome) gene: A putative rho/rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor

    SciTech Connect

    Pasteris, N.G.; Cadle, A.; Glover, T.W.

    1994-09-01

    Faciogenital dysplasia (FGDY, MIM No. 305400) is an X-linked multisystemic growth disorder characterized by disproportionate short stature, diagnostic facial and skeletal anomalies, and urogenital malformations. Past genetic, cytologic and radiation hybrid analyses mapped FGDY to a 350 kb interval within Xp11.21 flanked by markers ALAS2 and DXS323. Using positional methods to clone the locus, YAC clones spanning an FGDY-specific t(X;8) breakpoint were isolated. Human fetal cDNA libraries were screened with regional DNA markers to isolate a transcript that was disrupted consequential to the breakpoint. SSCP analyses identified a confirming mutation co-segregating with FGDY in an affected family. The isolated 4156 bp cDNA, termed FGD1, detected a 4.4 kb transcript in most fetal and adult tissues. The FGD1 gene contained > 19 exons spanning 100 kb of Xp11.21. The predicted length of the FGD1 protein was 809 AA, with an 89 Kd mass. FGD1 had strong homology to ras-like rho/rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) including proto-oncogenes Dbl, ect2, Bcr, and Vav. FGD1 also contained a Pro-rich 5{prime} region including two potential Src-homology 3 (SH3) binding sites, suggesting that, like Sos (a ras GEF), FGD1 may be involved in intracellular signal transduction. These results strongly suggest that FGD1, a putative rho/rac GEF, is responsible for X-linked FGDY. Mutations in FGD1 may result in perturbed signal transduction and, consequently, developmental growth anomalies. An analysis of FGD1 should aid in understanding FGDY pathogenesis and may provide extra insight into signal transduction and mammalian development.

  4. Giant exchange interaction in mixed lanthanides

    PubMed Central

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Iwahara, Naoya; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    Combining strong magnetic anisotropy with strong exchange interaction is a long standing goal in the design of quantum magnets. The lanthanide complexes, while exhibiting a very strong ionic anisotropy, usually display a weak exchange coupling, amounting to only a few wavenumbers. Recently, an isostructural series of mixed (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been reported, in which the exchange splitting is estimated to reach hundreds wavenumbers. The microscopic mechanism governing the unusual exchange interaction in these compounds is revealed here by combining detailed modeling with density-functional theory and ab initio calculations. We find it to be basically kinetic and highly complex, involving non-negligible contributions up to seventh power of total angular momentum of each lanthanide site. The performed analysis also elucidates the origin of magnetization blocking in these compounds. Contrary to general expectations the latter is not always favored by strong exchange interaction. PMID:27087470

  5. Membrane plasma exchange in Goodpasture's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keller, F; Offermann, G; Schultze, G; Wagner, K; Aulbert, E; Scholle, J; Faber, U; Maiga, M; Pommer, W

    1984-01-01

    We report two cases with Goodpasture's syndrome successfully treated by membrane plasma exchange. In both patients, pulmonary infiltrations and hemoptysis had already resolved after the first pulse methylprednisolone dose (1000 mg IV). Following plasma exchange, renal function did not further deteriorate in one patient and returned to normal in the other patient. From the clinical course of our patients and a review of the literature, we conclude that membrane plasma exchange is effective in preventing deterioration of renal function in Goodpasture's syndrome. Analysis of the literature shows that patients who respond to plasma exchange have significantly fewer crescents and lower plasma creatinine, while non-responders are more often oliguric or anuric and require dialysis at the time of plasma exchange.

  6. Giant exchange interaction in mixed lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Iwahara, Naoya; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-04-01

    Combining strong magnetic anisotropy with strong exchange interaction is a long standing goal in the design of quantum magnets. The lanthanide complexes, while exhibiting a very strong ionic anisotropy, usually display a weak exchange coupling, amounting to only a few wavenumbers. Recently, an isostructural series of mixed (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been reported, in which the exchange splitting is estimated to reach hundreds wavenumbers. The microscopic mechanism governing the unusual exchange interaction in these compounds is revealed here by combining detailed modeling with density-functional theory and ab initio calculations. We find it to be basically kinetic and highly complex, involving non-negligible contributions up to seventh power of total angular momentum of each lanthanide site. The performed analysis also elucidates the origin of magnetization blocking in these compounds. Contrary to general expectations the latter is not always favored by strong exchange interaction.

  7. Design and performance of a new continuous-flow sample-introduction system for flame infrared-emission spectrometry: Applications in process analysis, flow injection analysis, and ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lam, C K; Zhang, Y; Busch, M A; Busch, K W

    1993-06-01

    A new sample introduction system for the analysis of continuously flowing liquid streams by flame infrared-emission (FIRE) spectrometry has been developed. The system uses a specially designed purge cell to strip dissolved CO(2) from solution into a hydrogen gas stream that serves as the fuel for a hydrogen/air flame. Vibrationally excited CO(2) molecules present in the flame are monitored with a simple infrared filter (4.4 mum) photometer. The new system can be used to introduce analytes as a continuous liquid stream (process analysis mode) or on a discrete basis by sample injection (flow injection analysis mode). The key to the success of the method is the new purge-cell design. The small internal volume of the cell minimizes problems associated with purge-cell clean-out and produces sharp, reproducible signals. Spent analytical solution is continuously drained from the cell, making cell disconnection and cleaning between samples unnecessary. Under the conditions employed in this study, samples could be analyzed at a maximum rate of approximately 60/h. The new sample introduction system was successfully tested in both a process analysis- and a flow injection analysis mode for the determination of total inorganic carbon in Waco tap water. For the first time, flame infrared-emission spectrometry was successfully extended to non-volatile organic compounds by using chemical pretreatment with peroxydisulfate in the presence of silver ion to convert the analytes into dissolved carbon dioxide, prior to purging and detection by the FIRE radiometer. A test of the peroxydisulfate/Ag(+) reaction using six organic acids and five sugars indicated that all 11 compounds were oxidized to nearly the same extent. Finally, the new sample introduction system was used in conjunction with a simple filter FIRE radiometer as a detection system in ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. Ion-exchange chromatograms are shown for two aqueous mixtures, one containing six organic

  8. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  9. Teachers' Centers Exchange Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Jeanne; Kreitzman, Ruth

    This directory has three major sections. The foreword is a brief essay describing the purpose of the Teachers' Centers Exchange, the "network" of teachers' centers, and the reasons for compiling and publishing this directory. The second section gives descriptions of 78 teachers' centers in the Exchange's network. These descriptions highlight each…

  10. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  11. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  12. Higher Education Exchange, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  13. Building Relationships through Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primavera, Angi; Hall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    From the moment of birth, children form and develop relationships with others in their world based on exchange. Children recognize that engaging in such encounters offers them the opportunity to enter into a relationship with another individual and to nurture that relationship through the exchange of messages and gifts, items and ideas. At Boulder…

  14. Higher Education Exchange, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The Higher Education Exchange is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the Higher Education Exchange publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  15. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  16. Higher Education Exchange, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The "Higher Education Exchange" is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  17. Environmental Exchange Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2003-01-01

    In this activity, teachers in one state create and share an "exchange box" of environmental and cultural items with students of another state. The Environmental Exchange Box activity enables teachers to improve students' skills in scientific inquiry and develop attitudes and values conducive to science learning such as wonder, curiosity, and…

  18. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  19. Aberration corrected emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (rf) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by multiple orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dogleg emittance exchange setup with a five cell rf deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of an EEX line with emittances differing by four orders of magnitude, i.e., an initial transverse emittance of 1 pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of 10 nm-rad.

  20. Heat exchanger, head and shell acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    Instability of postulated flaws in the head component of the heat exchanger could not produce a large break, equivalent to a DEGB in the PWS piping, due to the configuration of the head and restraint provided by the staybolts. Rather, leakage from throughwall flaws in the head would increase with flaw length with finite leakage areas that are bounded by a post-instability flaw configuration. Postulated flaws at instability in the shell of the heat exchanger or in the cooling water nozzles could produce a large break in the Cooling Water System (CWS) pressure boundary. An initial analysis of flaw stability for postulated flaws in the heat exchanger head was performed in January 1992. This present report updates that analysis and, additionally, provides acceptable flaw configurations to maintain defined structural or safety margins against flaw instability of the external pressure boundary components of the heat exchanger, namely the head, shell, and cooling water nozzles. Structural and flaw stability analyses of the heat exchanger tubes, the internal pressure boundary of the heat exchangers or interface boundary between the PWS and CWS, were previously completed in February 1992 as part of the heat exchanger restart evaluation and are not covered in this report.

  1. Ion exchanger from chemically modified banana leaves.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Ahmed A; Mohamed, Samar H; Abd-Elkader, Amal H

    2013-07-25

    Cation exchangers from chemically modified banana leaves have been prepared. Banana leaves were treated with different molarities of KMnO4 and cross linked with epichlorohydrin and their effect on metal ion adsorption was investigated. Phosphorylation of chemically modified banana leaves was also studied. The metal ion uptake by these modified banana leaves was clarified. Effect of different varieties, e.g. activation of produced cation exchanger, concentration of metal ions was also investigated. Characterization of the prepared ion exchangers by using infrared and thermal analysis was also taken in consideration. PMID:23768590

  2. Energy-Exchange Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine what energy savings can be achieved by coordinating the resources and requirements of two facilities, the 26th Ward Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and a housing development named Starrett City with its own total energy system. It was determined that three energy exchange options were economically and technically feasible. These include: the transfer of digester gas produced at the 26th Ward to the boilers at the Starrett City's total energy plant (TEP); the transfer of hot water heated at the TEP to the 26th Ward for space and process heating; and the transfer of coal effluent waste water from the 26th Ward to the condenser cooling systems at the TEP. Technical information is presented to support the findings. The report addresses those tasks of the statement of work dedicated to data acquisition, analysis, and energy conservation strategies internal to the Starrett City TEP and the community it supplies as well as to the 26th Ward WPCP. (MCW)

  3. Four particle exchange in solid He-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations which demonstrate a physically important four-atom exchange process in bodycentered cubic He crystal and thus an important four-spin term in the exchange Hamiltonian are discussed. A simple, mean-field analysis of this Hamiltonian appears to account for a number of the perplexing properties of bodycentered cubic He crystal. It is suggested that an understanding of other properties may require treatment of the exact four-spin term.

  4. Mycorrhizal Stimulation of Leaf Gas Exchange in Relation to Root Colonization, Shoot Size, Leaf Phosphorus and Nitrogen: A Quantitative Analysis of the Literature Using Meta-Regression.

    PubMed

    Augé, Robert M; Toler, Heather D; Saxton, Arnold M

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis often stimulates gas exchange rates of the host plant. This may relate to mycorrhizal effects on host nutrition and growth rate, or the influence may occur independently of these. Using meta-regression, we tested the strength of the relationship between AM-induced increases in gas exchange, and AM size and leaf mineral effects across the literature. With only a few exceptions, AM stimulation of carbon exchange rate (CER), stomatal conductance (g s), and transpiration rate (E) has been significantly associated with mycorrhizal stimulation of shoot dry weight, leaf phosphorus, leaf nitrogen:phosphorus ratio, and percent root colonization. The sizeable mycorrhizal stimulation of CER, by 49% over all studies, has been about twice as large as the mycorrhizal stimulation of g s and E (28 and 26%, respectively). CER has been over twice as sensitive as g s and four times as sensitive as E to mycorrhizal colonization rates. The AM-induced stimulation of CER increased by 19% with each AM-induced doubling of shoot size; the AM effect was about half as large for g s and E. The ratio of leaf N to leaf P has been more closely associated with mycorrhizal influence on leaf gas exchange than leaf P alone. The mycorrhizal influence on CER has declined markedly over the 35 years of published investigations. PMID:27524989

  5. Mycorrhizal Stimulation of Leaf Gas Exchange in Relation to Root Colonization, Shoot Size, Leaf Phosphorus and Nitrogen: A Quantitative Analysis of the Literature Using Meta-Regression

    PubMed Central

    Augé, Robert M.; Toler, Heather D.; Saxton, Arnold M.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis often stimulates gas exchange rates of the host plant. This may relate to mycorrhizal effects on host nutrition and growth rate, or the influence may occur independently of these. Using meta-regression, we tested the strength of the relationship between AM-induced increases in gas exchange, and AM size and leaf mineral effects across the literature. With only a few exceptions, AM stimulation of carbon exchange rate (CER), stomatal conductance (gs), and transpiration rate (E) has been significantly associated with mycorrhizal stimulation of shoot dry weight, leaf phosphorus, leaf nitrogen:phosphorus ratio, and percent root colonization. The sizeable mycorrhizal stimulation of CER, by 49% over all studies, has been about twice as large as the mycorrhizal stimulation of gs and E (28 and 26%, respectively). CER has been over twice as sensitive as gs and four times as sensitive as E to mycorrhizal colonization rates. The AM-induced stimulation of CER increased by 19% with each AM-induced doubling of shoot size; the AM effect was about half as large for gs and E. The ratio of leaf N to leaf P has been more closely associated with mycorrhizal influence on leaf gas exchange than leaf P alone. The mycorrhizal influence on CER has declined markedly over the 35 years of published investigations. PMID:27524989

  6. A Review and Analysis of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders Using a Paradigm of Communication Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostryn, Cheryl; Wolfe, Pamela S.; Rusch, Frank R.

    2008-01-01

    Research related to the use of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) with individuals having autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) was examined using a communication competence paradigm detailed by J. C. Light (1988, 1989, 2003). Communication components were operationalized based on skills identified in ASD research. A review was conducted…

  7. Fine-Grained Analysis of Motionese: Eye Gaze, Object Exchanges, and Action Units in Infant-versus Adult-Directed Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Rebecca J.; Shallcross, Wendy L.; Sabatos, Maura G.; Massie, Kara Phaedra

    2007-01-01

    Mothers modify their actions when demonstrating objects to infants versus adults. Such modifications have been called infant-directed action (IDA) or "motionese" (Brand, Baldwin, & Ashburn, 2002). We investigated the IDA features of interactiveness and simplification by quantifying eye gaze, object exchanges, and action units enacted between…

  8. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  9. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1991-10-16

    This progress report is for the September--October 1991 quarter. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  10. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  11. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc J.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Tonon, Thomas

    2007-09-18

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  12. Affinity capture of biotinylated proteins at acidic conditions to facilitate hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of multimeric protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Koefoed, Klaus; Nygaard, Frank; Sen, Jette Wagtberg

    2013-08-01

    Characterization of conformational and dynamic changes associated with protein interactions can be done by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) by comparing the deuterium uptake in the bound and unbound state of the proteins. Investigation of local hydrogen/deuterium exchange in heteromultimeric protein complexes poses a challenge for the method due to the increased complexity of the mixture of peptides originating from all interaction partners in the complex. Previously, interference of peptides from one interaction partner has been removed by immobilizing the intact protein on beads prior to the HDX-MS experiment. However, when studying protein complexes of more than two proteins, immobilization can possibly introduce steric limitations to the interactions. Here, we present a method based on the high affinity biotin-streptavidin interaction that allows selective capture of biotinylated proteins even under the extreme conditions for hydrogen/deuterium exchange quenching i.e. pH 2.5 and 0 °C. This biotin-streptavidin capture strategy allows hydrogen/deuterium exchange to occur in proteins in solution and enables characterization of specific proteins in heteromultimeric protein complexes without interference of peptides originating from other interaction partners in the complex. The biotin-streptavidin strategy has been successfully implemented in a model system with two recombinant monoclonal antibodies that target nonoverlapping epitopes on the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We present a workflow for biotinylation and characterization of recombinant antibodies and demonstrate affinity capture of biotinylated antibodies under hydrogen/deuterium exchange quench conditions by the biotin-streptavidin strategy.

  13. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  14. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik

    2015-06-02

    Anion exchange polymer electrolytes that include guanidinium functionalized polymers may be used as membranes and binders for electrocatalysts in preparation of anodes for electrochemical cells such as solid alkaline fuel cells.

  15. Greywater heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, D.

    1983-11-21

    A kilowatt meter and water meter were installed to monitor pregreywater usage. The design considerations, the heat exchanger construction and installation, and the monitoring of usage levels are described.

  16. Microtube Strip Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1990-12-27

    Doty Scientific (DSI) believes their Microtube-Strip Heat Exchanger will contribute significantly to (a) the closed Brayton cycles being pursued at MIT, NASA, and elsewhere; (b) reverse Brayton cycle cryocoolers, currently being investigated by NASA for space missions, being applied to MRI superconducting magnets; and (c) high-efficiency cryogenic gas separation schemes for CO{sub 2} removal from exhaust stacks. The goal of this current study is to show the potential for substantial progress in high-effectiveness, low-cost, gas-to-gas heat exchangers for diverse applications at temperatures from below 100 K to above 1000 K. To date, the highest effectiveness measured is about 98%, and relative pressure drops below 0.1% with a specific conductance of about 45 W/kgK are reported. During the pre-award period DSI built and tested a 3-module heat exchanger bank using 103-tube microtube strip (MTS) modules. To add to their analytical capabilities, DSI has acquired computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This report describes the pre-award work and the status of the ten tasks of the current project, which are: analyze flow distribution and thermal stresses within individual modules; design a heat exchanger bank of ten modules with 400 microtube per module; obtain production quality tubestrip die and AISI 304 tubestrips; obtain production quality microtubing; construct revised MTS heat exchanger; construct dies and fixtures for prototype heat exchanger; construct 100 MTS modules; assemble 8-10 prototype MTS heat exchangers; test prototype MTS heat exchanger; and verify test through independent means. 7 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab. (CK)

  17. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  18. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  19. Heat exchange device

    SciTech Connect

    Callison, G.

    1984-01-17

    A heat exchange device is adapted to recover heat from the fire box of a wood burning stove or the like for heating ambient air in a room or other enclosed space. The heat exchange device is adapted to mount in a recess in a stove top in place of a lid which is normally supplied with the stove. The device according to the invention includes heat exchange means which extend into the fire box of the stove below the top surface thereof. The heat from the heat exchange device is transmitted into a main cavity of the device where the heat is transferred to air forced through the main cavity by a blower mounted to an outside surface of the device. Air exit means are provided on a surface opposite to the surface on which the blower is mounted to provide a passage for heated air into the room or other enclosed space to be heated. The device may also include a top mounted isolated handle for ease in handling the device such as for moving from one area to another. In a second embodiment of the device, a high temperature heat exchange glass plate is mounted on the surface of the device which is in contact with the fire box. Heat is transmitted by heat exchange plate to the main cavity of the device where the air is heated and blown into the room as above.

  20. Microscale continuous ion exchanger.

    PubMed

    Kuban, Petr; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Morris, Kavin A

    2002-11-01

    A microscale continuous ion exchanger based on two liquid streams flowing in parallel is presented. The ion exchange reaction occurs through diffusional transfer of molecules between the ion exchanger phase and the eluent phase and is applied for conductivity suppression. Two approaches are demonstrated. In the first approach, a liquid ion exchanger (i.e. a strongly basic compound, e.g., tetraoctylammonium hydroxide, or a secondary amine, e.g., Amberlite IA-2) is dissolved in an organic solvent immiscible with the aqueous eluent. The system allows for sensitive suppressed conductivity detection of various inorganic cations. When the weakly basic secondary amine is used, conductometric detection of heavy metals is possible. In the second approach, a suspension of finely ground ion-exchange resin is used as the ion exchanger phase. In this case, the suspension need not involve an organic solvent. Theoretical models and computations are presented along with experimental results. The potential of such a system as a chip-scale post-separation suppressor/reactor is evident.

  1. Cryptographic Combinatorial Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    We present a useful new mechanism that facilitates the atomic exchange of many large baskets of securities in a combinatorial exchange. Cryptography prevents information about the securities in the baskets from being exploited, enhancing trust. Our exchange offers institutions who wish to trade large positions a new alternative to existing methods of block trading: they can reduce transaction costs by taking advantage of other institutions’ available liquidity, while third party liquidity providers guarantee execution—preserving their desired portfolio composition at all times. In our exchange, institutions submit encrypted orders which are crossed, leaving a “remainder”. The exchange proves facts about the portfolio risk of this remainder to third party liquidity providers without revealing the securities in the remainder, the knowledge of which could also be exploited. The third parties learn either (depending on the setting) the portfolio risk parameters of the remainder itself, or how their own portfolio risk would change if they were to incorporate the remainder into a portfolio they submit. In one setting, these third parties submit bids on the commission, and the winner supplies necessary liquidity for the entire exchange to clear. This guaranteed clearing, coupled with external price discovery from the primary markets for the securities, sidesteps difficult combinatorial optimization problems. This latter method of proving how taking on the remainder would change risk parameters of one’s own portfolio, without revealing the remainder’s contents or its own risk parameters, is a useful protocol of independent interest.

  2. Fluctuation Dynamics of Exchange Rates on Indian Financial Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, A.; Barat, P.

    Here we investigate the scaling behavior and the complexity of the average daily exchange rate returns of the Indian Rupee against four foreign currencies namely US Dollar, Euro, Great Britain Pound and Japanese Yen. Our analysis revealed that the average daily exchange rate return of the Indian Rupee against the US Dollar exhibits a persistent scaling behavior and follow Levy stable distribution. On the contrary the average daily exchange rate returns of the other three foreign currencies show randomness and follow Gaussian distribution. Moreover, it is seen that the complexity of the average daily exchange rate return of the Indian Rupee against US Dollar is less than the other three exchange rate returns.

  3. Ideologically Structured Information Exchange among Environmental Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lhotka, Laura; Bailey, Conner; Dubois, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We use social network analysis to test the hypothesis that group ideology affects information exchange among environmental groups. The analysis is based on interviews with leaders of 136 environmental groups in Alabama. This paper adds to the literature on resource mobilization among social movement organizations by exploring information exchange…

  4. Oxidizer heat exchanger component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, is capable of multimode thrust operation. The engine operates at two low-thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust; and pumped idle, 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank prepressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine during the low-thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidized heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. This report summarizes the test activity and post-test data analysis for two possible heat exchangers, each of which employs a completely different design philosophy. One design makes use of a low-heat transfer (PHT) approach in combination with a volume to attenuate pressure and flow oscillations. The test data showed that the LHT unit satisfied the oxygen exit quality of 0.95 or greater in both the THI and PI modes while maintaining stability. The HHT unit fulfilled all PI requirements; data for THI satisfactory operation is implied from experimental data that straddle the exact THI operating point.

  5. Selective enrichment of sulfides, thiols and methylthiophosphates from water samples on metal-loaded cation-exchange materials for gas chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Beiner, K; Popp, P; Wennrich, R

    2002-08-30

    The suitability of using metal-loaded sorbents for solid-phase extraction to enrich organic sulfur compounds from water samples was studied. To test the retention behavior of a number of sulfides, thiols and methylthiophosphates, a cation-exchanger was loaded with various metal ions. The elution behavior of sulfur compounds was investigated with different solvents. A combination of Pb2+-modified cation-exchanger as sorbent and CS2 (1%, v/v) in toluene proved to be the most suitable approach for the given problem. Using GC with a pulsed flame photometric detector yielded detection limits of between 0.6 and 2.9 microg/l. The results showed good reproducibility with relative standard deviations of 2-11%. PMID:12236501

  6. Measuring gas exchange with step changes in inspired oxygen: an analysis of the assumption of oxygen steady state in patients suffering from COPD.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Lars P; Weinreich, Ulla M; Karbing, Dan S; Wagner, Peter D; Rees, Stephen E

    2014-12-01

    Bedside estimation of pulmonary gas exchange efficiency may be possible from step changes in FIO2 and subsequent measurement of arterial oxygenation at steady state conditions. However, a steady state may not be achieved quickly after a change in FIO2, especially in patients with lung disease such as COPD, rendering this approach cumbersome. This paper investigates whether breath by breath measurement of respiratory gas and arterial oxygen levels as FIO2 is changed can be used as a much more rapid alternative to collecting data from steady state conditions for measuring pulmonary gas exchange efficiency. Fourteen patients with COPD were studied using 4-5 step changes in FIO2 in the range of 0.15-0.35. Values of expired respiratory gas and arterial oxygenation were used to calculate and compare the parameters of a mathematical model of pulmonary gas exchange in two cases: from data at steady state; and from breath by breath data prior to achievement of a steady state. For each patient, the breath by breath data were corrected for the delay in arterial oxygen saturation changes following each change in FIO2. Calculated model parameters were shown to be similar for the two data sets, with Bland-Altman bias and limits of agreement of -0.4 and -3.0 to 2.2 % for calculation of pulmonary shunt and 0.17 and -0.47 to 0.81 kPa for alveolar to end-capillary PO2, a measure of oxygen abnormality due to shunting plus regions of low [Formula: see text] A/[Formula: see text] ratio. This study shows that steady state oxygen levels may not be necessary when estimating pulmonary gas exchange using changes in FIO2. As such this technique may be applicable in patients with lung disease such as COPD.

  7. PRV sizing for exchanger tube rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.Y. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports on heat exchanger tube ruptures which is one of the common over-pressure scenarios of pressure relief valve (PRV) design. ASME Code VIII-1 indicates that heat exchangers shall be protected with a relieving device of sufficient capacity to avoid over-pressure in case of an internal failure. But it does not provide any guidance on how to size a PRV and how to define the required relief load. API RP 520 Part I and API RP 521 do offer some guidelines for heat exchanger tube rupture in PRV design, but they are too general to be used to perform a detailed calculation or to do a relief system analysis. Furthermore, API 520's two-phase flow calculation concepts contradict its own assumptions, which makes its design approach infeasible. A detailed PRV design procedure for heat exchanger tube rupture will be discussed.

  8. Consumers’ Perceptions About and Use of the Internet for Personal Health Records and Health Information Exchange: Analysis of the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kreps, Gary; Zhu, Fang; Miller, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) and the sharing of health information through health information exchange (HIE) have been advocated as key new components in the effective delivery of modern health care. It is important to understand consumer attitudes toward utilization of PHRs and HIE to evaluate the public’s willingness to adopt these new health care tools. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine consumer attitudes toward PHRs and their health care providers’ use of HIE, as well as to evaluate consumer use of the Internet for tracking PHRs. Methods Analysis of data from the 2007 iteration of the Health Information National Trends Study (HINTS, N=7674) was conducted using multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of consumer (1) appraisal of PHRs, (2) appraisal of health care provider use of HIE, and (3) use of the Internet for tracking PHRs. Results : Approximately 86% of US adults rated electronic access to their PHRs as important. However, only 9% of them used the Internet for tracking PHRs. Those who rated electronic access to their PHRs as important were more likely to be Hispanic (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04 - 1.72) and Internet users (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.02 - 1.57) and less likely to be age 65 and above (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.38 - 0.67) or individuals whose doctors always ensured their understanding of their health (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.49 – 0.78). Those who rated HIE as important were more likely to be 45 to 54 years of age (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.03 - 2.08), 55 to 64 years of age (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.32 - 2.53), or 65 and above (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.27 - 2.43) and less likely to be women (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.68 - 0.95) or individuals who perceive their health information as not safely guarded by their doctors (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.40 - 0.69). Among Internet users, those who used the Internet to track their PHRs were more likely to be college graduates (OR = 1.84, 95% = 1.32 - 2

  9. Downhole heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1999-09-01

    The downhole heat exchanger (DHE) eliminates the problem of disposal of geothermal fluid, since only heat is taken from the well. The exchanger consists of a system of pipes or tubes suspended in the well through which clean secondary water is pumped or allowed to circulate by natural convection. These systems offer substantial economic savings over surface heat exchangers where a single-well system is adequate (typically less than 0.8 MWt, with well depths up to about 500 ft) and may be economical under certain conditions at well depths to 1500 ft. Several designs have proven successful; but, the most popular are a simple hairpin loop or multiple loops of iron pipe (similar to the tubes in a U-tube and shell exchanger) extending to near the well bottom. An experimental design consisting of multiple small tubes with headers at each end suspended just below the water surface appears to offer economic and heating capacity advantages. The paper describes design and construction details and New Zealand`s experience with downhole heat exchangers.

  10. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  11. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Culver, Donald W.

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger for use in nuclear reactors includes a heat exchange tube bundle formed from similar modules each having a hexagonal shroud containing a large number of thermally conductive tubes which are connected with inlet and outlet headers at opposite ends of each module, the respective headers being adapted for interconnection with suitable inlet and outlet manifold means. In order to adapt the heat exchanger for operation in a high temperature and high pressure environment and to provide access to all tube ports at opposite ends of the tube bundle, a spherical tube sheet is arranged in sealed relation across the chamber with an elongated duct extending outwardly therefrom to provide manifold means for interconnection with the opposite end of the tube bundle.

  12. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  13. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  14. Alert Exchange Process Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States of America (NASA), and the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acknowledging that NASA, ESA and JAXA have a mutual interest in exchanging Alerts and Alert Status Lists to enhance the information base for each system participant while fortifying the general level of cooperation between the policy agreement subscribers, and each Party will exchange Alert listings on regular basis and detailed Alert information on a need to know basis to the extent permitted by law.

  15. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  16. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of yeast Sec2p, a guanine nucleotide-exchange factor for the yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yusuke; Fukai, Shuya; Nureki, Osamu

    2007-07-01

    Crystal structure of a triple mutant (M115L, K121M, T142M) of SeMet-labelled Sec2p, a GEF for Rab GTPase, has been solved by SAD. Control of the selenium sites by mutagenesis much improved the resolution of the SeMet-labelled crystals. Sec2p is a guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) for the yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p. Sec2p accelerates GDP release from Sec4p and promotes GDP–GTP exchange for Sec4p activation. In order to elucidate this nucleotide-exchange mechanism using X-ray crystallography, three constructs of native Sec2p (Sec2{sub 1–160}p, Sec2{sub 18–160}p and Sec2{sub 31–160}p) and three constructs of selenomethionine-labelled Sec2p [Sec2{sub 31–160}p, Sec2{sub 31–160}p (M115L) and Sec2{sub 31–160}p (M115L, K121M, T142M)] were crystallized. These six crystals diffracted to 8.8, 4.8, 2.6, 4.0, 3.3 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. The data set from the SeMet-labelled Sec2{sub 31–160}p (M115L, K121M, T142M) crystal was processed for SAD phasing; the crystal belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 101.9, b = 176.6, c = 181.5 Å.

  17. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC) for representing the air-soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1) accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2) accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3) enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4) is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air-water volatile tracer exchange; and (5) is applicable to site, regional, and global land models. Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1) gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2) liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. We compared the predicted soil evaporation efficiency with those from several field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements and found good agreement with the typically observed two-stage soil evaporation curves. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92) indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1) the inverted soil resistance data are always severely impacted by measurement error and (2) the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance. We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer exchange at the soil-air interface.

  18. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC) for representing the air-soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1) accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2) accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3) enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4) is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air-water volatile tracer exchange; and (5) is applicable to site, regional, and global land models. Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1) gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2) liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. The resulting soil evaporation efficiency reasonably explains the two-stage soil evaporation curves typically observed in field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92) indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1) the inverted soil resistance data is always severely impacted by measurement error and (2) the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance. We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer exchange at the soil-air interface.

  19. Exploring knowledge exchange: a useful framework for practice and policy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Vicky; Smith, Simon; House, Allan; Hamer, Susan

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge translation is underpinned by a dynamic and social knowledge exchange process but there are few descriptions of how this unfolds in practice settings. This has hampered attempts to produce realistic and useful models to help policymakers and researchers understand how knowledge exchange works. This paper reports the results of research which investigated the nature of knowledge exchange. We aimed to understand whether dynamic and fluid definitions of knowledge exchange are valid and to produce a realistic, descriptive framework of knowledge exchange. Our research was informed by a realist approach. We embedded a knowledge broker within three service delivery teams across a mental health organisation in the UK, each of whom was grappling with specific challenges. The knowledge broker participated in the team's problem-solving process and collected observational fieldnotes. We also interviewed the team members. Observational and interview data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively in order to determine and describe the nature of the knowledge exchange process in more detail. This enabled us to refine our conceptual framework of knowledge exchange. We found that knowledge exchange can be understood as a dynamic and fluid process which incorporates distinct forms of knowledge from multiple sources. Quantitative analysis illustrated that five broadly-defined components of knowledge exchange (problem, context, knowledge, activities, use) can all be in play at any one time and do not occur in a set order. Qualitative analysis revealed a number of distinct themes which better described the nature of knowledge exchange. By shedding light on the nature of knowledge exchange, our findings problematise some of the linear, technicist approaches to knowledge translation. The revised model of knowledge exchange which we propose here could therefore help to reorient thinking about knowledge exchange and act as a starting point for further exploration and

  20. Exploring knowledge exchange: a useful framework for practice and policy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Vicky; Smith, Simon; House, Allan; Hamer, Susan

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge translation is underpinned by a dynamic and social knowledge exchange process but there are few descriptions of how this unfolds in practice settings. This has hampered attempts to produce realistic and useful models to help policymakers and researchers understand how knowledge exchange works. This paper reports the results of research which investigated the nature of knowledge exchange. We aimed to understand whether dynamic and fluid definitions of knowledge exchange are valid and to produce a realistic, descriptive framework of knowledge exchange. Our research was informed by a realist approach. We embedded a knowledge broker within three service delivery teams across a mental health organisation in the UK, each of whom was grappling with specific challenges. The knowledge broker participated in the team's problem-solving process and collected observational fieldnotes. We also interviewed the team members. Observational and interview data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively in order to determine and describe the nature of the knowledge exchange process in more detail. This enabled us to refine our conceptual framework of knowledge exchange. We found that knowledge exchange can be understood as a dynamic and fluid process which incorporates distinct forms of knowledge from multiple sources. Quantitative analysis illustrated that five broadly-defined components of knowledge exchange (problem, context, knowledge, activities, use) can all be in play at any one time and do not occur in a set order. Qualitative analysis revealed a number of distinct themes which better described the nature of knowledge exchange. By shedding light on the nature of knowledge exchange, our findings problematise some of the linear, technicist approaches to knowledge translation. The revised model of knowledge exchange which we propose here could therefore help to reorient thinking about knowledge exchange and act as a starting point for further exploration and

  1. Samarium Ion Exchanged Montmorillonite for High Temperature Cumene Cracking Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binitha, N. N.; Silija, P. P.; Suraj, V.; Yaakob, Z.; Sugunan, S.

    2011-02-01

    Montmorillonite clay is cation exchanged with samarium and its catalytic influence in cumene cracking reaction is investigated. Effect of exchange with sodium ions on further exchange with samarium ions is also noted. Acidity measurements are done using Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) of ammonia. The retention of basic structure is proved from FTIR spectra and XRD patterns. Elemental analysis result shows that samarium exchange has occurred, which is responsible for the higher catalytic activity. Surface area and pore volume remains more or less unaffected upon exchange. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates the enhanced thermal stability on exchanging. Cumene cracking reaction is carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed bed glass reactor at 673 K. The predominance of Brønsted acidity is confirmed from high selectivity to benzene.

  2. Diffraction described by virtual particle momentum exchange: the "diffraction force"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Particle diffraction can be described by an ensemble of particle paths determined through a Fourier analysis of a scattering lattice where the momentum exchange probabilities are defined at the location of scattering, not the point of detection. This description is compatible with optical wave theories and quantum particle models and provides deeper insights to the nature of quantum uncertainty. In this paper the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Fresnel-Kirchoff theories are analyzed for diffraction by a narrow slit and a straight edge to demonstrate the dependence of particle scattering on the distance of virtual particle exchange. The quantized momentum exchange is defined by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and is consistent with the formalism of QED. This exchange of momentum manifests the "diffraction force" that appears to be a universal construct as it applies to neutral and charged particles. This analysis indicates virtual particles might form an exchange channel that bridges the space of momentum exchange.

  3. Depolarization Laplace transform analysis of exchangeable hyperpolarized ¹²⁹Xe for detecting ordering phases and cholesterol content of biomembrane models.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Matthias; Witte, Christopher; Schröder, Leif

    2014-03-18

    We present a highly sensitive nuclear-magnetic resonance technique to study membrane dynamics that combines the temporary encapsulation of spin-hyperpolarized xenon ((129)Xe) atoms in cryptophane-A-monoacid (CrAma) and their indirect detection through chemical exchange saturation transfer. Radiofrequency-labeled Xe@CrAma complexes exhibit characteristic differences in chemical exchange saturation transfer-driven depolarization when interacting with binary membrane models composed of different molecular ratios of DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine). The method is also applied to mixtures of cholesterol and POPC. The existence of domains that fluctuate in cluster size in DPPC/POPC models at a high (75-98%) DPPC content induces up to a fivefold increase in spin depolarization time τ at 297 K. In POPC/cholesterol model membranes, the parameter τ depends linearly on the cholesterol content at 310 K and allows us to determine the cholesterol content with an accuracy of at least 5%.

  4. Kinetics and equilibrium of the ion exchange of Cd{sup 2+} at Na-montmorillonite: Analysis of heterogeneity by means of the regularization technique CONTIN

    SciTech Connect

    Haber-Pohlmeier, S.; Pohlmeier, A.

    1997-04-15

    Kinetics and equilibrium of the ion exchange of Cd{sup 2+} at Na-montmorillonite are investigated and analyzed for the first time by kinetic and affinity spectra. To obtain these distribution functions an inverse integral transformation is performed numerically by the program CONTIN with the integral adsorption equation. It employs the constrained regularization technique with a smoothing regularizor favoring parsimony of the solution and an automatic adjustment of the regularization strength by the statistical F test. A Langmuir equation as local isotherm is additionally built in the code for the first time so that CONTIN is now a very convenient and handy tool for the calculation of model independent kinetic and affinity spectra. Bimodal kinetic spectra are observed where the main process (80%) is the binding of Cd{sup 2+} at the outer surface. The mean rate coefficient K{sub mean} is 11 s{sup {minus}1} at 25 C and the HWHH of the distribution function of about 0.1 log k units proves the considerable degree of heterogeneity. An inner sphere complex is formed that is controlled by the ion exchange reaction itself, not by diffusion, as proven by temperature dependent measurements. The more heterogeneous slow process is caused by aggregation of the platelets and intercalation of Cd{sup 2+} into the interlayer space. A broad monomodal affinity spectrum is found with a mean value of log K{sub ex,mean} = 0.5 and an asymmetry to the low affinity side.

  5. Minimizing Carry-Over in an Online Pepsin Digestion System used for the H/D Exchange Mass Spectrometric Analysis of an IgG1 Monoclonal Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Ranajoy; Manikwar, Prakash; Hickey, John M.; Arora, Jayant; Middaugh, C. Russell; Volkin, David B.; Weis, David D.

    2012-12-01

    Chromatographic carry-over can severely distort measurements of amide H/D exchange in proteins analyzed by LC/MS. In this work, we explored the origin of carry-over in the online digestion of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody using an immobilized pepsin column under quenched H/D exchange conditions (pH 2.5, 0 °C). From a consensus list of 169 different peptides consistently detected during digestion of this large, ~150 kDa protein, approximately 30 % of the peptic peptides exhibited carry-over. The majority of carry-over originates from the online digestion. Carry-over can be substantially decreased by washing the online digestion flow-path and pepsin column with two wash cocktails: [acetonitrile (5 %)/ isopropanol (5 %)/ acetic acid (20 %) in water] and [2 M guanidine hydrochloride in 100 mM phosphate buffer pH 2.5]. Extended use of this two-step washing procedure does not adversely affect the specificity or activity of the immobilized pepsin column. The results suggest that although the mechanism of carry-over appears to be chemical in nature, and not hydrodynamic, carry-over cannot be attributed to a single factor such as mass, abundance, pI, or hydrophobicity of the peptides.

  6. Numerical analysis of magnetic field effects on hydro-thermal behavior of a magnetic nanofluid in a double pipe heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakiba, Ali; Vahedi, Khodadad

    2016-03-01

    This study attempts to numerically investigate the hydro-thermal characteristics of a ferrofluid (water and 4 vol% Fe3O4) in a counter-current horizontal double pipe heat exchanger, which is exposed to a non-uniform transverse magnetic field with different intensities. The magnetic field is generated by an electric current going through a wire located parallel to the inner tube and between two pipes. The single phase model and the control volume technique have been used to study the flow. The effects of magnetic field have been added to momentum equation by applying C++ codes in Ansys Fluent 14. The results show that applying this kind of magnetic field causes kelvin force to be produced perpendicular to the ferrofluid flow, changing axial velocity profile and creating a pair of vortices which leads to an increase in Nusselt number, friction factor and pressure drop. Comparing the enhancement percentage of Nusselt number, friction factor and pressure drop demonstrates that the optimum value of magnetic number for Reff=50 is between Mn=1.33×106 and Mn=2.37×106. So applying non-uniform transverse magnetic field can control the flow of ferrofluid and improve heat transfer process of double pipe heat exchanger.

  7. Analysis of exchanges between novice and cooperating teachers during internships using the NCATE/NASPE Standards for Teacher Preparation in Physical Education as guidelines.

    PubMed

    Banville, Dominique

    2006-06-01

    To be recognized as an accredited program, Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) programs in the country must abide by guidelines put forward by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE), in collaboration with the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The guidelines are divided into nine standards and identify a number of outcomes (NASPE, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine the nature of the exchanges between novice teachers (NTs) and cooperating teachers (CTs), when using the NASPE Standards (1998) as a reference point, and determine if the focus of the exchanges differed over time and according to data source. Six pairs of CTs and their NT participated in the study. Data were collected through recorded conversations between NTs and their CT as well as NTs' logs. Data showed that the majority of conversations focused on planning and instruction (Standard 6) and management and motivation (Standard 4), while few related to diverse learners (Standard 3), growth and development (Standard 2), and communication (Standard 5). The small amount of information shared by CTs in some standards indicates a need for PETE programs to share the guidelines with CTs to make them aware of the importance of offering a variety of topics to interns, because CTs are the primary source of information during this crucial experience. PMID:16898277

  8. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South China," and (4) "The Use…

  9. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual consumers…

  10. Technology Performance Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  11. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  12. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge produced…

  13. Higher Education Exchange, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Kettering's president David Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological…

  14. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge, Judgment and…

  15. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  16. Chimney heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, I.C.

    1981-09-01

    A heat exchanger for installation on the top of a chimney of a building includes a housing having a lower end receiving the top of the chimney and an upper end with openings permitting the escape of effluent from the chimney and a heat exchanger assembly disposed in the housing including a central chamber and a spirally arranged duct network defining an effluent spiral path between the top of the chimney and the central chamber and a fresh air spiral path between an inlet disposed at the lower end of the housing and the central chamber, the effluent and fresh air spiral paths being in heat exchange relationship such that air passing through the fresh air spiral path is heated by hot effluent gases passing upward through the chimney and the effluent spiral path for use in heating the building. A pollution trap can be disposed in the central chamber of the heat exchanger assembly for removing pollutants from the effluent, the pollution trap including a rotating cage carrying pumice stones for absorbing pollutants from the effluent with the surface of the pumice gradually ground off to reveal fresh stone as the cage rotates.

  17. Estimate exchanger vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, C.D.; Zengyan, H.

    1986-04-01

    Based on the classical beam theory, a simple method for calculating the natural frequency of unequally spanned tubes is presented. The method is suitable for various boundary conditions. Accuracy of the calculations is sufficient for practical applications. This method will help designers and operators estimate the vibration of tubular exchangers. In general, there are three reasons why a tube vibrates in cross flow: vortex shedding, fluid elasticity and turbulent buffeting. No matter which is the cause, the basic reason is that the frequency of exciting force is approximately the same as or equal to the natural frequency of the tube. To prevent the heat exchanger from vibrating, it is necessary to select correctly the shell-side fluid velocity so that the frequency of exciting force is different from the natural frequency of the tube, or to vary the natural frequency of the heat exchanger tube. So precisely determining the natural frequency of the heat exchanger, especially its foundational frequency under various supporting conditions, is of significance.

  18. Idea Exchange: Volunteerism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Jamice, Ed.

    1974-01-01

    This issue of "Idea Exchange" which focuses on the volunteer in education programs includes a variety of materials related to volunteer experiences and viewpoints: (1) a handbook for volunteer coordinators which discusses the coordinator's role, the recruiting and interviewing of volunteers, and the essentials of volunteer placement and…

  19. Preliminary design package for maxi-therm heat exchanger module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Heat exchangers were developed for use in a solar heating and cooling system installed in a single family dwelling. Each of the three exchangers consisted of a heating and cooling module and a submersed electric water heating element. Information necessary to evaluate the preliminary design of the heat exchanger is presented in terms of the development and verification plans, performance specifications, installation and maintenance, and hazard analysis.

  20. Composite ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amarasinghe, S.; Zook, L.; Leddy, J.

    1994-12-31

    Composite ion exchange materials can be formed by sorbing ion exchange polymers on inert, high surface area substrates. In general, the flux of ions and molecules through these composites, as measured electrochemically, increases as the ratio of the surface area of the substrate increases relative to the volume of the ion exchanger. This suggests that fields and gradients established at the interface between the ion exchanger and substrate are important in determining the transport characteristics of the composites. Here, the authors will focus on composites formed with a cation exchange polymer, Nafion, and two different types of microbeads: polystyrene microspheres and polystyrene coated magnetic microbeads. For the polystyrene microbeads, scanning electron micrographs suggest the beads cluster in a self-similar manner, independent of the bead diameter. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through the composites was studied as a function of bead fraction, bead radii, and fixed surface area with mixed bead sizes. Flux was well modeled by surface diffusion along a fractal interface. Magnetic composites were formed with columns of magnetic microbeads normal to the electrode surface. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through these composites increased exponentially with bead fraction. For electrolyses, the difference in the molar magnetic susceptibility of the products and reactants, Dcm, tends to be non-zero. For seven redox reactions, the ratio of the flux through the magnetic composites to the flux through a Nafion film increases monotonically with {vert_bar}Dcm{vert_bar}, with enhancements as large as thirty-fold. For reversible species, the electrolysis potential through the magnetic composites is 35 mV positive of that for the Nafion films.

  1. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  2. Hydrogeologic setting, water budget, and preliminary analysis of ground-water exchange at Lake Starr, a seepage lake in Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy; Lee, T.M.; O'Hare, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Lake Starr, a 134-acre seepage lake of multiple-sinkhole origin on the Lake Wales Ridge of central Florida, was the subject of a detailed water-budget study from August 1996 through July 1998. The study monitored the effects of hydrogeologic setting, climate, and ground-water pumping on the water budget and lake stage. The hydrogeologic setting of the Lake Starr basin differs markedly on the two sides of the lake. Ground water from the surficial aquifer system flows into the lake from the northwest side of the basin, and lake water leaks out to the surficial aquifer system on the southeast side of the basin. Lake Starr and the surrounding surficial aquifer system recharge the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The rate of recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer is determined by the integrity of the intermediate confining unit and by the downward head gradient between the two aquifers. On the inflow side of the lake, the intermediate confining unit is more continuous, allowing ground water from the surficial aquifer system to flow laterally into the lake. Beneath the lake and on the southeast side of the basin, breaches in the intermediate confining unit enhance downward flow to the Upper Floridan aquifer, so that water flows both downward and laterally away from the lake through the ground-water flow system in these areas. An accurate water budget, including evaporation measured by the energy-budget method, was used to calculate net ground-water flow to the lake, and to do a preliminary analysis of the relation of net ground-water fluxes to other variables. Water budgets constructed over different timeframes provided insight on processes that affect ground-water interactions with Lake Starr. Weekly estimates of net ground-water flow provided evidence for the occurrence of transient inflows from the nearshore basin, as well as the short-term effects of head in the Upper Floridan aquifer on ground-water exchange with the lake. Monthly water budgets showed the effects

  3. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence.

    PubMed

    Wobrauschek, P; Prost, J; Ingerle, D; Kregsamer, P; Misra, N L; Streli, C

    2015-08-01

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm(2) active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration. PMID:26329172

  4. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Prost, J.; Ingerle, D.; Kregsamer, P.; Misra, N. L.; Streli, C.

    2015-08-01

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm2 active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  5. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Wobrauschek, P. Prost, J.; Ingerle, D.; Kregsamer, P.; Streli, C.; Misra, N. L.

    2015-08-15

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm{sup 2} active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  6. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Warmer temperatures stimulate respiration and reduce net ecosystem productivity in a northern Great Plains grassland: Analysis of CO2 exchange in automatic chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    The interacting effects of altered temperature and precipitation are expected to have significant consequences for ecosystem net carbon storage. Here I report the results of an experiment that evaluated the effects of elevated temperature and altered precipitation on ecosystem CO2 exchange in a northern Great Plains grassland, near Lethbridge, Alberta Canada. Open-top chambers were used to establish an experiment in 2012 with three treatments (control, warmed, warmed plus 50% of normal precipitation input). A smaller experiment with only the two temperature treatments (control and warmed) was conducted in 2013. Continuous half-hourly net CO2 exchange measurements were made using nine automatic chambers during May-October in both years. My objectives were to determine the sensitivity of the ecosystem carbon budget to temperature and moisture manipulations, and to test for direct and indirect effects of the environmental changes on ecosystem CO2 exchange. The experimental manipulations resulted primarily in a significant increase in air temperature in the warmed treatment plots. A cumulative net loss of carbon or negative net ecosystem productivity (NEP) occurred during May through September in the warmed treatment (NEP = -659 g C m-2), while in the control treatment there was a cumulative net gain of carbon (NEP = +50 g C m-2). An eddy covariance system that operated at the site, over a footprint region that was not influenced by the experimental treatments, also showed a net gain of carbon by the ecosystem. The reduced NEP was due to higher plant and soil respiration rates in the warmed treatment that appeared to be caused by a combination of: (i) higher carbon substrate availability indirectly stimulating soil respiration in the warmed relative to the control treatment, and (ii) a strong increase in leaf respiration likely caused by a shift in electron partitioning to the alternative pathway respiration in the warmed treatment, particularly when exposed to high

  8. A numerical analysis of three-dimensional turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer in plate-fin and tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Jiin-Yuh; Chang, Wen-Jen; Lin, Min-Sheng

    1996-12-31

    Fluid flow and heat transfer over a multi-row (1-5 rows) plate-fin and tube heat exchanger are studied numerically. Flow is incompressible, three-dimensional and turbulent. The effects of tube arrangements and tube row numbers are investigated in detail for the Reynolds number ReH (based on the fin spacing H) ranging from 2000 to 10000. The effects of turbulence are simulated by the k-{epsilon} turbulence model. Stream and isothermal lines through the whole tube bank, local and average Nusselt number and pressure coefficient in the streamwise direction are presented. The numerical results for the average heat transfer coefficient agree well with the previously published experimental data.

  9. High-pH anion-exchange chromatographic analysis of phosphorylated compounds: application to isolation and characterization of nonpeptide mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Poquet, Y; Constant, P; Peyrat, M A; Poupot, R; Halary, F; Bonneville, M; Fournié, J J

    1996-12-01

    A rapid and sensitive high-pH anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) method for the separation and quantification of phosphorylated antigens in mycobacterial extracts has been developed. This method provides the separation of mono-, di-, or triphosphonucleotides and of various other phosphorylated molecules. Dual detection by conductimetry and UV absorption downstream of a chemical suppressor constitute nondegradative and highly sensitive tools for the physical detection and the quantification of phosphorylated compounds in biological samples. The lower limit of accurate quantification is around 1 nmol per sample. This method was used for the separation of several phosphorylated antigens activating human gamma delta T lymphocytes from semipurified mycobacterial fractions. Their quantification revealed that the minimal concentration activating a gamma delta T cell clone is between 1 and 5 nM. This approach can be used for more general preparative purposes with samples where minute amounts of biologically active phosphoanions are analyzed.

  10. Identification of PCR-amplified genetically modified organisms (GMOs) DNA by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in anion-exchange chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Stefano; Lesignoli, Francesca; Germini, Andrea; Faccini, Andrea; Sforza, Stefano; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2007-04-01

    PCR products obtained by selective amplification of transgenic DNA derived from food samples containing Roundup Ready soybean or Bt-176 maize have been analyzed by anion-exchange HPLC. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), oligonucleotide analogues known to bind to complementary single-stranded DNA with high affinity and specificity, have been used as specific probes in order to assess the identity of the peaks observed. Two different protocols were adopted in order to obtain single-stranded DNA: amplification with an excess of one primer or digestion of one DNA strand. The single-stranded DNA was mixed with the PNA probe, and the presence of a specific sequence was revealed through detection of the corresponding PNA:DNA peak with significantly different retention time. Advantages and limits of this approach are discussed. The method was tested with reference materials and subsequently applied to commercial samples.

  11. Large Devaluations and the Real Exchange Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Ariel; Eichenbaum, Martin; Rebelo, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the primary force behind the large drop in real exchange rates that occurs after large devaluations is the slow adjustment in the prices of nontradable goods and services. Our empirical analysis uses data from five large devaluation episodes: Argentina (2002), Brazil (1999), Korea (1997), Mexico (1994), and Thailand…

  12. Developing Intercultural Communicative Competence through Online Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Based on Byram's (1997) definition of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) and on specific types of discourse analysis proposed by Kramsch and Thorne (2002) and Ware and Kramsch (2005), this article explores how online exchanges can play a role in second language learners' development of pragmatic competence and ICC. With data obtained…

  13. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange and Molecular Dynamics Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils Formed by a D69K Charge-Pair Mutant of Human Apolipoprotein C-II.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yu; Zlatic, Courtney O; Griffin, Michael D W; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Todorova, Nevena; Yarovsky, Irene; Gooley, Paul R

    2015-08-11

    Plasma apolipoproteins form amphipathic α helices in lipid environments but in the lipid-free state show a high propensity to form β structure and self-associate into amyloid fibrils. The widespread occurrence of apolipoproteins in amyloid plaques suggests disease-related roles, specifically in atherosclerosis. To reconcile the dual abilities of apolipoproteins to form either α helices or cross-β sheet structures, we examined fibrils formed by human apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II). A structural model for apoC-II fibrils shows a cross-β core with parallel β strands, including a buried K30-D69 charge pair. We investigated the effect of abolishing this charge pair in mutant D69K apoC-II. Fluorescence studies indicated more rapid fibril formation and less solvent accessibility of tryptophan (W26) in D69K apoC-II fibrils than in wild-type (WT) fibrils. X-ray diffraction data of aligned D69K apoC-II fibrils yielded a typical cross-β structure with increased β sheet spacing compared to that of WT fibrils. Hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange patterns were similar for D69K apoC-II fibrils compared to WT fibrils, albeit with an overall reduction in the level of slow H/D exchange, particularly around residues 29-32. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated reduced β strand content for a model D69K apoC-II tetramer compared to the WT tetramer and confirmed an expansion of the cross-β spacing that contributed to the formation of a stable charge pair between K69 and E27. The results highlight the importance of charge-pair interactions within the apoC-II fibril core, which together with numerous salt bridges in the flexible connecting loop play a major role in the ability of lipid-free apoC-II to form stable cross-β fibrils.

  14. Experimental data and analysis to support the design of an ion-exchange process for the treatment of Hanford tank waste supernatant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.; Bray, L.A.; Brooks, K.P.; Brown, G.N.; Bryan, S.A.; Carlson, C.D.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.; Kim, A.Y.

    1994-12-01

    Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks contain a mixture of sludge, salt cake, and alkaline supernatant liquids. Disposal options for these wastes are high-level waste (HLW) glass for disposal in a repository or low-level waste (LLW) glass for onsite disposal. Systems-engineering studies show that economic and environmental considerations preclude disposal of these wastes without further treatment. Difficulties inherent in transportation and disposal of relatively large volumes of HLW make it impossible to vitrify all of the tank waste as HLW. Potential environmental impacts make direct disposal of all of the tank waste as LLW glass unacceptable. Although the pretreatment and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include retrieval of the aqueous liquids, dissolution of the salt cakes, and washing of the sludges to remove soluble components. Most of the cesium is expected to be in the aqueous liquids, which are the focus of this report on cesium removal by ion exchange. The main objectives of the ion-exchange process are removing cesium from the bulk of the tank waste (i.e., decontamination) and concentrating the separated cesium for vitrification. Because exact requirements for removal of {sup 137}Cs have not yet been defined, a range of removal requirements will be considered. This study addresses requirements to achieve {sup 137}Cs levels in LLW glass between (1) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Class C (10 CFR 61) limit of 4600 Ci/m{sup 3} and (2) 1/10th of the NRC Class A limit of 1 Ci/m{sup 3} i.e., 0.1/m{sup 3}. The required degrees of separation of cesium from other waste components is a complex function involving interactions between the design of the vitrification process, waste form considerations, and other HLW stream components that are to be vitrified.

  15. Detachable strong cation exchange monolith, integrated with capillary zone electrophoresis and coupled with pH gradient elution, produces improved sensitivity and numbers of peptide identifications during bottom-up analysis of complex proteomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Yan, Xiaojing; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-04-21

    A detachable sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange monolith was synthesized in a fused silica capillary, and used for solid phase extraction with online pH gradient elution during capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. Tryptic digests were prepared in 50 mM formic acid and loaded onto the strong cation-exchange monolith. Fractions were eluted using a series of buffers with lower concentration but higher pH values than the 50 mM formic acid background electrolyte. This combination of elution and background electrolytes results in both sample stacking and formation of a dynamic pH junction and allows use of relatively large elution buffer volumes while maintaining reasonable peak efficiency and resolution. A series of five pH bumps were applied to elute E. coli tryptic peptides from the monolith, followed by analysis using CZE coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; 799 protein groups and 3381 peptides were identified from 50 ng of the digest in a 2.5 h analysis, which approaches the identification rate for this organism that was obtained with an Orbitrap Fusion. We attribute the improved numbers of peptide and protein identifications to the efficient fractionation by the online pH gradient elution, which decreased the complexity of the sample in each elution step and improved the signal intensity of low abundance peptides. We also performed a comparative analysis using a nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LCH system. Similar numbers of protein and peptide identifications were produced by the two methods. Protein identifications showed significant overlap between the two methods, whereas peptide identifications were complementary.

  16. A detachable strong cation exchange monolith, integrated with capillary zone electrophoresis and coupled with pH gradient elution, produces improved sensitivity and numbers of peptide identifications during bottom-up analysis of complex proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Yan, Xiaojing; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2015-01-01

    A detachable sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange monolith was synthesized in a fused silica capillary, and used for solid phase extraction with on-line pH gradient elution during capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. Tryptic digests were prepared in 50 mM formic acid and loaded onto the strong cation-exchange monolith. Fractions were eluted using a series of buffers with lower concentration but higher pH values than the 50 mM formic acid background electrolyte. This combination of elution and background electrolytes results in both sample stacking and formation of a dynamic pH junction, and allows use of relatively large elution buffer volumes while maintaining reasonable peak efficiency and resolution. A series of five pH bumps were applied to elute E. coli tryptic peptides from the monolith, followed by analysis using CZE coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; 799 protein groups and 3,381 peptides were identified from 50 ng of the digest in a 2.5 hour analysis, which approaches the identification rate for this organism that was obtained with an Orbitrap Fusion. We attribute the improved numbers of peptide and protein identifications to the efficient fractionation by the on-line pH gradient elution, which decreased the complexity of the sample in each elution step and improved the signal intensity of low abundance peptides. We also performed a comparative analysis using a nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LCH system. Similar numbers of protein and peptide identifications were produced by the two methods. Protein identifications showed significant overlap between the two methods, whereas peptide identifications were complementary. PMID:25822566

  17. Metabolite identification of artemether by data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis using an LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in combination with the online hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian; Du, Fuying; Zhu, Fanping; Xing, Jie

    2011-11-15

    Artemether (ARM), the O-methyl ether prodrug of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), is a first-line antimalarial drug used in areas of multi-drug resistance. Artemisinin drugs can be metabolized extensively in vivo and this seems related to their autoinduction pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the metabolite identification of ARM was performed by the generic data-dependent accurate mass spectrometric analysis, using high-resolution (HR) liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in conjunction with online hydrogen (H)/deuterium (D) exchange for rapid structural characterization. The LC separation was improved allowing the separation of ARM parent drugs and their metabolites from their diastereomers. A total of 77 phase I metabolites of ARM were identified in rat liver microsomal incubates and rat urine, including dihydroartemisinin and artemisinin. In rat bile, 12 phase II metabolites were found. Accurate mass data were obtained in both full scan and HR-MS/MS mode to support assignments of metabolite structures. Online H/D exchange LC/HR-ESI-MS experiments provided additional evidence in differentiating dihydroxylated deoxy-ARM from mono-hydroxylated ARM. The results showed the main phase I metabolites of artemether are hydroxylated, dehydro, demethylated and deoxy products, and they will undergo subsequent phase II glucuronidation processes. Most metabolites were reported for the first time. This study also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-resolution mass spectrometry in combination with an online H/D exchange LC/HR-MS(n) technique in rapid identification of drug metabolites. PMID:22006394

  18. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  19. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  20. Vancouver's needle exchange program.

    PubMed

    Bardsley, J; Turvey, J; Blatherwick, J

    1990-01-01

    To stem the spread of HIV among intravenous drug users, and between them and their sexual partners and offspring, Vancouver initiated a multifaceted "ways and means" needle exchange program in March of 1989. As of the end of October, over 2,600 users have registered. The needle exchange rate has increased steadily, reaching a peak of 98% in November. Increases have also been noted in the number of regular users, and requests for referral to addition, medical, social and HIV-related services. Outreach services, especially using a van, have expanded program availability. Success in terms of clientele response is accredited primarily to the nonjudgemental, nonintrusive approach. The main problems have been the lack of addiction treatment services, financial and personnel constraints created by the large enrollment, and difficulties with Federal/Provincial funding. Funding for evaluation has been requested.

  1. Serial replica exchange.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Morten; Kim, Byungchan; Liu, Pu; Friesner, Richard A; Berne, B J

    2007-02-15

    Parallel tempering (or the replica exchange method (REM)) is a powerful method for speeding up the sampling of conformational states of systems with rough energy landscapes, like proteins, where stable conformational states can be separated by large energy barriers. The usual implementation of the REM is performed on local computer clusters (or parallel processors) where the different replicas must be run synchronously. Here, we present serial replica exchange (SREM), a method that is equivalent to the standard REM in terms of efficiency yet runs asynchronously on a distributed network of computers. A second advantage is the method's greatly enhanced fault tolerance, which enables the study of biological systems on worldwide distributed computing environments, such as Folding@Home. For proof of concept, we apply the SREM to a single alanine dipeptide molecule in explicit water. We show that the SREM reproduces the thermodynamic and structural properties determined by the REM.

  2. Serial Replica Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Morten; Kim, Byungchan; Liu, Pu; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    Parallel tempering (or the replica exchange method (REM)) is a powerful method for speeding up the sampling of conformational states of systems with rough energy landscapes, like proteins, where stable conformational states can be separated by large energy barriers. The usual implementation of the REM is performed on local computer clusters (or parallel processors) where the different replicas must be run synchronously. Here, we present serial replica exchange (SREM), a method that is equivalent to the standard REM in terms of efficiency yet runs asynchronously on a distributed network of computers. A second advantage is the method’s greatly enhanced fault tolerance, which enables the study of biological systems on worldwide distributed computing environments, such as Folding@Home.1 For proof of concept, we apply the SREM to a single alanine dipeptide molecule in explicit water. We show that the SREM reproduces the thermodynamic and structural properties determined by the REM. PMID:17249714

  3. Thermoelectric heat exchange element

    DOEpatents

    Callas, James J.; Taher, Mahmoud A.

    2007-08-14

    A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

  4. Heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2003-08-12

    A heat exchange apparatus comprising a coolant conduit or heat sink having attached to its surface a first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles and a second radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles thermally coupled to a body to be cooled and meshed with, but not contacting the first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles.

  5. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  6. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  7. International Exchange as a Transformative Learning Experience: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Sheena; Slaubaugh, Michael; Kim, Ae-Sook

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the role of international exchange programs on the transformative learning of English-speaking students. A student exchange program at a South Korean university is used for this case study. It explores how learning experiences are translated by participants onto their perceptions about the host country. An analysis of a pre-…

  8. 78 FR 21019 - Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions (Regulation NN)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Exchange Transactions and Intermediaries, 75 FR 55409 (Sept. 10, 2010) (Final CFTC Retail Forex Rule). The... Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions and Intermediaries, 75 FR 3281 (Jan. 20, 2010) (Proposed CFTC Retail Forex Rule). \\12\\ 76 FR 46652 (August 3, 2011). II. Section-by-Section Analysis Section...

  9. Pine needle holders for use in gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Edwards, N T

    1989-12-01

    Simple holders for positioning pine needles in a gas exchange cuvette are described. The holders make it easy to enclose a standard length of needles in the cuvette in a single plane without mutual shading. The holders also make it possible, following gas exchange measurements, to harvest for further analysis just those needle portions that were enclosed in the leaf chamber. Field observations, which were made with a gas exchange cuvette incorporating the needle holders, on the relationship between carbon exchange rate and photon flux density in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) needles are reported.

  10. The exchangeability of shape

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Landmark based geometric morphometrics (GM) allows the quantitative comparison of organismal shapes. When applied to systematics, it is able to score shape changes which often are undetectable by traditional morphological studies and even by classical morphometric approaches. It has thus become a fast and low cost candidate to identify cryptic species. Due to inherent mathematical properties, shape variables derived from one set of coordinates cannot be compared with shape variables derived from another set. Raw coordinates which produce these shape variables could be used for data exchange, however they contain measurement error. The latter may represent a significant obstacle when the objective is to distinguish very similar species. Results We show here that a single user derived dataset produces much less classification error than a multiple one. The question then becomes how to circumvent the lack of exchangeability of shape variables while preserving a single user dataset. A solution to this question could lead to the creation of a relatively fast and inexpensive systematic tool adapted for the recognition of cryptic species. Conclusions To preserve both exchangeability of shape and a single user derived dataset, our suggestion is to create a free access bank of reference images from which one can produce raw coordinates and use them for comparison with external specimens. Thus, we propose an alternative geometric descriptive system that separates 2-D data gathering and analyzes. PMID:20964872

  11. Extratropical Stratosphere-Troposphere Mass Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the exchange of gases between the stratosphere and the troposphere is important for determining how pollutants enter the stratosphere and how they leave. This study does a global analysis of that the exchange of mass between the stratosphere and the troposphere. While the exchange of mass is not the same as the exchange of constituents, you can t get the constituent exchange right if you have the mass exchange wrong. Thus this kind of calculation is an important test for models which also compute trace gas transport. In this study I computed the mass exchange for two assimilated data sets and a GCM. The models all agree that amount of mass descending from the stratosphere to the troposphere in the Northern Hemisphere extra tropics is approx. 10(exp 10) kg/s averaged over a year. The value for the Southern Hemisphere by about a factor of two. ( 10(exp 10) kg of air is the amount of air in 100 km x 100 km area with a depth of 100 m - roughly the size of the D.C. metro area to a depth of 300 feet.) Most people have the idea that most of the mass enters the stratosphere through the tropics. But this study shows that almost 5 times more mass enters the stratosphere through the extra-tropics. This mass, however, is quickly recycled out again. Thus the lower most stratosphere is a mixture of upper stratospheric air and tropospheric air. This is an important result for understanding the chemistry of the lower stratosphere.

  12. Social Skills as Exchange Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sletta, Olav

    1992-01-01

    A conceptualization of social skills as resources in social exchange is offered, and a social exchange theoretical framework is applied to educational research. In a social exchange framework, the contribution of the peer group to the social exclusion of an individual would not be ignored. (SLD)

  13. Impact of watershed topography on hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Alice; Ridolfi, Luca; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-08-01

    Among the interactions between surface water bodies and aquifers, hyporheic exchange has been recognized as a key process for nutrient cycling and contaminant transport. Even though hyporheic exchange is strongly controlled by groundwater discharge, our understanding of the impact of the regional groundwater flow on hyporheic fluxes is still limited because of the complexity arising from the multi-scale nature of these interactions. In this work, we investigate the role of watershed topography on river-aquifer interactions by way of a semi-analytical model, in which the landscape topography is used to approximate the groundwater head distribution. The analysis of a case study shows how the complex topographic structure is the direct cause of a substantial spatial variability of the aquifer-river exchange. Groundwater upwelling along the river corridor is estimated and its influence on the hyporheic zone is discussed. In particular, the fragmentation of the hyporeic corridor induced by groundwater discharge at the basin scale is highlighted.

  14. Analytical Aspects of Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry (HX MS). We describe the nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange, then review the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in HX MS depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that can be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics.

  15. Brayton-cycle heat exchanger technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killackey, J. J.; Coombs, M. G.; Graves, R. F.; Morse, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The following five tasks designed to advance this development of heat exchanger systems for close loop Brayton cycle power systems are presented: (1) heat transfer and pressure drop data for a finned tubular heat transfer matrix. The tubes are arranged in a triangular array with copper stainless steel laminate strips helically wound on the tubes to form a disk fin geometry; (2) the development of a modularized waste heat exchanger. Means to provide verified double containment are described; (3) the design, fabrication, and test of compact plate fin heat exchangers representative of full scale Brayton cycle recuperators; (4) the analysis and design of bellows suitable for operation at 1600 F and 200 psia for 1,000 cycles and 50,000 hours creep life; and (5) screening tests used to select a low cost braze alloy with the desirable attributes of a gold base alloy. A total of 22 different alloys were investigated; the final selection was Nicrobraz 30.

  16. Scientific data exchange: a schema for HDF5-based storage of raw and analyzed data.

    PubMed

    De Carlo, Francesco; Gürsoy, Doga; Marone, Federica; Rivers, Mark; Parkinson, Dilworth Y; Khan, Faisal; Schwarz, Nicholas; Vine, David J; Vogt, Stefan; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Narayanan, Suresh; Newville, Matt; Lanzirotti, Tony; Sun, Yue; Hong, Young Pyo; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-11-01

    Data Exchange is a simple data model designed to interface, or `exchange', data among different instruments, and to enable sharing of data analysis tools. Data Exchange focuses on technique rather than instrument descriptions, and on provenance tracking of analysis steps and results. In this paper the successful application of the Data Exchange model to a variety of X-ray techniques, including tomography, fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence tomography and photon correlation spectroscopy, is described. PMID:25343788

  17. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  18. Heat exchanger restart evaluation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summary herein.

  19. Structural analysis of the Sil1-Bip complex reveals the mechanism for Sil1 to function as a nucleotide-exchange factor

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Ming; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2013-01-16

    Sil1 functions as a NEF (nucleotide-exchange factor) for the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) Hsp70 (heat-shock protein of 70 kDa) Bip in eukaryotic cells. Sil1 may catalyse the ADP release from Bip by interacting directly with the ATPase domain of Bip. In the present study we show the complex crystal structure of the yeast Bip and the NEF Sil1 at the resolution of 2.3 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm). In the Sil1-Bip complex structure, the Sil1 molecule acts as a 'clamp' which binds lobe IIb of the Bip ATPase domain. The binding of Sil1 causes the rotation of lobe IIb {approx} 13.5{sup o} away from the ADP-binding pocket. The complex formation also induces lobe Ib to swing in the opposite direction by {approx} 3.7{sup o}. These conformational changes open up the nucleotide-binding pocket in the Bip ATPase domain and disrupt the hydrogen bonds between Bip and bound ADP, which may catalyse ADP release. Mutation of the Sil1 residues involved in binding the Bip ATPase domain compromise the binding affinity of Sil1 to Bip, and these Sil1 mutants also abolish the ability to stimulate the ATPase activity of Bip.

  20. Glycosylation of alpha1-acid glycoprotein in inflammatory disease: analysis by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography and concanavalin A crossed affinity immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Rydén, I; Skude, G; Lundblad, A; Påhlsson, P

    1997-06-01

    High-pH anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection is a highly sensitive technique that can be used for detecting changes in sialylation and fucosylation, as well as different branching patterns of N-linked oligosaccharides in glycoproteins. We examined the N-glycans of alpha1-acid glycoprotein obtained from twelve patients with various inflammatory conditions with this technique, as well as traditional concanavalin A crossed affinity immunoelectrophoresis. We found the chromatographic profiles of N-glycans in all patients with rheumatoid arthritis to be very similar, but significantly different from normal controls. N-glycans from patients with ulcerative colitis also showed specific alterations in their chromatographic profiles. However, some heterogeneity was found between these patients, perhaps reflecting changes in glycosylation secondary to certain states of the disease, or to medical treatment. We conclude that this technique is useful for detailed mapping of glycosylation changes in alpha1-acid glycoprotein in clinical samples, and that it may be used to further increase our knowledge about glycosylation changes in response to inflammatory disease.

  1. Simulation and performance analysis of an ammonia-water absorption heat pump based on the generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.; DeVault, R.C.; Creswick, F.A.

    1995-02-01

    A computer simulation has been conducted to investigate the performance of an absorption heat pump, based on the Generator-Absorber Heat Exchange (GAX) cycle employing ammonia-water as the working fluid pair. The particular feature of this cycle is the ability to recover heat from the absorber and employ it to partially heat the generator, thus improving the COP. In the present study, a detailed simulation has been conducted of one of the preferred configurations for the cycle. A modular computer code for flexible simulation of absorption systems (ABSIM) was employed. Performance parameters, including COP and capacity, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters over a wide range of conditions in both the cooling and heating mode. The effect of the ambient temperature, the rectifier performance, the flowrate in the GAX heat transfer loop and the refrigerant flow control were investigated. COP`s on the order of 1.0 for cooling and 2.0 for heating have been calculated.

  2. Analysis of biomass sugars and galacturonic acid by gradient anion exchange chromatography and pulsed amperometric detection without post-column addition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the most accurate method for analysis of sugars in biomass is based on gas chromatography of trimethylsilane or alditol acetate derivatives of sugars, the derivation method is time consuming and laborious. In comparison, sample preparation for sugar analysis of hydrolyzed biomass samples using...

  3. The Dynamics of Multilateral Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    The article formulates a dynamic mathematical model where arbitrarily many players produce, consume, exchange, loan, and deposit arbitrarily many goods over time to maximize utility. Consuming goods constitutes a benefit, and producing, exporting, and loaning away goods constitute a cost. Utilities are benefits minus costs, which depend on the exchange ratios and bargaining functions. Three-way exchange occurs when one player acquires, through exchange, one good from another player with the sole purpose of using this good to exchange against the desired good from a third player. Such a triple handshake is not merely a set of double handshakes since the player assigns no interest to the first good in his benefit function. Cognitive and organization costs increase dramatically for higher order exchanges. An exchange theory accounting for media of exchange follows from simple generalization of two-way exchange. The examples of r-way exchange are the triangle trade between Africa, the USA, and England in the 17th and 18th centuries, the hypothetical hypercycle involving RNAs as players and enzymes as goods, and reaction-diffusion processes. The emergence of exchange, and the role of trading agents are discussed. We simulate an example where two-way exchange gives zero production and zero utility, while three-way exchange causes considerable production and positive utility. Maximum utility for each player is reached when exchanges of the same order as the number of players in society are allowed. The article merges micro theory and macro theory within the social, natural, and physical sciences.

  4. In utero analysis of sister chromatid exchange: alterations in suscptibility to mutagenic damage as a function of fetal cell type and gestational age.

    PubMed Central

    Kram, D; Bynum, G D; Senula, G C; Bickings, C K; Schneider, E L

    1980-01-01

    Frequencies of baseline and cyclophosphamide-induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were measured in mouse maternal and fetal cells between days 11 and 19 of gestation. Baseline levels of SCE did not vary as a function of gestational age in either the mother or fetus. Cyclophosphamide-induced SCE frequencies remained constant in maternal cells but declined dramatically in the fetus throughout the latter half of development. Because cyclophosphamide is a metabolically activated mutagen, a direct-acting drug, mitomycin C, was given on days 11 and 15 to determine if the decline in induced SCE levels seen with gestational results from alterations in activating enzymes. A similar decline in mitomycin C-induced SCE levels was noted in fetal tissues as a function of gestational age. Dose-response curves to cyclophosphamide performed on day 13 of gestation showed increases in SCE as a function of cyclophosphamide concentration in both the mother and the fetus. When mutagen-induced SCE levels were compared in different fetal organs, the direct-acting drugs (mitomycin C and daunomycin) were found to induce similar levels in all tissues. Cyclophosphamide, which is metabolically activated, induced higher SCE levels in fetal liver than in lung or gut. Whereas cyclophosphamide induced similar SCE levels in fetal and maternal cells on day 13 of gestation, daunomycin produced fetal SCE levels that were approximately 50% of maternal levels. Simultaneous measurement of the distribution of [14C]cyclophosphamide and [3H]daunomycin in maternal and fetal cells revealed that the lower SCE induction by daunomycin was probably due to decreased ability to cross the placental barrier. PMID:6933526

  5. Gas-exchange analysis of chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase antisense potatoes at different air humidities and at elevated CO(2).

    PubMed

    Muschak, M; Willmitzer, L; Fisahn, J

    1999-07-01

    Gas-exchange measurements were performed to analyze the leaf conductances and assimilation rates of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Desireé) plants expressing an antisense construct against chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase, EC 3.1.3.11) in response to increasing photon flux densities, different relative air humidities and elevated CO(2) concentrations. Assimilation rates (A) and transpiration rates (E) were observed during a stepwise increase of photon flux density. These experiments were carried out under atmospheric conditions and in air containing 500 micromol mol(-1) CO(2). In both gas atmospheres, two levels of relative air humidity (60-70% and 70-80%) were applied in different sets of measurements. Intercellular CO(2) concentration, leaf conductance, air-to-leaf vapour pressure deficit, and instantaneous water-use efficiency (A/E) were determined. As expected, assimilation rates of the FBPase antisense plants were significantly reduced as compared to the wild type. Saturation of assimilation rates in transgenic plants occurred at a photon flux density of 200 micromol m(-2) s(-1), whereas saturation in wild type plants was observed at 600 micromol m(-2) s(-1). Elevated ambient CO(2) levels did not effect assimilation rates of transgenic plants. At 70-80% relative humidity and atmospheric CO(2) concentration the FBPase antisense plants had significantly higher leaf conductances than wild-type plants while no difference emerged at 60-70%. These differences in leaf conductance vanished at elevated levels of ambient CO(2). Stomatal response to different relative air humidities was not affected by mesophyll photosynthetic activity. It is suggested that the regulation of stomatal opening upon changes in photon flux density is merely mediated by a signal transmitted from mesophyll cells, whereas the intercellular CO(2) concentration plays a minor role in this kind of stomatal response. The results are discussed with respect to stomatal control by

  6. Mutational Analysis of Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteriophytochrome Reveals Key Amino Acids Necessary for the Photochromicity and Proton Exchange Cycle of Phytochromes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Zhang, Junrui; von Stetten, David; Günther, Mina; Murgida, Daniel H.; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Walker, Joseph M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Hildebrandt, Peter; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of phytochromes (Phy) to act as photointerconvertible light switches in plants and microorganisms depends on key interactions between the bilin chromophore and the apoprotein that promote bilin attachment and photointerconversion between the spectrally distinct red light-absorbing Pr conformer and far red light-absorbing Pfr conformer. Using structurally guided site-directed mutagenesis combined with several spectroscopic methods, we examined the roles of conserved amino acids within the bilin-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome with respect to chromophore ligation and Pr/Pfr photoconversion. Incorporation of biliverdin IXα (BV), its structure in the Pr state, and its ability to photoisomerize to the first photocycle intermediate are insensitive to most single mutations, implying that these properties are robust with respect to small structural/electrostatic alterations in the binding pocket. In contrast, photoconversion to Pfr is highly sensitive to the chromophore environment. Many of the variants form spectrally bleached Meta-type intermediates in red light that do not relax to Pfr. Particularly important are Asp-207 and His-260, which are invariant within the Phy superfamily and participate in a unique hydrogen bond matrix involving the A, B, and C pyrrole ring nitrogens of BV and their associated pyrrole water. Resonance Raman spectroscopy demonstrates that substitutions of these residues disrupt the Pr to Pfr protonation cycle of BV with the chromophore locked in a deprotonated Meta-Rc-like photoconversion intermediate after red light irradiation. Collectively, the data show that a number of contacts contribute to the unique photochromicity of Phy-type photoreceptors. These include residues that fix the bilin in the pocket, coordinate the pyrrole water, and possibly promote the proton exchange cycle during photoconversion. PMID:18192276

  7. Protein hydrogen exchange: Testing current models

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John J; Lim, Woon K; Bédard, Sabrina; Black, Ben E; Englander, S Walter

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the determinants of protein hydrogen exchange (HX), HX rates of most of the backbone amide hydrogens of Staphylococcal nuclease were measured by NMR methods. A modified analysis was used to improve accuracy for the faster hydrogens. HX rates of both near surface and well buried hydrogens are spread over more than 7 orders of magnitude. These results were compared with previous hypotheses for HX rate determination. Contrary to a common assumption, proximity to the surface of the native protein does not usually produce fast exchange. The slow HX rates for unprotected surface hydrogens are not well explained by local electrostatic field. The ability of buried hydrogens to exchange is not explained by a solvent penetration mechanism. The exchange rates of structurally protected hydrogens are not well predicted by algorithms that depend only on local interactions or only on transient unfolding reactions. These observations identify some of the present difficulties of HX rate prediction and suggest the need for returning to a detailed hydrogen by hydrogen analysis to examine the bases of structure-rate relationships, as described in the companion paper (Skinner et al., Protein Sci 2012;21:996–1005). PMID:22544567

  8. High flux heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Edward M.; Mackowski, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    This interim report documents the results of the first two phases of a four-phase program to develop a high flux heat exchanger for cooling future high performance aircraft electronics. Phase 1 defines future needs for high flux heat removal in advanced military electronics systems. The results are sorted by broad application categories: (1) commercial digital systems, (2) military data processors, (3) power processors, and (4) radar and optical systems. For applications expected to be fielded in five to ten years, the outlook is for steady state flux levels of 30-50 W/sq cm for digital processors and several hundred W/sq cm for power control applications. In Phase 1, a trade study was conducted on emerging cooling technologies which could remove a steady state chip heat flux of 100 W/sq cm while holding chip junction temperature to 90 C. Constraints imposed on heat exchanger design, in order to reflect operation in a fighter aircraft environment, included a practical lower limit on coolant supply temperature, the preference for a nontoxic, nonflammable, and nonfreezing coolant, the need to minimize weight and volume, and operation in an accelerating environment. The trade study recommended the Compact High Intensity Cooler (CHIC) for design, fabrication, and test in the final two phases of this program.

  9. Atlantic Telehealth Knowledge Exchange.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Patricia; Hagerman, Valerie; Ingram, Chris-Anne; MacFarlane, Ron; McCourt, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    Atlantic Canada has some of the earliest, most comprehensive, well-established networks, and innovative applications for telehealth in the country. The region offers a range of models for telehealth, in terms of management structure, coordination, funding, equipment, utilization, and telehealth applications. Collectively, this diversity, experience, and wealth of knowledge can significantly contribute to the development of a knowledge base for excellence in telehealth services. There is no formal process in place for the sharing of information amongst the provinces. Information sharing primarily occurs informally through professional contacts and participation in telehealth organizations. A core group of organizations partnered to develop a process for knowledge exchange to occur. This type of collaborative approach is favored in Atlantic Canada, given the region's economy and available resources. The Atlantic Telehealth Knowledge Exchange (ATKE) project centred on the development of a collaborative structure, information sharing and dissemination, development of a knowledge repository and sustainability. The project is viewed as a first step in assisting telehealth stakeholders with sharing knowledge about telehealth in Atlantic Canada. Significant progress has been made throughout the project in increasing the profile of telehealth in Atlantic Canada. The research process has captured and synthesized baseline information on telehealth, and fostered collaboration amongst telehealth providers who might otherwise have never come together. It has also brought critical awareness to the discussion tables of governments and key committees regarding the value of telehealth in sustaining our health system, and has motivated decision makers to take action to integrate telehealth into e-health discussions.

  10. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  11. Statistical Analysis of Lake Levels and Field Study of Groundwater and Surface-Water Exchanges in the Northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015: Chapter A of Water Levels and Groundwater and Surface-Water Exchanges in Lakes of the Northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; White, Eric A.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Morel, Daniel L.; Heck, Jessica M.

    2016-10-19

    Water levels declined from 2003 to 2011 in many lakes in Ramsey and Washington Counties in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota; however, water levels in other northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes increased during the same period. Groundwater and surface-water exchanges can be important in determining lake levels where these exchanges are an important component of the water budget of a lake. An understanding of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area has been limited by the lack of hydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council and Minnesota Department of Health, completed a field and statistical study assessing lake-water levels and regional and local groundwater and surface-water exchanges near northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. This report documents the analysis of collected hydrologic, water-quality, and geophysical data; and existing hydrologic and geologic data to (1) assess the effect of physical setting and climate on lake-level fluctuations of selected lakes, (2) estimate potential percentages of surface-water contributions to well water across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, (3) estimate general ages for waters extracted from the wells, and (4) assess groundwater inflow to lakes and lake-water outflow to aquifers downgradient from White Bear Lake. Statistical analyses of lake levels during short-term (2002–10) and long-term (1925–2014) periods were completed to help understand lake-level changes across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Comparison of 2002–10 lake levels to several landscape and geologic characteristics explained variability in lake-level changes for 96 northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. Application of several statistical methods determined that (1) closed-basin lakes (without an active outlet) had larger lake-level declines than flow-through lakes with an outlet; (2

  12. Statistical analysis of lake levels and field study of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015: Chapter A of Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; White, Eric A.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Morel, Daniel L.; Heck, Jessica M.

    2016-10-19

    Water levels declined from 2003 to 2011 in many lakes in Ramsey and Washington Counties in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota; however, water levels in other northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes increased during the same period. Groundwater and surface-water exchanges can be important in determining lake levels where these exchanges are an important component of the water budget of a lake. An understanding of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area has been limited by the lack of hydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council and Minnesota Department of Health, completed a field and statistical study assessing lake-water levels and regional and local groundwater and surface-water exchanges near northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. This report documents the analysis of collected hydrologic, water-quality, and geophysical data; and existing hydrologic and geologic data to (1) assess the effect of physical setting and climate on lake-level fluctuations of selected lakes, (2) estimate potential percentages of surface-water contributions to well water across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, (3) estimate general ages for waters extracted from the wells, and (4) assess groundwater inflow to lakes and lake-water outflow to aquifers downgradient from White Bear Lake. Statistical analyses of lake levels during short-term (2002–10) and long-term (1925–2014) periods were completed to help understand lake-level changes across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Comparison of 2002–10 lake levels to several landscape and geologic characteristics explained variability in lake-level changes for 96 northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. Application of several statistical methods determined that (1) closed-basin lakes (without an active outlet) had larger lake-level declines than flow-through lakes with an outlet; (2

  13. The use of strong anion-exchange (SAX) magnetic particles for the extraction of therapeutic siRNA and their analysis by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Guofeng; Beverly, Michael

    2011-11-15

    Traditional methods for extracting oligonucleotides from serum and other biological fluids are often time-consuming and require multiple steps. Magnetic particle based separation of oligonucleotides has gained importance recently due to the advantages of simplicity and high efficiency. Here we report the development and optimization of commercially available strong anion-exchange (SAX) magnetic beads for the extraction of siRNA from human serum. The beads allowed for rapid extraction of siRNA from human serum in 100-200 μL of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)-compatible buffer in less than 1 h for a 96-well plate with no further drying steps. Due to the strong cation-binding properties of oligonucleotides, volatile ammonium salts such as triethylammonium bicarbonate (TEAB), ammonium bicarbonate, and NH(4) Cl were used to elute the siRNA from the beads. For more hydrophobic siRNA sequences, the addition of 5-10% organic solvent was required for elution. The recovery of chemically modified siRNA from human serum was around 80% for two types of beads examined; however, the recovery for highly modified sequences differed greatly between the two types of beads. In addition to extracting highly modified oligonucleotides, the SAX beads were also able to extract liposomal formulated siRNAs from serum with no interference from the lipid formulation. The extraction of siRNA from human serum was linear over the tested range of 50 ng/mL to 10 µg/mL. Using this extraction methodology, we have created a workflow to monitor siRNA serum stability by LC/MS. Initial observations confirm that RNase A type degradation with strand cleavage on the 3' side of uridine or cytosine is the dominant cleavage pattern in serum. This finding has implications for the selection and modification of therapeutic siRNAs and demonstrates the utility of magnetic beads as a simple and rapid extraction technique for siRNA.

  14. International Cell Exchange: 1992.

    PubMed

    Lau, M; Terasaki, P I; Park, M S

    1992-01-01

    1. This is a review of 1992 typing of 40 cells for Class I antigens and 18 cultured cell lines for Class II antigens through the International Cell Exchange. Serological typings were compared with DNA typing reports for Class II specificities. Presently, 290 laboratories participate in the monthly Class I exchange. Class II results were received monthly from 166 serology laboratories and from 36 DNA laboratories. 2. In 1992, 11 of the 16 A-locus antigens attained 95% or greater average detection. Nine of the 27 B-locus antigens showed 95% or better mean agreement levels. Antigens such as B46 and B70 continued to show improvement in detection in a 5-year period. 3. We compared discrepancy rates of 7 A-locus and 8 B-locus antigens typed 3 times or more. The rates for the B-locus specificities, especially for percentages of false negatives (ie, how often the antigen assignment was missed), continued to be greater than those for the A-locus antigens. Nevertheless, the discrepancy rates of B35 and B70 decreased dramatically during the last 5 years. 4. We showed the number of laboratories with the total of false negatives and false positives. Nine laboratories achieved perfect records (0 false negatives and false positives) for all analyzed antigens in 1992. 5. Results of retyping of 3 donors over several years were shown to indicate improved antigen detection. 6. Recently recognized HLA-specificities, such as A2403 and B5102, were shown as cell variants studied in previous cell exchanges. Variants of B15, B16, and B40 families were presented, as well as several new A-locus antigens. 7. The low and high rates, in addition to the average detection levels, were indicated for a total of 27 (18 DR and 9 DQ) Class II specificities by serology and by DNA typings. Eight of the 15 DR/DRB1 specificities attained 90% or better average agreement by both serology and DNA. Three of the 9 DQ antigens achieved 90% or better average detection by both methods. 8. Confirmation by DNA

  15. Cross-Shelf Exchange.

    PubMed

    Brink, K H

    2016-01-01

    Cross-shelf exchange dominates the pathways and rates by which nutrients, biota, and materials on the continental shelf are delivered and removed. This follows because cross-shelf gradients of most properties are usually far greater than those in the alongshore direction. The resulting transports are limited by Earth's rotation, which inhibits flow from crossing isobaths. Thus, cross-shelf flows are generally weak compared with alongshore flows, and this leads to interesting observational issues. Cross-shelf flows are enabled by turbulent mixing processes, nonlinear processes (such as momentum advection), and time dependence. Thus, there is a wide range of possible effects that can allow these critical transports, and different natural settings are often governed by different combinations of processes. This review discusses examples of representative transport mechanisms and explores possible observational and theoretical paths to future progress.

  16. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  17. Hybrid Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jianping Gene; Shih, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid light-weight heat exchanger concept has been developed that uses high-conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) composites as the heat-transfer fins and uses conventional high-temperature metals, such as Inconel, nickel, and titanium as the parting sheets to meet leakage and structural requirements. In order to maximize thermal conductivity, the majority of carbon fiber is aligned in the fin direction resulting in 300 W/m.K or higher conductivity in the fin directions. As a result of this fiber orientation, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the C-C composite in both non-fiber directions matches well with the CTE of various high-temperature metal alloys. This allows the joining of fins and parting sheets by using high-temperature braze alloys.

  18. International Cell Exchange, 1994.

    PubMed

    Lau, M; Terasaki, P I; Park, M S

    1994-01-01

    1. We summarize typings of 40 cells for Class I antigens and 20 cultured cell lines for Class II antigens through the International Cell Exchange in 1994. Serologic Class II typings were compared with DNA typings for the same 20 cells. Two hundred eighty-one laboratories participated in the monthly Class I Serum Exchange. One hundred nineteen serology laboratories and 74 DNA laboratories reported Class II specificities on a monthly basis. 2. The average detection levels, as well as the high detection levels, were determined for 16 A-locus and 27 B-locus antigens. Mean detection rates of 95% or greater average detection were obtained for 12 A-locus and 10 B-locus antigens. Lower than 80% agreement was calculated for one A-locus antigen (A74) and 7 B-locus (B46, B48, B61, B67, B73, B75, B77) antigens. 3. We compared discrepancy rates of 10 A-locus and 7 B-locus antigens typed 3 times or more. The false-negative discrepancy rates, i.e. how often the antigen was missed, were greater for more of the B-locus specificities than for the A-locus antigens. B62, having the highest false-positive rate, tended to be overassigned. The discrepancy rates, especially the false-negative rate, for B70 were shown to decrease over a 7-year period. 4. In 1994, 8 laboratories attained records of total no misses for all analyzed antigens. Twelve laboratories had final records of only one discrepancy, and 5 laboratories had impressive perfect records (zero false negatives and false positives) for their yearly antigen reports. 5. Retyping of 12 Class I and 8 Class II reference cells showed improved detection of antigens. Results of a donor typed 4 times over 11 years demonstrated marked improvement, nearly doubling for A33, B38, and B75. Two cells first typed in 1991, then retyped in 1994, showed improved detection for Class II splits by serology and DNA typing. 6. We updated the list of sequenced Class I Exchange cells. Seven new cells were added as well as confirmatory sequence data for A

  19. Cross-Shelf Exchange.

    PubMed

    Brink, K H

    2016-01-01

    Cross-shelf exchange dominates the pathways and rates by which nutrients, biota, and materials on the continental shelf are delivered and removed. This follows because cross-shelf gradients of most properties are usually far greater than those in the alongshore direction. The resulting transports are limited by Earth's rotation, which inhibits flow from crossing isobaths. Thus, cross-shelf flows are generally weak compared with alongshore flows, and this leads to interesting observational issues. Cross-shelf flows are enabled by turbulent mixing processes, nonlinear processes (such as momentum advection), and time dependence. Thus, there is a wide range of possible effects that can allow these critical transports, and different natural settings are often governed by different combinations of processes. This review discusses examples of representative transport mechanisms and explores possible observational and theoretical paths to future progress. PMID:26747520

  20. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  1. 78 FR 47809 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Board Options Exchange, Incorporated; Notice of Filing of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... value of S&P 500 Index options. \\4\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 69638 (May 24, 2013), 78 FR... the volume, open interest, and trading patterns data that the Exchange proposes to include in the... program. The Exchange noted that the analysis would examine trading in the proposed option product as...

  2. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  3. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  4. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  5. Heat exchanger bypass test report

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, M.L.

    1995-01-26

    This test report documents the results that were obtained while conducting the test procedure which bypassed the heat exchangers in the HC-21C sludge stabilization process. The test was performed on November 15, 1994 using WHC-SD-CP-TC-031, ``Heat Exchanger Bypass Test Procedure.`` The primary objective of the test procedure was to determine if the heat exchangers were contributing to condensation of moisture in the off-gas line. This condensation was observed in the rotameters. Also, a secondary objective was to determine if temperatures at the rotameters would be too high and damage them or make them inaccurate without the heat exchangers in place.

  6. Correction of chlorophyll-defective male-sterile winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus) through organelle exchange: molecular analysis of the cytoplasm of parental lines and corrected progeny.

    PubMed

    Jarl, C I; van Grinsven, M Q; van den Mark, F

    1989-01-01

    Cytoplasmic differences between male-fertile and male-sterile Brassica napus as well as Raphanus sativus were investigated. Plastids of the male-fertile B. napus were found to differ from those of male-sterile B. napus and R. sativus with respect to DNA restriction enzyme patterns. Differences between male-fertile and male-sterile B. napus mitochondria were detected not only in the restriction fragment patterns of their DNA, but also at the level of expression by in organello translation of mitochondrial polypeptides.The chlorophyll deficiency obtained upon transferral of the male-sterility-conferring radish cytoplasm to a winter variety of B. napus had been corrected earlier through protoplast fusion. The cytoplasmic composition of the corrected lines was analysed using DNA restriction analysis and in organello translation. The stability of the recombined cytoplasm in the corrected lines was confirmed by analysis of the subsequent seed-derived generation. PMID:24232486

  7. Demonstration of the Application of Composite Load Spectra (CLS) and Probabilistic Structural Analysis (PSAM) Codes to SSME Heat Exchanger Turnaround Vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajagopal, Kadambi R.; DebChaudhury, Amitabha; Orient, George

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a probabilistic structural analysis performed to determine the probabilistic structural response under fluctuating random pressure loads for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turnaround vane. It uses a newly developed frequency and distance dependent correlation model that has features to model the decay phenomena along the flow and across the flow with the capability to introduce a phase delay. The analytical results are compared using two computer codes SAFER (Spectral Analysis of Finite Element Responses) and NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) and with experimentally observed strain gage data. The computer code NESSUS with an interface to a sub set of Composite Load Spectra (CLS) code is used for the probabilistic analysis. A Fatigue code was used to calculate fatigue damage due to the random pressure excitation. The random variables modeled include engine system primitive variables that influence the operating conditions, convection velocity coefficient, stress concentration factor, structural damping, and thickness of the inner and outer vanes. The need for an appropriate correlation model in addition to magnitude of the PSD is emphasized. The study demonstrates that correlation characteristics even under random pressure loads are capable of causing resonance like effects for some modes. The study identifies the important variables that contribute to structural alternate stress response and drive the fatigue damage for the new design. Since the alternate stress for the new redesign is less than the endurance limit for the material, the damage due high cycle fatigue is negligible.

  8. "TOF2H": A precision toolbox for rapid, high density/high coverage hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry via an LC-MALDI approach, covering the data pipeline from spectral acquisition to HDX rate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikamanon, Pornpat; Pun, Elroy; Chou, Wayne; Koter, Marek D; Gershon, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein-amide proton hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) is used to investigate protein conformation, conformational changes and surface binding sites for other molecules. To our knowledge, software tools to automate data processing and analysis from sample fractionating (LC-MALDI) mass-spectrometry-based HDX workflows are not publicly available. Results An integrated data pipeline (Solvent Explorer/TOF2H) has been developed for the processing of LC-MALDI-derived HDX data. Based on an experiment-wide template, and taking an ab initio approach to chromatographic and spectral peak finding, initial data processing is based on accurate mass-matching to fully deisotoped peaklists accommodating, in MS/MS-confirmed peptide library searches, ambiguous mass-hits to non-target proteins. Isotope-shift re-interrogation of library search results allows quick assessment of the extent of deuteration from peaklist data alone. During raw spectrum editing, each spectral segment is validated in real time, consistent with the manageable spectral numbers resulting from LC-MALDI experiments. A semi-automated spectral-segment editor includes a semi-automated or automated assessment of the quality of all spectral segments as they are pooled across an XIC peak for summing, centroid mass determination, building of rates plots on-the-fly, and automated back exchange correction. The resulting deuterium uptake rates plots from various experiments can be averaged, subtracted, re-scaled, error-barred, and/or scatter-plotted from individual spectral segment centroids, compared to solvent exposure and hydrogen bonding predictions and receive a color suggestion for 3D visualization. This software lends itself to a "divorced" HDX approach in which MS/MS-confirmed peptide libraries are built via nano or standard ESI without source modification, and HDX is performed via LC-MALDI using a standard MALDI-TOF. The complete TOF2H package includes additional (eg LC analysis) modules. Conclusion

  9. Characterization of various losses in a cryogenic counterflow heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminuddin, Mohammad; Zubair, Syed M.

    2014-11-01

    A detailed assessment of irreversibility, predominantly heat in-leak and axial wall conduction, is essential in accurately predicting the performance of high effectiveness heat exchangers employed in cryogenic applications. Integration into a refrigeration system as well requires consideration of parasitic heat loss by conduction from exchanger cold end to the adjacent components. Governing equations incorporating these effects in a counterflow exchanger are solved numerically and the model predictions evaluated for heat exchanger ineffectiveness and heat loss by conduction. The optimum performance mandates minimization of both. Although ineffectiveness decreases at higher longitudinal conduction, cold end loss increases with deterioration of the overall performance. Utilizing lower heat capacity rate hot fluid, nevertheless, reduces the cold end loss. Heat in-leak is relatively high with concurrent consideration of axial wall conduction and has adverse consequence on heat exchanger effectiveness. Analysis of the net heat transferred to lower stages of refrigeration reveals a critical NTU.

  10. Post-mortem analysis of a long-term tested proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under low cathode humidification conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-In; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Ki Buem; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Song, Inseob; Choi, Hanshin; Park, Jun-Young

    2014-05-01

    During continuous power operation for 2740 h, the major mechanisms and patterns of performance degradation in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack are investigated under low cathode humidification with simulated reformate fuel gases through the use of various physicochemical and electrochemical analysis tools. As operating time increases, the operating voltages and open-circuit voltages (OCVs) of the stack decrease with the large voltage distributions. In the post-mortem analysis of the stack, the delamination of the catalyst layer (CL) of unstable operating membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is significant near the cathode gas inlets. This observation is in agreement with the results of OCV, hydrogen crossover current, and anode off-gas measurements. This phenomenon may be due to the acceleration of carbon corrosion in the cathode during the frequent start-up and shut-down process, because the local cathode potential can reach more than 1.5 V in the air/fuel boundary. Additionally, the frequent membrane hydration and dehydration by the accumulation of excess water (through electrochemical reaction) and faster water evaporation (under dry-air cathode conditions and high operating temperatures) may accelerate the interface delamination between the membrane and cathode CL with a substantially uneven distribution of water.

  11. Structural, Thermal, and Safety Analysis of Isotope Heat Source and Integrated Heat Exchangers for 6-kWe Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-01-01

    The design of the 30-kWt isotope heat source integrated with a Rankine boiler and a Brayton gas heater, which was described in the preceding paper in these proceedings, was subjected to structural, thermal, and safety analyses. The present paper describes and discusses the results of these analyses. Detailed structural analyses of the heat source integrated with the boiler and gas heater showed positive safety margins at all locations during the launch. Detailed thermal analyses showed acceptable temperatures at all locations, during assembly, transfer and orbital operations. Reentry thermal analyses showed that the clads have acceptable peak and impact temperatures. Loss-of-cooling analyses indicated the feasibility of a passive safety concept for preventing over temperatures. Static structural analysis showed positive safety margins at all locations, and dynamic analysis showed that there were no low-frequency resources. Continuum-mechanics code analyses of the effects of the impact of Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) fragments on the heat source and of the very unlikely impact of the full heat source on concrete indicated relatively modest fuel clad deformations and little or no fuel release.

  12. Technology Performance Exchange (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    This fact sheet, 'The Technology Performance Exchange' will be presented at the ET Summit, held at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 15-17, 2012. The Technology Performance Exchange will be a centralized, Web-based portal for finding and sharing energy performance data for commercial building technologies.

  13. The Transatlantic Orientation Exchange Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gisevius, Annette; Weber, Robin A.

    2009-01-01

    The Transatlantic Orientation Exchange/Multiplikatorenschulung im transatlan-tischen Austausch is a collaboration between volunteers and staff in both the US and German AFS organizations. The goal of the project is to increase the level of intercultural learning of German and US secondary education exchange participants and their host families.…

  14. Liquid/liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1980-01-01

    Conceptual design for heat exchanger, utilizing two immiscible liquids with dissimilar specific gravities in direct contact, is more efficient mechanism of heat transfer than conventional heat exchangers with walls or membranes. Concept could be adapted for collection of heat from solar or geothermal sources.

  15. StarBright Learning Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This article features StarBright Learning Exchange, a program that provides a cross-cultural exchange between Australian and South African early childhood educators. The program was originated when its president, Carol Allen, and her colleague, Karen Williams, decided that they could no longer sit by and watch the unfolding social catastrophe that…

  16. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  17. EXCHANGE. Volume 9-92

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  18. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  19. Digoxin elimination by exchange transfusion.

    PubMed

    Rosegger, H; Zach, M; Gleispach, H; Beitzke, A

    1977-02-21

    The report covers four cases presenting simultaneous indications for digitalisation and exchange transfusions. Intravenous administration of digoxin was followed: 1. by monitoring of the behaviour of the plasma digoxin level; 2. by determination of the total amount of glycoside eliminated by the blood exchange. Particular attention was paid to the effect of the delay between injection and exchange transfusion on the amount of digoxin eliminated. All four cases showed moderate falls in plasma levels. The amounts of digoxin eliminated by exchange transfusion were in reverse relationship to the delay between administration of digoxin and the blood exchange. At no time did the eliminated fraction exceed 5% of the total amount present in the body. PMID:837948

  20. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Streptococcus canis Confirms the Zoonotic Origin of Human Infections and Reveals Genetic Exchange with Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, M. D.; Matos, S. C.; Pomba, C.; Lübke-Becker, A.; Wieler, L. H.; Preziuso, S.; Melo-Cristino, J.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus canis is an animal pathogen that occasionally causes human infections. Isolates recovered from infections of animals (n = 78, recovered from 2000 to 2010 in three European countries, mainly from house pets) and humans (n = 7, recovered from 2006 to 2010 in Portugal) were identified by phenotypic and genotypic methods and characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and emm typing. S. canis isolates presented considerable variability in biochemical profiles and 16S rRNA. Resistance to antimicrobial agents was low, with the most significant being tet(M)- and tet(O)-mediated tetracycline resistance. MLST analysis revealed a polyclonal structure of the S. canis population causing infections, where the same genetic lineages were found infecting house pets and humans and were disseminated in distinct geographic locations. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that S. canis was a divergent taxon of the sister species Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis and found evidence of acquisition of genetic material by S. canis from S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. PFGE confirmed the MLST findings, further strengthening the similarity between animal and human isolates. The presence of emm-like genes was restricted to a few isolates and correlated with some MLST-based genetic lineages, but none of the human isolates could be emm typed. Our data show that S. canis isolates recovered from house pets and humans constitute a single population and demonstrate that isolates belonging to the main genetic lineages identified have the ability to infect the human host, providing strong evidence for the zoonotic nature of S. canis infection. PMID:23345291