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Sample records for analysis e-food exchange

  1. Chemical exchange program analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Waffelaert, Pascale

    2007-09-01

    As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of

  2. Social Network Analysis of the Farabi Exchange Program: Student Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugurlu, Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: Exchange programs offer communication channels created through student and instructor exchanges; a flow of information takes place through these channels. The Farabi Exchange Program (FEP) is a student and instructor exchange program between institutions of higher education. Through the use of social network analysis and…

  3. Testing and analysis of immersed heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

    1986-08-01

    The objectives were to determine the performance of four immersed, ''supply-side'' heat exchangers used in solar domestic-hot-water systems; to examine the effects of flow rate, temperature difference, and coil configuration on performance; and to develop a simple model to predict the performance of immersed heat exchangers. We tested four immersed heat exchangers: a smooth coil, a finned spiral, a single-wall bayonet, and a double-wall bayonet. We developed two analyticl models and a simple finite difference model. We experimentally verified that the performance of these heat exchangers depends on the flow rate through them; we also showed that the temperature difference between the heat exchanger's inlet and the storage tank can strongly affect a heat exchanger's performance. We also compared the effects of the heat exchanger's configuration and correlated Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for each heat exchanger tested. The smooth coil had a higher effectiveness than the others, while the double-wall bayonet had a very low effectiveness. We still do not know the long-term effectiveness of heat exchangers regarding scale accumulation, nor do we know the effects of very low flow rates on a heat exchanger's performance.

  4. Analysis of proton exchange kinetics with time-dependent exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kierdaszuk, Borys; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2010-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is used to probe the kinetics of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in lysozyme in pH 5, 6 and 7.4. An analysis based on a Verhulst growth model is proposed and effectively applied to the kinetics of the hydrogen exchange. The data are described by a power-like function which is based on a time-dependence of the exchange rate. Experimental data ranging over many time scales is considered and accurate fits of a power-like function are obtained. Results of fittings show correlation between faster hydrogen-deuterium exchange and increase of pH. Furthermore a model is presented that discriminates between easily exchangeable hydrogens (located in close proximity to the protein surface) and those protected from the exchange (located in the protein interior). A possible interpretation of the model and its biological significance are discussed.

  5. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  6. Analysis of a Flooded Heat Exchanger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Aaron H.; Luyben, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Flooded heat exchangers are often used in industry to reduce the required heat-transfer area and the size of utility control valves. These units involve a condensing vapor on the hot side that accumulates as a liquid phase in the lower part of the vessel. The heat transfer occurs mostly in the vapor space, but the condensate becomes somewhat…

  7. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  8. Longwave radiative exchange analysis of cloudy atmospheres with a net exchange formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eymet, V.; Blanco, S.; Dufresne, J.-L.; Fournier, R.

    2003-04-01

    The Next Exchange Formulation (NEF) is an alternative to the usual radiative transfer equation. It was proposed in 1967 by Green for atmospheric sciences and by Hottel for engineering sciences. Until now, the NEF has been used only in a very few cases for atmospheric studies. Recently we have developed a longwave radiative code based on this formulation for a GCM of the Mars planet. Here, we will present results for the Earth atmosphere, obtained with a Monte Carlo Method based on the NEF. In this method, the fluxes are no more considered. The basic variables are the net exchange rates (NER) between each pair of atmospheric layer {i,j}, i.e. the radiative power emitted by i and absorbed by j minus the radiative power emitted by j and absorbed by i. The graphical representation of the NER matrix highlight the radiative exchanges which dominate the radiative budget of the atmosphere and allows one to have a very good insight of the radiative exchanges. Results will be shown for clear sky atmosphere, cloudy atmosphere and atmosphere with dust aerosols. The role of scattering in the longwave radiative exchanges will also be analyzed. The calculation of sensitivity parameter being automatically implemented in the Monte Carlo Method, a complementary sensitivity analysis will be presented that examines how radiative exchanges depend on concentrations profiles of main absorbing and scattering species.

  9. Physical explosion analysis in heat exchanger network design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, M.; Zaini, D.; Shariff, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The failure of shell and tube heat exchangers is being extensively experienced by the chemical process industries. This failure can create a loss of production for long time duration. Moreover, loss of containment through heat exchanger could potentially lead to a credible event such as fire, explosion and toxic release. There is a need to analyse the possible worst case effect originated from the loss of containment of the heat exchanger at the early design stage. Physical explosion analysis during the heat exchanger network design is presented in this work. Baker and Prugh explosion models are deployed for assessing the explosion effect. Microsoft Excel integrated with process design simulator through object linking and embedded (OLE) automation for this analysis. Aspen HYSYS V (8.0) used as a simulation platform in this work. A typical heat exchanger network of steam reforming and shift conversion process was presented as a case study. It is investigated from this analysis that overpressure generated from the physical explosion of each heat exchanger can be estimated in a more precise manner by using Prugh model. The present work could potentially assist the design engineer to identify the critical heat exchanger in the network at the preliminary design stage.

  10. Analytical and experimental analysis of tube coil heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smusz, R.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the analytical and experimental analysis of heat transfer for the finned tube coil heat exchanger immersed in thermal storage tank. The tank is equipped with three helical-shaped heating coils and cylindrical- shaped stratification device. Two coils, upper and lower, use the water as a heating medium. The third, double wall heat exchanger coil, located at the bottom head on the tank is filled by the refrigerant (freon). Calculations of thermal power of water coil were made. Correlations of heat transfer coefficients in curved tubes were applied. In order to verify the analytical calculations the experimental studies of heat transfer characteristic for coil heat exchanger were performed.

  11. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimum combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.

  12. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; ...

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimummore » combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.« less

  13. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate. PMID:26222702

  14. Statistical Analysis of the Exchange Rate of Bitcoin.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jeffrey; Nadarajah, Saralees; Chan, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bitcoin, the first electronic payment system, is becoming a popular currency. We provide a statistical analysis of the log-returns of the exchange rate of Bitcoin versus the United States Dollar. Fifteen of the most popular parametric distributions in finance are fitted to the log-returns. The generalized hyperbolic distribution is shown to give the best fit. Predictions are given for future values of the exchange rate.

  15. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoichi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Tani, Atsushi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2016-01-29

    Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of peroxynitric acid (O2NOOH) was performed by combining an acidic eluate with an UV-vis detector and immersing the separation column in an ice-water bath. The decomposition behavior of peroxynitric acid in the solution was also studied using this system. The fraction for the peroxynitric acid peak was collected. Ion-exchange chromatographic analysis of this fraction, after standing at room temperature for 24h, showed that the decomposition products were mainly nitrate ions with a very small amount of nitrous acid. The peroxynitric acid peak area correlated perfectly with the total amount of decomposition products. The ion-exchange chromatographic isolation allowed us to evaluate the molar extinction coefficient of peroxynitric acid precisely in a wider wavelength range than previous reports. The value decreases monotonically from 1729±26M(-1)cm(-1) at 200nm to 12.0±0.5M(-1)cm(-1) at 290nm.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis and optimization of air-cooled heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Bahrami, Zabihollah

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a thermodynamic second-law analysis was performed to investigate the effects of different geometry and flow parameters on the air-cooled heat exchanger performance. For this purpose, the entropy generation due to heat transfer and pressure loss of internal and external flows of the air-cooled heat exchanger was calculated; and it was observed that the total entropy generation has a minimum at special tube-side Reynolds number. Also, it was seen that the increasing of the tube-side Reynolds number resulted in the rise of the irreversibility of the air-cooled heat exchanger. The results also showed when air-side Reynolds number decreased, the entropy generation rate of the external flow reduced. Finally, based on the computed results, a new correlation was developed to predict the optimum Reynolds number of the tube-side fluid flow.

  17. Multivariate Comparative Analysis of Stock Exchanges: The European Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralun-Bereźnicka, Julia

    The aim of the research is to perform a multivariate comparative analysis of 20 European stock exchanges in order to identify the main similarities between the objects. Due to the convergence process of capital markets in Europe the similarities between stock exchanges could be expected to increase over time. The research is meant to show whether and how these similarities change. Consequently, the distances between clusters of similar stock exchanges should become less significant, which the analysis also aims at verifying. The basis of comparison is a set of 48 monthly variables from the period January, 2003 to December, 2006. The variables are classified into three categories: size of the market, equity trading and bonds. The paper aims at identifying the clusters of alike stock exchanges and at finding the characteristic features of each of the distinguished groups. The obtained categorization to some extent corresponds with the division of the European Union into “new” and “old” member countries. Clustering method, performed for each quarter separately, also reveals that the classification is fairly stable in time. The factor analysis, which was carried out to reduce the number of variables, reveals three major factors behind the data, which are related with the earlier mentioned categories of variables.

  18. Low heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.; Kmiec, T. D.; Peckham, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, a derivative of the RLIO, is capable of multi-mode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for log-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine at THI and PI thrust levels can be accomplished by providing gaseous oxygen at the propellant injector. Using gaseous hydrogen from the thrust chamber jacket as an energy source, a heat exchanger can be used to vaporize liquid oxygen without creating flow instability. This report summarizes the design and analysis of a United Aircraft Products (UAP) low-rate heat transfer heat exchanger concept for the RL10-IIB rocket engine. The design represents a second iteration of the RL10-IIB heat exchanger investigation program. The design and analysis of the first heat exchanger effort is presented in more detail in NASA CR-174857. Testing of the previous design is detailed in NASA CR-179487.

  19. Microscopic analysis of currency and stock exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kador, L.

    1999-08-01

    Recently it was shown that distributions of short-term price fluctuations in foreign-currency exchange exhibit striking similarities to those of velocity differences in turbulent flows. Similar profiles represent the spectral-diffusion behavior of impurity molecules in disordered solids at low temperatures. It is demonstrated that a microscopic statistical theory of the spectroscopic line shapes can be applied to the other two phenomena. The theory interprets the financial data in terms of information which becomes available to the traders and their reactions as a function of time. The analysis shows that there is no characteristic time scale in financial markets, but that instead stretched-exponential or algebraic memory functions yield good agreement with the price data. For an algebraic function, the theory yields truncated Lévy distributions which are often observed in stock exchange markets.

  20. Microscopic analysis of currency and stock exchange markets.

    PubMed

    Kador, L

    1999-08-01

    Recently it was shown that distributions of short-term price fluctuations in foreign-currency exchange exhibit striking similarities to those of velocity differences in turbulent flows. Similar profiles represent the spectral-diffusion behavior of impurity molecules in disordered solids at low temperatures. It is demonstrated that a microscopic statistical theory of the spectroscopic line shapes can be applied to the other two phenomena. The theory interprets the financial data in terms of information which becomes available to the traders and their reactions as a function of time. The analysis shows that there is no characteristic time scale in financial markets, but that instead stretched-exponential or algebraic memory functions yield good agreement with the price data. For an algebraic function, the theory yields truncated Lévy distributions which are often observed in stock exchange markets.

  1. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the following news headlines: ADPE acquisition process made easy with SRP; scientific reference material available; ORPS WordPerfect macro setup procedure; system managed storage is here; LIBSPOOL for MVS mainframe end-users; training center course schedule for February 1993; enjoy NJOY; scientific user services staff decreased; new release of Forwarn, a static source code analysis tool for FORTRAN programs; out of the cold with HEAT; coping cells from one table to another in word perfect; used PC equipment pool; and video training.

  2. Chromosome breakage and sister chromatid exchange analysis in computer operators

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.G.; Yost, J.; Jenkins, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome breakage analysis with Mitomycin C (MMC) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were obtained on 10 computer operators with computer exposure for a minimum of 3 hours per day for 4 years and 10 control subjects matched for age and personal lifestyle. No difference was found between the two groups in the total number of chromatid and chromosome aberrations in cells grown at 48 and/or 96 hours in Mitomycin C (20 or 50 ng/ml-final concentration). The average number of SCE per cell in approximately 30 cells from each person was 6.4 +/- 1.1 (mean +/- standard deviation) for the computer operators and 9.2 +/- 1.6 for the controls. This difference was significant (p < .001). The replicative index was significantly higher (p < .01) in computer operators than in control subjects. The number of SCE appeared not to be influenced by the years of computer exposure. Additional studies with larger sample sizes will be needed to identify if significant differences exist in cell kinetics and sister chromatid exchanges in individuals employed as computer operators.

  3. Tuning a High Transmission Ion Guide to Prevent Gas-Phase Proton Exchange During H/D Exchange MS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Miklos; Wales, Thomas E; Whittington, Dale; Engen, John R; Brown, Jeffery M; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for protein structural analysis has been adopted for many purposes, including biopharmaceutical development. One of the benefits of examining amide proton exchange by mass spectrometry is that it can readily resolve different exchange regimes, as evidenced by either binomial or bimodal isotope patterns. By careful analysis of the isotope pattern during exchange, more insight can be obtained on protein behavior in solution. However, one must be sure that any observed bimodal isotope patterns are not artifacts of analysis and are reflective of the true behavior in solution. Sample carryover and certain stationary phases are known as potential sources of bimodal artifacts. Here, we describe an additional undocumented source of deuterium loss resulting in artificial bimodal patterns for certain highly charged peptides. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is predominantly due to gas-phase proton exchange between peptides and bulk solvent within the initial stages of high-transmission conjoined ion guides. Minor adjustments of the ion guide settings, as reported here, eliminate the phenomenon without sacrificing signal intensity. Such gas-phase deuterium loss should be appreciated for all HDX-MS studies using such ion optics, even for routine studies not focused on interpreting bimodal spectra. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. PARAFAC analysis of IBIL spectra from silver ion exchanged glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valotto, G.; Cattaruzza, E.; Mardegan, M.; Quaranta, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present for the first time an application of PARAllel FACtor (PARAFAC) analysis to the investigation of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) spectra of Ag+ ↔ Na+ ion exchanged silicate glasses, in order to check the possibility to obtain additional information on the formation of silver aggregates under ion irradiation by a proper statistical rearrangement of experimental spectra. We decomposed the data by PARAFAC taking into account both IBIL emission features and their evolution as a function of the time. Shape and trend under irradiation of the extracted components were correlated to silver concentration and aggregates in the investigated systems. Strength and weakness of this statistical approach applied to IBIL spectra recorded as a function of time were evidenced and discussed.

  5. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    This document updates a previous calculation of the temperature distributions in a Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ion exchange column.1 LANL operates two laboratory-scale anion exchange columns, in series, to extract Pu-238 from nitric acid solutions. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has requested an updated analysis to calculate maximum temperatures for higher resin loading capacities obtained with a new formulation of the Reillex HPQ anion exchange resin. The increased resin loading capacity will not exceed 118 g plutonium per L of resin bed. Calculations were requested for normal operation of the resin bed at the minimum allowable solution feed rate of 30 mL/min and after an interruption of flow at the end of the feed stage, when one of the columns is fully loaded. The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades. At low temperatures, resin bed temperatures increase primarily due to decay heat. At {approx}70 C a Low Temperature Exotherm (LTE) resulting from the reaction between 8-12 M HNO{sub 3} and the resin has been observed. The LTE has been attributed to an irreversible oxidation of pendant ethyl benzene groups at the termini of the resin polymer chains by nitric acid. The ethyl benzene groups are converted to benzoic acid moities. The resin can be treated to permanently remove the LTE by heating a resin suspension in 8M HNO{sub 3} for 30-45 minutes. No degradation of the resin performance is observed after the LTE removal treatment. In fact, heating the resin in boiling ({approx}115-120 C) 12 M HNO{sub 3} for 3 hr displays thermal stability analogous to resin that has been treated to remove the LTE. The analysis is based on a previous study of the SRS Frames Waste Recovery (FWR) column, performed in support of the Pu-238 production campaign for NASA's Cassini mission. In that study, temperature transients

  6. Reliability analysis on a shell and tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingeswara, S.; Omar, R.; Mohd Ghazi, T. I.

    2016-06-01

    A shell and tube heat exchanger reliability was done in this study using past history data from a carbon black manufacturing plant. The heat exchanger reliability study is vital in all related industries as inappropriate maintenance and operation of the heat exchanger will lead to major Process Safety Events (PSE) and loss of production. The overall heat exchanger coefficient/effectiveness (Uo) and Mean Time between Failures (MTBF) were analyzed and calculated. The Aspen and down time data was taken from a typical carbon black shell and tube heat exchanger manufacturing plant. As a result of the Uo calculated and analyzed, it was observed that the Uo declined over a period caused by severe fouling and heat exchanger limitation. This limitation also requires further burn out period which leads to loss of production. The MTBF calculated is 649.35 hours which is very low compared to the standard 6000 hours for the good operation of shell and tube heat exchanger. The guidelines on heat exchanger repair, preventive and predictive maintenance was identified and highlighted for better heat exchanger inspection and repair in the future. The fouling of heat exchanger and the production loss will be continuous if proper heat exchanger operation and repair using standard operating procedure is not followed.

  7. Analysis of the heat transfer in double and triple concentric tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rădulescu, S.; Negoiţă, L. I.; Onuţu, I.

    2016-08-01

    The tubular heat exchangers (shell and tube heat exchangers and concentric tube heat exchangers) represent an important category of equipment in the petroleum refineries and are used for heating, pre-heating, cooling, condensation and evaporation purposes. The paper presents results of analysis of the heat transfer to cool a petroleum product in two types of concentric tube heat exchangers: double and triple concentric tube heat exchangers. The cooling agent is water. The triple concentric tube heat exchanger is a modified constructive version of double concentric tube heat exchanger by adding an intermediate tube. This intermediate tube improves the heat transfer by increasing the heat area per unit length. The analysis of the heat transfer is made using experimental data obtained during the tests in a double and triple concentric tube heat exchanger. The flow rates of fluids, inlet and outlet temperatures of water and petroleum product are used in determining the performance of both heat exchangers. Principally, for both apparatus are calculated the overall heat transfer coefficients and the heat exchange surfaces. The presented results shows that triple concentric tube heat exchangers provide better heat transfer efficiencies compared to the double concentric tube heat exchangers.

  8. Contextual determinants of condom use among female sex exchangers in East Harlem, NYC: an event analysis.

    PubMed

    McMahon, James M; Tortu, Stephanie; Pouget, Enrique R; Hamid, Rahul; Neaigus, Alan

    2006-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed a variety of contexts involving HIV risk behaviors among women who exchange sex for money or drugs. Event analysis was used to identify the individual, relationship, and contextual factors that contribute to these high-risk sex exchange practices. Analyses were conducted on data obtained from 155 drug-using women who reported details of their most recent sex exchange event with male clients. The majority of sex exchange encounters (78%) involved consistent condom use. In multivariable analysis, protective behavior was associated primarily with situational and relationship variables, such as exchange location, substance use, sexual practices, and respondent/client discussion and control. In order to inform HIV prevention programs targeted to women sex exchangers, further research is needed on the contextual determinants of risk, especially with regard to condom-use negotiation and factors involving substance use that adversely affect women's ability to manage protective behavior in the context of sex exchange.

  9. Exchange factor method: An alternative basis for zonal analysis of radiating enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, M.E.; Howell, J.R.

    1985-11-01

    In zonal analysis of an enclosure containing a radiatively participating medium, the volume and bounding surface are divided into volume and area elements which are assumed to be isothermal. For a system of M elements consisting of N surfaces and GAMMA volume elements (M = N+GAMMA), M/sup 2/ relationships (direct- or total-exchange areas of conventional zonal analysis) define all possible radiant interchange between element pairs. Due to reciprocity there are at most M(M+1)/2 unique direct-exchange areas. The use of symmetry may greatly reduce the number of unique exchange areas. In the alternative form presented, exchange factors are defined such that a gray medium's gas-to-gas exchange factors describe only the redistribution of radiative source terms. Only surface-to-surface and surface-to-gas (gas-to-surface) relationships are required to wholly define the system in radiative equilibrium. That is, a system in radiative equilibrium may be characterized by as many as GAMMA(GAMMA+1)/2 fewer factors. These same exchange factors may be augmented by gas-to-gas exchange factors to analyze media not in radiative equilibrium. In an isotropically scattering, gray medium, exchange factors are functions of system geometry and total extinction only. The degree of extinction due to scattering does not affect exchange factor. Transformations between direct-exchange areas and exchange factors are developed.

  10. Modeling Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index Using Time Series Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayo, W. S.; Urrutia, J. D.; Temple, J. M. F.; Sandoval, J. R. D.; Sanglay, J. E. A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a time series model of the Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index and its volatility using the finite mixture of ARIMA model with conditional variance equations such as ARCH, GARCH, EG ARCH, TARCH and PARCH models. Also, the study aimed to find out the reason behind the behaviorof PSEi, that is, which of the economic variables - Consumer Price Index, crude oil price, foreign exchange rate, gold price, interest rate, money supply, price-earnings ratio, Producers’ Price Index and terms of trade - can be used in projecting future values of PSEi and this was examined using Granger Causality Test. The findings showed that the best time series model for Philippine Stock Exchange Composite index is ARIMA(1,1,5) - ARCH(1). Also, Consumer Price Index, crude oil price and foreign exchange rate are factors concluded to Granger cause Philippine Stock Exchange Composite Index.

  11. A Spacebased Ocean Surface Exchange Data Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Wenqing; Liu, W. Timothy

    2000-01-01

    Emerging technologies have provided unprecedented opportunities to transform information into knowledge and disseminate them in a much faster, cheaper, and userfriendly mode. We have set up a system to produce and disseminate high level (gridded) ocean surface wind data from the NASA Scatterometer and European Remote Sensing missions. The data system is being expanded to produce real-time gridded ocean surface winds from an improved sensor SeaWinds on the Quikscat Mission. The wind field will be combined with hydrologic parameters from the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission to monitor evolving weather systems and natural hazard in real time. It will form the basis for spacebased Ocean Surface Exchange Data Analysis System (SOSEDAS) which will include the production of ocean surface momentum, heat, and water fluxes needed for interdisciplinary studies of ocean-atmosphere interaction. Various commercial or non-commercial software tools have been compared and selected in terms of their ability in database management, remote data accessing, graphical interface, data quality, storage needs and transfer speed, etc. Issues regarding system security and user authentication, distributed data archiving and accessing, strategy to compress large-volume geophysical and satellite data/image. and increasing transferring speed are being addressed. A simple and easy way to access information and derive knowledge from spacebased data of multiple missions is being provided. The evolving 'knowledge system' will provide relevant infrastructure to address Earth System Science, make inroads in educating an informed populace, and illuminate decision and policy making.

  12. Two-phase/two-phase heat exchanger analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Rhyn H.

    1992-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop (CPL) system with a condenser linked to a double two-phase heat exchanger is analyzed numerically to simulate the performance of the system from different starting conditions to a steady state condition based on a simplified model. Results of the investigation are compared with those of similar apparatus available in the Space Station applications of the CPL system with a double two-phase heat exchanger.

  13. Analysis of high-resolution foreign exchange data of USD-JPY for 13 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Takayuki; Kurihara, Shoko; Takayasu, Misako; Takayasu, Hideki

    2003-06-01

    We analyze high-resolution foreign exchange data consisting of 20 million data points of USD-JPY for 13 years to report firm statistical laws in distributions and correlations of exchange rate fluctuations. A conditional probability density analysis clearly shows the existence of trend-following movements at time scale of 8-ticks, about 1 min.

  14. A multifractal analysis of Asian foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Eom, C.; Havlin, S.; Jung, W.-S.; Wang, F.; Stanley, H. E.; Kim, S.

    2012-06-01

    We analyze the multifractal spectra of daily foreign exchange rates for Japan, Hong-Kong, Korea, and Thailand with respect to the United States in the period from 1991 until 2005. We find that the return time series show multifractal spectrum features for all four cases. To observe the effect of the Asian currency crisis, we also estimate the multifractal spectra of limited series before and after the crisis. We find that the Korean and Thai foreign exchange markets experienced a significant increase in multifractality compared to Hong-Kong and Japan. We also show that the multifractality is stronger related to the presence of high values of returns in the series.

  15. Multifractal Analysis of Asian Foreign Exchange Markets and Financial Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Gabjin; Kwon, Okyu; Jung, Woo-Sung

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the multifractal spectra of daily foreign exchange rates for Japan, Hong-Kong, Korea, and Thailand with respect to the United States Dollar from 1991 to 2005. We find that the return time series show multifractal spectrum features for all four cases. To observe the effect of the Asian currency crisis, we also estimate the multifractal spectra of limited series before and after the crisis. We find that the Korean and Thai foreign exchange markets experienced a significant increase in multifractality compared to Hong-Kong and Japan. We also show that the multifractality is stronge related to the presence of high values of returns in the series.

  16. Dimensional Analysis of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-30

    8217thIJt4IiTY CLASSIFICATION OF TWI4S PAG(E ona Dola t ern.r) 20. (continued) c-a• of factors having significance in OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion...heat exchangers. Certain of these groups are then evaluated for a model and prototype OTEC -Type heat exchanger using the same working fluid and ex...Development Administration, and the U. S. Navy are brought out. Chapter II investigates the scaling problems of heat ex- changers in OTEC (Ocean Thermal

  17. Child Language Data Exchange System Tools for Clinical Analysis.

    PubMed

    MacWhinney, Brian; Fromm, Davida

    2016-05-01

    The Child Language Data Exchange System Project has developed methods for analyzing many aspects of child language development, including grammar, lexicon, discourse, gesture, phonology, and fluency. This article will describe the methods available for each of these six fields, and how they can be used for assessment in the clinical setting.

  18. Thermal Analysis for Ion-Exchange Column System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Si Y.; King, William D.

    2012-12-20

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium either in a column configuration or distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the design and operation of a waste treatment process focused on treating dissolved, high-sodium salt waste solutions for the removal of specific radionuclides. The ion exchange column will be installed inside a high level waste storage tank at the Savannah River Site. After cesium loading, the ion exchange media may be transferred to the waste tank floor for interim storage. Models were used to predict temperature profiles in these areas of the system where the cesium-loaded media is expected to lead to localized regions of elevated temperature due to radiolytic decay. Normal operating conditions and accident scenarios (including loss of solution flow, inadvertent drainage, and loss of active cooling) were evaluated for the ion exchange column using bounding conditions to establish the design safety basis. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. In-tank modeling results revealed that an idealized hemispherical mound shape leads to the highest tank floor temperatures. In contrast, even large volumes of CST distributed in a flat layer with a cylindrical shape do not result in significant floor heating.

  19. Entropy analysis in foreign exchange markets and economic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jin-Gi; Yim, Kyubin; Kim, Seunghwan; Jung, Woo-Sung

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the relative market efficiency in 11 foreign exchange markets by using the Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity algorithm and several entropy values such as the Shannon entropy, the approximate entropy, and the sample entropy. With daily data in 11 foreign exchange markets from Jan. 2000 to Sep. 2011, we observe that mature markets have higher LZ complexities and entropy values than emerging markets. Furthermore, with sliding time windows, we also investigate the temporal evolutions of those entropies from Jan. 1994 to Sep. 2011, and we find that, after an economic crisis, the approximate entropy and the sample entropy of mature markets such as Japan, Europe and the United Kingdom suddenly become lower.

  20. Performance analysis of a medical record exchanges model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ean-Wen; Liou, Der-Ming

    2007-03-01

    Electronic medical record exchange among hospitals can provide more information for physician diagnosis and reduce costs from duplicate examinations. In this paper, we proposed and implemented a medical record exchange model. According to our study, exchange interface servers (EISs) are designed for hospitals to manage the information communication through the intra and interhospital networks linked with a medical records database. An index service center can be given responsibility for managing the EIS and publishing the addresses and public keys. The prototype system has been implemented to generate, parse, and transfer the health level seven query messages. Moreover, the system can encrypt and decrypt a message using the public-key encryption algorithm. The queuing theory is applied to evaluate the performance of our proposed model. We estimated the service time for each queue of the CPU, database, and network, and measured the response time and possible bottlenecks of the model. The capacity of the model is estimated to process the medical records of about 4000 patients/h in the 1-MB network backbone environments, which comprises about the 4% of the total outpatients in Taiwan.

  1. Thermal analysis for ion-exchange column system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; King, W. D.

    2012-07-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silico-titanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature. (authors)

  2. Numerical analysis of the steam flow field in shell and tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoszewicz, Jarosław; Bogusławski, Leon

    2016-06-01

    In the paper, the results of numerical simulations of the steam flow in a shell and tube heat exchanger are presented. The efficiency of different models of turbulence was tested. In numerical calculations the following turbulence models were used: k-ɛ, RNG k-ɛ, Wilcox k-ω, Chen-Kim k-ɛ, and Lam-Bremhorst k-ɛ. Numerical analysis of the steam flow was carried out assuming that the flow at the inlet section of the heat exchanger were divided into three parts. The angle of steam flow at inlet section was determined individually in order to obtain the best configuration of entry vanes and hence improve the heat exchanger construction. Results of numerical studies were verified experimentally for a real heat exchanger. The modification of the inlet flow direction according to theoretical considerations causes the increase of thermal power of a heat exchanger of about 14%.

  3. Analysis of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger gene family within the phylum Nematoda.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; O'Halloran, Damien M

    2014-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are low affinity, high capacity transporters that rapidly transport calcium at the plasma membrane, mitochondrion, endoplasmic (and sarcoplasmic) reticulum, and the nucleus. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are widely expressed in diverse cell types where they contribute homeostatic balance to calcium levels. In animals, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are divided into three groups based upon stoichiometry: Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCX), Na+/Ca2+/K+ exchangers (NCKX), and Ca2+/Cation exchangers (CCX). In mammals there are three NCX genes, five NCKX genes and one CCX (NCLX) gene. The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains ten Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes: three NCX; five CCX; and two NCKX genes. Here we set out to characterize structural and taxonomic specializations within the family of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers across the phylum Nematoda. In this analysis we identify Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes from twelve species of nematodes and reconstruct their phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships. The most notable feature of the resulting phylogenies was the heterogeneous evolution observed within exchanger subtypes. Specifically, in the case of the CCX exchangers we did not detect members of this class in three Clade III nematodes. Within the Caenorhabditis and Pristionchus lineages we identify between three and five CCX representatives, whereas in other Clade V and also Clade IV nematode taxa we only observed a single CCX gene in each species, and in the Clade III nematode taxa that we sampled we identify NCX and NCKX encoding genes but no evidence of CCX representatives using our mining approach. We also provided re-annotation for predicted CCX gene structures from Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Caenorhabditis japonica by RT-PCR and sequencing. Together, these findings reveal a complex picture of Na+/Ca2+ transporters in nematodes that suggest an incongruent evolutionary history of proteins that provide central control of calcium dynamics.

  4. Analysis of the Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger Gene Family within the Phylum Nematoda

    PubMed Central

    He, Chao; O'Halloran, Damien M.

    2014-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are low affinity, high capacity transporters that rapidly transport calcium at the plasma membrane, mitochondrion, endoplasmic (and sarcoplasmic) reticulum, and the nucleus. Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are widely expressed in diverse cell types where they contribute homeostatic balance to calcium levels. In animals, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers are divided into three groups based upon stoichiometry: Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCX), Na+/Ca2+/K+ exchangers (NCKX), and Ca2+/Cation exchangers (CCX). In mammals there are three NCX genes, five NCKX genes and one CCX (NCLX) gene. The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains ten Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes: three NCX; five CCX; and two NCKX genes. Here we set out to characterize structural and taxonomic specializations within the family of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers across the phylum Nematoda. In this analysis we identify Na+/Ca2+ exchanger genes from twelve species of nematodes and reconstruct their phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships. The most notable feature of the resulting phylogenies was the heterogeneous evolution observed within exchanger subtypes. Specifically, in the case of the CCX exchangers we did not detect members of this class in three Clade III nematodes. Within the Caenorhabditis and Pristionchus lineages we identify between three and five CCX representatives, whereas in other Clade V and also Clade IV nematode taxa we only observed a single CCX gene in each species, and in the Clade III nematode taxa that we sampled we identify NCX and NCKX encoding genes but no evidence of CCX representatives using our mining approach. We also provided re-annotation for predicted CCX gene structures from Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Caenorhabditis japonica by RT-PCR and sequencing. Together, these findings reveal a complex picture of Na+/Ca2+ transporters in nematodes that suggest an incongruent evolutionary history of proteins that provide central control of calcium dynamics. PMID:25397810

  5. Experimental testing and analytical analysis of a plastic panel heat exchanger for greenhouse heating

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.; Thomas, J.F.

    1980-02-01

    The performance of a plastic panel-type heat exchanger, suitable for greenhouse heating using low-grade (25 to 60/sup 0/C water) power plant reject heat, was investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical analysis showed that a plastic panel heat exchanger would have an overall heat transfer coefficient, U/sub 0/, of about 18 w/m/sup 2/-/sup 0/C compared to about 12 w/m/sup 2/-/sup 0/C for a fin-tube heat exchanger, under typical greenhouse conditions. Furthermore the plastic heat exchanger would require less fan power due to reduced air pressure losses. The experimental data revealed a similar functional relationship for U/sub 0/ and air flow when compared with the theoretical calculations, however the experimental values of U/sub 0/ were consistently larger by 20 to 30%. It was concluded that a properly designed plastic heat exchanger can compete with metal fin tube type exchangers on a performance basis, but the plastic heat exchangers are 3 to 4 times larger by volume. However, because of the lower cost of plastic, a substantial cost reduction is expected. It appears that further study, examining heat exchanger lifetime, performance and costs, is warranted.

  6. Multiply Controlled Verbal Operants: An Analysis and Extension to the Picture Exchange Communication System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondy, A.; Tincani, M.; Frost, L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior as a framework for understanding language acquisition in children with autism. We describe Skinner's analysis of pure and impure verbal operants and illustrate how this analysis may be applied to the design of communication training programs. The picture exchange communication system…

  7. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-05-23

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds immersed in waste supernate or filled with dry air under various accident scenarios. Accident scenarios evaluated included loss of salt solution flow through the bed, inadvertent column drainage, and loss of active cooling in the column. The modeling results demonstrate that the baseline design using one central and four outer cooling tubes provides a highly efficient cooling mechanism for reducing the maximum column temperature.

  8. Determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite by simultaneous thermal analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeva, N. M.; Bocharnikova, Yu. I.; Belousov, P. E.; Zhigarev, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    A way of determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite by simultaneous thermal analysis is developed using as an example the bentonites of the 10th Khutor deposit (Republic of Khakassia) and the Vodopadnyi area (Sakhalin Island). A correlation is established between the cation exchange capacity of smectite and its weight loss upon heating in the range of dehydration; the enthalpy of dehydration of montmorillonite; and the weight loss and the enthalpy of thermal dissociation of ethylene glycol contained in the interlayer space of the mineral's crystal structure. These data open up new possibilities for determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite, the most important technological indicator of the natural clay nanomineral.

  9. NMR analysis of t‐butyl‐catalyzed deuterium exchange at unactivated arene localities

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Regioselective labelling of arene rings via electrophilic exchange is often dictated by the electronic environment caused by substituents present on the aromatic system. Previously, we observed the presence of a t‐butyl group, either covalently bond or added as an external reagent, could impart deuterium exchange to the unactivated, C1‐position of estrone. Here, we provide nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of this exchange in a solvent system composed of 50:50 trifluoroacetic acid and D2O with either 2‐t‐butylestrone or estrone in the presence of t‐butyl alcohol has shed insights into the mechanism of this t‐butyl‐catalyzed exchange. Fast exchange of the t‐butyl group concurrent with the gradual reduction of the H1 proton signal in both systems suggest a mechanism involving ipso attack of the t‐butyl position by deuterium. The reversible addition/elimination of the t‐butyl group activates the H1 proton towards exchange by a mechanism of t‐butyl incorporation, H1 activation and exchange, followed by eventual t‐butyl elimination. Density functional calculations are consistent with the observation of fast t‐butyl exchange concurrent with slower H1 exchange. The σ‐complex resulting from ipso attack of deuterium at the t‐butyl carbon was 6.6 kcal/mol lower in energy than that of the σ‐complex resulting from deuterium attack at C1. A better understanding of the t‐butyl‐catalyzed exchange could help in the design of labelling recipes for other phenolic metabolites. PMID:27645832

  10. Plasma exchange for renal vasculitis and idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael; Catapano, Fausta; Szpirt, Wladimir; Thorlund, Kristian; Bruchfeld, Annette; Guillevin, Loic; Haubitz, Marion; Merkel, Peter A.; Peh, Chen Au; Pusey, Charles; Jayne, David

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasma exchange may be effective adjunctive treatment for renal vasculitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized control trials of plasma exchange for renal vasculitis. Study Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of manuscripts identified from electronic databases, bibliographies, and studies identified by experts. Data was abstracted in parallel by two reviewers. Setting & Population Adults with idiopathic renal vasculitis or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis Selection Criteria for Studies Randomized controlled trials that compared standard care with standard care plus adjuvant plasma exchange in adult patients with either renal vasculitis or idiopathic rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Intervention Adjuvant plasma exchange Outcome Composite of end-stage renal disease or death. Results We identified 9 trials including 387 patients. In a fixed-effects model the pooled relative risk of end-stage renal disease or death was 0.80 for patients treated with adjunctive plasma exchange compared to standard care alone (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.99; p=0.04). No significant heterogeneity was detected (p=0.5; I2=0%). The effect of plasma exchange did not differ significantly across the range of baseline serum creatinine values (p=0.7) or number of plasma exchange treatments (p=0.8). The relative risk for end-stage renal disease was 0.64 (95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.88; p=0.006) while the relative risk for death alone was 1.01 (95% confidence interval 0.71 to 1.4; p=0.9). Limitations Although the primary result was statistically significant, there is insufficient statistical information to reliable determine if plasma exchange reduces the composite of end-stage renal disease or death. Conclusions Plasma exchange may reduce the composite endpoint of end-stage renal disease or death in renal vasculitis. Further trials are required given the limited data available. PMID:21194817

  11. Two-phase/two-phase heat exchanger simulation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Rhyn H.

    1992-01-01

    The capillary pumped loop (CPL) system is one of the most desirable devices to dissipate heat energy in the radiation environment of the Space Station providing a relatively easy control of the temperature. A condenser, a component of the CPL system, is linked with a buffer evaporator in the form of an annulus section of a double tube heat exchanger arrangement: the concentric core of the double tube is the condenser; the annulus section is used as a buffer between the conditioned space and the radiation surrounding but works as an evaporator. A CPL system with this type of condenser is modeled to simulate its function numerically. Preliminary results for temperature variations of the system are shown and more investigations are suggested for further improvement.

  12. Bi-directional exchange of ammonia in a pine forest ecosystem - a model sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, Alexander; Hrdina, Amy; Murphy, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key component in the global nitrogen cycle and of great importance for atmospheric chemistry, neutralizing atmospheric acids and leading to the formation of aerosol particles. For understanding the role of NH3 in both natural and anthropogenically influenced environments, the knowledge of processes regulating its exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere is essential. A two-layer canopy compensation point model is used to evaluate the NH3 exchange in a pine forest in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. The net flux comprises the NH3 exchange of leaf stomata, its deposition to leaf cuticles and exchange with the forest ground. As key parameters the model uses in-canopy NH3 mixing ratios as well as leaf and soil emission potentials measured at the site in summer 2015. A sensitivity analysis is performed to evaluate the major exchange pathways as well as the model's constraints. In addition, the NH3 exchange is examined for an extended range of environmental conditions, such as droughts or varying concentrations of atmospheric pollutants, in order to investigate their influence on the overall net exchange.

  13. Exchange bias and anisotropy analysis of nano-composite Co84Zr16N thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jitendra; Taube, William Ringal; Ansari, Akhtar Saleem; Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Kulriya, Pawan Kumar; Akhtar, Jamil

    2015-03-01

    Nano-composite Co84Zr16N (CZN) films were prepared by reactive co-sputter deposition. As-deposited CZN films have not shown any exchange bias effect. But annealed (390 K) and field cooled samples have shown exchange bias phenomena. The observed exchange bias is attributed to inter-cluster exchange coupling between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic nano-composite phase. High resolution transmission electron microscope study reveals that, the CZN films are composed of ordered and crystalline ferromagnetic Cobalt nano-clusters embedded in an antiferromagnetic matrix. X-ray diffraction confirms the poly-crystalline growth of the CZN films with a preferred fcc (622) phase formation. In-plane anisotropy of the exchange biased films was investigated by rotational magnetization curve, and the analysis shows that the magnetization reversal behaves according to the coherent rotation of the magnetic moment vector. Effectively, exchange bias effect in such single layer films could be attributed to co-existing antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic phase within the single layer. Such single layer nano-composite films can be a possible alternative to the bilayer combination of antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic exchange biased films and are ideally suited for spintronics and tunnel junction applications.

  14. An Exchange Structure Analysis of the Development of Online Intercultural Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitade, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Internet-mediated intercultural discussions have been adopted for intercultural and second-language learning. However, the notion of community development in this context has received less attention. This study employs exchange structure (ES) analysis (Stubbs, M. (1983). "Discourse analysis." Oxford: Basil Blackwell) to investigate the…

  15. Experimental investigation on heat transfer analysis of conical coil heat exchanger with 90° cone angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purandare, Pramod S.; Lele, Mandar M.; Gupta, Raj Kumar

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, an experimental investigation on thermal performance of the conical coil heat exchanger with 90° conical coil heat exchanger is reported. Three different conical coil heat exchangers of same mean coil diameter (Dm = 200 mm) with different tube diameters ( di = 8, 10, 12.5 mm) are analyzed under steady state condition. The analysis is carried out for the tube side hot fluid flow range of 10-100 lph ( Re = 500-5,000), while the shell side flow range of 30-90 lph. The data available from experimentation leads to evaluate heat transfer coefficients for inside and outside the tube of the conical coil heat exchanger by Wilsons plot method. The calculations are further extended to estimate Nusselt Number ( Nu) and effectiveness. The empirical correlations are proposed for predicting Nu and the outlet temperatures of hot and cold fluids. The predicted empirical correlations show reasonable agreement with the experimental results within the given range of parameters.

  16. Mixed Multifractal Analysis of Crude Oil, Gold and Exchange Rate Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Meifeng; Shao, Shuxiang; Gao, Jianyu; Sun, Yu; Su, Weiyi

    2016-11-01

    The multifractal analysis of one time series, e.g. crude oil, gold and exchange rate series, is often referred. In this paper, we apply the classical multifractal and mixed multifractal spectrum to study multifractal properties of crude oil, gold and exchange rate series and their inner relationships. The obtained results show that in general, the fractal dimension of gold and crude oil is larger than that of exchange rate (RMB against the US dollar), reflecting a fact that the price series in gold and crude oil are more heterogeneous. Their mixed multifractal spectra have a drift and the plot is not symmetric, so there is a low level of mixed multifractal between each pair of crude oil, gold and exchange rate series.

  17. Application of nonlinear time series analysis techniques to high-frequency currency exchange data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Fernanda; Zaldívar, José-Manuel; Zbilut, Joseph P.

    2002-09-01

    In this work we have applied nonlinear time series analysis to high-frequency currency exchange data. The time series studied are the exchange rates between the US Dollar and 18 other foreign currencies from within and without the Euro zone. Our goal was to determine if their dynamical behaviours were in some way correlated. The nonexistence of stationarity called for the application of recurrence quantification analysis as a tool for this analysis, and is based on the definition of several parameters that allow for the quantification of recurrence plots. The method was checked using the European Monetary System currency exchanges. The results show, as expected, the high correlation between the currencies that are part of the Euro, but also a strong correlation between the Japanese Yen, the Canadian Dollar and the British Pound. Singularities of the series are also demonstrated taking into account historical events, in 1996, in the Euro zone.

  18. Analysis of induced temperature anomalies along borehole heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Michael; Schelenz, Sophie; Stollberg, Reiner; Gossel, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Over the last years, the thermal use of the shallow subsurface for heat generation, cooling, and thermal energy storage has increased. However, the injection or extraction of heat potentially drives changes in the subsurface temperature regime; especially in urban areas. The presented case study investigates the intensive use of borehole heat exchangers (BHE) and their potential thermal impacts on subsurface temperatures, as well as thermal interactions between individual BHE's for a residential neighborhood in Cologne, Germany. Based on on-site subsurface parameterization, a 3D subsurface model was designed, using the finite element software FEFLOW (DHI WASY). The model contains five BHE, extracting 8.2 kW, with a maximum BHE depth of 38 m, whereby the thickness of the unsaturated zone is 22 m. The simulated time span is 10 years. This study focusses on two questions: How will different BHE arrangements vary in terms of temperature plume formation and potential system interaction and what is the influence of seasonal subsurface heat storage on soil and ground water temperatures.

  19. Application of transient analysis methodology to quantify thermal performance of heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Rampall, I.; Singh, K.P.; Soler, A.I.; Scott, B.H.

    1997-10-01

    A transient testing technique is developed to evaluate the thermal performance of industrial-scale heat exchangers. A Galerkin-based numerical method with a choice of spectral basis elements to account for spatial temperature variations in heat exchangers is developed to solve the transient heat exchanger model equations. Testing a heat exchanger in the transient state may be the only viable alternative where conventional steady-state testing procedures are impossible or infeasible. For example, this methodology is particularly suited to the determination of apparent fouling levels in component cooling water system heat exchangers in nuclear power plants. The heat load on these so-called component coolers under steady-state conditions is too small to permit meaningful testing. An adequate heat load develops immediately after a reactor shutdown when the exchanger inlet temperatures are highly time-dependent. The application of the analysis methodology is illustrated with reference to an in-situ transient testing carried out at a nuclear power plant. The method, however, is applicable to any transient testing application.

  20. NASA Li/CF(x) cell problem analysis: Anion exchange chromatography analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytella, Joseph

    1991-05-01

    An analysis was made of wiper samples used to wipe down lithium/chlorine fluorine battery components and production equipment. These components and equipment were potentially exposed to thionyl chloride vapors. In the presence of moisture, thionyl chloride decomposes to sulfur dioxide and hydrogen chloride. The wiper samples were analyzed for soluble chlorides and fluorides by anion exchange chromatography. During the examination of the test chromatographs, fluoride contamination was discovered in wiper samples from the test equipment. An analytical method to determine fluoride was developed. The first 3 extracts from the potentially exposed and clean wiper samples were tested, and the total fluoride from both groups determined. A comparison of the results from both groups was made to determine the extent of fluoride contamination.

  1. NASA Li/CF(x) cell problem analysis: Anion exchange chromatography analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bytella, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An analysis was made of wiper samples used to wipe down lithium/chlorine fluorine battery components and production equipment. These components and equipment were potentially exposed to thionyl chloride vapors. In the presence of moisture, thionyl chloride decomposes to sulfur dioxide and hydrogen chloride. The wiper samples were analyzed for soluble chlorides and fluorides by anion exchange chromatography. During the examination of the test chromatographs, fluoride contamination was discovered in wiper samples from the test equipment. An analytical method to determine fluoride was developed. The first 3 extracts from the potentially exposed and clean wiper samples were tested, and the total fluoride from both groups determined. A comparison of the results from both groups was made to determine the extent of fluoride contamination.

  2. Exergy destruction analysis of a vortices generator in a gas liquid finned tube heat exchanger: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazikhani, M.; Khazaee, I.; Monazzam, S. M. S.; Takdehghan, H.

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the effect of using different shapes of vortices generator (VG) on a gas liquid finned heat exchanger is investigated experimentally with irreversibility analysis. In this project the ambient air with mass flow rates of 0.047-0.072 kg/s is forced across the finned tube heat exchanger. Hot water with constant flow rate of 240 L/h is circulated inside heat exchanger tubes with inlet temperature range of 45-73 °C. The tests are carried out on the flat finned heat exchanger and then repeated on the VG finned heat exchanger. The results show that using the vortex generator can decrease the ratio of air side irreversibility to heat transfer (ASIHR) of the heat exchanger. Also the results show that the IASIHR is >1.05 for all air mass flow rates, which means that ASIHR for the initial heat exchanger is higher than 5 % greater than that of improved heat exchanger.

  3. Automated Techniques for Rapid Analysis of Momentum Exchange Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    intuitive feel for how objects react on Earth . This intuition does not translate to objects in space because the motive forces used on Earth are not...will create a cone, an effect commonly called nutation [5, pg.53]. This makes the momentum vector time dependent and complicates the analysis

  4. Calorimetry Sample Exchange analysis of data report for October--December, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1989-12-31

    The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are to: discuss measurement differences; review and improve analytical measurements and methods; discuss new measurement capabilities; provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences; provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants; and provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. Statistical tests are used to evaluate the data and to determine if there are significant differences from accepted values for the exchange sample or from data previously reported by that facility. This information is presented, in the form of a quarterly report, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not bee collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. The six participating laboratories are Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, MRC-Mound, Westinghouse Hanford, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River.

  5. Detrended cross-correlation analysis on RMB exchange rate and Hang Seng China Enterprises Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qingsong; Yang, Bingchan; Ma, Guofeng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the cross-correlations between the Hang Seng China Enterprises Index and RMB exchange markets on the basis of a cross-correlation statistic test and multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DCCA). MF-DCCA has, at best, serious limitations for most of the signals describing complex natural processes and often indicates multifractal cross-correlations when there are none. In order to prevent these false multifractal cross-correlations, we apply MFCCA to verify the cross-correlations. Qualitatively, we find that the return series of the Hang Seng China Enterprises Index and RMB exchange markets were, overall, significantly cross-correlated based on the statistical analysis. Quantitatively, we find that the cross-correlations between the stock index and RMB exchange markets were strongly multifractal, and the multifractal degree of the onshore RMB exchange markets was somewhat larger than the offshore RMB exchange markets. Moreover, we use the absolute return series to investigate and confirm the fact of multifractality. The results from the rolling windows show that the short-term cross-correlations between volatility series remain high.

  6. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell conductivity and system analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qian

    A fuel cell converts chemical energy to electrical energy. It is a device that uses the electrochemical reaction of hydrogen and an oxidant, to produce electrical energy silently, without combustion. The role of the electrolyte in a PEM fuel cell is played by a proton exchange membrane. NafionRTM and its derivatives are the most widely used and studied polymers. Percolation theory holds a key to understanding the behavior of these polymers. In this dissertation, the percolation phenomenon was first simulated for the thermal conductivity of a representative polymer material. The simulation program was based on the finite element method, using Ansys software, which not only simplifies the method of calculation, but also increases the accuracy of the result. Ansys programs were developed to study the effects of matrix thickness, filler particle volume percentage, and various conductivities of the base material and filler particles. Comparison with existing experimental results and other models showed that the results from the finite element method were more accurate than the other models, especially the three-dimensional model. A similar Ansys program was utilized to predict the percolation threshold for the polymer electric conductivity, and its relationship with extra water content over the studied temperature range. The result showed that the percolation threshold varied with temperature and is in the range of 22% to 26% at room temperature, and matches the experimental data within 10% error margin. A natural gas fuel cell (NGFC) is a direct-energy conversion system which uses natural gas as the hydrogen carrier. A parametric model was developed to predict the overall system performance of a natural-gas-fueled PEM fuel cell system sized for a residential or small commercial building. The model accounts for interactions between various operating parameters: fuel consumption, air and water requirements, power produced, and heat and waste water discharge. For example

  7. Analysis and test of a breadboard cryogenic hydrogen/Freon heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, L. F.; Hooper, J.

    1973-01-01

    System studies required to verify a tube-in-tube cryogenic heat exchanger as optimum for the space shuttle mission are described. Design of the optimum configuration, which could be fabricated from commercially available hardware, is discussed. Finally, testing of the proposed configuration with supercritical hydrogen and Freon 21 is discussed and results are compared with thermal and dynamic analysis.

  8. Quantitative Synthesis and Component Analysis of Single-Participant Studies on the Picture Exchange Communication System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tincani, Matt; Devis, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The "Picture Exchange Communication System" (PECS) has emerged as the augmentative communication intervention of choice for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with a supporting body of single-participant studies. This report describes a meta-analysis of 16 single-participant studies on PECS with percentage of nonoverlapping data…

  9. Advanced view factor analysis method for radiation exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sookuk; Tuller, Stanton E.

    2014-03-01

    A raster-based method for determining complex view factor patterns is presented (HURES model). The model uses Johnson and Watson's view factor analysis method for fisheye lens photographs. The entire sphere is divided into 13 different view factors: open sky; sunny and shaded building walls, vegetation (trees) and ground surfaces above and below 1.2 m from the ground surface. The HURES model gave reasonable view factor results in tests at two urban study sites on summer days: downtown Nanaimo, B.C., Canada and Changwon, Republic of Korea. HURES gave better estimates of open sky view factors determined from fisheye lens photographs than did ENVI-met 3.1 and RayMan Pro. However, all three models underestimated sky view factor. For view factor analysis in outdoor urban areas, the 10° interval of rotation angle at 100 m distance of annuli will be suitable settings for three-dimensional computer simulations. The HURES model can be used for the rapid determination of complex view factor patterns which facilitates the analysis of their effects. Examples of how differing view factor patterns can affect human thermal sensation indices are given. The greater proportion of sunny view factors increased the computed predicted mean vote (PMV) by 1.3 on the sunny side of the street compared with the shady side during mid-morning in downtown Nanaimo. In another example, effects of differing amounts of open sky, sunny ground, sunny buildings and vegetation combined to produce only slight differences in PMV and two other human thermal sensation indices, PET and UTCI.

  10. Global analysis of proton elastic form factor data with two-photon exchange corrections

    SciTech Connect

    J. Arrington; W. Melnitchouk; J. A. Tjon

    2007-09-01

    We use the world's data on elastic electron-proton scattering and calculations of two-photon exchange effects to extract corrected values of the proton's electric and magnetic form factors over the full Q^2 range of the existing data. Our analysis combines the corrected Rosenbluth cross section and polarization transfer data, and is the first extraction of G_Ep and G_Mp including explicit two-photon exchange corrections and their associated uncertainties. In addition, we examine the angular dependence of the corrected cross sections, and discuss the possible nonlinearities of the cross section as a function of epsilon.

  11. Steady state thermal radiation analysis between the TOPAZ-II radiator and a heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Maveety, J.G.; Wold, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    In this study the authors investigate the feasibility and efficiency of coupling a single-pass heat exchanger to the TOPAZ-II space power system operating at steady state conditions. A first and second law analysis was performed in order to determine the optimal operating conditions which minimize the pumping power and maximize the flow exergy of the working fluid. The results of this study show that (1) the space power system is basically unaffected by the addition of this heat exchanger and (2) as much as 60% of the availability is destroyed by irreversibilities while operating at optimal flow conditions.

  12. Longitudinal hydraulic analysis of river-aquifer exchanges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.

    2006-01-01

    A longitudinal analysis of transient flow between a river and an underlying aquifer is developed to calculate flow rates between the river and the aquifer and the location of groundwater seepage into the river as it changes over time. Two flow domains are defined in the analysis: an upstream domain of fluvial recharge, where water flows vertically from the river into the unsaturated portion of the aquifer and horizontally in saturated parts of the aquifer, and a downstream domain of groundwater seepage to the river, where groundwater flows parallel to the underlying impermeable base. The river does not necessarily penetrate completely through the aquifer. A one-dimensional, unsteady flow equation is derived from mass conservation, Darcy's law, and the geometry of the river-aquifer system to calculate the water table position and the groundwater seepage rate into the river. Models based on numerical and analytical solutions of the flow equation were applied to a reach of the Methow River in north central Washington. The calibrated models simulated groundwater seepage with a root-mean-square error less than 5% of the mean groundwater seepage rates for three low-flow evaluation periods. The analytical model provides a theoretical basis for a nonlinear exponential base flow recession generated by a draining aquifer, but not an explicit functional form for the recession. Unlike cross-sectional approaches, the longitudinal approach allows the analysis of the length and location of groundwater seepage to a river, which have important ecological implications in many rivers. In the numerical simulations, the length of the groundwater seepage varied seasonally by about 4 km and the upstream boundary of groundwater seepage was within 689 m of its location at a stream gage on 9 September 2001 and within 91 m of its location on 6 October 2002. To demonstrate its utility in ecological applications, the numerical model was used to calculate differences in length of groundwater

  13. Multifractal analysis of managed and independent float exchange rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stošić, Darko; Stošić, Dusan; Stošić, Tatijana; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2015-06-01

    We investigate multifractal properties of daily price changes in currency rates using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). We analyze managed and independent floating currency rates in eight countries, and determine the changes in multifractal spectrum when transitioning between the two regimes. We find that after the transition from managed to independent float regime the changes in multifractal spectrum (position of maximum and width) indicate an increase in market efficiency. The observed changes are more pronounced for developed countries that have a well established trading market. After shuffling the series, we find that the multifractality is due to both probability density function and long term correlations for managed float regime, while for independent float regime multifractality is in most cases caused by broad probability density function.

  14. Value at risk estimation with entropy-based wavelet analysis in exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kaijian; Wang, Lijun; Zou, Yingchao; Lai, Kin Keung

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, exchange markets are increasingly integrated together. Fluctuations and risks across different exchange markets exhibit co-moving and complex dynamics. In this paper we propose the entropy-based multivariate wavelet based approaches to analyze the multiscale characteristic in the multidimensional domain and improve further the Value at Risk estimation reliability. Wavelet analysis has been introduced to construct the entropy-based Multiscale Portfolio Value at Risk estimation algorithm to account for the multiscale dynamic correlation. The entropy measure has been proposed as the more effective measure with the error minimization principle to select the best basis when determining the wavelet families and the decomposition level to use. The empirical studies conducted in this paper have provided positive evidence as to the superior performance of the proposed approach, using the closely related Chinese Renminbi and European Euro exchange market.

  15. Least-squares smoothing of direct-exchange in zonal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, M. E.; Howell, J. R.

    1984-08-01

    The method of Lagrange-multipliers has been used to determine adjustments to be made to a set of direct-exchange areas used in zonal analysis of a radiating enclosure containing a participating medium. The resulting adjusted direct-exchange areas satisfy conservation laws and the condition that an objective function be minimized. The objective function allows weights to be assigned to each adjustment. The solution of a set of linear algebraic equations yields the required adjustments. The method is well-suited for adjusting a set of direct-exchange areas which are assumed to include random inaccuracies. Other adjustment techniques in the literature are discussed and compared, and application of the present method is demonstrated.

  16. Least-squares smoothing of direct-exchange areas in zonal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, M.E.; Howell, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The method of Lagrange-multipliers has been used to determine adjustments to be made to a set of direct-exchange areas used in zonal analysis of a radiating enclosure containing a participating medium. The resulting adjusted direct-exchange areas satisfy conservation laws and the condition that an objective function be minimized. The objective function allows weights to be assigned to each adjustment. The solution of a set of linear algebraic equations yields the required adjustments. The method is well-suited for adjusting a set of direct-exchange areas which are assumed to include random inaccuracies. Other adjustment techniques in the literature are discussed and compared, and application of the present method is demonstrated.

  17. Multifractal detrended Cross Correlation Analysis of Foreign Exchange and SENSEX fluctuation in Indian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Srimonti; Ghosh, Dipak; Chatterjee, Sucharita

    2016-12-01

    The manuscript studies autocorrelation and cross correlation of SENSEX fluctuations and Forex Exchange Rate in respect to Indian scenario. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) and multifractal detrended cross correlation analysis (MFDXA) were employed to study the correlation between the two series. It was observed that the two series are strongly cross correlated. The change of degree of cross correlation with time was studied and the results are interpreted qualitatively.

  18. A meta-analysis of leaf gas exchange and water status responses to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weiming; Zhong, Yangquanwei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-02-01

    Drought is considered to be one of the most devastating natural hazards, and it is predicted to become increasingly frequent and severe in the future. Understanding the plant gas exchange and water status response to drought is very important with regard to future climate change. We conducted a meta-analysis based on studies of plants worldwide and aimed to determine the changes in gas exchange and water status under different drought intensities (mild, moderate and severe), different photosynthetic pathways (C3 and C4) and growth forms (herbs, shrubs, trees and lianas). Our results were as follows: 1) drought negatively impacted gas exchange and water status, and stomatal conductance (gs) decreased more than other physiological traits and declined to the greatest extent in shrubs and C3 plants. Furthermore, C4 plants had an advantage compared to C3 plants under the same drought conditions. 2) The decrease in gs mainly reduced the transpiration rate (Tr), and gs could explain 55% of the decrease in the photosynthesis (A) and 74% of the decline in Tr. 3). Finally, gas exchange showed a close relationship with the leaf water status. Our study provides comprehensive information about the changes in plant gas exchange and water status under drought.

  19. Large Scale Asynchronous and Distributed Multi-Dimensional Replica Exchange Molecular Simulations and Efficiency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F.; Gallicchio, Emilio; Zhang, Bin W.; He, Peng; Tan, Zhiqiang; Levy, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe methods to perform replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations asynchronously (ASyncRE). The methods are designed to facilitate large scale REMD simulations on grid computing networks consisting of heterogeneous and distributed computing environments as well as on homogeneous high performance clusters. We have implemented these methods on NSF XSEDE clusters and BOINC distributed computing networks at Temple University, and Brooklyn College at CUNY. They are also being implemented on the IBM World Community Grid. To illustrate the methods we have performed extensive (more than 60 microseconds in aggregate) simulations for the beta-cyclodextrin-heptanoate host-guest system in the context of one and two dimensional ASyncRE and we used the results to estimate absolute binding free energies using the Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM). We propose ways to improve the efficiency of REMD simulations: these include increasing the number of exchanges attempted after a specified MD period up to the fast exchange limit, and/or adjusting the MD period to allow sufficient internal relaxation within each thermodynamic state. Although ASyncRE simulations generally require long MD periods (> picoseconds) per replica exchange cycle to minimize the overhead imposed by heterogeneous computing networks, we found that it is possible to reach an efficiency similar to conventional synchronous REMD, by optimizing the combination of the MD period and the number of exchanges attempted per cycle. PMID:26149645

  20. Large-scale asynchronous and distributed multidimensional replica exchange molecular simulations and efficiency analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junchao; Flynn, William F; Gallicchio, Emilio; Zhang, Bin W; He, Peng; Tan, Zhiqiang; Levy, Ronald M

    2015-09-05

    We describe methods to perform replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations asynchronously (ASyncRE). The methods are designed to facilitate large scale REMD simulations on grid computing networks consisting of heterogeneous and distributed computing environments as well as on homogeneous high-performance clusters. We have implemented these methods on NSF (National Science Foundation) XSEDE (Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) clusters and BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing) distributed computing networks at Temple University and Brooklyn College at CUNY (the City University of New York). They are also being implemented on the IBM World Community Grid. To illustrate the methods, we have performed extensive (more than 60 ms in aggregate) simulations for the beta-cyclodextrin-heptanoate host-guest system in the context of one- and two-dimensional ASyncRE, and we used the results to estimate absolute binding free energies using the binding energy distribution analysis method. We propose ways to improve the efficiency of REMD simulations: these include increasing the number of exchanges attempted after a specified molecular dynamics (MD) period up to the fast exchange limit and/or adjusting the MD period to allow sufficient internal relaxation within each thermodynamic state. Although ASyncRE simulations generally require long MD periods (>picoseconds) per replica exchange cycle to minimize the overhead imposed by heterogeneous computing networks, we found that it is possible to reach an efficiency similar to conventional synchronous REMD, by optimizing the combination of the MD period and the number of exchanges attempted per cycle.

  1. A meta-analysis of leaf gas exchange and water status responses to drought

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Weiming; Zhong, Yangquanwei; Shangguan, Zhouping

    2016-01-01

    Drought is considered to be one of the most devastating natural hazards, and it is predicted to become increasingly frequent and severe in the future. Understanding the plant gas exchange and water status response to drought is very important with regard to future climate change. We conducted a meta-analysis based on studies of plants worldwide and aimed to determine the changes in gas exchange and water status under different drought intensities (mild, moderate and severe), different photosynthetic pathways (C3 and C4) and growth forms (herbs, shrubs, trees and lianas). Our results were as follows: 1) drought negatively impacted gas exchange and water status, and stomatal conductance (gs) decreased more than other physiological traits and declined to the greatest extent in shrubs and C3 plants. Furthermore, C4 plants had an advantage compared to C3 plants under the same drought conditions. 2) The decrease in gs mainly reduced the transpiration rate (Tr), and gs could explain 55% of the decrease in the photosynthesis (A) and 74% of the decline in Tr. 3). Finally, gas exchange showed a close relationship with the leaf water status. Our study provides comprehensive information about the changes in plant gas exchange and water status under drought. PMID:26868055

  2. 2004 on Warsaw Stock Exchange via Zipf Analysis, Scatter and Lag Plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachnik, W.; Chomiuk, P.; Faltynowicz, Sz.; Gawin, M.; Gorajek, W.; Kedzierski, J.; Kosk, K.; Kucharczyk, A.; Leszczynski, P.; Podsiadlo, R.; Makowiec, D.

    2005-08-01

    This paper presents the last year on Warsaw Stock Exchange (WSE) and world stock exchanges by graphical analysis: Scatter Plot, Zipf Analysis and Lag Plot of selected Polish (WIG, WIG20, WIG-BANKI, TECHWIG) and foreign (NIKKEI, DOW JONES Industrial Average) indices, and also selected companies listed on WSE. Zipf analysis proves that although, generally, holding securities was the best way to earn money in the last year, however, Zipf based strategy also could be profitable. Scatter Plots show no similarities between Polish and foreign indices, however, behaviour of Polish ones is similar. The volatility of indices and most companies was highest on Monday and lowest on Friday. Distribution of returns in continuous trading is neither Gaussian nor uniform.

  3. Educator Exchange Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Cris; Rodriguez, Victor

    This resource guide was developed for teachers and administrators interested in participating in intercultural and international exchange programs or starting an exchange program. An analysis of an exchange program's critical elements discusses exchange activities; orientation sessions; duration of exchange; criteria for participation; travel,…

  4. Analysis of a compartmental model of amyloid beta production, irreversible loss and exchange in humans.

    PubMed

    Elbert, Donald L; Patterson, Bruce W; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, and in particular Aβ42, are found in senile plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. A compartmental model of Aβ production, exchange and irreversible loss was recently developed to explain the kinetics of isotope-labeling of Aβ peptides collected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following infusion of stable isotope-labeled leucine in humans. The compartmental model allowed calculation of the rates of production, irreversible loss (or turnover) and short-term exchange of Aβ peptides. Exchange of Aβ42 was particularly pronounced in amyloid plaque-bearing participants. In the current work, we describe in much greater detail the characteristics of the compartmental model to two distinct audiences: physician-scientists and biokineticists. For physician-scientists, we describe through examples the types of questions the model can and cannot answer, as well as correct some misunderstandings of previous kinetic analyses applied to this type of isotope labeling data. For biokineticists, we perform a system identifiability analysis and a sensitivity analysis of the kinetic model to explore the global and local properties of the model. Combined, these analyses motivate simplifications from a more comprehensive physiological model to the final model that was previously presented. The analyses clearly demonstrate that the current dataset and compartmental model allow determination with confidence a single 'turnover' parameter, a single 'exchange' parameter and a single 'delay' parameter. When combined with CSF concentration data for the Aβ peptides, production rates may also be obtained.

  5. Experimental performance investigation of a shell and tube heat exchanger by exergy based sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Suha Orçun; Reis, Alper

    2016-06-01

    Heat exchangers are used extensively in many industrial branches, primarily so in chemical and energy sectors. They also have important household usage as they are used in central and local heating systems. Any betterment on heat exchangers will serve greatly in preserving our already dwindling and costly energy resources. Strong approach of exergy analysis -which helps find out where the first steps should be taken in determining sources of inefficiencies and how to remedy them- will be used as a means to this end. The maximum useful work that can be harnessed from systems relationships with its environment is defined as exergy. In this study, the inlet and outlet flow rate values of fluids and temperature of hot stream both on shell and tube parts of a shell-tube heat exchange system have been inspected and their effects on the exergy efficiency of this thermal system have been analyzed. It is seen that the combination of high tube side inlet temperature, low shell side flow rate and high tube side flow rate are found to be the optimum for this experimental system with reaching 75, 65, and 32 % efficiencies respectively. Selecting operating conditions suitable to this behavior will help to increase the overall efficiency of shell-tube heat exchange systems and cause an increment in energy conservation.

  6. Sister chromatid exchange analysis to monitor genotoxic chemicals. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis for toxicological studies. SCE analysis are very sensitive measures of genotoxic damage to chromosomes. SCE toxicological studies analyzing ionizing radiation, chromium compounds, styrene, paint thinner, mercury, cigarette smoke, coal dust, fuel oil, insecticides, ethylene oxide, diesel exhaust, and polychlorinated biphenyls are discussed. SCE studies using both human and animal tissue cultures are described. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  7. HDX Workbench: Software for the Analysis of H/D Exchange MS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Bruce D.; Willis, Scooter; Lauer, Janelle L.; Landgraf, Rachelle R.; West, Graham M.; Marciano, David; Novick, Scott; Goswami, Devrishi; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2012-09-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is an established method for the interrogation of protein conformation and dynamics. While the data analysis challenge of HDX-MS has been addressed by a number of software packages, new computational tools are needed to keep pace with the improved methods and throughput of this technique. To address these needs, we report an integrated desktop program titled HDX Workbench, which facilitates automation, management, visualization, and statistical cross-comparison of large HDX data sets. Using the software, validated data analysis can be achieved at the rate of generation. The application is available at the project home page http://hdx.florida.scripps.edu.

  8. Capillary ion-exchange chromatography with nanogram sensitivity for the analysis of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rea, Jennifer C; Freistadt, Benny S; McDonald, Daniel; Farnan, Dell; Wang, Yajun Jennifer

    2015-12-11

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) is widely used for profiling the charge heterogeneity of proteins, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Despite good resolving power and robustness, ionic strength-based ion-exchange separations are generally product specific and can be time consuming to develop. In addition, conventional analytical scale ion-exchange separations require tens of micrograms of mAbs for each injection, amounts that are often unavailable in sample-limited applications. We report the development of a capillary IEC (c-IEC) methodology for the analysis of nanogram amounts of mAb charge variants. Several key modifications were made to a commercially available liquid chromatography system to perform c-IEC for charge variant analysis of mAbs with nanogram sensitivity. We demonstrate the method for multiple monoclonal antibodies, including antibody fragments, on different columns from different manufacturers. Relative standard deviations of <10% were achieved for relative peak areas of main peak, acidic and basic regions, which are common regions of interest for quantifying monoclonal antibody charge variants using IEC. The results herein demonstrate the excellent sensitivity of this c-IEC characterization method, which can be used for analyzing charge variants in sample-limited applications, such as early-stage candidate screening and in vivo studies.

  9. Analysis of a membrane-based condesate recovery heat exchanger (CRX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbold, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a temperature and humidity control system that can remove heat and recover water vapor is key to the development of an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). Large quantities of water vapor must be removed from air, and this operation has proven difficult in the absense of gravity. This paper presents the modeling results from a program to develop a novel membrane-based heat exchanger known as the condensate recovery heat exchanger (CRX). This device cools and dehumidifies humid air and simultaneously recovers water-vapor condensate. In this paper, the CRX is described and the results of an analysis of the heat- and mass-transfer characteristics of the device are given.

  10. Analysis of chromite by cation-exchange using ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, M; Ingman, F

    1975-12-01

    A method for the separation and determination of five major elements in chromite ore (and chrome-bearing refractories), based on complexation of the metals with EDTA is described. After removal of silica, the cations are separated into two groups by passing the solution through a cation-exchange resin (Dowex 50W-X8, in Na-form) in the presence of an excess of the complexing agent. The optimum conditions for the separation are discussed on the basis of exchange constants that were either known or determined. The first group contains Cr and Fe, which emerge in the filtrate at pH between 1.5 and 2.1, whereas A1, Mg and Ca, which are adsorbed on the resin, form another group. Complexometric titrations are used for the subsequent determination of the cations in each group. The method is simpler and more rapid and accurate for routine analysis than the current methods.

  11. The Analysis of Information Exchange Capability for Battlefield Networks Using M&S Techniques of the NetSPIN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    battlefield network, which are modeled and simulated using the OPNET . In this paper, we suggest the analysis method of information exchange capability for...battlefield network, which are modeled and simulated using the OPNET . In this paper, we suggest the analysis method of information exchange capability...SPIDER, ATCIS, OPNET 1. INTRODUCTION For the NCW (Network Centric Warfare) that networks of a battlefield are interconnected in real time, the

  12. SPECIAL ANALYSIS FOR SLIT TRENCH DISPOSAL OF THE REACTOR PROCESS HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.; Collard, L.; Aleman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Butcher, T.

    2012-06-18

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), in response to a request from Solid Waste Management (SWM), conducted a Special Analysis (SA) to evaluate the performance of nineteen heat exchangers that are to be disposed in the E-Area low level waste facility Slit Trench 9 (ST 9). Although these nineteen heat exchangers were never decontaminated, the majority of the radionuclides in the heat exchanger inventory list were determined to be acceptable for burial because they are less than the 'generic' waste form inventory limits given in the 2008 Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC, 2008). However, as generic waste, the H-3 and C-14 inventories resulted in unacceptable sum-of-fractions (SOFs). Initial scoping analyses performed by SRNL indicated that if alterations were made to certain external nozzles to mitigate various potential leak paths, acceptable SOFs could be achieved through the use of a 'Special' waste form. This SA provides the technical basis for this new 'Special' waste form and provides the inventory limits for H-3 and C-14 for these nineteen heat exchangers such that the nineteen heat exchangers can be disposed in ST 9. This 'Special' waste form is limited to these nineteen heat exchangers in ST 9 and applies for H-3 and C-14, which are designated as H-3X and C-14X, respectively. The SA follows the same methodology used in the 2008 PA and the 2008 SA except for the modeling enhancements noted below. Infiltration rates above the heat exchangers are identical to those used in the 2008 PA; however, flow through the heat exchangers is unique. Because it is unknown exactly how sealed heat exchanger openings will perform and how surface and embedded contaminants will be released, multiple base cases or scenarios were established to investigate a set of performances. Each scenario consists of flow options (based on the performance of sealed openings) and a near-field release of contaminants (based on corrosion and diffusion performance). Two disposal

  13. Exergy analysis of an ethanol fuelled proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for automobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shuqin; Douvartzides, Savvas; Tsiakaras, Panagiotis

    An integrated ethanol fuelled proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) power system was investigated following a second law exergy analysis. The system was assumed to have the typical design for automobile applications and was comprised of a vaporizer/mixer, a steam reformer, a CO-shift reactor, a CO-remover (PROX) reactor, a PEMFC and a burner. The exergy analysis was applied for different PEMFC power and voltage outputs assuming the ethanol steam reforming at about 600 K and the CO-shift reaction at about 400 K. A detailed parametric analysis of the plant is presented and operation guidelines are suggested for effective performance. In every case, the exergy analysis method is proved to allow an accurate allocation of the deficiencies of the subsystems of the plant and serves as a unique tool for essential technical improvements.

  14. A Model for Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Tether Momentum Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen; Johnson, David; Sorensen, Kirk; Welzyn, Ken; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost (MXER) tether systems may enable high-energy missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by serving as an 'upper stage in space'. Existing rockets that use an MXER tether station could double their capability to launch communications satellites and help improve US competitiveness. A MXER tether station would boost spacecraft from low Earth orbit to a high-energy orbit quickly, like a high-thrust rocket. Then, using the same principles that make an electric motor work, it would slowly rebuild its orbital momentum by pushing against the Earth's magnetic field-without using any propellant. One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum-exchange/electrodynamic reboost tether systems is in the analysis and design of the capture mechanism and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. This paper will present a model for a momentum-exchange tether system that can simulate and evaluate the performance and requirements of such a system.

  15. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR ION-EXCHANGE WASTE REMOVAL PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2010-07-12

    The small column ion exchange (SCIX) process treats low curie salt (LCS) waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into the CST bed. A CST column loaded with radioactive cesium will generate significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs of the CST sorption column can not handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally within the column and degrade the performance of the ion-exchange process. The CST starts to degrade at about 80 to 85 C, and the CST completely changes to another material above 120 C. In addition, the process solution will boil around 130 C. If the column boiled dry, the sorbent could plug the column and require replacement of the column module. The objective of the present work is to compute temperature distributions across the column as a function of transit time after the initiation of accidents when there is loss of the salt solution flow in the CST column under abnormal conditions of the process operations. In this situation, the customer requested that the calculations should be conservative in that the model results would show the maximum centerline temperatures achievable by the CST design configurations. The thermal analysis results will be used to evaluate the fluid temperature distributions and the process component temperatures within the ion exchange system. This information will also assist in the system design and maintenance.

  16. High heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis. [RL10-2B engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, Thomas D.; Kanic, Paul G.; Peckham, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-2B engine, a derivative of the RL10, is capable of multimode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2% of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10% of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-2B engine during the low thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidizer heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. The design, concept verification testing and analysis for such a heat exchanger is discussed. The design presented uses a high efficiency compact core to vaporize the oxygen, and in the self-contained unit, attenuates any pressure and flow oscillations which result from unstable boiling in the core. This approach is referred to as the high heat transfer design. An alternative approach which prevents unstable boiling of the oxygen by limiting the heat transfer is referred to as the low heat transfer design and is reported in Pratt & Whitney report FR-19135-2.

  17. Nonparametric analysis of nonexponential and multidimensional kinetics. I. Quantifying rate dispersion, rate heterogeneity, and exchange dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Mark A.; Kaur, Harveen

    2017-02-01

    The quantification of nonexponential (dispersed) kinetics has relied on empirical functions, which yield parameters that are neither unique nor easily related to the underlying mechanism. Multidimensional kinetics provide more information on dispersed processes, but a good approach to their analysis is even less clear than for standard, one-dimensional kinetics. This paper is the first in a series that analyzes kinetic data in one or many dimensions with a scheme that is nonparametric: it quantifies nonexponential decays without relying on a specific functional form. The quantities obtained are directly related to properties of the mechanism causing the rate dispersion. Log-moments of decays, which parallel the standard moments of distributions (mean, standard deviation, etc.), are introduced for both one- and multi-dimensional decays. Kinetic spectra are defined to visualize the data. The utility of this approach is demonstrated on a simple, but general, model of dispersed kinetics—a nonexponential homogeneous decay combined with slowly exchanging rate heterogeneity. The first log-moments give a geometric-mean relaxation time. Second log-moments quantify the magnitude of rate dispersion, the fraction of the dispersion due to heterogeneity, and the dynamics of exchange between different rate subensembles. A suitable combination of these moments isolates exchange dynamics from three-dimensional kinetics without contamination by the rate-filtering effects that were identified in a recent paper [M. A. Berg and J. R. Darvin, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 054119 (2016)].

  18. Nonparametric analysis of nonexponential and multidimensional kinetics. I. Quantifying rate dispersion, rate heterogeneity, and exchange dynamics.

    PubMed

    Berg, Mark A; Kaur, Harveen

    2017-02-07

    The quantification of nonexponential (dispersed) kinetics has relied on empirical functions, which yield parameters that are neither unique nor easily related to the underlying mechanism. Multidimensional kinetics provide more information on dispersed processes, but a good approach to their analysis is even less clear than for standard, one-dimensional kinetics. This paper is the first in a series that analyzes kinetic data in one or many dimensions with a scheme that is nonparametric: it quantifies nonexponential decays without relying on a specific functional form. The quantities obtained are directly related to properties of the mechanism causing the rate dispersion. Log-moments of decays, which parallel the standard moments of distributions (mean, standard deviation, etc.), are introduced for both one- and multi-dimensional decays. Kinetic spectra are defined to visualize the data. The utility of this approach is demonstrated on a simple, but general, model of dispersed kinetics-a nonexponential homogeneous decay combined with slowly exchanging rate heterogeneity. The first log-moments give a geometric-mean relaxation time. Second log-moments quantify the magnitude of rate dispersion, the fraction of the dispersion due to heterogeneity, and the dynamics of exchange between different rate subensembles. A suitable combination of these moments isolates exchange dynamics from three-dimensional kinetics without contamination by the rate-filtering effects that were identified in a recent paper [M. A. Berg and J. R. Darvin, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 054119 (2016)].

  19. Using containment analysis to improve component cooling water heat exchanger limits

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, H.C.; Tajbakhsh, A.

    1995-12-31

    The Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station design requires that exit temperatures from the Component Cooling Water Heat Exchanger remain below 330.37 K during the Emergency Core Cooling System recirculation stage, following a hypothetical Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Due to measurements indicating a higher than expected combination of: (a) high fouling factor in the Component Cooling Water Heat Exchanger with (b) high ultimate heat sink temperatures, that might lead to temperatures in excess of the 330.37 K limit, if a LOCA were to occur, TUElectric adjusted key flow rates in the Component Cooling Water network. This solution could only be implemented with improvements to the containment analysis methodology of record. The new method builds upon the CONTEMPT-LT/028 code by: (a) coupling the long term post-LOCA thermohydraulics with a more detailed analytical model for the complex Component Cooling Water Heat Exchanger network and (b) changing the way mass and energy releases are calculated after core reflood and steam generator energy is dumped to the containment. In addition, a simple code to calculate normal cooldowns was developed to confirm RHR design bases were met with the improved limits.

  20. Horizontal Heat Exchanger Design and Analysis for Passive Heat Removal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vierow, Karen

    2005-08-29

    This report describes a three-year project to investigate the major factors of horizontal heat exchanger performance in passive containment heat removal from a light water reactor following a design basis accident LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The heat exchanger studied in this work may be used in advanced and innovative reactors, in which passive heat removal systems are adopted to improve safety and reliability The application of horizontal tube-bundle condensers to passive containment heat removal is new. In order to show the feasibility of horizontal heat exchangers for passive containment cooling, the following aspects were investigated: 1. the condensation heat transfer characteristics when the incoming fluid contains noncondensable gases 2. the effectiveness of condensate draining in the horizontal orientation 3. the conditions that may lead to unstable condenser operation or highly degraded performance 4. multi-tube behavior with the associated secondary-side effects This project consisted of two experimental investigations and analytical model development for incorporation into industry safety codes such as TRAC and RELAP. A physical understanding of the flow and heat transfer phenomena was obtained and reflected in the analysis models. Two gradute students (one funded by the program) and seven undergraduate students obtained research experience as a part of this program.

  1. Analysis of the radiative budget of the Venusian atmosphere based on infrared Net Exchange Rate formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebonnois, Sébastien; Eymet, Vincent; Lee, Christopher; Vatant d'Ollone, Jan

    2015-06-01

    A detailed one-dimensional analysis of the energy balance in Venus atmosphere is proposed in this work, based on the Net Exchange Rate formalism that allows the identification in each altitude region of the dominant energy exchanges controlling the temperature. Well-known parameters that control the temperature profile are the solar flux deposition and the cloud particle distribution. Balance between solar heating and infrared energy exchanges is analyzed for each region: upper atmosphere (from cloud top to 100 km), upper cloud, middle cloud, cloud base, and deep atmosphere (cloud base to surface). The energy accumulated below the clouds is transferred to the cloud base through infrared windows, mostly at 3-4 μm and 5-7 μm. The continuum opacity in these spectral regions is not well known for the hot temperatures and large pressures of Venus's deep atmosphere but strongly affects the temperature profile from cloud base to surface. From cloud base, upward transport of energy goes through convection and short-range radiative exchanges up to the middle cloud where the atmosphere is thin enough in the 20-30 μm window to cool directly to space. Total opacity in this spectral window between the 15 μm CO2 band and the CO2 collision-induced absorption has a strong impact on the temperature in the cloud convective layer. Improving our knowledge of the gas opacities in these different windows through new laboratory measurements or ab initio computations, as well as improving the constraints on cloud opacities would help to separate gas and cloud contributions and secure a better understanding of Venus's atmosphere energy balance.

  2. The use of multiobjective calibration and regional sensitivity analysis in simulating hyporheic exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naranjo, Ramon C.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Stone, Mark; Davis, Clinton; McKay, Alan

    2012-01-01

    We describe an approach for calibrating a two-dimensional (2-D) flow model of hyporheic exchange using observations of temperature and pressure to estimate hydraulic and thermal properties. A longitudinal 2-D heat and flow model was constructed for a riffle-pool sequence to simulate flow paths and flux rates for variable discharge conditions. A uniform random sampling approach was used to examine the solution space and identify optimal values at local and regional scales. We used a regional sensitivity analysis to examine the effects of parameter correlation and nonuniqueness commonly encountered in multidimensional modeling. The results from this study demonstrate the ability to estimate hydraulic and thermal parameters using measurements of temperature and pressure to simulate exchange and flow paths. Examination of the local parameter space provides the potential for refinement of zones that are used to represent sediment heterogeneity within the model. The results indicate vertical hydraulic conductivity was not identifiable solely using pressure observations; however, a distinct minimum was identified using temperature observations. The measured temperature and pressure and estimated vertical hydraulic conductivity values indicate the presence of a discontinuous low-permeability deposit that limits the vertical penetration of seepage beneath the riffle, whereas there is a much greater exchange where the low-permeability deposit is absent. Using both temperature and pressure to constrain the parameter estimation process provides the lowest overall root-mean-square error as compared to using solely temperature or pressure observations. This study demonstrates the benefits of combining continuous temperature and pressure for simulating hyporheic exchange and flow in a riffle-pool sequence. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Ion Exchange Equilibrium and Kinetic Properties of Polyacrylate Films and Applications to Chemical Analysis and Environmental Decontamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    One of the goals of the original proposal was to study how cross-linking affects the properties of an ion exchange material(IEM) developed at Lewis Research Center. However, prior to the start of this work, other workers at LERC investigated the effect of cross-linking on the properties of this material. Other than variation in the ion exchange capacity, the chemical characteristics were shown to be independent of the cross-linking agent, and the degree of cross-linking. New physical forms of the film were developed (film, supported film, various sizes of beads, and powder). All showed similar properties with respect to ion exchange equilibria but the kinetics of ion exchange depended on the surface area per unit mass; the powder form of the IEM exchanging much more rapidly than the other forms. The research performed under this grant was directed towards the application of the IEM to the analysis of metal ions at environmental concentrations.

  4. Analysis of the single-blow transient testing technique for perforated plate heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Jose I.; Mills, Anthony F.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the single-blow transient testing technique for heat exchanger surfaces is made for perforated plate and similar discontinuous surfaces. The model assumes that there is no temperature variation across each plate, and allows for axial conduction in spacers: the resulting axial fluid temperature profile is discontinuous, rather than the usual continuous profile. Numerical solutions are obtained to the resulting set of coupled first-order differential equations for a step change in inlet fluid temperature. Results are presented in tabular form, which allow the heat transfer coefficients to be calculated from test data using the maximum slope technique.

  5. Evolution of the Tropical Cyclone Integrated Data Exchange And Analysis System (TC-IDEAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turk, J.; Chao, Y.; Haddad, Z.; Hristova-Veleva, S.; Knosp, B.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Li, P.; Licata, S.; Poulsen, W.; Su, H.; Tanelli, S.; Vane, D.; Vu, Q.; Goodman, H. M.; Blakeslee, R.; Conover, H.; Hall, J.; He, Y.; Regner, K.; Knapp, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The Tropical Cyclone Integrated Data Exchange and Analysis System (TC-IDEAS) is being jointly developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as part of NASA's Hurricane Science Research Program. The long-term goal is to create a comprehensive tropical cyclone database of satellite and airborne observations, in-situ measurements and model simulations containing parameters that pertain to the thermodynamic and microphysical structure of the storms; the air-sea interaction processes; and the large-scale environment.

  6. Analysis and Perspective from the Complex Aerospace Systems Exchange (CASE) 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Parker, Peter A.; Detweiler, Kurt N.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Dress, David A.; Kimmel, William M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center embedded four rapporteurs at the Complex Aerospace Systems Exchange (CASE) held in August 2013 with the objective to capture the essence of the conference presentations and discussions. CASE was established to provide a discussion forum among chief engineers, program managers, and systems engineers on challenges in the engineering of complex aerospace systems. The meeting consists of invited presentations and panels from industry, academia, and government followed by discussions among attendees. This report presents the major and reoccurring themes captured throughout the meeting and provides analysis and insights to further the CASE mission.

  7. Thermal sensors utilizing thin layer technology applied to the analysis of aeronautical thermal exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godefroy, J. C.; Gageant, C.; Francois, D.

    Thin film surface thermometers and thermal gradient fluxmeters developed by ONERA to monitor thermal exchanges in aircraft engines to predict the remaining service life of the components are described. The sensors, less than 80 microns thick, with flexible Kapton dielectric layers and metal substrates, are integrated into the shape of the surface being monitored. Features of Cu-n, Ni-, Au-, and Cr-based films, including mounting and circuitry methods that permit calibration and accurate signal analysis, are summarized. Results are discussed from sample applications of the devices on a symmetric NACA 65(1)-012 airfoil and on a turbine blade.

  8. Strong cation exchange chromatography in analysis of posttranslational modifications: innovations and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Mariola J

    2011-01-01

    Strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography has been utilized as an excellent separation technique that can be combined with reversed-phase (RP) chromatography, which is frequently used in peptide mass spectrometry. Although SCX is valuable as the second component of such two-dimensional separation methods, its application goes far beyond efficient fractionation of complex peptide mixtures. Here I describe how SCX facilitates mapping of the protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs), specifically phosphorylation and N-terminal acetylation. The SCX chromatography has been mainly used for enrichment of these two PTMs, but it might also be beneficial for high-throughput analysis of other modifications that alter the net charge of a peptide.

  9. Estimation of Hydrogen-Exchange Protection Factors from MD Simulation Based on Amide Hydrogen Bonding Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hee; Venable, John D; Steckler, Caitlin; Cellitti, Susan E; Lesley, Scott A; Spraggon, Glen; Brock, Ansgar

    2015-09-28

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) studies have provided critical insight into our understanding of protein folding, structure, and dynamics. More recently, hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) has become a widely applicable tool for HX studies. The interpretation of the wealth of data generated by HX-MS experiments as well as other HX methods would greatly benefit from the availability of exchange predictions derived from structures or models for comparison with experiment. Most reported computational HX modeling studies have employed solvent-accessible-surface-area based metrics in attempts to interpret HX data on the basis of structures or models. In this study, a computational HX-MS prediction method based on classification of the amide hydrogen bonding modes mimicking the local unfolding model is demonstrated. Analysis of the NH bonding configurations from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation snapshots is used to determine partitioning over bonded and nonbonded NH states and is directly mapped into a protection factor (PF) using a logistics growth function. Predicted PFs are then used for calculating deuteration values of peptides and compared with experimental data. Hydrogen exchange MS data for fatty acid synthase thioesterase (FAS-TE) collected for a range of pHs and temperatures was used for detailed evaluation of the approach. High correlation between prediction and experiment for observable fragment peptides is observed in the FAS-TE and additional benchmarking systems that included various apo/holo proteins for which literature data were available. In addition, it is shown that HX modeling can improve experimental resolution through decomposition of in-exchange curves into rate classes, which correlate with prediction from MD. Successful rate class decompositions provide further evidence that the presented approach captures the underlying physical processes correctly at the single residue level. This assessment is further strengthened in a comparison of

  10. Vibration analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers: an overview-Part 2: vibration response, fretting-wear, guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Taylor, C. E.

    2003-11-01

    Design guidelines were developed to prevent tube failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration in shell-and-tube heat exchangers. An overview of vibration analysis procedures and recommended design guidelines is presented in this paper. This paper pertains to liquid, gas and two-phase heat exchangers such as nuclear steam generators, reboilers, coolers, service water heat exchangers, condensers, and moisture-separator-reheaters. Part 2 of this paper covers forced vibration excitation mechanisms, vibration response prediction, resulting damage assessment, and acceptance criteria.

  11. Vibration analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers: an overview-Part 1: flow, damping, fluidelastic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettigrew, M. J.; Taylor, C. E.

    2003-11-01

    Design guidelines were developed to prevent tube failures due to excessive flow-induced vibration in shell-and-tube heat exchangers. An overview of vibration analysis procedures and recommended design guidelines is presented in this paper. This paper pertains to liquid, gas and two-phase heat exchangers such as nuclear steam generators, reboilers, coolers, service water heat exchangers, condensers, and moisture-separator-reheaters. Generally, a heat exchanger vibration analysis consists of the following steps: (i) flow distribution calculations, (ii) dynamic parameter evaluation (i.e. damping, effective tube mass, and dynamic stiffness), (iii) formulation of vibration excitation mechanisms, (iv) vibration response prediction, and (v) resulting damage assessment (i.e., comparison against allowables). The requirements applicable to each step are outlined in this paper. Part 1 of this paper covers flow calculations, dynamic parameters and fluidelastic instability.

  12. Sister-chromatid exchange analysis in a rural population of Mexico exposed to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arroyo, S; Noriega-Aldana, N; Osorio, A; Galicia, F; Ling, S; Villalobos-Pietrini, R

    1992-03-01

    Cytogenetic damage was evaluated by means of the analysis of sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) in a rural population of Tlaxcala, Mexico, in occupational contact with pesticides. We studied 170 men, 94 exposed and 76 not exposed. It was shown that SCE followed a normal distribution and Student's t test did not present differences between the two groups (P = 0.4). The frequency of SCE was not correlated with the duration of exposure of the rural workers (r = -0.06), the multiple covariance analysis applied to the data of duration of exposure, tobacco intake and alcohol ingestion demonstrated a lack of statistical significance. In the exposed people we observed no symptoms provoked by these compounds.

  13. HDX Workbench: Software for the Analysis of H/D Exchange MS Data

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Bruce D.; Willis, Scooter; Lauer, Janelle L.; Landgraf, Rachelle R.; West, Graham M.; Marciano, David; Novick, Scott; Goswami, Devrishi; Chalmers, Michael J.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is an established method for the interrogation of protein conformation and dynamics. While the data analysis challenge of HDX-MS has been addressed by a number of software packages, new computational tools are needed to keep pace with the improved methods and throughput of this technique. To address these needs, we report an integrated desktop program titled HDX Workbench, which facilitates automation, management, visualization, and statistical cross-comparison of large HDX data sets. Using the software, validated data analysis can be achieved at the rate of generation. The application is available at the project home page http://hdx.florida.scripps.edu. PMID:22692830

  14. A 2-D oscillating flow analysis in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1991-01-01

    A two dimensional oscillating flow analysis was conducted, simulating the gas flow inside Stirling heat exchangers. Both laminar and turbulent oscillating pipe flow were investigated numerically for Re(max) = 1920 (Va = 80), 10800 (Va = 272), 19300 (Va = 272), and 60800 (Va = 126). The results are compared with experimental results of previous investigators. Also, predictions of the flow regime on present oscillating flow conditions were checked by comparing velocity amplitudes and phase differences with those from laminar theory and quasi-steady profile. A high Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was used for turbulent oscillating pipe flow. Finally, performance evaluation of the K-epsilon model was made to explore the applicability of quasi-steady turbulent models to unsteady oscillating flow analysis.

  15. A cryogenic heat exchanger with bypass and throttling and its thermodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Liu, D. L.; Wang, L. Y.; Shen, J.; Gan, Z. H.

    2015-12-01

    A precooled Joule-Thomson (J-T) cooler refrigerates at liquid helium temperature. Its third stage heat exchanger works below 20 K. Hot fluid cannot be sufficiently cooled due to nonidealism of the heat exchanger and helium-4 properties. In a J-T cycle of low pressure ratio, the heat exchanger with bypass and throttling improves the refrigeration capacity. Bypass and throttling reduces the temperature difference and entropy generation within the heat exchanger.

  16. Analysis of condensation and evaporation of ammonia/water mixtures in matrix heat-exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, C. B.; Arman, B.

    A theoretical analysis is carried out for the condensation and evaporation of water/ammonia mixtures in matrix heat-exchangers. A set of equations is formulated and a calculation algorithm is developed to predict the local rate of heat and mass transfer for binary-component systems. A thermodynamic property model is developed for ammonia/water mixtures on the basis of the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The two-phase flow heat-transfer coefficient for matrix heat-exchangers is calculated by using the analytical method developed in a previous study. The experimental data are analyzed to determine the effects of small amounts of water in ammonia on the rate of evaporation. The role of diffusion in simultaneous heat and mass transfer associated with condensation and evaporation processes are analyzed by comparing the results from three limiting cases, which include equilibrium conditions, and liquid-phase diffusion- resistance of finite and infinite values. The results show that the vapor-phase mass-transfer resistance is the controlling mechanism for condensation, and the liquid-phase mass-transfer resistance is the controlling mechanism for evaporation.

  17. Anion exchange kinetics of nanodimensional layered metal hydroxides: use of isoconversional analysis.

    PubMed

    Majoni, Stephen; Hossenlopp, Jeanne M

    2010-12-16

    Anion exchange reactions of nanodimensional layered metal hydroxide compounds are utilized to create materials with targeted physical and chemical properties and also as a means for controlled release of intercalated anions. The kinetics of this important class of reaction are generally characterized by model-based approaches. In this work, a different approach based on isothermal, isoconversional analysis was utilized to determine effective activation energies with respect to extent of reaction. Two different layered metal hydroxide materials were chosen for reaction with chloride anions, using a temperature range of 30-60 °C. The concentrations of anions released into solution and the changes in polycrystalline solid phases were evaluated using model-based (Avrami-Erofe'ev nucleation-growth model) and model-free (integral isoconversional) methods. The results demonstrate the utility of the isoconversional approach for identifying when fitting to a single model is not appropriate, particularly for characterizing the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics.

  18. Vibration mode analysis of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Liu, L. F.; Wei, M. Y.; Wu, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks usually undergo vibration during packing, transportation, and serving time, in particular for those used in the automobiles or portable equipment. To study the stack vibration response, based on finite element method (FEM), a mode analysis is carried out in the present paper. Using this method, we can distinguish the local vibration from the stack global modes, predict the vibration responses, such as deformed shape and direction, and discuss the effects of the clamping configuration and the clamping force magnitude on vibration modes. It is found that when the total clamping force remains the same, increasing the bolt number can strengthen the stack resistance to vibration in the clamping direction, but cannot obviously strengthen stack resistance to vibration in the translations perpendicular to clamping direction and the three axis rotations. Increasing the total clamping force can increase both of the stack global mode and the bolt local mode frequencies, but will decrease the gasket local mode frequency.

  19. Analysis of field-performance data on shell-and-tube heat exchangers in geothermal service

    SciTech Connect

    Silvester, L.F.; Doyle, P.T.

    1982-03-01

    Analysis of field performance data from a binary cycle test loop using geothermal brine and a hydrocarbon working fluid is reported. Results include test loop operational problems, and shell-and-tube heat exchanger performance factors such as overall heat transfer coefficients, film coefficients, pinch points, and pressure drops. Performance factors are for six primary heaters having brine in the tubes and hydrocarbon in the shells in counterflow, and for a condenser having cooling water in the tubes and hydrocarbon in the shell. Working fluids reported are isobutane, 90/10 isobutane/isopentane, and 80/20 isobutane/isopentane. Performance factors are for heating each working fluid at supercritical conditions in the vicinity of their critical pressure and temperature and condensing the same fluid.

  20. Efficiency analysis of organic Rankine cycle with internal heat exchanger using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Fatih; Selbaş, Reşat; Şahin, Arzu Şencan

    2016-02-01

    In this study, artificial neural network (ANN) has been used for efficiency analysis of the organic Rankine cycle with internal heat exchanger (IHEORC) using refrigerants R410a, R407c which do not damage to ozone layer. It is well known that the evaporator temperature, condenser temperature, subcooling temperature and superheating temperature affect the thermal efficiency of IHEORC. In this study, thermal efficiency is estimated depending on the above temperatures. The results of ANN are compared with actual results. The coefficient of determination values obtained when the test set were used to the networks were 0.99946 and 0.999943 for the R410a and R407c respectively which is very satisfactory.

  1. Using computer simulation to assist in the robustness analysis of an ion-exchange chromatography step.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Niklas; Karlsson, David; Axelsson, Jan Peter; Zacchi, Guido; Nilsson, Bernt

    2005-01-21

    This paper presents a methodology to gain process knowledge and assist in the robustness analysis of an ion-exchange step in a protein purification process using a model-based approach. Factorial experimental design is common practice in industry today to obtain robustness characterization of unit operations with respect to variations in process parameters. This work aims at providing a better insight into what process variations affect quality and to further reduce the experimental work to the regions of process variation that are of most interest. This methodology also greatly increases the ability to predict process performance and promotes process understanding. The model calibration part of the methodology involves three consecutive steps to calibrate a steric mass action (SMA) ion-exchange chromatography model. Firstly, a number of gradient elution experiments are performed. Secondly, experimental breakthrough curves have to be generated for the proteins if the adsorption capacity of the medium for each component is not known. Thirdly, a multi-component loading experiment is performed to calibrate the multi-component effects that cannot be determined from the single-component experiments. The separation process studied in this work is the separation of polyclonal IgG from a mixture containing IgG, myoglobin and BSA. The calibrated model is used to simulate six process variations in a full factorial experiment. The results of the simulations provide information about the importance of the different process variations and the simulations are also used to determine the crucial points for the process parameter variations. The methodology can be used to assist in the robustness analysis normally performed in the pharmaceutical industry today as it is able to predict the impact on process performance resulting from variations in salt concentration, column load, protein concentration and flow rate.

  2. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of the mulberry Na(+)/H(+) exchanger gene family.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boning; Long, Dingpei; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Changying; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Zhao, Aichun

    2016-02-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHXs) have important roles in cellular pH, and Na(+) and K(+) homeostasis in plants. Mulberry is not only an important traditional economic woody plant known for its leaves, which are the exclusive food source of the silkworm Bombyx mori, but it can also adapt to many different adverse conditions, including saline environments. However, little is known about the NHXs in this important perennial tree. In this study, we identified and cloned seven putative NHX gene family members from Morus atropurpurea based on a genome-wide analysis of the Morus genome database. A phylogenetic analysis and genomic organization of mulberry NHXs suggested that the mulberry NHX family forms three distinct subgroups. Transcriptome data and real-time PCR of different mulberry varieties under normal culture conditions revealed that the mulberry NHX family has a different tissue-specific pattern in the two mulberry species. The MaNHX genes' expression analyses under different stresses (salt and drought) and signal molecules (abscisic acid, salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide and methyl jasmonate) revealed that MaNHXs not only could be induced by salt, drought and abscisic acid as describe in the literature, but were also induced by other signal molecules, which indicated that MaNHX members exhibited diverse and complicated expression patterns in different mulberry tissues under various abiotic stresses, phytohormones and plant signaling molecules. Our results provide some insights into new and emerging cellular and physiological functions of this group of H(+)-coupled cation exchangers, beyond their function in salt tolerance, and also provide the basis for further characterizations of MaNHXs' physiological functions.

  3. Performance analysis of three nanofluids in liquid to gas and liquid to liquid heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Dustin R.

    One purpose of this research was to analyze the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of nanofluids in an automotive radiator (liquid to gas). Detailed computations were performed on an automotive radiator using three different nanofluids containing aluminum oxide, copper oxide and silicon dioxide nanoparticles dispersed in the base fluid, 60:40 ethylene glycol and water (EG/W) by mass. The computational scheme adopted was the effectiveness-Number of Transfer Unit (epsilon-NTU) method encoded in Matlab. The computational scheme was validated by comparing the predicted results with that of the base fluid reported by other researchers. Then, the scheme was adapted to compute the performance of nanofluids. Results show that a dilute 1% volumetric concentration of nanoparticles can have substantial savings in the pumping power or surface area of the heat exchanger, while transferring the same amount of heat as the base fluid. The second purpose of this research was to carry out experimental and theoretical studies for a plate heat exchanger (PHE). A benchmark test was performed with the minichannel PHE to validate the test apparatus with water. Next, using a 0.5% aluminum oxide nanoparticle concentration dispersed in EG/W preliminary correlations for the Nusselt number and the friction factor for nanofluid flow in a PHE were derived. Then, a theoretical study was conducted to compare the performance of three nanofluids comprised of aluminum oxide, copper oxide and silicon dioxide nanoparticles in EG/W. This theoretical analysis was conducted using the epsilon-NTU method. The operational parameters were set by the active thermal control system currently under design by NASA. The analysis showed that for a dilute particle volumetric concentration of 1%, all the nanofluids showed improvements in their performance over the base fluid by reducing the pumping power and surface area of the PHE.

  4. Study on passive momentum exchange landing gear using two-dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Hara, Susumu; Otsuki, Masatsugu

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses a landing response control system based on the momentum exchange principle for planetary exploration spacecraft. In the past, landing gear systems with cantilever designs that incorporate honeycomb materials to dissipate shock energy through plastic deformation have been used, but once tested before launch, the system cannot be used in a real mission. The sky crane system used for the Mars Science Laboratory by NASA can achieve a safe and precise landing, but it is highly complex. This paper introduces a momentum exchange impact damper (MEID) that absorbs the controlled object's momentum with extra masses called damper masses. The MEID is reusable, which makes it easy to ensure the landing gear's reliability. In this system, only passive elements such as springs are needed. A single-axis (SA) model has already been used to verify the effectiveness of MEIDs through simulations and experiments measuring the rebound height of the spacecraft. However, the SA model cannot address the rotational motion and tipping of the spacecraft. This paper presents a two-landing-gear-system (TLGS) model in which multiple MEIDs are equipped for two-dimensional analysis. Unlike in the authors' previous studies, in this study each MEID is launched when the corresponding landing gear lands and the MEIDs do not contain active actuators. This mechanism can be used to realize advanced control specifications, and it is simply compared with previous mechanisms including actuators, in which all of the MEIDs are launched simultaneously. If each MEID works when the corresponding gear lands, the rebound height of each gear can be minimized, and tipping can be prevented, as demonstrated by the results of our simulations.

  5. Analysis of Agonist and Antagonist Effects on Thyroid Hormone Receptor Conformation by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, A. C. M.; Saidemberg, D. M.; Souza, P. C. T.; Martínez, L.; Scanlan, T. S.; Baxter, J. D.; Skaf, M. S.; Palma, M. S.; Webb, P.; Polikarpov, I.

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are ligand-gated transcription factors with critical roles in development and metabolism. Although x-ray structures of TR ligand-binding domains (LBDs) with agonists are available, comparable structures without ligand (apo-TR) or with antagonists are not. It remains important to understand apo-LBD conformation and the way that it rearranges with ligands to develop better TR pharmaceuticals. In this study, we conducted hydrogen/deuterium exchange on TR LBDs with or without agonist (T3) or antagonist (NH3). Both ligands reduce deuterium incorporation into LBD amide hydrogens, implying tighter overall folding of the domain. As predicted, mass spectroscopic analysis of individual proteolytic peptides after hydrogen/deuterium exchange reveals that ligand increases the degree of solvent protection of regions close to the buried ligand-binding pocket. However, there is also extensive ligand protection of other regions, including the dimer surface at H10–H11, providing evidence for allosteric communication between the ligand-binding pocket and distant interaction surfaces. Surprisingly, C-terminal activation helix H12, which is known to alter position with ligand, remains relatively protected from solvent in all conditions suggesting that it is packed against the LBD irrespective of the presence or type of ligand. T3, but not NH3, increases accessibility of the upper part of H3–H5 to solvent, and we propose that TR H12 interacts with this region in apo-TR and that this interaction is blocked by T3 but not NH3. We present data from site-directed mutagenesis experiments and molecular dynamics simulations that lend support to this structural model of apo-TR and its ligand-dependent conformational changes. PMID:21106879

  6. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA FOR THE SMALL ION EXCHANGE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; King, W.

    2011-09-12

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project is designed to accelerate closure of High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS tanks store HLW in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. An in-tank ion exchange process is being designed to treat supernate and dissolved saltcake waste. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is adsorbed into Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. The waste supernate solution within the ion exchange bed will boil around 120 C. Solution superheating above the boiling point within the column could lead to violent hazardous energy releases. System heating from loaded CST is also of concern in other process modules, such as the waste tank. Due to tank structural integrity concerns, the wall temperature limit for the SRS waste tanks is 100 C. The transfer of cesium-loaded CST to the tank could result in localized hot spots on the tank floor and walls which may exceed this limit. As a result, thermal modeling calculations have been conducted to predict the maximum temperatures achievable both in the column and in the waste tank. As specified in the associated Technical Task Plan, one objective of the present work was to compute temperature distributions within the ion exchange column module under accident scenarios including loss of salt solution flow through the bed and loss of coolant system flow. The column modeling domain and the scope of the calculations in this case were broadened relative to previous two-dimensional calculations to include vertical temperature distributions within the packed bed of ion exchange media as well as the upper column plenum region containing only fluid. The baseline design conditions and in-column modeling domain for the ion-exchange column module are shown in Figure 1. These evaluations assumed the maximum

  8. Foreign exchange market data analysis reveals statistical features that predict price movement acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, Jose C.; Ochiai, Tomoshiro

    2012-05-01

    Increasingly accessible financial data allow researchers to infer market-dynamics-based laws and to propose models that are able to reproduce them. In recent years, several stylized facts have been uncovered. Here we perform an extensive analysis of foreign exchange data that leads to the unveiling of a statistical financial law. First, our findings show that, on average, volatility increases more when the price exceeds the highest (or lowest) value, i.e., breaks the resistance line. We call this the breaking-acceleration effect. Second, our results show that the probability P(T) to break the resistance line in the past time T follows power law in both real data and theoretically simulated data. However, the probability calculated using real data is rather lower than the one obtained using a traditional Black-Scholes (BS) model. Taken together, the present analysis characterizes a different stylized fact of financial markets and shows that the market exceeds a past (historical) extreme price fewer times than expected by the BS model (the resistance effect). However, when the market does, we predict that the average volatility at that time point will be much higher. These findings indicate that any Markovian model does not faithfully capture the market dynamics.

  9. Sister chromatid exchange analysis in workers exposed to noise and vibration.

    PubMed

    Silva, M J; Carothers, A; Branco, N C; Dias, A; Boavida, M G

    1996-07-10

    Workers chronically exposed to whole-body vibration and noise are known to develop pathophysiological and psychological disturbances. The frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and of cells with high frequencies of SCEs (HFCs) were analyzed in lymphocytes of 50 workers occupationally exposed to vibration and noise and of 34 controls. The exposed group included: individuals operating hand-vibrating tools (group 1), 'test-cell operators' (group 2) and 'run-up' operators (group 3) from an air base and helicopter pilots (group 4). The statistical analysis of the mean SCE count per cell was carried out by multiple regression analysis, comparing various predictor variables: exposure group, duration of exposure, age and cigarette consumption. Only cigarette consumption and exposure group were found to be significantly correlated with the mean SCE frequency. After allowing for the effects of smoking, the analysis indicates that: (1) there was no significant difference between group 1 and controls (p > 0.05); (2) the differences between group 2 and group 0, group 3 and group 0 and group 4 and group 0 were all highly significant (p < 0.001); (3) there was no significant difference between groups 2 and 3 (p > 0.05), nor between groups 2 and 3 combined and group 4 (p > 0.05); (4) exposure groups 2, 3 and 4 combined, had a significantly elevated mean SCE frequency compared to the control group (p < 0.0001). Statistical analysis of the proportion of HFCs was consistent with these results. Our data suggest that chronic exposure to whole-body vibration and noise may lead to an increase in the level of SCEs in man. The observed effects may not reflect a direct action of these physical agents on DNA. Alternative explanations may include some of the whole-body vibration and noise-induced or stress-induced pathophysiological alterations which may indirectly induce SCE formation.

  10. Testing and analysis of load-side immersed heat exchangers for solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes work to determine the performance of load-side heat exchangers for use in residential solar domestic hot water systems. We measured the performance of four heat exchangers: a smooth coil and a finned coil having heat transfer areas of 2.5 m/sup 2/ (26 ft/sup 2/) and those having areas of 1.7 m/sup 2/ (19 ft/sup 2/). A numerical model using the thermal network program MITAS was constructed, and results were compared to the experimental results. Research showed a smooth coil with only 70% of the surface area of a finned coil performed better than the finned coil. Also, load-side heat exchangers can maintain and enhance stratification in storage tanks, permitting the use of control strategies that take advantage of stratified storage tanks to increase system performance. The analytical model, which agreed reasonably well with the experimental results, was used to vary heat exchanger flow rate and area and initial tank temperature for both a smooth- and a finned-coil heat exchanger. Increasing the heat exchanger flow rate and area results in higher heat transfer rates but not necessarily optimal performance. Lower initial tank temperatures resulted in reduced tank stratification. The smooth heat exchanger outperformed the finned heat exchanger with the same outside surface area. 15 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI - omega plot analysis of RF-spillover-corrected inverse CEST ratio asymmetry for simultaneous determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhua; Xiao, Gang; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Ran, Chongzhao; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to labile proton concentration and exchange rate, thus allowing measurement of dilute CEST agent and microenvironmental properties. However, CEST measurement depends not only on the CEST agent properties but also on the experimental conditions. Quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis has been proposed to address the limitation of the commonly used simplistic CEST-weighted calculation. Recent research has shown that the concomitant direct RF saturation (spillover) effect can be corrected using an inverse CEST ratio calculation. We postulated that a simplified qCEST analysis is feasible with omega plot analysis of the inverse CEST asymmetry calculation. Specifically, simulations showed that the numerically derived labile proton ratio and exchange rate were in good agreement with input values. In addition, the qCEST analysis was confirmed experimentally in a phantom with concurrent variation in CEST agent concentration and pH. Also, we demonstrated that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (P < 0.01) while the pH-dependent exchange rate followed a dominantly base-catalyzed exchange relationship (P < 0.01). In summary, our study verified that a simplified qCEST analysis can simultaneously determine labile proton ratio and exchange rate in a relatively complex in vitro CEST system.

  12. Frequency analysis of tick quotes on the foreign exchange market and agent-based modeling: A spectral distance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2007-08-01

    High-frequency financial data of the foreign exchange market (EUR/CHF, EUR/GBP, EUR/JPY, EUR/NOK, EUR/SEK, EUR/USD, NZD/USD, USD/CAD, USD/CHF, USD/JPY, USD/NOK, and USD/SEK) are analyzed by utilizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between two normalized spectrograms of the tick frequency and the generalized Jensen-Shannon divergence among them. The temporal structure variations of the similarity between currency pairs is detected and characterized. A simple agent-based model in which N market participants exchange M currency pairs is proposed. The equation for the tick frequency is approximately derived theoretically. Based on the analysis of this model, the spectral distance of the tick frequency is associated with the similarity of the behavior (perception and decision) of the market participants in exchanging these currency pairs.

  13. Numerical Analysis of a Single Microchannel Within a High-Temperature Hydrogen Heat Exchanger for Beamed Energy Propulsion Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Conference Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 14 Jul 2013 – 19 Jul 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Numerical Analysis of a Single Microchannel Within a High...propulsion spacecraft. It was found that despite the very small diameter of the microchannels , each design produced extreme temperature...2013, Minneapolis, MN, USA HT2013-17217 DRAFT NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF A SINGLE MICROCHANNEL WITHIN A HIGH- TEMPERATURE HYDROGEN HEAT EXCHANGER FOR

  14. A student's analysis of the Moi University-Linköping University exchange programme.

    PubMed

    Mwenda, A S

    2012-11-01

    Introduction : Moi University College of Health Sciences was established in 1989. It is comprised of the schools of medicine, nursing, public health and dentistry. Since its inception, the college has been in collaboration with Linköping University in Sweden. This collaboration has taken the form of student and staff exchanges, as well as infrastructure and library improvements. This study was carried out to analyse the exchange programme and highlight some of the strengths that the exchange programme brings to the students' academic experience. Methods : A qualitative cross-sectional survey was conducted among the students who participated in the elective/exchange programme in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by the participants. Additional data were obtained from the recommendations and conclusions from the reports that the students wrote after their participation in the exchange programme. Focus group discussions and key informant interviews were also carried out. Results : A total of 46 students participated in the exchange programme: 27 from Moi University and 19 from Linköping University. The disciplines of students reflected the undergraduate courses offered by these universities. The exchange programme's strengths were exposing students to new cultural settings, different healthcare system organisation and influencing future academic and personal lives, as well as making education global. The main challenge facing the exchange programme was language. Discussion : This study shows the exchange programme as a strong pillar of the medical education curriculum, enabling students to get a global perspective on their education, while exposing them to significant cultural and healthcare organisation diversity. There is a need to expand the collaboration so that more students have the opportunity to experience the overseas exchange programme.

  15. The Exchange Factor Method: AN Alternative Zonal Formulation for Analysis of Radiating Enclosures Containing Participating Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Marvin Elwood

    The exchange factor method (EFM) is introduced and compared to the zone method (ZM). In both the EFM and the ZM the region of interest is discretized into volume and surface elements, each considered to be isothermal, which are small enough to give the required resolution. A suitable set of state variables for the system is composed of the surface element radiosities and the gas element emissive powers. The EFM defines exchange factors as dimensionless total-exchange areas for radiant interchange between volume and surface elements by all possible absorption/re-emission paths, but excluding wall reflections. In the EFM, the exchange factors replace the direct-exchange areas of the ZM and are used to write energy balances for each area and volume element in the system. As in the ZM, the radiant energy balance equations result in a set of algebraic equations linear in the system state variables. The distinguishing feature of the EFM is that exchange factors may be measurable quantities. Relationships between the EFM exchange factors and the ZM direct-exchange areas are presented. EFM conservation and reciprocity laws, analogous to those of the ZM, are also included. Temperature and heat flux distributions, predicted using the EFM, for two- and three-dimensional enclosures containing absorbing/emitting, isotropically scattering, and conducting media are included. An application of the EFM is proposed which calls for the measurement of exchange factors in a scale model of the enclosure to be analyzed. The measurement of these factors in an enclosure containing an isotropically scattering medium is discussed. The effects of isotropic scattering and absorption/re-emission processes are shown to be indistinguishable in their contribution to exchange factor paths.

  16. Exchange factor method: an alternative zonal formulation for analysis of radiating enclosures containing participating media

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    The exchange factor method (EFM) is introduced and compared to the zone method (ZM). In both the EFM and ZM the region of interest is discretized into volume and surface elements, each considered to be isothermal, which are small enough to give the required resolution. A suitable set of state variables for the system is composed of the surface element radiosities and the gas element emissive powers. The EFM defines exchange factors as dimensionless total-exchange areas for radiant interchange between volume and surface elements by all possible absorption/re-emission paths, but excluding wall reflections. In the EFM, the exchange factors replace the direct-exchange areas of the ZM and are used to write energy balances for each area and volume element in the system. As in the ZM, the radiant energy balance equations result in a set of algebraic equations linear in the system state variables. The distinguishing feature of the EFM is that exchange factors may be measurable quantities. Relationships between the EFM exchange factors and the ZM direct-exchange areas are presented. EFM conservation and reciprocity laws, analogous to those of the ZM, are also included. Temperature and heat flux distributions, predicted using the EFM, for two- and three-dimensional enclosures containing absorbing/emitting, isotropically scattering, and conducting media are included. An application of the EFM is proposed which calls for the measurement of exchange factors in a scale model of the enclosure to be analyzed. The measurement of these factors in an enclosure containing an isotropically scattering medium is discussed. The effects of isotropic scattering and absorption/re-emission processes are shown to be indistinguishable in their contribution to exchange factor paths.

  17. Agricultural Science in the Wild: A Social Network Analysis of Farmer Knowledge Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Brennon A.; Blair, Hugh T.; Gray, David I.; Kemp, Peter D.; Kenyon, Paul R.; Morris, Steve T.; Sewell, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Responding to demands for transformed farming practices requires new forms of knowledge. Given their scale and complexity, agricultural problems can no longer be solved by linear transfers in which technology developed by specialists passes to farmers by way of extension intermediaries. Recent research on alternative approaches has focused on the innovation systems formed by interactions between heterogeneous actors. Rather than linear transfer, systems theory highlights network facilitation as a specialized function. This paper contributes to our understanding of such facilitation by investigating the networks in which farmers discuss science. We report findings based on the study of a pastoral farming experiment collaboratively undertaken by a group of 17 farmers and five scientists. Analysis of prior contact and alter sharing between the group’s members indicates strongly tied and decentralized networks. Farmer knowledge exchanges about the experiment have been investigated using a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods. Network surveys identified who the farmers contacted for knowledge before the study began and who they had talked to about the experiment by 18 months later. Open-ended interviews collected farmer statements about their most valuable contacts and these statements have been thematically analysed. The network analysis shows that farmers talked about the experiment with 192 people, most of whom were fellow farmers. Farmers with densely tied and occupationally homogeneous contacts grew their networks more than did farmers with contacts that are loosely tied and diverse. Thematic analysis reveals three general principles: farmers value knowledge delivered by persons rather than roles, privilege farming experience, and develop knowledge with empiricist rather than rationalist techniques. Taken together, these findings suggest that farmers deliberate about science in intensive and durable networks that have significant implications for

  18. [Analysis of mouse liver membrane proteins using multidimensional ion exchange chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuowei; Peng, Fuli; Wang, Yuan; Tong, Wei; Ren, Yan; Xu, Ningzhi; Liu, Siqi

    2010-02-01

    The analysis of membrane proteins is still a technical obstacle in proteomic investigation. A fundamental question is how to allow the hydrophobic proteins fully solubilizing in a proper solvent environment. We propose that the denatured membrane proteins in high denaturant solution are fully ionized and separated through ion exchange chromatography. The membrane proteins prepared from a mouse liver were dissolved in 4 mol/L urea, 20 mmol/L Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.0), and loaded onto a tandem chromatography coupled with Q-Sepharose FF and Sephacryl S-200HR. With a linear NaCl gradient elution, the bound proteins were eluted and collected followed by sodium-dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to further separate the eluted proteins. The protein bound on SDS-PAGE were excised and in-gel digested by trypsin, while the digested peptides were delivered to reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ion-trap mass spectrometry for the peptide identifications. Of a total of 392 proteins identified, 306 were membrane proteins or membrane associated proteins reported by literature. Based on the calculation of hydrophobicity, the GRAVY (grand average of hydropathicity) scores of 83 proteins are over or equal to 0.00. Taking all the evidence, we have established an effective approach which is feasible in the investigation towards mouse liver membrane proteomics.

  19. Differential hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of protein–ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Michael J; Busby, Scott A; Pascal, Bruce D; West, Graham M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    Functional regulation of ligand-activated receptors is driven by alterations in the conformational dynamics of the protein upon ligand binding. Differential hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled with mass spectrometry has emerged as a rapid and sensitive approach for characterization of perturbations in conformational dynamics of proteins following ligand binding. While this technique is sensitive to detecting ligand interactions and alterations in receptor dynamics, it also can provide important mechanistic insights into ligand regulation. For example, HDX has been used to determine a novel mechanism of ligand activation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ, perform detailed analyses of binding modes of ligands within the ligand-binding pocket of two estrogen receptor isoforms, providing insight into selectivity, and helped classify different types of estrogen receptor-α ligands by correlating their pharmacology with the way they interact with the receptor based solely on hierarchical clustering of receptor HDX signatures. Beyond small-molecule–receptor interactions, this technique has also been applied to study protein–protein complexes, such as mapping antibody–antigen interactions. In this article, we summarize the current state of the differential HDX approaches and the future outlook. We summarize how HDX analysis of protein–ligand interactions has had an impact on biology and drug discovery. PMID:21329427

  20. Water Phase Change Heat Exchanger System Level Analysis for Low Lunar Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Ungar, Eugene; Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    In low Lunar orbit (LLO) the thermal environment is cyclic - extremely cold in the eclipse and as warm as room temperature near the subsolar point. Phase change material heat exchangers (PCHXs) are the best option for long term missions in these environments. The Orion spacecraft will use a n-pentadecane wax PCHX for its envisioned mission to LLO. Using water as a PCM material is attractive because its higher heat of fusion and greater density result in a lighter, more compact PCHX. To assess the use of a water PCHX for a human spacecraft in a circular LLO, a system level analysis was performed for the Orion spacecraft. Three cases were evaluated: 1) A one-to-one replacement of the wax PCHX on the internal thermal control loop with a water PCHX (including the appropriate control modifications), 2) reducing the radiator return setpoint temperature below Orion's value to enhance PCHX freezing, and 3) placing the water PCM on the external loop. The model showed that the water PCHX could not be used as a drop-in replacement for the wax PCHX. It did not freeze fully during the eclipse owing to its low freezing point. To obtain equivalent performance, 40% more radiator area than the Orion baseline was required. The study shows that, although water PCHXs are attractive at a component level, system level effects mean that they are not the best choice for LLO.

  1. Performance analysis of distributed and centralized models for electronic medical record exchanges.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ean-Wen; Lee, Chiung-San; Jiang, Wey-Wen; Chiou, Shwu-Fen; Liu, Fei-Ying; Liou, Der-Ming

    2007-01-01

    Electronic medical record exchanges can save time and reduce cost by eliminating redundant data and typing errors. The major steps of record exchange consist of querying information from database, encoding data into messages, and sending and decoding messages. Three medical-record-exchange models were proposed in the past, including the distributed, centralized, and indexed models. In this paper, the queuing theory is applied to evaluate the performance of the three models. We estimate the service time for each queue of the CPU, database and network, and predict the response time, probable bottlenecks and system capacities of each model.

  2. Anion exchange SPE and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in GHB analysis.

    PubMed

    Elian, Albert A; Hackett, Jeffery

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the extraction of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) from urine using solid-phase extraction (SPE) is described. SPE was performed on anion exchange columns after samples of urine had been diluted with de-ionized water. After application of the diluted samples containing GHB-d(6) as an internal standard, the sorbent was washed with deionized water and methanol and dried. The GHB was eluted from the SPE column with a solvent consisting of methanol containing 6% glacial acetic acid. The eluent was collected, evaporated to dryness, and dissolved in mobile phase (100 μL) for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in negative multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Liquid chromatography was performed in gradient mode employing a biphenyl column and a mobile phase consisting of acetontitrile (containing 0.1% formic acid) and 0.1% aqueous formic acid. The total run time for each analysis was less than 5 min. The limits of detection/quantification for this method were determined to be 50 and 100 ng/mL, respectively. The method was found to be linear from 500 ng/mL to 10,000 ng/mL (r(2)>0.995). The recovery of GHB was found to be greater than 75%. In this report, results of authentic urine samples analyzed for GHB by this method are presented. GHB concentrations in these samples were found to be range from less than 500 ng/mL to 5110 ng/mL.

  3. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  4. Analysis of heat transfers inside counterflow plate heat exchanger augmented by an auxiliary fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Khaled, A-R A

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost.

  5. Genetic Exchange Between Mutant Strains of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius: Analysis, Applications, and Significance for Hyperthermophiles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-20

    A prokaryotic micro-organism originally isolated from terrestrial hot springs, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius , was studied for its ability to exchange and...genetic phenomena of prokaryotes from geothermal habitats were studied for the first time using S. acidocaldarius ; these included photoreactivation, UV...induced mutagenesis, and stimulation of genetic exchange by UV.. The rate of spontaneous mutation was measured at 75 degrees C in S. acidocaldarius

  6. Heat-transfer analysis of double-pipe heat exchangers for indirect-cycle SCW NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thind, Harwinder

    SuperCritical-Water-cooled Reactors (SCWRs) are being developed as one of the Generation-IV nuclear-reactor concepts. SuperCritical Water (SCW) Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are expected to have much higher operating parameters compared to current NPPs, i.e., pressure of about 25 MPa and outlet temperature up to 625 °C. This study presents the heat transfer analysis of an intermediate Heat exchanger (HX) design for indirect-cycle concepts of Pressure-Tube (PT) and Pressure-Vessel (PV) SCWRs. Thermodynamic configurations with an intermediate HX gives a possibility to have a single-reheat option for PT and PV SCWRs without introducing steam-reheat channels into a reactor. Similar to the current CANDU and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPPs, steam generators separate the primary loop from the secondary loop. In this way, the primary loop can be completely enclosed in a reactor containment building. This study analyzes the heat transfer from a SCW primary (reactor) loop to a SCW and Super-Heated Steam (SHS) secondary (turbine) loop using a double-pipe intermediate HX. The numerical model is developed with MATLAB and NIST REFPROP software. Water from the primary loop flows through the inner pipe, and water from the secondary loop flows through the annulus in the counter direction of the double-pipe HX. The analysis on the double-pipe HX shows temperature and profiles of thermophysical properties along the heated length of the HX. It was found that the pseudocritical region has a significant effect on the temperature profiles and heat-transfer area of the HX. An analysis shows the effect of variation in pressure, temperature, mass flow rate, and pipe size on the pseudocritical region and the heat-transfer area of the HX. The results from the numerical model can be used to optimize the heat-transfer area of the HX. The higher pressure difference on the hot side and higher temperature difference between the hot and cold sides reduces the pseudocritical-region length, thus

  7. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws) ) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA): normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-04-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and radiofrequency (RF) irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (k(ws) ), with little dependence on bulk water T(1) , T(2) , RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments.

  8. Diffusional analysis of the adsorption of methyl iodide on silver exchanged mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.; Counce, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The removal of organic iodides from off-gas streams is an important step in controlling the release of radioactive iodine to the environment during the treatment of radioactive wastes or the processing of some irradiated materials. Nine-well accepted mass transfer models were evaluated for their ability to adequately explain the observed CH{sub 3}I uptake behavior onto the Ag{degrees}Z. Linear and multidimensional regression techniques were used to estimate the diffusion constants and other model parameters, which then permitted the selection of an appropriate mass transfer model. Although a number of studies have been conducted to evaluate the loading of both elemental and methyl iodide on silver-exchanged mordenite, these studies focused primarily on the macro scale (deep bed) while evaluating the material under a broad range of process conditions and contaminants for total bed loading at the time of breakthrough. A few studies evaluated equilibrium or maximum loading. Thus, to date, only bulk loading data exist for the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z. Hence this is believed to be the first study to quantify the controlling mass transfer mechanisms of this process, It can be concluded from the analysis of the experimental data obtained by the {open_quotes}single-pellet{close_quotes} type experiments and for the process conditions used in this study that the overall mass transfer rate associated with the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z is affected by both micropore and macropore diffusion. The macropore diffusion rate was significantly faster than the micropore diffusion, resulting in a two-step adsorption behavior which was adequately modeled by a bimodal pore distribution model. The micropore diffusivity was determined to be on the order of 2 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s. The system was also shown to be isothermal under all conditions of this study. 21 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Development of Nusselt number correlation using dimensional analysis for plate heat exchanger with a carboxymethyl cellulose solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthamizhi, Karuppannan; Kalaichelvi, Ponnusamy

    2015-06-01

    Versatile applications of plate heat exchangers (PHE's) in various industrial processes signify their command over other types of heat exchangers. The objective of this work was to derive Nusselt number correlations using dimensional analysis in terms of all the parameters to determine the heat transfer coefficients in a PHE for various concentrations of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) solution and it was also compared with the available models in literature. The heat transfer coefficient increases with increase in concentration of CMC from 0.1 to 0.6 %w/w and also increases with increase in mass flow rates of both cold and hot fluids from 0.016 to 0.099 kg/s. The Nusselt number correlation developed using dimensional analysis has predicted the Nusselt number for the given PHE with a RMS deviation of 14.61.

  10. Assessment of chemical exchange in tryptophan-albumin solution through (19)F multicomponent transverse relaxation dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping-Chang

    2015-06-01

    A number of NMR methods possess the capability of probing chemical exchange dynamics in solution. However, certain drawbacks limit the applications of these NMR approaches, particularly, to a complex system. Here, we propose a procedure that integrates the regularized nonnegative least squares (NNLS) analysis of multiexponential T2 relaxation into Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments to probe chemical exchange in a multicompartmental system. The proposed procedure was validated through analysis of (19)F T2 relaxation data of 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan in a two-compartment solution with and without bovine serum albumin. Given the regularized NNLS analysis of a T2 relaxation curve acquired, for example, at the CPMG frequency υ CPMG  = 125, the nature of two distinct peaks in the associated T2 distribution spectrum indicated 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan either retaining the free state, with geometric mean */multiplicative standard deviation (MSD) = 1851.2 ms */1.51, or undergoing free/albumin-bound interconversion, with geometric mean */MSD = 236.8 ms */1.54, in the two-compartment system. Quantities of the individual tryptophan species were accurately reflected by the associated T2 peak areas, with an interconversion state-to-free state ratio of 0.45 ± 0.11. Furthermore, the CPMG relaxation dispersion analysis estimated the exchange rate between the free and albumin-bound states in this fluorinated tryptophan analog and the corresponding dissociation constant of the fluorinated tryptophan-albumin complex in the chemical-exchanging, two-compartment system.

  11. Kinetic Analysis of Cation Exchange in Birnessite using Time-resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    C Lopano; P Heaney; J Bandstra; J Post; S Brantley

    2011-12-31

    In this study, we applied time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction (TRXRD) to develop kinetic models that test a proposed two-stage reaction pathway for cation exchange in birnessite. These represent the first rate equations calculated for cation exchange in layered manganates. Our previous work has shown that the substitution of K, Cs, and Ba for interlayer Na in synthetic triclinic birnessite induces measurable changes in unit-cell parameters. New kinetic modeling of this crystallographic data supports our previously postulated two-stage reaction pathway for cation exchange, and we can correlate the kinetic steps with changes in crystal structure. In addition, the initial rates of cation exchange, R ({angstrom}{sup 3} min{sup -1}), were determined from changes in unit-cell volume to follow these rate laws: R = 1.75[K{sup +}{sub (aq)}]{sup 0.56}, R = 41.1[Cs{sup +}{sub (aq)}]{sup 1.10}, R = 1.15[Ba{sup 2+}{sub (aq)}]{sup 0.50}. Thus, the exchange rates for Na in triclinic birnessite decreased in the order: Cs >> K > Ba. These results are likely a function of hydration energy differences of the cations and the preference of the solution phase for the more readily hydrated cation.

  12. Statistical analysis of entropy generation in longitudinally finned tube heat exchanger with shell side nanofluid by a single phase approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konchada, Pavan Kumar; Pv, Vinay; Bhemuni, Varaprasad

    2016-06-01

    The presence of nanoparticles in heat exchangers ascertained increment in heat transfer. The present work focuses on heat transfer in a longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger. Experimentation is done on longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger with pure water as working fluid and the outcome is compared numerically using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package based on finite volume method for different flow rates. Further 0.8% volume fraction of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanofluid is considered on shell side. The simulated nanofluid analysis has been carried out using single phase approach in CFD by updating the user-defined functions and expressions with thermophysical properties of the selected nanofluid. These results are thereafter compared against the results obtained for pure water as shell side fluid. Entropy generated due to heat transfer and fluid flow is calculated for the nanofluid. Analysis of entropy generation is carried out using the Taguchi technique. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results show that the inlet temperature on shell side has more pronounced effect on entropy generation.

  13. Expanded Analysis of Hot Isostatic Pressed Iodine-Loaded Silver-Exchanged Mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R. T.; Bruffey, S. H.; Patton, K. K.

    2014-09-30

    Reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z) is being evaluated as a potential material to control the release of radioactive iodine that is released during the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel into the plant off-gas streams. The purpose of this study was to determine if hot pressing could directly convert this iodine loaded sorbent into a waste form suitable for long-term disposition. The minimal pretreatment required for production of pressed pellets makes hot pressing a technically and economically desirable process. Initial scoping studies utilized hot uniaxial pressing (HUPing) to prepare samples of non-iodine-loaded reduced silver exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z). The resulting samples were very fragile due to the low pressure (~ 28 MPa) used. It was recommended that hot isostatic pressing (HIPing), performed at higher temperatures and pressures, be investigated. HIPing was carried out in two phases, with a third and final phase currently underway. Phase I evaluated the effects of pressure and temperature conditions on the manufacture of a pressed sample. The base material was an engineered form of silver zeolite. Six samples of Ag0Z and two samples of I-Ag0Z were pressed. It was found that HIPing produced a pressed pellet of high density. Analysis of each pressed pellet by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrophotometry (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrated that under the conditions used for pressing, the majority of the material transforms into an amorphous structure. The only crystalline phase observed in the pressed Ag0Z material was SiO2. For the samples loaded with iodine (I-Ag0Z) iodine was present as AgI clusters at low temperatures, and transformed into AgIO4 at high temperatures. Surface mapping and EDS demonstrate segregation between silver iodide phases and silicon dioxide phases. Based on the results of the Phase I study, an expanded test matrix was developed to examine the effects of multiple source materials, compositional

  14. Transmembrane exchange of hyperpolarized 13C-urea in human erythrocytes: subminute timescale kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Guilhem; Puckeridge, Max; Liangfeng, Guo; Tan, Yee Ling; Jacob, Chacko; Garland, Marc; Kuchel, Philip W

    2013-11-05

    The rate of exchange of urea across the membranes of human erythrocytes (red blood cells) was quantified on the 1-s to 2-min timescale. (13)C-urea was hyperpolarized and subjected to rapid dissolution and the previously reported (partial) resolution of (13)C NMR resonances from the molecules inside and outside red blood cells in suspensions was observed. This enabled a stopped-flow type of experiment to measure the (initially) zero-trans transport of urea with sequential single-pulse (13)C NMR spectra, every second for up to ~2 min. Data were analyzed using Bayesian reasoning and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method with a set of simultaneous nonlinear differential equations that described nuclear magnetic relaxation combined with transmembrane exchange. Our results contribute to quantitative understanding of urea-exchange kinetics in the whole body; and the methodological approach is likely to be applicable to other cellular systems and tissues in vivo.

  15. Calculation of Scattering Amplitude Without Partial Analysis. II; Inclusion of Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, Aaron; Shertzer, J.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    There was a method for calculating the whole scattering amplitude, f(Omega(sub k)), directly. The idea was to calculate the complete wave function Psi numerically, and use it in an integral expression for f, which can be reduced to a 2 dimensional quadrature. The original application was for e-H scattering without exchange. There the Schrodinger reduces a 2-d partial differential equation (pde), which was solved using the finite element method (FEM). Here we extend the method to the exchange approximation. The S.E. can be reduced to a pair of coupled pde's, which are again solved by the FEM. The formal expression for f(Omega(sub k)) consists two integrals, f+/- = f(sub d) +/- f(sub e); f(sub d) is formally the same integral as the no-exchange f. We have also succeeded in reducing f(sub e) to a 2-d integral. Results will be presented at the meeting.

  16. CFD analysis of the plate heat exchanger - Mathematical modelling of mass and heat transfer in serial connection with tubular heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojko, Marian; Kocich, Radim

    2016-06-01

    Application of numerical simulations based on the CFD calculation when the mass and heat transfer between the fluid flows is essential component of thermal calculation. In this article the mathematical model of the heat exchanger is defined, which is subsequently applied to the plate heat exchanger, which is connected in series with the other heat exchanger (tubular heat exchanger). The present contribution deals with the possibility to use the waste heat of the flue gas produced by small micro turbine. Inlet boundary conditions to the mathematical model of the plate heat exchanger are obtained from the results of numerical simulation of the tubular heat exchanger. Required parameters such for example inlet temperature was evaluated from temperature field, which was subsequently imported to the inlet boundary condition to the simulation of plate heat exchanger. From the results of 3D numerical simulations are evaluated basic flow variables including the evaluation of dimensionless parameters such as Colburn j-factor and friction ft factor. Numerical simulation is realized by software ANSYS Fluent15.0.

  17. Bias-Exchange Metadynamics Simulations: An Efficient Strategy for the Analysis of Conduction and Selectivity in Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Domene, Carmen; Barbini, Paolo; Furini, Simone

    2015-04-14

    Conduction through ion channels possesses two interesting features: (i) different ionic species are selected with high-selectivity and (ii) ions travel across the channel with rates approaching free-diffusion. Molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to reveal how these processes take place at the atomic level. However, analysis of conduction and selectivity at atomistic detail is still hampered by the short time scales accessible by computer simulations. Several algorithms have been developed to "accelerate" sampling along the slow degrees of freedom of the process under study and thus to probe longer time scales. In these algorithms, the slow degrees of freedom need to be defined in advance, which is a well-known shortcoming. In the particular case of ion conduction, preliminary assumptions about the number and type of ions participating in the permeation process need to be made. In this study, a novel approach for the analysis of conduction and selectivity based on bias-exchange metadynamics simulations was tested. This approach was compared with umbrella sampling simulations, using a model of a Na(+)-selective channel. Analogous conclusions resulted from both techniques, but the computational cost of bias-exchange simulations was lower. In addition, with bias-exchange metadynamics it was possible to calculate free energy profiles in the presence of a variable number and type of permeating ions. This approach might facilitate the definition of the set of collective variables required to analyze conduction and selectivity in ion channels.

  18. Behavior of human serum albumin on strong cation exchange resins: I. experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Voitl, Agnes; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-20

    Experiments with human serum albumin on the strong cation exchange resin Fractogel EMD SE Hicap (M) were carried out. Even though human serum albumin was used at high purity, two peaks in gradient elution experiments occurred. The obtained data can be explained by considering that human serum albumin binds to Fractogel EMD SE Hicap (M) in two different binding conformations: the protein adsorbs instantaneously in the first conformation and then changes into the second one with a kinetic limitation. The two-peak behavior of human serum albumin was analyzed in detail, especially at various gradient lengths, concentrations and temperatures. Breakthrough curves were performed at four modifier concentrations and three velocities. The characteristic adsorption behavior, found for gradient experiments, was confirmed by the breakthrough curves. The two-peak elution pattern of human serum albumin was also found for other strong cation exchange resins, but not for weak cation exchange resins. It is concluded that the described behavior is peculiar for the interaction of human serum albumin with the strong cation exchange ligand of the resin.

  19. Analysis of the galactosyltransferase reaction by positional isotope exchange and secondary deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.C.; Singh, A.N.; Raushel, F.M.

    1988-11-15

    The mechanism of the galactosyltransferase-catalyzed reaction was probed using positional isotope exchange, alpha-secondary deuterium isotope effects, and inhibition studies with potential transition state analogs. Incubation of (beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O)UDP-galactose and alpha-lactalbumin with galactosyltransferase from bovine milk did not result in any positional isotope exchange. The addition of 4-deoxy-4-fluoroglucose as a dead-end inhibitor did not induce any detectable positional isotope exchange. alpha-Secondary deuterium isotope effects of 1.21 +/- 0.04 on Vmax and 1.05 +/- 0.04 on Vmax/KM were observed for (1-2H)-UDP-galactose. D-Glucono-1,5-lactone, D-galactono-1,4-lactone, D-galactono-1,5-lactone, nojirimycin, and deoxynojirimycin, did not inhibit the galactosyl transfer reaction at concentrations less than 1.0 mM. The magnitude of the secondary deuterium isotope effect supports a mechanism in which the anomeric carbon of the galactosyl moiety has substantial sp2 character in the transition state. Therefore, the cleavage of the bond between the galactose and UDP moieties in the transition state has proceeded to a much greater extent than the formation of the bond between the galactose and the incoming glucose. The lack of a positional isotope exchange reaction indicates that the beta-phosphoryl group of the UDP is not free to rotate in the absence of an acceptor substrate.

  20. Space shuttle launch vehicle performance trajectory, exchange ratios, and dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toelle, R. G.; Blackwell, D. L.; Lott, L. N.

    1973-01-01

    A baseline space shuttle performance trajectory for Mission 3A launched from WTR has been generated. Design constraints of maximum dynamic pressure, longitudinal acceleration, and delivered payload were satisfied. Payload exchange ratios are presented with explanation on use. Design envelopes of dynamic pressure, SRB staging point, aerodynamic heating and flight performance reserves are calculated and included.

  1. Measurement and analysis of gas exchange during exercise using a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Sue, D Y; Hansen, J E; Blais, M; Wasserman, K

    1980-09-01

    Although exercise testing is useful in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, a rapid comprehensive method for measurement of ventilation and gas exchange has been limited to expensive complex computer-based systems. We devised a relatively inexpensive, technically simple, and clinically oriented exercise system built around a desktop calculator. This system automatically collects and analyzes data on a breath-by-breath basis. Our calculator system overcomes the potential inaccuracies of gas exchange measurement due to water vapor dilution and mismatching of expired flow and gas concentrations. We found no difference between the calculator-derived minute ventilation, CO2 production, O2 consumption, and respiratory exchange ratio and the values determined from simultaneous mixed expired gas collections in 30 constant-work-rate exercise studies. Both tabular and graphic displays of minute ventilation, CO2 production, O2 consumption, respiratory exchange ratio, heart rate, end-tidal O2 tension, end-tidal CO2 tension, and arterial blood gas value are included for aid in the interpretation of clinical exercise tests.

  2. Theoretical considerations for anticipating of function analysis on a gradient index-lens fabrication through double ion-exchange process.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Banafsheh; Sabatyan, Arash

    2012-09-10

    Based on precise and detailed theoretical examination of diffusion equation analysis, two-step Ag(+)-Na(+) and Na(+)-Ag(+) ion-exchange parameters were optimized in order to fabricate a gradient index (GRIN) lens in the BK7 glass rod. Using the diffusion equation, the impact of the concentration ratio of the exchanged ion during the first and second steps was examined in detail. Then, based on the calculated effective parameters such as concentration ratio and immersion time, a fabrication process was proposed. We managed to get the optimum parameters (the bath stop time, temperature, and length) to make a quarter pitch lens. As a result, some samples of the GRIN lens were fabricated and tested successfully. Theoretical considerations and experimental results are presented.

  3. Adenine and guanine 8CH exchange in nucleic acids: resolution and measurement by Raman optical multichannel analysis.

    PubMed

    Lamba, O P; Becka, R; Thomas, G J

    Deuterium exchange of 8C protons of adenine and guanine in nucleic acids is conveniently monitored by laser Raman spectrophotometry, and the average exchange rate so determined [kA + kG] can be exploited as a dynamic probe of the secondary structure of DNA or RNA [J. M. Benevides and G. J. Thomas, Jr. (1985) Biopolymers 24, 667-682]. The present work describes a rapid Raman procedure, based upon optical multichannel analysis, which permits discrimination of the different 8CH exchange rates, kA of adenine and kG of guanine, in a single experimental protocol. For this procedure, simultaneous measurements are made of the intensity decay or frequency shift in separately resolved Raman bands of adenine and guanine, each of which is sensitive only to 8C deuteration of its respective purine. Resolution of the rates kA and kG is demonstrated for the mononucleotide mixtures, 5'-rAMP + 5'-rGMP and 5'-dAMP + 5'-dGMP, for the polynucleotides poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) and poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), for calf thymus DNA, and for the 17 base-pair operator OR3. We show that the different exchange rates of adenine and guanine, in nucleotide mixtures and in DNA, may also be calculated independently from intensity decay of the composite 1481-cm-1 band, comprising overlapped adenine and guanine components, over a time domain that encompasses two distinct regimes: (1) a relatively more rapid exchange of guanine, and (2) a concurrent slower exchange of adenine. Both methods developed here yield consistent results. We find, first, that exchange of guanine is approximately twofold more rapid than that of adenine when both purines are present in the same structure and solvent environment, presumably a consequence of the greater basicity of the 7N site of guanine. Second, we find that adenine suffers greater retardation of exchange than guanine when both purines are incorporated into a "classical" B-DNA secondary structure, such as that of calf thymus DNA. This finding suggests different

  4. Stability analysis of direct contact heat exchangers subject to system perturbations. Final report, Task 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This report includes a project summary, copies of two papers resulting from the work and the Ph.D. Dissertation of Dr. Mehdi Golafshani entitled, ''Stability of a Direct Contact Heat Exchanger''. Specifically, the work deals with the operational stability of a spray column type heat exchanger subject to disturbances typical of those which can occur for geothermal applications. A computer program was developed to solve the one-dimensional transient two-phase flow problem and it was applied to the design of a spray column. The operation and design of the East Mesa 500kW/sub e/ direct contactor was assessed. It is shown that the heat transfer is governed by the internal resistance of the dispersed phase. In fact, the performance is well-represented by diffusion of heat within the drops. 5 refs.

  5. Impaired Gas Exchange at Birth and Risk of Intellectual Disability and Autism: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Mollon, Josephine; Boffetta, Paolo; Reichenberg, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    We conducted meta-analyses of 67 studies on the association between neonatal proxies of impaired gas exchange and intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Neonatal acidosis was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.55 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 2.23-5.49] for ID and an OR of 1.10 (95% CI 0.91-1.31) for ASD.…

  6. Measurement of frost characteristics on heat exchanger fins. Part 2: Data and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Thomas, L.; Besant, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Part 1 of this paper described the frost growth test facility and instrumentation. In Part 2, results are presented for typical operating conditions with frost growth on heat exchanger fins. Typical data are presented for frost height distributions on fins, increase in pressure loss for airflow through a finned test section, frost mass accumulation on fins, and heat rate. Special attention is given to the uncertainty in each of these measurements and calculations.

  7. Analysis of Foreign Exchange Interventions by Intervention Agent with an Artificial Market Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Hiroki; Tojo, Satoshi

    We propose a multi-agent system which learns intervention policies and evaluates the effect of interventions in an artificial foreign exchange market. Izumi et al. had presented a system called AGEDASI TOF to simulate artificial market, together with a support system for the government to decide foreign exchange policies. However, the system needed to fix the amount of governmental intervention prior to the simulation, and was not realistic. In addition, the interventions in the system did not affect supply and demand of currencies; thus we could not discuss the effect of intervention correctly. First, we improve the system so as to make much of the weights of influential factors. Thereafter, we introduce an intervention agent that has the role of the central bank to stabilize the market. We could show that the agent learned the effective intervention policies through the reinforcement learning, and that the exchange rate converged to a certain extent in the expected range. We could also estimate the amount of intervention, showing the efficacy of signaling. In this model, in order to investigate the aliasing of the perception of the intervention agent, we introduced a pseudo-agent who was supposed to be able to observe all the behaviors of dealer agents; with this super-agent, we discussed the adequate granularity for a market state description.

  8. Calculation of scattering amplitude without partial wave analysis: Inclusion of exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temkin, Aaron; Shertzer, Janine

    2002-05-01

    In Ref. [1], a method is given for calculating the scattering amplitude f(Ω) directly. The idea is to calculate the complete wave function Ψ_k( r) numerically and use it in an integral expression for f(Ω). The original application was for electron scattering from static hydrogen without exchange. The Schrödinger equation (SE) reduces to a 2D partial differential equation (PDE), which is solved using the finite element method (FEM) [2]. The integral over dφr is done analytically, reducing the integral expression for f(Ω_k) to a 2D integral. Here we extend the method to include the effects of exchange. The SE can be reduced to a pair of 2D coupled PDE's which are again solved by the FEM. The formal expression for f(Ω) consists of two integrals, f^=fd f_e; fd is formally the same integral as the no-exchange f. We have also succeeded in reducing fe to a 2D integral. Results will be presented at the meeting. [1] J. Shertzer and A. Temkin, Phys. Rev. A 63, 062714 (2001). [2] J. Shertzer and J. Botero, Phys. Rev. A 49, 3673 (1994).

  9. Sorption processes and XRD analysis of a natural zeolite exchanged with Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) cations.

    PubMed

    Castaldi, Paola; Santona, Laura; Enzo, Stefano; Melis, Pietro

    2008-08-15

    In this study the Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) adsorption capacity of a natural zeolite was evaluated in batch tests at a constant pH of 5.5 by polluting this mineral with solutions containing increasing concentrations of the three cations to obtain adsorption isotherms. In addition X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the changes of zeolite structure caused by the exchange with cations of different ionic radius. The zeolite adsorption capacity for the three cations was Zn>Pb>Cd. Moreover a sequential extraction procedure [H(2)O, 0.05 M Ca(NO(3))(2) and 0.02 M EDTA] was applied to zeolite samples used in the adsorption experiments to determine the chemical form of the cations bound to the sorbent. Using this approach it was shown that low concentrations of Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) were present as water-soluble and exchangeable fractions (<25% of the Me adsorbed), while EDTA extracted most of the adsorbed cations from the zeolite (>27% of the Me adsorbed). The XRD pattern of zeolite, analysed according to the Rietveld method, showed that the main mineralogical phase involved in the adsorption process was clinoptilolite. Besides structure information showed that the incorporation of Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Zn(2+), into the zeolite frameworks changed slightly but appreciably the lattice parameters. XRD analysis also showed the occurrence of some isomorphic substitution phenomena where the Al(3+) ions of the clinoptilolite framework were replaced by exchanged Pb(2+) cations in the course of the ion exchange reaction. This mechanism was instead less evident in the patterns of the samples doped with Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) cations.

  10. Analysis of equilibrium data for cesium ion exchange of Hanford CC and NCAW supernatant liquid--Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.; Bray, L.A.; Brooks, K.P.; Carlson, C.D.; Kim, A.Y.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains the results of a partial analysis and correlation of a large amount of equilibrium data obtained for cesium ion exchange. Data from testing of organic resins, a phenolic- carboxylic acid resin, and a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin with NCAW and CC waste simulants were assessed. The isotherms that were considered for correlating the data include the Langmuir, the Freundlich, and a combination of the two. These correlations are being developed to provide equations that can be used with models for assessing column behavior and provide correlations that will allow prediction of the equilibrium performance of the two resins with wastes of different compositions.

  11. Sociological functionalism, exchange theory and life-cycle analysis: a call for more explicit theoretical bridges.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, V L; Dowd, J J

    There has been a notable lack of articulation between mainstream sociological theory and the work of social gerontologists. This paper suggests four reasons for this, and reviews the basic assumptions and applications to gerontology of two well-established frameworks in sociological theory: structural-functionalism and exchange. With more rigorous and systematic integration of gerontological data with social and social psychological theory, more comprehensive explanations of life course phenomena would result. Moreover, the age variable would be considerably by other sociologists as less of a control and more of a relevant variable in its own right.

  12. THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR IN-TANK ION-EXCHANGE COLUMN PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Frank02 Smith, F

    2009-01-05

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is stored in three forms: sludge, saltcake, and supernate. A small column ion-exchange (SCIX) process is being designed to treat dissolved saltcake waste before feeding it to the saltstone facility to be made into grout. The waste is caustic with high concentrations of various sodium salts and lower concentrations of radionuclides. Two cation exchange media being considered are a granular form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and a spherical form of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin. CST is an inorganic material highly selective for cesium that is not elutable. Through this process, radioactive cesium from the salt solution is absorbed into ion exchange media (either CST or RF) which is packed within a flow-through column. A packed column loaded with radioactive cesium generates significant heat from radiolytic decay. If engineering designs cannot handle this thermal load, hot spots may develop locally which could degrade the performance of the ion-exchange media. Performance degradation with regard to cesium removal has been observed between 50 and 80 C for CST [1] and at 65 C for RF resin [2]. In addition, the waste supernate solution will boil around 130 C. If the columns boiled dry, the sorbent material could plug the column and lead to replacement of the entire column module. Alternatively, for organic resins such as RF there is risk of fire at elevated temperatures. The objective of the work is to compute temperature distributions across CST- and RF-packed columns immersed in waste supernate under accident scenarios involving loss of salt solution flow through the beds and, in some cases, loss of coolant system flow. For some cases, temperature distributions are determined as a function of time after the initiation of a given accident scenario and in other cases only the final steady-state temperature distributions are calculated. In general, calculations are conducted to ensure conservative and

  13. Safe Affordable Fission Engine-(SAFE-) 100a Heat Exchanger Thermal and Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.

    2005-01-01

    A potential fission power system for in-space missions is a heat pipe-cooled reactor coupled to a Brayton cycle. In this system, a heat exchanger (HX) transfers the heat of the reactor core to the Brayton gas. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine- (SAFE-) 100a is a test program designed to thermally and hydraulically simulate a 95 Btu/s prototypic heat pipe-cooled reactor using electrical resistance heaters on the ground. This Technical Memorandum documents the thermal and structural assessment of the HX used in the SAFE-100a program.

  14. Analysis of diffusion models for protein adsorption to porous anion-exchange adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Dong; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2002-07-12

    The ion-exchange adsorption kinetics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and gamma-globulin to an anion exchanger, DEAE Spherodex M, has been studied by batch adsorption experiments. Various diffusion models, that is, pore diffusion, surface diffusion, homogeneous diffusion and parallel diffusion models, are analyzed for their suitabilities to depict the adsorption kinetics. Protein diffusivities are estimated by matching the models with the experimental data. The dependence of the diffusivities on initial protein concentration is observed and discussed. The adsorption isotherm of BSA is nearly rectangular, so there is little surface diffusion. As a result, the surface and homogeneous diffusion models do not fit to the kinetic data of BSA adsorption. The adsorption isotherm of gamma-globulin is less favorable, and the surface diffusion contributes greatly to the mass transport. Consequently, both the surface and homogeneous diffusion models fit to the kinetic data of gamma-globulin well. The adsorption kinetics of BSA and gamma-globulin can be very well fitted by parallel diffusion model, because the model reflects correctly the intraparticle mass transfer mechanism. In addition, for both the favorably bound proteins, the pore diffusion model fits the adsorption kinetics reasonably well. The results here indicate that the pore diffusion model can be used as a good approximate to depict protein adsorption kinetics for protein adsorption systems from rectangular to linear isotherms.

  15. The temporal structure of intergenerational exchange: a within-family analysis of parent-child reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Thomas; Raab, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies of parent-child reciprocity have focused either on the long term (generalized exchange over the life course) or on the short term (concurrent exchange in later life). The purpose of this research was to investigate the linkage between both temporal patterns of reciprocity within an integrative conceptual framework. We assessed whether long-term and short-term reciprocity operated as interdependent mechanisms that initially selected and subsequently relieved intergenerational caregiving relationships. We used data from the Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old study (AHEAD) provided by frail, single-living parents of at least two children (N=1010 respondents comprising 3768 parent-child dyads). Fixed-effects conditional logit models estimated between-sibling differences in assistance provided to parents, measured by instrumental help (i.e., assistance with IADLs) and hands-on care (i.e., assistance with ADLs). Key predictors were two measures of financial transfers given to children referring to longer and shorter recall periods. Receiving earlier and current financial transfers increased adult children's propensity to support their parents in later life. The effect of earlier transfers pertained to help rather than care whereas the reverse was true for the effect of current transfers. We found no evidence for a linkage between long-term and short-term reciprocity. Overall, the results indicate that adult children might balance long-term support accounts relative to their siblings, suggesting an intra-generational orientation on equity.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroek, C.; Louis, J.F. |

    1995-02-01

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO2 flux to perturbation in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model`s main parameters describing current seasonal CO2 exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO2 flux is most sensitive to parameters characterizing litter chemical composition and more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO2 exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO2-induced warming is a significant increase in CO2 emission, creating a positive feedback to atmosphreic CO2 accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO2, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO2 flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO2 exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waelbroek, C.; Louis, J.-F.

    1995-01-01

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO2 flux to perturbation in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model's main parameters describing current seasonal CO2 exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO2 flux is most sensitive to parameters characterizing litter chemical composition and more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO2 exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO2-induced warming is a significant increase in CO2 emission, creating a positive feedback to atmosphreic CO2 accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO2, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO2 flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results.

  18. A global analysis of stratospheric-tropospheric exchange during northern winter

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerling, M.P. ); Schaack, T.K.; Lenzen, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical formulation of stratospheric-tropospheric exchange was used to globally diagnose the cross-tropopause mass flux for January 1979. Contributions by physical mechanisms were evaluated. Two regions of zonally integrated mass flux into the stratosphere were found, one over tropical latitudes associated with diabatic transports, and a second over subpolar latitude associated with abiabatic transports. The ingress to the stratosphere in each of the latitude bands 50[degrees]-70[degrees]N and 40[degrees]-70[degrees]S was as intense as that occurring over the tropics, a feature of the global budget not previously documented. Compensating mass outflow from the stratosphere occured mainly over midlatitudes near axes of strong upper-level westerlies. Large zonal asymmetries were found in the regional patterns of the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange. Tropical inflow to the statosphere was maximized over the Australasian monsoon. The midlatitude mass outflow was concentrated along stationary wave troughs. Mass transport into the stratosphere occurred downstream and poleward relative to the troughs. The extratropical pattern of time-averaged cross-tropopause mass flux was interpretable within the context of physical models of three-dimensional airmass trajectories in baroclinic disturbances. The findings of mass inflow to the stratosphere at subpolar latitudes were consistent with satellite and aircraft measurements of high water vapor mixing ratios in the low stratosphere over these regions. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Provider stakeholders' perceived benefit from a nascent health information exchange: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Pevnick, Joshua M; Claver, Maria; Dobalian, Aram; Asch, Steven M; Stutman, Harris R; Tomines, Alan; Fu, Paul

    2012-04-01

    We sought to better understand the perceived costs and benefits of joining a nascent health information exchange (HIE) from the perspective of potential provider organization participants. We therefore conducted semi-structured interviews with organizational representatives. Interview transcriptions were thematically coded, and coded text was subsequently aggregated to summarize the breadth and depth of responses. Although no respondents expected HIE to result in net financial benefit to their organization, all respondents recognized some potential benefits, and some respondents expected HIE to result in overall organizational benefit. Disproportionate benefit was expected for the poorest, sickest patients. Many respondents had concerns about HIE increasing the risk of data security breaches, and these concerns were most pronounced at larger organizations. We found little evidence of organizational concern regarding loss of patients to other organizations or publication of unfavorable quality data. If HIE's greatest benefactors are indeed the poorest, sickest patients, our current health care financing environment will make it difficult to align HIE costs with benefits. To sustain HIE, state and federal governments may need to consider ongoing subsidies. Furthermore, these governments will need to ensure that policies regulating data exchange have sufficient nationwide coordination and liability limitations that the perceived organizational risks of joining HIEs do not outweigh perceived benefits. HIE founders can address organizational concerns by attempting to coordinate HIE policies with those of their largest founding organizations, particularly for data security policies. Early HIE development and promotional efforts should not only focus on potential benefits, but should also address organizational concerns.

  20. Analysis of venous access for therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Grishaber, J E; Cunningham, M C; Rohret, P A; Strauss, R G

    1992-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed our 2-year experience with venous access for 363 therapeutic plasma exchanges in 46 patients with neurological disease, including acute Guillain-Barré syndrome (N = 20), myasthenia gravis (N = 17), and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (N = 9). Twenty-three patients (50%) completed the planned course of therapy using only peripheral venous access, and 28 central venous catheters were placed in the remaining 23 patients. Patients utilizing central venous access did not undergo a greater number of procedures, but they were more likely to have acute Guillain-Barré syndrome (P < 0.02) or to be hospitalized in a medical intensive care unit (P < 0.01). Three types of central catheters were used, and although our experience was predominantly with 1 type, differences were noted. Only 3% of procedures (3 of 96) done with a Quinton-Mahurkar catheter were associated with a catheter failure, compared to 27% (4 of 15, P < 0.01) with a Hickman catheter and 67% (2 of 3) with a triple-lumen catheter. Life-threatening complications occurred with 3 of 28 (11%) central catheters. To optimize the success of therapeutic plasma exchange using central access, it is critical that hemapheresis personnel advise each patient's primary physician regarding the type of central venous catheter required. Currently, we recommend use of a Quinton-Mahurkar or other dual-lumen hemodialysis catheter.

  1. A Numerical Analysis on a Compact Heat Exchanger in Aluminum Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonomo, B.; Ercole, D.; Manca, O.; Nardini, S.

    2016-09-01

    A numerical investigation on a compact heat exchanger in aluminum foam is carried out. The governing equations in two-dimensional steady state regime are written in local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE). The geometrical domain under investigation is made up of a plate in aluminum foam with inside a single array of five circular tubes. The presence of the open-celled metal foam is modeled as a porous media by means of the Darcy-Forchheimer law. The foam has a porosity of 0.93 with 20 pores per inch and the LTNE assumption is used to simulate the heat transfer between metal foam and air. The compact heat exchanger at different air flow rates is studied with an assigned surface tube temperature. The results in terms of local heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number on the external surface of the tubes are given. Moreover, local air temperature and velocity profiles in the smaller cross section, between two consecutive tubes, as a function of Reynolds number are showed. The performance evaluation criteria (PEC) is assessed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the metal foam.

  2. Hyporheic Exchange: Analysis of Aquifer Heterogeneity, Channel Morphology and Bedforms- 2D and 3D Simulations Using MODFLOW and MODPATH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, J. R.; Welty, C.; Packman, A.

    2005-12-01

    The main purpose of the simulations in this research is the analysis of three-dimensional surface-groundwater interchange in heterogeneous systems. The effects of channel pattern, bed forms and aquifer heterogeneity on flow interactions between stream and groundwater systems are examined in order to contribute for a better understanding of the hyporheic process. A two-dimensional approach was also adopted to allow comparisons with the three-dimensional results. The grid was designed using the correlation scales of the heterogeneous fields and the scale of the stream meanders. MODFLOW and MODPATH were used to evaluate magnitude, direction and spatial distribution of the exchange flow. PMWIN and PMPATH were used as pre and post-processors during the construction of the models and analysis of results. Gaining and losing streams as well as parallel flow and flow across streams were simulated as idealized cases intended to describe how properties of the streambed and aquifer in low-gradient lowland streams contribute to hyporheic exchange. At first a straight river was analyzed then meandering streams were created with a sine curve and variations on wavelength and amplitude. Bed forms were simulated assuming a sinusoidal distribution of pressure head in the bed surface. Aspects of the influence of bedforms on mechanisms such as "pumping" and "turnover" are expected to be addressed with simulations. Flow velocities between 20 and 40 cm/s in the channel were tested with the objective of showing the influence of river morphology and natural bed forms on the flow exchange in the hyporheic zone. Several meander cycles and four levels of hydraulic conductivity variance were analyzed. Results of flow variances along the cross-sections and wetted perimeter show the increasing on hyporheic exchange as the degree of heterogeneity increases. Particle tracking was performed to define hyporheic residence time distributions. When comparing the homogeneous fields with all degrees of

  3. Analysis of Hydrogen Isotopic Exchange: Lava Creek Tuff Ash and Isotopically Labeled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. M.; Seligman, A. N.; Bindeman, I. N.; Nolan, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Nolan and Bindeman (2013) placed secondarily hydrated ash from the 7.7 ka eruption of Mt. Mazama (δD=-149‰, 2.3wt% H2Ot) in isotopically labeled water (+650 ‰ δD, +56 ‰ δ18O) and observed that the H2Ot and δ18O values remained constant, but the δD values of ash increased with the surrounding water at 20, 40 and 70 °C. We expand on this work by conducting a similar experiment with ash from the 640 ka Lava Creek Tuff (LCT, δD of -128 ‰; 2.1 wt.% H2Ot) eruption of Yellowstone to see if significantly older glass (with a hypothesized gel layer on the surface shielding the interior from alteration) produces the same results. We have experiments running at 70, 24, and 5 °C, and periodically remove ~1.5 mg of glass to measure the δD (‰) and H2Ot (wt.%) of water extracted from the glass on a TC/EA MAT 253 continuous flow system. After 600 hours, the δD of the samples left at 5 and 24 °C remains at -128 ‰, but increased 8‰ for the 70 °C run series. However, there is no measurable change in wt.% of H2Ot, indicating that hydrogen exchange is not dictated by the addition of water. We are measuring and will report further progress of isotope exchange. We also plan to analyze the water in the LCT glass for δ18O (‰) to see if, as is the case for the Mt. Mazama glass, the δ18O (‰) remains constant. We also analyzed Mt. Mazama glass from the Nolan and Bindeman (2013) experiments that have now been sitting in isotopically labeled water at room temperature for ~5 years. The water concentration is still unchanged (2.3 wt.% H2Ot), and the δD of the water in the glass is now -111 ‰, causing an increase of 38 ‰. Our preliminary results show that exchange of hydrogen isotopes of hydrated glass is not limited by the age of the glass, and that the testing of hydrogen isotopes of secondarily hydrated glass, regardless of age, may not be a reliable paleoclimate indicator.

  4. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the local condensation heat transfer in a plate heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabenstein, V.; Kabelac, S.

    2012-11-01

    Plate heat exchanger (PHE) are today widely used in industrial heat transfer applications due to their good thermal performance, modest space requirement, easy accessibility to all areas and their lower capital and operating costs as compared to shell-and-tube heat exchangers. Although authoritative models for the design of PHE used as condensers are missing, the number of applications where a PHE is operating as a condenser increases. On the way to a reliable model based on physical approaches for the prediction of heat transfer and pressure drop during the condensation process inside a PHE, the flow and heat interactions as well as their dependence on the geometrical parameters of the corrugated plates and the operating conditions must be studied in detail. In this work the stepwise procedure for the fundamental construction of such a model is described. An experimental setup was built to analyze the characteristics of the two-phase-flow in PHE. A single gap, consisting of two transparent corrugated plates, was tested with a two-phase flow of air/water and also with boiling refrigerant R365mfc. Flow pattern maps were constructed for plates with corrugation angles of 27 and 63 degrees relative to the direction of flow. Investigations of the local heat transfer coefficients and the pressure drop were done with the same plates. The measurement of the local heat transfer coefficients was carried out by the use of the "Temperature Oscillation InfraRed Thermography" (TOIRT) method. Based on these results three main flow patterns are defined: film flow, bubbly flow and slug flow. For each of the three flow patterns an own model for the heat transfer and pressure drop mechanism are developed and the heat transfer coefficient and the friction factor is calculated with different equations depending on the actual steam quality, mass flow and geometrical parameters by means of a flow pattern map. The theory of the flow pattern based prediction models is proved with own

  5. Numerical analysis of heat exchange processes for the ground source heat pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Muto, H.; Moritani, S.; Kohgo, Y.; Hamamoto, S.; Takemura, T.; Ohnishi, J.; Komatsu, T.

    2012-12-01

    Ground source heat pump systems (GSHP) use ground or groundwater as a heat source. They can achieve much higher coefficient of performance (COP) than conventional air source heat pump systems because the temperature of the ground is much more stable than that of the air. Heat energy in the ground is then viewed as one of the renewable energy sources. GSHP has been receiving great interests among countries in North America and Western Europe, as well as some developed countries in Asia because it can potentially reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission. While GSHP can inject heat from the buildings to the ground for cooling during the summer, it can pump heat stored in the ground for heating during the winter. As some physical, chemical, and biological properties of the ground and groundwater are temperature dependent, running GSHP can eventually affect groundwater quality. The main objective of this project was to develop a model that allows predicting not only ground and groundwater temperatures but also changes in physical, chemical, and biological properties of ground and groundwater with GSHP under operations. This particular study aims at simulating heat exchange and transfer processes in the ground for a vertical-loop closed GSHP system. In the closed GSHP system, an anti-freezing solution is circulated inside the closed-loop tube, called U-tube, that is buried in the ground. Heat is then transferred to the anti-freezing solution in the U-tube by a heat exchanger. In this study we used HYDRUS to predict temperature of the anti-freezing solution, as well as that of the ground. HYDRUS allows one to simulate variably-saturated water flow and solute and heat transport in porous media numerically in two- and three-dimensional domains with great flexibility in defining boundary conditions. At first changes in anti-freezing solution temperatures measured were predicted in response to Thermal Response Test (TRT) conducted at our study site. Then, heat

  6. Analysis of ustiloxins in rice using polymer cation exchange cleanup followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhao-Yun; Sun, Li-Hua; Mou, Ren-Xiang; Lin, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Rong; Ma, You-Ning; Chen, Ming-Xue

    2016-12-09

    Ustiloxins are cyclopeptide mycotoxins produced by the pathogenic fungus Ustilaginoidea virens of rice false smut. Quantification of ustiloxins is essential to assess the food safety of rice infected by rice false smut disease. This paper describes a sensitive method for the simultaneous quantification of ustiloxins A, B, C, D and F in rice grains using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Since notable matrix enhancement effects (21%-78%) occurred for all of the target analytes (except for ustiloxin A), several solid phase extraction materials were tested for their ability to retain ustiloxins from aqueous solutions prior to the LC-MS/MS analysis, including C18 sorbents, polymer anion exchange sorbents resin (PAX), and polymer cation exchange resin (PCX). The PCX resin was adopted due to its higher extraction capability and selectivity for all targets compared to others, and in this case, almost no matrix effects (-5% to 8%) were observed for all of the ustiloxins monitored. The developed method reached limits of quantification of 0.2-2ngg(-1), and linearity was statistically verified over two orders of magnitude with regression coefficients (R(2))>0.991. The mean recoveries were from 85% to 109%, and the inter-day precisions (n=11) were less than 16%, with intra-day precisions (n=6) within 12%. Analysis of samples showed that ustiloxin A was the dominant species, with the content ranging from 5.5 to 273.8ngg(-1), followed by ustiloxin B (≤88.7ngg(-1)), while concentrations of ustiloxins C, D and F were slightly lower (≤43.2ngg(-1)). To our knowledge, this is the first report on the determination and analysis of five ustiloxins simultaneously in a single analysis.

  7. Fouling of anion exchange resin by fluorescence analysis in advanced treatment of municipal wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibo; Li, Aimin; Shuang, Chendong; Zhou, Qing; Li, Wentao

    2014-12-01

    The application of anion exchange resins (AERs) has been limited by the critical problem of resin fouling, which increases the volume of the desorption concentrate and decreases treatment efficiency. To date, resin fouling has not been well studied and is poorly understood compared to membrane fouling. To reflect the resin fouling level, a resin fouling index (RFI) was established in this work according to the decrease of DOC removal after regeneration of the resin for the advanced treatment of municipal wastewater. Comparing the linear fitting results between the RFI and the fluorescence intensity indicated that the resin fouling was related to the protein-like substances with fluorescence peak T in the region of excitation wavelength <250 nm and emission wavelength <380 nm. Using their fluorescent characteristics as a label, the protein-like substances causing the fouling were further identified as hydrophilic components with molecular weights greater than 6500 Da.

  8. Behavior of human serum albumin on strong cation exchange resins: II. model analysis.

    PubMed

    Voitl, Agnes; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-20

    Experiments with human serum albumin on a strong cation exchange resin exhibit a peculiar elution pattern: the protein elutes with two peaks in a modifier gradient. This behavior is modeled with a general rate model, where the two elution peaks are modeled with two binding conformations, one of which is at equilibrium conditions, while for the other, the adsorption process is rate limited. Isocratic experiments under nonadsorbing conditions were used to characterize the mass transfer process. The isotherm of both adsorption conformations as well as the kinetic of adsorption and desorption for the second conformation are functions of the modifier concentration. They are evaluated with linear modifier gradient experiments and step experiments with various adsorption times. All experimental features are well reproduced by the proposed modified general rate model.

  9. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF CST MEDIA IN THE SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2010-11-01

    Models have been developed to simulate the thermal characteristics of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange media fully loaded with radioactive cesium in a column configuration and distributed within a waste storage tank. This work was conducted to support the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program which is focused on processing dissolved, high-sodium salt waste for the removal of specific radionuclides (including Cs-137, Sr-90, and actinides) within a High Level Waste (HLW) storage tank at the Savannah River Site. The SCIX design includes CST columns inserted and supported in the tank top risers for cesium removal. Temperature distributions and maximum temperatures across the column were calculated with a focus on process upset conditions. A two-dimensional computational modeling approach for the in-column ion-exchange domain was taken to include conservative, bounding estimates for key parameters such that the results would provide the maximum centerline temperatures achievable under the design configurations using a feed composition known to promote high cesium loading on CST. One salt processing scenario includes the transport of the loaded (and possibly ground) CST media to the treatment tank floor. Therefore, additional thermal modeling calculations were conducted using a three-dimensional approach to evaluate temperature distributions for the entire in-tank domain including distribution of the spent CST media either as a mound or a flat layer on the tank floor. These calculations included mixtures of CST with HLW sludge or loaded Monosodium Titanate (MST) media used for strontium/actinide sorption. The current full-scale design for the CST column includes one central cooling pipe and four outer cooling tubes. Most calculations assumed that the fluid within the column was stagnant (i.e. no buoyancy-induced flow) for a conservative estimate. A primary objective of these calculations was to estimate temperature distributions across packed CST beds

  10. Hierarchical cluster-tendency analysis of the group structure in the foreign exchange market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xin-Ye; Zheng, Zhi-Gang

    2013-08-01

    A hierarchical cluster-tendency (HCT) method in analyzing the group structure of networks of the global foreign exchange (FX) market is proposed by combining the advantages of both the minimal spanning tree (MST) and the hierarchical tree (HT). Fifty currencies of the top 50 World GDP in 2010 according to World Bank's database are chosen as the underlying system. By using the HCT method, all nodes in the FX market network can be "colored" and distinguished. We reveal that the FX networks can be divided into two groups, i.e., the Asia-Pacific group and the Pan-European group. The results given by the hierarchical cluster-tendency method agree well with the formerly observed geographical aggregation behavior in the FX market. Moreover, an oil-resource aggregation phenomenon is discovered by using our method. We find that gold could be a better numeraire for the weekly-frequency FX data.

  11. Ion distribution in copper exchanged zeolites by using Si-29 spin lattice relaxation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palamara, Joseph; Seidel, Karsten; Moini, Ahmad; Prasad, Subramanian

    2016-06-01

    Transition metal-containing zeolites, particularly those with smaller pore size, have found extensive application in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of environmental pollutants containing nitrogen oxides. We report these zeolites have dramatically faster silicon-29 (Si-29) spin lattice relaxation times (T1) compared to their sodium-containing counterparts. Paramagnetic doping allows one to acquire Si-29 MAS spectra in the order of tens of seconds without significantly affecting the spectral resolution. Moreover, relaxation times depend on the method of preparation and the next-nearest neighbor silicon Qn(mAl) sites, where n = 4 and m = 0-4, respectively. A clear trend is noted between the effectiveness of Cu exchange and the Si-29 NMR relaxation times. It is anticipated that the availability of this tool, and the enhanced understanding of the nature of the active sites, will provide the means for designing improved SCR catalysts.

  12. Analysis of Continuous Heat Exchangers for Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, J. R.; Kashani, A.; Helvensteign, B. P. M.; Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Plachta, D.; Christie, R.; Carlberg, E.

    2008-03-01

    Cryogenic boil-off reduction systems (CBRS) employing continuous heat exchangers in pressurized helium distributed cooling networks for active thermal control of large surfaces such as propellant tank walls and light-weight radiation shields have been studied for some time. Usually, very simple and intuitive relations are used to derive such quantities as the pressure drop across the network and the required flow rate for a given heat load. Here, detailed thermal-fluid and heat transfer relations for such systems are formulated and then studied term by term in order to determine the conditions under which various approximations to them may reasonably be made. It is found that in most applications of interest, use of the simplified relations is justifiable.

  13. Ion exchange separation of chromium from natural water matrix for stable isotope mass spectrometric analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Bassett, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for separating the Cr dissolved in natural water from matrix elements and determination of its stable isotope ratios using solid-source thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The separation method takes advantage of the existence of the oxidized form of Cr as an oxyanion to separate it from interfering cations using anion-exchange chromatography, and of the reduced form of Cr as a positively charged ion to separate it from interfering anions such as sulfate. Subsequent processing of the separated sample eliminates residual organic material for application to a solid source filament. Ratios for 53Cr/52Cr for National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 979 can be measured using the silica gel-boric acid technique with a filament-to-filament standard deviation in the mean 53Cr/52Cr ratio for 50 replicates of 0.00005 or less. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of effect of the solubility on gas exchange in nonhomogeneous lungs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, W. E., Jr.; Evans, J. W.; West, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison is made of the gas exchange in nonhomogeneous lung models and in homogeneous lung models with the same total blood flow and ventilation. It is shown that the ratio of the rate of gas transfer of the inhomogeneous lung model over the rate of gas transfer of the homogeneous lung model as a function of gas solubility always has the qualitative features for gases with linear dissociation curves. This ratio is 1 for a gas with zero solubility and decreases to a single minimum. It subsequently rises to approach 1 as the solubility tends to infinity. The early portion of the graph of this function is convex, then after a single inflection point it is concave.

  15. Physical properties of the Atlantic - Arctic water exchange formation. Modelling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshonkin, Sergey; Gusev, Anatoly; Bagno, Alexey; Zalesny, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Physical mechanisms of water exchange between North Atlantic (NA) and Arctic Oceans (AO) in 1958-2009 are analyzed using results of numerical experiments with the eddy-permitting ocean circulation model INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model). Changes of heat and salt transports by West Spitsbergen and East Greenland currents caused by atmospheric forcing produce the baroclinic modes of velocity anomalies in the layer 0-300m, stabilizing ocean response on the atmospheric forcing, which stimulates keeping water exchange between NA and AO at the certain climatological level. We revealed the quick response of dense water outflow by near-bottom current in the deep NA layers through the Denmark Strait at monthly timescale on the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO) index change, as well as the response at the scale 39 months. The quick response on NAO is broken in 1969-1978, which is caused by the Great Salinity Anomaly. Transverse oscillations of the Norwegian current front have the great influence on the formation of the intermediate dense waters of Greenland and Norwegian Seas (GNS). Dense water outflow to the NA deep layers through the Faroe Channels with the time lag of 1 year respond to the transverse oscillations of the front. The mass transport of by near-bottom current through Faroe Channels to the NA can be used as the integral index of formation and discharge of new high-density water portions generated due to mixing of salt warm Atlantic waters and freshened cold Arctic waters in GNS. The research was supported by the Council on the Russian Federation President Grants (grant № MK-3241.2015.5)

  16. Transient thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical analysis of a counter flow offset strip fin intermediate heat exchanger using an effective porous media approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquiza, Eugenio

    This work presents a comprehensive thermal hydraulic analysis of a compact heat exchanger using offset strip fins. The thermal hydraulics analysis in this work is followed by a finite element analysis (FEA) to predict the mechanical stresses experienced by an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) during steady-state operation and selected flow transients. In particular, the scenario analyzed involves a gas-to-liquid IHX operating between high pressure helium and liquid or molten salt. In order to estimate the stresses in compact heat exchangers a comprehensive thermal and hydraulic analysis is needed. Compact heat exchangers require very small flow channels and fins to achieve high heat transfer rates and thermal effectiveness. However, studying such small features computationally contributes little to the understanding of component level phenomena and requires prohibitive computational effort using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). To address this issue, the analysis developed here uses an effective porous media (EPM) approach; this greatly reduces the computation time and produces results with the appropriate resolution [1]. This EPM fluid dynamics and heat transfer computational code has been named the Compact Heat Exchanger Explicit Thermal and Hydraulics (CHEETAH) code. CHEETAH solves for the two-dimensional steady-state and transient temperature and flow distributions in the IHX including the complicating effects of temperature-dependent fluid thermo-physical properties. Temperature- and pressure-dependent fluid properties are evaluated by CHEETAH and the thermal effectiveness of the IHX is also calculated. Furthermore, the temperature distribution can then be imported into a finite element analysis (FEA) code for mechanical stress analysis using the EPM methods developed earlier by the University of California, Berkeley, for global and local stress analysis [2]. These simulation tools will also allow the heat exchanger design to be improved through an

  17. Analysis of selected ionic liquid cations by ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Stepnowski, Piotr; Mrozik, Wojciech

    2005-02-01

    The chromatographic behavior of 8 ionic liquids - 7 homologues of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium and 4-methyl-N-butylpyridinium - has been investigated with a strong cation exchange adsorbent. In particular, the dependence of the retention properties of these solutes on mobile phase composition, pH, and buffer concentration was evaluated with the aim of optimizing and improving the selectivity and retention of solute separation. While using the SCX stationary phase, several interactions occurred with varying strengths, depending on the mobile phase composition. Cation exchange, nonspecific hydrophobic interactions, and adsorption chromatography behavior were observed. Reversed phase chromatography occurred at low concentrations of acetonitrile, electrostatic and adsorption interactions at higher organic modifier concentrations. Elevated buffer concentrations lowered the retention factors without affecting the selectivity of ionic liquids. Obtained results were further compared to the chromatographic behaviour of ionic liquids in the reversed phase system. All analyzed ionic liquids follow reversed-phase behavior while being separated. Much lower selectivity in the range of highly hydrophilic compounds is obtained. This suggests preferred use of ion chromatography for separation and analysis of compounds below 4 carbon atoms in the alkyl side chain.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of pharmaceutical products using simultaneous mixed-mode (ion-exchange/reversed-phase) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Soisungnoen, Phimpha; Burakham, Rodjana; Srijaranai, Supalax; Paull, Brett

    2014-08-01

    Liquid chromatographic assays were developed using a mixed-mode column coupled in sequence with a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column to allow the simultaneous comprehensive analysis of inorganic/organic anions and cations, active pharmaceutical ingredients, and excipients (carbohydrates). The approach utilized dual sample injection and valve-mediated column switching and was based upon a single high-performance liquid chromatography gradient pump. The separation consisted of three distinct sequential separation mechanisms, namely, (i) ion-exchange, (ii) mixed-mode interactions under an applied dual gradient (reversed-phase/ion-exchange), and (iii) hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Upon first injection, the Scherzo SS C18 column (Imtakt) provided resolution of inorganic anions and cations under isocratic conditions, followed by a dual organic/salt gradient to elute active pharmaceutical ingredients and their respective organic counterions and potential degradants. At the top of the mixed-mode gradient (high acetonitrile content), the mobile phase flow was switched to a preconditioned hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column, and the standard/sample was reinjected for the separation of hydrophilic carbohydrates, some of which are commonly known excipients in drug formulations. The approach afforded reproducible separation and resolution of up to 23 chemically diverse solutes in a single run. The method was applied to investigate the composition of commercial cough syrups (Robitussin®), allowing resolution and determination of inorganic ions, active pharmaceutical ingredients, excipients, and numerous well-resolved unknown peaks.

  19. New developments in protein structure-function analysis by MS and use of hydrogen-deuterium exchange microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Astorga-Wells, Juan; Johansson, Jan; Bergman, Tomas; Jörnvall, Hans

    2011-10-01

    The study of protein structure and function has evolved to become a leading discipline in the biophysical sciences. Although it is not yet possible to determine 3D protein structures from MS data alone, multiple MS-based techniques can be combined to obtain structural and functional data that are complementary to classical protein structure information obtained from NMR or X-ray crystallography. Monitoring gas-phase interactions of noncovalent complexes yields information on binding constants, complex stability, and the nature of interactions. Ion mobility MS and chemical crosslinking strategies can be applied to probe the architecture of macromolecular assemblies and protein-ligand complexes. MS analysis of hydrogen-deuterium exchange can be used to determine the localization of secondary structure elements, binding sites and conformational dynamics of proteins in solution. This minireview focuses first on new strategies that combine these techniques to gain insights into protein structure and function. Using one such strategy, we then demonstrate how a novel hydrogen-deuterium exchange microfluidics tool can be used online with an ESI mass spectrometer to monitor regional accessibility in a peptide, as exemplified with amyloid-β peptide 1-40.

  20. Simultaneous experimental determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency power-dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents owing to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis.

  1. An improved method for analysis of biomass sugars and galacturonic acid by anion exchange chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the most accurate method for analysis of sugars in biomass is based on gas chromatography of trimethylsilane or alditol acetate derivitives of sugars, the derivation method is time consuming and laborious. In comparison, sample preparation for sugar analysis using liquid chromatography is a si...

  2. A comparison of positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) methods for analysis of a tube-in-shell heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Cody; Patel, Nitant; Ruggles, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    A positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) study of a stainless steel tube-in-shell heat exchanger is performed. Studies are performed using two different energy window settings. A new multiple particle tracking technique is introduced and used in this analysis. Results are compared to those obtained with previously established multiple particle tracking technique. Both techniques are found to be capable of flow imaging through opaque surfaces. No significant difference is observed between energy window settings using either method. Results from both methods are found to be qualitatively similar; however, it is observed that the new method exhibits consistently lower measurement uncertainty across the field of view of the scanner and is robust against the adverse effects of stationary particles in the flow field.

  3. Sister chromatid exchange analysis in lung and peripheral blood lymphocytes of mice exposed to methyl isocyanate by inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Kligerman, A.D.; Campbell, J.A.; Erexson, G.L.; Allen, J.W.; Shelby, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Mice were exposed to 1, 3, or 6 ppm methyl isocyanate (MIC) for 6 hr/day for four consecutive days. Lung cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were removed and cultured for analysis of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and cell cycle kinetics. MIC caused a small but significant increase in SCE frequency of cultured lung cells from mice exposed to 1, 3, or 6 ppm MIC. MIC did not significantly increase SCE levels in PBLs of mice exposed to concentrations as high as 6 ppm. In cultured PBLs, MIC had a stimulatory effect on cell cycling rates as measured by the replicative index, and it caused a significant reduction in mononuclear leucocyte counts and the mitotic indices.

  4. Analysis of x-ray emission spectra in charge-exchange collisions of C6 + with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6 +-He and -H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method for low to intermediate projectile energies. Within the independent electron model, we calculate capture cross sections and perform a radiative cascade analysis to obtain Lyman line-emission ratios. Single capture is considered for the C6 +-He system, while both single capture and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6 +-H2 system. Effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of capture cross sections and the line-emission ratios are examined as well. Calculated line-emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are in satisfactory agreement with previous measurements.

  5. Human body area factors for radiation exchange analysis: standing and walking postures.

    PubMed

    Park, Sookuk; Tuller, Stanton E

    2011-09-01

    Effective radiation area factors (f (eff)) and projected area factors (f (p)) of unclothed Caucasians' standing and walking postures used in estimating human radiation exchange with the surrounding environment were determined from a sample of adults in Canada. Several three-dimensional (3D) computer body models were created for standing and walking postures. Only small differences in f (eff) and f (p) values for standing posture were found between gender (male or female) and body type (normal- or over-weight). Differences between this study and previous studies were much larger: ≤0.173 in f (p) and ≤0.101 in f (eff). Directionless f (p) values for walking posture also had only minor differences between genders and positions in a stride. However, the differences of mean directional f (p) values of the positions dependent on azimuth angles were large enough, ≤0.072, to create important differences in modeled radiation receipt. Differences in f (eff) values were small: 0.02 between the normal-weight male and female models and up to 0.033 between positions in a stride. Variations of directional f (p) values depending on solar altitudes for walking posture were narrower than those for standing posture. When both standing and walking postures are considered, the mean f (eff) value, 0.836, of standing (0.826) and walking (0.846) could be used. However, f (p) values should be selected carefully because differences between directional and directionless f (p) values were large enough that they could influence the estimated level of human thermal sensation.

  6. The technical analysis of the stock exchange and physics: Japanese candlesticks for solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dineva, C.; Atanasov, V.

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we use the Japanese candlesticks, a method popular in the technical analysis of the Stock/Forex markets and apply it to a variable in physics-the solar activity. This method is invented and used exclusively for economic analysis and its application to a physical problem produced unexpected results. We found that the Japanese candlesticks are convenient tool in the analysis of the variables in the physics of the Sun. Based on our observations, we differentiated a new cycle in the solar activity.

  7. Nickel-catalyzed proton-deuterium exchange (HDX) procedures for glycosidic linkage analysis of complex carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structural analysis of complex carbohydrates typically requires the assignment of three parameters: monosaccharide composition, the position of glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and the position and nature of non-carbohydrate substituents. The glycosidic linkage positions are often de...

  8. Solid cation exchange phase to remove interfering anthocyanins in the analysis of other bioactive phenols in red wine.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Letícia Flores; Guerra, Celito Crivellaro; Klein, Diandra; Bergold, Ana Maria

    2017-07-15

    Bioactive phenols (BPs) are often targets in red wine analysis. However, other compounds interfere in the liquid chromatography methods used for this analysis. Here, purification procedures were tested to eliminate anthocyanin interference during the determination of 19 red-wine BPs. Liquid chromatography, coupled to a diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) and a mass spectrometer (UPLC-MS), was used to compare the direct injection of the samples with solid-phase extractions: reversed-phase (C18) and strong cation-exchange (SCX). The HPLC-DAD method revealed that, out of 13BPs, only six are selectively analyzed with or without C18 treatment, whereas SCX enabled the detection of all BPs. The recovery with SCX was above 86.6% for eight BPs. Moreover, UPLC-MS demonstrated the potential of SCX sample preparation for the determination of 19BPs. The developed procedure may be extended to the analysis of other red wine molecules or to other analytical methods where anthocyanins may interfere.

  9. Effect of molecular exchange on water droplet size analysis in W/O emulsions as determined by diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Vermeir, Lien; Sabatino, Paolo; Balcaen, Mathieu; Declerck, Arnout; Dewettinck, Koen; Martins, José C; Van der Meeren, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Using NMR diffusometry, the diffusion of water and tetramethylammonium chloride was recorded in order to determine the water droplet size distribution in W/O emulsions. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of extradroplet diffusion of water on the estimated droplet size distribution upon comparison to the real droplet size distribution. The latter originated from the diffusion behavior of the tetramethylammonium cation (TMA+), which is known to have a much lower permeability through the oil phase as compared to water. Whereas both low-resolution and high-resolution pulsed field gradient NMR revealed that the water droplet size overestimation could be reduced selecting either a lower measurement temperature during diffusion analysis, or a smaller diffusion delay value Δ, still comparison to TMA+ diffusion indicated that artefacts were unavoidable even at low Δ and temperature. In order to correct for this extradroplet water diffusion phenomenon, different data analysis methods were evaluated. The previously described Pfeuffer exchange model could only partly compensate for the effect of extradroplet diffusion on the water droplet size determination. On the other hand, accurate water droplet size analysis results were obtained by correcting the experimentally determined diffusion distances based on Einstein's diffusion law. As such, reliable data could be obtained by low resolution NMR based on water diffusion at or even above room temperature.

  10. Analysis and Test of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Power System for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo; Varanauski, Donald; Clark, Robert, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop a prototype Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell breadboard system for fuhlre space applications. This prototype will be used to develop a comprehensive design basis for a space-rated PEM fuel cell powerplant. The prototype system includes reactant pressure regulators, ejector-based reactant pumps, a 4-kW fuel cell stack and cooling system, and a passive, membranebased oxygen / water separator. A computer model is being developed concurrently to analytically predict fluid flow in the oxidant reactant system. Fuel cells have historically played an important role in human-rated spacecraft. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used fuel cells for vehicle electrical power. The Space Shuttle currently uses three Alkaline Fuel Cell Powerplants (AFCP) to generate all of the vehicle's 15-20kW electrical power. Engineers at the Johnson Space Center have leveraged off the development effort ongoing in the commercial arena to develop PEM fuel cel ls for terrestrial uses. The prototype design originated from efforts to develop a PEM fuel cell replacement for the current Space Shuttle AFCP' s. In order to improve on the life and an already excellent hi storical record of reliability and safety, three subsystems were focused on. These were the fuel cell stack itself, the reactant circulation devices, and reactant / product water separator. PEM fuel cell stack performance is already demonstrating the potential for greater than four times the useful life of the current Shuttle's AFCP. Reactant pumping for product water removal has historically been accomplished with mechanical pumps. Ejectors offer an effective means of reactant pumping as well as the potential for weight reduction, control simplification, and long life. Centrifugal water separation is used on the current AFCP. A passive, membrane-based water separator offers compatibility with the micro-gravity environment of space, and the potential for control simplification, elimination of

  11. A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T. Arble, Chris; Goodwin, Chris; Khalifa, Yehia; Broderick, Alicia; Åhlund, John

    2015-08-15

    Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) is a powerful spectroscopy tool that is inherently surface sensitive, elemental, and chemical specific, with the ability to probe sample surfaces under Torr level pressures. Herein, we describe the design of a new lab-based APXPS system with the ability to swap small volume analysis chambers. Ag 3d(5/2) analyses of a silver foil were carried out at room temperature to determine the optimal sample-to-aperture distance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis spot size, relative peak intensities, and peak full width at half maximum of three different electrostatic lens modes: acceleration, transmission, and angular. Ag 3d(5/2) peak areas, differential pumping pressures, and pump performance were assessed under varying N{sub 2}(g) analysis chamber pressures up to 20 Torr. The commissioning of this instrument allows for the investigation of molecular level interfacial processes under ambient vapor conditions in energy and environmental research.

  12. A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, John T.; Åhlund, John; Arble, Chris; Goodwin, Chris; Khalifa, Yehia; Broderick, Alicia

    2015-08-01

    Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) is a powerful spectroscopy tool that is inherently surface sensitive, elemental, and chemical specific, with the ability to probe sample surfaces under Torr level pressures. Herein, we describe the design of a new lab-based APXPS system with the ability to swap small volume analysis chambers. Ag 3d(5/2) analyses of a silver foil were carried out at room temperature to determine the optimal sample-to-aperture distance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis spot size, relative peak intensities, and peak full width at half maximum of three different electrostatic lens modes: acceleration, transmission, and angular. Ag 3d(5/2) peak areas, differential pumping pressures, and pump performance were assessed under varying N2(g) analysis chamber pressures up to 20 Torr. The commissioning of this instrument allows for the investigation of molecular level interfacial processes under ambient vapor conditions in energy and environmental research.

  13. A lab-based ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer with exchangeable analysis chambers.

    PubMed

    Newberg, John T; Åhlund, John; Arble, Chris; Goodwin, Chris; Khalifa, Yehia; Broderick, Alicia

    2015-08-01

    Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) is a powerful spectroscopy tool that is inherently surface sensitive, elemental, and chemical specific, with the ability to probe sample surfaces under Torr level pressures. Herein, we describe the design of a new lab-based APXPS system with the ability to swap small volume analysis chambers. Ag 3d(5/2) analyses of a silver foil were carried out at room temperature to determine the optimal sample-to-aperture distance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis spot size, relative peak intensities, and peak full width at half maximum of three different electrostatic lens modes: acceleration, transmission, and angular. Ag 3d(5/2) peak areas, differential pumping pressures, and pump performance were assessed under varying N2(g) analysis chamber pressures up to 20 Torr. The commissioning of this instrument allows for the investigation of molecular level interfacial processes under ambient vapor conditions in energy and environmental research.

  14. Nickel-catalyzed proton-deuterium exchange (HDX) for linkage analysis of complex carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structural assignment of complex carbohydrates typically requires the analysis of at least three parameters: 1. composition; 2. linkage; and 3. substituents. These are often assigned on a small scale by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Linkage positions are determined by permethylat...

  15. Using Participatory Analysis for Community Action: Idea Book. Information Collection and Exchange Publication No. M0086

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This idea book addresses key concepts in two earlier Peace Corps' publications, "Participatory Analysis for Community Action (PACA) Manual" [ICE No. M0053], and the "Gender and Development Training Manual" [ICE No. M0054]. These previous resources were large training manuals that introduced PACA to staff and Volunteers in the context of the Peace…

  16. Exchange Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Information Exchange Network (EIEN) is an Internet-based system used by state, tribal and territorial partners to securely share environmental and health information with one another and EPA.

  17. Gas exchange

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the ... share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory ...

  18. Reverse process of usual optical analysis of boson-exchange superconductors: impurity effects on s- and d-wave superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2015-03-04

    We performed a reverse process of the usual optical data analysis of boson-exchange superconductors. We calculated the optical self-energy from two (MMP and MMP+peak) input model electron-boson spectral density functions using Allen's formula for one normal and two (s- and d-wave) superconducting cases. We obtained the optical constants including the optical conductivity and the dynamic dielectric function from the optical self-energy using an extended Drude model, and finally calculated the reflectance spectrum. Furthermore, to investigate impurity effects on optical quantities we added various levels of impurities (from the clean to the dirty limit) in the optical self-energy and performed the same reverse process to obtain the optical conductivity, the dielectric function, and reflectance. From these optical constants obtained from the reverse process we extracted the impurity-dependent superfluid densities for two superconducting cases using two independent methods (the Ferrel-Glover-Tinkham sum rule and the extrapolation to zero frequency of -ϵ1(ω)ω(2)); we found that a certain level of impurities is necessary to get a good agreement on results obtained by the two methods. We observed that impurities give similar effects on various optical constants of s- and d-wave superconductors; the greater the impurities the more distinct the gap feature and the lower the superfluid density. However, the s-wave superconductor gives the superconducting gap feature more clearly than the d-wave superconductor because in the d-wave superconductors the optical quantities are averaged over the anisotropic Fermi surface. Our results supply helpful information to see how characteristic features of the electron-boson spectral function and the s- and d-wave superconducting gaps appear in various optical constants including raw reflectance spectrum. Our study may help with a thorough understanding of the usual optical analysis process. Further systematic study of experimental

  19. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  20. Functional analysis of amino acids of the Na+/H+ exchanger that are important for proton translocation.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Christine A; Rieder, Carmen; Young, Paul G; Dibrov, Pavel; Fliegel, Larry

    2003-12-01

    The Na+/H+ exchanger is an integral membrane protein found in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. In eukaryotes it functions to exchange one proton for a sodium ion. In mammals it removes intracellular protons while in plants and fungal cells the plasma membrane form removes intracellular sodium in exchange for extracellular protons. In this study we used the Na+/H+ exchanger of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (Sod2) as a model system to study amino acids critical for activity of the protein. Twelve mutant forms of the Na+/H+ exchanger were examined for their ability to translocate protons as assessed by a Cytosensor microphysiometer. Mutation of the amino acid Histidine 367 resulted in defective proton translocation. The acidic residues Asp145, Asp178, Asp266 and Asp267 were important in the proton translocation activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger. Mutation of amino acids His98, His233 and Asp241 did not significantly impair proton translocation by the Na+/H+ exchanger. These results confirm that polar amino acids are important in proton flux activity of Na+/H+ exchangers.

  1. Three-Dimensional Numerical Analysis of Laminar Heat Exchanger with Respect to Fin Shape and Fan Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. M.; Kim, J. Y.; Seol, S. S.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, M. C.

    2010-06-01

    The performances of the fin-and-tube heat exchangers with wavy or plain fins were numerically investigated using a commercial code based on the finite volume method implementing SIMPLE algorithm. The relations among the heat transfer performance, pressure and the fin shape were taken into consideration with the performance characteristic of the fan installed in the real heat exchanger. Generally, a heat exchanger with wavy fins shows better performance than that with plain fins under the same air flow rate. However, the performance of a heat exchanger was mainly affected by the performance characteristics of the installed fans. In case that a fan whose air flow rate remarkably changes by the minor pressure variation, the performance characteristic of the fan was much more important than the fin shape with respect to heat transfer rate. This is attributed to the fact that the air flow rates of fans were varied with the pressure loss of the heat exchanger.

  2. Forecasting of magnitude and duration of currency crises based on the analysis of distortions of fractal scaling in exchange rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritskaya, Olga Y.

    2005-05-01

    Results of fractal stability analysis of daily exchange rate fluctuations of more than 30 floating currencies for a 10-year period are presented. It is shown for the first time that small- and large-scale dynamical instabilities of national monetary systems correlate with deviations of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) exponent from the value 1.5 predicted by the efficient market hypothesis. The observed dependence is used for classification of long-term stability of floating exchange rates as well as for revealing various forms of distortion of stable currency dynamics prior to large-scale crises. A normal range of DFA exponents consistent with crisis-free long-term exchange rate fluctuations is determined, and several typical scenarios of unstable currency dynamics with DFA exponents fluctuating beyond the normal range are identified. It is shown that monetary crashes are usually preceded by prolonged periods of abnormal (decreased or increased) DFA exponent, with the after-crash exponent tending to the value 1.5 indicating a more reliable exchange rate dynamics. Statistically significant regression relations (R=0.99, p<0.01) between duration and magnitude of currency crises and the degree of distortion of monofractal patterns of exchange rate dynamics are found. It is demonstrated that the parameters of these relations characterizing small- and large-scale crises are nearly equal, which implies a common instability mechanism underlying these events. The obtained dependences have been used as a basic ingredient of a forecasting technique which provided correct in-sample predictions of monetary crisis magnitude and duration over various time scales. The developed technique can be recommended for real-time monitoring of dynamical stability of floating exchange rate systems and creating advanced early-warning-system models for currency crisis prevention.

  3. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Pad B Catenary Capability Analysis and Technical Exchange Meeting (TEM) Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Kichak, Robert; Rakov, Vladimir; Kithil, Richard, Jr.; Sargent, Noel B.

    2009-01-01

    The existing lightning protection system at Pad 39B for the Space Shuttle is an outgrowth of a system that was put in place for the Apollo Program. Dr. Frank Fisher of Lightning Technologies was a key participant in the design and implementation of that system. He conveyed to the NESC team that the catenary wire provision was put in place quickly (as assurance against possible vehicle damage causing critical launch delays) rather than being implemented as a comprehensive system designed to provide a high degree of guaranteed protection. Also, the technology of lightning protection has evolved over time with considerable work being conducted by groups such as the electric utilities companies, aircraft manufacturers, universities, and others. Several accepted present-day methods for analysis of lightning protection were used by Drs. Medelius and Mata to study the expected lightning environment for the Pad 39B facility and to analyze the degree of protection against direct lightning attachment to the Space Shuttle. The specific physical configuration directly affects the vulnerability, so cases that were considered included the RSS next to and rolled back from the Space Shuttle, and the GOx Vent Arm both extended and withdrawn from the ET. Elements of the lightning protection system at Pad 39B are shown in Figure 6.0-1 and consist of an 80 foot insulating mast on top of the Fixed Support Structure (FSS), a catenary wire system that runs from the mast in a North/South direction to grounds 1000 feet away on each side of the mast, the RSS which can either be next to or away from the Space Shuttle, and a GOx vent that can either be extended or retracted from the top of the ET.

  4. Multivariate analysis of the transport in an ion exchange membrane bioreactor for removal of anionic micropollutants from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, A R; Velizarov, S; Crespo, J G; Reis, M A M

    2011-01-01

    The present study focuses on investigating the effects of biological compartment conditions on the transport of nitrate and perchlorate in an Ion Exchange Membrane Bioreactor (IEMB). In this hybrid process, the transport depends not only on the membrane properties but also on the biological compartment conditions. The experiments were planned according to the Plackett-Burman statistical design in order to cover a broader range of experimental conditions, under which a previously developed mechanistic transport model was not able to predict correctly the transport fluxes of the target pollutants. Using Principal Component Analysis, it was possible to identify not only the concentrations of target (nitrate and perchlorate) and of major driving counter-ion (chloride) but also those of some biomedium components (e.g. ammonia, ethanol and sulphate) as variables that affect the transport rate of micropollutants across the membrane. These conclusions are based on the loadings of the two first principal components that describe 84% of the data variance. The present study also revealed that the hydraulic retention time and the hydrodynamic conditions in the biocompartment have a minor contribution to the micropollutants transport. The results obtained are important for process optimization purposes.

  5. Analysis of the control structures for an integrated ethanol processor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biset, S.; Nieto Deglioumini, L.; Basualdo, M.; Garcia, V. M.; Serra, M.

    The aim of this work is to investigate which would be a good preliminary plantwide control structure for the process of Hydrogen production from bioethanol to be used in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) accounting only steady-state information. The objective is to keep the process under optimal operation point, that is doing energy integration to achieve the maximum efficiency. Ethanol, produced from renewable feedstocks, feeds a fuel processor investigated for steam reforming, followed by high- and low-temperature shift reactors and preferential oxidation, which are coupled to a polymeric fuel cell. Applying steady-state simulation techniques and using thermodynamic models the performance of the complete system with two different control structures have been evaluated for the most typical perturbations. A sensitivity analysis for the key process variables together with the rigorous operability requirements for the fuel cell are taking into account for defining acceptable plantwide control structure. This is the first work showing an alternative control structure applied to this kind of process.

  6. Design and experimental analysis of counter-flow heat and mass exchanger incorporating (M-cycle) for evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Omar; Butt, Zubair; Tanveer, Waqas; Rao, Hasan Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the functioning of dew-point cooler is improved in terms of its thermal effectiveness. For this reason, a heat and mass exchanger has been designed by using a counter-flow pattern incorporating Maisotsenko cycle (M-cycle) having effective absorbing material called Kraft paper on wet channel side and improved width to height ratio. Experimentation has been performed under various inlet air working parameters such as humidity, velocity and temperature in addition with changing feed water temperature. The results from the experiments specify that the dew-point and the wet-bulb effectiveness is achieved between 67-87 % and 104-120 % respectively. Analysis is performed with temperature variation between 25 and 45 °C at different absolute humidity levels ranging from 14.4 to 18 g/kg, while the inlet air velocity is varied between 0.88 and 1.50 m/s. Thus, the working ability of the improved design has been found 5 % more effective in terms of wet bulb effectiveness as compared to previous counter-flow designs.

  7. Dynamic analysis and linear control strategies for proton exchange membrane fuel cell using a distributed parameter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methekar, R. N.; Prasad, V.; Gudi, R. D.

    To satisfy high power density demand in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), a robust control strategy is essential. A linear ratio control strategy is examined in this work. The manipulated variables are selected using steady-state relative gain array (RGA) analysis to be the inlet molar flow rates of hydrogen and coolant, and the controlled variables are average power density and average solid temperature, respectively. By selecting proper manipulated variables, the PEMFC does not exhibit sign change in gain and hence can be controlled by using a linear controller. Transfer function models obtained from step tests on the distributed parameter PEMFC model are used to design controllers for the multiple input-multiple output (MIMO) system. In addition, a ratio control strategy is proposed and evaluated, where the inlet molar flow rate of oxygen is used as a dependent manipulated variable and changed in a constant ratio with respect to the inlet molar flow rate of hydrogen. Simulation results show that the ratio control strategy provides a faster response than a MIMO control strategy. This ratio control strategy is able to circumvent the problem of oxygen starvation, and the increase in average solid temperature is small as compared to the MIMO control strategy.

  8. Improvement of sugar analysis sensitivity using anion-exchange chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with sheath liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian-Bing; Liu, Ding-Bo; Guo, Xiao Ming; Yu, Shu-Juan; Yu, Pei

    2014-10-31

    A novel interface that enables high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) to be coupled with electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) is reported. A sheath liquid consisting of 50mM NH4Ac in isopropanol with 0.05% acetic acid, infused at a flow rate of 3μL/min at the tip of the electrospray probe, requires less ESI source cleaning and promotes efficient ionization of mono- and di-carbohydrates. The results suggest that use of a sheath liquid interface rather than a T-joint allows volatile ammonium salts to replace non-volatile metal salts as modifiers for improving sugar ESI signals. The efficient ionization of mono- and di-carbohydrates in the ESI source is affected by the sheath liquid properties such as buffer concentration and type of organic solvent. HPAEC-ESI-MS was used for the analysis of monocarbohydrates in pectins, particularly co-eluted sugars, and the performance was evaluated. Addition of a make-up solution through the sheath liquid interface proved to be an efficient tool for enhancing the intensities of sugars analyzed using HPAEC-ESI-MS.

  9. Analysis of x-ray emission in charge-exchange collisions of C6+ ions with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6+-He and - H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. The analysis examines the two collision systems for low to intermediate projectile energies. We perform capture cross section and radiative cascade calculations to obtain Lyman line emission ratios which can be compared to measurements that were carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Multicharged Ion Research Facility. Single-electron capture is considered for the C6+-He system while both single and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6+- H2 system. We also examine the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of the capture cross sections and the emission ratios. Calculated line emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are found to be in satisfactory agreement with the measurements. Work supported by SHARCNET, OGS, and NSERC, Canada

  10. [Simultaneous analysis of trehalose, glucose and maltose in biotransformation samples by high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed ampere detection].

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Zang, Ying; Jiang, Ting; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Quyang, Jia

    2014-12-01

    An analytical method for the determination of trehalose, maltose, and glucose in biotransformation samples was developed by using high performance anion exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed ampere detection (HPAEC-PAD). The analysis was performed on a CarboPac™ 10 column (250 mm x 2 mm) with the gradient elution of NaOH-NaAc as the mobile phase. The column temperature was set at 30 °C, the flow rate was 0. 30 mL/min. The results showed that trehalose, maltose, and glucose in biotransformation system were completely separated and determined in 15 min. The linear ranges and the working curves were determined by using standard samples. The correlation coefficients of three kinds of carbohydrates were over 0. 9998 . The detection limits (LODs) were 0. 010 - 0. 100 mg/L. Under the optimized separation conditions, the recoveries of saccharides in the transformation system at three different spiked levels ranged from 89. 4% to 103. 2%. In biotransformation system, 50 IU trehalose synthase were added into 200 g/L maltose for reaction of 8 h at 37 °C, pH 8. 0. Under the above conditions, the concentration of trehalose in biotransformation sample was 101. 084 g/L, and the conversion rate of trehalose reached 50. 5%. The method can be applied to determine the composition in the transformation system with the advantages of simplicity and convenience.

  11. Analysis of complex-type chromosome exchanges in astronauts' lymphocytes after space flight as a biomarker of high-LET exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Willingham, Veronica; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    High-LET radiation is more efficient in producing complex-type chromosome exchanges than sparsely ionizing radiation, and this can potentially be used as a biomarker of radiation quality. To investigate if complex chromosome exchanges are induced by the high-LET component of space radiation exposure, damage was assessed in astronauts' blood lymphocytes before and after long duration missions of 3-4 months. The frequency of simple translocations increased significantly for most of the crewmembers studied. However, there were few complex exchanges detected and only one crewmember had a significant increase after flight. It has been suggested that the yield of complex chromosome damage could be underestimated when analyzing metaphase cells collected at one time point after irradiation, and analysis of chemically-induced PCC may be more accurate since problems with complicated cell-cycle delays are avoided. However, in this case the yields of chromosome damage were similar for metaphase and PCC analysis of astronauts' lymphocytes. It appears that the use of complex-type exchanges as biomarker of radiation quality in vivo after low-dose chronic exposure in mixed radiation fields is hampered by statistical uncertainties.

  12. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  13. Effective application of bicelles for conformational analysis of G protein-coupled receptors by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  14. Effective Application of Bicelles for Conformational Analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Nguyen Minh; Du, Yang; Thorsen, Thor S.; Lee, Su Youn; Zhang, Cheng; Kato, Hideaki; Kobilka, Brian K.; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have important roles in physiology and pathology, and 40% of drugs currently on the market target GPCRs for the treatment of various diseases. Because of their therapeutic importance, the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling is of great interest in the field of drug discovery. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is a useful tool for analyzing ligand binding sites, the protein-protein interaction interface, and conformational changes of proteins. However, its application to GPCRs has been limited for various reasons, including the hydrophobic nature of GPCRs and the use of detergents in their preparation. In the present study, we tested the application of bicelles as a means of solubilizing GPCRs for HDX-MS studies. GPCRs (e.g., β2-adrenergic receptor [β2AR], μ-opioid receptor, and protease-activated receptor 1) solubilized in bicelles produced better sequence coverage (greater than 90%) than GPCRs solubilized in n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM), suggesting that bicelles are a more effective method of solubilization for HDX-MS studies. The HDX-MS profile of β2AR in bicelles showed that transmembrane domains (TMs) undergo lower deuterium uptake than intracellular or extracellular regions, which is consistent with the fact that the TMs are highly ordered and embedded in bicelles. The overall HDX-MS profiles of β2AR solubilized in bicelles and in DDM were similar except for intracellular loop 3. Interestingly, we detected EX1 kinetics, an important phenomenon in protein dynamics, at the C-terminus of TM6 in β2AR. In conclusion, we suggest the application of bicelles as a useful method for solubilizing GPCRs for conformational analysis by HDX-MS.

  15. Anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with post-column detection for the analysis of phytic acid and other inositol phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rounds, M. A.; Nielsen, S. S.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The use of gradient anion-exchange HPLC, with a simple post-column detection system, is described for the separation of myo-inositol phosphates, including "phytic acid" (myo-inositol hexaphosphate). Hexa-, penta-, tetra-, tri- and diphosphate members of this homologous series are clearly resolved within 30 min. This method should facilitate analysis and quantitation of "phytic acid" and other inositol phosphates in plant, food, and soil samples.

  16. Anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with post-column detection for the analysis of phytic acid and other inositol phosphates.

    PubMed

    Rounds, M A; Nielsen, S S

    1993-10-29

    The use of gradient anion-exchange HPLC, with a simple post-column detection system, is described for the separation of myo-inositol phosphates, including "phytic acid" (myo-inositol hexaphosphate). Hexa-, penta-, tetra-, tri- and diphosphate members of this homologous series are clearly resolved within 30 min. This method should facilitate analysis and quantitation of "phytic acid" and other inositol phosphates in plant, food, and soil samples.

  17. Information exchange between registered nurses and district nurses during the discharge planning process: cross-sectional analysis of survey data.

    PubMed

    Nordmark, Sofi; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Discharge planning is an important care process for managing transitions from the hospital to the community. It has been studied for >20 years, but few studies clarify the information exchanged between healthcare providers. This study aimed to describe nurses' experiences and perceptions of information exchange during the discharge planning process, focused on what, when and how information is exchanged between the hospital and primary healthcare. Method: A web-based census survey was used to collect data; the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-squared test. A questionnaire was distributed to 194 registered nurses (129 respondents) from a central county hospital and 67 district nurses (42 respondents) working in 13 primary healthcare centres. Results: The results show a significant difference between given and received information between the two groups. Both groups thought the information exchange worked best when all participants met at the discharge planning conference and that the electronic information system was difficult to use. Conclusion: This study shows difficulties knowing what patient-related information needs to give and not receiving the expected information. These results can be used to develop knowledge about roles, work tasks and needs to enhance the outcome of the process and the information exchanged.

  18. Genotoxicity of thimerosal in cultured human lymphocytes with and without metabolic activation sister chromatid exchange analysis proliferation index and mitotic index.

    PubMed

    Eke, Dilek; Celik, Ayla

    2008-06-01

    Thimerosal is an antiseptic containing 49.5% of ethyl mercury that has been used for years as a preservative in many infant vaccines and in flu vaccines. Thimerosal is an organic mercurial compound used as a preservative in biomedical preparations. In this study, we evaluated the genotoxic effect of thimerosal in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes using sister chromatid exchange analysis in culture conditions with and without S9 metabolic activation. This study is the first report investigating the genotoxic effects of thimerosal in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocyte cells using sister chromatid exchange analysis. An analysis of variance test (ANOVA) was performed to evaluate the results. Significant induction of sister chromatid exchanges was seen at concentrations between 0.2 and 0.6 microg/ml of thimerosal compared with negative control. A significant decrease (p<0.001) in mitotic index (MI) and proliferation index (PRI) as well as an increase in SCE frequency (p<0.001) was observed compared with control cultures. Our results indicate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effect of TH in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes at tested doses in cultures with/without S9 fraction.

  19. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: I. Chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the first part of a theoretical and experimental work aiming at modeling the chemo-mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C3S). Because of ion exchange processes, the volume change of the IER may cause internal pressures leading to the degradation of the material. In this study, a predictive modeling is developed for describing the chemical behavior of such material. It is based on thermodynamic equilibria to determine the evolution of the ion exchange processes, and the potential precipitation of portlandite in the composite. In parallel, a phenomenological study has been set up to understand chemical phenomena related to the swelling mechanisms. The model created has been finally implemented in a finite elements software; the simulation of a laboratory test has been performed and the results compared to experimental data.

  20. Similarity, Clustering, and Scaling Analyses for the Foreign Exchange Market ---Comprehensive Analysis on States of Market Participants with High-Frequency Financial Data---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, A.; Sakai, H.; Nishimura, M.; Holyst, J. A.

    This article proposes mathematical methods to quantify states of marketparticipants in the foreign exchange market (FX market) and conduct comprehensive analysis on behavior of market participants by means of high-frequency financial data. Based on econophysics tools and perspectives we study similarity measures for both rate movements and quotation activities among various currency pairs. We perform also clustering analysis on market states for observation days, and find scaling relationship between mean values of quotation activities and their standard deviations. Using these mathematical methods we can visualize states of the FX market comprehensively. Finally we conclude that states of market participants temporally vary due to both external and internal factors.

  1. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbury, Phillip J.

    1986-04-01

    A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

  2. COED Transactions, Vol. X, No. 6, June 1978. Concentric-Tube Heat Exchanger Analysis and Data Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcovitz, Alan B., Ed.

    Four computer programs written in FORTRAN and BASIC develop theoretical predictions and data reduction for a junior-senior level heat exchanger experiment. Programs may be used at the terminal in the laboratory to check progress of the experiment or may be used in the batch mode for interpretation of final information for a formal report. Several…

  3. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of branches in dextran using high-performance anion exchange chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lin; Ouyang, Yilan; Sun, Xue; Xu, Naiyu; Linhardt, Robert J; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2015-12-04

    Dextran, a family of natural polysaccharides, consists of an α (1→6) linked-glucose main (backbone) chain having a number of branches. The determination of the types and the quantities of branches in dextran is important in understanding its various biological roles. In this study, a hyphenated method using high-performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) in parallel with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) and mass spectrometry (MS) was applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of dextran branches. A rotary cation-exchange cartridge array desalter was used for removal of salt from the HPAEC eluent making it MS compatible. MS and MS/MS were used to provide structural information on the enzymatically prepared dextran oligosaccharides. PAD provides quantitative data on the ratio of enzyme-resistant, branched dextran oligosaccharides. Both the types and degree of branching found in a variety of dextrans could be simultaneously determined online using this method.

  4. Exchange-diffusion reactions in HfSiON during annealing studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and narrow resonant nuclear reaction profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotti, L.; Bastos, K. P.; Soares, G. V.; Driemeier, C.; Pezzi, R. P.; Morais, J.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Rotondaro, A. L. P.; Visokay, M. R.; Chambers, J. J.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Colombo, L.

    2004-11-01

    HfSiON films deposited on Si (001) by reactive sputtering were submitted to rapid thermal annealing at 1000°C in vacuum, N2 and O2 atmospheres. The stability of the dielectric was evaluated by measuring the atomic transport and exchange of the chemical species, using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis and narrow resonant nuclear reaction profiling. Annealing in O2 ambient reduced the N concentration mainly from near-surface regions where oxygen was incorporated in comparable amounts. Vacuum annealing, on the other hand, induced N loss preferentially from the Si/dielectric interface and O loss preferentially from near-surface regions. The results are explained in terms of exchange-diffusion reactions occurring in the HfSiON.

  5. Nonadiabatic exchange dynamics during adiabatic frequency sweeps.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Thomas M

    2016-04-01

    A Bloch equation analysis that includes relaxation and exchange effects during an adiabatic frequency swept pulse is presented. For a large class of sweeps, relaxation can be incorporated using simple first order perturbation theory. For anisochronous exchange, new expressions are derived for exchange augmented rotating frame relaxation. For isochronous exchange between sites with distinct relaxation rate constants outside the extreme narrowing limit, simple criteria for adiabatic exchange are derived and demonstrate that frequency sweeps commonly in use may not be adiabatic with regard to exchange unless the exchange rates are much larger than the relaxation rates. Otherwise, accurate assessment of the sensitivity to exchange dynamics will require numerical integration of the rate equations. Examples of this situation are given for experimentally relevant parameters believed to hold for in-vivo tissue. These results are of significance in the study of exchange induced contrast in magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Quantitative analysis of spin exchange interactions to identify β strand and turn regions in Ure2 prion domain fibrils with site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Sam; Chiang, Vicky; Guo, Zhefeng

    2012-11-01

    Amyloid formation is associated with a range of debilitating human disorders including Alzheimer's and prion diseases. The amyloid structure is essential for understanding the role of amyloids in these diseases. Amyloid formation of Ure2 protein underlies the yeast prion [URE3]. Here we use site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the structure of amyloid fibrils formed by the Ure2 prion domain. The Ure2 prion domain under study contains a Sup35M domain at C-terminus as a solubilization element. We introduced spin labels at every residue from positions 2-15, and every 5th residue from positions 20-80 in Ure2 prion domain. EPR spectra at most labeling sites show strong spin exchange interactions, suggesting a parallel in-register β structure. With quantitative analysis of spin exchange interactions, we show that residues 8-12 form the first β strand, followed by a turn at residues 13-14, and then the second β strand from residue 15 to at least residue 20. Comparison of the spin exchange frequency for the fibrils formed under quiescent and agitated conditions also revealed differences in the fibril structures. Currently there is a lack of techniques for in-depth structural studies of amyloid fibrils. Detailed structural information is obtained almost exclusively from solid-state NMR. The identification of β-strand and turn regions in this work suggests that quantitative analysis of spin exchange interactions in spin-labeled amyloid fibrils is a powerful approach for identifying the β-strand and turn/loop residues and for studying structural differences of different fibril polymorphs.

  7. Pathway analysis of super-exchange electronic couplings in electron transfer reactions using a multi-configuration self-consistent field method.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2011-04-21

    We present a novel pathway analysis of super-exchange electronic couplings in electron transfer reactions using localized molecular orbitals from multi-configuration self-consistent field (MCSCF) calculations. In our analysis, the electronic coupling and the tunneling pathways can be calculated in terms of the configuration interaction (CI) Hamiltonian matrix obtained from the localized MCSCF wave function. Making use of the occupation restricted multiple active spaces (ORMAS) method can effectively produce the donor, acceptor, and intermediate configuration state functions (CSFs) and CIs among these CSFs. In order to express the electronic coupling as a sum of individual tunneling pathways contributions, we employed two perturbative methods: Löwdin projection-iteration method and higher-order super-exchange method. We applied them to anion couplings of butane-1,4-diyl and pentane-1,5-diyl. The results were (1) the electronic couplings calculated from the two perturbative methods were in reasonable agreement with those from a non-perturbative method (one-half value of the energy difference between the ground and first excited states), (2) the main tunneling pathways consisted of a small number of lower-order super-exchange pathways where bonding, anti-bonding, or extra-valence-shell orbitals were used once or twice, and (3) the interference among a huge number of higher-order super-exchange pathways significantly contributed to the overall electronic coupling, whereas each of them contributed only fractionally. Our method can adequately take into account both effects of non-dynamical electron correlation and orbital relaxation. Comparing with the analyses based on the Koopmans' theorem (ignoring both effects) and the ORMAS-CIs from frozen localized reference orbitals (ignoring the effect of orbital relaxation), we discuss these effects.

  8. Analysis of the influence of climatic and physiological parameters on the net ecosystem carbon exchange of an apple orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotelli, Damiano; Montagnani, Leonardo; Scandellari, Francesca; Tagliavini, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) of an apple orchard located in South Tyrol (Caldaro, Bolzano, Italy) was monitored continuously since March 2009 via eddy covariance technique. Contemporary measurements of the main environmental parameters (temperature, photosynthetic active photon flux density, soil water content, vapor pressure deficit) were taken at the same field site. Leaf Area Index was also determined biometrically starting from spring 2010. Objectives of this work were (i) to assess the influence of these environmental and physiological parameters on NEE, (ii) to set up a model capable to fill large gap occurring in the dataset and (iii) predict inter-annual variability of fluxes based on the measurements of the selected explanatory variables. Daily cumulated values of the response variable (NEE, g C d-1) and mean daily value of the five explanatory variables considered (air T, ° C; SWC, m3m-3; PPFD, μmol m-2s-1; VPD, hPa, LAI m2m-2) were used in this analysis. The complex interactions between the explanatory variables and NEE were analyzed with the tree model approach which draws a picture of the complexity of data structure and highlights the explanatory variable that explain the greater amount of deviance of the response variable. NEE variability was mostly explained by LAI and PPFD. The most positive values of NEE occurred below the LAI threshold of 1.16 m2m-2 while above that LAI threshold and with an average daily PPFD above 13.2 μmol m-2s-1, the orchard resulted always a sink of carbon (negative daily NEE). On half of the available data (only alternate months of the considered period were considered), a stepwise multiple regression approach was used to model NEE using the variables indicated above. Simplification by deletion of the non-significant terms was carried out until all parameters where highly significant (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in deviance was observed when deleting further variables. Since heteroscedasticity and non

  9. Synonym-based word frequency analysis to support the development and presentation of a public health quality improvement taxonomy in an online exchange.

    PubMed

    Pina, Jamie; Chester, Kelley; Danoff, Diana; Koyanagi, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Word frequency analysis has not been fully explored as an input to public health taxonomy development. We used document analysis, expert review, and user-centered design to develop a taxonomy of public health quality improvement concepts for an online exchange of quality improvement work (www.phqix.org). Online entries were made searchable using a faceted search approach. To present the most relevant facets to users, we analyzed 334 published public health quality improvement documents using word frequency analysis to identify the most prevalent clusters of word meanings. We reviewed the highest-weighted concepts and identified their relationships to quality improvement details in our taxonomy. The meanings were mapped to items in our taxonomy, and presented in order of their weighted percentages in the data. Using this combination of methods, we developed and sorted concepts in the faceted search presentation so that relevant search criteria were accessible to users of the online exchange. Word frequency analysis may be a useful method to incorporate in other taxonomy development and presentationwhen relevant data is available.

  10. A comparative study of linear and non-linear regression analysis for ammonium exchange by clinoptilolite zeolite.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Dogan; Koc, Yunus; Turan, Mustafa; Ozturk, Mustafa

    2007-06-01

    Ammonium ion exchange from aqueous solution using clinoptilolite zeolite was investigated at laboratory scale. Batch experimental studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of various parameters such as pH, zeolite dosage, contact time, initial ammonium concentration and temperature. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models and pseudo-second-order model were fitted to experimental data. Linear and non-linear regression methods were compared to determine the best fitting of isotherm and kinetic model to experimental data. The rate limiting mechanism of ammonium uptake by zeolite was determined as chemical exchange. Non-linear regression has better performance for analyzing experimental data and Freundlich model was better than Langmuir to represent equilibrium data.

  11. Optimization of UA of heat exchangers and BOG compressor exit pressure of LNG boil-off gas reliquefaction system using exergy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochunni, Sarun Kumar; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2015-12-01

    Boil-off gas (BOG) generation and its handling are important issues in Liquefied natural gas (LNG) value chain because of economic, environment and safety reasons. Several variants of reliquefaction systems of BOG have been proposed by researchers. Thermodynamic analyses help to configure them and size their components for improving performance. In this paper, exergy analysis of reliquefaction system based on nitrogen-driven reverse Brayton cycle is carried out through simulation using Aspen Hysys 8.6®, a process simulator and the effects of heat exchanger size with and without related pressure drop and BOG compressor exit pressure are evaluated. Nondimensionalization of parameters with respect to the BOG load allows one to scale up or down the design. The process heat exchanger (PHX) requires much higher surface area than that of BOG condenser and it helps to reduce the quantity of methane vented out to atmosphere. As pressure drop destroys exergy, optimum UA of PHX decreases for highest system performance if pressure drop is taken into account. Again, for fixed sizes of heat exchangers, as there is a range of discharge pressures of BOG compressor at which the loss of methane in vent minimizes, the designer should consider choosing the pressure at lower value.

  12. Off-line elimination of carbohydrates for amino acid analysis of samples with high carbohydrate content by ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongsheng; Yu, Hong; Mou, Shifen

    2003-05-16

    This paper introduces a new off-line sample preparation that eliminates carbohydrates from amino acid samples containing a high carbohydrate content before analysis by anion-exchange chromatography and integrated pulsed amperometric detection. First, the sample is introduced into a cation-exchange column in the hydrogen form. Carbohydrates are removed completely using 0.02% formic acid as a transfer fluid, while only amino acids are retained. Amino acids are then extracted from the cation-exchange resin by 10 ml of 1 M ammonia. The ammonia collected is evaporated to dryness and the residue redissolved in water containing 20 mg/l NaN3 for injection. All amino acids are recovered following the carbohydrate removal step. The average recovery is 97.2%. The relative standard deviation for seven replicates is less than 5.2%. The usefulness of the method is illustrated with chromatograms of ratafia samples obtained before and after the off-line removal of carbohydrates.

  13. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  14. Intergranular exchange coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, M. W.; Indeck, R. S.

    1994-02-01

    We evaluate the exchange interaction between neighboring grains of a polycrystalline magnetic material with uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy, based on the energy of the domain wall formed at the portion of the interface in atomic contact. The analysis suggests that previous work [J.-G. Zhu and H. N. Bertram, in Solid State Physics Vol. 46, edited by H. Ehrenreich and T. Turnbull (Academic, San Diego, 1992)] may underestimate the interaction, and it predicts a different dependence on grain size.

  15. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H](4+) ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å(2) and 446 Å(2); the [M + 3H](3+) ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å(2) and 367 Å(2). Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H](3+) ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H](4+) ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H](4+) ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  16. Combining ion mobility spectrometry with hydrogen-deuterium exchange and top-down MS for peptide ion structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Maleki, Hossein; Arndt, James R; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    The gas-phase conformations of electrosprayed ions of the model peptide KKDDDDIIKIIK have been examined by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. [M+4H](4+) ions exhibit two conformers with collision cross sections of 418 Å(2) and 471 Å(2). [M+3H](3+) ions exhibit a predominant conformer with a collision cross section of 340 Å(2) as well as an unresolved conformer (shoulder) with a collision cross section of ~367 Å(2). Maximum HDX levels for the more compact [M+4H](4+) ions and the compact and partially-folded [M+3H](3+) ions are ~12.9, ~15.5, and ~14.9, respectively. Ion structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) suggest that this ordering of HDX level results from increased charge-site/exchange-site density for the more compact ions of lower charge. Additionally, a new model that includes two distance calculations (charge site to carbonyl group and carbonyl group to exchange site) for the computer-generated structures is shown to better correlate to the experimentally determined per-residue deuterium uptake. Future comparisons of IMS-HDX-MS data with structures obtained from MDS are discussed with respect to novel experiments that will reveal the HDX rates of individual residues.

  17. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H]4+ ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 446 Å2; the [M + 3H]3+ ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å2 and 367 Å2. Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H]3+ ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H]4+ ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H]4+ ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  18. Boltzmann-BCA Analysis on the Role of Charge Exchange in Microscopic Erosion of Fusion-Relevant Plasma Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keniley, Shane; Curreli, Davide

    2016-10-01

    Charge-exchange is expected to play an important role in microscopic erosion of plasma facing components under fusion-relevant conditions. In this work we present a set of detailed Boltzmann simulations of the near-wall plasma including surface response, with the goal of highlighting the relative role of charge exchange against ion-induced erosion. The simulations reveal that the charge-exchange processes occurring in the collisional presheath release energetic neutrals toward the wall with angular distributions ranging from grazing to normal incidence; the ions accelerated across the collisional and magnetic presheath acts as a dominant factor in affecting the initial phase of the neutral population reaching the wall, and ultimately its energy-angle distribution at the surface. The effect on erosion rates, plasma sheath/presheath structure, and moments of the distributions are highlighted. The study has been made possible thanks to a newly-developed dynamically-coupled Boltzmann-BCA model retaining the effects of both the plasma and the material erosion. Material based on work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research through the SciDAC project on Plasma-Surface Interactions, Award No. DE-SC0008875.

  19. Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry with Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange and Top-Down MS for Peptide Ion Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Maleki, Hossein; Arndt, James R.; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2014-12-01

    The gas-phase conformations of electrosprayed ions of the model peptide KKDDDDIIKIIK have been examined by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. [M+4H]4+ ions exhibit two conformers with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 471 Å2. [M+3H]3+ ions exhibit a predominant conformer with a collision cross section of 340 Å2 as well as an unresolved conformer (shoulder) with a collision cross section of ~367 Å2. Maximum HDX levels for the more compact [M+4H]4+ ions and the compact and partially-folded [M+3H]3+ ions are ~12.9, ~15.5, and ~14.9, respectively. Ion structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) suggest that this ordering of HDX level results from increased charge-site/exchange-site density for the more compact ions of lower charge. Additionally, a new model that includes two distance calculations (charge site to carbonyl group and carbonyl group to exchange site) for the computer-generated structures is shown to better correlate to the experimentally determined per-residue deuterium uptake. Future comparisons of IMS-HDX-MS data with structures obtained from MDS are discussed with respect to novel experiments that will reveal the HDX rates of individual residues.

  20. Communication performance analysis and comparison of two patterns for data exchange between nodes in WorldFIP fieldbus network.

    PubMed

    Liang, Geng; Wang, Hong; Li, Wen; Li, Dazhong

    2010-10-01

    Data exchange patterns between nodes in WorldFIP fieldbus network are quite important and meaningful in improving the communication performance of WorldFIP network. Based on the basic communication ways supported in WorldFIP protocol, we propose two patterns for implementation of data exchange between peer nodes over WorldFIP network. Effects on communication performance of WorldFIP network in terms of some network parameters, such as number of bytes in user's data and turn-around time, in both the proposed patterns, are analyzed at length when different network speeds are applied. Such effects with the patterns of periodic message transmission using acknowledged and non-acknowledged messages, are also studied. Communication performance in both the proposed patterns are analyzed and compared. Practical applications of the research are presented. Through the study, it can be seen that different data exchange patterns make a great difference in improving communication efficiency with different network parameters, which is quite useful and helpful in the practical design of distributed systems based on WorldFIP network.

  1. Climatic and management drivers of CO2 exchanges by a production crop: analysis over three successive 4-year cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buysse, Pauline; Moureaux, Christine; Bodson, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchanges between crops and the atmosphere are influenced by both climatic and crop management drivers. The investigated crop, situated at the Lonzée Terrestrial Observatory (candidate ICOS site) in the Hesbaye region in Belgium and managed for more than 70 years using conventional farming practices, was monitored over three complete sugar beet/winter wheat/potato/winter wheat rotation cycles from 2004 to 2016. Eddy covariance, automatic and manual soil chambers, leaf diffusion and biomass measurements were performed continuously in order to obtain the daily and seasonal Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), total Ecosystem Respiration (TER), Net Primary Productivity (NPP), autotrophic respiration, heterotrophic respiration and Net Biome Production (NBP). Meteorological data and crop management practices were also recorded. Climatic and seasonal evolutions of the carbon balance components were studied and crop carbon budgets were computed both at the yearly and crop rotation cycle scales. On average over the 12 years, NEE was negative but NBP was positive, i.e. as far as carbon exportation by harvest are included in the budget, the site behaved as a carbon source. Impacts of both meteorological drivers and crop management operations on CO2 exchanges were analyzed and compared between crop types, years, and rotation cycles. The uncertainties associated to the carbon fluxes were also evaluated and discussed.

  2. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, F. D.

    1991-04-01

    During the last quarter, Doty Scientific, Inc. (DSI) continued to make progress on the microtube strip (MTS) heat exchangers. The team has begun a heat exchanger stress analysis; however, they have been concentrating the bulk of their analytical energies on a computational fluid dynmaics (CFD) model to determine the location and magnitude of shell-side flow maldistribution which decreases heat exchanger effectiveness. DSI received 120 fineblanked tubestrips from Southern Fineblanking (SFB) for manufacturing process development. Both SFB and NIST provided inspection reports of the tubestrips. DSI completed the tooling required to encapsulate a tube array and press tubestrips on the array. Pressing the tubestrips on tube arrays showed design deficiencies both in the tubestrip design and the tooling design. DSI has a number of revisions in process to correct these deficiencies. The research effort has identified a more economical fusible alloy for encapsulating the tube array, and determined the parameters required to successfully encapsulate the tube array with the new alloy. A more compact MTS heat exchanger bank was designed.

  3. Ratiometric analysis in hyperpolarized NMR (I): test of the two-site exchange model and the quantification of reaction rate constants.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin Z; Kadlececk, Stephen; Xu, He N; Daye, Dania; Pullinger, Benjamin; Profka, Harrilla; Chodosh, Lewis; Rizi, Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for the analysis of in vivo hyperpolarized (13) C NMR data from the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction usually make assumptions on the stability of rate constants and/or the validity of the two-site exchange model. In this study, we developed a framework to test the validity of the assumption of stable reaction rate constants and the two-site exchange model in vivo via ratiometric fitting of the time courses of the signal ratio L(t)/P(t). Our analysis provided evidence that the LDH enzymatic kinetics observed by hyperpolarized NMR are in near-equilibrium and satisfy the two-site exchange model for only a specific time window. In addition, we quantified both the forward and reverse exchange rate constants of the LDH reaction for the transgenic and mouse xenograft models of breast cancer using the ratio fitting method developed, which includes only two modeling parameters and is less sensitive to the influence of instrument settings/protocols, such as flip angles, degree of polarization and tracer dosage. We further compared the ratio fitting method with a conventional two-site exchange modeling method, i.e. the differential equation fitting method, using both the experimental and simulated hyperpolarized NMR data. The ratio fitting method appeared to fit better than the differential equation fitting method for the reverse rate constant on the mouse tumor data, with less relative errors on average, whereas the differential equation fitting method also resulted in a negative reverse rate constant for one tumor. The simulation results indicated that the accuracy of both methods depends on the width of the transport function, noise level and rate constant ratio; one method may be more accurate than the other based on the experimental/biological conditions aforementioned. We were able to categorize our tumor models into specific conditions of the computer simulation and to estimate the errors of rate quantification. We also discussed possible

  4. Evaluation of the effect of transcytolemmal water exchange analysis for therapeutic response assessment using DCE-MRI: a comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhao; Subashi, Ergys; Liang, Xiao; Yin, Fang-Fang; Chang, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    This study compares the shutter-speed (SS) and the Tofts models as used in assessing therapeutic response in a longitudinal DCE-MRI experiment. Sixteen nu/nu mice with implanted colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (LS-174T) were randomly assigned into treatment/control groups (n  =  8/group) and received bevacizumab/saline twice weekly (Day1/Day4/Day8). All mice were scanned at one pre- (Day0) and two post-treatment (Day2/Day9) time points using a high spatiotemporal resolution DCE-MRI pulse sequence. The CA extravasation rate constant K\\text{T}\\text{trans}/K\\text{S}\\text{trans} from the Tofts/SS model and the mean intracellular water residence time {τ\\text{i}} from the SS model were analyzed. A biological subvolume (BV) within the tumor was identified based on the {τ\\text{i}} intensity distribution, and the SS model parameters within the BV (K\\text{S,BV}\\text{trans} and {τ\\text{i,BV}} ) were analyzed. It is found that K\\text{S}\\text{trans} and K\\text{T}\\text{trans} have a similar spatial distribution in the tumor volume. The Bayesian information criterion results show that the SS model was a better fit for all scans. At Day9, the treatment group had significantly higher tumor mean K\\text{T}\\text{trans} (p  =  0.021), K\\text{S}\\text{trans} (p  =  0.021) and {τ\\text{i}} (p  = 0.045). When BV from transcytolemmal water exchange analysis was adopted, the treatment group had higher mean K\\text{S,BV}\\text{trans} at both Day2 (p  =  0.038) and Day9 (p  =  0.007). Additionally, at Day9, the treatment group had higher mean {τ\\text{i,BV}} (p  =  0.045) and higher K\\text{S,BV}\\text{trans} spatial heterogeneity indices (Rényi dimensions) d 1 (p  = 0.010) and d 2 (p  = 0.021). When mean K\\text{S,BV}\\text{trans} and its coefficient of variation (CV) were used to separate treatment/control group samples using supporting vector machine, the accuracy of treatment/control classification was

  5. Protein pre-fractionation with a mixed-bed ion exchange column in 3D LC-MS/MS proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luofu; Yao, Ling; Zhang, Yan; Xue, Ting; Dai, Guangchen; Chen, Keying; Hu, Xiaofang; Xu, Lisa X

    2012-09-15

    The fractionation of complex samples at the protein level prior to shotgun proteomics analysis is an efficient means to more comprehensive analysis of samples. A mixed-bed ion-exchange (IEX) column, packed with both weak anion exchange (WAX) and weak cation exchange (WCX) materials, was used for the first dimensional separation of complex samples at the protein level using volatile solvents. The peptides from digestion of each fraction were then identified by 2D SCX-RP-LC-MS/MS. We applied this 3D strategy to mouse mammary tumor 4T1 cell lysate and identified a total of 3084 proteins in a typical experiment. The moderate separation performance of the mixed-bed IEX column facilitated the in-depth identification of the proteins in the complex sample. There were some acceptable inter-fraction overlaps. Nearly half (45.8%) of the proteins were only identified in single fractions, while 82.3% were identified in no more than 3 fractions. The identified proteins covered a broad range of pI, size and grand average hydrophobicity (GRAVY) values. Detailed analysis of proteins identified in each fraction elucidated the separation characteristics of mixed-bed IEX. Retention on mixed-bed IEX was associated, but not restricted to the extreme pI values (pI<5, pI>10) and to the percentage of charged residues of both signs. In conclusion, we have exploited the mixed-bed IEX column to establish an efficient and comprehensive identification method for complex samples.

  6. Compact, accurate description of diagnostic neutral beam propagation and attenuation in a high temperature plasma for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Bespamyatnov, Igor O; Rowan, William L; Granetz, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod relies on the use of the diagnostic neutral beam injector as a source of neutral particles which penetrate deep into the plasma. It employs the emission resulting from the interaction of the beam atoms with fully ionized impurity ions. To interpret the emission from a given point in the plasma as the density of emitting impurity ions, the density of beam atoms must be known. Here, an analysis of beam propagation is described which yields the beam density profile throughout the beam trajectory from the neutral beam injector to the core of the plasma. The analysis includes the effects of beam formation, attenuation in the neutral gas surrounding the plasma, and attenuation in the plasma. In the course of this work, a numerical simulation and an analytical approximation for beam divergence are developed. The description is made sufficiently compact to yield accurate results in a time consistent with between-shot analysis.

  7. Use of ion exchange resins in the analysis of rocks and minerals: Separation of sodium and potassium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichen, L.E.

    1958-01-01

    This procedure was developed primarily for analyses in which limited amounts of sample are available. Sodium and potassium can be separated from the other constituents of silicate rocks by cation exchange resin (Amberlite IR-120). The sample is decomposed with hydrofluoric and sulfuric acids and passed through the resin bed after expulsion of the fluorine. The column is eluted with 0.12N hydrochloric acid at a fast flow rate of 4 ml. per sq. cm. per minute and the sodium and potassium are recovered together within a reasonable time. Other constituents of the sample, except silica, can be determined on the same portion of sample.

  8. Anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with conductivity detection for the analysis of phytic acid in food.

    PubMed

    Talamond, P; Doulbeau, S; Rochette, I; Guyot, J P

    2000-02-25

    A sensitive method for the accurate determination of phytic acid in food samples is described. The proposed procedure involves the anion-exchange liquid chromatography with conductivity detection. Initially, two methods of determination of phytic acid were compared: absorptiometry and high-performance ion chromatography (HPIC) with chemically suppressed conductivity detector. Unlike most conventional methods involving precipitation by FeCl3, the simpler and more reliable HPIC assay avoids the numerous assumptions inherent in the iron precipitation and the accuracy is independent of the phytate content. The protocol was also applied to a survey of phytic acid concentration in some cereal, oil and legume seeds.

  9. Direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Sakurai, Hiromu; Nishiguchi, Kohei; Utani, Keisuke; Günther, Detlef

    2015-09-03

    An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) coupled with gas to particle conversion-gas exchange technique was applied to the direct analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in ambient air. The ultra-trace semiconductor gases such as arsine (AsH3) and phosphine (PH3) were converted to particles by reaction with ozone (O3) and ammonia (NH3) gases within a gas to particle conversion device (GPD). The converted particles were directly introduced and measured by ICPMS through a gas exchange device (GED), which could penetrate the particles as well as exchange to Ar from either non-reacted gases such as an air or remaining gases of O3 and NH3. The particle size distribution of converted particles was measured by scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and the results supported the elucidation of particle agglomeration between the particle converted from semiconductor gas and the particle of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) which was produced as major particle in GPD. Stable time-resolved signals from AsH3 and PH3 in air were obtained by GPD-GED-ICPMS with continuous gas introduction; however, the slightly larger fluctuation, which could be due to the ionization fluctuation of particles in ICP, was observed compared to that of metal carbonyl gas in Ar introduced directly into ICPMS. The linear regression lines were obtained and the limits of detection (LODs) of 1.5 pL L(-1) and 2.4 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, were estimated. Since these LODs revealed sufficiently lower values than the measurement concentrations required from semiconductor industry such as 0.5 nL L(-1) and 30 nL L(-1) for AsH3 and PH3, respectively, the GPD-GED-ICPMS could be useful for direct and high sensitive analysis of ultra-trace semiconductor gas in air.

  10. Analysis of particle content of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 8 vectors by ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lock, Martin; Alvira, Mauricio R; Wilson, James M

    2012-02-01

    Advances in adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy have brought the possibility of commercial manufacturing of AAV vectors one step closer. To realize this prospect, a parallel effort with the goal of ever-increasing sophistication for AAV vector production technology and supporting assays will be required. Among the important release assays for a clinical gene therapy product, those monitoring potentially hazardous contaminants are most critical for patient safety. A prominent contaminant in many AAV vector preparations is vector particles lacking a genome, which can substantially increase the dose of AAV capsid proteins and lead to possible unwanted immunological consequences. Current methods to determine empty particle content suffer from inconsistency, are adversely affected by contaminants, or are not applicable to all serotypes. Here we describe the development of an ion-exchange chromatography-based assay that permits the rapid separation and relative quantification of AAV8 empty and full vector particles through the application of shallow gradients and a strong anion-exchange monolith chromatography medium.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of nanofluid in heat exchanger fitted by modified twisted tape: exergy analysis and ANN prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddah, Heydar; Ghasemi, Nahid; Keyvani, Bahram; Cheraghali, Ramin

    2016-09-01

    Present study provides an experimental investigation of the exergetic efficiency due to the flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in different geometries and flow regimes of the double pipe heat exchangers. The experiments with different Geometrical Progression Ratio (GPR) of twists as the new modified twisted tapes and different nanofluid concentration were performed under similar operation condition. Pitch length of the proposed twisted tapes and consequently the twist ratios changed along the twists with respect to the Geometrical Progression Ratio (GPR) whether reducer (RGPR < 1) or increaser (IGPR > 1). Regarding the experimental data, utilization of RGPR twists together with nanofluids tends to increase exergetic efficiency. Since the Prediction of exergetic efficiency from experimental process is complex and time consuming, artificial neural networks for identification of the relationship, which may exist between the thermal and flow parameters and exergetic efficiency, have been utilized. The network input consists of five parameters (Re,Pr ,φ, Tr, GPR) that crucially dominate the heat transfer process. The results proved that the introduced ANN model is reliable and capable in proposing a proper development plan for a heat exchanger and/or to determine the optimal plan of operation for heat transfer process.

  12. Structural analysis of the Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) using the divide and conquer approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian L; Sykes, Brian D; Fliegel, Larry

    2011-04-01

    The sodium/proton exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is an ubiquitous plasma membrane protein that regulates intracellular pH by removing excess intracellular acid. NHE1 is important in heart disease and cancer, making it an attractive therapeutic target. Although much is known about the function of NHE1, current structural knowledge of NHE1 is limited to two conflicting topology models: a low-resolution molecular envelope from electron microscopy, and comparison with a crystal structure of a bacterial homologue, NhaA. Our laboratory has used high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the structures of individual transmembrane helices of NHE1 - a divide and conquer approach to the study of this membrane protein. In this review, we discuss the structural and functional insights obtained from this approach in combination with functional data obtained from mutagenesis experiments on the protein. We also compare the known structure of NHE1 transmembrane segments with the structural and functional insights obtained from a bacterial sodium/proton exchanger homologue, NhaA. The structures of regions of the NHE1 protein that have been determined have both similarities and specific differences to the crystal structure of the NhaA protein. These have allowed insights into both the topology and the function of the NHE1 protein.

  13. Effect of the shape on the spin state and exchange in quantum dots. Feynman path integral analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shevkunov, S. V.

    2015-05-15

    The ab initio computer simulation of the mixed quantum states of 1–5-nm model ellipsoid quantum dots with “soft” walls containing two and three quantum-indistinguishable nonrelativistic electrons has been performed by the path integral method. The calculation has been carried out beyond the single-electron and mean-field approximations with the fundamentally exact inclusion of Coulomb and exchange correlations of all orders and the spin variable. Distributions over the eigenfunctions of the spin-squared operator, as well as the equilibrium spin numbers, have been obtained depending on the shape of a quantum dot and the temperature. The complete set of basis functions symmetrized in permutations according to the spin of the system has been obtained by application of the Young symmetry operators. The dependence of the energy on the shape of the quantum dot corresponds to the negative sign of the surface tension at its boundary. The calculation indicates that the spin magnetic susceptibility in the system of two electrons decreases strongly for spherical quantum dots (“pairing” of spins) and the temperature dependences have a pronounced maximum whose position depends on the shape of the quantum dot. For three electrons in an oblate quantum dot, the inversion of the energy levels of spin states is observed and affects the spin magnetic susceptibility. The results indicate a strong dependence of the energy of collective spin states of electrons on the detailed inclusion of exchange and Coulomb spatial correlations.

  14. Functional analysis of amino acid residues essential for activity in the Na+/H+ exchanger of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Dibrov, P; Young, P G; Fliegel, L

    1998-06-09

    We identified amino acid residues important for activity of sod2, the Na+/H+ antiporter of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We mutated all eight His residues of sod2 into Arg. Only His367-->Arg affected function and resulted in complete inability of sod2 to allow growth of S. pombe in LiCl-containing medium. Mutant S. pombe (H367R) could not expel sodium in acidic (pH 4.0) medium and were defective in their ability to alkalinize external medium. When His367 was replaced by Asp, sodium export of S. pombe was suppressed at acidic pH while the sodium-dependent proton influx at pH 6.1 was increased compared to wild type. We also mutated three residues conserved in putative membrane regions of various eukaryotic and prokaryotic Na+/H+ exchangers. S. pombe containing Asp241-->Asn and Asp266, 267-->Asn mutations had greatly impaired growth in LiCl-containing medium. In addition, sodium-dependent proton influx at external pH 6. 1 was impaired. Sodium export from S. pombe cells at external pH 4.0 was also almost completely abolished by the D266,267N mutation; however, the D241N mutant protein retained almost normal Na+ export. The results demonstrate that His367, Asp241, and Asp266,267 are important in the function of the eukaryotic Na+/H+ exchanger sod2.

  15. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  16. Heat exchangers of gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Iu. F.; Mitin, B. M.

    1991-07-01

    The papers presented in this volume focus on methods for studying the thermal and hydraulic characteristics of heat exchangers used in gas turbine engines and methods for the analysis and experimental investigation of the dynamic characteristics of heat exchangers with different coolant flow schemes, including cryogenic heat exchangers. In particular, attention is given to the effect of tube bundle parameters on the dimensional and mass characteristics of high-temperature heat exchangers, a numerical method for calculating the dynamic characteristics of a fuel-air heat exchanger with a buffer cavity, and an experimental study of the air drying process in air coolers.

  17. Optimal counter-current exchange networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Robert S.; Mao, Yong

    2016-11-01

    We present a general analysis of exchange devices linking their efficiency to the geometry of the exchange surface and supply network. For certain parameter ranges, we show that the optimal exchanger consists of densely packed pipes which can span a thin sheet of large area (an "active layer"), which may be crumpled into a fractal surface and supplied with a fractal network of pipes. We derive the efficiencies of such exchangers, showing the potential for significant gains compared to regular exchangers (where the active layer is flat), using parameters relevant to biological systems.

  18. [Comparative analysis of gas exchange and cardiorespiratory systems reactions to increasing normobaric hypoxia and physical load of swimmers and skiers].

    PubMed

    Krivoshchekin, S G; Divert, V E; Mel'nikov, V N; Vodianitskiĭ, S N; Girenko, L A

    2013-01-01

    Qualification comparable groups of young men engaged in cyclic kinds of sports were tested with stepwise accruing loads on bicycle ergometer and 25-minute exponential increasing normobaric hypoxia to final concentration of 10% oxygen. Group of skiers, having the greatest values of the maximal oxygen consumption at muscular work, show the relaxed cardiorespiratory reactions and more falling of blood oxygen in the hypoxia. The swimmers, having restrictions of ventilatory function in the course of trainings, form preadaptation to hypoxia with changes of external respiration and gas exchange functions that allows at hypoxia to better oxygen sate the blood in lungs. The joint assessment of aerobic capacity at physical work and physiological reactions to hypoxia shows the direct relation between individual maximal oxygen consumption and the descent rate of blood oxygen saturation at accruing hypoxia that can be useful at an assessment of a sportsman functional state and its correction at training processes.

  19. Evidence for Msh2 haploinsufficiency in mice revealed by MNU-induced sister-chromatid exchange analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bouffler, S D; Hofland, N; Cox, R; Fodde, R

    2000-01-01

    The role of Msh2 in chromosome stability has been investigated in a targeted mouse model for HNPCC Msh2Δ7N. Chromosome aberration frequencies were similar in bone marrow of Msh2+/+Msh2+/–and Msh2–/–mice and no differential effects of in vivo X-irradiation were noted. By contrast, the induction of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) by methyl nitrosourea (MNU) was reduced in Msh2–/–and Msh2+/–cells to ~20% and ~45% wild-type levels respectively indicating a phenotypic effect of haploinsufficiency of the mouse Msh2 gene. © 2000 CancerResearch Campaign PMID:11044352

  20. Exchange frequency in replica exchange molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel; Meng, Yilin; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the exchange-attempt frequency on sampling efficiency is studied in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). We show that sampling efficiency increases with increasing exchange-attempt frequency. This conclusion is contrary to a commonly expressed view in REMD. Five peptides (1-21 residues long) are studied with a spectrum of exchange-attempt rates. Convergence rates are gauged by comparing ensemble properties between fixed length test REMD simulations and longer reference simulations. To show the fundamental correlation between exchange frequency and convergence time, a simple model is designed and studied, displaying the same basic behavior of much more complex systems.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of a model of CO{sub 2} exchange in tundra ecosystems by the adjoint method

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, C.; Louis, J.F.

    1995-02-20

    A model of net primary production (NPP), decomposition, and nitrogen cycling in tundra ecosystems has been developed. The adjoint technique is used to study the sensitivity of the computed annual net CO{sub 2} flux to perturbations in initial conditions, climatic inputs, and model`s main parameters describing current seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange in wet sedge tundra at Barrow, Alaska. The results show that net CO{sub 2} flux is more sensitive to decomposition parameters than to NPP parameters. This underlines the fact that in nutrient-limited ecosystems, decomposition drives net CO{sub 2} exchange by controlling mineralization of main nutrients. The results also indicate that the short-term (1 year) response of wet sedge tundra to CO{sub 2}-induced warming is a significant increase in CO{sub 2} emission, creating a positive feedback to atmospheric CO{sub 2} accumulation. However, a cloudiness increase during the same year can severely alter this response and lead to either a slight decrease or a strong increase in emitted CO{sub 2}, depending on its exact timing. These results demonstrate that the adjoint method is well suited to study systems encountering regime changes, as a single run of the adjoint model provides sensitivities of the net CO{sub 2} flux to perturbations in all parameters and variables at any time of the year. Moreover, it is shown that large errors due to the presence of thresholds can be avoided by first delimiting the range of applicability of the adjoint results. 38 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Improving policy and practice to promote equity and social justice - a qualitative comparative analysis building on key learnings from a twinning exchange between England and the US.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Claire; Narle, Ginder; Gibbs, Martin; Ruddock, Charmaine; Grady, Michael; Brookes, Chris; Hopkins, Trevor; Norwood, Jayne

    2013-12-01

    Community health promotion interventions, targeted at marginalised populations and focusing on addressing the social determinants of health (SDH) to reduce health inequalities and addressing the processes of exclusion, are an important strategy to prevent and control non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and promote the health of underprivileged and under-resourced groups. This article builds on key lessons learnt from a learning exchange between Communities for Health in England and the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health across the US (REACH US) communities that are tackling health inequities. It presents a qualitative analysis further capturing information about specific community interventions involved in the exchange and identifying lessons learnt. This exchange was led by a partnership between the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the International Union for Health Promotion and Education, the Department of Health of England, Health Action Partnership International, and Learning for Public Health West Midlands. These efforts provide interesting insights for further research, priority areas of action for policy and practice to address the SDH and to promote and sustain equity and social justice globally. The article highlights some key lessons about the use of data, assets-based community interventions and the importance of good leadership in times of crisis and adversity. Whilst complex and time-consuming to arrange, such programmes have the potential to offer other countries including the global south new insights and perspectives that will in turn contribute to the SDH field and provide concrete strategies and actions that effectively reduce inequities and promote the health of our societies. The key learnings have the potential to contribute to the global community and growing documentation on evidence of effective efforts in the reduction of health inequities.

  3. The Exchange.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blain, Mary P., Ed.; Pintavalle, Steven J., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Presents 10 activities in biology, chemistry, physical science, and general science. Activities focus on: alfalfa sprouts; soap test; density; skating on cold ice; Kirlian photography; titration analysis (with program listing); radioactive decay; and others. Each activity includes suggested grade level(s) and procedures. (DH)

  4. 43 CFR 3436.2-3 - Exchange procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... environmental analysis for the proposed exchange with the regional environmental impact statement prepared on... analysis or environmental impact statement on the proposed exchange. (e) Exchanges shall be made on an... pursuant to § 3420.3-4 of this title. If the environmental analysis is not so consolidated, the...

  5. 43 CFR 3436.2-3 - Exchange procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... environmental analysis for the proposed exchange with the regional environmental impact statement prepared on... analysis or environmental impact statement on the proposed exchange. (e) Exchanges shall be made on an... pursuant to § 3420.3-4 of this title. If the environmental analysis is not so consolidated, the...

  6. 43 CFR 3436.2-3 - Exchange procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... environmental analysis for the proposed exchange with the regional environmental impact statement prepared on... analysis or environmental impact statement on the proposed exchange. (e) Exchanges shall be made on an... pursuant to § 3420.3-4 of this title. If the environmental analysis is not so consolidated, the...

  7. Single particle electron microscopy analysis of the bovine anion exchanger 1 reveals a flexible linker connecting the cytoplasmic and membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Atanasov, Ivo; Ge, Peng; Narla, Mohandas; Pushkin, Alexander; Zhou, Z Hong; Kurtz, Ira

    2013-01-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1) is the major erythrocyte membrane protein that mediates chloride/bicarbonate exchange across the erythrocyte membrane facilitating CO₂ transport by the blood, and anchors the plasma membrane to the spectrin-based cytoskeleton. This multi-protein cytoskeletal complex plays an important role in erythrocyte elasticity and membrane stability. An in-frame AE1 deletion of nine amino acids in the cytoplasmic domain in a proximity to the membrane domain results in a marked increase in membrane rigidity and ovalocytic red cells in the disease Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis (SAO). We hypothesized that AE1 has a flexible region connecting the cytoplasmic and membrane domains, which is partially deleted in SAO, thus causing the loss of erythrocyte elasticity. To explore this hypothesis, we developed a new non-denaturing method of AE1 purification from bovine erythrocyte membranes. A three-dimensional (3D) structure of bovine AE1 at 2.4 nm resolution was obtained by negative staining electron microscopy, orthogonal tilt reconstruction and single particle analysis. The cytoplasmic and membrane domains are connected by two parallel linkers. Image classification demonstrated substantial flexibility in the linker region. We propose a mechanism whereby flexibility of the linker region plays a critical role in regulating red cell elasticity.

  8. Single Particle Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Bovine Anion Exchanger 1 Reveals a Flexible Linker Connecting the Cytoplasmic and Membrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Abuladze, Natalia; Atanasov, Ivo; Ge, Peng; Narla, Mohandas; Pushkin, Alexander; Zhou, Z. Hong; Kurtz, Ira

    2013-01-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1) is the major erythrocyte membrane protein that mediates chloride/bicarbonate exchange across the erythrocyte membrane facilitating CO2 transport by the blood, and anchors the plasma membrane to the spectrin-based cytoskeleton. This multi-protein cytoskeletal complex plays an important role in erythrocyte elasticity and membrane stability. An in-frame AE1 deletion of nine amino acids in the cytoplasmic domain in a proximity to the membrane domain results in a marked increase in membrane rigidity and ovalocytic red cells in the disease Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis (SAO). We hypothesized that AE1 has a flexible region connecting the cytoplasmic and membrane domains, which is partially deleted in SAO, thus causing the loss of erythrocyte elasticity. To explore this hypothesis, we developed a new non-denaturing method of AE1 purification from bovine erythrocyte membranes. A three-dimensional (3D) structure of bovine AE1 at 2.4 nm resolution was obtained by negative staining electron microscopy, orthogonal tilt reconstruction and single particle analysis. The cytoplasmic and membrane domains are connected by two parallel linkers. Image classification demonstrated substantial flexibility in the linker region. We propose a mechanism whereby flexibility of the linker region plays a critical role in regulating red cell elasticity. PMID:23393575

  9. A Hamiltonian Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (MD) Method for the Study of Folding, Based on the Analysis of the Stabilization Determinants of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meli, Massimiliano; Colombo, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we present a novel Hamiltonian replica exchange protocol for classical molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding/unfolding. The scheme starts from the analysis of the energy-networks responsible for the stabilization of the folded conformation, by means of the energy-decomposition approach. In this framework, the compact energetic map of the native state is generated by a preliminary short molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the protein in explicit solvent. This map is simplified by means of an eigenvalue decomposition. The highest components of the eigenvector associated with the lowest eigenvalue indicate which sites, named “hot spots”, are likely to be responsible for the stability and correct folding of the protein. In the Hamiltonian replica exchange protocol, we use modified force-field parameters to treat the interparticle non-bonded potentials of the hot spots within the protein and between protein and solvent atoms, leaving unperturbed those relative to all other residues, as well as solvent-solvent interactions. We show that it is possible to reversibly simulate the folding/unfolding behavior of two test proteins, namely Villin HeadPiece HP35 (35 residues) and Protein A (62 residues), using a limited number of replicas. We next discuss possible implications for the study of folding mechanisms via all atom simulations. PMID:23743827

  10. Single column comprehensive analysis of pharmaceutical preparations using dual-injection mixed-mode (ion-exchange and reversed-phase) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Taylor, Mark R; Haddad, Paul R; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2013-12-01

    The comprehensive separation and detection of hydrophobic and hydrophilic active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), their counter-ions (organic, inorganic) and excipients, using a single mixed-mode chromatographic column, and a dual injection approach is presented. Using a mixed-mode Thermo Fisher Acclaim Trinity P1 column, APIs, their counter-ions and possible degradants were first separated using a combination of anion-exchange, cation-exchange and hydrophobic interactions, using a mobile phase consisting of a dual organic modifier/salt concentration gradient. A complementary method was also developed using the same column for the separation of hydrophilic bulk excipients, using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) under high organic solvent mobile phase conditions. These two methods were then combined within a single gradient run using dual sample injection, with the first injection at the start of the applied gradient (mixed-mode retention of solutes), followed by a second sample injection at the end of the gradient (HILIC retention of solutes). Detection using both ultraviolet absorbance and refractive index enabled the sensitive detection of APIs and UV-absorbing counter-ions, together with quantitative determination of bulk excipients. The developed approach was applied successfully to the analysis of a dry powder inhalers (Flixotide(®), Spiriva(®)), enabling comprehensive quantification of all APIs and excipients in the sample.

  11. Structural Insights into the Exchange Domain of sec2p: Expression, Purification, Crystallization, and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gill,H.

    2007-01-01

    Sec2p is an essential yeast gene and is part of the cell polarization process that leads to budding. The Nterminal domain of sec2p (Sec2pN) the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for sec4p has been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and crystallized. Crystals belong to the space group P21 with unit cell dimensions 178.1 x 98.4 x 180.0 {angstrom}, {beta} = 91.7{sup o}, and diffract synchrotron-generated X-rays to better than 3.6 {angstrom} resolution. Pseudo-precession plots reveal a Laue symmetry of 2/m, corresponding to the aforementioned space group, and unusual weak diffraction in the -5--7 {angstrom} resolution range. The Matthews number calculations for a typical crystal density suggest a range of 28 to 64 molecules per asymmetric unit. Self-rotation and native Patterson calculations demonstrate a pure helical array of protein subunits. Based on the X-ray diffraction data analysis and amino-acid sequence alignments, the paper presents a hypothetical model of the exchange domain of sec2p as a pair of coiled-coil helices that binds to sec4p and facilitates nucleotide disassociation.

  12. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part II: Bias and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) and micrometeorological (MM) methods are extensively deployed for gauging air-surface Hg0 gas exchange. However, a systematic evaluation of the precision of the contemporary Hg0 flux quantification methods is not available. In this study, the uncertainty in Hg0 flux measured by the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method, the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM), the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method, as well as DFC of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs, are assessed using a robust data set from two field intercomparison campaigns. The absolute precision in Hg0 concentration difference (ΔC) measurements is estimated at 0.064 ng m-3 for the gradient-based MBR and AGM systems. For the REA system, the parameter is Hg0 concentration (C) dependent at 0.069 + 0.022C. During the campaigns, 57 and 62 % of the individual vertical gradient measurements are found to be significantly different from 0, while for the REA technique, the percentage of significant observations is lower. For the chambers, non-significant fluxes are confined to a few night-time periods with varying ambient Hg0 concentrations. Relative bias for DFC-derived fluxes is estimated to be ~ ±10, and ~ 85% of the flux bias is within ±2 ng m-2 h-1 in absolute terms. The DFC flux bias follows a diurnal cycle, which is largely affected by the forced temperature and irradiation bias in the chambers. Due to contrasting prevailing micrometeorological conditions, the relative uncertainty (median) in turbulent exchange parameters differs by nearly a factor of 2 between the campaigns, while that in ΔC measurement is fairly consistent. The estimated flux uncertainties for the triad of MM techniques are 16-27, 12-23 and 19-31% (interquartile range) for the AGM, MBR and REA methods, respectively. This study indicates that flux-gradient-based techniques (MBR and AGM) are preferable to REA in quantifying Hg0 flux over ecosystems with low vegetation height. A limitation of all Hg0 flux

  13. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part II: Bias and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) and micrometeorological (MM) methods are extensively deployed for gauging air-surface Hg0 gas exchange. However, a systematic evaluation of the precision of the contemporary Hg0 flux quantification methods is not available. In this study, the uncertainty in Hg0 flux measured by relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method, aerodynamic gradient method (AGM), modified Bowen-ratio (MBR) method, as well as DFC of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs is assessed using a robust data-set from two field intercomparison campaigns. The absolute precision in Hg0 concentration difference (Δ C) measurements is estimated at 0.064 ng m-3 for the gradient-based MBR and AGM system. For the REA system, the parameter is Hg0 concentration (C) dependent at 0.069+0.022C. 57 and 62% of the individual vertical gradient measurements were found to be significantly different from zero during the campaigns, while for the REA-technique the percentage of significant observations was lower. For the chambers, non-significant fluxes are confined to a few nighttime periods with varying ambient Hg0 concentration. Relative bias for DFC-derived fluxes is estimated to be ~ ±10%, and ~ 85% of the flux bias are within ±2 ng m-2 h-1 in absolute term. The DFC flux bias follows a diurnal cycle, which is largely dictated by temperature controls on the enclosed volume. Due to contrasting prevailing micrometeorological conditions, the relative uncertainty (median) in turbulent exchange parameters differs by nearly a factor of two between the campaigns, while that in Δ C measurements is fairly stable. The estimated flux uncertainties for the triad of MM-techniques are 16-27, 12-23 and 19-31% (interquartile range) for the AGM, MBR and REA method, respectively. This study indicates that flux-gradient based techniques (MBR and AGM) are preferable to REA in quantifying Hg0 flux over ecosystems with low vegetation height. A limitation of all Hg0 flux measurement systems investigated

  14. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-05-05

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  15. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-01-01

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  16. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometric analysis of a protein containing multiple disulfide bonds: Solution structure of recombinant macrophage colony stimulating factor-beta (rhM-CSFbeta).

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuguang; Zhang, Heidi; Watson, Jeffrey; Schimerlik, Michael I; Deinzer, Max L

    2002-09-01

    Studies with the homodimeric recombinant human macrophage colony-stimulating factor beta (rhM-CSFbeta), show for the first time that a large number (9) of disulfide linkages can be reduced after amide hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange, and the protein digested and analyzed successfully for the isotopic composition by electrospray mass spectrometry. Analysis of amide H/D after exchange-in shows that in solution the conserved four-helix bundle of (rhM-CSFbeta) has fast and moderately fast exchangeable sections of amide hydrogens in the alphaA helix, and mostly slow exchanging sections of amide hydrogens in the alphaB, alphaC, and alphaD helices. Most of the amide hydrogens in the loop between the beta1 and beta4 sheets exhibited fast or moderately fast exchange, whereas in the amino acid 63-67 loop, located at the interface of the two subunits, the exchange was slow. Solvent accessibility as measured by H/D exchange showed a better correlation with the average depth of amide residues calculated from reported X-ray crystallographic data for rhM-CSFalpha than with the average B-factor. The rates of H/D exchange in rhM-CSFbeta appear to correlate well with the exposed surface calculated for each amino acid residue in the crystal structure except for the alphaD helix. Fast hydrogen isotope exchange throughout the segment amino acids 150-221 present in rhM-CSFbeta, but not rhM-CSFalpha, provides evidence that the carboxy-terminal region is unstructured. It is, therefore, proposed that the anomalous behavior of the alphaD helix is due to interaction of the carboxy-terminal tail with this helical segment.

  17. MR chemical exchange imaging with spin-lock technique (CESL): a theoretical analysis of the Z-spectrum using a two-pool R1ρ relaxation model beyond the fast-exchange limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Zhou, Jinyuan; Ahuja, Anil T.; Wang, Yi-Xiang J.

    2012-12-01

    The chemical exchange (CE) process has been exploited as a novel and powerful contrast mechanism for MRI, which is primarily performed in the form of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging. A spin-lock (SL) technique can also be used for CE studies, although traditionally performed and interpreted quite differently from CEST. Chemical exchange imaging with spin-lock technique (CESL), theoretically based on the Bloch-McConnell equations common to CEST, has the potential to be used as an alternative to CEST and to better characterize CE processes from slow and intermediate to fast proton exchange rates through the tuning of spin-lock pulse parameters. In this study, the Z-spectrum and asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) obtained by CESL are theoretically analyzed and numerically simulated using a general two-pool R1ρ relaxation model beyond the fast-exchange limit. The influences of spin-lock parameters, static magnetic field strength B0 and physiological properties on the Z-spectrum and MTRasym are quantitatively revealed. Optimization of spin-lock frequency and spin-lock duration for the maximum CESL contrast enhancement is also investigated. Numerical simulation results in this study are compatible with the findings in the existing literature on CE imaging studies.

  18. Finite-element analysis of the fluid temperature distribution in double U-tube Borehole Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchini, E.; Jahanbin, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the evaluation of Thermal Response Tests (TRTs) and in the design of Borehole Heat Exchanger (BHE) fields, the mean temperature of the fluid Tm is usually approximated by the arithmetic mean Tave of inlet and outlet temperatures. This approximation can yield errors in the estimation of the thermal conductivity of the ground, of the BHE thermal resistance, and of the heat pump performance. An expression for the evaluation of Tm has been proposed by Marcotte and Pasquier (Marcotte D, Pasquier P 2008, Renewable Energy, 33 2407) for single U-tube BHEs. In this paper, the difference between Tm and Tave is determined by 3D finite- element simulations for a typical double U-tube BHE in 6 unsteady working conditions. The results are validated qualitatively through an approximate analytical method, and show that the expression proposed by Marcotte and Pasquier underestimates the difference between Tm and Tave when applied to a typical double U-tube BHE. Therefore, new relations to evaluate this difference for double U-tube BHEs would be useful.

  19. Analysis of the behavior and degradation in proton exchange membrane fuel cells with a dead-ended anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianliang; Jiang, Zuwei; Hou, Ming; Liang, Dong; Xiao, Yu; Dou, Meiling; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2014-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with a dead-ended anode (DEA) can obtain high hydrogen utilization by a comparatively simple system. Nevertheless, the accumulation of the nitrogen and the water in the anode channels can lead to a local fuel starvation, which degrades the performance and durability of PEMFCs. In this paper, the behaviors of PEMFCs with a DEA are explored experimentally by detecting the current distribution and the local potentials. The results indicate that the current distribution is uneven during the DEA operation. The local current firstly decreases at the region near the anode outlet, and then extends to the inlet region along the channels with time. The complete fuel starvation near the anode outlet leads to a high local potential and carbon corrosion on the cathode side. The SEM images of the cathode electrode reveal that the significant thickness reduction and the collapse of the electrode's porous structure happen in the cathode catalyst layer, leading to the irreversible decline of the performance. The comparison of the experiments with different oxidants and fuels reveals that the nitrogen crossover from cathode to anode is the dominant factor on the performance decline under the DEA operations.

  20. Ion exchanger in the brain: Quantitative analysis of perineuronally fixed anionic binding sites suggests diffusion barriers with ion sorting properties

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Markus; Reinert, Tilo; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Wagner, Friedrich E.; Tröger, Wolfgang; Reinert, Anja; Jäger, Carsten; Brückner, Gert; Arendt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) are a specialized form of brain extracellular matrix, consisting of negatively charged glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins and proteoglycans in the direct microenvironment of neurons. Still, locally immobilized charges in the tissue have not been accessible so far to direct observations and quantifications. Here, we present a new approach to visualize and quantify fixed charge-densities on brain slices using a focused proton-beam microprobe in combination with ionic metallic probes. For the first time, we can provide quantitative data on the distribution and net amount of pericellularly fixed charge-densities, which, determined at 0.4–0.5 M, is much higher than previously assumed. PNs, thus, represent an immobilized ion exchanger with ion sorting properties high enough to partition mobile ions in accord with Donnan-equilibrium. We propose that fixed charge-densities in the brain are involved in regulating ion mobility, the volume fraction of extracellular space and the viscosity of matrix components. PMID:26621052

  1. Experimental Analysis of Thermoelectric Heat Exchanger for Power Generation from Salinity Gradient Solar Pond Using Low-Grade Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Baljit; Baharin, Nuraida `Aadilia; Remeli, Muhammad Fairuz; Oberoi, Amandeep; Date, Abhijit; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2016-10-01

    Salinity gradient solar ponds act as an integrated thermal solar energy collector and storage system. The temperature difference between the upper convective zone and the lower convective zone of a salinity gradient solar pond can be in the range of 40-60°C. The temperature at the bottom of the pond can reach up to 90°C. Low-grade heat (<100°C) from solar ponds is currently converted into electricity by organic Rankine cycle engines. Thermoelectric generators can operate at very low temperature differences and can be a good candidate to replace organic Rankine cycle engines for power generation from salinity gradient solar ponds. The temperature difference in a solar pond can be used to power thermoelectric generators for electricity production. This paper presents an experimental investigation of a thermoelectric generators heat exchanger system designed to be powered by the hot water from the lower convective zone of a solar pond, and cold water from the upper convective zone of a solar pond. The results obtained have indicated significant prospects of such a system to generate power from low-grade heat for remote area power supply systems.

  2. Hybrid approach combining multiple characterization techniques and simulations for microstructural analysis of proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetinbas, Firat C.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Kariuki, Nancy; De Andrade, Vincent; Fongalland, Dash; Smith, Linda; Sharman, Jonathan; Ferreira, Paulo; Rasouli, Somaye; Myers, Deborah J.

    2017-03-01

    The cost and performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells strongly depend on the cathode electrode due to usage of expensive platinum (Pt) group metal catalyst and sluggish reaction kinetics. Development of low Pt content high performance cathodes requires comprehensive understanding of the electrode microstructure. In this study, a new approach is presented to characterize the detailed cathode electrode microstructure from nm to μm length scales by combining information from different experimental techniques. In this context, nano-scale X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) is performed to extract the secondary pore space of the electrode. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is employed to determine primary C particle and Pt particle size distributions. X-ray scattering, with its ability to provide size distributions of orders of magnitude more particles than TEM, is used to confirm the TEM-determined size distributions. The number of primary pores that cannot be resolved by nano-CT is approximated using mercury intrusion porosimetry. An algorithm is developed to incorporate all these experimental data in one geometric representation. Upon validation of pore size distribution against gas adsorption and mercury intrusion porosimetry data, reconstructed ionomer size distribution is reported. In addition, transport related characteristics and effective properties are computed by performing simulations on the hybrid microstructure.

  3. Binding stoichiometry in sorption of divalent metal ions: a theoretical analysis based on the ion-exchange model.

    PubMed

    Plazinski, Wojciech; Rudzinski, Władysław

    2010-04-01

    Two stoichiometric assumptions have been compared for describing divalent metal ion binding by protonated sorbent/biosorbent. The first one corresponds to the classical model in which each metal ion (M) binds to two binding sites (X) forming a single MX(2) complex while the second one, proposed by Schiewer and Volesky and used for description of biosorption equilibria, assumes the existence of M(1/2)X complexes. Mathematical expressions corresponding to both these models have been developed by applying the ion-exchange model and methods of statistical thermodynamics. The M(1/2)X model appears to be nonphysical because it does not take into account the basic fact that two sites binding one metal ion must be neighboring. On the other hand, this latter assumption is the part of the MX(2) model which has been shown using Nitta's approach. Nevertheless, equations associated with the M(1/2)X model can be successfully used for description of the experimental data as they can simulate quite well the behavior predicted by the MX(2) model. This is especially true when considering the range of relatively high metal concentrations in the bulk solution and significant degree of surface heterogeneity characteristic of the sorbent surface.

  4. Multi-scale Analysis of Methane Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation via Point Source Thermal Stimulation and Carbon Dioxide Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Garrett Christopher

    experimental data. Increased hydrate saturation and increased heating rate lead to a more intense flow development. Thermal stimulation methane production has been coupled with the simultaneous injection of gaseous carbon dioxide as method of enhancing gas production rates while providing a means for long term storage of carbon dioxide in the hydrate phase. The exchange process was investigated at low and high gas injection rates under conditions of both low and high thermal stimulation applied to a 50% hydrate saturated quartz sand pack. The amount of carbon dioxide stored in the hydrate phased was greatest for the low injection-high heating condition sequestering 69 moles, and lowest for the high injection- low heating condition sequestering 13 moles. The gas exchange is improved with longer contact time between gas phase carbon dioxide and hydrate phase methane, this condition is optimized at low carbon dioxide injection rates. The availability of free water for formation of carbon dioxide is enhanced with the higher heating rates. Thus it is possible to tune the gas production rates and carbon dioxide storage potential by manipulating heating rates and gas injection rates to achieve the desired ratio between methane produced and carbon dioxide sequestered. Understanding the transition period and flow development within the pore fluid mixture should play a large role in determining the optimum placement and geometry of heating and exchange systems on industrial scale hydrate production scenarios. In addition to the optimization of thermal stimulation heating location, the profile and degree of heating rate can be tuned in order to maximize gas collection and minimize excessive heating of unproductive sediment matrix after it has been exhausted of methane hydrate. The production efficiency produced across the three experimental scales averaged between 80 and 90% and appears to be independent of scale. The scale up of this method for industrial scale production should pay

  5. Microcalorimetric study of thermal unfolding of lysozyme in water/glycerol mixtures: An analysis by solvent exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinozzi, Francesco; Ortore, Maria Grazia; Sinibaldi, Raffaele; Mariani, Paolo; Esposito, Alessandro; Cinelli, Stefania; Onori, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    Folded protein stabilization or destabilization induced by cosolvent in mixed aqueous solutions has been studied by differential scanning microcalorimetry and related to difference in preferential solvation of native and denatured states. In particular, the thermal denaturation of a model system formed by lysozyme dissolved in water in the presence of the stabilizing cosolvent glycerol has been considered. Transition temperatures and enthalpies, heat capacity, and standard free energy changes have been determined when applying a two-state denaturation model to microcalorimetric data. Thermodynamic parameters show an unexpected, not linear, trend as a function of solvent composition; in particular, the lysozyme thermodynamic stability shows a maximum centered at water molar fraction of about 0.6. Using a thermodynamic hydration model based on the exchange equilibrium between glycerol and water molecules from the protein solvation layer to the bulk, the contribution of protein-solvent interactions to the unfolding free energy and the changes of this contribution with solvent composition have been derived. The preferential solvation data indicate that lysozyme unfolding involves an increase in the solvation surface, with a small reduction of the protein-preferential hydration. Moreover, the derived changes in the excess solvation numbers at denaturation show that only few solvent molecules are responsible for the variation of lysozyme stability in relation to the solvent composition.

  6. Separation of low concentration of cesium ion from wastewater by electrochemically switched ion exchange method: experimental adsorption kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Hao, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Zhong-De; Guan, Guo-Qing; Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Li, Yi-Bin; Liu, Shi-Bin

    2012-09-30

    A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the continuous separation of cesium based on an electrochemically switched ion exchange (ESIX) process using a diaphragm-isolated reactor with two identical nickel hexacyanoferrate/porous three-dimensional carbon felt (NiHCF/PTCF) electrodes as working electrodes. The effects of applied potential, initial concentrations and pH values of the simulation solutions on the adsorption of cesium ion were investigated. The adsorption rate of cesium ion in the ESIX process was fitted by a pseudo-first-order reaction model. The experiments revealed that the introduction of applied potential on the electrodes greatly enhanced the adsorption/desorption rate of Cs(+) and increased the separation efficiency. H(3)O(+) was found to play a dual role of electrolyte and competitor, and the adsorption rate constant showed a curve diversification with an increase in pH value. Also, it was found that the electrochemically switched adsorption process of Cs(+) by NiHCF/PTCF electrodes proceeded in two main steps, i.e., an ESIX step with a fast adsorption rate and an ion diffusion step with a slow diffusion rate. Meanwhile, the NiHCF/PTCF film electrode showed adsorption selectivity for Cs(+) in preference to Na(+).

  7. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  8. Analysis of modern and Pleistocene hydrologic exchange between Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron) and the Saginaw Lowlands area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoaglund, J. R.; Kolak, J.J.; Long, D.T.; Larson, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Two numerical models, one simulating present groundwater flow conditions and one simulating ice-induced hydraulic loading from the Port Huron ice advance, were used to characterize both modern and Pleistocene groundwater exchange between the Michigan Basin and near-surface water systems of Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron) and the surrounding Saginaw Lowlands area. These models were further used to constrain the origin of saline, isotopically light groundwater, and porewater from the study area. Output from the groundwater-flow model indicates that, at present conditions, head in the Marshall aquifer beneath Saginaw Bay exceeds the modern lake elevation by as much as 21 m. Despite this potential for flow, simulated groundwater discharge through the Saginaw Bay floor constitutes only 0.028 m3 s-1 (???1 cfs). Bedrock lithology appears to regulate the rate of groundwater discharge, as the portion of the Saginaw Bay floor underlain by the Michigan confining unit exhibits an order of magnitude lower flux than the portion underlain by the Saginaw aquifer. The calculated shoreline discharge of groundwater to Saginaw Bay is also relatively small (1.13 m3 s-1 or ???40 cfs) because of low gradients across the Saginaw Lowlands area and the low hydraulic conductivities of lodgement tills and glacial-lake clays surrounding the bay. In contrast to the present groundwater flow conditions, the Port Huron ice-induced hydraulic-loading model generates a groundwater-flow reversal that is localized to the region of a Pleistocene ice sheet and proglacial lake. This area of reversed vertical gradient is largely commensurate with the distribution of isotopically light groundwater presently found in the study area. Mixing scenarios, constrained by chloride concentrations and ??18O values in porewater samples, demonstrate that a mixing event involving subglacial recharge could have produced the groundwater chemistry currently observed in the Saginaw Lowlands area. The combination of models and

  9. Comparison of Kinetic Models for Analysis of Pyruvate-to-Lactate Exchange by Hyperpolarized 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Crystal; Yang, Chendong; Jindal, Ashish; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Hooshyar, M.A.; Merritt, Matthew; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of specific enzyme-catalyzed reactions may be detected in vivo by 13C NMR of hyperpolarized (HP) substrates. The signal from HP substrates and products, acquired over time, have been fit to a number of different mathematical models to determine fluxes, but these models have not been critically compared. In this study, two-pool and three-pool first-order models were constructed to measure flux through lactate dehydrogenase in isolated glioblastoma cells by NMR detection of lactate and pyruvate following addition of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Mass spectrometry (MS) was used to independently monitor 13C enrichment in intra- and extracellular lactate. Six models were evaluated using time dependent pyruvate C2 and lactate C1 HP NMR data acquired by use of selective excitation pulses plus 13C enrichment data from intracellular and extracellular lactate measured by MS. A three-pool bi-directional model provided the most accurate description of pyruvate metabolism in these cells. With computed values for the T1 of pyruvate and lactate as well as the effect of pulsing, the initial flux through lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was well-determined by both the two-pool bidirectional and unidirectional models when only HP data was available. The three-pool model was necessary to fit the combined data from both MS and HP, but the simpler two-pool exchange model was sufficient to determine the 13C lactate concentration when the lactate appearance was measured only by HP. PMID:22451442

  10. Sparseness and Roughness of Foreign Exchange Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, N.; Ausloos, M.

    An accurate multiaffine analysis of 23 foreign currency exchange rates has been performed. The roughness exponent H1 which characterizes the excursion of the exchange rate has been numerically measured. The degree of intermittency C1 has been also estimated. In the (H1,C1) phase diagram, the currency exchange rates are dispersed in a wide region around the Brownian motion value (H1=0.5,C1=0) and have a significantly intermittent component (C1≠0).

  11. Your Laptop to the Rescue: Using the Child Language Data Exchange System Archive and CLAN Utilities to Improve Child Language Sample Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Nan Bernstein; MacWhinney, Brian

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we review the advantages of language sample analysis (LSA) and explain how clinicians can make the process of LSA faster, easier, more accurate, and more insightful than LSA done "by hand" by using free, available software programs such as Computerized Language Analysis (CLAN). We demonstrate the utility of CLAN analysis in studying the expressive language of a very large cohort of 24-month-old toddlers tracked in a recent longitudinal study; toddlers in particular are the most likely group to receive LSA by clinicians, but existing reference "norms" for this population are based on fairly small cohorts of children. Finally, we demonstrate how a CLAN utility such as KidEval can now extract potential normative data from the very large number of corpora now available for English and other languages at the Child Language Data Exchange System project site. Most of the LSA measures that we studied appear to show developmental profiles suggesting that they may be of specifically higher value for children at certain ages, because they do not show an even developmental trajectory from 2 to 7 years of age.

  12. Acyl-biotinyl exchange chemistry and mass spectrometry-based analysis of palmitoylation sites of in vitro palmitoylated rat brain tubulin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Hou, Junjie; Xie, Zhensheng; Deng, Jianwei; Wang, Xiaoming; Chen, Danfang; Yang, Fuquan; Gong, Weimin

    2010-11-01

    Research has shown that the palmitoyl group of α-tubulin mediates the hydrophobic interaction between microtubules and intracellular membranes and that palmitoylated tubulin plays a role in signal transduction. There are 20 cysteine residues per α/β tubulin heterodimer. C376 of α-tubulin was reported to be predominantly palmitoylated and C20, C213 and C305 of α-tubulin were palmitoylated at lower levels. The previous method used for the analysis of the palmitoylation sites on α-tubulin was based on ³H-labeling, enzymolysis, purification and sequencing. This approach, although efficient, is laborious. Mass spectrometry (MS), especially tandem MS, has been shown to be a successful method for identification of various post-translational modifications of proteins. We report here a convenient MS-based method to comprehensively analyze the palmitoylation sites of the α/β tubulin heterodimer. Acyl-biotinyl exchange chemistry and streptavidin agarose affinity purification were applied to enrich palmitoylated peptides from tubulin. After nano-LC-MS/MS analysis, database searching and manual analysis of the spectra revealed that 11 cysteine residues of the α/β tubulin heterodimer were palmitoylated.

  13. Analysis of cardiac mitochondrial Na+–Ca2+ exchanger kinetics with a biophysical model of mitochondrial Ca2+ handing suggests a 3: 1 stoichiometry

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ranjan K; Beard, Daniel A

    2008-01-01

    Calcium is a key ion and is known to mediate signalling pathways between cytosol and mitochondria and modulate mitochondrial energy metabolism. To gain a quantitative, biophysical understanding of mitochondrial Ca2+ regulation, we developed a thermodynamically balanced model of mitochondrial Ca2+ handling and bioenergetics by integrating kinetic models of mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (CU), Na+–Ca2+ exchanger (NCE), and Na+–H+ exchanger (NHE) into an existing computational model of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Kinetic flux expressions for the CU, NCE and NHE were developed and individually parameterized based on independent data sets on flux rates measured in purified mitochondria. While available data support a wide range of possible values for the overall activity of the CU in cardiac and liver mitochondria, even at the highest estimated values, the Ca2+ current through the CU does not have a significant effect on mitochondrial membrane potential. This integrated model was then used to analyse additional data on the dynamics and steady-states of mitochondrial Ca2+ governed by mitochondrial CU and NCE. Our analysis of the data on the time course of matrix free [Ca2+] in respiring mitochondria purified from rabbit heart with addition of different levels of Na+ to the external buffer medium (with the CU blocked) with two separate models – one with a 2: 1 stoichiometry and the other with a 3: 1 stoichiometry for the NCE – supports the hypothesis that the NCE is electrogenic with a stoichiometry of 3: 1. This hypothesis was further tested by simulating an additional independent data set on the steady-state variations of matrix free [Ca2+] with respect to the variations in external free [Ca2+] in purified respiring mitochondria from rat heart to show that only the 3: 1 stoichiometry model predictions are consistent with the data. Based on these analyses, it is concluded that the mitochondrial NCE is electrogenic with a stoichiometry of 3: 1. PMID

  14. Predicting protein aggregation during storage in lyophilized solids using solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS).

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Schultz, Steven G; Kim, Sherry G; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-06-02

    Solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS) was used to assess the conformation of myoglobin (Mb) in lyophilized formulations, and the results correlated with the extent of aggregation during storage. Mb was colyophilized with sucrose (1:1 or 1:8 w/w), mannitol (1:1 w/w), or NaCl (1:1 w/w) or in the absence of excipients. Immediately after lyophilization, samples of each formulation were analyzed by ssHDX-MS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to assess Mb conformation, and by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to determine the extent of aggregation. The remaining samples were then placed on stability at 25 °C and 60% RH or 40 °C and 75% RH for up to 1 year, withdrawn at intervals, and analyzed for aggregate content by SEC and DLS. In ssHDX-MS of samples immediately after lyophilization (t = 0), Mb was less deuterated in solids containing sucrose (1:1 and 1:8 w/w) than in those containing mannitol (1:1 w/w), NaCl (1:1 w/w), or Mb alone. Deuterium uptake kinetics and peptide mass envelopes also indicated greater Mb structural perturbation in mannitol, NaCl, or Mb-alone samples at t = 0. The extent of deuterium incorporation and kinetic parameters related to rapidly and slowly exchanging amide pools (Nfast, Nslow), measured at t = 0, were highly correlated with the extent of aggregation on storage as measured by SEC. In contrast, the extent of aggregation was weakly correlated with FTIR band intensity and peak position measured at t = 0. The results support the use of ssHDX-MS as a formulation screening tool in developing lyophilized protein drug products.

  15. Eastern Mediterranean Economic Exchange during the Iron Age: Portable X-Ray Fluorescence and Neutron Activation Analysis of Cypriot-Style Pottery in the Amuq Valley, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Two markers of regional exchange in the Eastern Mediterranean during the first millennium BCE are the White Painted and Bichrome Wares from Cyprus’s Cypro-Geometric and Cypro-Archaic periods. Although these ceramics are often assumed to be imports from Cyprus, excavations in southern Turkey at sites such as Tarsus-Gözlükule, Kilise Tepe, Sirkeli Höyük, and Kinet Höyük suggest that at least some of this pottery was produced locally, requiring a major revision of our understanding of economic interaction in the Eastern Mediterranean. We employ a combination of portable x-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analysis to investigate the White Painted and Bichrome Wares recovered from Tell Tayinat, Çatal Höyük, and Tell Judaidah, three sites in the Amuq Valley of southeastern Anatolia. Our results demonstrate that a clear geochemical distinction exists between imported and local versions of this pottery. Through comparison with legacy datasets, we locate the likely origin of the imported pottery in the Circum-Troodos sediments of central and southern Cyprus. The secondary and tertiary settlements of Çatal Höyük and Tell Judaidah had access only to this imported material. In contrast, the inhabitants of Tell Tayinat, capital city of the region, consumed both imported and locally produced White Painted and Bichrome Wares. This pattern cannot be explained in purely economic terms whereby the frequency of imports decreases as distance from the point of production increases. Instead, we suggest that elite feasting practices drove demand, resulting in either local potters producing Cypriot-style pottery or Cypriot potters settling in the vicinity of Tell Tayinat. These findings offer new insights into the relationship between historically attested Iron Age kingdoms in southern Turkey and Cyprus and complicate our understanding of exchange in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Iron Age. PMID:27902729

  16. Development of Online pH Gradient-Eluted Strong Cation Exchange Nanoelectrospray-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Proteomic Analysis Facilitating Basic and Histidine-Containing Peptides Identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Gao, Jing; Yu, Chengli; He, Han; Yang, Yiming; Figeys, Daniel; Zhou, Hu

    2016-01-05

    A novel one-dimensional online pH gradient-eluted strong cation exchange-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (SCX-nano-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for protein identification and tested with a mixture of six standard proteins, total lysate of HuH7 and N2a cells, as well as membrane fraction of N2a cells. This method utilized an online nanoflow SCX column in a nano-LC system coupled with a nanoelectrospray high-resolution mass spectrometer. Protein digests were separated on a nanoflow SCX column with a pH gradient and directly introduced into a mass spectrometer through nanoelectrospray ionization. More than five thousand unique peptides were identified in each 90 min LC-MS/MS run using 500 nanogram of protein digest either from total cell lysate or from membrane fraction. The unique peptide overlap between online strong cation exchange nano-ESI-MS/MS (SCXLC-MS/MS) and reverse phase nano-ESI-MS/MS (RPLC-MS/MS) is only ≤30%, which indicated these two methods were complementary to each other. The correlation coefficient of retention time and theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of identified peptides in SCXLC-MS/MS was higher than 0.4, which showed that peptides elution in SCXLC-MS/MS was dependent on their charge states. Furthermore, SCXLC-MS/MS showed identification capability for a higher proportion of basic peptides compared to the RPLC-MS/MS method, especially for histidine-containing peptides. Our SCXLC-MS/MS method is an excellent alternative method to the RPLC-MS/MS method for analysis of standard proteins, total cell and membrane proteomes.

  17. Timing matters in foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-02-01

    We show using nonlinear time series analysis that the timing of trades in foreign exchange markets has significant information. We apply a set of methods for analyzing point process data developed in neuroscience and nonlinear science. Our results imply that foreign exchange markets might be chaotic and have short-term predictability.

  18. Indiana Health Information Exchange

    Cancer.gov

    The Indiana Health Information Exchange is comprised of various Indiana health care institutions, established to help improve patient safety and is recognized as a best practice for health information exchange.

  19. Epitope mapping by epitope excision, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and peptide-panning techniques combined with in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Nicola; Mancini, Nicasio; Criscuolo, Elena; Cappelletti, Francesca; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The fine characterization of protective B cell epitopes plays a pivotal role in the development of novel vaccines. The development of epitope-based vaccines, in fact, cannot be possible without a clear definition of the antigenic regions involved in the binding between the protective antibody (Ab) and its molecular target. To achieve this result, different epitope-mapping approaches have been widely described (Clementi et al. Drug Discov Today 18(9-10):464-471, 2013). Nowadays, the best way to characterize an Ab bound region is still the resolution of Ab-antigen (Ag) co-crystal structure. Unfortunately, the crystallization approaches are not always feasible. However, different experimental strategies aimed to predict Ab-Ag interaction and followed by in silico analysis of the results may be good surrogate approaches to achieve this result. Here, we review few experimental techniques followed by the use of "basic" informatics tools for the analysis of the results.

  20. FTIR spectrophotometry, kinetics and adsorption isotherms modeling, ion exchange, and EDX analysis for understanding the mechanism of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) removal by mango peel waste.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Saeed, Asma; Zafar, Saeed Iqbal

    2009-05-15

    Mango peel waste (MPW) was evaluated as a new sorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) from aqueous solution. The maximum sorption capacity of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) was found to be 68.92 and 99.05mgg(-1), respectively. The kinetics of sorption of both metals was fast, reaching at equilibrium in 60min. Sorption kinetics and equilibria followed pseudo-second order and Langmuir adsorption isotherm models. FTIR analysis revealed that carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups were mainly responsible for the sorption of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+). Chemical modification of MPW for blocking of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups showed that 72.46% and 76.26% removal of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+), respectively, was due to the involvement of carboxylic group, whereas 26.64% and 23.74% was due to the hydroxyl group. EDX analysis of MPW before and after metal sorption and release of cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), K(+)) and proton H(+) from MPW with the corresponding uptake of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) revealed that the main mechanism of sorption was ion exchange. The regeneration experiments showed that the MPW could be reused for five cycles without significant loss in its initial sorption capacity. The study points to the potential of new use of MPW as an effective sorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) from aqueous solution.

  1. Proteomic analysis with integrated multiple dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry based on elution of ion exchange column using pH steps.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Shieh, Chia Hui; Sheng, Quan-Hu; Zhou, Hu; Zeng, Rong

    2005-09-15

    A novel integrated multidimensional liquid chromatography (IMDL) method is demonstrated for the separation of peptide mixtures by two-dimensional HPLC coupled with ion trap mass spectrometry. The method uses an integrated column, containing both strong cation exchange and reversed-phase sections for two-dimensional liquid chromatography. The peptide mixture was fractionated by a pH step using a series of pH buffers, followed by reversed-phase chromatography. Since no salt was used during separation, the integrated multidimensional liquid chromatography can be directly connected to mass spectrometry for peptide analysis. The pH buffers were injected from an autosampler, and the entire process can be carried out on a one-dimensional liquid chromatography system. In a single analysis, the IMDL system, coupled with linear ion trap mass spectrometry, identified more than 2000 proteins in mouse liver. The peptides were eluted according to their pI distribution. The resolution of the pH fractionation is approximately 0.5 pH unit. The method has low overlapping across pH fractions, good resolution of peptide mixture, and good correlation of peptide pIs with pH steps. This method provides a technique for large-scale protein identification using existing one-dimensional HPLC systems.

  2. Analysis of nonstructural carbohydrates in storage organs of 30 ornamental geophytes by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Ranwala, Anil P; Miller, William B

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of nonstructural carbohydrates in storage organs (bulbs and corms) of 30 ornamental geophytes was conducted by employing a variety of extraction techniques followed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD). Among species, starch, fructan, glucomannan and soluble sugars accounted for 50-80% of storage organ dry weight (DW). Starch ranged from 24 to 760 mg g(-1) DW, fructan (commonly occurring with starch) from 25 to 500 mg g(-1) DW, and glucomannan from 15 to 145 mg g(-1) DW. An acid hydrolysis protocol for concurrent determination of fructan and glucomannan was developed. The average degree of polymerization (DP) of ethanol and water-soluble fructan and the man : glu ratio of glucomannan also varied between species. The 80% ethanol fraction contained soluble sugars and short-chain fructans (< 25 DP), whereas water extracts contained soluble sugars, fructans (both short- and long-chain, analysis techniques of nonstructural carbohydrates for physiological and biochemical research on geophytic storage organs should be validated to accurately understand the identity of diverse carbohydrate pools, their physiological relevance and functions.

  3. Analysis of amphetamine-type stimulants and their metabolites in plasma, urine and bile by liquid chromatography with a strong cation-exchange column-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Iwata, Yuko T; Miyauchi, Seiji; Kamo, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop and validate a method for analysing amphetamine-type stimulants (ATSs) and their metabolites in plasma, urine and bile by liquid chromatography with a strong cation-exchange column-tandem mass spectrometry, and to apply it to the pharmacokinetic study of ATSs. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methamphetamine, ketamine and their main metabolites, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, p-hydroxymethamphetamine, amphetamine and norketamine, were simultaneously quantified by the new method (50-5000 ng/ml). The coefficients of variation and the percent deviations for the eight compounds were in the range of 0.2 to 5.3% and -9.4 to +12.8%, respectively. The recoveries were over 90% in all biological samples tested. This method was effective for the separation and the identification of ATSs and their main metabolites having amine moieties in plasma, urine and bile, and was applicable to pharmacokinetic analysis of methamphetamine, ketamine and their main metabolites in biological samples. This analytical method should be useful for the pharmacokinetic analysis of ATSs.

  4. Analyzing the Cross-Correlation Between Onshore and Offshore RMB Exchange Rates Based on Multifractal Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (MF-DCCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chi; Zhou, Yingying; Wang, Gangjin; Yan, Xinguo

    We use the multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DCCA) method to explore the multifractal behavior of the cross-correlation between exchange rates of onshore RMB (CNY) and offshore RMB (CNH) against US dollar (USD). The empirical data are daily prices of CNY/USD and CNH/USD from May 1, 2012 to February 29, 2016. The results demonstrate that: (i) the cross-correlation between CNY/USD and CNH/USD is persistent and its fluctuation is smaller when the order of fluctuation function is negative than that when the order is positive; (ii) the multifractal behavior of the cross-correlation between CNY/USD and CNH/USD is significant during the sample period; (iii) the dynamic Hurst exponents obtained by the rolling windows analysis show that the cross-correlation is stable when the global economic situation is good and volatile in bad situation; and (iv) the non-normal distribution of original data has a greater effect on the multifractality of the cross-correlation between CNY/USD and CNH/USD than the temporary correlation.

  5. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  6. Rapid exchange of fluoroethylamine via the Rhesus complex in human erythrocytes: 19F NMR magnetization transfer analysis showing competition by ammonia and ammonia analogues.

    PubMed

    Szekely, David; Chapman, Bogdan E; Bubb, William A; Kuchel, Philip W

    2006-08-01

    A remarkable recent discovery in red blood cell function is that the Rhesus antigen complex that for so long was considered to be simply a means of cell recognition is also the ammonia transporter. It catalyzes transmembrane exchange of ammonia on the subsecond time scale, and yet because of a lack of rapid-exchange methodology its kinetics had not been characterized. The flux of ammonia varies appreciably in diverse clinical states, and a convenient method for its characterization would be of basic and of clinical diagnostic value. Fluoroethylamine is water-soluble and when added to a suspension of human red blood cells (RBCs) displays the experimentally useful property of giving separate 19F NMR spectral peaks for the populations inside and outside the cells. By using two-site, one-dimensional magnetization exchange spectroscopy (1D-EXSY), the transmembrane exchange of fluoroethylamine was measured; it was found to occur on the subsecond time scale with an apparent first-order rate constant for efflux, under the equilibrium exchange conditions, of 3.4 s(-1). The method was used to characterize the concentration, temperature, and pH dependence of the exchange rate constant. We determined the extent of competitive inhibition exhibited by ammonia and two molecules that contain an amine group (ethylamine and methylamine). Inhibition of the exchange by incubating the suspension with anti-RhAG antibody, and no inhibition by anti-RhD antibody, suggested specificity of exchange via the RhAG protein of the Rh complex.

  7. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade.

  8. The relationships between Shanghai stock market and CNY/USD exchange rate: New evidence based on cross-correlation analysis, structural cointegration and nonlinear causality test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Wan, Jieqiu

    2012-12-01

    This paper explores the co-movement of Shanghai stock market and China Yuan (CNY) exchange rates. First, we find that stock price and exchange rate are significantly cross-correlated. Second, employing a cointegration test allowing for a structural break, we find that the Shanghai Composite Index (SCI) is not cointegrated with the exchange rate of CNY/USD. The so-called “cointegration” found in previous studies is just caused by the shock of the recent financial crisis. Third, using linear and nonlinear Granger causality tests, we find no causality between stock prices and exchange rates during the period before the recent financial crisis. After the financial crisis, a unidirectional causality behavior running from exchange rates to stock index is present.

  9. Design and performance of a new continuous-flow sample-introduction system for flame infrared-emission spectrometry: Applications in process analysis, flow injection analysis, and ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lam, C K; Zhang, Y; Busch, M A; Busch, K W

    1993-06-01

    A new sample introduction system for the analysis of continuously flowing liquid streams by flame infrared-emission (FIRE) spectrometry has been developed. The system uses a specially designed purge cell to strip dissolved CO(2) from solution into a hydrogen gas stream that serves as the fuel for a hydrogen/air flame. Vibrationally excited CO(2) molecules present in the flame are monitored with a simple infrared filter (4.4 mum) photometer. The new system can be used to introduce analytes as a continuous liquid stream (process analysis mode) or on a discrete basis by sample injection (flow injection analysis mode). The key to the success of the method is the new purge-cell design. The small internal volume of the cell minimizes problems associated with purge-cell clean-out and produces sharp, reproducible signals. Spent analytical solution is continuously drained from the cell, making cell disconnection and cleaning between samples unnecessary. Under the conditions employed in this study, samples could be analyzed at a maximum rate of approximately 60/h. The new sample introduction system was successfully tested in both a process analysis- and a flow injection analysis mode for the determination of total inorganic carbon in Waco tap water. For the first time, flame infrared-emission spectrometry was successfully extended to non-volatile organic compounds by using chemical pretreatment with peroxydisulfate in the presence of silver ion to convert the analytes into dissolved carbon dioxide, prior to purging and detection by the FIRE radiometer. A test of the peroxydisulfate/Ag(+) reaction using six organic acids and five sugars indicated that all 11 compounds were oxidized to nearly the same extent. Finally, the new sample introduction system was used in conjunction with a simple filter FIRE radiometer as a detection system in ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. Ion-exchange chromatograms are shown for two aqueous mixtures, one containing six organic

  10. Analysis of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rate within the scope of econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Kocakaplan, Yusuf; Keskin, Mustafa; Balcılar, Mehmet; Özdemir, Zeynel Abidin; Ersoy, Ersan

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we analyze the Turkish Lira/US Dollar (TRY/USD), Turkish Lira/Euro (TRY/EUR), Turkish Lira/Japanese Yen (TRY/JPY) and Turkish Lira/Swiss Franc (TRY/CHF) exchange rates in the global financial crisis period to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY by using a mathematical methodology developed by Watanabe et al. (2007). The methodology defines the bubbles and crashes in financial market price fluctuations by considering an exponential fitting of the associated data. This methodology is applied to detect the bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF exchange rates from January, 1, 2005 to December, 20, 2013. In this mathematical methodology, the whole period of bubbles and crashes can be determined purely from past data, and the start of bubbles and crashes can be identified even before its bursts. In this way, the periods of bubbles and crashes in the TRY/USD, TRY/EUR, TRY/JPY and TRY/CHF are determined, and the beginning and end points of these periods are detected. The results show that the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate are commonly finished earlier than in the other exchange rates; hence it is probable that the crashes in the other exchange rates would be finished soon when the crashes in the TRY/CHF exchange rate ended. We also find that the periods of crashes in the TRY/EUR exchange rate take longer time than in the other exchange rates. This information can be used in risk management and/or speculative gain. The crashes' periods in the TRY/EUR and TRY/USD exchange rates are observed to be relatively longer than in the other exchange rates.

  11. Conformational analysis of large and highly disulfide-stabilized proteins by integrating online electrochemical reduction into an optimized H/D exchange mass spectrometry workflow.

    PubMed

    Trabjerg, Esben; Jakobsen, Rasmus U; Mysling, Simon; Christensen, Søren; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Rand, Kasper D

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of disulfide-bonded proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) requires effective and rapid reduction of disulfide bonds before enzymatic digestion in order to increase sequence coverage. In a conventional HDX-MS workflow, disulfide bonds are reduced chemically by addition of a reducing agent to the quench solution (e.g., tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP)). The chemical reduction, however, is severely limited under quenched conditions due to a narrow time window as well as low pH and temperature. Here, we demonstrate the real-world applicability of integrating electrochemical reduction into an online HDX-MS workflow. We have optimized the electrochemical reduction efficiency during HDX-MS analysis of two particularly challenging disulfide stabilized proteins: a therapeutic IgG1-antibody and nerve growth factor-β (NGF). Several different parameters (flow rate and applied square wave potential, as well as the type of labeling and quench buffer) were investigated, and the optimized workflow increased the sequence coverage of NGF from 46% with chemical reduction to 99%, when electrochemical reduction was applied. Additionally, the optimized workflow also enabled a similar high sequence coverage of 96% and 87% for the heavy and light chain of the IgG1-antibody, respectively. The presented results demonstrate the successful electrochemical reduction during HDX-MS analysis of both a small exceptional tightly disulfide-bonded protein (NGF) as well as the largest protein attempted to date (IgG1-antibody). We envision that online electrochemical reduction is poised to decrease the complexity of sample handling and increase the versatility of the HDX-MS technique.

  12. Analysis of ligand-protein exchange by Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs (CoLD-CoP).

    PubMed

    Snyder, David A; Chantova, Mihaela; Chaudhry, Saadia

    2015-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool in describing protein structures and protein activity for pharmaceutical and biochemical development. This study describes a method to determine weak binding ligands in biological systems by using hierarchic diffusion coefficient clustering of multidimensional data obtained with a 400 MHz Bruker NMR. Comparison of DOSY spectrums of ligands of the chemical library in the presence and absence of target proteins show translational diffusion rates for small molecules upon interaction with macromolecules. For weak binders such as compounds found in fragment libraries, changes in diffusion rates upon macromolecular binding are on the order of the precision of DOSY diffusion measurements, and identifying such subtle shifts in diffusion requires careful statistical analysis. The "CoLD-CoP" (Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs) method presented here uses SAHN clustering to identify protein-binders in a chemical library or even a not fully characterized metabolite mixture. We will show how DOSY NMR and the "CoLD-CoP" method complement each other in identifying the most suitable candidates for lysozyme and wheat germ acid phosphatase.

  13. Analysis of ligand-protein exchange by Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs (CoLD-CoP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David A.; Chantova, Mihaela; Chaudhry, Saadia

    2015-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool in describing protein structures and protein activity for pharmaceutical and biochemical development. This study describes a method to determine weak binding ligands in biological systems by using hierarchic diffusion coefficient clustering of multidimensional data obtained with a 400 MHz Bruker NMR. Comparison of DOSY spectrums of ligands of the chemical library in the presence and absence of target proteins show translational diffusion rates for small molecules upon interaction with macromolecules. For weak binders such as compounds found in fragment libraries, changes in diffusion rates upon macromolecular binding are on the order of the precision of DOSY diffusion measurements, and identifying such subtle shifts in diffusion requires careful statistical analysis. The "CoLD-CoP" (Clustering of Ligand Diffusion Coefficient Pairs) method presented here uses SAHN clustering to identify protein-binders in a chemical library or even a not fully characterized metabolite mixture. We will show how DOSY NMR and the "CoLD-CoP" method complement each other in identifying the most suitable candidates for lysozyme and wheat germ acid phosphatase.

  14. The Exchange of Social Support on Online Bariatric Surgery Discussion Forums: A Mixed-Methods Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Molly E; Friedman, Aliza; Meisner, Brad A; Cassin, Stephanie E

    2017-03-10

    Bariatric surgery patients often experience physical and psychosocial stressors, and difficulty adjusting to significant lifestyle changes. As a result, social support groups that provide patients with support, coping skills, and nutritional information are valuable components of bariatric care. Support group attendance at bariatric centers is associated with greater post-surgery weight loss; however, several barriers hinder attendance at in-person support groups (e.g., travel distance to bariatric centers). Consequently, online support forums are an increasingly utilized resource for patients both before and after surgery. This study examined and described the type and frequency of social support provided on a large online bariatric surgery forum. A total of 1,412 messages in the pre- (n = 822) and post-surgery (n = 590) sections of the forum were coded using qualitative content analysis according to Cutrona and Suhr's (1992) Social Support Behavior Code model (i.e., including informational, tangible, esteem, network, and emotional support types). The majority of messages provided informational and emotional support regarding: a) factual information about the bariatric procedure and nutrition; b) advice for coping with the surgery preparation process, and physical symptoms; and c) encouragement regarding adherence to surgical guidelines, and weight loss progress. Network, esteem, and tangible support types were less frequent than informational and emotional support types. The results inform healthcare providers about the types of social support available to bariatric patients on online support forums and, thus, encourage appropriate referrals to this resource.

  15. Analysis of gas exchange, stomatal behaviour and micronutrients uncovers dynamic response and adaptation of tomato plants to monochromatic light treatments.

    PubMed

    O'Carrigan, Andrew; Babla, Mohammad; Wang, Feifei; Liu, Xiaohui; Mak, Michelle; Thomas, Richard; Bellotti, Bill; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Light spectrum affects the yield and quality of greenhouse tomato, especially over a prolonged period of monochromatic light treatments. Physiological and chemical analysis was employed to investigate the influence of light spectral (blue, green and red) changes on growth, photosynthesis, stomatal behaviour, leaf pigment, and micronutrient levels. We found that plants are less affected under blue light treatment, which was evident by the maintenance of higher A, gs, Tr, and stomatal parameters and significantly lower VPD and Tleaf as compared to those plants grown in green and red light treatments. Green and red light treatments led to significantly larger increase in the accumulation of Fe, B, Zn, and Cu than blue light. Moreover, guard cell length, width, and volume all showed highly significant positive correlations to gs, Tr and negative links to VPD. There was negative impact of monochromatic lights-induced accumulation of Mn, Cu, and Zn on photosynthesis, leaf pigments and plant growth. Furthermore, most of the light-induced significant changes of the physiological traits were partially recovered at the end of experiment. A high degree of morphological and physiological plasticity to blue, green and red light treatments suggested that tomato plants may have developed mechanisms to adapt to the light treatments. Thus, understanding the optimization of light spectrum for photosynthesis and growth is one of the key components for greenhouse tomato production.

  16. Systematic Analysis of the Effect of Small Scale Permeability Heterogeneity on Hyporheic Exchange Flux and Residence Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, G.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) contributes significantly to whole stream biogeochemical cycling. Biogeochemical reactions within the HZ are often transport limited, thus, understanding these reactions requires knowledge about the magnitude of hyporheic fluxes (HF) and the residence time (RT) of these fluxes within the HZ. While the hydraulics of HF are relatively well understood, studies addressing the influence of permeability heterogeneity lack systematic analysis and have even produced contradictory results (e.g. [1] vs. [2]). In order to close this gap, this study uses a statistical numerical approach to elucidate the influence of permeability heterogeneity on HF and RT. We simulated and evaluated 3750 2D-scenarios of sediment heterogeneity by means of Gaussian random fields with focus on total HF and RT distribution. The scenarios were based on ten realizations of each of all possible combinations of 15 different correlation lengths, 5 dipping angles and 5 permeability variances. Roughly 500 hyporheic stream traces were analyzed per simulation, for a total of almost two million stream traces analyzed for correlations between permeability heterogeneity, HF, and RT. Total HF and the RT variance positively correlated with permeability variance while the mean RT negatively correlated with permeability variance. In contrast, changes in correlation lengths and dipping angles had little effect on the examined properties RT and HF. These results provide a possible explanation of the seemingly contradictory conclusions of recent studies, given that the permeability variances in these studies differ by several orders of magnitude. [1] Bardini, L., Boano, F., Cardenas, M.B, Sawyer, A.H, Revelli, R. and Ridolfi, L. "Small-Scale Permeability Heterogeneity Has Negligible Effects on Nutrient Cycling in Streambeds." Geophysical Research Letters, 2013. doi:10.1002/grl.50224. [2] Zhou, Y., Ritzi, R. W., Soltanian, M. R. and Dominic, D. F. "The Influence of Streambed Heterogeneity on

  17. Simultaneous analysis of acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and aspirin metabolites by hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange capillary liquid chromatography coupled to amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minmin; Wu, Yimin; Lu, Lanxiang; Ding, Kang; Tang, Fengxiang; Lin, Zian; Wu, Xiaoping

    2011-08-01

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of polar nonsteroidal pharmaceuticals and metabolites, including acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and several aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid, salicyluric acid and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), by capillary liquid chromatography with amperometric detection. Using a capillary monolithic column with mixed mode stationary phases and a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and Tris buffer, rapid separation of six polar analytes was achieved within 8 min, and a hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange separation mechanism were exhibited. Method detection limits of six analytes ranged from 10 to 50 ng/mL. In terms of precision, the intra- and interday relative standard deviation values in all analytes never exceeded 3.1% for migration time and 8.9% for peak areas, respectively. This method provided a simple, rapid and cost-effective approach for the analysis of polar pharmaceuticals. The applicability of the method in pharmacokinetics was verified by spiking human serum samples with the compounds and analyzing the recoveries.

  18. [Rapid analysis of melamine in milk and milk powder using QuEChERS approach coupled with weak cation exchange chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Guo, Zhimou; Shen, Aijin; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao

    2011-07-01

    A simple, rapid method for the determination of melamine in milk and milk powder was developed using QuEChERS approach coupled with weak cation exchange chromatography (WCX). The samples were extracted and cleaned-up by medicinal alcohol and lipid adsorbent (LAS) simultaneously, then centrifuged and filtered for high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis. The separation was performed on a WCX column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) with 2 mmol/L KH2 PO4 (pH 3.8) as mobile phase. The flow rate was 1.5 mL/min and the detection wavelength was 208 nm. The injection volume was 20 microL and the column temperature was 30 degrees C. Under the optimized conditions, good linearity was obtained in the range of 0.02-20 mg/L with a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.999 9. For samples spiked with melamine standard in the range of 1-50 mg/kg, the average recoveries of standard in the milk and milk powder were 98.9%-105.2% and 86.4%-102.9%, respectively. The relative standard deviations were 0.9%-3.4% and 1.5%-6.7%, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD, S/N > or = 3) were 0.05 mg/kg (milk) and 0.1 mg/kg (milk powder). The present method is green due to not use of the toxic organic solvents.

  19. Wet chemical preparation and isotope exchange process of H/D-terminated Si(111) and Si(110) studied by adsorbate vibrational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Erina; Kang, Jungmin; Matsuda, Takuya; Yamada, Taro; Suto, Shozo

    2017-02-01

    A convenient procedure for preparing D-terminated Si(111)-(1×1) and Si(110)-(1×1) by wet chemical etching was developed and applied to the vibrational analysis of these surfaces by high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Fully H-terminated Si(111)/(110) was first prepared in regular 40% NH4F/H2O solution, followed by immersion in saturated KF/D2O solution. HREELS revealed partially D-terminated H:Si(111)/(110) with the amount of deuterium termination depending on the immersion time. A series of various immersion times revealed the H/D exchange reaction kinetics, which are associated with the Si substrate etching processes on Si(111) (step-flow etching) and Si(110) (zipper reaction). The H-Si and D-Si stretching vibration frequencies as functions of the surface D fraction did not appear to change on Si(111), but on Si(110) the H-Si signal red shifted at a high D fraction. This is due to the adsorbate-adsorbate interaction, which is more intense on Si(110) because of the short nearest-neighbor distance of the adsorbates.

  20. Measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air by collection onto an ion exchange resin and analysis by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-02-01

    Ammonia and amines are common trace gases in the atmosphere and have a variety of both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, with a major contribution coming from agricultural sites. In addition to their malodorous nature, both ammonia and amines have been shown to enhance particle formation from acids such as nitric, sulfuric and methanesulfonic acids, which has implications for visibility, human health and climate. A key component of quantifying the effects of these species on particle formation is accurate gas-phase measurements in both laboratory and field studies. However, these species are notoriously difficult to measure as they are readily taken up on surfaces, including onto glass surfaces from aqueous solution as established in the present studies. We describe here a novel technique for measuring gas-phase ammonia and amines that involves uptake onto a weak cation exchange resin followed by extraction and analysis using ion chromatography. Two variants, one for ppb concentrations in air and the second with lower (ppt) detection limits, are described. The latter involves the use of a custom-designed high-pressure cartridge to hold the resin for in-line extraction. These methods avoid the use of sampling lines, which can lead to significant inlet losses of these compounds. They also have the advantages of being relatively simple and inexpensive. The applicability of this technique to ambient air is demonstrated in measurements made near a cattle farm in Chino, CA.

  1. Measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air by collection onto an ion exchange resin and analysis by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-08-01

    Ammonia and amines are common trace gases in the atmosphere and have a variety of both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, with a major contribution coming from agricultural sites. In addition to their malodorous nature, both ammonia and amines have been shown to enhance particle formation from acids such as nitric, sulfuric and methanesulfonic acids, which has implications for visibility, human health and climate. A key component of quantifying the effects of these species on particle formation is accurate gas-phase measurements in both laboratory and field studies. However, these species are notoriously difficult to measure as they are readily taken up on surfaces, including onto glass surfaces from aqueous solution as established in the present studies. We describe here a novel technique for measuring gas-phase ammonia and amines that involves uptake onto a weak cation exchange resin followed by extraction and analysis using ion chromatography. Two variants - one for parts per billion concentrations in air and the second with lower (parts per trillion) detection limits - are described. The latter involves the use of a custom-designed high-pressure cartridge to hold the resin for in-line extraction. These methods avoid the use of sampling lines, which can lead to significant inlet losses of these compounds. They also have the advantages of being relatively simple and inexpensive. The applicability of this technique to ambient air is demonstrated in measurements made near a cattle farm in Chino, CA.

  2. Tracer kinetic analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and CT bladder cancer data: A preliminary comparison to assess the magnitude of water exchange effects.

    PubMed

    Bains, Lauren J; McGrath, Deirdre M; Naish, Josephine H; Cheung, Susan; Watson, Yvonne; Taylor, M Ben; Logue, John P; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Waterton, John C; Buckley, David L

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of water exchange on tracer kinetic parameter estimates derived from T(1)-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data using a direct quantitative comparison with DCE-CT. Data were acquired from 12 patients with bladder cancer who underwent DCE-CT followed by DCE-MRI within a week. A two-compartment tracer kinetic model was fitted to the CT data, and two versions of the same model with modifications to account for the fast exchange and no exchange limits of water exchange were fitted to the MR data. The two-compartment tracer kinetic model provided estimates of the fractional plasma volume (v(p)), the extravascular extracellular space fraction (v(e)), plasma perfusion (F(p)), and the microvascular permeability surface area product. Our findings suggest that DCE-CT is an appropriate reference for DCE-MRI in bladder cancers as the only significant difference found between CT and MR parameter estimates were the no exchange limit estimates of v(p) (P = 0.002). These results suggest that although water exchange between the intracellular and extravascular-extracellular space has a negligible effect on DCE-MRI, vascular-extravascular-extracellular space water exchange may be more important.

  3. Folding of apomyoglobin: Analysis of transient intermediate structure during refolding using quick hydrogen deuterium exchange and NMR.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Chiaki

    2017-01-01

    The structures of apomyoglobin folding intermediates have been widely analyzed using physical chemistry methods including fluorescence, circular dichroism, small angle X-ray scattering, NMR, mass spectrometry, and rapid mixing. So far, at least two intermediates (on sub-millisecond- and millisecond-scales) have been demonstrated for apomyoglobin folding. The combination of pH-pulse labeling and NMR is a useful tool for analyzing the kinetic intermediates at the atomic level. Its use has revealed that the latter-phase kinetic intermediate of apomyoglobin (6 ms) was composed of helices A, B, G and H, whereas the equilibrium intermediate, called the pH 4 molten-globule intermediate, was composed mainly of helices A, G and H. The improved strategy for the analysis of the kinetic intermediate was developed to include (1) the dimethyl sulfoxide method, (2) data processing with the various labeling times, and (3) a new in-house mixer. Particularly, the rapid mixing revealed that helices A and G were significantly more protected at the earlier stage (400 µs) of the intermediate (former-phase intermediate) than the other helices. Mutation studies, where each hydrophobic residue was replaced with an alanine in helices A, B, E, F, G and H, indicated that both non-native and native-like structures exist in the latter-phase folding intermediate. The N-terminal part of helix B is a weak point in the intermediate, and the docking of helix E residues to the core of the A, B, G and H helices was interrupted by a premature helix B, resulting in the accumulation of the intermediate composed of helices A, B, G and H. The prediction-based protein engineering produced important mutants: Helix F in a P88K/A90L/S92K/A94L mutant folded in the latter-phase intermediate, although helix F in the wild type does not fold even at the native state. Furthermore, in the L11G/W14G/A70L/G73W mutant, helix A did not fold but helix E did, which is similar to what was observed in the kinetic

  4. Simulation and economic analysis of a liquid-based solar system with a direct-contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger, in comparison to a system with a conventional heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, P.; Karaki, S.

    Using a solar computer simulation package called TRNSYS, simulations of the direct contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger (DCLLHE) solar system and a system with conventional shell-and-tube heat exchanger were developed, based in part on performance measurements of the actual systems. The two systems were simulated over a full year on an hour-by-hour basis at five locations; Boston, Massachusetts, Charleston, South Carolina, Dodge City, Kansas, Madison, Wisconsin, and Phoenix, Arizona. Typically the direct-contact system supplies slightly more heat for domestic hot water and space heating in all locations and about 5 percentage points more cooling as compared to the conventional system. Using a common set of economic parameters and the appropriate federal and state income tax credits, as well as property tax legislation for solar systems in the corresponding states, the results of the study indicate for heating-only systems, the DCLLHE system has a slight life-cycle cost disadvantage compared to the conventional system. For combined solar heating and cooling systems, the DCLLHE has a slight life-cycle cost advantage which varies with location and amounts to one to three percent difference from the conventional system.

  5. Integrated strong cation-exchange hybrid monolith coupled with capillary zone electrophoresis and simultaneous dynamic pH junction for large-volume proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Yan, Xiaojing; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-06-01

    A sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange (SCX) monolith was synthesized at the proximal end of a capillary zone electrophoresis column and used for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample preconcentration. Sample was prepared in an acidic buffer and deposited onto the SCX-SPE monolith and eluted using a basic buffer. Electrophoresis was performed in an acidic buffer. This combination of buffers results in formation of a dynamic pH junction, which allows use of relatively large elution buffer volume while maintaining peak efficiency and resolution. All experiments were performed with a 50 µm ID capillary, a 1cm long SCX-SPE monolith, a 60cm long separation capillary, and a electrokinetically pumped nanospray interface. The volume of the capillary is 1.1 µL. By loading 21 µL of a 1×10(-7) M angiotensin II solution, an enrichment factor of 3000 compared to standard electrokinetic injection was achieved on this platform while retaining efficient electrophoretic performance (N=44,000 plates). The loading capacity of the sulfonate SCX hybrid monolith was determined to be ~15 pmol by frontal analysis with 10(-5) M angiotensin II. The system was also applied to the analysis of a 10(-4) mg/mL bovine serum albumin tryptic digest; the protein coverage was 12% and 11 peptides were identified. Finally, by loading 5.5 µL of a 10(-3) mg/mL E. coli digest, 109 proteins and 271 peptides were identified in a 20 min separation; the median separation efficiency generated by these peptides was 25,000 theoretical plates.

  6. Online coupling of hydrophilic interaction/strong cation exchange/reversed-phase liquid chromatography with porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography for simultaneous proteomics and N-glycomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Law, Henry C H; Zhang, Zaijun; Lam, Herman C; Quan, Quan; Li, Guohui; Chu, Ivan K

    2015-10-09

    In this study we developed a fully automated three-dimensional (3D) liquid chromatography methodology-comprising hydrophilic interaction separation as the first dimension, strong cation exchange fractionation as the second dimension, and low-pH reversed-phase (RP) separation as the third dimension-in conjunction downstream with additional complementary porous graphitic carbon separation, to capture non-retained hydrophilic analytes, for both shotgun proteomics and N-glycomics analyses. The performance of the 3D system alone was benchmarked through the analysis of the total lysate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, leading to improved hydrophilic peptide coverage, from which we identified 19% and 24% more proteins and peptides, respectively, relative to those identified from a two-dimensional hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and low-pH RP chromatography (HILIC-RP) system over the same mass spectrometric acquisition time; consequently, the 3D platform also provided enhanced proteome and protein coverage. When we applied the integrated technology to analyses of the total lysate of primary cerebellar granule neurons, we characterized a total of 2201 proteins and 16,937 unique peptides for this primary cell line, providing one of its most comprehensive datasets. Our new integrated technology also exhibited excellent performance in the first N-glycomics analysis of cynomolgus monkey plasma; we successfully identified 122 proposed N-glycans and 135 N-glycosylation sites from 122 N-glycoproteins, and confirmed the presence of 38 N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing N-glycans, a rare occurrence in human plasma, through tandem mass spectrometry for the first time.

  7. Nonsurvivable momentum exchange system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roder, Russell (Inventor); Ahronovich, Eliezer (Inventor); Davis, III, Milton C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A demiseable momentum exchange system includes a base and a flywheel rotatably supported on the base. The flywheel includes a web portion defining a plurality of web openings and a rim portion. The momentum exchange system further includes a motor for driving the flywheel and a cover for engaging the base to substantially enclose the flywheel. The system may also include components having a melting temperature below 1500 degrees Celsius. The momentum exchange system is configured to demise on reentry.

  8. Text Exchange System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. V.; Hanson, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Text Exchange System (TES) exchanges and maintains organized textual information including source code, documentation, data, and listings. System consists of two computer programs and definition of format for information storage. Comprehensive program used to create, read, and maintain TES files. TES developed to meet three goals: First, easy and efficient exchange of programs and other textual data between similar and dissimilar computer systems via magnetic tape. Second, provide transportable management system for textual information. Third, provide common user interface, over wide variety of computing systems, for all activities associated with text exchange.

  9. Giant exchange interaction in mixed lanthanides

    PubMed Central

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Iwahara, Naoya; Ungur, Liviu; Chibotaru, Liviu F.

    2016-01-01

    Combining strong magnetic anisotropy with strong exchange interaction is a long standing goal in the design of quantum magnets. The lanthanide complexes, while exhibiting a very strong ionic anisotropy, usually display a weak exchange coupling, amounting to only a few wavenumbers. Recently, an isostructural series of mixed (Ln = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been reported, in which the exchange splitting is estimated to reach hundreds wavenumbers. The microscopic mechanism governing the unusual exchange interaction in these compounds is revealed here by combining detailed modeling with density-functional theory and ab initio calculations. We find it to be basically kinetic and highly complex, involving non-negligible contributions up to seventh power of total angular momentum of each lanthanide site. The performed analysis also elucidates the origin of magnetization blocking in these compounds. Contrary to general expectations the latter is not always favored by strong exchange interaction. PMID:27087470

  10. Investigating contingencies: an examination of the impact of span of supervision and upward controllingness on leader-member exchange using traditional and multivariate within- and between-entities analysis.

    PubMed

    Schriesheim, C A; Castro, S L; Yammarino, F J

    2000-10-01

    Using a sample of 150 bank employees, span of supervision and subordinate use of influence tactics were examined as moderators of relationships between leader-member exchange (LMX) and subordinate performance and organizational commitment. Raw score analyses indicate that moderators are present. Span of supervision and upward controlling influence tactics moderate relationships between LMX and both performance and commitment. However, using multiple relationship analysis and multivariate within- and between-entities analysis to assess the level of analysis results in some discrepant findings. These discrepancies are discussed, as are implications for future LMX research.

  11. On-line two-dimensional capillary strong anion exchange/reversed phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for comprehensive lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Bang, Dae Young; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2013-10-04

    An on-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography method was developed for comprehensive lipid profiling by coupling strong anion exchange (SAX) and nanoflow reversed-phase liquid chromatography (nRPLC) prior to electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-SAX/nRPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Lipids can be classified into four different types according to the electrical propensities of the lipids: anionic, weak anionic, neutral polar, and special lipids. In 2D-SAX/nRPLC, various lipids can be fractionated in the first dimension (SAX: 5 μm to 100 Å, 5.0 cm × 75 μm i.d.) by step elution (methanol and salt solution), followed by the molecular separation of lipids in the second dimension (RP: 3 μm to 100 Å, 7.0 cm × 75 μm i.d.) with binary gradient LC. Since the elution of lipids from SAX can be achieved with a very small volume of eluent delivered from an autosampler, it can be simply implemented with an LC-ESI-MS instrument for full automation, and the salt step elution, including the two-step injection procedure, can be used for the selective analysis of the desired lipid fraction. For nRPLC-ESI-MS/MS run in either positive or negative ion mode, a common ionization modifier (0.05% ammonium hydroxide with 5mM ammonium formate) was introduced into the binary mobile phase solutions so that 2D-LC-MS could be operated in both ion modes without changing the mobile phase solutions. The developed on-line 2D-SAX/nRPLC-ESI-MS/MS was evaluated with 22 different standard lipids for the optimization of the salt step elution and was applied to a healthy human plasma lipid extract, resulting in the identification of a total of 303 plasma lipids, including 14 different classes.

  12. Monoclonal antibody heterogeneity analysis and deamidation monitoring with high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing using simple, two component buffer systems.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xuezhen; Kutzko, Joseph P; Hayes, Michael L; Frey, Douglas D

    2013-03-29

    The use of either a polyampholyte buffer or a simple buffer system for the high-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing of monoclonal antibodies is demonstrated for the case where the pH gradient is produced entirely inside the column and with no external mixing of buffers. The simple buffer system used was composed of two buffering species, one which becomes adsorbed onto the column packing and one which does not adsorb, together with an adsorbed ion that does not participate in acid-base equilibrium. The method which employs the simple buffer system is capable of producing a gradual pH gradient in the neutral to acidic pH range that can be adjusted by proper selection of the starting and ending pH values for the gradient as well as the buffering species concentration, pKa, and molecular size. By using this approach, variants of representative monoclonal antibodies with isoelectric points of 7.0 or less were separated with high resolution so that the approach can serve as a complementary alternative to isoelectric focusing for characterizing a monoclonal antibody based on differences in the isoelectric points of the variants present. Because the simple buffer system used eliminates the use of polyampholytes, the method is suitable for antibody heterogeneity analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. The method can also be used at the preparative scale to collect highly purified isoelectric variants of an antibody for further study. To illustrate this, a single isoelectric point variant of a monoclonal antibody was collected and used for a stability study under forced deamidation conditions.

  13. Folding analysis of hormonal polypeptide calcitonins and the oxidized calcitonins using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with H/D exchange.

    PubMed

    Nabuchi, Yoshiaki; Asoh, Yoshinori; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2004-11-01

    Conformational change of calcitonins has been examined by measuring the rate of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange in amino acids. Time dependent m/z shift caused by H/D exchange was monitored by electrospray ionization quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-QIT MS). The rate constants of H/D exchange were calculated from apparent first-order kinetics. The time course of H/D exchange exhibited two phases of faster and slower exchange. The smaller rate constant (k2) estimated from the slower H/D exchange was correlated with an alpha-helix content that reflected the folding state. The order of k2 values obtained for human calcitonin (hCT), porcine calcitonin (pCT), salmon calcitonin (sCT), and elcatonin (ECT) was hCT > pCT approximately sCT > ECT. Although the amino acid sequence of sCT is similar to that of ECT, their k2 values were considerably different. The results suggest that ECT is relatively rigid on the N-terminal side cyclic structure in the folded state. Further, the effect of methionine oxidation on k2 has been examined. In the oxidized pCT that possesses similar biological activity with the intact pCT, the k2 values obtained were nearly equal. The k2 of hCT increased via methionine oxidation, and the biological activity was weakened by oxidation. This suggested that methionine oxidation of hCT produced unfolding in the secondary structure and that oxidative unfolding of hCT led to the loss of biological activity. The results indicate that the H/D exchange rate constant may be used as an informative parameter to elucidate the relationship between the folded state and biological activity of polypeptides like calcitonins with secondary structure.

  14. Higher Education Exchange, 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape…

  15. Higher Education Exchange, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The Higher Education Exchange is part of a movement to strengthen higher education's democratic mission and foster a more democratic culture throughout American society. Working in this tradition, the Higher Education Exchange publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic…

  16. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  17. Higher Education Exchange, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape…

  18. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  19. Higher Education Exchange, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape their future.…

  20. Higher Education Exchange, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Exchange" publishes case studies, analyses, news, and ideas about efforts within higher education to develop more democratic societies. Contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" examine whether institutions of higher learning are doing anything to increase the capacity of citizens to shape…

  1. Building Relationships through Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primavera, Angi; Hall, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    From the moment of birth, children form and develop relationships with others in their world based on exchange. Children recognize that engaging in such encounters offers them the opportunity to enter into a relationship with another individual and to nurture that relationship through the exchange of messages and gifts, items and ideas. At Boulder…

  2. Handicapping Social Exchange Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishler, Barbara

    The economic theory of social exchange has some serious shortcomings when applied to minorities--especially the disabled. First, it assumes dyads comprise the basic unit where exchange occurs and that rewards and costs must occur at that level. Second, the model standardizes the experience of white, Western European and American males. The model…

  3. Heat exchanger, head and shell acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    Instability of postulated flaws in the head component of the heat exchanger could not produce a large break, equivalent to a DEGB in the PWS piping, due to the configuration of the head and restraint provided by the staybolts. Rather, leakage from throughwall flaws in the head would increase with flaw length with finite leakage areas that are bounded by a post-instability flaw configuration. Postulated flaws at instability in the shell of the heat exchanger or in the cooling water nozzles could produce a large break in the Cooling Water System (CWS) pressure boundary. An initial analysis of flaw stability for postulated flaws in the heat exchanger head was performed in January 1992. This present report updates that analysis and, additionally, provides acceptable flaw configurations to maintain defined structural or safety margins against flaw instability of the external pressure boundary components of the heat exchanger, namely the head, shell, and cooling water nozzles. Structural and flaw stability analyses of the heat exchanger tubes, the internal pressure boundary of the heat exchangers or interface boundary between the PWS and CWS, were previously completed in February 1992 as part of the heat exchanger restart evaluation and are not covered in this report.

  4. Four particle exchange in solid He-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahan, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations which demonstrate a physically important four-atom exchange process in bodycentered cubic He crystal and thus an important four-spin term in the exchange Hamiltonian are discussed. A simple, mean-field analysis of this Hamiltonian appears to account for a number of the perplexing properties of bodycentered cubic He crystal. It is suggested that an understanding of other properties may require treatment of the exact four-spin term.

  5. Energy-Exchange Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine what energy savings can be achieved by coordinating the resources and requirements of two facilities, the 26th Ward Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) and a housing development named Starrett City with its own total energy system. It was determined that three energy exchange options were economically and technically feasible. These include: the transfer of digester gas produced at the 26th Ward to the boilers at the Starrett City's total energy plant (TEP); the transfer of hot water heated at the TEP to the 26th Ward for space and process heating; and the transfer of coal effluent waste water from the 26th Ward to the condenser cooling systems at the TEP. Technical information is presented to support the findings. The report addresses those tasks of the statement of work dedicated to data acquisition, analysis, and energy conservation strategies internal to the Starrett City TEP and the community it supplies as well as to the 26th Ward WPCP. (MCW)

  6. Energy exchanges in reconnection outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin V.; Newman, David L.; Markidis, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Reconnection outflows are highly energetic directed flows that interact with the ambient plasma or with flows from other reconnection regions. Under these conditions the flow becomes highly unstable and chaotic, as any flow jets interacting with a medium. We report here massively parallel simulations of the two cases of interaction between outflow jets and between a single outflow with an ambient plasma. We find in both case the development of a chaotic magnetic field, subject to secondary reconnection events that further complicate the topology of the field lines. The focus of the present analysis is on the energy balance. We compute each energy channel (electromagnetic, bulk, thermal, for each species) and find where the most energy is exchanged and in what form. The main finding is that the largest energy exchange is not at the reconnection site proper but in the regions where the outflowing jets are destabilized.

  7. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  8. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  9. Cryptographic Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    While transparency in financial markets should enhance liquidity, its exploitation by unethical and parasitic traders discourages others from fully embracing disclosure of their own information. Traders exploit both the private information in upstairs markets used to trade large orders outside traditional exchanges and the public information present in exchanges' quoted limit order books. Using homomorphic cryptographic protocols, market designers can create "partially transparent" markets in which every matched trade is provably correct and only beneficial information is revealed. In a cryptographic securities exchange, market operators can hide information to prevent its exploitation, and still prove facts about the hidden information such as bid/ask spread or market depth.

  10. Effect of water on the transport properties of protic and aprotic imidazolium ionic liquids - an analysis of self-diffusivity, conductivity, and proton exchange mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yaghini, N; Nordstierna, L; Martinelli, A

    2014-05-28

    In this paper we report on the transport properties of protic and aprotic ionic liquids of the imidazolium cation (C2C1Im(+) or C2HIm(+)) and the TFSI(-) or TfO(-) anion as a function of added water. We observe that the self-diffusion coefficient of the ionic species increases upon addition of water, and that the cation diffuses faster than the anion in the entire water concentration range investigated. We also observe that the overall increase of anionic and cationic diffusion coefficients is significant for C2HImTfO while it is rather weak for C2C1ImTFSI, the former being more hydrophilic. Moreover, the difference between cationic and anionic self-diffusivity specifically depends on the structure of the ionic liquid's ions. The degree of ion-ion association has been investigated by comparing the molar conductivity obtained by impedance measurements with the molar conductivity calculated from NMR data using the Nernst-Einstein equation. Our data indicate that the ions are partly dissociated (Λimp/ΛNMR in the range 0.45-0.75) but also that the degree of association decreases in the order C2HImTfO > C2HImTFSI ≈ C2C1ImTfO > C2C1ImTFSI. From these results, it seems that water finds different sites of interaction in the protic and aprotic ionic liquids, with a strong preference for hydrogen bonding to the -NH group (when available) and a stronger affinity to the TfO anion as compared to the TFSI. For the protic ionic liquids, the analysis of (1)H NMR chemical shifts (upon addition of H2O and D2O, respectively) indicates a water-cation interaction of hydrogen bonding nature. In addition, we could probe proton exchange between the -NH group and deuterated water for the protic cation, which occurs at a significantly faster rate if associated with the TfO anion as compared to the TFSI.

  11. Universities, SMEs and Social Capital: Can You Get Too Much of a Good Thing? An Illustrative Analysis of One University's Knowledge Exchange Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This article explores a university knowledge exchange programme for small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) owner-managers. Specifically, it considers why a programme designed to achieve growth in a group of SMEs through the creation of a network high in social capital may have become a constraint on the programme's effectiveness over a period of…

  12. U.S. Professional Association Initiatives Related to Black South Africans: An Analysis and An Inventory. Information Exchange: Working Paper #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Julie D.

    The nature and level of activity among U.S. private sector groups seeking to expand educational opportunities for black South Africans is examined. The Information Exchange of the Institute of International Education (South African Programs) did research on such categories of organizations as foundations, church groups, educational institutions,…

  13. Mycorrhizal Stimulation of Leaf Gas Exchange in Relation to Root Colonization, Shoot Size, Leaf Phosphorus and Nitrogen: A Quantitative Analysis of the Literature Using Meta-Regression

    PubMed Central

    Augé, Robert M.; Toler, Heather D.; Saxton, Arnold M.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis often stimulates gas exchange rates of the host plant. This may relate to mycorrhizal effects on host nutrition and growth rate, or the influence may occur independently of these. Using meta-regression, we tested the strength of the relationship between AM-induced increases in gas exchange, and AM size and leaf mineral effects across the literature. With only a few exceptions, AM stimulation of carbon exchange rate (CER), stomatal conductance (gs), and transpiration rate (E) has been significantly associated with mycorrhizal stimulation of shoot dry weight, leaf phosphorus, leaf nitrogen:phosphorus ratio, and percent root colonization. The sizeable mycorrhizal stimulation of CER, by 49% over all studies, has been about twice as large as the mycorrhizal stimulation of gs and E (28 and 26%, respectively). CER has been over twice as sensitive as gs and four times as sensitive as E to mycorrhizal colonization rates. The AM-induced stimulation of CER increased by 19% with each AM-induced doubling of shoot size; the AM effect was about half as large for gs and E. The ratio of leaf N to leaf P has been more closely associated with mycorrhizal influence on leaf gas exchange than leaf P alone. The mycorrhizal influence on CER has declined markedly over the 35 years of published investigations. PMID:27524989

  14. Fine-Grained Analysis of Motionese: Eye Gaze, Object Exchanges, and Action Units in Infant-versus Adult-Directed Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Rebecca J.; Shallcross, Wendy L.; Sabatos, Maura G.; Massie, Kara Phaedra

    2007-01-01

    Mothers modify their actions when demonstrating objects to infants versus adults. Such modifications have been called infant-directed action (IDA) or "motionese" (Brand, Baldwin, & Ashburn, 2002). We investigated the IDA features of interactiveness and simplification by quantifying eye gaze, object exchanges, and action units enacted…

  15. Mycorrhizal Stimulation of Leaf Gas Exchange in Relation to Root Colonization, Shoot Size, Leaf Phosphorus and Nitrogen: A Quantitative Analysis of the Literature Using Meta-Regression.

    PubMed

    Augé, Robert M; Toler, Heather D; Saxton, Arnold M

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis often stimulates gas exchange rates of the host plant. This may relate to mycorrhizal effects on host nutrition and growth rate, or the influence may occur independently of these. Using meta-regression, we tested the strength of the relationship between AM-induced increases in gas exchange, and AM size and leaf mineral effects across the literature. With only a few exceptions, AM stimulation of carbon exchange rate (CER), stomatal conductance (g s), and transpiration rate (E) has been significantly associated with mycorrhizal stimulation of shoot dry weight, leaf phosphorus, leaf nitrogen:phosphorus ratio, and percent root colonization. The sizeable mycorrhizal stimulation of CER, by 49% over all studies, has been about twice as large as the mycorrhizal stimulation of g s and E (28 and 26%, respectively). CER has been over twice as sensitive as g s and four times as sensitive as E to mycorrhizal colonization rates. The AM-induced stimulation of CER increased by 19% with each AM-induced doubling of shoot size; the AM effect was about half as large for g s and E. The ratio of leaf N to leaf P has been more closely associated with mycorrhizal influence on leaf gas exchange than leaf P alone. The mycorrhizal influence on CER has declined markedly over the 35 years of published investigations.

  16. Affinity capture of biotinylated proteins at acidic conditions to facilitate hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of multimeric protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Koefoed, Klaus; Nygaard, Frank; Sen, Jette Wagtberg

    2013-08-06

    Characterization of conformational and dynamic changes associated with protein interactions can be done by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) by comparing the deuterium uptake in the bound and unbound state of the proteins. Investigation of local hydrogen/deuterium exchange in heteromultimeric protein complexes poses a challenge for the method due to the increased complexity of the mixture of peptides originating from all interaction partners in the complex. Previously, interference of peptides from one interaction partner has been removed by immobilizing the intact protein on beads prior to the HDX-MS experiment. However, when studying protein complexes of more than two proteins, immobilization can possibly introduce steric limitations to the interactions. Here, we present a method based on the high affinity biotin-streptavidin interaction that allows selective capture of biotinylated proteins even under the extreme conditions for hydrogen/deuterium exchange quenching i.e. pH 2.5 and 0 °C. This biotin-streptavidin capture strategy allows hydrogen/deuterium exchange to occur in proteins in solution and enables characterization of specific proteins in heteromultimeric protein complexes without interference of peptides originating from other interaction partners in the complex. The biotin-streptavidin strategy has been successfully implemented in a model system with two recombinant monoclonal antibodies that target nonoverlapping epitopes on the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We present a workflow for biotinylation and characterization of recombinant antibodies and demonstrate affinity capture of biotinylated antibodies under hydrogen/deuterium exchange quench conditions by the biotin-streptavidin strategy.

  17. Entire-Dataset Analysis of NMR Fast-Exchange Titration Spectra: A Mg(2+) Titration Analysis for HIV-1 Ribonuclease H Domain.

    PubMed

    Karki, Ichhuk; Christen, Martin T; Spiriti, Justin; Slack, Ryan L; Oda, Masayuki; Kanaori, Kenji; Zuckerman, Daniel M; Ishima, Rieko

    2016-12-15

    This article communicates our study to elucidate the molecular determinants of weak Mg(2+) interaction with the ribonuclease H (RNH) domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in solution. As the interaction is weak (a ligand-dissociation constant >1 mM), nonspecific Mg(2+) interaction with the protein or interaction of the protein with other solutes that are present in the buffer solution can confound the observed Mg(2+)-titration data. To investigate these indirect effects, we monitored changes in the chemical shifts of backbone amides of RNH by recording NMR (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectra upon titration of Mg(2+) into an RNH solution. We performed the titration under three different conditions: (1) in the absence of NaCl, (2) in the presence of 50 mM NaCl, and (3) at a constant 160 mM Cl(-) concentration. Careful analysis of these three sets of titration data, along with molecular dynamics simulation data of RNH with Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, demonstrates two characteristic phenomena distinct from the specific Mg(2+) interaction with the active site: (1) weak interaction of Mg(2+), as a salt, with the substrate-handle region of the protein and (2) overall apparent lower Mg(2+) affinity in the absence of NaCl compared to that in the presence of 50 mM NaCl. A possible explanation may be that the titrated MgCl2 is consumed as a salt and interacts with RNH in the absence of NaCl. In addition, our data suggest that Na(+) increases the kinetic rate of the specific Mg(2+) interaction at the active site of RNH. Taken together, our study provides biophysical insight into the mechanism of weak metal interaction on a protein.

  18. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  19. Compact, super heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Heat exchanger uses porous media to enhance heat transfer through walls of cooling channels, thereby lowering wall temperature. Porous media within cooling channel increases internal surface area from which heat can be transferred to coolant. Comparison data shows wall has lower temperature and coolant has higher temperature when porous medium is used within heat exchanger. Media can be sintered powedered metal, metal fibers, woven wire layers, or any porous metal having desired permeability and porosity.

  20. Hibernation and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Milsom, William K; Jackson, Donald C

    2011-01-01

    Hibernation in endotherms and ectotherms is characterized by an energy-conserving metabolic depression due to low body temperatures and poorly understood temperature-independent mechanisms. Rates of gas exchange are correspondly reduced. In hibernating mammals, ventilation falls even more than metabolic rate leading to a relative respiratory acidosis that may contribute to metabolic depression. Breathing in some mammals becomes episodic and in some small mammals significant apneic gas exchange may occur by passive diffusion via airways or skin. In ectothermic vertebrates, extrapulmonary gas exchange predominates and in reptiles and amphibians hibernating underwater accounts for all gas exchange. In aerated water diffusive exchange permits amphibians and many species of turtles to remain fully aerobic, but hypoxic conditions can challenge many of these animals. Oxygen uptake into blood in both endotherms and ectotherms is enhanced by increased affinity of hemoglobin for O₂ at low temperature. Regulation of gas exchange in hibernating mammals is predominately linked to CO₂/pH, and in episodic breathers, control is principally directed at the duration of the apneic period. Control in submerged hibernating ectotherms is poorly understood, although skin-diffusing capacity may increase under hypoxic conditions. In aerated water blood pH of frogs and turtles either adheres to alphastat regulation (pH ∼8.0) or may even exhibit respiratory alkalosis. Arousal in hibernating mammals leads to restoration of euthermic temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange and occurs periodically even as ambient temperatures remain low, whereas body temperature, metabolic rate, and gas exchange of hibernating ectotherms are tightly linked to ambient temperature.

  1. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1992-07-09

    The purpose of this contract has been to explore the limits of miniaturization of heat exchangers with the goals of (1) improving the theoretical understanding of laminar heat exchangers, (2) evaluating various manufacturing difficulties, and (3) identifying major applications for the technology. A low-cost, ultra-compact heat exchanger could have an enormous impact on industry in the areas of cryocoolers and energy conversion. Compact cryocoolers based on the reverse Brayton cycle (RBC) would become practical with the availability of compact heat exchangers. Many experts believe that hardware advances in personal computer technology will rapidly slow down in four to six years unless lowcost, portable cryocoolers suitable for the desktop supercomputer can be developed. Compact refrigeration systems would permit dramatic advances in high-performance computer work stations with conventional'' microprocessors operating at 150 K, and especially with low-cost cryocoolers below 77 K. NASA has also expressed strong interest in our MTS exchanger for space-based RBC cryocoolers for sensor cooling. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  2. Cryptographic Combinatorial Securities Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Christopher; Parkes, David C.

    We present a useful new mechanism that facilitates the atomic exchange of many large baskets of securities in a combinatorial exchange. Cryptography prevents information about the securities in the baskets from being exploited, enhancing trust. Our exchange offers institutions who wish to trade large positions a new alternative to existing methods of block trading: they can reduce transaction costs by taking advantage of other institutions’ available liquidity, while third party liquidity providers guarantee execution—preserving their desired portfolio composition at all times. In our exchange, institutions submit encrypted orders which are crossed, leaving a “remainder”. The exchange proves facts about the portfolio risk of this remainder to third party liquidity providers without revealing the securities in the remainder, the knowledge of which could also be exploited. The third parties learn either (depending on the setting) the portfolio risk parameters of the remainder itself, or how their own portfolio risk would change if they were to incorporate the remainder into a portfolio they submit. In one setting, these third parties submit bids on the commission, and the winner supplies necessary liquidity for the entire exchange to clear. This guaranteed clearing, coupled with external price discovery from the primary markets for the securities, sidesteps difficult combinatorial optimization problems. This latter method of proving how taking on the remainder would change risk parameters of one’s own portfolio, without revealing the remainder’s contents or its own risk parameters, is a useful protocol of independent interest.

  3. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  4. Oxidizer heat exchanger component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, is capable of multimode thrust operation. The engine operates at two low-thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust; and pumped idle, 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank prepressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine during the low-thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidized heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. This report summarizes the test activity and post-test data analysis for two possible heat exchangers, each of which employs a completely different design philosophy. One design makes use of a low-heat transfer (PHT) approach in combination with a volume to attenuate pressure and flow oscillations. The test data showed that the LHT unit satisfied the oxygen exit quality of 0.95 or greater in both the THI and PI modes while maintaining stability. The HHT unit fulfilled all PI requirements; data for THI satisfactory operation is implied from experimental data that straddle the exact THI operating point.

  5. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  6. Measuring gas exchange with step changes in inspired oxygen: an analysis of the assumption of oxygen steady state in patients suffering from COPD.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Lars P; Weinreich, Ulla M; Karbing, Dan S; Wagner, Peter D; Rees, Stephen E

    2014-12-01

    Bedside estimation of pulmonary gas exchange efficiency may be possible from step changes in FIO2 and subsequent measurement of arterial oxygenation at steady state conditions. However, a steady state may not be achieved quickly after a change in FIO2, especially in patients with lung disease such as COPD, rendering this approach cumbersome. This paper investigates whether breath by breath measurement of respiratory gas and arterial oxygen levels as FIO2 is changed can be used as a much more rapid alternative to collecting data from steady state conditions for measuring pulmonary gas exchange efficiency. Fourteen patients with COPD were studied using 4-5 step changes in FIO2 in the range of 0.15-0.35. Values of expired respiratory gas and arterial oxygenation were used to calculate and compare the parameters of a mathematical model of pulmonary gas exchange in two cases: from data at steady state; and from breath by breath data prior to achievement of a steady state. For each patient, the breath by breath data were corrected for the delay in arterial oxygen saturation changes following each change in FIO2. Calculated model parameters were shown to be similar for the two data sets, with Bland-Altman bias and limits of agreement of -0.4 and -3.0 to 2.2 % for calculation of pulmonary shunt and 0.17 and -0.47 to 0.81 kPa for alveolar to end-capillary PO2, a measure of oxygen abnormality due to shunting plus regions of low [Formula: see text] A/[Formula: see text] ratio. This study shows that steady state oxygen levels may not be necessary when estimating pulmonary gas exchange using changes in FIO2. As such this technique may be applicable in patients with lung disease such as COPD.

  7. Interface mixing and its impact on exchange coupling in exchange biased systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, P. K.; Skoropata, E.; Ting, Y.-W.; Lin, K.-W.; Freeland, J. W.; van Lierop, J.

    2016-12-01

    Exchange bias and interlayer exchange coupling are interface driven phenomena. Since an ideal interface is very challenging to achieve, a clear understanding of the chemical and magnetic natures of interfaces is pivotal to identify their influence on the magnetism. We have chosen Ni80Fe20/CoO(t CoO)/Co trilayers as a model system, and identified non-stoichiometric Ni-ferrite and Co-ferrite at the surface and interface, respectively. These ferrites, being ferrimagnets typically, should influence the exchange coupling. However, in our trilayers the interface ferrites were found not to be ferro- or ferri-magnetic; thus having no observable influence on the exchange coupling. Our analysis also revealed that (i) interlayer exchange coupling was present between Ni80Fe20 and Co even though the interlayer thickness was significantly larger than expected for this phenomenon to happen, and (ii) the majority of the CoO layer (except some portion near the interface) did not contribute to the observed exchange bias. We also identified that the interlayer exchange coupling and the exchange bias properties were not interdependent.

  8. Interface mixing and its impact on exchange coupling in exchange biased systems.

    PubMed

    Manna, P K; Skoropata, E; Ting, Y-W; Lin, K-W; Freeland, J W; van Lierop, J

    2016-12-07

    Exchange bias and interlayer exchange coupling are interface driven phenomena. Since an ideal interface is very challenging to achieve, a clear understanding of the chemical and magnetic natures of interfaces is pivotal to identify their influence on the magnetism. We have chosen Ni80Fe20/CoO(t CoO)/Co trilayers as a model system, and identified non-stoichiometric Ni-ferrite and Co-ferrite at the surface and interface, respectively. These ferrites, being ferrimagnets typically, should influence the exchange coupling. However, in our trilayers the interface ferrites were found not to be ferro- or ferri-magnetic; thus having no observable influence on the exchange coupling. Our analysis also revealed that (i) interlayer exchange coupling was present between Ni80Fe20 and Co even though the interlayer thickness was significantly larger than expected for this phenomenon to happen, and (ii) the majority of the CoO layer (except some portion near the interface) did not contribute to the observed exchange bias. We also identified that the interlayer exchange coupling and the exchange bias properties were not interdependent.

  9. Comparative analysis of carbon, water, and energy exchanges in co-located mid-latitude forests at various stages of development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.; Munger, J. W.; Hadley, J.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of mass and energy vary with forest type, stand age, and following disturbance, but the degree, character, and persistence of these variations remain poorly understood. This work explores such gradients by synthesizing across a local network of flux tower sites within Harvard Forest (central Massachusetts). We examine how CO2, H2O, and energy exchanges compare among mature and intermediate aged deciduous forests, a mature hemlock forest, and a newly instrumented site in the early stages of secondary succession following a recent clearcut. We find markedly lower growing season evapotranspiration in the hemlock stand compared to adjacent deciduous forests, lower still in the revegetating clearcut. Daytime net ecosystem carbon exchange follows a similar pattern, with highest uptake in the deciduous forests, intermediate in the hemlock site, and lowest in the clearcut. This is true despite sizeable midday uptake in the clearcut during the second growing season post-harvest. Large nighttime CO2 emissions from the clearcut indicate high respiration rates of the early succession vegetation as well as vigorous decomposition of the abundant woody debris and litter left onsite after harvest. Surface albedo and corresponding net radiation are both surprisingly consistent across these adjacent cover types. Implications for water resources and carbon balance of New England landscapes will be discussed, particularly within the contexts of human and natural disturbances, such as harvesting and Hemlock Wooly Adelgid infestations.

  10. Prefractionation of intact proteins by reversed-phase and anion-exchange chromatography for the differential proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stobaugh, Jordan T; Fague, Kaitlin M; Jorgenson, James W

    2013-02-01

    The need for multidimensional separations for bottom-up proteomic analyses has been well demonstrated by many over the past decade. The vast majority of reported approaches has focused primarily on improving the separation once the sample has already been digested. The work presented in this study shows an improvement in multidimensional approaches by prefractionation of intact proteins prior to digestion and separation of the peptides. Two modes of intact protein separation were compared, anion-exchange and reversed-phase, to assess the utility of each mode for the purpose of fractionation. Each of the samples was then enzymatically digested and analyzed by RP-UPLC-MS(E). To assess the validity of each approach, baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was grown on two different carbon sources, glycerol and dextrose. More proteins were identified by the reversed-phase prefractionation approach (546) than were found by the anion-exchange method (262). As a result, there was much greater coverage of the metabolic pathways of interest for the reversed-phase method than for the anion-exchange method.

  11. The dominant mechanisms of hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, Alexander H.; Stewardson, Michael J.; Grant, Stanley B.

    2013-04-01

    The mechanisms driving hyporheic exchange are of significant interest facilitating transfer of nutrients, oxygen and energy essential for benthic ecology. The hyporheic zone is the region directly beneath the sediment-water interface (SWI) marking the transition from stream to porous flow. Hyporheic exchange is controlled by a range of variables of the stream, streambed and the geometry of the SWI. The boundary layer of a stream is characterized by a slip velocity across the SWI, facilitating transition from free fluid to Darcian flow. Mass and momentum transfer across the SWI are driven by either (1) advective pumping from variation in dynamic head at the SWI causing potential flow into and out of the streambed, or; (2) turbulent structures in the boundary layer which penetrate into the streambed. Unlike the advective pumping, turbulent structures penetrate well beyond the characteristic mixing length scale and lead to permanent displacement of fluid. The advective pumping model assumes a potential field directly beneath the SWI, despite the slip layer propagating into the bed. Furthermore, turbulent exchange can lead to a permanent displacement of fluid, while advective pumping is multidirectional and periodic. Models derived from flume experiments have been based on one of these mechanisms and have been presented as two alternative approaches for modelling hyporheic exchange. However, the incongruence of these mechanisms leads us to investigate and model each individually. Our investigation treats coherent turbulent penetration and advective pumping as unique mechanisms which both contribute to rates of hyporheic exchange. Using bedforms as a proxy for advective pumping allowed us to gain insight into the dynamics of exchange mechanisms. Analysis of 93 past flume experiments has shown that bedforms alter the dependence of hyporheic exchange on these exchange mechanisms. Power models developed through a multilinear regression analysis showed that exchange in

  12. Exploring knowledge exchange: a useful framework for practice and policy.

    PubMed

    Ward, Vicky; Smith, Simon; House, Allan; Hamer, Susan

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge translation is underpinned by a dynamic and social knowledge exchange process but there are few descriptions of how this unfolds in practice settings. This has hampered attempts to produce realistic and useful models to help policymakers and researchers understand how knowledge exchange works. This paper reports the results of research which investigated the nature of knowledge exchange. We aimed to understand whether dynamic and fluid definitions of knowledge exchange are valid and to produce a realistic, descriptive framework of knowledge exchange. Our research was informed by a realist approach. We embedded a knowledge broker within three service delivery teams across a mental health organisation in the UK, each of whom was grappling with specific challenges. The knowledge broker participated in the team's problem-solving process and collected observational fieldnotes. We also interviewed the team members. Observational and interview data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively in order to determine and describe the nature of the knowledge exchange process in more detail. This enabled us to refine our conceptual framework of knowledge exchange. We found that knowledge exchange can be understood as a dynamic and fluid process which incorporates distinct forms of knowledge from multiple sources. Quantitative analysis illustrated that five broadly-defined components of knowledge exchange (problem, context, knowledge, activities, use) can all be in play at any one time and do not occur in a set order. Qualitative analysis revealed a number of distinct themes which better described the nature of knowledge exchange. By shedding light on the nature of knowledge exchange, our findings problematise some of the linear, technicist approaches to knowledge translation. The revised model of knowledge exchange which we propose here could therefore help to reorient thinking about knowledge exchange and act as a starting point for further exploration and

  13. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  14. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  15. Samarium Ion Exchanged Montmorillonite for High Temperature Cumene Cracking Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binitha, N. N.; Silija, P. P.; Suraj, V.; Yaakob, Z.; Sugunan, S.

    2011-02-01

    Montmorillonite clay is cation exchanged with samarium and its catalytic influence in cumene cracking reaction is investigated. Effect of exchange with sodium ions on further exchange with samarium ions is also noted. Acidity measurements are done using Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) of ammonia. The retention of basic structure is proved from FTIR spectra and XRD patterns. Elemental analysis result shows that samarium exchange has occurred, which is responsible for the higher catalytic activity. Surface area and pore volume remains more or less unaffected upon exchange. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates the enhanced thermal stability on exchanging. Cumene cracking reaction is carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed bed glass reactor at 673 K. The predominance of Brønsted acidity is confirmed from high selectivity to benzene.

  16. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  17. Alert Exchange Process Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration of the United States of America (NASA), and the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), acknowledging that NASA, ESA and JAXA have a mutual interest in exchanging Alerts and Alert Status Lists to enhance the information base for each system participant while fortifying the general level of cooperation between the policy agreement subscribers, and each Party will exchange Alert listings on regular basis and detailed Alert information on a need to know basis to the extent permitted by law.

  18. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  19. Reggeon exchange from gauge/gravity duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Matteo; Peschanski, Robi

    2011-10-01

    We perform the analysis of quark-antiquark Reggeon exchange in meson-meson scattering, in the framework of the gauge/gravity correspondence in a confining background. On the gauge theory side, Reggeon exchange is described as quark-antiquark exchange in the t channel between fast projectiles. The corresponding amplitude is represented in terms of Wilson loops running along the trajectories of the constituent quarks and antiquarks. The paths of the exchanged fermions are integrated over, while the "spectator" fermions are dealt with in an eikonal approximation. On the gravity side, we follow a previously proposed approach, and we evaluate the Wilson-loop expectation value by making use of gauge/gravity duality for a generic confining gauge theory. The amplitude is obtained in a saddle-point approximation through the determination near the confining horizon of a Euclidean "minimal surface with floating boundaries", i.e., by fixing the trajectories of the exchanged quark and antiquark by means of a minimisation procedure, which involves both area and length terms. After discussing, as a warm-up exercise, a simpler problem on a plane involving a soap film with floating boundaries, we solve the variational problem relevant to Reggeon exchange, in which the basic geometry is that of a helicoid. A compact expression for the Reggeon-exchange amplitude, including the effects of a small fermion mass, is then obtained through analytic continuation from Euclidean to Minkowski space-time. We find in particular a linear Regge trajectory, corresponding to a Regge-pole singularity supplemented by a logarithmic cut induced by the non-zero quark mass. The analytic continuation leads also to companion contributions, corresponding to the convolution of the same Reggeon-exchange amplitude with multiple elastic rescattering interactions between the colliding mesons.

  20. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC) for representing the air-soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1) accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2) accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3) enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4) is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air-water volatile tracer exchange; and (5) is applicable to site, regional, and global land models. Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1) gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2) liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. We compared the predicted soil evaporation efficiency with those from several field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements and found good agreement with the typically observed two-stage soil evaporation curves. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92) indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1) the inverted soil resistance data are always severely impacted by measurement error and (2) the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance. We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer exchange at the soil-air interface.

  1. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC) for representing the air-soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1) accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2) accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3) enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4) is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air-water volatile tracer exchange; and (5) is applicable to site, regional, and global land models. Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1) gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2) liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. The resulting soil evaporation efficiency reasonably explains the two-stage soil evaporation curves typically observed in field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92) indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1) the inverted soil resistance data is always severely impacted by measurement error and (2) the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance. We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer exchange at the soil-air interface.

  2. California residential indoor air quality study. Volume 2. Carbon monoxide and air exchange rate: A univariate and multivariate analysis. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Colome, S.D.; Wilson, A.L.; Tian, Y.

    1994-07-01

    This second volume provides a systematic evaluation of the data set focusing on the relationships of the recorded parameters with the following four outcome measures: indoor 48-hour average CO; net 48-hour average indoor minus outdoor CO; air exchange rates; and maximum 8-hour average indoor CO. Over 350 variables were measured and/or recorded for each house in the pilot study. These parameters included the concentrations of pollutants of interest (CO, benzene, NO2, toluene, radon, formaldehyde, and methane), housing characteristics (e.g., cooking fuel, burner adjustments, proper venting) and occupant practices (e.g., cigarette smoking, heating with the range/oven).

  3. Currency Exchange Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Carl R.

    This curriculum unit of the Muncie (Indiana) Southside High School is to simulate the dynamics of foreign currency exchange rates from the perspectives of: (1) a major U.S. corporation, ABB Power T & D Company, Inc., of Muncie, Indiana, a manufacturer of large power transformers for the domestic and foreign markets; and (2) individual…

  4. Chimney heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, I.C.

    1981-09-01

    A heat exchanger for installation on the top of a chimney of a building includes a housing having a lower end receiving the top of the chimney and an upper end with openings permitting the escape of effluent from the chimney and a heat exchanger assembly disposed in the housing including a central chamber and a spirally arranged duct network defining an effluent spiral path between the top of the chimney and the central chamber and a fresh air spiral path between an inlet disposed at the lower end of the housing and the central chamber, the effluent and fresh air spiral paths being in heat exchange relationship such that air passing through the fresh air spiral path is heated by hot effluent gases passing upward through the chimney and the effluent spiral path for use in heating the building. A pollution trap can be disposed in the central chamber of the heat exchanger assembly for removing pollutants from the effluent, the pollution trap including a rotating cage carrying pumice stones for absorbing pollutants from the effluent with the surface of the pumice gradually ground off to reveal fresh stone as the cage rotates.

  5. Higher Education Exchange, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that not only does higher education not see the public; when the public, in turn, looks at higher education, it sees mostly malaise, inefficiencies, expense, and unfulfilled promises. Yet, the contributors to this issue of the "Higher Education Exchange" tell of bright spots in higher education where experiments in working…

  6. Technology Performance Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  7. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  8. Research Exchange, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Exchange, 2002

    2002-01-01

    These three issues of the "Research Exchange" focus on how better to conduct disability research and disseminate research results. The first issue examines the topic of human subject/human research participant protection, with a focus on research funded through the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). It…

  9. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South…

  10. Higher Education Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This volume begins with an essay by Noelle McAfee, a contributor who is familiar to readers of Higher Education Exchange (HEX). She reiterates Mathews' argument regarding the disconnect between higher education's sense of engagement and the public's sense of engagement, and suggests a way around the epistemological conundrum of "knowledge…

  11. Higher Education Exchange 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Ed.; Witte, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the Higher Education Exchange debate the issues around knowledge production, discuss the acquisition of deliberative skills for democracy, and examine how higher education prepares, or does not prepare, students for citizenship roles. Articles include: (1) "Foreword" (Deborah Witte); (2) "Knowledge,…

  12. Numerical analysis of magnetic field effects on hydro-thermal behavior of a magnetic nanofluid in a double pipe heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakiba, Ali; Vahedi, Khodadad

    2016-03-01

    This study attempts to numerically investigate the hydro-thermal characteristics of a ferrofluid (water and 4 vol% Fe3O4) in a counter-current horizontal double pipe heat exchanger, which is exposed to a non-uniform transverse magnetic field with different intensities. The magnetic field is generated by an electric current going through a wire located parallel to the inner tube and between two pipes. The single phase model and the control volume technique have been used to study the flow. The effects of magnetic field have been added to momentum equation by applying C++ codes in Ansys Fluent 14. The results show that applying this kind of magnetic field causes kelvin force to be produced perpendicular to the ferrofluid flow, changing axial velocity profile and creating a pair of vortices which leads to an increase in Nusselt number, friction factor and pressure drop. Comparing the enhancement percentage of Nusselt number, friction factor and pressure drop demonstrates that the optimum value of magnetic number for Reff=50 is between Mn=1.33×106 and Mn=2.37×106. So applying non-uniform transverse magnetic field can control the flow of ferrofluid and improve heat transfer process of double pipe heat exchanger.

  13. Analysis of exchanges between novice and cooperating teachers during internships using the NCATE/NASPE Standards for Teacher Preparation in Physical Education as guidelines.

    PubMed

    Banville, Dominique

    2006-06-01

    To be recognized as an accredited program, Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) programs in the country must abide by guidelines put forward by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE), in collaboration with the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The guidelines are divided into nine standards and identify a number of outcomes (NASPE, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine the nature of the exchanges between novice teachers (NTs) and cooperating teachers (CTs), when using the NASPE Standards (1998) as a reference point, and determine if the focus of the exchanges differed over time and according to data source. Six pairs of CTs and their NT participated in the study. Data were collected through recorded conversations between NTs and their CT as well as NTs' logs. Data showed that the majority of conversations focused on planning and instruction (Standard 6) and management and motivation (Standard 4), while few related to diverse learners (Standard 3), growth and development (Standard 2), and communication (Standard 5). The small amount of information shared by CTs in some standards indicates a need for PETE programs to share the guidelines with CTs to make them aware of the importance of offering a variety of topics to interns, because CTs are the primary source of information during this crucial experience.

  14. Minimizing Carry-Over in an Online Pepsin Digestion System used for the H/D Exchange Mass Spectrometric Analysis of an IgG1 Monoclonal Antibody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Ranajoy; Manikwar, Prakash; Hickey, John M.; Arora, Jayant; Middaugh, C. Russell; Volkin, David B.; Weis, David D.

    2012-12-01

    Chromatographic carry-over can severely distort measurements of amide H/D exchange in proteins analyzed by LC/MS. In this work, we explored the origin of carry-over in the online digestion of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody using an immobilized pepsin column under quenched H/D exchange conditions (pH 2.5, 0 °C). From a consensus list of 169 different peptides consistently detected during digestion of this large, ~150 kDa protein, approximately 30 % of the peptic peptides exhibited carry-over. The majority of carry-over originates from the online digestion. Carry-over can be substantially decreased by washing the online digestion flow-path and pepsin column with two wash cocktails: [acetonitrile (5 %)/ isopropanol (5 %)/ acetic acid (20 %) in water] and [2 M guanidine hydrochloride in 100 mM phosphate buffer pH 2.5]. Extended use of this two-step washing procedure does not adversely affect the specificity or activity of the immobilized pepsin column. The results suggest that although the mechanism of carry-over appears to be chemical in nature, and not hydrodynamic, carry-over cannot be attributed to a single factor such as mass, abundance, pI, or hydrophobicity of the peptides.

  15. A new strategy for exploiting ion exchange in sequential injection analysis: in-line phytic acid separation/determination in foods as an example.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Raquel P; Oliveira, Cláudio C

    2002-06-01

    A novel strategy for exploiting ion exchange in sequential injection systems is proposed. The procedure is based on the selection of a defined volume of a resin suspension, which is introduced and packed in the analytical path, establishing a resin mini-column in the system. The passage of a selected sample volume through the resin mini-column leads to the retention of the analyte, while the sample matrix is discarded. The analyte is eluted during the passage of the eluant/reagent by the packed beads, being the analytical signal monitored (absorbance) in the liquid phase. The beads are then aspirated back to the holding coil and directed to a recovery flask, linked at the selection valve; then the system is ready to begin a new cycle. With the proposed strategy, the main characteristics of the sequential injection system are kept as any new artifact is added to the manifold and system reconfiguration is not required. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated by the phytic acid determination in food samples. For this specific application, AG1-X8 was selected as ion exchanger, and a solution containing Cl- and Fe(III)-salicylate complex was used as eluant and spectrophotometric reagent.

  16. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  17. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Large Devaluations and the Real Exchange Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Ariel; Eichenbaum, Martin; Rebelo, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the primary force behind the large drop in real exchange rates that occurs after large devaluations is the slow adjustment in the prices of nontradable goods and services. Our empirical analysis uses data from five large devaluation episodes: Argentina (2002), Brazil (1999), Korea (1997), Mexico (1994), and Thailand…

  19. Developing Intercultural Communicative Competence through Online Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Based on Byram's (1997) definition of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) and on specific types of discourse analysis proposed by Kramsch and Thorne (2002) and Ware and Kramsch (2005), this article explores how online exchanges can play a role in second language learners' development of pragmatic competence and ICC. With data obtained…

  20. Hydrogeologic setting, water budget, and preliminary analysis of ground-water exchange at Lake Starr, a seepage lake in Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy; Lee, T.M.; O'Hare, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Lake Starr, a 134-acre seepage lake of multiple-sinkhole origin on the Lake Wales Ridge of central Florida, was the subject of a detailed water-budget study from August 1996 through July 1998. The study monitored the effects of hydrogeologic setting, climate, and ground-water pumping on the water budget and lake stage. The hydrogeologic setting of the Lake Starr basin differs markedly on the two sides of the lake. Ground water from the surficial aquifer system flows into the lake from the northwest side of the basin, and lake water leaks out to the surficial aquifer system on the southeast side of the basin. Lake Starr and the surrounding surficial aquifer system recharge the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The rate of recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer is determined by the integrity of the intermediate confining unit and by the downward head gradient between the two aquifers. On the inflow side of the lake, the intermediate confining unit is more continuous, allowing ground water from the surficial aquifer system to flow laterally into the lake. Beneath the lake and on the southeast side of the basin, breaches in the intermediate confining unit enhance downward flow to the Upper Floridan aquifer, so that water flows both downward and laterally away from the lake through the ground-water flow system in these areas. An accurate water budget, including evaporation measured by the energy-budget method, was used to calculate net ground-water flow to the lake, and to do a preliminary analysis of the relation of net ground-water fluxes to other variables. Water budgets constructed over different timeframes provided insight on processes that affect ground-water interactions with Lake Starr. Weekly estimates of net ground-water flow provided evidence for the occurrence of transient inflows from the nearshore basin, as well as the short-term effects of head in the Upper Floridan aquifer on ground-water exchange with the lake. Monthly water budgets showed the effects

  1. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Wobrauschek, P. Prost, J.; Ingerle, D.; Kregsamer, P.; Streli, C.; Misra, N. L.

    2015-08-15

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm{sup 2} active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  2. A novel vacuum spectrometer for total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis with two exchangeable low power x-ray sources for the analysis of low, medium, and high Z elements in sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Prost, J.; Ingerle, D.; Kregsamer, P.; Misra, N. L.; Streli, C.

    2015-08-01

    The extension of the detectable elemental range with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis is a challenging task. In this paper, it is demonstrated how a TXRF spectrometer is modified to analyze elements from carbon to uranium. Based on the existing design of a vacuum TXRF spectrometer with a 12 specimen sample changer, the following components were renewed: the silicon drift detector with 20 mm2 active area and having a special ultra-thin polymer window allowing the detection of elements from carbon upwards. Two exchangeable X-ray sources guarantee the efficient excitation of both low and high Z elements. These X-ray sources were two light-weighted easily mountable 35 W air-cooled low-power tubes with Cr and Rh anodes, respectively. The air cooled tubes and the Peltier-cooled detector allowed to construct a transportable tabletop spectrometer with compact dimensions, as neither liquid nitrogen cooling for the detector nor a water cooling circuit and a bulky high voltage generator for the X-ray tubes are required. Due to the excellent background conditions as a result of the TXRF geometry, detection limits of 150 ng for C, 12 ng for F, and 3.3 ng for Na have been obtained using Cr excitation in vacuum. For Rh excitation, the detection limits of 90 pg could be achieved for Sr. Taking 10 to 20 μl of sample volume, extrapolated detection limits in the ng/g (ppb) range are resulting in terms of concentration.

  3. Warmer temperatures stimulate respiration and reduce net ecosystem productivity in a northern Great Plains grassland: Analysis of CO2 exchange in automatic chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    The interacting effects of altered temperature and precipitation are expected to have significant consequences for ecosystem net carbon storage. Here I report the results of an experiment that evaluated the effects of elevated temperature and altered precipitation on ecosystem CO2 exchange in a northern Great Plains grassland, near Lethbridge, Alberta Canada. Open-top chambers were used to establish an experiment in 2012 with three treatments (control, warmed, warmed plus 50% of normal precipitation input). A smaller experiment with only the two temperature treatments (control and warmed) was conducted in 2013. Continuous half-hourly net CO2 exchange measurements were made using nine automatic chambers during May-October in both years. My objectives were to determine the sensitivity of the ecosystem carbon budget to temperature and moisture manipulations, and to test for direct and indirect effects of the environmental changes on ecosystem CO2 exchange. The experimental manipulations resulted primarily in a significant increase in air temperature in the warmed treatment plots. A cumulative net loss of carbon or negative net ecosystem productivity (NEP) occurred during May through September in the warmed treatment (NEP = -659 g C m-2), while in the control treatment there was a cumulative net gain of carbon (NEP = +50 g C m-2). An eddy covariance system that operated at the site, over a footprint region that was not influenced by the experimental treatments, also showed a net gain of carbon by the ecosystem. The reduced NEP was due to higher plant and soil respiration rates in the warmed treatment that appeared to be caused by a combination of: (i) higher carbon substrate availability indirectly stimulating soil respiration in the warmed relative to the control treatment, and (ii) a strong increase in leaf respiration likely caused by a shift in electron partitioning to the alternative pathway respiration in the warmed treatment, particularly when exposed to high

  4. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  5. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  6. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  7. Detachable strong cation exchange monolith, integrated with capillary zone electrophoresis and coupled with pH gradient elution, produces improved sensitivity and numbers of peptide identifications during bottom-up analysis of complex proteomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Yan, Xiaojing; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-04-21

    A detachable sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange monolith was synthesized in a fused silica capillary, and used for solid phase extraction with online pH gradient elution during capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. Tryptic digests were prepared in 50 mM formic acid and loaded onto the strong cation-exchange monolith. Fractions were eluted using a series of buffers with lower concentration but higher pH values than the 50 mM formic acid background electrolyte. This combination of elution and background electrolytes results in both sample stacking and formation of a dynamic pH junction and allows use of relatively large elution buffer volumes while maintaining reasonable peak efficiency and resolution. A series of five pH bumps were applied to elute E. coli tryptic peptides from the monolith, followed by analysis using CZE coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; 799 protein groups and 3381 peptides were identified from 50 ng of the digest in a 2.5 h analysis, which approaches the identification rate for this organism that was obtained with an Orbitrap Fusion. We attribute the improved numbers of peptide and protein identifications to the efficient fractionation by the online pH gradient elution, which decreased the complexity of the sample in each elution step and improved the signal intensity of low abundance peptides. We also performed a comparative analysis using a nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LCH system. Similar numbers of protein and peptide identifications were produced by the two methods. Protein identifications showed significant overlap between the two methods, whereas peptide identifications were complementary.

  8. Organizational Uses of Health Information Exchange to Change Cost and Utilization Outcomes: A Typology from a Multi-Site Qualitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R; Abramson, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Health information exchange (HIE) systems facilitate access to patient information for a variety of health care organizations, end users, and clinical and organizational goals. While a complex intervention, organizations' usage of HIE is often conceptualized and measured narrowly. We sought to provide greater specificity to the concept of HIE as an intervention by formulating a typology of organizational HIE usage. We interviewed representatives of a regional health information organization and health care organizations actively using HIE information to change patient utilization and costs. The resultant typology includes three dimensions: user role, usage initiation, and patient set. This approach to categorizing how health care organizations are actually applying HIE information to clinical and business tasks provides greater clarity about HIE as an intervention and helps elucidate the conceptual linkage between HIE an organizational and patient outcomes.

  9. Identification of PCR-amplified genetically modified organisms (GMOs) DNA by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes in anion-exchange chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Stefano; Lesignoli, Francesca; Germini, Andrea; Faccini, Andrea; Sforza, Stefano; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2007-04-04

    PCR products obtained by selective amplification of transgenic DNA derived from food samples containing Roundup Ready soybean or Bt-176 maize have been analyzed by anion-exchange HPLC. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), oligonucleotide analogues known to bind to complementary single-stranded DNA with high affinity and specificity, have been used as specific probes in order to assess the identity of the peaks observed. Two different protocols were adopted in order to obtain single-stranded DNA: amplification with an excess of one primer or digestion of one DNA strand. The single-stranded DNA was mixed with the PNA probe, and the presence of a specific sequence was revealed through detection of the corresponding PNA:DNA peak with significantly different retention time. Advantages and limits of this approach are discussed. The method was tested with reference materials and subsequently applied to commercial samples.

  10. Effects of changes in environmental conditions on atmospheric mercury exchange: Comparative analysis from a rice paddy field during the two spring periods of 2001 and 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Kim, Joon; Lee, Gangwoong

    2003-10-01

    The environmental mobilization characteristics of Hg were investigated in a rice paddy field in the Hari district of Kang Hwa Island, Korea during two field campaigns held in late March 2001 and late April 2002. In the course of these two field campaigns, we measured the concentration, concentration gradients (between two different heights of 1 and 5 m), and fluxes of Hg with the aid of micrometeorological approaches. The results of our experiments consistently indicate that the study area behaved as both source and sink of Hg, yielding a net emission rate of 183 (1st) to 28 ng m-2 h-1 (2nd campaign). It was however found that the soil-air exchange patterns of Hg during the two study periods, although investigated in similar seasonal cycles, contrast to a large extent. Upward emission prevailed in both the frequency and magnitude during the 1st study period, but dry deposition was seen more dominantly in terms of frequency during the 2nd study period. In light of the fact that the occurrence patterns of Asian Dust events differed greatly between the two study periods, the possible role of long-range transport of airborne pollutants (LRTAP) as sources of Hg into the study area has also been examined using information on air mass movement patterns. Because observed differences in Hg flux patterns generally reflect changes in environmental conditions across study periods, the bi-directional exchange patterns of Hg during the two field campaigns were explained in relation to highly diverse environmental conditions that persisted in each study period.

  11. Analysis of Ca2+ Signaling Motifs That Regulate Proton Signaling through the Na+/H+ Exchanger NHX-7 during a Rhythmic Behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Allman, Erik; Waters, Korrie; Ackroyd, Sarah; Nehrke, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proton transporters contribute to pH homeostasis but have also been shown to transmit information between cells in close proximity through regulated proton secretion. For example, the nematode intestinal Na+/H+ exchanger NHX-7 causes adjacent muscle cells to contract by transiently acidifying the extracellular space between the intestine and muscle. NHX-7 operates during a Ca2+-dependent rhythmic behavior and contains several conserved motifs for regulation by Ca2+ input, including motifs for calmodulin and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding, protein kinase C- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II phosphorylation, and a binding site for calcineurin homologous protein. Here, we tested the idea that Ca2+ input differentiates proton signaling from pH housekeeping activity. Each of these motifs was mutated, and their contribution to NHX-7 function was assessed. These functions included pH recovery from acidification in cells in culture expressing recombinant NHX-7, extracellular acidification measured during behavior in live moving worms, and muscle contraction strength as a result of this acidification. Our data suggest that multiple levels of Ca2+ input regulate NHX-7, whose transport capacity normally exceeds the minimum necessary to cause muscle contraction. Furthermore, extracellular acidification limits NHX-7 proton transport through feedback inhibition, likely to prevent metabolic acidosis from occurring. Our findings are consistent with an integrated network whereby both Ca2+ and pH contribute to proton signaling. Finally, our results obtained by expressing rat NHE1 in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that a conserved mechanism of regulation may contribute to cell-cell communication or proton signaling by Na+/H+ exchangers in mammals. PMID:23319594

  12. Structural and functional analysis of the transmembrane segment pair VI and VII of the NHE1 isoform of the Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Alves, Claudia; Lee, Brian L; Sykes, Brian D; Fliegel, Larry

    2014-06-10

    Isoform 1 of the mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE1) is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane pH regulatory protein. It removes one intracellular H(+) in exchange for one extracellular Na(+). The 500 N-terminal amino acids comprise the catalytic membrane domain and fold into 12 transmembrane (TM) segments. To gain insight into the structure and function of human NHE1, a region spanning transmembrane domains VI and VII was expressed and purified, and the structure was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Segment VI includes two structurally conserved regions corresponding to two short α-helices involving residues 229-236 and 239-247. Segment VII includes one long helical region spanning residues 255-274. The NMR structure of the peptide containing transmembrane domains VI and VII was very similar to the previously published structures of the single-transmembrane segments except that TM VII was not kinked. Tryptophan scanning site-directed mutagenesis of TM VI demonstrated that mutation of residues V240-V245 to tryptophan eliminated NHE1 activity when the full length protein was expressed in cells. In contrast, mutants F246W and E247W were functional. Double mutant V242F/F260V retained activity, while the individual mutations were not active. The results suggest that the region of TM VI from V240 to V245 is closely associated with TM VII and that, in agreement with the NMR structure of VI-VII segments, V242 and F260 are in close association. A study of two transmembrane peptides provides further insight into the structure of the NHE1 protein.

  13. Structural and functional analysis of critical amino acids in TMVI of the NHE1 isoform of the Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Jennifer; Lee, Brian L; Sykes, Brian D; Fliegel, Larry

    2011-09-01

    The mammalian Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) resides on the plasma membrane and exchanges one intracellular H(+) for one extracellular Na(+). It maintains intracellular pH and regulates cell volume, and cell functions including growth and cell differentiation. Previous structural and functional studies on TMVI revealed several amino acids that are potentially pore lining. We examined these and other critical residues by site-directed mutagenesis substituting Asn227→Ala, Asp, Arg; Ile233→Ala; Leu243→Ala; Glu247→Asp, Gln; Glu248→Asp, Gln. Mutant NHE1 proteins were characterized in AP-1 cells, which do not express endogenous NHE1. All the TMVI critical amino acids were highly sensitive to substitution and changes often lead to a dysfunctional protein. Mutations of Asn227→Ala, Asp, Arg; Ile233→Ala; Leu243→Ala; Glu247→Asp; Glu248→Gln yielded significant reduction in NHE1 activity. Mutants of Asn227 demonstrated defects in protein expression, targeting and activity. Substituting Asn227→Arg and Ile233→Ala decreased the surface localization and expression of NHE1 respectively. The pore lining amino acids Ile233 and Leu243 were both essential for activity. Glu247 was not essential, but the size of the residue at this location was important while the charge on residue Glu248 was more critical to NHE1 function. Limited trypsin digestion on Leu243→Ala and Glu248→Gln revealed that they had increased susceptibility to proteolytic attack, indicating an alteration in protein conformation. Modeling of TMVI with TMXI suggests that these TM segments form part of the critical fold of NHE1 with Ile233 and Leu465 of TMXI forming a critical part of the extracellular facing ion conductance pathway.

  14. Analysis of BNP7787 thiol-disulfide exchange reactions in phosphate buffer and human plasma using microscale electrochemical high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shanmugarajah, Dakshine; Ding, Daoyuan; Huang, Quili; Chen, Xinghai; Kochat, Harry; Petluru, Pavankumar N; Ayala, Philippe Y; Parker, Aulma R; Hausheer, Frederick H

    2009-04-01

    BNP7787 (disodium 2,2'-dithio-bis ethane sulfonate; Tavocept) is a novel water-soluble investigational agent that is undergoing clinical development for prevention and mitigation of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. BNP7787 is a disulfide that undergoes thiol-disulfide exchange reactions in vivo with physiological thiols. Mesna-disulfide heteroconjugates that form as a result of these exchange reactions may play a key role in the protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Although several analytical methods have been used to detect thiols and disulfides, they have notable limitations including (i) low sensitivity, (ii) interference by chemical modification by derivatization reagents, and (iii) cumbersome sample preparation. In this paper, a sensitive micro-HPLC-EC method is described that identifies BNP7787 and mesna in plasma and phosphate buffer across a broad concentration range from 500nM to 100microM. This method utilizes a dual electrochemical detector equipped with a wall-jet gold electrode. The approach described here facilitates the identification of BNP7787 and mesna down to nanomolar levels. Although we did not focus on optimizing the approach for other thiol and disulfide compounds, we believe this approach could be optimized and used in the identification of other thiols and disulfides in plasma. The assay requires significantly less sample preparation and does not involve the use of derivatizing agents (i.e., the thiol and disulfide species can be detected directly) and represents an important advance over previous methods. This method was used to detect and quantitate BNP7787 and to monitor and kinetically characterize the interactions of BNP7787 with glutathione, cysteine, cysteinyl-glycine, cysteinyl-glutamate and homocysteine.

  15. Experimental data and analysis to support the design of an ion-exchange process for the treatment of Hanford tank waste supernatant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, D.E.; Bray, L.A.; Brooks, K.P.; Brown, G.N.; Bryan, S.A.; Carlson, C.D.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.; Kim, A.Y.

    1994-12-01

    Hanford`s 177 underground storage tanks contain a mixture of sludge, salt cake, and alkaline supernatant liquids. Disposal options for these wastes are high-level waste (HLW) glass for disposal in a repository or low-level waste (LLW) glass for onsite disposal. Systems-engineering studies show that economic and environmental considerations preclude disposal of these wastes without further treatment. Difficulties inherent in transportation and disposal of relatively large volumes of HLW make it impossible to vitrify all of the tank waste as HLW. Potential environmental impacts make direct disposal of all of the tank waste as LLW glass unacceptable. Although the pretreatment and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include retrieval of the aqueous liquids, dissolution of the salt cakes, and washing of the sludges to remove soluble components. Most of the cesium is expected to be in the aqueous liquids, which are the focus of this report on cesium removal by ion exchange. The main objectives of the ion-exchange process are removing cesium from the bulk of the tank waste (i.e., decontamination) and concentrating the separated cesium for vitrification. Because exact requirements for removal of {sup 137}Cs have not yet been defined, a range of removal requirements will be considered. This study addresses requirements to achieve {sup 137}Cs levels in LLW glass between (1) the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Class C (10 CFR 61) limit of 4600 Ci/m{sup 3} and (2) 1/10th of the NRC Class A limit of 1 Ci/m{sup 3} i.e., 0.1/m{sup 3}. The required degrees of separation of cesium from other waste components is a complex function involving interactions between the design of the vitrification process, waste form considerations, and other HLW stream components that are to be vitrified.

  16. Extratropical Stratosphere-Troposphere Mass Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the exchange of gases between the stratosphere and the troposphere is important for determining how pollutants enter the stratosphere and how they leave. This study does a global analysis of that the exchange of mass between the stratosphere and the troposphere. While the exchange of mass is not the same as the exchange of constituents, you can t get the constituent exchange right if you have the mass exchange wrong. Thus this kind of calculation is an important test for models which also compute trace gas transport. In this study I computed the mass exchange for two assimilated data sets and a GCM. The models all agree that amount of mass descending from the stratosphere to the troposphere in the Northern Hemisphere extra tropics is approx. 10(exp 10) kg/s averaged over a year. The value for the Southern Hemisphere by about a factor of two. ( 10(exp 10) kg of air is the amount of air in 100 km x 100 km area with a depth of 100 m - roughly the size of the D.C. metro area to a depth of 300 feet.) Most people have the idea that most of the mass enters the stratosphere through the tropics. But this study shows that almost 5 times more mass enters the stratosphere through the extra-tropics. This mass, however, is quickly recycled out again. Thus the lower most stratosphere is a mixture of upper stratospheric air and tropospheric air. This is an important result for understanding the chemistry of the lower stratosphere.

  17. Exchange rate rebounds after foreign exchange market interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshikawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the rebounds in the exchange rate after foreign exchange intervention. When intervention is strongly effective, the exchange rate rebounds at next day. The effect of intervention is reduced slightly by the rebound after the intervention. The exchange rate might have been 67.12-77.47 yen to a US dollar without yen-selling/dollar-purchasing intervention of 74,691,100 million yen implemented by the Japanese government since 1991, in comparison to the actual exchange rate was 103.19 yen to the US dollar at the end of March 2014.

  18. Heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2003-08-12

    A heat exchange apparatus comprising a coolant conduit or heat sink having attached to its surface a first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles and a second radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles thermally coupled to a body to be cooled and meshed with, but not contacting the first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles.

  19. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  20. The Area Between Exchange Curves as a Measure of Conformational Differences in Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Sharlyn J.; Weber, Daniel P.

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) provides information about protein conformational mobility under native conditions. The area between exchange curves, A bec , a functional data analysis concept, was adapted to the interpretation of HDX-MS data and provides a useful measure of exchange curve dissimilarity for tests of significance. Importantly, for most globular proteins under native conditions, A bec values provide an estimate of the log ratio of exchange-competent fractions in the two states, and thus are related to differences in the free energy of microdomain unfolding.

  1. Minimizing back exchange in the hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry experiment.

    PubMed

    Walters, Benjamin T; Ricciuti, Alec; Mayne, Leland; Englander, S Walter

    2012-12-01

    The addition of mass spectrometry (MS) analysis to the hydrogen exchange (HX) proteolytic fragmentation experiment extends powerful HX methodology to the study of large biologically important proteins. A persistent problem is the degradation of HX information due to back exchange of deuterium label during the fragmentation-separation process needed to prepare samples for MS measurement. This paper reports a systematic analysis of the factors that influence back exchange (solution pH, ionic strength, desolvation temperature, LC column interaction, flow rates, system volume). The many peptides exhibit a range of back exchange due to intrinsic amino acid HX rate differences. Accordingly, large back exchange leads to large variability in D-recovery from one residue to another as well as one peptide to another that cannot be corrected for by reference to any single peptide-level measurement. The usual effort to limit back exchange by limiting LC time provides little gain. Shortening the LC elution gradient by 3-fold only reduced back exchange by ~2%, while sacrificing S/N and peptide count. An unexpected dependence of back exchange on ionic strength as well as pH suggests a strategy in which solution conditions are changed during sample preparation. Higher salt should be used in the first stage of sample preparation (proteolysis and trapping) and lower salt (<20 mM) and pH in the second stage before electrospray injection. Adjustment of these and other factors together with recent advances in peptide fragment detection yields hundreds of peptide fragments with D-label recovery of 90% ± 5%.

  2. Scraped surface heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chetan S; Hartel, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Scraped surface heat exchangers (SSHEs) are commonly used in the food, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries for heat transfer, crystallization, and other continuous processes. They are ideally suited for products that are viscous, sticky, that contain particulate matter, or that need some degree of crystallization. Since these characteristics describe a vast majority of processed foods, SSHEs are especially suited for pumpable food products. During operation, the product is brought in contact with a heat transfer surface that is rapidly and continuously scraped, thereby exposing the surface to the passage of untreated product. In addition to maintaining high and uniform heat exchange, the scraper blades also provide simultaneous mixing and agitation. Heat exchange for sticky and viscous foods such as heavy salad dressings, margarine, chocolate, peanut butter, fondant, ice cream, and shortenings is possible only by using SSHEs. High heat transfer coefficients are achieved because the boundary layer is continuously replaced by fresh material. Moreover, the product is in contact with the heating surface for only a few seconds and high temperature gradients can be used without the danger of causing undesirable reactions. SSHEs are versatile in the use of heat transfer medium and the various unit operations that can be carried out simultaneously. This article critically reviews the current understanding of the operations and applications of SSHEs.

  3. Optimizing exchanger design early

    SciTech Connect

    Lacunza, M.; Vaschetti, G.; Campana, H.

    1987-08-01

    It is not practical for process engineers and designers to make a rigorous economic evaluation for each component of a process due to the loss of time and money. But, it's very helpful and useful to have a method for a quick design evaluation of heat exchangers, considering their important contribution to the total fixed investment in a process plant. This article is devoted to this subject, and the authors present a method that has been proved in some design cases. Linking rigorous design procedures with a quick cost-estimation method provides a good technique for obtaining the right heat exchanger. The cost will be appropriate, sometimes not the lowest because of design restrictions, but a good approach to the optimum in an earlier process design stage. The authors intend to show the influence of the design variables in a shell and tube heat exchanger on capital investment, or conversely, taking into account the general limiting factors of the process such as thermodynamics, operability, corrosion, etc., and/or from the mechanical design of the calculated unit. The last is a special consideration for countries with no access to industrial technology or with difficulties in obtaining certain construction materials or equipment.

  4. Exchange-driven growth.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2003-09-01

    We study a class of growth processes in which clusters evolve via exchange of particles. We show that depending on the rate of exchange there are three possibilities: (I) Growth-clusters grow indefinitely, (II) gelation-all mass is transformed into an infinite gel in a finite time, and (III) instant gelation. In regimes I and II, the cluster size distribution attains a self-similar form. The large size tail of the scaling distribution is Phi(x) approximately exp(-x(2-nu)), where nu is a homogeneity degree of the rate of exchange. At the borderline case nu=2, the distribution exhibits a generic algebraic tail, Phi(x) approximately x(-5). In regime III, the gel nucleates immediately and consumes the entire system. For finite systems, the gelation time vanishes logarithmically, T approximately [lnN](-(nu-2)), in the large system size limit N--> infinity. The theory is applied to coarsening in the infinite range Ising-Kawasaki model and in electrostatically driven granular layers.

  5. Impact of watershed topography on hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Alice; Ridolfi, Luca; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-08-01

    Among the interactions between surface water bodies and aquifers, hyporheic exchange has been recognized as a key process for nutrient cycling and contaminant transport. Even though hyporheic exchange is strongly controlled by groundwater discharge, our understanding of the impact of the regional groundwater flow on hyporheic fluxes is still limited because of the complexity arising from the multi-scale nature of these interactions. In this work, we investigate the role of watershed topography on river-aquifer interactions by way of a semi-analytical model, in which the landscape topography is used to approximate the groundwater head distribution. The analysis of a case study shows how the complex topographic structure is the direct cause of a substantial spatial variability of the aquifer-river exchange. Groundwater upwelling along the river corridor is estimated and its influence on the hyporheic zone is discussed. In particular, the fragmentation of the hyporeic corridor induced by groundwater discharge at the basin scale is highlighted.

  6. Brayton-cycle heat exchanger technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killackey, J. J.; Coombs, M. G.; Graves, R. F.; Morse, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The following five tasks designed to advance this development of heat exchanger systems for close loop Brayton cycle power systems are presented: (1) heat transfer and pressure drop data for a finned tubular heat transfer matrix. The tubes are arranged in a triangular array with copper stainless steel laminate strips helically wound on the tubes to form a disk fin geometry; (2) the development of a modularized waste heat exchanger. Means to provide verified double containment are described; (3) the design, fabrication, and test of compact plate fin heat exchangers representative of full scale Brayton cycle recuperators; (4) the analysis and design of bellows suitable for operation at 1600 F and 200 psia for 1,000 cycles and 50,000 hours creep life; and (5) screening tests used to select a low cost braze alloy with the desirable attributes of a gold base alloy. A total of 22 different alloys were investigated; the final selection was Nicrobraz 30.

  7. Calorimetry exchange program. Annual report, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1988-12-31

    The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Program are: 1. Discuss measurement differences, 2. Review and improve analytical measurements and methods, 3. Discuss new measurement capabilities, 4. Provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper- receiver differences, 5. Provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants, 6. Provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. Statistical tests are used to evaluate the data and to determine if there are significant differences from accepted values for the exchange or from data previously reported by that facility. Data included in this report is a compilation of all exchange data received in 1988. Since a large number of data points were recorded, a change was made to the analysis method to account for the uncertainty in the accepted values.

  8. On the occurrence of plateaus in the dependence of critical temperatures on oxygen content in HTSC cuprates Quantitative analysis for Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+ x on the basis of indirect-exchange pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, L.; Block, R.

    1997-02-01

    Plateaus observed, with several cuprates, in the dependence of critical temperatures on oxygen content are analyzed on the basis of indirect-exchange Cooper-pair formation via oxygen anions (oxygen-mediated superconductivity), with emphasis on recent experimental results by Li et al. (1994) for Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+ x. It is shown that these results can be quantitatively explained in the framework of the indirect-exchange formalism. The plateau structure is found to arise as a compensating effect on Tc from hole doping and a change in density of oxygen anions in (or near) the CuO 2 layers. The observed steep decrease of TC in underdoped samples is ascribed to a rapid loss of macroscopic phase coherence with decreasing oxygen content. Extrapolating the analysis to the double-plateau (“chair”) structure of TC( x) in YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x, the origin of the first (60 K) plateau is similar to that in the Bi-compound, whereas the increase to TC ≈ 90 K is due to participation by the basal (chain) plane in superconductivity.

  9. Statistical properties of the yuan exchange rate index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Wen; Suo, Yuan-Yuan

    2012-06-01

    We choice the yuan exchange rate index based on a basket of currencies as the effective exchange rate of the yuan and investigate the statistical properties of the yuan exchange rate index after China's exchange rate system reform on the 21st July 2005. After dividing the time series into two parts according to the change in the yuan exchange rate regime in July 2008, we compare the statistical properties of the yuan exchange rate index during these two periods. We find that the distribution of the two return series has the exponential form. We also perform the detrending moving average analysis (DMA) and the multifractal detrending moving average analysis (MFDMA). The two periods possess different degrees of long-range correlations, and the multifractal nature is also unveiled in these two time series. Significant difference is found in the scaling exponents τ(q) and singularity spectra f(α) of the two periods obtained from the MFDMA analysis. Besides, in order to detect the sources of multifractality, shuffling and phase randomization procedures are applied to destroy the long-range temporal correlation and fat-tailed distribution of the yuan exchange rate index respectively. We find that the fat-tailedness plays a critical role in the sources of multifractality in the first period, while the long memory is the major cause in the second period. The results suggest that the change in China's exchange rate regime in July 2008 gives rise to the different multifractal properties of the yuan exchange rate index in these two periods, and thus has an effect on the effective exchange rate of the yuan after the exchange rate reform on the 21st July 2005.

  10. Lightweight Long Life Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    A shuttle orbiter flight configuration aluminum heat exchanger was designed, fabricated, and tested. The heat exchanger utilized aluminum clad titanium composite parting sheets for protection against parting sheet pin hole corrosion. The heat exchanger, which is fully interchangeable with the shuttle condensing heat exchanger, includes slurpers (a means for removing condensed water from the downstream face of the heat exchanger), and both the core air passes and slurpers were hydrophilic coated to enhance wettability. The test program included performance tests which demonstrated the adequacy of the design and confirmed the predicted weight savings.

  11. Oxidizer heat exchanger component testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, T.; Kanic, P.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the RL10 Rocket Engine Product Improvement Program, Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (OHE) stages 1, 2, and 3 were designed and fabricated during late 1983 and early 1984. The purpose of the OHE is to provide gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector for stable engine operation at tank head idle and pumped idle operating modes. This report summarizes the OHE stages 1 and 3 rig testing, and includes the separation of the stage 1-and-2 assembly and the remanifolding of stage 1. The OHE performance analysis and analytical model modifications for both stages are also presented. The flow tests were accomplished during the time period from 9 October 1984 to 12 November 1984.

  12. Indian/atlantic Interocean Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matano, R. P.; Beier, E. J.

    In this presentation we analyze the interocean exchanges between the Indian and the South Atlantic Oceans simulated in an global, eddy-permitting simulation. The analy- sis focuses in the Cape Basin, a region of the southeastern Atlantic limited to the north- west by the Walvis Ridge and to the south by the subtropical convergence. To quantify the relative importance of the different dynamical mechanisms involved in the intero- cean exchange we separated the climatological mean circulation from the transients. The analysis indicates that Agulhas eddies not only influence the transient fluxes but also to those associated with the mean circulation (eddy fluxes, for example, supply most of the energy of the Benguela Current). A distinct characteristic of the eddy variability within the Cape Basin is the co-existence of cyclonic and anticyclonic vor- tices in dipole structures that resemble the heton model of Hogg and Stommel (Deep Sea Research,1985). Anticyclones are surface intensified vortices that, in spite of their baroclinic structure, reach to deep layers. Cyclones, are bottom-intensified vortices with dominant barotropic structure that projects into the upper layer. The propaga- tion of cyclones and anticyclones is strongly affected by the bottom topography. Our analysis shows that the Walvis Ridge and the Vema Seamount block the passage of bottom-intensified cyclones and rectifies the trajectories of the upper-intensified anti- cyclones. Although most anticyclones are able to escape the basin the deep compen- sation generated by the ridge generates an energy loss of approximately 30%, and a rectification of the eddy trajectory to a more westward direction.

  13. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  14. Are channels standalone? Analysis of channel to land interactions using a physically-based surface-subsurface processes model with multi-way exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Smithgall, K. M.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale land surface models commonly assumed that land-channel exchanges are unidirectional, in which the channel network receives runoff, baseflow, sediments, and other materials from land and conveys them to the outlet. The physiographic and geomorphological characteristics of channels, as well as flow conditions, exert no influence on simulated upland dynamics. In this work we study the feedbacks to upland hydrologic and ecosystem states and fluxes provided by channels. We employ a physically-based surface-subsurface processes model (PAWS+CLM) that fully resolves the multi-way interactions between channel flow, overland flow, groundwater, soil water and wetlands. We found notable influences of channels on land surface fluxes, which are explained by the baseflow mechanism and the efficient conveyance mechanism. We systematically quantify the extent of the impact and link channel characteristics to these impacts. Our results indicate that to further improve our understanding of the land-water system, the influence of channels need to be included in integrated models.

  15. Analysis of amphetamine and methamphetamine in municipal wastewater influent and effluent using weak cation-exchange SPE and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Boles, Tammy H; Wells, Martha J M

    2016-12-01

    Amphetamine and methamphetamine are emerging contaminants-those for which no regulations currently require monitoring or public reporting of their presence in our water supply. In this research, a protocol for weak cation-exchange (WCX) SPE coupled with LC-MS/MS was developed for determination of emerging contaminants amphetamine and methamphetamine in a complex wastewater matrix. Gradient LC parameters were adjusted to yield baseline separation of methamphetamine from other contaminants. Methamphetamine-D5 was used as the internal standard (IS) to compensate for sample loss during SPE and for signal loss during MS (matrix effects). Recoveries were 102.1 ± 7.9% and 99.4 ± 4.0% for amphetamine and methamphetamine, respectively, using WCX sorbent. Notably, methamphetamine was determined to be present in wastewater influent at each sampling date tested. Amphetamine was present in wastewater influent on two of four sampling dates. Amphetamine concentrations ranged from undetectable to 86.4 ng/L in influent, but it was undetectable in wastewater effluent. Methamphetamine was detected in influent at concentrations ranging from 27.0-60.3 ng/L. Methamphetamine concentration was reduced but incompletely removed at this facility. Although absent in one post-UV effluent sample, concentrations of methamphetamine ranged from 10.8-14.8 ng/L.

  16. Structural analysis of the Sil1-Bip complex reveals the mechanism for Sil1 to function as a nucleotide-exchange factor

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Ming; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2013-01-16

    Sil1 functions as a NEF (nucleotide-exchange factor) for the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) Hsp70 (heat-shock protein of 70 kDa) Bip in eukaryotic cells. Sil1 may catalyse the ADP release from Bip by interacting directly with the ATPase domain of Bip. In the present study we show the complex crystal structure of the yeast Bip and the NEF Sil1 at the resolution of 2.3 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm). In the Sil1-Bip complex structure, the Sil1 molecule acts as a 'clamp' which binds lobe IIb of the Bip ATPase domain. The binding of Sil1 causes the rotation of lobe IIb {approx} 13.5{sup o} away from the ADP-binding pocket. The complex formation also induces lobe Ib to swing in the opposite direction by {approx} 3.7{sup o}. These conformational changes open up the nucleotide-binding pocket in the Bip ATPase domain and disrupt the hydrogen bonds between Bip and bound ADP, which may catalyse ADP release. Mutation of the Sil1 residues involved in binding the Bip ATPase domain compromise the binding affinity of Sil1 to Bip, and these Sil1 mutants also abolish the ability to stimulate the ATPase activity of Bip.

  17. Structural and chemical analysis by transmission electron microscopy of Pt-Ru membrane precipitates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell aged under reformate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Philémon A.; Guétaz, Laure; Pélissier, Nathalie; Jacques, Pierre-André; Escribano, Sylvie

    2015-02-01

    Carbon supported platinum-ruthenium (Pt-Ru/C) nanoparticles are used as anode catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) operated under reformate owing to their good carbon monoxide tolerance. The stability of these catalysts during fuel cell operation is still not well known. In this work, we have studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the microstructural evolution of a membrane/electrode assembly after a 1000 h ageing test under reformate (26 ppm CO). The analyses clearly show dissolution of Ru from the Pt-Ru/C anode catalysts, its diffusion and precipitation within the anode micro-porous layer and within the membrane. The structure and the chemistry of the membrane precipitates were accurately analysed. The high resolution TEM images and EDS (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy) Pt, Ru elemental maps show that the largest precipitates display a singular flower shape consisting of a Pt-rich face-centred cubic (fcc) crystallographic structure core and Ru-rich hexagonal close-packed (hcp) crystallographic structure shell. These results suggest that within the membrane the Ru reduction is catalysed by Pt. Moreover, the localization of the precipitation band near the cathode seems to indicate that the Pt in the precipitates comes from the dissolution of cathodic Pt/C and that both Pt and Ru ions are reduced by the hydrogen crossover.

  18. Analysis of crude heparin by (1)H NMR, capillary electrophoresis, and strong-anion-exchange-HPLC for contamination by over sulfated chondroitin sulfate.

    PubMed

    Keire, David A; Trehy, Michael L; Reepmeyer, John C; Kolinski, Richard E; Ye, Wei; Dunn, Jamie; Westenberger, Benjamin J; Buhse, Lucinda F

    2010-03-11

    We previously published a strong-anion-exchange-high performance liquid chromatography (SAX-HPLC) method for the detection of the contaminant over sulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) in heparin sodium active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). While APIs have been processed to remove impurities, crude heparins contain insoluble material, chondroitin sulfates, heparan sulfate, and proteins that may interfere with the recovery and measurement of OSCS. We examined 500MHz (1)H NMR, capillary electrophoresis (CE), and SAX-HPLC to quantify OSCS in crude heparin. Using our standard API protocol on OSCS spiked crude heparin samples; we observed a weight percent LOD and LOQ for the NMR approach of 0.1% and 0.3%, respectively, while the SAX-HPLC method gave values of 0.03% and 0.09%, respectively. CE data was not amenable to quantitative measurement of OSCS in crude heparin. We developed a modified HPLC sample preparation protocol using crude dissolved at the 100mg/mL level with a 2.5M NaCl solution. This SAX-HPLC approach gave a weight percent LOD of 0.02% and a LOQ of 0.07% and had better performance characteristics than that of the protocol used for APIs.

  19. The Dynamics of Multilateral Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausken, Kjell; Moxnes, John F.

    The article formulates a dynamic mathematical model where arbitrarily many players produce, consume, exchange, loan, and deposit arbitrarily many goods over time to maximize utility. Consuming goods constitutes a benefit, and producing, exporting, and loaning away goods constitute a cost. Utilities are benefits minus costs, which depend on the exchange ratios and bargaining functions. Three-way exchange occurs when one player acquires, through exchange, one good from another player with the sole purpose of using this good to exchange against the desired good from a third player. Such a triple handshake is not merely a set of double handshakes since the player assigns no interest to the first good in his benefit function. Cognitive and organization costs increase dramatically for higher order exchanges. An exchange theory accounting for media of exchange follows from simple generalization of two-way exchange. The examples of r-way exchange are the triangle trade between Africa, the USA, and England in the 17th and 18th centuries, the hypothetical hypercycle involving RNAs as players and enzymes as goods, and reaction-diffusion processes. The emergence of exchange, and the role of trading agents are discussed. We simulate an example where two-way exchange gives zero production and zero utility, while three-way exchange causes considerable production and positive utility. Maximum utility for each player is reached when exchanges of the same order as the number of players in society are allowed. The article merges micro theory and macro theory within the social, natural, and physical sciences.

  20. Non-hydrosatatic Effects in Exchange Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanarska, Y.

    2003-12-01

    An important class of stratified flows is exchange flows in which fluids of different densities move in opposite directions through a channel. These flows are studied mainly in the frame of an internal hydraulic theory. However geophysical flows are more complicated than a two-layer hydraulic solution. In this paper the hydrodynamics of exchange flows is investigated with focusing on the role of non-hydrostatic effects, friction, mixing and an impact of an unsteady barotropic tide forcing on hydrodynamics of water exchange in the straits. Special attention is given to design of physically relevant time-dependence boundary conditions at the open boundaries. The numerical tool for investigations is a three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic, numerical model of free surface stratified flows (Kanarska Y., Maderich V, 2003). The model is a non-hydrostatic extension of the free-surface primitive equation POM model. A mode splitting technique, decomposition of pressure and velocity fields into hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic components and sequential calculation of these components are the base of numerical algorithm of the model. At first the model is used to investigate different regimes of exchange flows ranging from dispersive gravity waves in the seiche flows to shear instability in the lock-exchange flows including transition regimes where both mechanisms occur. The investigation of the energetics and the resulting diapycnal mixing is carried on the base of the analysis of available potential energy. Then the model is applied for an investigation of the exchange flows in a long and narrow strait with a sill or contraction for the configuration of experiments of Maderich (2000) and to the simulation of the water circulation in the Dadanelles strait. Calculations and analysis based on a three-layer decomposition with an intermediate layer of variable density showed the importance of entrainment and friction in the long straits. As a result the composite Froude number is

  1. Analysis of biomass sugars and galacturonic acid by gradient anion exchange chromatography and pulsed amperometric detection without post-column addition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the most accurate method for analysis of sugars in biomass is based on gas chromatography of trimethylsilane or alditol acetate derivatives of sugars, the derivation method is time consuming and laborious. In comparison, sample preparation for sugar analysis of hydrolyzed biomass samples using...

  2. New Automated and High-Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Urinary Ketones by Multifiber Exchange-Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled to Fast Gas Chromatography/Negative Chemical-Electron Ionization/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pacenti, Marco; Dugheri, Stefano; Traldi, Pietro; Degli Esposti, Filippo; Perchiazzi, Nicola; Franchi, Elena; Calamante, Massimo; Kikic, Ireneo; Alessi, Paolo; Bonacchi, Alice; Salvadori, Edoardo; Arcangeli, Giulio; Cupelli, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The present research is focused on automation, miniaturization, and system interaction with high throughput for multiple and specific Direct Immersion-Solid Phase Microextraction/Fast Gas Chromatography analysis of the urinary ketones. The specific Mass Spectrometry instrumentation, capable of supporting such the automated changeover from Negative Chemical to Electron Ionization mode, as well as the automation of the preparation procedure by new device called MultiFiber Exchange, through change of the fibers, allowed a friendly use of mass spectrometry apparatus with a number of advantages including reduced analyst time and greater reproducibility (2.01–5.32%). The detection limits for the seven ketones were less than 0.004 mg/L. For an innovative powerful meaning in high-throughput routine, the generality of the structurally informative Mass Spectrometry fragmentation patterns together with the chromatographic separation and software automation are also investigated. PMID:20628512

  3. In utero analysis of sister chromatid exchange: alterations in suscptibility to mutagenic damage as a function of fetal cell type and gestational age.

    PubMed Central

    Kram, D; Bynum, G D; Senula, G C; Bickings, C K; Schneider, E L

    1980-01-01

    Frequencies of baseline and cyclophosphamide-induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were measured in mouse maternal and fetal cells between days 11 and 19 of gestation. Baseline levels of SCE did not vary as a function of gestational age in either the mother or fetus. Cyclophosphamide-induced SCE frequencies remained constant in maternal cells but declined dramatically in the fetus throughout the latter half of development. Because cyclophosphamide is a metabolically activated mutagen, a direct-acting drug, mitomycin C, was given on days 11 and 15 to determine if the decline in induced SCE levels seen with gestational results from alterations in activating enzymes. A similar decline in mitomycin C-induced SCE levels was noted in fetal tissues as a function of gestational age. Dose-response curves to cyclophosphamide performed on day 13 of gestation showed increases in SCE as a function of cyclophosphamide concentration in both the mother and the fetus. When mutagen-induced SCE levels were compared in different fetal organs, the direct-acting drugs (mitomycin C and daunomycin) were found to induce similar levels in all tissues. Cyclophosphamide, which is metabolically activated, induced higher SCE levels in fetal liver than in lung or gut. Whereas cyclophosphamide induced similar SCE levels in fetal and maternal cells on day 13 of gestation, daunomycin produced fetal SCE levels that were approximately 50% of maternal levels. Simultaneous measurement of the distribution of [14C]cyclophosphamide and [3H]daunomycin in maternal and fetal cells revealed that the lower SCE induction by daunomycin was probably due to decreased ability to cross the placental barrier. PMID:6933526

  4. Gas Exchange of Algae

    PubMed Central

    Ammann, Elizabeth C. B.; Lynch, Victoria H.

    1967-01-01

    The oxygen production of a photosynthetic gas exchanger containing Chlorella pyrenoidosa (1% packed cell volume) was measured when various concentrations of carbon dioxide were present within the culture unit. The internal carbon dioxide concentrations were obtained by manipulating the entrance gas concentration and the flow rate. Carbon dioxide percentages were monitored by means of electrodes placed directly in the nutrient medium. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the nutrient medium which produced maximal photosynthesis was in the range of 1.5 to 2.5% by volume. Results were unaffected by either the level of carbon dioxide in the entrance gas or the rate of gas flow. Entrance gases containing 2% carbon dioxide flowing at 320 ml/min, 3% carbon dioxide at 135 ml/min, and 4% carbon dioxide at 55 ml/min yielded optimal carbon dioxide concentrations in the particular unit studied. By using carbon dioxide electrodes implanted directly in the gas exchanger to optimize the carbon dioxide concentration throughout the culture medium, it should be possible to design more efficient large-scale units. PMID:4382391

  5. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  6. Statistical analysis of lake levels and field study of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015: Chapter A of Water levels and groundwater and surface-water exchanges in lakes of the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota, 2002 through 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Diekoff, Aliesha L.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; White, Eric A.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Morel, Daniel L.; Heck, Jessica M.

    2016-10-19

    Water levels declined from 2003 to 2011 in many lakes in Ramsey and Washington Counties in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, Minnesota; however, water levels in other northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes increased during the same period. Groundwater and surface-water exchanges can be important in determining lake levels where these exchanges are an important component of the water budget of a lake. An understanding of groundwater and surface-water exchanges in the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area has been limited by the lack of hydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Metropolitan Council and Minnesota Department of Health, completed a field and statistical study assessing lake-water levels and regional and local groundwater and surface-water exchanges near northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. This report documents the analysis of collected hydrologic, water-quality, and geophysical data; and existing hydrologic and geologic data to (1) assess the effect of physical setting and climate on lake-level fluctuations of selected lakes, (2) estimate potential percentages of surface-water contributions to well water across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area, (3) estimate general ages for waters extracted from the wells, and (4) assess groundwater inflow to lakes and lake-water outflow to aquifers downgradient from White Bear Lake. Statistical analyses of lake levels during short-term (2002–10) and long-term (1925–2014) periods were completed to help understand lake-level changes across the northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area. Comparison of 2002–10 lake levels to several landscape and geologic characteristics explained variability in lake-level changes for 96 northeast Twin Cities Metropolitan Area lakes. Application of several statistical methods determined that (1) closed-basin lakes (without an active outlet) had larger lake-level declines than flow-through lakes with an outlet; (2

  7. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-01-01

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW's. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  8. Ion exchange technology assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Duhn, E.F.

    1992-12-31

    In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

  9. Direct lead isotope analysis in Hg-rich sulfides by LA-MC-ICP-MS with a gas exchange device and matrix-matched calibration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Hu, Zhaochu; Günther, Detlef; Liu, Yongsheng; Ling, Wenli; Zong, Keqing; Chen, Haihong; Gao, Shan

    2016-12-15

    In situ Pb isotope data of sulfide samples measured by LA-MC-ICP-MS provide valuable geochemical information for studies of the origin and evolution of ore deposits. However, the severe isobaric interference of (204)Hg on (204)Pb and the lack of matrix-matched sulfide reference materials limit the precision of Pb isotopic analyses for Hg-rich sulfides. In this study, we observe that Hg forms vapor and can be completely removed from sample aerosol particles produced by laser ablation using a gas exchange device. Additionally, this device does not influence the signal intensities of Pb isotopes. The within-run precision, the external reproducibility and the analytical accuracy are significantly improved for the Hg-rich sulfide samples using this mercury-vapor-removing device. Matrix effects are observed when using silicate glass reference materials as the external standards to assess the relationship of mass fractionation factors between Tl and Pb in sulfide samples, resulting in a maximum deviation of ∼0.20% for (20x)Pb/(204)Pb. Matrix-matched reference materials are therefore required for the highly precise and accurate Pb isotope analyses of sulfide samples. We investigated two sulfide samples, MASS-1 (the Unites States Geological Survey reference materials) and Sph-HYLM (a natural sphalerite), as potential candidates. Repeated analyses of the two proposed sulfide reference materials by LA-MC-ICP-MS yield good external reproducibility of <0.04% (RSD, k = 2) for (20x)Pb/(206)Pb and <0.06% (RSD, k = 2) for (20x)Pb/(204)Pb with the exception of (20x)Pb/(204)Pb in MASS-1, which provided an external reproducibility of 0.24% (RSD, k = 2). Because the concentration of Pb in MASS-1 (76 μg g(-1)) is ∼5.2 times lower than that in Sph-HYLM (394 ± 264 μg g(-1)). The in situ analytical results of MASS-1 and Sph-HYLM are consistent with the values obtained by solution MC-ICP-MS, demonstrating the reliability and robustness of our analytical protocol.

  10. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  11. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  12. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  13. Quantitative ion-exchange separation of plutonium from impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Pietri, C.E.; Freeman, B.P.; Weiss, J.R.

    1981-09-01

    The methods used at the New Brunswick Laboratory for the quantitative ion exchange separation of plutonium from impurities prior to plutonium assay are described. Other ion exchange separation procedures for impurity determination and for isotopic abundance measurements are given. The primary technique used consists of sorption of plutonium(IV) in 8N HNO/sub 3/ on Dowex-1 anion exchange resin and elution of the purified plutonium with 0.3N HCl-0.01N HF. Other methods consist of the anion exchange separation of plutonium(IV) in 12N HCl and the cation exchange separation of plutonium(III) in 0.2 N HNO/sub 3/. The application of these procedures to the subsequent assay of plutonium, isotopic analysis, and impurity determination is described.

  14. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  15. Hybrid Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jianping Gene; Shih, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid light-weight heat exchanger concept has been developed that uses high-conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) composites as the heat-transfer fins and uses conventional high-temperature metals, such as Inconel, nickel, and titanium as the parting sheets to meet leakage and structural requirements. In order to maximize thermal conductivity, the majority of carbon fiber is aligned in the fin direction resulting in 300 W/m.K or higher conductivity in the fin directions. As a result of this fiber orientation, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the C-C composite in both non-fiber directions matches well with the CTE of various high-temperature metal alloys. This allows the joining of fins and parting sheets by using high-temperature braze alloys.

  16. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  17. Cross-Shelf Exchange.

    PubMed

    Brink, K H

    2016-01-01

    Cross-shelf exchange dominates the pathways and rates by which nutrients, biota, and materials on the continental shelf are delivered and removed. This follows because cross-shelf gradients of most properties are usually far greater than those in the alongshore direction. The resulting transports are limited by Earth's rotation, which inhibits flow from crossing isobaths. Thus, cross-shelf flows are generally weak compared with alongshore flows, and this leads to interesting observational issues. Cross-shelf flows are enabled by turbulent mixing processes, nonlinear processes (such as momentum advection), and time dependence. Thus, there is a wide range of possible effects that can allow these critical transports, and different natural settings are often governed by different combinations of processes. This review discusses examples of representative transport mechanisms and explores possible observational and theoretical paths to future progress.

  18. International Cell Exchange, 1994.

    PubMed

    Lau, M; Terasaki, P I; Park, M S

    1994-01-01

    1. We summarize typings of 40 cells for Class I antigens and 20 cultured cell lines for Class II antigens through the International Cell Exchange in 1994. Serologic Class II typings were compared with DNA typings for the same 20 cells. Two hundred eighty-one laboratories participated in the monthly Class I Serum Exchange. One hundred nineteen serology laboratories and 74 DNA laboratories reported Class II specificities on a monthly basis. 2. The average detection levels, as well as the high detection levels, were determined for 16 A-locus and 27 B-locus antigens. Mean detection rates of 95% or greater average detection were obtained for 12 A-locus and 10 B-locus antigens. Lower than 80% agreement was calculated for one A-locus antigen (A74) and 7 B-locus (B46, B48, B61, B67, B73, B75, B77) antigens. 3. We compared discrepancy rates of 10 A-locus and 7 B-locus antigens typed 3 times or more. The false-negative discrepancy rates, i.e. how often the antigen was missed, were greater for more of the B-locus specificities than for the A-locus antigens. B62, having the highest false-positive rate, tended to be overassigned. The discrepancy rates, especially the false-negative rate, for B70 were shown to decrease over a 7-year period. 4. In 1994, 8 laboratories attained records of total no misses for all analyzed antigens. Twelve laboratories had final records of only one discrepancy, and 5 laboratories had impressive perfect records (zero false negatives and false positives) for their yearly antigen reports. 5. Retyping of 12 Class I and 8 Class II reference cells showed improved detection of antigens. Results of a donor typed 4 times over 11 years demonstrated marked improvement, nearly doubling for A33, B38, and B75. Two cells first typed in 1991, then retyped in 1994, showed improved detection for Class II splits by serology and DNA typing. 6. We updated the list of sequenced Class I Exchange cells. Seven new cells were added as well as confirmatory sequence data for A

  19. Safety of Propofol for Oxygenator Exchange in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Hohlfelder, Benjamin; Szumita, Paul M; Lagambina, Susan; Weinhouse, Gerald; Degrado, Jeremy R

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the safety of propofol administration in adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) patients. We performed a prospective cohort analysis of patients using ECMO at Brigham and Women's Hospital between February 2013 and October 2015. Patients were included if they used ECMO for at least 48 hours. The major end-point of the analysis was the median oxygenator lifespan. Oxygenator exchanges were analyzed by the number of patients requiring an oxygenator exchange and the number of oxygenator exchanges per ECMO day. A priori analysis was performed by comparing the outcomes between patients who did and did not receive propofol during their ECMO course. During the study, 43 patients were included in the analysis. Sixteen patients used propofol during their ECMO course. There were 12 oxygenator exchanges during therapy. Oxygenator exchange occurred on 1.8% of ECMO days. The median oxygenator lifespan was 7 days. Patients who used propofol had a significantly longer oxygenator lifespan (p = 0.02). Among patients who received propofol, patients who required oxygenator exchange used a significantly lower median daily dose of propofol (p < 0.001). The use of propofol appears safe in ECMO with regards to oxygenator viability. Contrary to expected, oxygenator lifespan was significantly longer among patients who received propofol.

  20. Grain Exchange Probabilities Within a Gravel Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J.

    2008-12-01

    Sediment transfers in gravel-bed rivers involve the vertical exchange of sediments during floods. These exchanges regulate the virtual velocity of sediment and bed material texture. This study describes general tendencies in the vertical exchange of gravels within the substrate that result from multiple floods. Empirical observations come from Carnation Creek, a small gravel-bed river with large woody debris located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Frequent floods and the relatively limited armor layer facilitate streambed activity and relatively high bedload transport rates, typically under partial sediment transport conditions. Over 2000 magnetically tagged stones, ranging in size from 16 to 180 mm, were deployed on the bed surface between 1991 and 1992. These tracers have been recovered 10 times over 12 flood seasons to quantify their vertical position in the streambed. For analysis, the bed is divided into layers based on armor layer thickness. Once tracers are well mixed within the streambed, grains in the surface layer are most likely to be mixed into the subsurface, while subsurface grains are most likely to persist within the subsurface. Fractional exchange probabilities approach size independence when the most active depth of the substrate is considered. Overall these results highlight vertical mixing as an important process in the dispersion of gravels.

  1. "TOF2H": A precision toolbox for rapid, high density/high coverage hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry via an LC-MALDI approach, covering the data pipeline from spectral acquisition to HDX rate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikamanon, Pornpat; Pun, Elroy; Chou, Wayne; Koter, Marek D; Gershon, Paul D

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein-amide proton hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) is used to investigate protein conformation, conformational changes and surface binding sites for other molecules. To our knowledge, software tools to automate data processing and analysis from sample fractionating (LC-MALDI) mass-spectrometry-based HDX workflows are not publicly available. Results An integrated data pipeline (Solvent Explorer/TOF2H) has been developed for the processing of LC-MALDI-derived HDX data. Based on an experiment-wide template, and taking an ab initio approach to chromatographic and spectral peak finding, initial data processing is based on accurate mass-matching to fully deisotoped peaklists accommodating, in MS/MS-confirmed peptide library searches, ambiguous mass-hits to non-target proteins. Isotope-shift re-interrogation of library search results allows quick assessment of the extent of deuteration from peaklist data alone. During raw spectrum editing, each spectral segment is validated in real time, consistent with the manageable spectral numbers resulting from LC-MALDI experiments. A semi-automated spectral-segment editor includes a semi-automated or automated assessment of the quality of all spectral segments as they are pooled across an XIC peak for summing, centroid mass determination, building of rates plots on-the-fly, and automated back exchange correction. The resulting deuterium uptake rates plots from various experiments can be averaged, subtracted, re-scaled, error-barred, and/or scatter-plotted from individual spectral segment centroids, compared to solvent exposure and hydrogen bonding predictions and receive a color suggestion for 3D visualization. This software lends itself to a "divorced" HDX approach in which MS/MS-confirmed peptide libraries are built via nano or standard ESI without source modification, and HDX is performed via LC-MALDI using a standard MALDI-TOF. The complete TOF2H package includes additional (eg LC analysis) modules. Conclusion

  2. The Application of Exchange Network Theory to the Analysis of Foreign Direct Investment in the People’s Republic of China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    core countries (So, 1981). Wallerstein (1979) argued for a higher level of analysis than was provided by dependency theory. He proposed that the world... Wallerstein , the capitalist world-system is both dynamic and cyclical in nature. So (1986) points out that Wallerstein’s model has an additional semi...position in the world economy (Koo, 1984; So, 1986). The world system model proposed by Wallerstein was largely inspired by Frank (Nash, 1981). Nash has

  3. Demonstration of the Application of Composite Load Spectra (CLS) and Probabilistic Structural Analysis (PSAM) Codes to SSME Heat Exchanger Turnaround Vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajagopal, Kadambi R.; DebChaudhury, Amitabha; Orient, George

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a probabilistic structural analysis performed to determine the probabilistic structural response under fluctuating random pressure loads for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turnaround vane. It uses a newly developed frequency and distance dependent correlation model that has features to model the decay phenomena along the flow and across the flow with the capability to introduce a phase delay. The analytical results are compared using two computer codes SAFER (Spectral Analysis of Finite Element Responses) and NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) and with experimentally observed strain gage data. The computer code NESSUS with an interface to a sub set of Composite Load Spectra (CLS) code is used for the probabilistic analysis. A Fatigue code was used to calculate fatigue damage due to the random pressure excitation. The random variables modeled include engine system primitive variables that influence the operating conditions, convection velocity coefficient, stress concentration factor, structural damping, and thickness of the inner and outer vanes. The need for an appropriate correlation model in addition to magnitude of the PSD is emphasized. The study demonstrates that correlation characteristics even under random pressure loads are capable of causing resonance like effects for some modes. The study identifies the important variables that contribute to structural alternate stress response and drive the fatigue damage for the new design. Since the alternate stress for the new redesign is less than the endurance limit for the material, the damage due high cycle fatigue is negligible.

  4. Mechanism of extracellular ion exchange and binding-site occlusion in a sodium/calcium exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Jun; Marinelli, Fabrizio; Lee, Changkeun; Huang, Yihe; Faraldo-Gomez, Jose D.; Jiang, Youxing

    2016-05-16

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers utilize the Na+ electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane to extrude intracellular Ca2+, and play a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we elucidate their mechanisms of extracellular ion recognition and exchange through a structural analysis of the exchanger from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX_Mj) bound to Na+, Ca2+ or Sr2+ in various occupancies and in an apo state. This analysis defines the binding mode and relative affinity of these ions, establishes the structural basis for the anticipated 3:1Na+/Ca2+ exchange stoichiometry, and reveals the conformational changes at the onset of the alternating-access transport mechanism. An independent analysis of the dynamics and conformational free-energy landscape of NCX_Mj in different ion-occupancy states, based on enhanced-sampling molecular-dynamics simulations, demonstrates that the crystal structures reflect mechanistically relevant, interconverting conformations. Lastly, these calculations also reveal the mechanism by which the outward-to-inward transition is controlled by the ion-occupancy state, thereby explaining the emergence of strictly-coupled Na+/Ca2+ antiport.

  5. Mechanism of extracellular ion exchange and binding-site occlusion in the sodium-calcium exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ChangKeun; Huang, Yihe; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.; Jiang, Youxing

    2016-01-01

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers utilize the Na+ electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane to extrude intracellular Ca2+, and play a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we elucidate their mechanisms of extracellular ion recognition and exchange through a structural analysis of the exchanger from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX_Mj) bound to Na+, Ca2+ or Sr2+ in various occupancies and in an apo state. This analysis defines the binding mode and relative affinity of these ions, establishes the structural basis for the anticipated 3Na+:1Ca2+ exchange stoichiometry, and reveals the conformational changes at the onset of the alternating-access transport mechanism. An independent analysis of the dynamics and conformational free-energy landscape of NCX_Mj in different ion-occupancy states, based on enhanced-sampling molecular-dynamics simulations, demonstrates that the crystal structures reflect mechanistically relevant, interconverting conformations. These calculations also reveal the mechanism by which the outward-to-inward transition is controlled by the ion-occupancy state, thereby explaining the emergence of strictly-coupled Na+/Ca2+ antiport. PMID:27183196

  6. Mechanism of extracellular ion exchange and binding-site occlusion in a sodium/calcium exchanger

    DOE PAGES

    Liao, Jun; Marinelli, Fabrizio; Lee, Changkeun; ...

    2016-05-16

    Na+/Ca2+ exchangers utilize the Na+ electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane to extrude intracellular Ca2+, and play a central role in Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we elucidate their mechanisms of extracellular ion recognition and exchange through a structural analysis of the exchanger from Methanococcus jannaschii (NCX_Mj) bound to Na+, Ca2+ or Sr2+ in various occupancies and in an apo state. This analysis defines the binding mode and relative affinity of these ions, establishes the structural basis for the anticipated 3:1Na+/Ca2+ exchange stoichiometry, and reveals the conformational changes at the onset of the alternating-access transport mechanism. An independent analysis of the dynamicsmore » and conformational free-energy landscape of NCX_Mj in different ion-occupancy states, based on enhanced-sampling molecular-dynamics simulations, demonstrates that the crystal structures reflect mechanistically relevant, interconverting conformations. Lastly, these calculations also reveal the mechanism by which the outward-to-inward transition is controlled by the ion-occupancy state, thereby explaining the emergence of strictly-coupled Na+/Ca2+ antiport.« less

  7. Valence bond/broken symmetry analysis of the exchange coupling constant in copper(II) dimers. Ferromagnetic contribution exalted through combined ligand topology and (singlet) covalent-ionic mixing.

    PubMed

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Mouesca, Jean-Marie

    2010-05-27

    In this paper we aim at presenting a full-VB (valence-bond) analysis of the DFT broken symmetry (BS) exchange coupling constant J(BS). We extend Kahn and Briat's "two sites-two electrons" VB original formalism (Kahn, O.; Briat, B. J. Chem. Soc. Farady Trans. II, 1976, 72, 268) by taking into account the covalent-ionic singlet state mixing, here translated into intersite magnetic orbital delocalization. In this way, two explicit contributions to the magnetic orbital overlap appear, one from the purely covalent state, and the other one from the covalent-ionic mixing. This scheme allows us to relax the strict orthogonality constraint of Kahn and Briat's chemically heuristic model resulting into ferromagnetism. Moreover, we show how DFT-BS calculations applied to various copper(II) dimers yield effective parameters that can be injected into the full-VB model, allowing for a breaking down of J(BS) into various contributions, one of which being either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic depending on the bridging ligand topology. Two classes of systems emerge from this analysis and the exceptional ferromagnetic coupling property of the "end-on" azido-bridged copper dimer is especially emphasized.

  8. Exchange Rates and Old People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, James J.

    1980-01-01

    Extends earlier work on aging as a process of exchange by focusing on the issue of exchange rates and how they are negotiated. Access to power resources declines with age, placing the old person in the position of negotiating from weakness. (Author)

  9. The NESACS Exchange with Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Morton Z.; Tanner, Ruth; Strem, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society (NESACS) is going to host visit to the representatives of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) at their annual exchange program this year. The delegation is expected to spotlight the ACS international effects, in addition to the advantages of the exchange between the two organizations.

  10. Macroreticular chelating ion-exchangers.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, R F; E Gancher, R; Russo, F R

    1970-06-01

    Two macroreticular chelating ion-exchangers have been prepared and characterized. One contains the iminodiacetate group and the second contains the arsonate group as the ion-exchanging site. The macroreticular resins show selectivities among metal ions similar to those of the commercially available naicroreticular chelating resins. Chromatographie separations on the new resins are rapid and sharp.

  11. EXCHANGE. Volume 9-92

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  12. Technology Performance Exchange (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-10-01

    This fact sheet, 'The Technology Performance Exchange' will be presented at the ET Summit, held at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 15-17, 2012. The Technology Performance Exchange will be a centralized, Web-based portal for finding and sharing energy performance data for commercial building technologies.

  13. The Transatlantic Orientation Exchange Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gisevius, Annette; Weber, Robin A.

    2009-01-01

    The Transatlantic Orientation Exchange/Multiplikatorenschulung im transatlan-tischen Austausch is a collaboration between volunteers and staff in both the US and German AFS organizations. The goal of the project is to increase the level of intercultural learning of German and US secondary education exchange participants and their host families.…

  14. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  15. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  16. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  17. Post-mortem analysis of a long-term tested proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under low cathode humidification conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-In; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Ki Buem; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Song, Inseob; Choi, Hanshin; Park, Jun-Young

    2014-05-01

    During continuous power operation for 2740 h, the major mechanisms and patterns of performance degradation in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack are investigated under low cathode humidification with simulated reformate fuel gases through the use of various physicochemical and electrochemical analysis tools. As operating time increases, the operating voltages and open-circuit voltages (OCVs) of the stack decrease with the large voltage distributions. In the post-mortem analysis of the stack, the delamination of the catalyst layer (CL) of unstable operating membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is significant near the cathode gas inlets. This observation is in agreement with the results of OCV, hydrogen crossover current, and anode off-gas measurements. This phenomenon may be due to the acceleration of carbon corrosion in the cathode during the frequent start-up and shut-down process, because the local cathode potential can reach more than 1.5 V in the air/fuel boundary. Additionally, the frequent membrane hydration and dehydration by the accumulation of excess water (through electrochemical reaction) and faster water evaporation (under dry-air cathode conditions and high operating temperatures) may accelerate the interface delamination between the membrane and cathode CL with a substantially uneven distribution of water.

  18. Structural, Thermal, and Safety Analysis of Isotope Heat Source and Integrated Heat Exchangers for 6-kWe Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1989-01-01

    The design of the 30-kWt isotope heat source integrated with a Rankine boiler and a Brayton gas heater, which was described in the preceding paper in these proceedings, was subjected to structural, thermal, and safety analyses. The present paper describes and discusses the results of these analyses. Detailed structural analyses of the heat source integrated with the boiler and gas heater showed positive safety margins at all locations during the launch. Detailed thermal analyses showed acceptable temperatures at all locations, during assembly, transfer and orbital operations. Reentry thermal analyses showed that the clads have acceptable peak and impact temperatures. Loss-of-cooling analyses indicated the feasibility of a passive safety concept for preventing over temperatures. Static structural analysis showed positive safety margins at all locations, and dynamic analysis showed that there were no low-frequency resources. Continuum-mechanics code analyses of the effects of the impact of Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) fragments on the heat source and of the very unlikely impact of the full heat source on concrete indicated relatively modest fuel clad deformations and little or no fuel release.

  19. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Giardina, A.R.

    1981-03-03

    A shell and tube heat exchanger is described having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelepiped tube bundle modules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending there through, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattices, each of which is situated in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattices extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates. 12 figs.

  20. Aluminum heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Koisuka, M.; Aoki, H.

    1986-11-04

    This patent describes a heat exchanger comprising a flat metal tube for conducting fluid having opposite first and second ends, of metal fins fixed onto outer surfaces of the flat metal tube, first and second header pipes fixedly mounted on the opposite ends of the flat metal tube, respectively, so that the flat metal tube communicates with the interior of the header pipes. Each of the header pipes has a first end that is open and a second end that is closed. An inlet tube is connected to the first end of the first header pipe, and an outlet tube is connected to the first end of the second header pipe. The improvement described here comprises one of the inlet and outlet tubes having an end portion inserted into the first end of the corresponding interconnected header pipe. The end portion has a cut-away portion in the form of a first axial slit extending axially inwardly from an open end at the adjacent end of the one tube. The first axial slit has an axial intermediate portion slightly smaller than the thickness of the flat metal tube, and a tapered portion diverging towards the open end of the first axial slit, and the first end of the flat metal tube extends into the corresponding interconnected header pipe and is closely fitted into the first axial slit.