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Sample records for analysis reveal damage

  1. MRI Texture Analysis Reveals Deep Gray Nuclei Damage in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Milena; Anjos, Lara G V; Maia Tavares de Andrade, Helen; de Oliveira, Márcia S; Castellano, Gabriela; Junqueira Ribeiro de Rezende, Thiago; Nucci, Anamarli; França Junior, Marcondes Cavalcante

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by extensive corticospinal damage, but extrapyramidal involvement is suggested in pathological studies. Texture analysis (TA) is an image processing technique that evaluates the distribution of gray levels between pixels in a given region of interest (ROI). It provides quantitative data and has been employed in several neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we used TA to investigate possible deep gray nuclei (DGN) abnormalities in a cohort of ALS patients. Thirty-two ALS patients and 32 healthy controls underwent MRI in a 3T scanner. The T1 volumetric sequence was used for DGN segmentation and extraction of 11 texture parameters using the MaZda software. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric test, with a significance level set at α = 0.025 (FDR-corrected) for TA. Patients had significantly higher values for the parameter correlation (CO) in both thalami and in the right caudate nucleus compared to healthy controls. Also, the parameter Inverse Difference Moment or Homogeneity (IDM) presented significantly smaller values in the ALS group in both thalami. TA of T1 weighted images revealed DGN alterations in patients with ALS, namely in the thalami and caudate nuclei. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  2. Deregulation upon DNA damage revealed by joint analysis of context-specific perturbation data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Deregulation between two different cell populations manifests itself in changing gene expression patterns and changing regulatory interactions. Accumulating knowledge about biological networks creates an opportunity to study these changes in their cellular context. Results We analyze re-wiring of regulatory networks based on cell population-specific perturbation data and knowledge about signaling pathways and their target genes. We quantify deregulation by merging regulatory signal from the two cell populations into one score. This joint approach, called JODA, proves advantageous over separate analysis of the cell populations and analysis without incorporation of knowledge. JODA is implemented and freely available in a Bioconductor package 'joda'. Conclusions Using JODA, we show wide-spread re-wiring of gene regulatory networks upon neocarzinostatin-induced DNA damage in Human cells. We recover 645 deregulated genes in thirteen functional clusters performing the rich program of response to damage. We find that the clusters contain many previously characterized neocarzinostatin target genes. We investigate connectivity between those genes, explaining their cooperation in performing the common functions. We review genes with the most extreme deregulation scores, reporting their involvement in response to DNA damage. Finally, we investigate the indirect impact of the ATM pathway on the deregulated genes, and build a hypothetical hierarchy of direct regulation. These results prove that JODA is a step forward to a systems level, mechanistic understanding of changes in gene regulation between different cell populations. PMID:21693013

  3. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals that PP4 dephosphorylates KAP-1 impacting the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Goodarzi, Aaron A; Adelmant, Guillaume O; Pan, Yunfeng; Jeggo, Penelope A; Marto, Jarrod A; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphatase PP4C has been implicated in the DNA damage response (DDR), but its substrates in DDR remain largely unknown. We devised a novel proteomic strategy for systematic identification of proteins dephosphorylated by PP4C and identified KRAB-domain-associated protein 1 (KAP-1) as a substrate. Ionizing radiation leads to phosphorylation of KAP-1 at S824 (via ATM) and at S473 (via CHK2). A PP4C/R3β complex interacts with KAP-1 and silencing this complex leads to persistence of phospho-S824 and phospho-S473. We identify a new role for KAP-1 in DDR by showing that phosphorylation of S473 impacts the G2/M checkpoint. Depletion of PP4R3β or expression of the phosphomimetic KAP-1 S473 mutant (S473D) leads to a prolonged G2/M checkpoint. Phosphorylation of S824 is necessary for repair of heterochromatic DNA lesions and similar to cells expressing phosphomimetic KAP-1 S824 mutant (S824D), or PP4R3β-silenced cells, display prolonged relaxation of chromatin with release of chromatin remodelling protein CHD3. Our results define a new role for PP4-mediated dephosphorylation in the DDR, including the regulation of a previously undescribed function of KAP-1 in checkpoint response. PMID:22491012

  4. Systems Analysis of the Dynamic Inflammatory Response to Tissue Damage Reveals Spatiotemporal Properties of the Wound Attractant Gradient.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Helen; Liepe, Juliane; Sim, Aaron; Wood, Will; Martin, Paul; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-08-08

    In the acute inflammatory phase following tissue damage, cells of the innate immune system are rapidly recruited to sites of injury by pro-inflammatory mediators released at the wound site. Although advances in live imaging allow us to directly visualize this process in vivo, the precise identity and properties of the primary immune damage attractants remain unclear, as it is currently impossible to directly observe and accurately measure these signals in tissues. Here, we demonstrate that detailed information about the attractant signals can be extracted directly from the in vivo behavior of the responding immune cells. By applying inference-based computational approaches to analyze the in vivo dynamics of the Drosophila inflammatory response, we gain new detailed insight into the spatiotemporal properties of the attractant gradient. In particular, we show that the wound attractant is released by wound margin cells, rather than by the wounded tissue per se, and that it diffuses away from this source at rates far slower than those of previously implicated signals such as H2O2 and ATP, ruling out these fast mediators as the primary chemoattractant. We then predict, and experimentally test, how competing attractant signals might interact in space and time to regulate multi-step cell navigation in the complex environment of a healing wound, revealing a period of receptor desensitization after initial exposure to the damage attractant. Extending our analysis to model much larger wounds, we uncover a dynamic behavioral change in the responding immune cells in vivo that is prognostic of whether a wound will subsequently heal or not. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  5. Single-molecule analysis reveals human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) dimerizes on DNA via multiple kinetic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Ghodke, Harshad; Wang, Hong; Hsieh, Ching L; Woldemeskel, Selamawit; Watkins, Simon C; Rapić-Otrin, Vesna; Van Houten, Bennett

    2014-05-06

    How human DNA repair proteins survey the genome for UV-induced photoproducts remains a poorly understood aspect of the initial damage recognition step in nucleotide excision repair (NER). To understand this process, we performed single-molecule experiments, which revealed that the human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) performs a 3D search mechanism and displays a remarkable heterogeneity in the kinetics of damage recognition. Our results indicate that UV-DDB examines sites on DNA in discrete steps before forming long-lived, nonmotile UV-DDB dimers (DDB1-DDB2)2 at sites of damage. Analysis of the rates of dissociation for the transient binding molecules on both undamaged and damaged DNA show multiple dwell times over three orders of magnitude: 0.3-0.8, 8.1, and 113-126 s. These intermediate states are believed to represent discrete UV-DDB conformers on the trajectory to stable damage detection. DNA damage promoted the formation of highly stable dimers lasting for at least 15 min. The xeroderma pigmentosum group E (XP-E) causing K244E mutant of DDB2 found in patient XP82TO, supported UV-DDB dimerization but was found to slide on DNA and failed to stably engage lesions. These findings provide molecular insight into the loss of damage discrimination observed in this XP-E patient. This study proposes that UV-DDB recognizes lesions via multiple kinetic intermediates, through a conformational proofreading mechanism.

  6. Single-molecule analysis reveals human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) dimerizes on DNA via multiple kinetic intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Ghodke, Harshad; Wang, Hong; Hsieh, Ching L.; Woldemeskel, Selamawit; Watkins, Simon C.; Rapić-Otrin, Vesna; Van Houten, Bennett

    2014-01-01

    How human DNA repair proteins survey the genome for UV-induced photoproducts remains a poorly understood aspect of the initial damage recognition step in nucleotide excision repair (NER). To understand this process, we performed single-molecule experiments, which revealed that the human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) performs a 3D search mechanism and displays a remarkable heterogeneity in the kinetics of damage recognition. Our results indicate that UV-DDB examines sites on DNA in discrete steps before forming long-lived, nonmotile UV-DDB dimers (DDB1-DDB2)2 at sites of damage. Analysis of the rates of dissociation for the transient binding molecules on both undamaged and damaged DNA show multiple dwell times over three orders of magnitude: 0.3–0.8, 8.1, and 113–126 s. These intermediate states are believed to represent discrete UV-DDB conformers on the trajectory to stable damage detection. DNA damage promoted the formation of highly stable dimers lasting for at least 15 min. The xeroderma pigmentosum group E (XP-E) causing K244E mutant of DDB2 found in patient XP82TO, supported UV-DDB dimerization but was found to slide on DNA and failed to stably engage lesions. These findings provide molecular insight into the loss of damage discrimination observed in this XP-E patient. This study proposes that UV-DDB recognizes lesions via multiple kinetic intermediates, through a conformational proofreading mechanism. PMID:24760829

  7. A systematic analysis of factors localized to damaged chromatin reveals PARP-dependent recruitment of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Izhar, Lior; Adamson, Britt; Ciccia, Alberto; Lewis, Jedd; Pontano-Vaites, Laura; Leng, Yumei; Liang, Anthony C.; Westbrook, Thomas F.; Harper, J. Wade; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Localization to sites of DNA damage is a hallmark of DNA damage response (DDR) proteins. To identify new DDR factors, we screened epitope-tagged proteins for localization to sites of chromatin damaged by UV laser microirradiation and found >120 proteins that localize to damaged chromatin. These include the BAF tumor suppressor complex and the ALS candidate protein TAF15. TAF15 contains multiple domains that bind damaged chromatin in a PARP-dependent manner, suggesting a possible role as glue that tethers multiple PAR chains together. Many positives were transcription factors and >70% of randomly tested transcription factors localized to sites of DNA damage and approximately 90% were PARP-dependent for localization. Mutational analyses showed that localization to damaged chromatin is DNA-binding domain-dependent. By examining Hoechst staining patterns at damage sites, we see evidence of chromatin decompaction that is PARP-dependent. We propose that PARP-regulated chromatin remodeling at sites of damage allows transient accessibility of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:26004182

  8. Transcriptional analysis of rat photoreceptor cells reveals daily regulation of genes important for visual signaling and light damage susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kunst, Stefanie; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Hölter, Philip; Wengert, Alexander; Grether, Markus; Sticht, Carsten; Weyer, Veronika; Wolfrum, Uwe; Spessert, Rainer

    2013-03-01

    Photoreceptor cells face the challenge of adjusting their function and, possibly, their susceptibility to light damage to the marked daily changes in ambient light intensity. To achieve a better understanding of photoreceptor adaptation at the transcriptional level, this study aimed to identify genes which are under daily regulation in photoreceptor cells using microarray analysis and quantitative PCR. Included in the gene set obtained were a number of genes which up until now have not been shown to be expressed in photoreceptor cells, such as Atf3 (activating transcription factor 3) and Pde8a (phosphodiesterase 8A), and others with a known impact on phototransduction and/or photoreceptor survival, such as Grk1 (G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1) and Pgc-1α (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, coactivator 1alpha). According to their daily dynamics, the genes identified could be clustered in two groups: those with peak expression during the second part of the day which are uniformly promoted to cycle by light/dark transitions and those with peak expression during the second part of the night which are predominantly driven by a clock. Since Grk1 and Pgc-1α belong in the first group, the present results support a concept in which transcriptional regulation of genes by ambient light contributes to the functional adjustment of photoreceptor cells over the 24-h period. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Structure analysis of FAAP24 reveals single-stranded DNA-binding activity and domain functions in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yucai; Han, Xiao; Wu, Fangming; Leung, Justin W; Lowery, Megan G; Do, Huong; Chen, Junjie; Shi, Chaowei; Tian, Changlin; Li, Lei; Gong, Weimin

    2013-01-01

    The FANCM/FAAP24 heterodimer has distinct functions in protecting cells from complex DNA lesions such as interstrand crosslinks. These functions rely on the biochemical activity of FANCM/FAAP24 to recognize and bind to damaged DNA or stalled replication forks. However, the DNA-binding activity of this complex was not clearly defined. We investigated how FAAP24 contributes to the DNA-interacting functions of the FANCM/FAAP24 complex by acquiring the N-terminal and C-terminal solution structures of human FAAP24. Modeling of the FAAP24 structure indicates that FAAP24 may possess a high affinity toward single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Testing of various FAAP24 mutations in vitro and in vivo validated this prediction derived from structural analyses. We found that the DNA-binding and FANCM-interacting functions of FAAP24, although both require the C-terminal (HhH)2 domain, can be distinguished by segregation-of-function mutations. These results demonstrate dual roles of FAAP24 in DNA damage response against crosslinking lesions, one through the formation of FANCM/FAAP24 heterodimer and the other via its ssDNA-binding activity required in optimized checkpoint activation. PMID:23999858

  10. [18F]FDG-PET reveals temporal hypometabolism in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy even when quantitative MRI and histopathological analysis show only mild hippocampal damage.

    PubMed

    Lamusuo, S; Jutila, L; Ylinen, A; Kälviäinen, R; Mervaala, E; Haaparanta, M; Jääskeläinen, S; Partanen, K; Vapalahti, M; Rinne, J

    2001-06-01

    The relationship between reduced glucose metabolism in positron emission tomography with fludeoxyglucose F 18 ([(18)F]FDG-PET) and hippocampal damage (HD) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy is still unclear. To determine whether the presence and severity of HD verified by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (QMRI) and histopathological analysis affect the degree of hypometabolism. Sixteen patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy underwent [(18)F]FDG-PET and QMRI (hippocampal volumetry and T2 relaxometry) before surgery. Histopathological analysis of the hippocampus included measurements of neuronal loss, proliferation of glial cells, and mossy fiber sprouting. The asymmetry in glucose metabolism described the degree of hypometabolism. Temporal hypometabolism was not related to severity of HD as measured by QMRI or histopathological analysis. The degree of hypometabolism did not differ in patients with mild, moderate, or severe HD. In addition, [(18)F]FDG-PET revealed significant temporal hypometabolism even though hippocampal QMRI findings were normal or showed only mild HD. Thus, glucose consumption was reduced over and above the histopathological changes. [(18)F]FDG-PET is sensitive for localizing the epileptogenic region in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. However, it is insensitive to reflect the severity of HD.

  11. In situ analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine oxidation reveals sequence- and agent-specific damage spectra.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kok Seong; Cui, Liang; Taghizadeh, Koli; Wishnok, John S; Chan, Wan; DeMott, Michael S; Babu, I Ramesh; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Dedon, Peter C

    2012-10-31

    Guanine is a major target for oxidation in DNA, with 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) as a major product. 8-oxodG is itself significantly more susceptible to oxidation than guanine, with the resulting damage consisting of more than 10 different products. This complexity has hampered efforts to understand the determinants of biologically relevant DNA oxidation chemistry. To address this problem, we have developed a high mass accuracy mass spectrometric method to quantify oxidation products arising site specifically in DNA. We applied this method to quantify the role of sequence context in defining the spectrum of damage products arising from oxidation of 8-oxodG by two oxidants: nitrosoperoxycarbonate (ONOOCO(2)(-)), a macrophage-derived chemical mediator of inflammation, and the classical one-electron oxidant, riboflavin-mediated photooxidation. The results reveal the predominance of dehydroguanidinohydantoin (DGh) in 8-oxodG oxidation by both oxidants. While the relative quantities of 8-oxodG oxidation products arising from ONOOCO(2)(-) did not vary as a function of sequence context, products of riboflavin-mediated photooxidation of 8-oxodG were highly sequence dependent. Several of the 8-oxodG oxidation products underwent hydrolytic conversion to new products with half-lives of 2-7 h. The results have implications for understanding the chemistry of DNA oxidation and the biological response to the damage, with DNA damage recognition and repair systems faced with a complex and dynamic set of damage targets.

  12. Rapid Approaches Towards DNA Damage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Crews, N.; Paidipalli, Manasa

    2013-01-01

    The severe effects of DNA damage on human health have led to a tremendous amount of research being focused. Owing to the importance of damage detection, different approaches for the detection and quantification of the damaged DNA will be presented. In this work, we have modeled DNA damage using well-known mutagens: UV radiation to create photoproducts and restriction enzyme digestion to create double strand breaks. We will show that quantitative PCR (qPCR), a widely known measure of detecting the presence of the target DNA can be used to quantify photoproducts/intramolecular DNA damage. Our results indicate that a comparison of the initial concentration available in the undamaged and the damaged samples can be used to reveal the effect of damaged DNA in its amplification. By analyzing multiple regions using this technique, their relative susceptibility to damage can be measured. We also show that high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA), a measure of the bond energy between two DNA strands, can be used to quantify double strand breaks. The strand breaks resulted in a change in the overall distribution of the bond energy thus causing variations in the melting profile. HRMA has also been examined to compare DNA damage resulting from UV-A, UV-B and UV-C irradiation. The evaluation techniques demonstrated can potentially be extended to various types of DNA damage.

  13. Microarray Analysis of Murine Retinal Light Damage Reveals Changes in Iron Regulatory, Complement, and Antioxidant Genes in the Neurosensory Retina and Isolated RPE

    PubMed Central

    Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Kumar, Usha; Song, Ying; Grieco, Steven; Song, Delu; Li, Yafeng; Tobias, John W.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate light damage–induced transcript changes within neurosensory retina (NSR) and isolated retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Similar studies have been conducted previously, but were usually limited to the NSR and only a portion of the transcriptome. Herein most of the transcriptome, not just in the NSR but also in isolated RPE, was queried. Methods. Mice were exposed to 10,000 lux cool white fluorescent light for 18 hours and euthanized 4 hours after photic injury. NSR and isolated RPE were collected, and RNA was isolated. DNA microarray hybridization was conducted as described in the Affymetrix GeneChip Expression Analysis Technical Manual. Microarray analysis was performed using probe intensity data derived from the Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Array. For the genes of interest, confirmation of gene expression was done using quantitative real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence assessed protein levels and localization. Results. Numerous iron regulatory genes were significantly changed in the light-exposed NSR and RPE. Several of these gene expression changes favored an iron-overloaded state. For example, the transferrin receptor was upregulated in both light-exposed NSR and RPE. Consistent with this, there was stronger transferrin receptor immunoreactivity in the light-exposed retinas. Significant changes in gene expression following light damage were also observed in oxidative stress and complement system genes. Conclusions. The concept of a photooxidative stress–induced vicious cycle of increased iron uptake leading to further oxidative stress was introduced. PMID:22736611

  14. Meta-analysis of 49 549 individuals imputed with the 1000 Genomes Project reveals an exonic damaging variant in ANGPTL4 determining fasting TG levels

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Sabo, Aniko; Bis, Joshua C; Huffman, Jennifer E; Manichaikul, Ani; Smith, Albert V; Feitosa, Mary F; Demissie, Serkalem; Joshi, Peter K; Duan, Qing; Marten, Jonathan; van Klinken, Jan B; Surakka, Ida; Nolte, Ilja M; Zhang, Weihua; Mbarek, Hamdi; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Trompet, Stella; Verweij, Niek; Evangelou, Evangelos; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Tayo, Bamidele O; Deelen, Joris; van der Most, Peter J; van der Laan, Sander W; Arking, Dan E; Morrison, Alanna; Dehghan, Abbas; Franco, Oscar H; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Campbell, Archie; Hocking, Lynne J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Brody, Jennifer A; Rice, Kenneth M; White, Charles C; Harris, Tamara; Isaacs, Aaron; Campbell, Harry; Lange, Leslie A; Rudan, Igor; Kolcic, Ivana; Navarro, Pau; Zemunik, Tatijana; Salomaa, Veikko; Kooner, Angad S; Kooner, Jaspal S; Lehne, Benjamin; Scott, William R; Tan, Sian-Tsung; de Geus, Eco J; Milaneschi, Yuri; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Mutsert, Renée; Ford, Ian; Gansevoort, Ron T; Segura-Lepe, Marcelo P; Raitakari, Olli T; Viikari, Jorma S; Nikus, Kjell; Forrester, Terrence; McKenzie, Colin A; de Craen, Anton J M; de Ruijter, Hester M; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Snieder, Harold; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Slagboom, P Eline; Cooper, Richard S; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Elliott, Paul; van der Harst, Pim; Jukema, J Wouter; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Chambers, John C; Swertz, Morris; Ripatti, Samuli; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Vitart, Veronique; Polasek, Ozren; Hayward, Caroline; Wilson, James G; Wilson, James F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rich, Stephen S; Psaty, Bruce M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rotter, Jerome I; Cupples, L Adrienne; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2016-01-01

    Background So far, more than 170 loci have been associated with circulating lipid levels through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). These associations are largely driven by common variants, their function is often not known, and many are likely to be markers for the causal variants. In this study we aimed to identify more new rare and low-frequency functional variants associated with circulating lipid levels. Methods We used the 1000 Genomes Project as a reference panel for the imputations of GWAS data from ∼60 000 individuals in the discovery stage and ∼90 000 samples in the replication stage. Results Our study resulted in the identification of five new associations with circulating lipid levels at four loci. All four loci are within genes that can be linked biologically to lipid metabolism. One of the variants, rs116843064, is a damaging missense variant within the ANGPTL4 gene. Conclusions This study illustrates that GWAS with high-scale imputation may still help us unravel the biological mechanism behind circulating lipid levels. PMID:27036123

  15. Molecular Analysis of a Multistep Lung Cancer Model Induced by Chronic Inflammation Reveals Epigenetic Regulation of p16 and Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway12

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, David; Vicent, Silvestre; Fraga, Mario F; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Freire, Javier; Lujambio, Amaia; Esteller, Manel; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Pio, Ruben; Lecanda, Fernando; Montuenga, Luis M

    2007-01-01

    The molecular hallmarks of inflammation-mediated lung carcinogenesis have not been fully clarified, mainly due to the scarcity of appropriate animal models. We have used a silica-induced multistep lung carcinogenesis model driven by chronic inflammation to study the evolution of molecular markers and genetic alterations. We analyzed markers of DNA damage response (DDR), proliferative stress, and telomeric stress: γ-H2AX, p16, p53, and TERT. Lung cancer-related epigenetic and genetic alterations, including promoter hypermethylation status of p16(CDKN2A), APC, CDH13, Rassf1, and Nore1A, as well as mutations of Tp53, epidermal growth factor receptor, K-ras, N-ras, and c-H-ras, have been also studied. Our results showed DDR pathway activation in preneoplastic lesions, in association with inducible nitric oxide synthase and p53 induction. p16 was also induced in early tumorigenic progression and was inactivated in bronchiolar dysplasias and tumors. Remarkably, lack of mutations of Ras and epidermal growth factor receptor, and a very low frequency of Tp53 mutations suggest that they are not required for tumorigenesis in this model. In contrast, epigenetic alterations in p16(CDKN2A), CDH13, and APC, but not in Rassf1 and Nore1A, were clearly observed. These data suggest the existence of a specific molecular signature of inflammation-driven lung carcinogenesis that shares some, but not all, of the molecular landmarks of chemically induced lung cancer. PMID:17971904

  16. Molecular analysis of a multistep lung cancer model induced by chronic inflammation reveals epigenetic regulation of p16 and activation of the DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    Blanco, David; Vicent, Silvestre; Fraga, Mario F; Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Freire, Javier; Lujambio, Amaia; Esteller, Manel; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Pio, Ruben; Lecanda, Fernando; Montuenga, Luis M

    2007-10-01

    The molecular hallmarks of inflammation-mediated lung carcinogenesis have not been fully clarified, mainly due to the scarcity of appropriate animal models. We have used a silica-induced multistep lung carcinogenesis model driven by chronic inflammation to study the evolution of molecular markers and genetic alterations. We analyzed markers of DNA damage response (DDR), proliferative stress, and telomeric stress: gamma-H2AX, p16, p53, and TERT. Lung cancer-related epigenetic and genetic alterations, including promoter hypermethylation status of p16(CDKN2A), APC, CDH13, Rassf1, and Nore1A, as well as mutations of Tp53, epidermal growth factor receptor, K-ras, N-ras, and c-H-ras, have been also studied. Our results showed DDR pathway activation in preneoplastic lesions, in association with inducible nitric oxide synthase and p53 induction. p16 was also induced in early tumorigenic progression and was inactivated in bronchiolar dysplasias and tumors. Remarkably, lack of mutations of Ras and epidermal growth factor receptor, and a very low frequency of Tp53 mutations suggest that they are not required for tumorigenesis in this model. In contrast, epigenetic alterations in p16(CDKN2A), CDH13, and APC, but not in Rassf1 and Nore1A, were clearly observed. These data suggest the existence of a specific molecular signature of inflammation-driven lung carcinogenesis that shares some, but not all, of the molecular landmarks of chemically induced lung cancer.

  17. A Network of Conserved Damage Survival Pathways Revealed by a Genomic RNAi Screen

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Dashnamoorthy; Wiles, Amy M.; Bhavani, Selvaraj; Ruan, Jianhua; Leder, Philip; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Damage initiates a pleiotropic cellular response aimed at cellular survival when appropriate. To identify genes required for damage survival, we used a cell-based RNAi screen against the Drosophila genome and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulphonate (MMS). Similar studies performed in other model organisms report that damage response may involve pleiotropic cellular processes other than the central DNA repair components, yet an intuitive systems level view of the cellular components required for damage survival, their interrelationship, and contextual importance has been lacking. Further, by comparing data from different model organisms, identification of conserved and presumably core survival components should be forthcoming. We identified 307 genes, representing 13 signaling, metabolic, or enzymatic pathways, affecting cellular survival of MMS–induced damage. As expected, the majority of these pathways are involved in DNA repair; however, several pathways with more diverse biological functions were also identified, including the TOR pathway, transcription, translation, proteasome, glutathione synthesis, ATP synthesis, and Notch signaling, and these were equally important in damage survival. Comparison with genomic screen data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed no overlap enrichment of individual genes between the species, but a conservation of the pathways. To demonstrate the functional conservation of pathways, five were tested in Drosophila and mouse cells, with each pathway responding to alkylation damage in both species. Using the protein interactome, a significant level of connectivity was observed between Drosophila MMS survival proteins, suggesting a higher order relationship. This connectivity was dramatically improved by incorporating the components of the 13 identified pathways within the network. Grouping proteins into “pathway nodes” qualitatively improved the interactome organization, revealing a highly organized “MMS survival

  18. Different precursor populations revealed by microscopic studies of bulk damage in KDP and DKDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

    2005-10-31

    We present experimental results aiming to reveal the relationship between damage initiating defect populations in KDP and DKDP crystals under irradiation at different wavelengths. Our results indicate that there is more than one type of defects leading to damage initiation, each defect acting as damage initiators over a different wavelength range. Results showing disparities in the morphology of damage sites from exposure at different wavelengths provides additional evidence for the presence of multiple types of defects responsible for damage initiation.

  19. Gear Damage Detection Using Oil Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to verify, when using an oil debris sensor, that accumulated mass predicts gear pitting damage and to identify a method to set threshold limits for damaged gears. Oil debris data was collected from 8 experiments with no damage and 8 with pitting damage in the NASA Glenn Spur Gear Fatigue Rig. Oil debris feature analysis was performed on this data. Video images of damage progression were also collected from 6 of the experiments with pitting damage. During each test, data from an oil debris sensor was monitored and recorded for the occurrence of pitting damage. The data measured from the oil debris sensor during experiments with damage and with no damage was used to identify membership functions to build a simple fuzzy logic model. Using fuzzy logic techniques and the oil debris data, threshold limits were defined that discriminate between stages of pitting wear. Results indicate accumulated mass combined with fuzzy logic analysis techniques is a good predictor of pitting damage on spur gears.

  20. Flood damage claims reveal insights about surface runoff in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernet, D. B.; Prasuhn, V.; Weingartner, R.

    2015-12-01

    A few case studies in Switzerland exemplify that not only overtopping water bodies frequently cause damages to buildings. Reportedly, a large share of the total loss due to flooding in Switzerland goes back to surface runoff that is formed and is propagating outside of regular watercourses. Nevertheless, little is known about when, where and why such surface runoff occurs. The described process encompasses surface runoff formation, followed by unchannelised overland flow until a water body is reached. It is understood as a type of flash flood, has short response times and occurs diffusely in the landscape. Thus, the process is difficult to observe and study directly. A promising source indicating surface runoff indirectly are houseowners' damage claims recorded by Swiss Public Insurance Companies for Buildings (PICB). In most of Switzerland, PICB hold a monopoly position and insure (almost) every building. Consequently, PICB generally register all damages to buildings caused by an insured natural hazard (including surface runoff) within the respective zones. We have gathered gapless flood related claim records of most of all Swiss PICB covering more than the last two decades on average. Based on a subset, we have developed a methodology to differentiate claims related to surface runoff from other causes. This allows us to assess the number of claims as well as total loss related to surface runoff and compare these to the numbers of overtopping watercourses. Furthermore, with the good data coverage, we are able to analyze surface runoff related claims in space and time, from which we can infer spatial and temporal characteristics of surface runoff. Although the delivered data of PICB are heterogeneous and, consequently, time-consuming to harmonize, our first results show that exploiting these damage claim records is feasible and worthwhile to learn more about surface runoff in Switzerland.

  1. Femtosecond near-infrared laser microirradiation reveals a crucial role for PARP signaling on factor assemblies at DNA damage sites

    PubMed Central

    Saquilabon Cruz, Gladys Mae; Kong, Xiangduo; Silva, Bárbara Alcaraz; Khatibzadeh, Nima; Thai, Ryan; Berns, Michael W.; Yokomori, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Laser microirradiation is a powerful tool for real-time single-cell analysis of the DNA damage response (DDR). It is often found, however, that factor recruitment or modification profiles vary depending on the laser system employed. This is likely due to an incomplete understanding of how laser conditions/dosages affect the amounts and types of damage and the DDR. We compared different irradiation conditions using a femtosecond near-infrared laser and found distinct damage site recruitment thresholds for 53BP1 and TRF2 correlating with the dose-dependent increase of strand breaks and damage complexity. Low input-power microirradiation that induces relatively simple strand breaks led to robust recruitment of 53BP1 but not TRF2. In contrast, increased strand breaks with complex damage including crosslinking and base damage generated by high input-power microirradiation resulted in TRF2 recruitment to damage sites with no 53BP1 clustering. We found that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation distinguishes between the two damage states and that PARP activation is essential for rapid TRF2 recruitment while suppressing 53BP1 accumulation at damage sites. Thus, our results reveal that careful titration of laser irradiation conditions allows induction of varying amounts and complexities of DNA damage that are gauged by differential PARP activation regulating protein assembly at the damage site. PMID:26424850

  2. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals that Rad4 Employs a Dynamic DNA Damage Recognition Process.

    PubMed

    Kong, Muwen; Liu, Lili; Chen, Xuejing; Driscoll, Katherine I; Mao, Peng; Böhm, Stefanie; Kad, Neil M; Watkins, Simon C; Bernstein, Kara A; Wyrick, John J; Min, Jung-Hyun; Van Houten, Bennett

    2016-10-20

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that processes helix-destabilizing and/or -distorting DNA lesions, such as UV-induced photoproducts. Here, we investigate the dynamic protein-DNA interactions during the damage recognition step using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Quantum dot-labeled Rad4-Rad23 (yeast XPC-RAD23B ortholog) forms non-motile complexes or conducts a one-dimensional search via either random diffusion or constrained motion. Atomic force microcopy analysis of Rad4 with the β-hairpin domain 3 (BHD3) deleted reveals that this motif is non-essential for damage-specific binding and DNA bending. Furthermore, we find that deletion of seven residues in the tip of β-hairpin in BHD3 increases Rad4-Rad23 constrained motion at the expense of stable binding at sites of DNA lesions, without diminishing cellular UV resistance or photoproduct repair in vivo. These results suggest a distinct intermediate in the damage recognition process during NER, allowing dynamic DNA damage detection at a distance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Damage analysis in Al thin films fatigued at ultrahigh frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberl, Christoph; Spolenak, Ralph; Kraft, Oliver; Kubat, Franz; Ruile, Werner; Arzt, Eduard

    2006-06-01

    A quantitative damage analysis provides insight into the damage mechanisms and lifetimes of aluminum thin films fatigued at ultrahigh frequencies. Surface acoustic wave test devices were used to test continuous and patterned Al thin films up to more than 1014 cycles. The analysis revealed increasing extrusion and void formation concentrated at grain boundaries. This finding and the observed grain growth indicate a high material flux at the grain boundaries induced by the cyclic load. A correlation between device degradation and defect density is established which is explained by a theoretical model. For stress amplitudes as low as 14 MPa lifetime measurements showed no fatigue limit for 420 nm Al thin films.

  4. Nano-cathodoluminescence reveals the effect of electron damage on the optical properties of nitride optoelectronics and the damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James T.; Zhang, Siyuan; Lhuillier, Jeremy; Zhu, Dandan; Fu, Wai Yuen; Howkins, Ashley; Boyd, Ian; Stowe, David; Wallis, David J.; Humphreys, Colin J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2016-10-01

    Nano-cathodoluminescence (Nano-CL) reveals optical emission from individual InGaN quantum wells for applications in optoelectronic devices. We show the luminescent intensity decays over time with exposure to the electron beam for energies between 80 and 200 keV. Measurements of the CL intensity over time show an exponential decline in intensity, which we propose is due to the formation of nitrogen Frenkel defects. The measured CL damage decreases with reductions in the electron accelerating voltage and we suggest that the electron induced structural damage may be suppressed below the proposed damage threshold. The electron beam induced damage leads to a non-radiative region that extends over the measured minority carrier diffusion length. Nano-CL may thus serve as a powerful technique to study III-nitride optoelectronics.

  5. Equivalent damage validation by variable cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, Carlo; Ferlito, Rachele; Zucconi, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of this work is to perform a clustering analysis on the damage relieved in the old center of L'Aquila after the earthquake occurred on April 6, 2009 and to validate an Indicator of Equivalent Damage ED that summarizes the information reported on the AeDES card regarding the level of damage and their extension on the surface of the buildings. In particular we used a sample of 13442 masonry buildings located in an area characterized by a Macroseismic Intensity equal to 8 [1]. The aim is to ensure the coherence between the clusters and its hierarchy identified in the data of damage detected and in the data of the ED elaborated.

  6. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E. H.; Naylor, Maria L.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Gygi, Steven P.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast. PMID:27298372

  7. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E H; Naylor, Maria L; Dephoure, Noah; Ballif, Bryan A; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gygi, Steven P; Elledge, Stephen J

    2016-06-28

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast.

  8. Single cell trapping and DNA damage analysis using microwell arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wood, David K.; Weingeist, David M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2010-01-01

    With a direct link to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases as well as a critical role in cancer treatment, the importance of DNA damage is well-established. The intense interest in DNA damage in applications ranging from epidemiology to drug development drives an urgent need for robust, high throughput, and inexpensive tools for objective, quantitative DNA damage analysis. We have developed a simple method for high throughput DNA damage measurements that provides information on multiple lesions and pathways. Our method utilizes single cells captured by gravity into a microwell array with DNA damage revealed morphologically by gel electrophoresis. Spatial encoding enables simultaneous assays of multiple experimental conditions performed in parallel with fully automated analysis. This method also enables novel functionalities, including multiplexed labeling for parallel single cell assays, as well as DNA damage measurement in cell aggregates. We have also developed 24- and 96-well versions, which are applicable to high throughput screening. Using this platform, we have quantified DNA repair capacities of individuals with different genetic backgrounds, and compared the efficacy of potential cancer chemotherapeutics as inhibitors of a critical DNA repair enzyme, human AP endonuclease. This platform enables high throughput assessment of multiple DNA repair pathways and subpathways in parallel, thus enabling new strategies for drug discovery, genotoxicity testing, and environmental health. PMID:20534572

  9. Analysis and Repair of Impact Damaged Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Manager/Librarian (2 copies) Ansett Airlines of Australia, Library Australian Airlines, Library Qantas Airways Limited Civil Aviation Authority...VICTORIA Aircraft Structures Report 435 ANALYSIS AND REPAIR OF IMPACT DAMAGED COMPOSITES (U) by J. PAUL and R. JONES Approved for Public Release s DTICn...ACT 2601 I AR-005-570 EEPARDIP CIF EEFENCE IE I SCIENE AND 7Y CANISArION AEE rICAL EMSEACH LABRM AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES REPORT 435 ANALYSI AND REPAIR OF

  10. Analysis of Boling's laser-damage morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, M.S.

    1980-08-15

    Boling observed that his total-internal-reflection laser-damage sites in glass closely resembled the scattering cross section for small (ka << 1), perfectly conducting sphere and suggested that a very small plasma formed and grew to a larger size, still with ka << 1 satisfied. Even with ka = 1, for which the cross section is different from that observed, the scattered field still is too small to explain the damage in terms of constructive interference between the incident- and scattered fields. Furthermore, the characteristic shape of the scattering cross section that matches the damage patterns is for circular polarization or unpolarized light, in contrast to the experimental plane polarizations. Extending the ideas to include effects of the scattered field outside the glass, such as plasma formation, and to include the correct field (with interesting polarization, including longitudinal circuler polarization at certain distances from the surface) incident on the sphere may explain the experiments. Additional experiments and analysis would be useful to determine if the extended model is valid and to investigate related materials improvement, nondestructive testing, and the relation between laser damage, plasma initiation, and failure under stress, all initiated at small isolated spots.

  11. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-30

    to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00014- l6- l -2 173 Sc. PROGRAM... Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics A ward Number 1\\00014-1 6-1-2173 DOD - NAVY -Office of...of interface bonds between different phases in a composite . Task 1.2 Ply level constrained cracking Task 1.1 dealt with initiation of micro-level

  12. Subsurface damage mechanism of high speed grinding process in single crystal silicon revealed by atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Zhang, Liangchi; Liu, Youwen

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the nanoscale grinding process of single crystal silicon using diamond tool. The effect of grinding speed on subsurface damage and grinding surface integrity by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and phase transformation are studied. We also establish an analytical model to calculate several important stress fields including hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress for studying subsurface damage mechanism, and obtain the dislocation density on the grinding subsurface. The results show that a higher grinding velocity in machining brittle material silicon causes a larger chip and a higher temperature, and reduces subsurface damage. However, when grinding velocity is above 180 m s-1, subsurface damage thickness slightly increases because a higher grinding speed leads to the increase in grinding force and temperature, which accelerate dislocation nucleation and motion. Subsurface damage is studied by the evolution of surface area at first time for more obvious observation on transition from ductile to brittle, that provides valuable reference for machining nanometer devices. The von Mises stress and the hydrostatic stress play an important role in the grinding process, and explain the subsurface damage though dislocation mechanism under high stress status. The dislocation nucleation and motion induced plastic deformation during grinding process can better reveal subsurface damage mechanism considering to stress and temperature acting on the dislocations.

  13. Recent flood events in Germany - revealing damage influencing factors on residential property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, F.; Pech, I.; Thieken, A. H.; Kreibich, H.

    2009-04-01

    The trend of increasing damages due to floods can only be counteracted with effective flood management, based on reliable flood risk analysis. Better knowledge about the connections between flood losses and damage determining factors is necessary to improve damage estimation models. Thus extensive data about flood losses were collected at affected properties in Germany in the aftermath of floods in August 2002, August 2005 and April 2006. The data set contains more than 2100 residential damage cases. The data for the residential sector include information about building and content damages, evacuation, locations of the objects, people living at the sites and their socioeconomic situation, flood experience, precautionary measures undertaken before and during the event as well as flood information like maximum water level, flood duration, and flow velocity at the affected buildings. As first analyses showed significantly higher average damages caused by the extreme event in 2002 than by the 2005 and 2006 events the data sets were amended by adding site specific information about the recurrence interval of the event. Therefore, an estimation of the flood annuality was done for more than 120 gauges in the affected areas. The results were assigned to each damaged object to be able to analyze the influence of the magnitude on the flood damage. Thus, the data set enables a comparative analysis of multiple events of different severity that occurred over a couple of years in the same regions. Variables that contribute most to the explanation of damages are identified by multi-criteria analyses using data mining techniques and software, namely the WEKA-tool. In applying this routine to subsets (divided by region, by recurrence interval, by event) main differences in the contribution of single factors can be identified. The aim is to use the results for the improvement of existing flood damage estimation models.

  14. Dark progression reveals slow timescales for radiation damage between T = 180 and 240 K

    PubMed Central

    Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Can radiation damage to protein crystals be ‘outrun’ by collecting a structural data set before damage is manifested? Recent experiments using ultra-intense pulses from a free-electron laser show that the answer is yes. Here, evidence is presented that significant reductions in global damage at temperatures above 200 K may be possible using conventional X-ray sources and current or soon-to-be available detectors. Specifically, ‘dark progression’ (an increase in damage with time after the X-rays have been turned off) was observed at temperatures between 180 and 240 K and on timescales from 200 to 1200 s. This allowed estimation of the temperature-dependent timescale for damage. The rate of dark progression is consistent with an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 14 kJ mol−1. This is comparable to the activation energy for the solvent-coupled diffusive damage processes responsible for the rapid increase in radiation sensitivity as crystals are warmed above the glass transition near 200 K. Analysis suggests that at T = 300 K data-collection times of the order of 1 s (and longer at lower temperatures) may allow significant reductions in global radiation damage, facilitating structure solution on crystals with liquid solvent. No dark progression was observed below T = 180 K, indicating that no important damage process is slowed through this timescale window in this temperature range. PMID:21904032

  15. Dark progression reveals slow timescales for radiation damage between T = 180 and 240 K

    SciTech Connect

    Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-09-01

    Between T = 180 and 240 K, radiation damage progresses on minute timescales when the X-rays are off, suggesting that a fraction of damage at higher temperatures may be outrun using currently available sources and detectors. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be ‘outrun’ by collecting a structural data set before damage is manifested? Recent experiments using ultra-intense pulses from a free-electron laser show that the answer is yes. Here, evidence is presented that significant reductions in global damage at temperatures above 200 K may be possible using conventional X-ray sources and current or soon-to-be available detectors. Specifically, ‘dark progression’ (an increase in damage with time after the X-rays have been turned off) was observed at temperatures between 180 and 240 K and on timescales from 200 to 1200 s. This allowed estimation of the temperature-dependent timescale for damage. The rate of dark progression is consistent with an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 14 kJ mol{sup −1}. This is comparable to the activation energy for the solvent-coupled diffusive damage processes responsible for the rapid increase in radiation sensitivity as crystals are warmed above the glass transition near 200 K. Analysis suggests that at T = 300 K data-collection times of the order of 1 s (and longer at lower temperatures) may allow significant reductions in global radiation damage, facilitating structure solution on crystals with liquid solvent. No dark progression was observed below T = 180 K, indicating that no important damage process is slowed through this timescale window in this temperature range.

  16. An Integrated Software Package for Flood Damage Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    Table 4: : Effect of Flood Plain Management Measures Impacted Relationship’ Stage- Stage- Flow- Flow- Damage - Measure flow Damage Damage Frequency...US Army Corps of Engineers The Hydrologic Engineering Center AD-A206 232 An Integrated Software Packagi for Flood Damage Analysis / DTIC nELECTE f...does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. AN INTEGRATED SOFTWARE PACKAGE FOR FLOOD DAMAGE

  17. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    composites . However, this temperature can be varied. Today, resins are avai lable to do room temperature curing of thermosetting resins . Therefore, the... Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synerg istic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics Sb. GRANT NUMBER N00014-16-1 -2 173 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Quarterly Progress Report, Aprill -June 30, 2016 A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining

  18. Cross-Sectional Nakagami Images in Passive Stretches Reveal Damage of Injured Muscles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Ping; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Lin, Wei-Yin; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Shung, K Kirk; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strain is still awanting a noninvasive quantitatively diagnosis tool. High frequency ultrasound (HFU) improves image resolution for monitoring changes of tissue structures, but the biomechanical factors may influence ultrasonography during injury detection. We aim to illustrate the ultrasonic parameters to present the histological damage of overstretched muscle with the consideration of biomechanical factors. Gastrocnemius muscles from mice were assembled and ex vivo passive stretching was performed before or after injury. After injury, the muscle significantly decreased mechanical strength. Ultrasonic images were obtained by HFU at different deformations to scan in cross and longitudinal orientations of muscle. The ultrasonography was quantified by echogenicity and Nakagami parameters (NP) for structural evaluation and correlated with histological results. The injured muscle at its original length exhibited decreased echogenicity and NP from HFU images. Cross-sectional ultrasonography revealed a loss of correlation between NP and passive muscle stretching that suggested a special scatterer pattern in the cross section of injured muscle. The independence of NP during passive stretching of injured muscle was confirmed by histological findings in ruptured collagen fibers, decreased muscle density, and increased intermuscular fiber space. Thus, HFU analysis of NP in cross section represents muscle injury that may benefit the clinical diagnosis.

  19. Cross-Sectional Nakagami Images in Passive Stretches Reveal Damage of Injured Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Ping; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Lin, Wei-Yin; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Shung, K. Kirk; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strain is still awanting a noninvasive quantitatively diagnosis tool. High frequency ultrasound (HFU) improves image resolution for monitoring changes of tissue structures, but the biomechanical factors may influence ultrasonography during injury detection. We aim to illustrate the ultrasonic parameters to present the histological damage of overstretched muscle with the consideration of biomechanical factors. Gastrocnemius muscles from mice were assembled and ex vivo passive stretching was performed before or after injury. After injury, the muscle significantly decreased mechanical strength. Ultrasonic images were obtained by HFU at different deformations to scan in cross and longitudinal orientations of muscle. The ultrasonography was quantified by echogenicity and Nakagami parameters (NP) for structural evaluation and correlated with histological results. The injured muscle at its original length exhibited decreased echogenicity and NP from HFU images. Cross-sectional ultrasonography revealed a loss of correlation between NP and passive muscle stretching that suggested a special scatterer pattern in the cross section of injured muscle. The independence of NP during passive stretching of injured muscle was confirmed by histological findings in ruptured collagen fibers, decreased muscle density, and increased intermuscular fiber space. Thus, HFU analysis of NP in cross section represents muscle injury that may benefit the clinical diagnosis. PMID:27034946

  20. Statistical Analysis of Japanese Structural Damage Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    Calculated Peak Overpressure Data ......... .. 36 Figure 4. Frequency Functions for Assumed Damage Laws ............ .. 38 Figure 5. Conversions to Value of...Buildings .... .......... .. 92 Figure 20. Effect of Damage Law on Confidence Regions ............ .. 97 * Figure 21. Comparison of Confidence Limits on...Value of ad (Cumulative Log Normal Damage Law ) ...... ............ .. 99 * Figure 22. Comparison of Confidence Limits on Value of ad (Cumulative Log

  1. Microbial Response to Soil Liming of Damaged Ecosystems Revealed by Pyrosequencing and Phospholipid Fatty Acid Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Narendrula-Kotha, Ramya; Nkongolo, Kabwe K.

    2017-01-01

    Aims To assess the effects of dolomitic limestone applications on soil microbial communities’ dynamics and bacterial and fungal biomass, relative abundance, and diversity in metal reclaimed regions. Methods and Results The study was conducted in reclaimed mining sites and metal uncontaminated areas. The limestone applications were performed over 35 years ago. Total microbial biomass was determined by Phospholipid fatty acids. Bacterial and fungal relative abundance and diversity were assessed using 454 pyrosequencing. There was a significant increase of total microbial biomass in limed sites (342 ng/g) compared to unlimed areas (149 ng/g). Chao1 estimates followed the same trend. But the total number of OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units) in limed (463 OTUs) and unlimed (473 OTUs) soil samples for bacteria were similar. For fungi, OTUs were 96 and 81 for limed and unlimed soil samples, respectively. Likewise, Simpson and Shannon diversity indices revealed no significant differences between limed and unlimed sites. Bacterial and fungal groups specific to either limed or unlimed sites were identified. Five major bacterial phyla including Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were found. The latter was the most prevalent phylum in all the samples with a relative abundance of 50%. Bradyrhizobiaceae family with 12 genera including the nitrogen fixing Bradirhizobium genus was more abundant in limed sites compared to unlimed areas. For fungi, Ascomycota was the most predominant phylum in unlimed soils (46%) while Basidiomycota phylum represented 86% of all fungi in the limed areas. Conclusion Detailed analysis of the data revealed that although soil liming increases significantly the amount of microbial biomass, the level of species diversity remain statistically unchanged even though the microbial compositions of the damaged and restored sites are different. Significance and Impact of the study Soil liming still have a significant

  2. Microbial Response to Soil Liming of Damaged Ecosystems Revealed by Pyrosequencing and Phospholipid Fatty Acid Analyses.

    PubMed

    Narendrula-Kotha, Ramya; Nkongolo, Kabwe K

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effects of dolomitic limestone applications on soil microbial communities' dynamics and bacterial and fungal biomass, relative abundance, and diversity in metal reclaimed regions. The study was conducted in reclaimed mining sites and metal uncontaminated areas. The limestone applications were performed over 35 years ago. Total microbial biomass was determined by Phospholipid fatty acids. Bacterial and fungal relative abundance and diversity were assessed using 454 pyrosequencing. There was a significant increase of total microbial biomass in limed sites (342 ng/g) compared to unlimed areas (149 ng/g). Chao1 estimates followed the same trend. But the total number of OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units) in limed (463 OTUs) and unlimed (473 OTUs) soil samples for bacteria were similar. For fungi, OTUs were 96 and 81 for limed and unlimed soil samples, respectively. Likewise, Simpson and Shannon diversity indices revealed no significant differences between limed and unlimed sites. Bacterial and fungal groups specific to either limed or unlimed sites were identified. Five major bacterial phyla including Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were found. The latter was the most prevalent phylum in all the samples with a relative abundance of 50%. Bradyrhizobiaceae family with 12 genera including the nitrogen fixing Bradirhizobium genus was more abundant in limed sites compared to unlimed areas. For fungi, Ascomycota was the most predominant phylum in unlimed soils (46%) while Basidiomycota phylum represented 86% of all fungi in the limed areas. Detailed analysis of the data revealed that although soil liming increases significantly the amount of microbial biomass, the level of species diversity remain statistically unchanged even though the microbial compositions of the damaged and restored sites are different. Soil liming still have a significant beneficial effects on soil microbial abundance and composition > 35 years

  3. Accurate 3d Scanning of Damaged Ancient Greek Inscriptions for Revealing Weathered Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadaki, A. I.; Agrafiotis, P.; Georgopoulos, A.; Prignitz, S.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper two non-invasive non-destructive alternative techniques to the traditional and invasive technique of squeezes are presented alongside with specialized developed processing methods, aiming to help the epigraphists to reveal and analyse weathered letters in ancient Greek inscriptions carved in masonry or marble. The resulting 3D model would serve as a detailed basis for the epigraphists to try to decipher the inscription. The data were collected by using a Structured Light scanner. The creation of the final accurate three dimensional model is a complicated procedure requiring large computation cost and human effort. It includes the collection of geometric data in limited space and time, the creation of the surface, the noise filtering and the merging of individual surfaces. The use of structured light scanners is time consuming and requires costly hardware and software. Therefore an alternative methodology for collecting 3D data of the inscriptions was also implemented for reasons of comparison. Hence, image sequences from varying distances were collected using a calibrated DSLR camera aiming to reconstruct the 3D scene through SfM techniques in order to evaluate the efficiency and the level of precision and detail of the obtained reconstructed inscriptions. Problems in the acquisition processes as well as difficulties in the alignment step and mesh optimization are also encountered. A meta-processing framework is proposed and analysed. Finally, the results of processing and analysis and the different 3D models are critically inspected and then evaluated by a specialist in terms of accuracy, quality and detail of the model and the capability of revealing damaged and "hidden" letters.

  4. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-1 6-1-2173 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics Award Number N00014-16-1-2173 DOD - NAVY- Office of Naval Research PI: Ramesh Talreja Co-PI: Florin Bobaru Executive...local stress states are responsible for the precursor mechanisms that initiate cracks. This task studies the point-failure processes that become critical

  5. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-30

    during resin infusion in polymer matrix composites . Task 2.1 is concerned with damage evolution in a peridynamic model of poroelastic materials. Effects... Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics 5b. GRANT NUMBER NOOO 14-16-1-2173 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...element containing disordered fiber distributions. Procedures have been developed to simulate formation of fiber clusters during resin infusion in

  6. Characterization of Multiple Light Damage Paradigms Reveals Regional Differences in Photoreceptor Loss

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jennifer L.; Nelson, Craig M.; Luo, Xixia; Hyde, David R.; Thummel, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Zebrafish provide an attractive model to study the retinal response to photoreceptor apoptosis due to its remarkable ability to spontaneously regenerate retinal neurons following damage. There are currently two widely used light-induced retinal degeneration models to damage photoreceptors in the adult zebrafish. One model uses constant bright light, whereas the other uses a short exposure to extremely intense ultraviolet light. Although both models are currently used, it is unclear whether they differ in regard to the extent of photoreceptor damage or the subsequent regeneration response. Here we report a thorough analysis of the photoreceptor damage and subsequent proliferation response elicited by each individual treatment, as well as by the concomitant use of both treatments. We show a differential loss of rod and cone photoreceptors with each treatment. Additionally, we show that the extent of proliferation observed in the retina directly correlates with the severity of photoreceptor loss. We also demonstrate that both the ventral and posterior regions of the retina are partially protected from light damage. Finally, we show that combining a short ultraviolet exposure followed by a constant bright light treatment largely eliminates the neuroprotected regions, resulting in widespread loss of rod and cone photoreceptors and a robust regenerative response throughout the retina. PMID:22425727

  7. Thermographic analysis of surface damage in teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde-Contreras, M.; Bante-Guerra, J.; Hernandez-Garcia, E.; Hernandez, A. M.; Trujillo, S.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2008-02-01

    The analysis of the surface of teeth is an important field of research and technological development due to the importance of dental pieces in health and aesthetics. The presence of cracks as well as the etching effects on teeth surface, due to different chemical agents, affects not only the appearance of teeth but its integrity. In this work, laser thermography analysis of dental pieces with damage in the form of cracks is presented. The technique consists in the illumination of the surface at the center of the sample, using a 300 mW pulsed solid state laser beam focused with a gradium lens, and monitoring the spatial and temporal distribution of the temperature field. The heating of the sample is monitored using a focal plane array infrared camera, sensitive in the spectral range 7.5-13 μm with a noise equivalent temperature difference of 0.12°C. The data acquisition was performed by the PC firewire port using a PCI-8254R card and a home-made program in Labview 8.0 was used for data acquisition. The images were processed in a home-made linux program to obtain the experimental table values. Our results are compared with position and frequency scans obtained by infrared photothermal radiometry. It is shown that the crack in the tooth appears as an increase in the photothermal signal. In contrast, the thermographic image shows a more detailed structure in which close to the crack the temperature increases, but at the crack the signal falls.

  8. Mutational strand asymmetries in cancer genomes reveal mechanisms of DNA damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Haradhvala, Nicholas J.; Polak, Paz; Stojanov, Petar; Covington, Kyle R.; Shinbrot, Eve; Hess, Julian; Rheinbay, Esther; Kim, Jaegil; Maruvka, Yosef; Braunstein, Lior Z.; Kamburov, Atanas; Hanawalt, Philip C.; Wheeler, David A.; Koren, Amnon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Mutational processes constantly shape the somatic genome, leading to immunity, aging, and other diseases. When cancer is the outcome, we are afforded a glimpse into these processes by the clonal expansion of the malignant cell. Here, we characterize a less explored layer of the mutational landscape of cancer: mutational asymmetries between the two DNA strands. Analyzing whole genome sequences of 590 tumors from 14 different cancer types, we reveal widespread asymmetries across mutagenic processes, with transcriptional (“T-class”) asymmetry dominating UV-, smoking-, and liver-cancer-associated mutations, and replicative (“R-class”) asymmetry dominating POLE-, APOBEC-, and MSI-associated mutations. We report a striking phenomenon of Transcription-Coupled Damage (TCD) on the non-transcribed DNA strand, and provide evidence that APOBEC mutagenesis occurs on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication. As more genomes are sequenced, studying and classifying their asymmetries will illuminate the underlying biological mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. PMID:26806129

  9. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts: Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    This handbook reviews the analysis of structural damage on spacecraft due to hypervelocity impacts by meteoroid and space debris. These impacts can potentially cause structural damage to a Space Station module wall. This damage ranges from craters, bulges, minor penetrations, and spall to critical damage associated with a large hole, or even rupture. The analysis of damage depends on a variety of assumptions and the area of most concern is at a velocity beyond well controlled laboratory capability. In the analysis of critical damage, one of the key questions is how much momentum can actually be transfered to the pressure vessel wall. When penetration occurs without maximum bulging at high velocity and obliquities (if less momentum is deposited in the rear wall), then large tears and rupture may be avoided. In analysis of rupture effects of cylindrical geometry, biaxial loading, bending of the crack, a central hole strain rate and R-curve effects are discussed.

  10. Fatigue damage analysis under variable amplitude cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Forte, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper explores the suitability of a recently proposed mean stress parameter and introduces a nonlinear damage accumulation procedure. Data covering a range of positive and negative stress ratios from +0.6 to -2.66, for several aluminum alloys and steels, are assembled and shown to be well correlated by a simple damage parameter. A nonlinear damage accumulation postulate is advanced to replace the usual linear procedure. Results of critical experiments performed to assess the suitability of the postulate are introduced and shown to support a non-linear criterion. The implications of this work related to variable amplitude life prediction are discussed.

  11. Luminescence analysis of damage accumulation; case study of calcium molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagielski, J.; Gawlik, G.; Jozwik-Biala, I.; Panczer, G.; Moncoffre, N.; Wang, X.; Ratajczak, R.; Swirkowicz, M.; Thomé, L.

    2014-08-01

    A comparative study of damage accumulation in calcium molybdate (CaMoO4) has been conducted using Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling (RBS/C), cathodoluminescence (CL) and ionoluminescence (IL) techniques. All methods used confirm a two-step character of damage build-up process. Similar threshold fluence values have been extracted from RBS/C, CL and IL measurements. This analysis confirms the huge potential of luminescence techniques for damage analysis in single- and polycrystalline samples and the ability of the IL method to perform fast, in situ analysis of damage accumulation process.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Interaction of Human and Yeast DNA Damage Recognition Complexes with Damaged DNA in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Pestryakov, Pavel E.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2013-01-01

    The human XPC-RAD23B complex and its yeast ortholog, Rad4-Rad23, are the primary initiators of global genome nucleotide excision repair. The interaction of these proteins with damaged DNA was analyzed using model DNA duplexes containing a single fluorescein-substituted dUMP analog as a lesion. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed similarity between human and yeast proteins in DNA binding. Quantitative analyses of XPC/Rad4 binding to the model DNA structures were performed by fluorescent depolarization measurements. XPC-RAD23B and Rad4-Rad23 proteins demonstrate approximately equal binding affinity to the damaged DNA duplex (KD ∼ (0.5 ± 0.1) and (0.6 ± 0.3) nm, respectively). Using photoreactive DNA containing 5-iodo-dUMP in defined positions, XPC/Rad4 location on damaged DNA was shown. Under conditions of equimolar binding to DNA both proteins exhibited the highest level of cross-links to 5I-dUMP located exactly opposite the damaged nucleotide. The positioning of the XPC and Rad4 proteins on damaged DNA by photocross-linking footprinting is consistent with x-ray analysis of the Rad4-DNA crystal complex. The identity of the XPC and Rad4 location illustrates the common principles of structure organization of DNA damage-scanning proteins from different Eukarya organisms. PMID:23443653

  13. A method of damage mechanics analysis for solder material

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, H.E.; Chow, C.L.; Yang, Fan

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents as a method of damage mechanics analysis for solder joint material stressed to extensive plastic deformation. The material chosen for the current work is the 60Sn-40Pb eutectic alloy due to its wide use. The analysis is based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes. With the introduction of a set of internal state variables, known as damage variables, and a damage effect tensor, a damage dissipative potential function is proposed to enable the formulation of the constitutive equations of elasticity and plasticity coupled with damage. The equations of damage evolution are also derived to monitor damage initiation and growth. Before a damage analysis can be performed with a finite element analysis, the mechanical properties of the chosen solder joint material and its damage variables must first be determined. A method of experimental analysis was developed and used to successfully measure the highly strain sensitive 60Sn-40Pb solder material. The measured properties are presented and various characteristics of the solder material are examined and discussed. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Nonlinear damage analysis: Postulate and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Forte, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is to assess the viability of a damage postulate which asserts that the fatigue resistance curve of a metal is history dependent due to inelastic action. The study focusses on OFE copper because this simple model material accentuates the inelastic action central to the damage postulate. Data relevant to damage evolution and crack initiation are developed via a study of surface topography. The effects of surface layer residual stresses are explored via comparative testing as were the effects in initial prestraining. The results of the study very clearly show the deformation history dependence of the fatigue resistance of OFE copper. Furthermore the concept of deformation history dependence is shown to qualitatively explain the fatigue resistance of all histories considered. Likewise quantitative predictions for block cycle histories are found to accurately track the observed results. In this respect the assertion that damage per cycle for a given level of the damage parameter is deformation history dependent appears to be physically justified.

  15. Revealing Student Teacher's Thinking through Dilemma Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talanquer, Vicente; Tomanek, Debra; Novodvorsky, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    We explore the potential of dilemma analysis as an assessment tool to reveal student teachers' thinking and concerns about their practice. For this purpose we analyze the dilemma analyses completed by 22 student teachers enrolled in our science teacher preparation program over a period of four semesters. Student teachers' dilemmas fall into two…

  16. Analysis of optics damage growth at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z. M.; Nostrand, M.; Whitman, P.; Bude, J.

    2015-11-01

    Optics damage growth modeling and analysis at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been performed on fused silica. We will show the results of single shot growth comparisons, damage site lifetime comparisons as well as growth metrics for each individual NIF beamline. These results help validate the consistency of the damage growth models and allow us to have confidence in our strategic planning in regards to projected optic usage.

  17. Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.; Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented durable redundant joint. Both designs involve honeycomb sandwich structures with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined using adhesively bonded doublers.Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage within a structure. For structures that include multiple material systems, such as the joint designs under consideration, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be accounted for drastically increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, intraply matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The bonded joints were modeled using highly parametric, explicitly solved finite element models, with damage modeling implemented via custom user-written subroutines. Each ply was discretely meshed using three-dimensional solid elements. Layers of cohesive elements were included between each ply to account for the possibility of delaminations and were used to model the adhesive layers forming the joint. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and the predicted failure mechanism(s).

  18. Business Depth-Damage Analysis Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    inside construction Styrofoam and similar types of insulation are less susceptible to damage than fiberglass and woolfiber insulation. Most drywall ...and any plaster will crumble under prolonged inundation. Waterproof drywall will hold up for long floods. Paneling may be salvageable when other wall

  19. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-30

    most manufacturing processes for polymer matrix composites (PMCs) one starts with dry bundles of fibers. On resin infusion, the initially closed-pack... Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics 5b. GRANT NUMBER NOOO 14-16-1-21 73 5c. PROGRAM...distributions. The activities related to Task 2 cover the new peridynamic model for multi-phase composites which can introduce the presence of pores and

  20. Multiscale models of skeletal muscle reveal the complex effects of muscular dystrophy on tissue mechanics and damage susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Kelley M.; Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been increasingly used to study the tissue-level constitutive properties of muscle microstructure; however, these models were not created to study or incorporate the influence of disease-associated modifications in muscle. The purpose of this paper was to develop a novel multiscale muscle modelling framework to elucidate the relationship between microstructural disease adaptations and modifications in both mechanical properties of muscle and strain in the cell membrane. We used an agent-based model to randomly generate new muscle fibre geometries and mapped them into a finite-element model representing a cross section of a muscle fascicle. The framework enabled us to explore variability in the shape and arrangement of fibres, as well as to incorporate disease-related changes. We applied this method to reveal the trade-offs between mechanical properties and damage susceptibility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is a fatal genetic disease caused by a lack of the transmembrane protein dystrophin, leading to muscle wasting and death due to cardiac or pulmonary complications. The most prevalent microstructural variations in DMD include: lack of transmembrane proteins, fibrosis, fatty infiltration and variation in fibre cross-sectional area. A parameter analysis of these variations and case study of DMD revealed that the nature of fibrosis and density of transmembrane proteins strongly affected the stiffness of the muscle and susceptibility to membrane damage. PMID:25844152

  1. Multiscale models of skeletal muscle reveal the complex effects of muscular dystrophy on tissue mechanics and damage susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, Kelley M; Martin, Kyle S; Peirce, Shayn M; Blemker, Silvia S

    2015-04-06

    Computational models have been increasingly used to study the tissue-level constitutive properties of muscle microstructure; however, these models were not created to study or incorporate the influence of disease-associated modifications in muscle. The purpose of this paper was to develop a novel multiscale muscle modelling framework to elucidate the relationship between microstructural disease adaptations and modifications in both mechanical properties of muscle and strain in the cell membrane. We used an agent-based model to randomly generate new muscle fibre geometries and mapped them into a finite-element model representing a cross section of a muscle fascicle. The framework enabled us to explore variability in the shape and arrangement of fibres, as well as to incorporate disease-related changes. We applied this method to reveal the trade-offs between mechanical properties and damage susceptibility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is a fatal genetic disease caused by a lack of the transmembrane protein dystrophin, leading to muscle wasting and death due to cardiac or pulmonary complications. The most prevalent microstructural variations in DMD include: lack of transmembrane proteins, fibrosis, fatty infiltration and variation in fibre cross-sectional area. A parameter analysis of these variations and case study of DMD revealed that the nature of fibrosis and density of transmembrane proteins strongly affected the stiffness of the muscle and susceptibility to membrane damage.

  2. The dig task: a simple scent discrimination reveals deficits following frontal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Martens, Kris M; Vonder Haar, Cole; Hutsell, Blake A; Hoane, Michael R

    2013-01-04

    Cognitive impairment is the most frequent cause of disability in humans following brain damage, yet the behavioral tasks used to assess cognition in rodent models of brain injury is lacking. Borrowing from the operant literature our laboratory utilized a basic scent discrimination paradigm in order to assess deficits in frontally-injured rats. Previously we have briefly described the Dig task and demonstrated that rats with frontal brain damage show severe deficits across multiple tests within the task. Here we present a more detailed protocol for this task. Rats are placed into a chamber and allowed to discriminate between two scented sands, one of which contains a reinforcer. The trial ends after the rat either correctly discriminates (defined as digging in the correct scented sand), incorrectly discriminates, or 30 sec elapses. Rats that correctly discriminate are allowed to recover and consume the reinforcer. Rats that discriminate incorrectly are immediately removed from the chamber. This can continue through a variety of reversals and novel scents. The primary analysis is the accuracy for each scent pairing (cumulative proportion correct for each scent). The general findings from the Dig task suggest that it is a simple experimental preparation that can assess deficits in rats with bilateral frontal cortical damage compared to rats with unilateral parietal damage. The Dig task can also be easily incorporated into an existing cognitive test battery. The use of more tasks such as this one can lead to more accurate testing of frontal function following injury, which may lead to therapeutic options for treatment. All animal use was conducted in accordance with protocols approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee.

  3. Genetic Interaction Landscape Reveals Critical Requirements for Schizosaccharomyces pombe Brc1 in DNA Damage Response Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Arancha; Roguev, Assen; Krogan, Nevan J.; Russell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Brc1, which was first identified as a high-copy, allele-specific suppressor of a mutation impairing the Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, protects genome integrity during normal DNA replication and when cells are exposed to toxic compounds that stall or collapse replication forks. The C-terminal tandem BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminus) domain of fission yeast Brc1 docks with phosphorylated histone H2A (γH2A)-marked chromatin formed by ATR/Rad3 checkpoint kinase at arrested and damaged replication forks; however, how Brc1 functions in relation to other genome protection modules remains unclear. Here, an epistatic mini-array profile reveals critical requirements for Brc1 in mutants that are defective in multiple DNA damage response pathways, including checkpoint signaling by Rad3-Rad26/ATR-ATRIP kinase, DNA repair by Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex, replication fork stabilization by Mrc1/claspin and Swi1-Swi3/Timeless-Tipin, and control of ubiquitin-regulated proteolysis by the COP9 signalosome (CSN). Exogenous genotoxins enhance these negative genetic interactions. Rad52 and RPA foci are increased in CSN-defective cells, and loss of γH2A increases genotoxin sensitivity, indicating a critical role for the γH2A-Brc1 module in stabilizing replication forks in CSN-defective cells. A negative genetic interaction with the Nse6 subunit of Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex indicates that the DNA repair functions of Brc1 and Smc5-Smc6 holocomplex are at least partially independent. Rtt107, the Brc1 homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has a very different pattern of genetic interactions, indicating evolutionary divergence of functions and DNA damage responses. PMID:25795664

  4. Damage functions for climate-related hazards: unification and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Boris F.; Rybski, Diego; Boettle, Markus; Kropp, Jürgen P.

    2016-05-01

    Most climate change impacts manifest in the form of natural hazards. Damage assessment typically relies on damage functions that translate the magnitude of extreme events to a quantifiable damage. In practice, the availability of damage functions is limited due to a lack of data sources and a lack of understanding of damage processes. The study of the characteristics of damage functions for different hazards could strengthen the theoretical foundation of damage functions and support their development and validation. Accordingly, we investigate analogies of damage functions for coastal flooding and for wind storms and identify a unified approach. This approach has general applicability for granular portfolios and may also be applied, for example, to heat-related mortality. Moreover, the unification enables the transfer of methodology between hazards and a consistent treatment of uncertainty. This is demonstrated by a sensitivity analysis on the basis of two simple case studies (for coastal flood and storm damage). The analysis reveals the relevance of the various uncertainty sources at varying hazard magnitude and on both the microscale and the macroscale level. Main findings are the dominance of uncertainty from the hazard magnitude and the persistent behaviour of intrinsic uncertainties on both scale levels. Our results shed light on the general role of uncertainties and provide useful insight for the application of the unified approach.

  5. Phosphoproteomic Profiling Reveals Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Kinase Integration of DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Renfeng; Pinto, Sneha M.; Shaw, Patrick G.; Huang, Tai-Chung; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Gowda, Harsha; Wu, Xinyan; Lv, Dong-Wen; Zhang, Kun; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hayward, S. Diane

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically linked to infectious mononucleosis and several human cancers. EBV encodes a conserved protein kinase BGLF4 that plays a key role in the viral life cycle. To provide new insight into the host proteins regulated by BGLF4, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to compare site-specific phosphorylation in BGLF4-expressing Akata B cells. Our analysis revealed BGLF4-mediated hyperphosphorylation of 3,046 unique sites corresponding to 1,328 proteins. Frequency analysis of these phosphosites revealed a proline-rich motif signature downstream of BGLF4, indicating a broader substrate recognition for BGLF4 than its cellular ortholog cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Further, motif analysis of the hyperphosphorylated sites revealed enrichment in ATM, ATR and Aurora kinase substrates while functional analyses revealed significant enrichment of pathways related to the DNA damage response (DDR), mitosis and cell cycle. Phosphorylation of proteins associated with the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) indicated checkpoint activation, an event that inactivates the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to and directly phosphorylates the key cellular proteins PP1, MPS1 and CDC20 that lie upstream of SAC activation and APC/C inhibition. Consistent with APC/C inactivation, we found that BGLF4 stabilizes the expression of many known APC/C substrates. We also noted hyperphosphorylation of 22 proteins associated the nuclear pore complex, which may contribute to nuclear pore disassembly and SAC activation. A drug that inhibits mitotic checkpoint activation also suppressed the accumulation of extracellular EBV virus. Taken together, our data reveal that, in addition to the DDR, manipulation of mitotic kinase signaling and SAC activation are mechanisms associated with lytic EBV replication. All MS data have been deposited in

  6. Controlled DNA double-strand break induction in mice reveals post-damage transcriptome stability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongkyu; Sturgill, David; Tran, Andy D; Sinclair, David A; Oberdoerffer, Philipp

    2016-04-20

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their repair can cause extensive epigenetic changes. As a result, DSBs have been proposed to promote transcriptional and, ultimately, physiological dysfunction via both cell-intrinsic and cell-non-autonomous pathways. Studying the consequences of DSBs in higher organisms has, however, been hindered by a scarcity of tools for controlled DSB induction. Here, we describe a mouse model that allows for both tissue-specific and temporally controlled DSB formation at ∼140 defined genomic loci. Using this model, we show that DSBs promote a DNA damage signaling-dependent decrease in gene expression in primary cells specifically at break-bearing genes, which is reversed upon DSB repair. Importantly, we demonstrate that restoration of gene expression can occur independently of cell cycle progression, underlining its relevance for normal tissue maintenance. Consistent with this, we observe no evidence for persistent transcriptional repression in response to a multi-day course of continuous DSB formation and repair in mouse lymphocytes in vivo Together, our findings reveal an unexpected capacity of primary cells to maintain transcriptome integrity in response to DSBs, pointing to a limited role for DNA damage as a mediator of cell-autonomous epigenetic dysfunction.

  7. Study on an auto-correlation-function-based damage index: Sensitivity analysis and structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2015-12-01

    The damage index based on the auto correlation function to detect the damage of the structure under white noise excitation is studied in detail in this paper. The maximum values of the auto correlation function of the vibration response signals (displacement, velocity and acceleration) from different measurement points of the structure are collected and formulated as a vector called Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector (AMV), which is expressed as a weighted combination of the Hadamard product of two mode shapes. AMV is normalized by its root mean square value so that the influence of the excitation can be eliminated. Sensitivity analysis for the different parts of the normalized AMV shows that the sensitivity of the normalized AMV to the local stiffness is dependent most on the sensitivity of the Hadamard product of the two lower order mode shapes to the local stiffness, which has a sudden change of the value around the local stiffness change position. The sensitivity of the normalized AMV has the similar shape and same trend that shows it is a very good damage indicator even for the very small damage. The relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage occurs in the structure is adopted as the damage index to show the damage location. Several examples of the stiffness reduction detection of a 12-story shear frame structure are utilized to validate the results in sensitivity analysis, illustrate the effectiveness and anti-noise ability of the AMV-based damage detection method and compare the effect of the response type on the detectability of the normalized AMV.

  8. Identification of S-phase DNA damage-response targets in fission yeast reveals conservation of damage-response networks

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E. H.; Murray, Johanne M.; Carr, Antony M.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Rhind, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The cellular response to DNA damage during S-phase regulates a complicated network of processes, including cell-cycle progression, gene expression, DNA replication kinetics, and DNA repair. In fission yeast, this S-phase DNA damage response (DDR) is coordinated by two protein kinases: Rad3, the ortholog of mammalian ATR, and Cds1, the ortholog of mammalian Chk2. Although several critical downstream targets of Rad3 and Cds1 have been identified, most of their presumed targets are unknown, including the targets responsible for regulating replication kinetics and coordinating replication and repair. To characterize targets of the S-phase DDR, we identified proteins phosphorylated in response to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced S-phase DNA damage in wild-type, rad3∆, and cds1∆ cells by proteome-wide mass spectrometry. We found a broad range of S-phase–specific DDR targets involved in gene expression, stress response, regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis, and DNA replication and repair. These targets are highly enriched for proteins required for viability in response to MMS, indicating their biological significance. Furthermore, the regulation of these proteins is similar in fission and budding yeast, across 300 My of evolution, demonstrating a deep conservation of S-phase DDR targets and suggesting that these targets may be critical for maintaining genome stability in response to S-phase DNA damage across eukaryotes. PMID:27298342

  9. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging reveals visual pathway damage that correlates with clinical severity in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqi; Lin, Fuchun; Wang, Junming; Li, Zheng; Dai, Hui; Mu, Ketao; Ge, Jian; Zhang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate nerve fibre damage of the visual pathway in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma using tract-based spatial statistical analysis of diffusion tensor imaging and correlate these measures with the clinical severity of glaucoma. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-five individuals with primary open-angle glaucoma and 24 healthy controls were recruited. All subjects underwent detailed ophthalmological examinations, including the cup-to-disc ratio, retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and visual fields test. Diffusion tensor imaging of the visual pathway was performed using a 3.0-T magnetic resonance scanner. Diffusivity changes of the nerve fibres in the visual pathway were calculated through tract-based spatial statistical analysis. The mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were assessed and compared with ophthalmological measurements. Compared with controls, bilateral optic tracts and optic radiations in primary open-angle glaucoma patients showed significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and increased mean diffusivity (P < 0.05). In the glaucoma group, the fractional anisotropy of the optic tracts and optic radiations varied consistently with the cup-to-disc ratio, retinal nerve fibre layer thickness and visual function analysis, respectively (P < 0.05). The mean diffusivity of the optic tracts correlated with these ophthalmological measurements (P < 0.05). However, no significant correlation was observed between the mean diffusivity of the optic radiations and the ophthalmological measurements (P > 0.05). The optic tracts and optic radiations of primary open-angle glaucoma patients demonstrated radiological evidence of neurodegeneration. This varied with damage to the optic disc and with the loss of visual function. Tract-based spatial statistical analysis of diffusion tensor imaging is an objective and effective tool for detecting the loss of cortical nerve fibres in primary open-angle glaucoma. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental

  10. Structure of crystal defects in damaged RDX as revealed by an AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, J.; Hoover, S. M.; Coffey, C. S.; Tompa, A. S.; Sandusky, H. W.; Armstrong, R. W.; Elban, W. L.

    1998-07-10

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) was employed to reveal the structure of defects produced in single crystals of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), damaged either by indentation, heat or underwater shock. In general, all of these stimuli produced dislocation pits, cracks, fissures and mosaics, however, the details were different. Indentation generated a large number of triangular dislocation pits, which in their turn produced fissures, cracks and holes by coalescing. Heat produced fine parallel cracks. Slivers as thin as sixty molecules across were observed. Shock caused the crystal to become a three-dimensional mosaic structure, 100-500 nm in size, produced by intensive cleavage and delamination. In all cases very fine particles, 20-500 nm in size, were ejected onto the surface as debris from the formation of defects. The AFM has revealed for the first time un-etched dislocation pits in their pristine condition, so that their internal structure could be investigated. A dislocation density of 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} has been observed. RDX is found to behave like a very fragile crystal in which numerous imperfections show up at a level of the stimuli, far below that necessary for the start of chemical reaction.

  11. Targeted detection of in vivo endogenous DNA base damage reveals preferential base excision repair in the transcribed strand

    PubMed Central

    Reis, António M. C.; Mills, Wilbur K.; Ramachandran, Ilangovan; Friedberg, Errol C.; Thompson, David; Queimado, Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous DNA damage is removed mainly via base excision repair (BER), however, whether there is preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage is still under intense debate. We developed a highly sensitive primer-anchored DNA damage detection assay (PADDA) to map and quantify in vivo endogenous DNA damage. Using PADDA, we documented significantly higher levels of endogenous damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in stationary phase than in exponential phase. We also documented that yeast BER-defective cells have significantly higher levels of endogenous DNA damage than isogenic wild-type cells at any phase of growth. PADDA provided detailed fingerprint analysis at the single-nucleotide level, documenting for the first time that persistent endogenous nucleotide damage in CAN1 co-localizes with previously reported spontaneous CAN1 mutations. To quickly and reliably quantify endogenous strand-specific DNA damage in the constitutively expressed CAN1 gene, we used PADDA on a real-time PCR setting. We demonstrate that wild-type cells repair endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. In contrast, yeast BER-defective cells accumulate endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. These data provide the first direct evidence for preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage and documents the major role of BER in this process. PMID:21911361

  12. Revealing Student Teachers' Thinking through Dilemma Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanquer, Vicente; Tomanek, Debra; Novodvorsky, Ingrid

    2007-06-01

    We explore the potential of dilemma analysis as an assessment tool to reveal student teachers’ thinking and concerns about their practice. For this purpose we analyze the dilemma analyses completed by 22 student teachers enrolled in our science teacher preparation program over a period of four semesters. Student teachers’ dilemmas fall into two main groups: dilemmas about student performance and dilemmas associated with instructional decisions. These dilemmas reveal a variety of concerns that student teachers have about their work. In particular, concerns about lack of student motivation and its consequences on performance and instruction play a central role in student teachers’ thinking. The recognition of common patterns of thought in our student teacher thinking has made us reflect on and re-evaluate important components of the curriculum in our science teacher preparation program.

  13. Output-Based Structural Damage Detection by Using Correlation Analysis Together with Transmissibility

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hongyou; Liu, Quanmin; Wahab, Magd Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Output-based structural damage detection is becoming increasingly appealing due to its potential in real engineering applications without any restriction regarding excitation measurements. A new transmissibility-based damage detection approach is presented in this study by combining transmissibility with correlation analysis in order to strengthen its performance in discriminating damaged from undamaged scenarios. From this perspective, damage detection strategies are hereafter established by constructing damage-sensitive indicators from a derived transmissibility. A cantilever beam is numerically analyzed to verify the feasibility of the proposed damage detection procedure, and an ASCE (American Society of Civil Engineers) benchmark is henceforth used in the validation for its application in engineering structures. The results of both studies reveal a good performance of the proposed methodology in identifying damaged states from intact states. The comparison between the proposed indicator and the existing indicator also affirms its applicability in damage detection, which might be adopted in further structural health monitoring systems as a discrimination criterion. This study contributed an alternative criterion for transmissibility-based damage detection in addition to the conventional ones. PMID:28773218

  14. Photoinduced Oxidative DNA Damage Revealed by an Agarose Gel Nicking Assay: A Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafirovich, Vladimir; Singh, Carolyn; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2003-11-01

    Oxidative damage of DNA molecules associated with electron-transfer reactions is an important phenomenon in living cells, which can lead to mutations and contribute to carcinogenesis and the aging processes. This article describes the design of several simple experiments to explore DNA damage initiated by photoinduced electron-transfer reactions sensitized by the acridine derivative, proflavine (PF). A supercoiled DNA agarose gel nicking assay is employed as a sensitive probe of DNA strand cleavage. A low-cost experimental and computer-interfaced imaging apparatus is described allowing for the digital recording and analysis of the gel electrophoresis results. The first experiment describes the formation of direct strand breaks in double-stranded DNA induced by photoexcitation of the intercalated PF molecules. The second experiment demonstrates that the addition of the well-known electron acceptor, methylviologen, gives rise to a significant enhancement of the photochemical DNA strand cleavage effect. This occurs by an electron transfer step to methylviologen that renders the inital photoinduced charge separation between photoexcited PF and DNA irreversible. The third experiment demonstrates that the action spectrum of the DNA photocleavage matches the absorption spectrum of DNA-bound, intercalated PF molecules, which differs from that of free PF molecules. This result demonstrates that the photoinduced DNA strand cleavage is initiated by intercalated rather than free PF molecules.

  15. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  16. Damage Detection and Analysis in CFRPs Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, Travis Laron

    Real time monitoring of damage is an important aspect of life management of critical structures. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques allow for measurement and assessment of damage in real time. Acoustic emission parameters such as signal amplitude and duration were monitored during the loading sequences. Criteria that can indicate the onset of critical damage to the structure were developed. Tracking the damage as it happens gives a better analysis of the failure evolution that will allow for a more accurate determination of structural life. The main challenge is distinguishing between legitimate damage signals and "false positives" which are unrelated to damage growth. Such false positives can be related to electrical noise, friction, or mechanical vibrations. This research focuses on monitoring signals of damage growth in carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) and separating the relevant signals from the false ones. In this Dissertation, acoustic emission signals from CFRP specimens were experimentally recorded and analyzed. The objectives of this work are: (1) perform static and fatigue loading of CFRP composite specimens and measure the associated AE signals, (2) accurately determine the AE parameters (energy, frequency, duration, etc.) of signals generated during failure of such specimens, (3) use fiber optic sensors to monitor the strain distribution of the damage zone and relate these changes in strain measurements to AE data.

  17. Analysis of nonlinear deformations and damage in CFRP textile laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Harland, A. R.; Lucas, T.; Price, D.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) textile composites are widely used in aerospace, automotive and construction components and structures thanks to their relatively low production costs, higher delamination and impact strength. They can also be used in various products in sports industry. These products are usually exposed to different in-service conditions such as large bending deformation and multiple impacts. Composite materials usually demonstrate multiple modes of damage and fracture due to their heterogeneity and microstructure, in contrast to more traditional homogeneous structural materials like metals and alloys. Damage evolution affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. These damage modes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation, numerical simulations and microtomography analysis. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in composite laminates linked to their quasi-static bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of woven CFRP material under large-deflection bending. Two-dimensional finite element (FE) models are implemented in the commercial code Abaqus/Explicit to study the deformation behaviour and damage in woven CFRP laminates. Multiple layers of bilinear cohesive-zone elements are employed to model the onset and progression of inter-ply delamination process. X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) analysis is carried out to investigate internal damage mechanisms such as cracking and delaminations. The obtained results of simulations are in agreement with experimental data and MicroCT scans.

  18. Application Of Shakedown Analysis To Cyclic Creep Damage Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Peter; Jetter, Robert I; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Shakedown analysis may be used to provide a conservative estimate of local rupture and hence cyclic creep damage for use in a creep-fatigue assessment. The shakedown analysis is based on an elastic-perfectly plastic material with a temperature-dependent pseudo yield stress defined to guarantee that a shakedown solution exists which does not exceed rupture stress and temperature for a defined life. The ratio of design life to the estimated maximum cyclic life is the shakedown creep damage. The methodology does not require stress classification and is also applicable to cycles over the full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Full cyclic creep and damage analysis is the alternative when shakedown analysis appears to be excessively conservative.

  19. Damage functions for climate-related hazards: unification and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, B. F.; Rybski, D.; Boettle, M.; Kropp, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    Most climate change impacts manifest in the form of natural hazards. For example, sea-level rise and changes in storm climatology are expected to increase the frequency and magnitude of flooding events. In practice there is a need for comprehensive damage assessment at an intermediate level of complexity. Answering this need, we reveal the common grounds of macroscale damage functions employed in storm damage, coastal-flood damage, and heat mortality assessment. The universal approach offers both bottom-up and top-down damage evaluation, employing either an explicit or an implicit portfolio description. Putting emphasis on the treatment of data uncertainties, we perform a sensitivity analysis across different scales. We find that the behaviour of intrinsic uncertainties on the microscale level (i.e. single item) does still persist on the macroscale level (i.e. portfolio). Furthermore, the analysis of uncertainties can reveal their specific relevance, allowing for simplification of the modelling chain. Our results shed light on the role of uncertainties and provide useful insight for the application of a unified damage function.

  20. Real-Time Tracking of Parental Histones Reveals Their Contribution to Chromatin Integrity Following DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Adam, Salomé; Dabin, Juliette; Chevallier, Odile; Leroy, Olivier; Baldeyron, Céline; Corpet, Armelle; Lomonte, Patrick; Renaud, Olivier; Almouzni, Geneviève; Polo, Sophie E

    2016-10-06

    Chromatin integrity is critical for cell function and identity but is challenged by DNA damage. To understand how chromatin architecture and the information that it conveys are preserved or altered following genotoxic stress, we established a system for real-time tracking of parental histones, which characterize the pre-damage chromatin state. Focusing on histone H3 dynamics after local UVC irradiation in human cells, we demonstrate that parental histones rapidly redistribute around damaged regions by a dual mechanism combining chromatin opening and histone mobilization on chromatin. Importantly, parental histones almost entirely recover and mix with new histones in repairing chromatin. Our data further define a close coordination of parental histone dynamics with DNA repair progression through the damage sensor DDB2 (DNA damage-binding protein 2). We speculate that this mechanism may contribute to maintaining a memory of the original chromatin landscape and may help preserve epigenome stability in response to DNA damage.

  1. Spiral Bevel Gear Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    2002-01-01

    A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spiral bevel gears was developed. Two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated using data fusion into a health monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on gears. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual monitoring technologies. This diagnostic tool was evaluated by collecting vibration and oil debris data from fatigue tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rigs. Data was collected during experiments performed in this test rig when pitting damage occurred. Results show that combining the vibration and oil debris measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spiral bevel gears.

  2. Sensitivity Analysis for Dynamic Failure and Damage in Metallic Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    respect to the nominal alloy composition at the center of weld surface (Point 6 of Figure 7) -21 - U CO 2000 - * cE axc -2000 o" "....". . -401.11𔃺 1󈧄...Final Report Sensitivity Analysis for Dynamic Failure and Damage in Metallic Structures Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street Arlington...3/31/05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Sensitivity Analysis for Dynamic Failure and Damage in Metallic Structures Sb. GRANT NUMBER N000

  3. Thermomechanical analysis of a damaged thermal protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Wei Heok

    Research on the effects of damage on the thermomechanical performance and structural integrity of thermal protection systems (TPS) has been limited. The objective of this research is to address this need by conducting experiments and finite element (FE) analysis on damaged TPS. The TPS selected for study is the High-Temperature Reusable Insulation (HRSI) tiles that are used extensively on NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter. The TPS considered, which consists of a LI-900 tile, the strain isolator pad and the underlying structure, is subjected to the thermal loading and re-entry static pressure of the Access to Space reference vehicle. The damage to the TPS emulates hypervelocity-impact-type damage, which is approximated in the current research by a cylindrical hole ending with a spherical cap. Preliminary FE analysis using several simplifying assumptions, was conducted to determine the accuracy of using an approximate axisymmetric model compared to a complete three-dimensional model for both heat transfer and thermal stress analyses. Temperature results from the two models were found to be reasonable close; however, thermal stress results displayed significant differences. The sensitivity of the FE results to the various simplifying assumptions was also examined and it was concluded that for reliable results, the simplifying assumptions were not acceptable. Subsequently, an exact three-dimensional model was developed and validated by comparison with experimental data. Re-entry static pressures and temperatures were simulated using a high-temperature experimental facility that consists of a quartz radiant heater and a vacuum chamber with appropriate instrumentation. This facility was developed during the course of this dissertation. Temperatures on the top and bottom surfaces of the TPS specimen as well as strains in the underlying structure were recorded for FE model validation. The validated FE model was then combined with improved thermal loads based on the interactions

  4. Nonlinear damage detection in composite structures using bispectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Pickering, Simon; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Literature offers a quantitative number of diagnostic methods that can continuously provide detailed information of the material defects and damages in aerospace and civil engineering applications. Indeed, low velocity impact damages can considerably degrade the integrity of structural components and, if not detected, they can result in catastrophic failure conditions. This paper presents a nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) method, based on ultrasonic guided waves (GW), for the detection of the nonlinear signature in a damaged composite structure. The proposed technique, based on a bispectral analysis of ultrasonic input waveforms, allows for the evaluation of the nonlinear response due to the presence of cracks and delaminations. Indeed, such a methodology was used to characterize the nonlinear behaviour of the structure, by exploiting the frequency mixing of the original waveform acquired from a sparse array of sensors. The robustness of bispectral analysis was experimentally demonstrated on a damaged carbon fibre reinforce plastic (CFRP) composite panel, and the nonlinear source was retrieved with a high level of accuracy. Unlike other linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods for damage detection, this methodology does not require any baseline with the undamaged structure for the evaluation of the nonlinear source, nor a priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Moreover, bispectral analysis can be considered as a nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) technique for materials showing either classical or non-classical nonlinear behaviour.

  5. Analysis of damaging hydrogeological events in a Mediterranean region (Calabria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceto, Luigi; Caloiero, Tommaso; Pasqua, A. A.; Petrucci, Olga

    2016-10-01

    Damaging Hydrogeological Events (DHEs) are periods of severe weather conditions affecting wide areas for several days, and causing mainly damaging landslides and floods. In order to characterise the DHEs, we analysed the historical series of the events that affected a Mediterranean region (Calabria, southern Italy) throughout 92 years of observation. Depending on their magnitude, we classified the events as: major catastrophic, catastrophic, extraordinary and ordinary. In winter events, damaged areas and damage were greater than those resulting from the other seasons. Nevertheless, the majority of the events took place in autumn, when, in addition to landslides, a relevant percentage of flash floods and floods also occurred. Results also show that the frequency of major catastrophic and catastrophic events has decreased since 1971, and that, in recent decades, Calabria has suffered from damaging effects even though rain did not reached extreme characteristics. In fact, the duration of triggering rain, the maximum daily rain of the events and the out coming frequency of the high return period of rain show a decreasing pattern throughout the study period. As to what concerns the damaging phenomena, landslides were identified as the most frequent in every season and in every type of events, the eastern side of the region was the most frequently and heavily damaged. According to literature, the trend of number of victims per event is also decreasing. The proposed analysis can be applied to different study areas in order to assess the relative magnitude of DHEs and their evolution throughout the years. The classification criterion can be useful to compare different events for either scientific or insurance purposes, and to identify the typical rainfall-damage scenario of a study area.

  6. Online nanoflow RP-RP-MS reveals dynamics of multicomponent Ku complex in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng; Cardoza, Job D; Ficarro, Scott B; Adelmant, Guillaume O; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Marto, Jarrod A

    2010-12-03

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) coupled with mass spectrometry has become the technique of choice for characterization of multicomponent protein complexes. While current TAP protocols routinely provide high yield and specificity for proteins expressed under physiologically relevant conditions, analytical figures of merit required for efficient and in-depth LC-MS analysis remain unresolved. Here we implement a multidimensional chromatography platform, based on two stages of reversed-phase (RP) separation operated at high and low pH, respectively. We compare performance metrics for RP-RP and SCX-RP for the analysis of complex peptide mixtures derived from cell lysate, as well as protein complexes purified via TAP. Our data reveal that RP-RP fractionation outperforms SCX-RP primarily due to increased peak capacity in the first dimension separation. We integrate this system with miniaturized LC assemblies to achieve true online fractionation at low (≤5 nL/min) effluent flow rates. Stable isotope labeling is used to monitor the dynamics of the multicomponent Ku protein complex in response to DNA damage induced by γ radiation.

  7. Online Nanoflow RP-RP-MS Reveals Dynamics of Multi-component Ku Complex in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Cardoza, Job D.; Ficarro, Scott B.; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Marto, Jarrod A.

    2010-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) coupled with mass spectrometry has become the technique of choice for characterization of multi-component protein complexes. While current TAP protocols routinely provide high yield and specificity for proteins expressed under physiologically relevant conditions, analytical figures of merit required for efficient and in-depth LC-MS analysis remain unresolved. Here we implement a multidimensional chromatography platform, based on two stages of reversed-phase separation operated at high and low pH, respectively. We compare performance metrics for RP-RP and SCX-RP for the analysis of complex peptide mixtures derived from cell lysate, as well as protein complexes purified via TAP. Our data reveal that RP-RP fractionation outperforms SCX-RP primarily due to increased peak capacity in the first dimension separation. We integrate this system with miniaturized LC assemblies to achieve true online fractionation at low (≤5nL/min) effluent flow rates. Stable isotope labeling is used to monitor the dynamics of the multi-component Ku protein complex in response to DNA damage induced by gamma radiation. PMID:20873769

  8. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact: Consulting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A portion of the contract NAS8-38856, 'Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impacts,' from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), included consulting which was to be documented in the final report. This attachment to the final report contains memos produced as part of that consulting.

  9. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  10. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  11. Fatigue is more damaging than creep in ligament revealed by modulus reduction and residual strength.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Gail M; Schwab, Timothy D; Oxland, Thomas R

    2007-10-01

    Following injury of a complementary joint restraint, ligaments can be subjected to higher than normal stresses. Normal ligaments are exposed to static (creep) and cyclic (fatigue) loading from which damage can accumulate at these higher than normal stresses. This study tracked damage accumulation during creep and fatigue loading of normal rabbit medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) over a range of stresses, using modulus reduction as a marker of damage. Creep tests were interrupted occasionally with unloading/reloading cycles to measure modulus. Test stresses were normalized to ultimate tensile strength (UTS): 60%, 30%, and 15% UTS. Not all creep and fatigues tests progressed until rupture but were stopped and followed by an assessment of the residual strength of that partially damaged ligament using a monotonic failure test. Fatigue loading caused earlier modulus reduction than creep. Modulus reduction occurred at lower increases in strain (strain relative to initial strain) for fatigue than creep. In other words, at the same time or increase in strain, fatigue is more damaging than creep because the modulus ratio reduction is greater. These findings suggest that creep and fatigue have different strain and damage mechanisms. Ligaments exposed to creep or fatigue loading which produced a modulus reduction had decreased residual strength and increased toe-region strain in a subsequent monotonic failure test. This finding confirmed that modulus reduction during creep and fatigue is a suitable marker of partial damage in ligament. Cyclic loading caused damage earlier than static loading, likely an important consideration when ligaments are loaded to higher than normal magnitudes following injury of a complementary joint restraint.

  12. Analysis of tank damage during the 1994 Northridge earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Haroun, M.A.; Bhatia, H.

    1995-12-31

    The damage sustained by cylindrical liquid storage tanks during the 1994 Northridge earthquake is summarized. It included elephant foot buckling, anchor failure and roof-shell connection separation. A few of the important lessons learned, in particular, as related to the accuracy of code computations in predicting the actual behavior of these structures are outlined. A detailed case study is presented to illustrate the application of current seismic design standards to a damaged unanchored tank and to demonstrate the use of a state-of-the-art finite element analysis in assessing the seismic safety of the same tank.

  13. Sample EP Flow Analysis of Severely Damaged Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Werley, Kenneth Alan; McCown, Andrew William

    2016-10-12

    These are slides for a presentation at the working group meeting of the WESC SREMP Software Product Integration Team on sample EP flow analysis of severely damaged networks. The following topics are covered: ERCOT EP Transmission Model; Zoomed in to Houston and Overlaying StreetAtlas; EMPACT Solve/Dispatch/Shedding Options; QACS BaseCase Power Flow Solution; 3 Substation Contingency; Gen. & Load/100 Optimal Dispatch; Dispatch Results; Shed Load for Low V; Network Damage Summary; Estimated Service Areas (Potential); Estimated Outage Areas (potential).

  14. Analysis of free radical damage within single cells using flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, A.T.; Allan, I.M.; Gordon, D.J.; Grdina, D.J.; Milner, A.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The data presented here illustrates the additional information that can be gained on single cell biological effects by using a method of damage estimation based on single cells. The experiments involving primarily free radical damage carried out using H{sub 2}O2 and the radioprotectors cysteamine and WR 1065, both revealed data that could not have been obtained from a macroscopic study of free radical-DNA chemistry and analysis of reaction products. This serves to emphasise the difficulty in extrapolating both free radical based and other chemical reactions to effects seen in living systems.

  15. Development of synthetic flood damage curve by explicit costs analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, Mario; Molinari, Daniela; Dottori, Francesco; Scorzini, Annarita

    2015-04-01

    characteristics. Such functions were developed using a what-if analysis using data collected after the 2012 flood in the Umbria Region in Central Italy, as well as authors' experience, as reference to understand damage mechanisms. Observed damage data were also used to calibrate the functions.

  16. Transmission Bearing Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage to rolling element bearings in an OH-58 main rotor transmission. Two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated using data fusion into a health monitoring system for detecting bearing surface fatigue pitting damage. This integrated system showed improved detection and decision-making capabilities as compared to using individual monitoring technologies. This diagnostic tool was evaluated by collecting vibration and oil debris data from tests performed in the NASA Glenn 500 hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Data was collected during experiments performed in this test rig when two unanticipated bearing failures occurred. Results show that combining the vibration and oil debris measurement technologies improves the detection of pitting damage on spiral bevel gears duplex ball bearings and spiral bevel pinion triplex ball bearings in a main rotor transmission.

  17. Tapered Roller Bearing Damage Detection Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Kreider, Gary; Fichter, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic tool was developed for detecting fatigue damage of tapered roller bearings. Tapered roller bearings are used in helicopter transmissions and have potential for use in high bypass advanced gas turbine aircraft engines. A diagnostic tool was developed and evaluated experimentally by collecting oil debris data from failure progression tests conducted using health monitoring hardware. Failure progression tests were performed with tapered roller bearings under simulated engine load conditions. Tests were performed on one healthy bearing and three pre-damaged bearings. During each test, data from an on-line, in-line, inductance type oil debris sensor and three accelerometers were monitored and recorded for the occurrence of bearing failure. The bearing was removed and inspected periodically for damage progression throughout testing. Using data fusion techniques, two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, were integrated into a health monitoring system for detecting bearing surface fatigue pitting damage. The data fusion diagnostic tool was evaluated during bearing failure progression tests under simulated engine load conditions. This integrated system showed improved detection of fatigue damage and health assessment of the tapered roller bearings as compared to using individual health monitoring technologies.

  18. Deletion of histone deacetylase 3 reveals critical roles in S phase progression and DNA damage control.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Srividya; Chyla, Brenda J; Amann, Joseph M; Knutson, Sarah K; Cortez, David; Sun, Zu-Wen; Hiebert, Scott W

    2008-04-11

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that modify key residues in histones to regulate chromatin architecture, and they play a vital role in cell survival, cell-cycle progression, and tumorigenesis. To understand the function of Hdac3, a critical component of the N-CoR/SMRT repression complex, a conditional allele of Hdac3 was engineered. Cre-recombinase-mediated inactivation of Hdac3 led to a delay in cell-cycle progression, cell-cycle-dependent DNA damage, and apoptosis in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While no overt defects in mitosis were observed in Hdac3-/- MEFs, including normal H3Ser10 phosphorylation, DNA damage was observed in Hdac3-/- interphase cells, which appears to be associated with defective DNA double-strand break repair. Moreover, we noted that Hdac3-/- MEFs were protected from DNA damage when quiescent, which may provide a mechanistic basis for the action of HDAC inhibitors on cycling tumor cells.

  19. Aspergillus fumigatus spore proteomics and genetics reveal that VeA represses DefA-mediated DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kwang-Soo; Park, Hee-Soo; Kim, Young; Heo, In-Beom; Kim, Young Hwan; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-10-04

    Aspergillus fumigatus reproduces and infects host by forming a high number of small asexual spores (conidia). The velvet proteins are global transcriptional regulators governing the complex process of conidiogenesis in this fungus. Here, to further understand the velvet-mediated regulation, we carried out comparative proteomic analyses of conidia of wild type (WT) and three velvet mutants (ΔveA, ΔvelB and ΔvosA). Cluster analysis of 184 protein spots showing at least 1.5-fold differential accumulation between WT and mutants reveal the clustering of WT- ΔveA and ΔvelB-ΔvosA. Among 43 proteins identified by Nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS, 23 including several heat shock proteins showed more than two-fold reduction in both the ∆velB and ∆vosA conidia. On the contrary, three proteins exhibited more than five-fold increase in ∆veA only, including the putative RNA polymerase II degradation factor DefA. The deletion of defA resulted in a reduced number of conidia and restricted colony growth. In addition, the defA deletion mutant conidia showed hypersensitivity against the DNA damaging agents NQO and MMS, while the ΔveA mutant conidia were more resistant against to NQO. Taken together, we propose that VeA controls protein level of DefA in conidia, which are dormant and equipped with multiple layers of protection against environmental cues.

  20. The Effects of Revealed Information on Catastrophe Loss Projection Models' Characterization of Risk: Damage Vulnerability Evidence from Florida.

    PubMed

    Karl, J Bradley; Medders, Lorilee A; Maroney, Patrick F

    2016-06-01

    We examine whether the risk characterization estimated by catastrophic loss projection models is sensitive to the revelation of new information regarding risk type. We use commercial loss projection models from two widely employed modeling firms to estimate the expected hurricane losses of Florida Atlantic University's building stock, both including and excluding secondary information regarding hurricane mitigation features that influence damage vulnerability. We then compare the results of the models without and with this revealed information and find that the revelation of additional, secondary information influences modeled losses for the windstorm-exposed university building stock, primarily evidenced by meaningful percent differences in the loss exceedance output indicated after secondary modifiers are incorporated in the analysis. Secondary risk characteristics for the data set studied appear to have substantially greater impact on probable maximum loss estimates than on average annual loss estimates. While it may be intuitively expected for catastrophe models to indicate that secondary risk characteristics hold value for reducing modeled losses, the finding that the primary value of secondary risk characteristics is in reduction of losses in the "tail" (low probability, high severity) events is less intuitive, and therefore especially interesting. Further, we address the benefit-cost tradeoffs that commercial entities must consider when deciding whether to undergo the data collection necessary to include secondary information in modeling. Although we assert the long-term benefit-cost tradeoff is positive for virtually every entity, we acknowledge short-term disincentives to such an effort.

  1. Analysis Methods for Progressive Damage of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides an overview of recent accomplishments and lessons learned in the development of general progressive damage analysis methods for predicting the residual strength and life of composite structures. These developments are described within their State-of-the-Art (SoA) context and the associated technology barriers. The emphasis of the authors is on developing these analysis tools for application at the structural level. Hence, modeling of damage progression is undertaken at the mesoscale, where the plies of a laminate are represented as a homogenous orthotropic continuum. The aim of the present effort is establish the ranges of validity of available models, to identify technology barriers, and to establish the foundations of the future investigation efforts. Such are the necessary steps towards accurate and robust simulations that can replace some of the expensive and time-consuming "building block" tests that are currently required for the design and certification of aerospace structures.

  2. Lightning Strike Ablation Damage Influence Factors Analysis of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Based on Coupled Electrical-Thermal Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J. J.; Chang, F.; Li, S. L.; Yao, X. L.; Sun, J. R.; Xiao, Y.

    2016-12-01

    According to the mathematical analysis model constructed on the basis of energy-balance relationship in lightning strike, and accompany with the simplified calculation strategy of composite resin pyrolysis degree dependent electrical conductivity, an effective three dimensional thermal-electrical coupling analysis finite element model of composite laminate suffered from lightning current was established based on ABAQUS, to elucidate the effects of lighting current waveform parameters and thermal/electrical properties of composite laminate on the extent of ablation damage. Simulated predictions agree well with the composite lightning strike directed effect experimental data, illustrating the potential accuracy of the constructed model. The analytical results revealed that extent of composite lightning strike ablation damage can be characterized by action integral validly, there exist remarkable power function relationships between action integral and visual damage area, projected damage area, maximum damage depth and damage volume of ablation damage, and enhancing the electrical conductivity and specific heat of composite, ablation damage will be descended obviously, power function relationships also exist between electrical conductivity, specific heat and ablation damage, however, the impact of thermal conductivity on the extent of ablation damage is not notable. The conclusions obtained provide some guidance for composite anti-lightning strike structure-function integration design.

  3. Visualization and Analysis of Impact Damage in Sapphire

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    Analysis of Impact Damage in Sapphire Elmar Strassburger Fraunhofer-Institut für Kurzzeitdynamik, Ernst - Mach -Institut (EMI) Parimal Patel and...Miami, FL, 12–16 September 2011. *Fraunhofer-Institut für Kurzzeitdynamik, Ernst - Mach -Institut (EMI), Am Christianswuhr 2, 79400 Kandern, Germany 14...ABSTRACT This report reviews work carried out with the fully instrumented Edge-on Impact (EOI) facility at the Ernst - Mach -Institute (EMI), using a

  4. The Nature of Macular Damage in Glaucoma as Revealed by Averaging Optical Coherence Tomography Data

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Donald C.; Raza, Ali S.; de Moraes, Carlos Gustavo V.; Johnson, Chris A.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To better understand the nature of glaucomatous damage, especially to the macula, the inner retinal thickness maps obtained with frequency domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT) were averaged. Methods Frequency domain optical coherence tomography macular and optic disc cube scans were obtained from 54 healthy eyes and 156 eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy. A manually corrected algorithm was used for layer segmentation. Patients' eyes were grouped both by mean deviation (MD) and hemifield classification using standard categories and 24-2 (6° grid) visual fields (VFs). To obtain average difference maps, the thickness of retinal nerve fiber (RNF) and retinal ganglion cell plus inner plexiform (RGC+) layers were averaged and subtracted from the average control values. Results On the average difference maps, RGC+ and RNF layer thinning was seen in the patient groups with VFs classified as normal. The pattern of the thinning was the same, but the degree of thinning increased with decreased MD and with classification category (from normal to arcuate). This RGC+ thinning was largely within the central four points of the 24-2 (6° grid) field, after correcting for RGC displacement. Conclusion 1. VF categories represent different degrees of the same pattern of RGC+ and RNFL layer thinning. 2. RGC+ damage occurs in the central macula even in patients with VFs classified as normal. 3. The 6° grid (24-2) pattern is not optimally designed to detect macular damage. 4. A schematic model of RGC projections is proposed to explain the pattern of macular loss, including the greater vulnerability of the inferior retinal region. Translational relevance The 24-2 is not an optimal test pattern for detecting or following glaucomatous damage. Further, we suggest clinical fdOCT reports include RGC+ and RNFL probability plots combined with VF information. PMID:23626924

  5. Lightning Strike Ablation Damage Characteristic Analysis for Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Laminate with Fastener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J. J.; Li, S. L.; Yao, X. L.; Chang, F.; Li, L. K.; Zhang, X. H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to analyze the lightning strike ablation damage characteristic of composite laminate with fastener, based on the energy-balance relationship in lightning strike, mathematical analysis model of ablation damage of composite laminate with fastener was constructed. According to the model, an effective three dimensional thermal-electrical coupling analysis finite element model of composite laminate with fastener suffered from lightning current was established based on ABAQUS, and lightning strike ablation damage characteristic was analyzed. Analytical results reveal that lightning current could conduct through the thickness direction of the laminate due to the existence of metallic fastener, and then distribute to all layers, finally conducted in-the-plane of each layer, conductive ability of different layup orientations depend on potential distribution and in-the-plane electrical conductivity along potential gradient declining direction; different potential boundaries correspond to different potential distribution in each layer, and result in conductive ability of different layup orientations was changed, then caused different lightning strike ablation damage distribution. According to the investigation in this paper, we can recognize the lightning strike ablation damage characteristic of composite laminate with fastener qualitatively.

  6. Image Science and Analysis Group Spacecraft Damage Detection/Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, Ira M., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This project consisted of several tasks that could be served by an intern to assist the ISAG in detecting damage to spacecrafts during missions. First, this project focused on supporting the Micrometeoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) damage detection and assessment for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) using imagery from the last two HST Shuttle servicing missions. In this project, we used coordinates of two windows on the Shuttle Aft flight deck from where images were taken and the coordinates of three ID points in order to calculate the distance from each window to the three points. Then, using the specifications from the camera used, we calculated the image scale in pixels per inch for planes parallel to and planes in the z-direction to the image plane (shown in Table 1). This will help in the future for calculating measurements of objects in the images. Next, tabulation and statistical analysis were conducted for screening results (shown in Table 2) of imagery with Orion Thermal Protection System (TPS) damage. Using the Microsoft Excel CRITBINOM function and Goal Seek, the probabilities of detection of damage to different shuttle tiles were calculated as shown in Table 3. Using developed measuring tools, volume and area measurements will be created from 3D models of Orion TPS damage. Last, mathematical expertise was provided to the Photogrammetry Team. These mathematical tasks consisted of developing elegant image space error equations for observations along 3D lines, circles, planes, etc. and checking proofs for minimal sets of sufficient multi-linear constraints. Some of the processes and resulting equations are displayed in Figure 1.

  7. MutSα's Multi-Domain Allosteric Response to Three DNA Damage Types Revealed by Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, Ryan L.; Thompson, William G.; Godwin, Ryan C.; Gmeiner, William H.; Salsbury, Freddie R.

    2017-03-01

    MutSalpha is a key component in the mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. This protein is responsible for initiating the signaling pathways for DNA repair or cell death. Herein we investigate this heterodimer’s post-recognition, post-binding response to three types of DNA damage involving cytotoxic, anti-cancer agents - carboplatin, cisplatin, and FdU. Through a combination of supervised and unsupervised machine learning techniques along with more traditional structural and kinetic analysis applied to all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) calculations, we predict that MutSalpha has a distinct response to each of the three damage types. Via a binary classification tree (a supervised machine learning technique), we identify key hydrogen bond motifs unique to each type of damage and suggest residues for experimental mutation studies. Through a combination of a recently developed clustering (unsupervised learning) algorithm, RMSF calculations, PCA, and correlated motions we predict that each type of damage causes MutS↵to explore a specific region of conformation space. Detailed analysis suggests a short range effect for carboplatin - primarily altering the structures and kinetics of residues within 10 angstroms of the damaged DNA - and distinct longer-range effects for cisplatin and FdU. In our simulations, we also observe that a key phenylalanine residue - known to stack with a mismatched or unmatched bases in MMR - stacks with the base complementary to the damaged base in 88.61% of MD frames containing carboplatinated DNA. Similarly, this Phe71 stacks with the base complementary to damage in 91.73% of frames with cisplatinated DNA. This residue, however, stacks with the damaged base itself in 62.18% of trajectory frames with FdU-substituted DNA and has no stacking interaction at all in 30.72% of these frames. Each drug investigated here induces a unique perturbation in the MutS↵complex, indicating the possibility of a distinct signaling event and specific repair or death

  8. Revealing low-dose radiation damage using single-crystal spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin L.; Yorke, Briony A.; Gowdy, James A.; Pearson, Arwen R.

    2011-01-01

    The structural information and functional insight obtained from X-ray crystallography can be enhanced by the use of complementary spectroscopies. Here the information that can be obtained from spectroscopic methods commonly used in conjunction with X-ray crystallography and best-practice single-crystal UV-Vis absorption data collection are briefly reviewed. Using data collected with the in situ system at the Swiss Light Source, the time and dose scales of low-dose X-ray-induced radiation damage and solvated electron generation in metalloproteins at 100 K are investigated. The effect of dose rate on these scales is also discussed. PMID:21525644

  9. Identification and analysis of damaged or porous hair.

    PubMed

    Hill, Virginia; Loni, Elvan; Cairns, Thomas; Sommer, Jonathan; Schaffer, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Cosmetic hair treatments have been referred to as 'the pitfall' of hair analysis. However, most cosmetic treatments, when applied to the hair as instructed by the product vendors, do not interfere with analysis, provided such treatments can be identified by the laboratory and the samples analyzed and reported appropriately for the condition of the hair. This paper provides methods for identifying damaged or porous hair samples using digestion rates of hair in dithiothreitol with and without proteinase K, as well as a protein measurement method applied to dithiothreitol-digested samples. Extremely damaged samples may be unsuitable for analysis. Aggressive and extended aqueous washing of hair samples is a proven method for removing or identifying externally derived drug contamination of hair. In addition to this wash procedure, we have developed an alternative wash procedure using 90% ethanol for washing damaged or porous hair. The procedure, like the aqueous wash procedure, requires analysis of the last of five washes to evaluate the effectiveness of the washing procedure. This evaluation, termed the Wash Criterion, is derived from studies of the kinetics of washing of hair samples that have been experimentally contaminated and of hair from drug users. To study decontamination methods, in vitro contaminated drug-negative hair samples were washed by both the aqueous buffer method and a 90% ethanol method. Analysis of cocaine and methamphetamine was by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Porous hair samples from drug users, when washed in 90% ethanol, pass the wash criterion although they may fail the aqueous wash criterion. Those samples that fail both the ethanolic and aqueous wash criterion are not reported as positive for ingestion. Similar ratios of the metabolite amphetamine relative to methamphetamine in the last wash and the hair is an additional criterion for assessing contamination vs. ingestion of methamphetamine.

  10. Spiral-Bevel-Gear Damage Detected Using Decision Fusion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    Helicopter transmission integrity is critical to helicopter safety because helicopters depend on the power train for propulsion, lift, and flight maneuvering. To detect impending transmission failures, the ideal diagnostic tools used in the health-monitoring system would provide real-time health monitoring of the transmission, demonstrate a high level of reliable detection to minimize false alarms, and provide end users with clear information on the health of the system without requiring them to interpret large amounts of sensor data. A diagnostic tool for detecting damage to spiral bevel gears was developed. (Spiral bevel gears are used in helicopter transmissions to transfer power between nonparallel intersecting shafts.) Data fusion was used to integrate two different monitoring technologies, oil debris analysis and vibration, into a health-monitoring system for detecting surface fatigue pitting damage on the gears.

  11. Finite element stress analysis of idealized composite damage zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, D.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    A quasi three dimensional finite element stress analysis of idealized damage zones in composite laminates is presented. The damage zones consist of a long centered groove or cutout extending one or two layers in depth from both top and bottom surfaces of a thin composite laminate. Elastic results are presented for compressive loading of four and eight layer laminates. It is shown that a boundary layer exists near the cutout edge similar to that previously shown to exist along free edges. The cutout is shown to produce significant interlaminar stresses in the interior of the laminate away from free cutout edges. The interlaminar stresses are also shown to contribute to failure which is defined using the Tsai-Wu failure criteria.

  12. Subsurface damage detection and damage mechanism analysis of chemical-mechanical polished optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Yang, Wei; Bi, Guo; Yang, Ping; Guo, Yinbiao

    2014-09-01

    Detection of the subsurface damage depth in optical elements has significance on the subsequent material removal amount and improving element surface quality. The paper focuses on the subsurface damage of chemical-mechanical polished K9 specimen, and analyses the chemical-mechanical polishing mechanism and the cause of subsurface damage. A most suitable etchant is chosen and the step-by-step etching method is applied to measure the subsurface damage depth. A microscope is used to detect the damage morphology and the variation trend at different depth. Research shows that the subsurface damage caused by chemical-mechanical polishing is Hertz scratch, and the scratch quantity below surface presents a variation of zero-more-less-disappeared. The K9 specimen is polished for 3 min under the pressure of 2.5 Kgf and the spindle speed of 43139 r/min, thus resulting in a subsurface damage depth 15.3μm.

  13. Arrow damage to textiles--analysis of clothing and bedding in two cases of crossbow deaths.

    PubMed

    Taupin, J M

    1998-01-01

    Two cases of crossbow deaths involving analysis of damage to clothing and bedding are described. The distinctive characteristics of the damage examined in these cases indicate that there is merit in examining damage to clothing as well as wounds to the body in crossbow injuries. Clothing damage analysis may be especially useful if the body is badly decomposed or never recovered. Furthermore, damage to textiles may reflect a clearer geometry of the weapon than that of the associated wounding.

  14. Metabolic network analysis revealed distinct routes of deletion effects between essential and non-essential genes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Xun; Ung, Choong Yong; Chen, Yu Zong; Li, Baowen

    2012-04-01

    Interest in essential genes has arisen recently given their importance in antimicrobial drug development. Although knockouts of essential genes are commonly known to cause lethal phenotypes, there is insufficient understanding on the intermediate changes followed by genetic perturbation and to what extent essential genes correlate to other genes. Here, we characterized the gene knockout effects by using a list of affected genes, termed as 'damage lists'. These damage lists were identified through a refined cascading failure approach that was based on a previous topological flux balance analysis. Using an Escherichia coli metabolic network, we incorporated essentiality information into damage lists and revealed that the knockout of an essential gene mainly affects a large range of other essential genes whereas knockout of a non-essential gene only interrupts other non-essential genes. Also, genes sharing common damage lists tend to have the same essentiality. We extracted 72 core functional modules from the common damage lists of essential genes and demonstrated their ability to halt essential metabolites production. Overall, our network analysis revealed that essential and non-essential genes propagated their deletion effects via distinct routes, conferring mechanistic explanation to the observed lethality phenotypes of essential genes.

  15. Quantitative interactome analysis reveals a chemoresistant edgotype

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan D.; Schweppe, Devin K.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Zheng, Chunxiang; Taipale, Alex; Zhang, Yiyi; Takara, Kohji; Bruce, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a common mode of therapy failure for many cancers. Tumours develop resistance to chemotherapeutics through a variety of mechanisms, with proteins serving pivotal roles. Changes in protein conformations and interactions affect the cellular response to environmental conditions contributing to the development of new phenotypes. The ability to understand how protein interaction networks adapt to yield new function or alter phenotype is limited by the inability to determine structural and protein interaction changes on a proteomic scale. Here, chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry were employed to quantify changes in protein structures and interactions in multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells. Quantitative analysis of the largest crosslinking-derived, protein interaction network comprising 1,391 crosslinked peptides allows for ‘edgotype' analysis in a cell model of chemoresistance. We detect consistent changes to protein interactions and structures, including those involving cytokeratins, topoisomerase-2-alpha, and post-translationally modified histones, which correlate with a chemoresistant phenotype. PMID:26235782

  16. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  17. Diagnosis of Lung Cancer by Fractal Analysis of Damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kiminezhadmalaie, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. In fact cells become cancer cells because of DNA damage. A DNA walk of a genome represents how the frequency of each nucleotide of a pairing nucleotide couple changes locally. In this research in order to study the cancer genes, DNA walk plots of genomes of patients with lung cancer were generated using a program written in MATLAB language. The data so obtained was checked for fractal property by computing the fractal dimension using a program written in MATLAB. Also, the correlation of damaged DNA was studied using the Hurst exponent measure. We have found that the damaged DNA sequences are exhibiting higher degree of fractality and less correlation compared with normal DNA sequences. So we confirmed this method can be used for early detection of lung cancer. The method introduced in this research not only is useful for diagnosis of lung cancer but also can be applied for detection and growth analysis of different types of cancers. PMID:26539245

  18. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  19. Micromechanical Continuum Damage Analysis of Plain Woven Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Aliabadi, F.; Wen, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Application of meshfree Galerkin method to homogenization and Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) analysis of plain woven composites is presented. Three types of meshfree formulations are developed and include: radial basis function, moving least squares and moving Kriging. Three benchmark examples are used to demonstrated the efficiency of the meshfree formulation as well as compare the performance of the three shape functions. Non-linear stress-strain relationhip of unit cellusing the three shape functions are assessed with two benchmark examples of CDM model.

  20. Sensitivity analysis of an auto-correlation-function-based damage index and its application in structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2014-12-01

    Structural damage detection using time domain vibration responses has advantages such as simplicity in calculation and no requirement of a finite element model, which attracts more and more researchers in recent years. In present paper, a new approach to detect the damage based on the auto correlation function is proposed. The maximum values of the auto correlation function of the vibration response signals from different measurement points are formulated as a vector called Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector, AMV for short. The relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage is used as the damage index to locate the damage. Sensitivity analysis of the normalized AMV with respect to the local stiffness shows that the normalized AMV has a sharp change around the local stiffness change location, which means the normalized AMV is a good indicator to detect the damage even when the damage is very small. Stiffness reduction detection of a 12-story frame structure is provided to illustrate the validity, effectiveness and the anti-noise ability of the proposed method. Comparison of the normalized AMV and the other correlation-function-based damage detection method shows the normalized AMV has a better detectability.

  1. Deep rock damage in the San Andreas Fault revealed by P- and S-type fault-zone-guided waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.; Malin, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Damage to fault-zone rocks during fault slip results in the formation of a channel of low seismic-wave velocities. Within such channels guided seismic waves, denoted by Fg, can propagate. Here we show with core samples, well logs and Fg-waves that such a channel is crossed by the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) borehole at a depth of 2.7 km near Parkfield, California, USA. This laterally extensive channel extends downwards to at least half way through the seismogenic crust, more than about 7 km. The channel supports not only the previously recognized Love-type- (FL) and Rayleigh-type- (FR) guided waves, but also a new fault-guided wave, which we name FF. As recorded 2.7 km underground, FF is normally dispersed, ends in an Airy phase, and arrives between the P- and S-waves. Modelling shows that FF travels as a leaky mode within the core of the fault zone. Combined with the drill core samples, well logs and the two other types of guided waves, FF at SAFOD reveals a zone of profound, deep, rock damage. Originating from damage accumulated over the recent history of fault movement, we suggest it is maintained either by fracturing near the slip surface of earthquakes, such as the 1857 Fort Tejon M 7.9, or is an unexplained part of the fault-creep process known to be active at this site.

  2. Impact damage analysis of balsawood sandwich composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalslam, Suof Omran

    In this study, a new composite sandwich structure with a balsa wood core (end grain and regular balsa) in conjunction with E-glass/epoxy face sheets was proposed, fabricated, impact tested, and modeled. The behavior of the sandwich structure under low velocity impact and compression after impact was investigated. Low velocity impact tests were carried out by drop-weight impact tower at different energy levels (8J-35J) to evaluate the impact response of the sandwich structure. Visual inspection, destructive and non destructive evaluation methods have been conducted. For the sandwich plate with end grain core, the damage was very clear and can be visually detected. However, the damage in regular balsa core was not clearly visible and destructive evaluation method was used. Compression testing was done after subjecting the specimens to impact testing. Impact test results; load-time, load-deflection history and energy absorption for sandwich composites with two different cores, end grain and regular balsa were compared and they were investigated at three different impact energies. The results show that the sandwich structures with end grain core are able to withstand impact loading better than the regular balsa core because the higher stiffness of end grain core informs of sustaining higher load and higher overall energy. The results obtained from compression after impact testing show that the strengths of sandwich composites with end grain and regular balsa cores were reduced about 40% and 52%, respectively, after impact. These results were presented in terms of stress-strain curves for both damaged and undamaged specimens. Finite element analysis was conducted on the sandwich composite structure using LS-DYNA code to simulate impact test. A 3- D finite element model was developed and appropriate material properties were given to each component. The computational model was developed to predict the response of sandwich composite under dynamic loading. The experimental

  3. Structural damage identification using multifunctional Bragg grating sensors: II. Damage detection results and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Daniel C.; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian

    2006-10-01

    Damage detection is an important issue in structural health monitoring. Lamb waves are the most widely used acousto-ultrasonic guided waves for damage detection. This paper gives the results of experiments carried out to study the identification of damage using Bragg grating sensors as ultrasonic receivers of Lamb waves. The experiments involve a rectangular aluminium plate. Damage was introduced into the plate by drilling a hole into the centre of the plate. In order to obtain different severity of damage, the hole diameter was increased step by step. Several signal processing tools are presented and then applied to the Lamb wave signals in order to find a parameter that corresponds to the severity of damage. The parameter that serves as the damage index has to have small cross-sensitivity to other physical parameters, e.g. temperature. Therefore, additional experiments have been carried out to study the temperature dependence of the Lamb wave signals. In order to determine the influence of the temperature on the damage detection results, the cross-sensitivity is studied within this paper.

  4. Chromosome Model reveals Dynamic Redistribution of DNA Damage into Nuclear Sub-domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costes, Sylvain V.; Ponomarev, Artem; Chen, James L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Barcellos-Hoff, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB) form microscopically visible nuclear domains, or foci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF) are believed to be located where DNA damage is induced. To test this assumption, we analyzed the spatial distribution of 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM and gammaH2AX RIF in cells irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Since energy is randomly deposited along high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also be randomly distributed. The probability to induce DSB can be derived from DNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations to predict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by a complete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope optics from real experiments. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weighted random (Poisson) distributions. In contrast, the distributions of RIF obtained as early as 5 min after exposure to high LET (1 GeV/amu Fe) were non-random. This deviation from the expected DNA-weighted random pattern can be further characterized by relative DNA image measurements. This novel imaging approach shows that RIF were located preferentially at the interface between high and low DNA density regions, and were more frequent in regions with lower density DNA than predicted. This deviation from random behavior was more pronounced within the first 5 min following irradiation for phosphorylated ATM RIF, while gammaH2AX and 53BP1 RIF showed very pronounced deviation up to 30 min after exposure. These data suggest the existence of repair centers in mammalian epithelial cells. These centers would be nuclear sub-domains where DNA lesions would be collected for more efficient repair.

  5. Genomic assay reveals tolerance of DNA damage by both translesion DNA synthesis and homology-dependent repair in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Izhar, Lior; Ziv, Omer; Cohen, Isadora S; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Livneh, Zvi

    2013-04-16

    DNA lesions can block replication forks and lead to the formation of single-stranded gaps. These replication complications are mitigated by DNA damage tolerance mechanisms, which prevent deleterious outcomes such as cell death, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis. The two main tolerance strategies are translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), in which low-fidelity DNA polymerases bypass the blocking lesion, and homology-dependent repair (HDR; postreplication repair), which is based on the homologous sister chromatid. Here we describe a unique high-resolution method for the simultaneous analysis of TLS and HDR across defined DNA lesions in mammalian genomes. The method is based on insertion of plasmids carrying defined site-specific DNA lesions into mammalian chromosomes, using phage integrase-mediated integration. Using this method we show that mammalian cells use HDR to tolerate DNA damage in their genome. Moreover, analysis of the tolerance of the UV light-induced 6-4 photoproduct, the tobacco smoke-induced benzo[a]pyrene-guanine adduct, and an artificial trimethylene insert shows that each of these three lesions is tolerated by both TLS and HDR. We also determined the specificity of nucleotide insertion opposite these lesions during TLS in human genomes. This unique method will be useful in elucidating the mechanism of DNA damage tolerance in mammalian chromosomes and their connection to pathological processes such as carcinogenesis.

  6. Differential transcriptomic analysis reveals hidden light response in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Koepff, Joachim; Morschett, Holger; Busche, Tobias; Winkler, Anika; Kalinowski, Jörn; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Oldiges, Marco

    2017-09-27

    Recently, a comprehensive screening workflow for the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces lividans, a highly performant source for pharmaceutically active agents was introduced. This framework used parallelized cultivation in microtiter plates to efficiently accelerate early upstream process development. Focusing on growth performance, cultivation was successfully scaled-up to 1 liter stirred tank reactors. However, metabolic adaptation was observed on the transcriptomic level as among others, several genes incorporated in light response were up-regulated during bioreactor cultivation. Despite it was assumed that this was attributed to the fact that reactor cultivations were carried out in glass vessels exposed to daylight and artificial room light, this setup did not allow distinguishing exclusively between light and other effects. Upon that, the present study directly investigates the influence of light by defined illumination of microtiter plate cultures. Almost identical growth performance was observed for cultures grown in the dark or with illumination. Transcriptomics revealed the up-regulation of seven genes of which 6 have previously been described to be relevant for carotenoid synthesis and its regulation. These pigments are effective quenchers of reactive oxygen species. The seventh transcript coded for a photo-lyase incorporated in UV-damage repair of DNA further confirming induced light response. However, this was fully compensated by metabolic adaptation on the transcriptomic level and overall process performance was maintained. Consequently, environmental conditions need extremely careful control and evaluation during in-depth omics analysis of bioprocesses. Otherwise metabolic adaptation induced by such issues can easily be misinterpreted, especially during studies addressing cultivation system comparisons. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. Nanoscale histone localization in live cells reveals reduced chromatin mobility in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Lelièvre, Sophie A.; Irudayaraj, Joseph M. K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nuclear functions including gene expression, DNA replication and genome maintenance intimately rely on dynamic changes in chromatin organization. The movements of chromatin fibers might play important roles in the regulation of these fundamental processes, yet the mechanisms controlling chromatin mobility are poorly understood owing to methodological limitations for the assessment of chromatin movements. Here, we present a facile and quantitative technique that relies on photoactivation of GFP-tagged histones and paired-particle tracking to measure chromatin mobility in live cells. We validate the method by comparing live cells to ATP-depleted cells and show that chromatin movements in mammalian cells are predominantly energy dependent. We also find that chromatin diffusion decreases in response to DNA breaks induced by a genotoxic drug or by the ISceI meganuclease. Timecourse analysis after cell exposure to ionizing radiation indicates that the decrease in chromatin mobility is transient and precedes subsequent increased mobility. Future applications of the method in the DNA repair field and beyond are discussed. PMID:25501817

  8. Parallel in vivo and in vitro melanoma RNAi dropout screens reveal synthetic lethality between hypoxia and DNA damage response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Possik, Patricia A; Müller, Judith; Gerlach, Carmen; Kenski, Juliana C N; Huang, Xinyao; Shahrabi, Aida; Krijgsman, Oscar; Song, Ji-Ying; Smit, Marjon A; Gerritsen, Bram; Lieftink, Cor; Kemper, Kristel; Michaut, Magali; Beijersbergen, Roderick L; Wessels, Lodewyk; Schumacher, Ton N; Peeper, Daniel S

    2014-11-20

    To identify factors preferentially necessary for driving tumor expansion, we performed parallel in vitro and in vivo negative-selection short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screens. Melanoma cells harboring shRNAs targeting several DNA damage response (DDR) kinases had a greater selective disadvantage in vivo than in vitro, indicating an essential contribution of these factors during tumor expansion. In growing tumors, DDR kinases were activated following hypoxia. Correspondingly, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of DDR kinases was toxic to melanoma cells, including those that were resistant to BRAF inhibitor, and this could be enhanced by angiogenesis blockade. These results reveal that hypoxia sensitizes melanomas to targeted inhibition of the DDR and illustrate the utility of in vivo shRNA dropout screens for the identification of pharmacologically tractable targets. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  10. Lightning damage to a general aviation aircraft: Description and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, P. T.

    1974-01-01

    The damage sustained by a Beechcraft King Air Model B90 aircraft by a single lightning discharge is presented and analyzed. The incident occurred during landing approach at Jackson, Michigan, on Feb. 19, 1971. In addition to the usual melted-metal damage at the lightning attachment points, there was severe implosion-type damage over a large area on the lower right side of the aircraft and impact- and crushing-type damage on the upper and lower surfaces on the left wingtip near the trailing edge. Analyses indicate that the implosion-type damage was probably caused by lightning-generated shock waves, that the impact-and crushing-type damage was caused by magnetic forces, and that the lightning discharge was a multiple strike with at least 11 strokes separated in time by about 4.5 milliseconds. The evidence indicates that the lightning discharge was rather different from the average in character severity.

  11. Analysis Concerning the Inspection Threshold for Multi-Site Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    uL 200 words) Periodic inspections, at a prescribed interval, for Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in longitudinal fuselage lap-joints start when the aircraft ...at a prescribed interval, for Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in longitudinal fuselage lap-joints start when the aircraft has accumulated a certain number of...viii 1. INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE The cumulative probability of detection of Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in fuselage lap-joints of aging aircraft was assessed

  12. Generalized Computer Program. Agricultural Flood Damage Analysis (AGDAM) Users Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    3.3.1 Duration. Duration is - zritical parameter in the determination of flood damage to crops. The impact of duration of flood typically varies...on damage are difficult to distinguish from depth and duration. The need to consider erosion and sedimentation impacts is greatest for alluvial streams...Multiple Flood Concepts The damage associated with a flood event may be influenced by previous events. The impact is dependent on the type of crop and

  13. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, Norman

    1995-01-01

    It is necessary to integrate a wide variety of technical disciplines to provide an analysis of structural damage to a spacecraft due to hypervelocity impact. There are many uncertainties, and more detailed investigation is warranted, in each technical discipline. However, a total picture of the debris and meteoroid hazard is required to support manned spaceflight in general, and the international Space Station in particular. In the performance of this contract, besides producing a handbook, research and development was conducted in several different areas. The contract was broken into six separate tasks. Each task objectives and accomplishments will be reviewed in the following sections. The Handbook and separate task reports are contained as attachments to the final report. The final section summarizes all of the recommendations coming out of this study. The analyses and comments are general design guidelines and not necessarily applicable to final Space Station designs since several configuration and detailed design changes were being made during the course of this contract. Rather, the analyses and comments may indicate either a point-in-time concept analysis, available test data, or desirable protection goals, not hindered by the design and operation constraints faced by Space Station designers.

  14. Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis for bladed wheels damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, P.; Peeters, B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bladed wheels and the fluid distributed by the stator vanes results in cyclic loading of the rotating components. Compressors and turbines wheels are subject to vibration and fatigue issues, especially when resonance conditions are excited. Even if resonance conditions can be often predicted and avoided, high cycle fatigue failures can occur, causing safety issues and economic loss. Rigorous maintenance programs are then needed, forcing the system to expensive shut-down. Blade crack detection methods are beneficial for condition-based maintenance. While contact measurement systems are not always usable in exercise conditions (e.g. high temperature), non-contact methods can be more suitable. One (or more) stator-fixed sensor can measure all the blades as they pass by, in order to detect the damaged ones. The main drawback in this situation is the short acquisition time available for each blade, which is shortened by the high rotational speed of the components. A traditional Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) analysis would result in a poor frequency resolution. A Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis (NHFA) can be executed with an arbitrary frequency resolution instead, allowing to obtain frequency information even with short-time data samples. This paper shows an analytical investigation of the NHFA method. A data processing algorithm is then proposed to obtain frequency shift information from short time samples. The performances of this algorithm are then studied by experimental and numerical tests.

  15. Damage Analysis of Rectangular Section Composite Beam under Pure Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiping; Xiao, Fan; Liu, Zejia; Tang, Liqun; Fang, Daining

    2013-02-01

    Laminated composite beams are commonly used in engineering applications involving macro to nano structures. Based on the assumption that plain sections remain plain after deformation, this paper analyzes stress distributions in cross-ply laminated composite beams with rectangular cross-sections, and formulates the basic damage equations through Kachanov's damage definition and Janson's failure criterion. The location of the neutral axis and the ultimate bending moment are obtained for pure bending cases. The effect of the elastic modulus of the two layers on the damage evolution is analyzed; a reasonable damage composite beam model is proposed to predict the ultimate bending moment.

  16. Damage Assessment Using Vibration Analysis on the Z24-BRIDGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeck, J.; de Roeck, G.

    2003-01-01

    Vibration monitoring is a useful evaluation tool in the development of a non-destructive damage-identification technique, and relies on the fact that occurrence of damage in a structural system leads to changes in its dynamic properties. It can give global information of a structure, and the location of the damage has not to be known in advance. The damage-identification technique is based on the observed shifts in eigenfrequencies and modeshapes and relate the dynamic characteristics to a damage pattern of the structure. The presented technique makes use of the calculation of modal bending moments and curvatures to derive the bending stiffness at each location. The basic assumption is that damage can be directly related to a decrease of stiffness in the structure. Damage-assessment techniques are validated on the progressively damaged prestressed concrete bridge Z24 in Switzerland, tested in the framework of the Brite Euram project SIMCES. A series of full modal surveys are carried out on the bridge before and after applying a number of damage scenarios.

  17. Mechanistic Analysis of Rock Damage Anisotropy and Rotation Around Circular Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Arson, Chloé

    2015-11-01

    We used the differential stress-induced damage (DSID) model to predict anisotropic crack propagation under tensile and shear stress. The damage variable is similar to a crack density tensor. The damage function and the damage potential are expressed as functions of the energy release rate, defined as the thermodynamic force that is work-conjugate to damage. Contrary to the previous damage models, flow rules are obtained by deriving dissipation functions by the energy release rate, and thermodynamic consistency is ensured. The damage criterion is adapted from the Drucker-Prager yield function. Simulations of biaxial stress tests showed that: (1) three-dimensional states of damage can be obtained for three-dimensional states of stress; (2) no damage propagates under isotropic compression; (3) crack planes propagate in the direction parallel to major compression stress; (4) damage propagation hardens the material; (5) stiffness and deformation anisotropy result from the anisotropy of damage. There is no one-to-one relationship between stress and damage. We demonstrated the effect of the loading sequence in a two-step simulation (a shear loading phase and a compression loading phase): the current state of stress and damage can be used to track the effect of stress history on damage rotation. We finally conducted a sensitivity analysis with the finite element method, to explore the stress conditions in which damage is expected to rotate around a circular cavity subject to pressurization or depressurization. Simulation results showed that: (1) before damage initiation, the DSID model matches the analytical solution of stress distribution obtained with the theory of elasticity; (2) the DSID model can predict the extent of the tensile damage zone at the crown, and that of the compressive damage zone at the sidewalls; (3) damage generated during a vertical far-field compression followed by a depressurization of the cavity is more intense than that generated during a

  18. Damage Characterization in Copper Deformed under Hydrostatic Stress - Experimental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Flater, P. J.; House, J. W.; Nixon, M. E.

    2006-07-28

    The results of an experimental investigation designed to determine the effect of damage created by hydrostatic tensile loading on the properties of copper are reported. Three metallurgical conditions of half-hard OFHC copper were investigated; as worked; annealed 2hr at 400 deg. C ({approx}40 micron grain diameter); and annealed 2hr at 800 deg. C ({approx}80 micron grain diameter). Mechanical property characterization included uniaxial compression tests. High rate plasticity and damage was introduced by Taylor and rod-on-rod impact tests. The damage from the high rate experiments was characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Quasi-static compression specimens machined from recovered high rate samples were tested to determine the influence of damage on the mechanical response of the material. The compression test results will be discussed in relationship to the starting microstructure and the extent of damaged introduced into the material.

  19. Damage Tolerance Analysis of a Pressurized Liquid Oxygen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Harvin, Stephen F.; Gregory, Peyton B.; Mason, Brian H.; Thompson, Joe E.; Hoffman, Eric K.

    2006-01-01

    A damage tolerance assessment was conducted of an 8,000 gallon pressurized Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank. The LOX tank is constructed of a stainless steel pressure vessel enclosed by a thermal-insulating vacuum jacket. The vessel is pressurized to 2,250 psi with gaseous nitrogen resulting in both thermal and pressure stresses on the tank wall. Finite element analyses were performed on the tank to characterize the stresses from operation. Engineering material data was found from both the construction of the tank and the technical literature. An initial damage state was assumed based on records of a nondestructive inspection performed on the tank. The damage tolerance analyses were conducted using the NASGRO computer code. This paper contains the assumptions, and justifications, made for the input parameters to the damage tolerance analyses and the results of the damage tolerance analyses with a discussion on the operational safety of the LOX tank.

  20. Analysis of 1w Bulk Laser Damage in KDP

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, D A; Carr, C W

    2011-04-11

    The influence of laser parameters on laser-induced damage in the bulk of KDP is difficult to determine because the damage manifests as discrete sites a few microns in diameter distributed throughout a relatively large volume of material. Here, they present a method to directly measure the size and location of many thousands of such sites and correlate them to the laser conditions which produced them. This technique is used to characterize the effects of pulse duration on damage initiated by 1053 nm light in the bulk of KDP crystals. They find that the density of damage sites produced by 1053 nm light is less sensitive to pulse duration than was previously reported for 526 nm and 351 nm light. In addition, the effect of pulse duration on the size of the damage sites produced appears insensitive to wavelength.

  1. Analysis of shape memory alloy sensory particles for damage detection via substructure and continuum damage modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielefeldt, Brent R.; Benzerga, A. Amine; Hartl, Darren J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to monitor and predict the structural health of an aircraft is of growing importance to the aerospace industry. Currently, structural inspections and maintenance are based upon experiences with similar aircraft operating in similar conditions. While effective, these methods are time-intensive and unnecessary if the aircraft is not in danger of structural failure. It is imagined that future aircraft will utilize non-destructive evaluation methods, allowing for the near real-time monitoring of structural health. A particularly interesting method involves utilizing the unique transformation response of shape memory alloy (SMA) particles embedded in an aircraft structure. By detecting changes in the mechanical and/or electromagnetic responses of embedded particles, operators could detect the formation or propagation of fatigue cracks in the vicinity of these particles. This work focuses on a finite element model of SMA particles embedded in an aircraft wing using a substructure modeling approach in which degrees of freedom are retained only at specified points of connection to other parts or the application of boundary conditions, greatly reducing computational cost. Previous work evaluated isolated particle response to a static crack to numerically demonstrate and validate this damage detection method. This paper presents the implementation of a damage model to account for crack propagation and examine for the first time the effect of particle configuration and/or relative placement with respect to the ability to detect damage.

  2. A Histomorphometric Analysis of Radiation Damage in an Isogenic Murine Model of Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zheutlin, Alexander R.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Nelson, Noah S.; Polyatskaya, Yekaterina; Rodriguez, Jose J.; Donneys, Alexis; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The devastation radiation therapy (XRT) causes to endogenous tissue in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients can be a prohibitive obstacle in reconstruction of the mandible, demanding a better understanding of XRT-induced damage and options for reconstruction. Our study investigates the cellular damage caused by radiation in an isogenic murine model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis (DO). We posit that radiation will result in reduced osteocytes, with elevated empty lacunae and immature osteoid. Methods Twenty Lewis rats were randomly assigned to two groups: DO (n=10) and XRT/DO (n=10). Both groups underwent an osteotomy and mandibular DO across a 5.1 mm gap. XRT was administered to the XRT/DO group at a fractionated, human equivalent dose of 35 Gy prior to surgery. Animals were sacrificed on postoperative day 40 and mandibles were harvested and sectioned for histological analysis. Results Bone that underwent radiation revealed a significantly decreased osteocyte count and complementary increase in empty lacunae when compared to non-XRT bone (p=0.019, p=0.000). Additionally, XRT bone demonstrated increased immature osteoid and decreased mature woven bone when compared to non-radiated bone (p=0.001 and p=0.003, respectively). Furthermore, analysis of the ratio of immature osteoid to woven bone volume exhibited a significant increase in the XRT bone, further revealing the devastating damage brought by XRT (p=0.001). Conclusion These results clearly demonstrate the cellular diminution that occurs as a result of radiation. This foundational study provides the groundwork upon which to investigate cellular therapies in an immunoprivileged model of mandibular DO. PMID:26341682

  3. On damage detection in wind turbine gearboxes using outlier analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadou, Ifigeneia; Manson, Graeme; Dervilis, Nikolaos; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Worden, Keith

    2012-04-01

    The proportion of worldwide installed wind power in power systems increases over the years as a result of the steadily growing interest in renewable energy sources. Still, the advantages offered by the use of wind power are overshadowed by the high operational and maintenance costs, resulting in the low competitiveness of wind power in the energy market. In order to reduce the costs of corrective maintenance, the application of condition monitoring to gearboxes becomes highly important, since gearboxes are among the wind turbine components with the most frequent failure observations. While condition monitoring of gearboxes in general is common practice, with various methods having been developed over the last few decades, wind turbine gearbox condition monitoring faces a major challenge: the detection of faults under the time-varying load conditions prevailing in wind turbine systems. Classical time and frequency domain methods fail to detect faults under variable load conditions, due to the temporary effect that these faults have on vibration signals. This paper uses the statistical discipline of outlier analysis for the damage detection of gearbox tooth faults. A simplified two-degree-of-freedom gearbox model considering nonlinear backlash, time-periodic mesh stiffness and static transmission error, simulates the vibration signals to be analysed. Local stiffness reduction is used for the simulation of tooth faults and statistical processes determine the existence of intermittencies. The lowest level of fault detection, the threshold value, is considered and the Mahalanobis squared-distance is calculated for the novelty detection problem.

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FANG, YI; ZHANG, QIAN; WANG, XIN; YANG, XUE; WANG, XIANGYU; HUANG, ZHEN; JIAO, YUCHEN; WANG, JING

    2016-01-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  5. ANALYSIS OF IMPACT DAMAGE USING LINE SCANNING THERMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Ley, O.; Valatka, T.; Godinez, V.; Chung, S.; Schutte, J.; Dunne, K.; Caiazzo, A.; Bandos, B.

    2010-02-22

    Impact damage in a composite shaft was studied using Line Scanning Thermography (LST), a novel dynamic thermography technique capable of inspecting large areas in short times. It is expected that projectile impact in a laminate composite will generate a discontinuity that affects heat propagation. Therefore, as heat is deposited over the impacted region, a hot spot will be observed. In this study several impact points were evaluated using UT and LST. Experiments show that assessing impact damage using LST is a dynamic process, which should be accounted for when using dynamic thermography to quantify impact damage extension and severity. The LST images provided information about the region affected by impact damage, which was consistent with the damage region determined using UT. It is seen that the damage areas obtained at early observation time after heat application show small areas with severe damage; and for further times after heat application, the temperature of the hot spots drops and the size of the region affected increases with time following a linear relationship with the observation time.

  6. Analysis of damage in composite laminates under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriakose, Sunil

    The focus of this research was damage formation in composite laminates subjected to bending. Matrix cracking and internal delamination are common damage modes before final failure for a composite laminate under thermo-mechanical loading. Two configurations of cross-ply laminates, namely [0m/90 n]s and [90m/0n]s, were considered for the study. Approximate analytical solutions for the stress states in the two laminates subjected to constant bending moment, with matrix cracks in the 90° layers, were derived using a variational approach. The evolution of matrix cracking under monotonically increasing load was studied for a number of composite materials. The analytical predictions showed an initial stage of rapid matrix crack multiplication followed by a slowing down in the crack multiplication. In the case of [0m/90n] s laminate, 0° ply failure in tension or compression was found to be likely even at the initial stages of matrix cracking for laminates with thin 90° layer. The 0° ply failure is delayed for laminates with thicker 90° layer. The analytical model for the stress state in the [90m/0 n]s laminate was extended to include delamination from the matrix crack-tip along the 0/90 interface. The bending moment required to initiate crack-tip delamination was computed as a function of the crack density. By comparing this result with matrix crack evolution, the relative dominance of the two modes of damage could be determined. The critical crack density beyond which delamination dominates matrix cracking is obtained from the analysis. The critical crack density is interpreted as the stage beyond which growth of delamination rather than matrix cracking is likely to occur. Parametric studies conducted by varying the laminate configuration showed that the critical crack density for delamination onset strongly depends on the thickness of the 90° layer and the distance of the 90° layer from the laminate mid-plane. Quasi-static growth of delamination under monotonic

  7. Multi-frequency local wavenumber analysis and ply correlation of delamination damage.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Peter D; Leckey, Cara A C

    2015-09-01

    Wavenumber domain analysis through use of scanning laser Doppler vibrometry has been shown to be effective for non-contact inspection of damage in composites. Qualitative and semi-quantitative local wavenumber analysis of realistic delamination damage and quantitative analysis of idealized damage scenarios (Teflon inserts) have been performed previously in the literature. This paper presents a new methodology based on multi-frequency local wavenumber analysis for quantitative assessment of multi-ply delamination damage in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite specimens. The methodology is presented and applied to a real world damage scenario (impact damage in an aerospace CFRP composite). The methodology yields delamination size and also correlates local wavenumber results from multiple excitation frequencies to theoretical dispersion curves in order to robustly determine the delamination ply depth. Results from the wavenumber based technique are validated against a traditional nondestructive evaluation method.

  8. Structure of C-terminal Tandem BRCT Repeats of Rtt107 Protein Reveals Critical Role in Interaction with Phosphorylated Histone H2A during DNA Damage Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinxin; Liu, Kaixian; Li, Fudong; Wang, Juncheng; Huang, Hongda; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2012-01-01

    Rtt107 (regulator of Ty1 transposition 107; Esc4) is a DNA repair protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that can restore stalled replication forks following DNA damage. There are six BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminal) domains in Rtt107 that act as binding sites for other recruited proteins during DNA repair. Several Rtt107 binding partners have been identified, including Slx4, Rtt101, Rad55, and the Smc5/6 (structural maintenance of chromosome) protein complex. Rtt107 can reportedly be recruited to chromatin in the presence of Rtt101 and Rtt109 upon DNA damage, but the chromatin-binding site of Rtt107 has not been identified. Here, we report our investigation of the interaction between phosphorylated histone H2A (γH2A) and the C-terminal tandem BRCT repeats (BRCT5-BRCT6) of Rtt107. The crystal structures of BRCT5-BRCT6 alone and in a complex with γH2A reveal the molecular basis of the Rtt107-γH2A interaction. We used in vitro mutagenesis and a fluorescence polarization assay to confirm the location of the Rtt107 motif that is crucial for this interaction. In addition, these assays indicated that this interaction requires the phosphorylation of H2A. An in vivo phenotypic analysis in yeast demonstrated the critical role of BRCT5-BRCT6 and its interaction with γH2A during the DNA damage response. Our results shed new light on the molecular mechanism by which Rtt107 is recruited to chromatin in response to stalled DNA replication forks. PMID:22262834

  9. Damage modeling and statistical analysis of optics damage performance in MJ-class laser systems.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhi M; Raymond, B; Gaylord, J; Fallejo, R; Bude, J; Wegner, P

    2014-11-17

    Modeling the lifetime of a fused silica optic is described for a multiple beam, MJ-class laser system. This entails combining optic processing data along with laser shot data to account for complete history of optic processing and shot exposure. Integrating with online inspection data allows for the construction of a performance metric to describe how an optic performs with respect to the model. This methodology helps to validate the damage model as well as allows strategic planning and identifying potential hidden parameters that are affecting the optic's performance.

  10. Analysis of Widespread Fatigue Damage in Aerospace Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    equivalent initial flaw size (EIFS) for corrosion damage. The EIFS approach has been applied to pores andmicrofeatures...The better performance of an improved alloy like 2524 would be recognized by a smaller equivalent initial flaw size (EIFS) than that from a poorer...in this regard would be to determine the equivalent initial flaw size (EIFS) for corrosion damage. It is also recommended that similar studies

  11. TSS tether cable meteoroid/orbital debris damage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the damage analyses performed on the tether cable used for the tethered satellite system (TSS), for the damage that could be caused by meteoroid or orbital debris impacts. The TSS consists of a tethered satellite deployer and a tethered satellite. The analytical studies were performed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the results from the following tests: (1) hypervelocity impact tests to determine the 'critical' meteoroid particle diameter, i.e., the maximum size of a meteoroid particle which can impact the tether cable without causing 'failure'; (2) electrical resistance tests on the damaged and undamaged tether cable to determine if degradation of current flow occurred through the damaged tether cables; and (3) tensile load tests to verify the load carrying capability of the damaged tether cables. Finally, the HULL hydrodynamic computer code was used to simulate the hypervelocity impact of the tether cable by particles at velocities higher than can be tested, to determine the extent of the expected tether damage.

  12. 'Relaxers' damage hair: evidence from amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Khumalo, Nonhlanhla P; Stone, Janet; Gumedze, Freedom; McGrath, Emily; Ngwanya, Mzudumile R; de Berker, David

    2010-03-01

    'Relaxers' are used by more than two thirds of African females to straighten hair, with easy grooming and increased length often cited as reasons. A recent study reported relaxed hair lengths much shorter than expected, suggesting increased fragility; the potential for scalp inflammation and scarring alopecia remains unclear. To investigate the biochemical effects of 'relaxers' on hair. With informed consent, included participants represented 3 groups: natural hair, asymptomatic relaxed hair, and symptomatic (brittle) relaxed hair. Biochemical analysis was performed by using a Biochrom 30 amino acid analyzer. Differences in amino acid levels were assessed using either Wilcoxon rank sum test or matched-pairs signed-rank test. There was a decrease in cystine, citrulline, and arginine; however, an increase in glutamine was found in all relaxed compared to natural hair. Cystine levels (milligram per gram amino acid nitrogen) were similar in natural proximal and distal hair: 14 mg/g (range, 4-15 mg/g) versus 14 mg/g (range, 12-15 mg/g); P = .139. In asymptomatic relaxed hair, cystine levels were higher in less frequently relaxed samples proximal to scalp: 7.5 mg/g (5.6-12) versus 3.3 mg/g (1.3-9.2); P = .005. Cystine levels in distal asymptomatic relaxed and symptomatic relaxed hair were similar to each other and to those in the genetic hair fragility disease trichothiodystrophy. It was not possible to analyze lye and no-lye 'relaxers' separately. 'Relaxers' are associated with reduced cystine consistent with fragile damaged hair. A decrease in citrulline and glutamine has been associated with inflammation; prospective studies are needed to investigate whether or how 'relaxers' induce inflammation. Copyright 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical analysis of laser ablation and damage in glass with multiple picosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingying; Eppelt, Urs; Russ, Simone; Hartmann, Claudia; Siebert, Christof; Zhu, Jianqiang; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-04-08

    This study presents a novel numerical model for laser ablation and laser damage in glass including beam propagation and nonlinear absorption of multiple incident ultrashort laser pulses. The laser ablation and damage in the glass cutting process with a picosecond pulsed laser was studied. The numerical results were in good agreement with our experimental observations, thereby revealing the damage mechanism induced by laser ablation. Beam propagation effects such as interference, diffraction and refraction, play a major role in the evolution of the crater structure and the damage region. There are three different damage regions, a thin layer and two different kinds of spikes. Moreover, the electronic damage mechanism was verified and distinguished from heat modification using the experimental results with different pulse spatial overlaps.

  14. Statistical analysis of vibration-induced bone and joint damages.

    PubMed

    Schenk, T

    1995-01-01

    Vibration-induced damages to bones and joints are still occupational diseases with insufficient knowledge about causing and moderating factors and resulting damages. For a better understanding of these relationships also retrospective analyses of already acknowledged occupational diseases may be used. Already recorded detailed data for 203 in 1970 to 1979 acknowledged occupational diseases in the building industry and the building material industry of the GDR are the basis for the here described investigations. The data were gathered from the original documents of the occupational diseases and scaled in cooperation of an industrial engineer and an industrial physician. For the purposes of this investigations the data are to distinguish between data which describe the conditions of the work place (e.g. material, tools and posture), the exposure parameters (e.g. beginning of exposure and latency period) and the disease (e.g. anamnestical and radiological data). These data are treated for the use with sophisticated computerized statistical methods. The following analyses were carried out. Investigation of the connections between the several characteristics, which describe the occupational disease (health damages), including the comparison of the severity of the damages at the individual joints. Investigation of the side dependence of the damages. Investigation of the influence of the age at the beginning of the exposure and the age at the acknowledgement of the occupational disease and herewith of the exposure duration. Investigation of the effect of different occupational and exposure conditions.

  15. Analysis of chromatin integrity and DNA damage of buffalo spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, K. Gh. M.; El-Sokary, A. A. E.; Abdel-Ghaffar, A. E.; Abou El-Roos, M. E. A.; Ahmed, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine chromatin integrity and DNA damage by DNA electrophoresis and comet assays of buffalo fresh and frozen semen. Semen samples were collected from four buffalo bulls and evaluated after freezing for semen motility, viability, sperm abnormalities, chromatin integrity and DNA damage. A significant variation was found in semen parameters after thawing. Highly significant differences (P<0.001) in chromatin integrity were observed between fresh and frozen semen. For the fresh semen, there was no significant difference between the bulls for chromatin integrity; however, a significant variation (P<0.05) was detected in their frozen semen. No DNA fragmentation was observed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The percentage of sperm with damaged DNA detected by comet assay differed significantly between fresh and frozen semen. A significant negative correlation was recorded between motility and DNA damage (r=-0.68, P<0.05). Sperm abnormalities and DNA fragmentation were significantly positively correlated (r=0.59, P<0.05). In conclusion, DNA damage evaluation can provide reassurance about genomic normalcy and guide the development of improved methods of selecting spermatozoa with intact DNA to be used in artificial insemination. PMID:27175169

  16. Thermomechanics of damageable materials under diffusion: modelling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Tomassetti, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent general-purpose model describing diffusion of a solute or a fluid in a solid undergoing possible phase transformations and damage, beside possible visco-inelastic processes. Also heat generation/consumption/transfer is considered. Damage is modelled as rate-independent. The applications include metal-hydrogen systems with metal/hydride phase transformation, poroelastic rocks, structural and ferro/para-magnetic phase transformation, water and heat transport in concrete, and if diffusion is neglected, plasticity with damage and viscoelasticity, etc. For the ensuing system of partial differential equations and inclusions, we prove existence of solutions by a carefully devised semi-implicit approximation scheme of the fractional-step type.

  17. Multiomic Analysis of the UV-Induced DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Boeing, Stefan; Williamson, Laura; Encheva, Vesela; Gori, Ilaria; Saunders, Rebecca E; Instrell, Rachael; Aygün, Ozan; Rodriguez-Martinez, Marta; Weems, Juston C; Kelly, Gavin P; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Stewart, Aengus; Howell, Michael; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2016-05-11

    In order to facilitate the identification of factors and pathways in the cellular response to UV-induced DNA damage, several descriptive proteomic screens and a functional genomics screen were performed in parallel. Numerous factors could be identified with high confidence when the screen results were superimposed and interpreted together, incorporating biological knowledge. A searchable database, bioLOGIC, which provides access to relevant information about a protein or process of interest, was established to host the results and facilitate data mining. Besides uncovering roles in the DNA damage response for numerous proteins and complexes, including Integrator, Cohesin, PHF3, ASC-1, SCAF4, SCAF8, and SCAF11, we uncovered a role for the poorly studied, melanoma-associated serine/threonine kinase 19 (STK19). Besides effectively uncovering relevant factors, the multiomic approach also provides a systems-wide overview of the diverse cellular processes connected to the transcription-related DNA damage response.

  18. Statistical multi-site fatigue damage analysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. S.

    1995-02-01

    A statistical model has been developed to evaluate fatigue damage at multi-sites in complex joints based on coupon test data and fracture mechanics methods. The model is similar to the USAF model, but modified by introducing a failure criterion and a probability of fatal crack occurrence to account for the multiple site damage phenomenon. The involvement of NDI techniques has been included in the model which can be used to evaluate the structural reliability, the detectability of fatigue damage (cracks), and the risk of failure based on NDI results taken from samples. A practical example is provided for rivet fasteners and bolted fasteners. It is shown that the model can be used even if it is based on conventional S-N coupon experiments should further fractographic inspections be made for cracks on the broken surfaces of specimens.

  19. Analysis of bending properties for damaged laminated pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, A.; Nishiwaki, T.; Nakai, A.; Hamada, H.

    1996-12-01

    Various composite cylinders, such as braided cylinders, could be fabricated with a high volume fabrication method, using thermoplastic composites and so on. If so, usage of composite cylinder would be extended. In this paper, a new analytical model named Quasi-Three-Dimensional model was proposed and applied to a two-layered composite cylinder. Under various service environments, a damaged cylinder with interlaminar fracture often appeared. The calculated elastic modulus was decreased with an increase of the damaged area. From deformation states and stress distribution of interlaminae, some coupling effects were recognized, even if the analytical cylinder without any damage never showed any coupling effects. This result showed the usefulness of the Quasi-Three-Dimensional model.

  20. Analysis of pesticide exposure and DNA damage in immigrant farmworkers.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Linda A; Lasarev, Michael; Muniz, Juan; Nazar Stewart, Valle; Kisby, Glen

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, the Comet assay has been used increasingly in studies of workers potentially exposed to genotoxic substances in the workplace or environment. Significant increases in DNA damage measured with the Comet assay has been reported in lymphocytes of agricultural workers; however, less intrusive means of biomonitoring are needed in epidemiological investigations. This study was designed to use the Comet assay to describe the association of markers of DNA damage in oral leukocytes with biomarkers of pesticide exposure in 134 farmworkers working in berry crops in Oregon compared to control populations. The authors also examined the extent of DNA damage in young workers compared to adults and the effect of work histories, lifestyle factors, and diet on markers of DNA damage. Urinary levels of organophosphate pesticides were low at the time of sampling; however, mean levels of the Captan metabolite tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI) were found to be shifted significantly higher in the farmworkers (0.14 microg/ml) compared to controls (0.078 microg/ml) (one-sided p value=.01). Likewise, the combined molar equivalent of all dialkylphosphate metabolites was marginally higher in farmworkers (p value=.05). The mean tail intensity was significantly greater for agricultural workers compared to controls (one-sided p value<.001), indicating more DNA damage in the oral leukocytes. On average, the mean tail intensity was 10.9 units greater for agricultural workers (95% CI: 6-16 units greater). Tail moment was also significantly greater for agricultural workers compared to nonagricultural workers (one-sided p value<.001). No Comet parameter was significantly associated with years spent working in agriculture, age, sex, body mass index, diet, and alcohol or tobacco use. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility for using the Comet assay in biomonitoring studies of farmworkers. Additional studies are needed to examine the effects of different pesticide types on

  1. Hybrid molecular dynamics simulation for plasma induced damage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable further device size reduction (also known as Moore's law) and improved power performance, the semiconductor industry is introducing new materials and device structures into the semiconductor fabrication process. Materials now include III-V compounds, germanium, cobalt, ruthenium, hafnium, and others. The device structure in both memory and logic has been evolving from planar to three dimensional (3D). One such device is the FinFET, where the transistor gate is a vertical fin made either of silicon, silicon-germanium or germanium. These changes have brought renewed interests in the structural damages caused by energetic ion bombardment of the fin sidewalls which are exposed to the ion flux from the plasma during the fin-strip off step. Better control of the physical damage of the 3D devices requires a better understanding of the damage formation mechanisms on such new materials and structures. In this study, the damage formation processes by ion bombardment have been simulated for Si and Ge substrate by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid simulations and compared to the results from the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In our QM/MM simulations, the highly reactive region in which the structural damage is created is simulated with the Density Functional based Tight Binding (DFTB) method and the region remote from the primary region is simulated using classical MD with the Stillinger-Weber and Moliere potentials. The learn on the fly method is also used to reduce the computational load. Hence our QM/MM simulation is much faster than the full QC-MD simulations and the original QM/MM simulations. The amorphous layers profile simulated with QM/MM have obvious differences in their thickness for silicon and germanium substrate. The profile of damaged structure in the germanium substrate is characterized by a deeper tail then in silicon. These traits are also observed in the results from the mass selected ion beam

  2. Surface crack analysis applied to impact damage in a thick graphite-epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.; Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1988-01-01

    The residual tensile strength of a thick graphite/epoxy composite with impact damage was predicted using surface crack analysis. The damage was localized to a region directly beneath the impact site and extended only part way through the laminate. The damaged region contained broken fibers, and the locus of breaks in each layer resembled a crack perpendicular to the direction of the fibers. In some cases, the impacts broke fibers without making a visible crater. The impact damage was represented as a semi-elliptical surface crack with length and depth equal to that of the impact damage. The maximum length and depth of the damage were predicted with a stress analysis and a maximum shear stress criterion. The predictions and measurements of strength were in good agreement.

  3. UAV-based urban structural damage assessment using object-based image analysis and semantic reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Galarreta, J.; Kerle, N.; Gerke, M.

    2014-09-01

    Structural damage assessment is critical after disasters but remains a challenge. Many studies have explored the potential of remote sensing data, but limitations of vertical data persist. Oblique imagery has been identified as more useful, though the multi-angle imagery also adds a new dimension of complexity. This paper addresses damage assessment based on multi-perspective, overlapping, very high resolution oblique images obtained with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). 3-D point-cloud assessment for the entire building is combined with detailed object-based image analysis (OBIA) of façades and roofs. This research focuses not on automatic damage assessment, but on creating a methodology that supports the often ambiguous classification of intermediate damage levels, aiming at producing comprehensive per-building damage scores. We identify completely damaged structures in the 3-D point cloud, and for all other cases provide the OBIA-based damage indicators to be used as auxiliary information by damage analysts. The results demonstrate the usability of the 3-D point-cloud data to identify major damage features. Also the UAV-derived and OBIA-processed oblique images are shown to be a suitable basis for the identification of detailed damage features on façades and roofs. Finally, we also demonstrate the possibility of aggregating the multi-perspective damage information at building level.

  4. UAV-based urban structural damage assessment using object-based image analysis and semantic reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Galarreta, J.; Kerle, N.; Gerke, M.

    2015-06-01

    Structural damage assessment is critical after disasters but remains a challenge. Many studies have explored the potential of remote sensing data, but limitations of vertical data persist. Oblique imagery has been identified as more useful, though the multi-angle imagery also adds a new dimension of complexity. This paper addresses damage assessment based on multi-perspective, overlapping, very high resolution oblique images obtained with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). 3-D point-cloud assessment for the entire building is combined with detailed object-based image analysis (OBIA) of façades and roofs. This research focuses not on automatic damage assessment, but on creating a methodology that supports the often ambiguous classification of intermediate damage levels, aiming at producing comprehensive per-building damage scores. We identify completely damaged structures in the 3-D point cloud, and for all other cases provide the OBIA-based damage indicators to be used as auxiliary information by damage analysts. The results demonstrate the usability of the 3-D point-cloud data to identify major damage features. Also the UAV-derived and OBIA-processed oblique images are shown to be a suitable basis for the identification of detailed damage features on façades and roofs. Finally, we also demonstrate the possibility of aggregating the multi-perspective damage information at building level.

  5. FRP/steel composite damage acoustic emission monitoring and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    FRP is a new material with good mechanical properties, such as high strength of extension, low density, good corrosion resistance and anti-fatigue. FRP and steel composite has gotten a wide range of applications in civil engineering because of its good performance. As the FRP/steel composite get more and more widely used, the monitor of its damage is also getting more important. To monitor this composite, acoustic emission (AE) is a good choice. In this study, we prepare four identical specimens to conduct our test. During the testing process, the AE character parameters and mechanics properties were obtained. Damaged properties of FRP/steel composite were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. By the growing trend of AE accumulated energy, the severity of the damage made on FRP/steel composite was estimated. The AE sentry function has been successfully used to study damage progression and fracture emerge release rate of composite laminates. This technique combines the cumulative AE energy with strain energy of the material rather than analyzes the AE information and mechanical separately.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Electron Beam Damage in Organic Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Leijten, Zino J W A; Keizer, Arthur D A; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2017-05-18

    In transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the interaction of an electron beam with polymers such as P3HT:PCBM photovoltaic nanocomposites results in electron beam damage, which is the most important factor limiting acquisition of structural or chemical data at high spatial resolution. Beam effects can vary depending on parameters such as electron dose rate, temperature during imaging, and the presence of water and oxygen in the sample. Furthermore, beam damage will occur at different length scales. To assess beam damage at the angstrom scale, we followed the intensity of P3HT and PCBM diffraction rings as a function of accumulated electron dose by acquiring dose series and varying the electron dose rate, sample preparation, and the temperature during acquisition. From this, we calculated a critical dose for diffraction experiments. In imaging mode, thin film deformation was assessed using the normalized cross-correlation coefficient, while mass loss was determined via changes in average intensity and standard deviation, also varying electron dose rate, sample preparation, and temperature during acquisition. The understanding of beam damage and the determination of critical electron doses provides a framework for future experiments to maximize the information content during the acquisition of images and diffraction patterns with (cryogenic) transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Risk-Based Analysis for Flood Damage Reduction Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    collapse than other material. Inside construction Styrofoam and similar types of insulation are less susceptible to damage than fiberglass and wool...fiber insulation. Most drywall and any plaster will crumble under prolonged inundation. Waterproof drywall will hold up for long per- iods of

  8. Towards a Fuzzy Bayesian Network Based Approach for Safety Risk Analysis of Tunnel-Induced Pipeline Damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limao; Wu, Xianguo; Qin, Yawei; Skibniewski, Miroslaw J; Liu, Wenli

    2016-02-01

    Tunneling excavation is bound to produce significant disturbances to surrounding environments, and the tunnel-induced damage to adjacent underground buried pipelines is of considerable importance for geotechnical practice. A fuzzy Bayesian networks (FBNs) based approach for safety risk analysis is developed in this article with detailed step-by-step procedures, consisting of risk mechanism analysis, the FBN model establishment, fuzzification, FBN-based inference, defuzzification, and decision making. In accordance with the failure mechanism analysis, a tunnel-induced pipeline damage model is proposed to reveal the cause-effect relationships between the pipeline damage and its influential variables. In terms of the fuzzification process, an expert confidence indicator is proposed to reveal the reliability of the data when determining the fuzzy probability of occurrence of basic events, with both the judgment ability level and the subjectivity reliability level taken into account. By means of the fuzzy Bayesian inference, the approach proposed in this article is capable of calculating the probability distribution of potential safety risks and identifying the most likely potential causes of accidents under both prior knowledge and given evidence circumstances. A case concerning the safety analysis of underground buried pipelines adjacent to the construction of the Wuhan Yangtze River Tunnel is presented. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed FBN approach and its application potential. The proposed approach can be used as a decision tool to provide support for safety assurance and management in tunnel construction, and thus increase the likelihood of a successful project in a complex project environment.

  9. Invoking Thomas Kuhn: What Citation Analysis Reveals about Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loving, Cathleen C.; Cobern, William W.

    This paper analyzes how Thomas Kuhn's writings are used by others, especially science education researchers. Previous research in citation analysis is used to frame questions related to who cites Kuhn, in what manner and why. Research questions first focus on the variety of disciplines invoking Kuhn and to what extent Structure of Scientific Revolutions (SSR) is cited. The Web of Science database provides material from 1982 for this analysis. The science education literature is analyzed using back issues from 1985 of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching and Science Education. An article analysis reveals trends in terms of what Kuhnian ideas are most frequently invoked. Results indicate a wide array of disciplines from beekeeping to law cite Kuhn - especially generic citations to SSR. The science education journal analysis reveals pervasive use of the term paradigm, although use is quite varied. The two areas of research in science education most impacted by Kuhn appear to be conceptual change theory and constructivist epistemologies. Additional uses of Kuhn are discussed. The degree to which Kuhn is invoked in ways supporting the theoretical framework of citation analysis, whether his work is misappropriated, and the impact of Kuhn are discussed.

  10. Clothing damage analysis in alleged sexual assaults--the need for a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Boland, C A; McDermott, S D; Ryan, J

    2007-04-11

    Clothing damage analysis is an integral part of the examinations carried out in sexual assault type cases. This analysis can be used to corroborate different versions of events and is at its most powerful in elucidating false allegation cases and consent cases. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent people with varying levels of forensic awareness, experience and training could correctly carry out damage analysis. Two participant groups were asked to take part in this study. Group A ('forensic group') comprised participants at a forensic science conference, and Group B ('student group') comprised students undertaking a degree course in Forensic Science. Each group was given a practical workshop consisting of a lecture outlining common fabric types and general features observed in different damage types. Each participant was subsequently shown 25 pieces of 'damage' and asked to identify both the type of fabric construction (knit or weave) and the type of damage (cut, tear, rip, wear and tear). The ability to identify fabric construction and damage types varied within the two groups studied and across the groups. The forensic group performed better both in fabric and damage assessment than the student group. This paper suggests a systematic approach to clothing damage analysis to maximise the benefits that can be obtained from this area of forensic science and to minimise the subjectivity within the field.

  11. Acoustic impact testing and waveform analysis for damage detection in glued laminated timber

    Treesearch

    Feng Xu; Xiping Wang; Marko Teder; Yunfei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Delamination and decay are common structural defects in old glued laminated timber (glulam) buildings, which, if left undetected, could cause severe structural damage. This paper presents a new damage detection method for glulam inspection based on moment analysis and wavelet transform (WT) of impact acoustic signals. Acoustic signals were collected from a glulam arch...

  12. Development of an engineering analysis of progressive damage in composites during low velocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized, analytical methodology was developed to study damage accumulation during low velocity lateral impact of layered composite plates. The impact event was modeled as perfectly plastic with complete momentum transfer to the plate structure. A transient dynamic finite element approach was selected to predict the displacement time response of the plate structure. Composite ply and interlaminar stresses were computed at selected time intervals and subsequently evaluated to predict layer and interlaminar damage. The effects of damage on elemental stiffness were then incorporated back into the analysis for subsequent time steps. Damage predicted included fiber failure, matrix ply failure and interlaminar delamination.

  13. Structure Inventory for Damage Analysis (SID). User’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    identifier, damage category, a percentage of total structure value. and location); monetary values (building, contents and other items, i.e...since some measures may not be regulatory development policies , and physically feasible for the feet of protection temporary emergency elevation of...target protection elevation is structures or future structures under flood 425.5 feet. The difference in water surface plain regulatory policies is

  14. Fatigue Damage Analysis of an Elastomeric Tank Track Component

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-22

    hyperelastic law has been selected to represent the rubber’s stress-strain behavior on first extension (i.e. the primary stress-strain curve), and the Ogden...precursor that exists in this material prior to any damage accumulation. The crack precursor size depends on the microstructure of the polymer /filler... Polymer Science 8, 707, 1964. 2. Mars W. V., Cracking Energy Density as a predictor of fatigue life under multiaxial conditions, Rubber Chemistry

  15. Application of outlier analysis for baseline-free damage diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Dae; In, Chi Won; Cronin, Kelly E.; Sohn, Hoon; Harries, Kent

    2006-03-01

    As carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates have been widely accepted as valuable materials for retrofitting civil infrastructure systems, an appropriate assessment of bonding conditions between host structures and CFRP laminates becomes a critical issue to guarantee the performance of CFRP strengthened structures. This study attempts to develop a continuous performance monitoring system for CFRP strengthened structures by autonomously inspecting the bonding conditions between the CFRP layers and the host structure. The uniqueness of this study is to develop a new concept and theoretical framework of nondestructive testing (NDT), in which debonding is detected "without using past baseline data." The proposed baseline-free damage diagnosis is achieved in two stages. In the first step, features sensitive to debonding of the CFPR layers but insensitive to loading conditions are extracted based on a concept referred to as a time reversal process. This time reversal process allows extracting damage-sensitive features without direct comparison with past baseline data. Then, a statistical damage classifier will be developed in the second step to make a decision regarding the bonding condition of the CFRP layers. The threshold necessary for decision making will be adaptively determined without predetermined threshold values. Monotonic and fatigue load tests of full-scale CFRP strengthened RC beams are conducted to demonstrate the potential of the proposed reference-free debonding monitoring system.

  16. Rate process analysis of thermal damage in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Sergio H; Nelson, J Stuart; Wong, Brian J F

    2003-01-07

    Cartilage laser thermoforming (CLT) is a new surgical procedure that allows in situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. While some animal and human studies have shown promising results, the clinical feasibility of CLT depends on preservation of chondrocyte viability, which has not been extensively studied. The present paper characterizes cellular damage due to heat in rabbit nasal cartilage. Damage was modelled as a first orderrate process for which two experimentally derived coefficients, A = 1.2 x 10(70) s(-1) and Ea = 4.5 x 10(5) J mole(-1), were determined by quantifying the decrease in concentration of healthy chondrocytes in tissue samples as a function of exposure time to constant-temperature water baths. After immersion, chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the matrix and stained with a two-component fluorescent dye. The dye binds nuclear DNA differentially depending upon chondrocyte viability. A flow cytometer was used to detect differential cell fluorescence to determine the percentage of live and dead cells in each sample. As a result, a damage kinetic model was obtained that can be used to predict the onset, extent and severity of cellular injury to thermal exposure.

  17. Rate process analysis of thermal damage in cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Sergio H.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2003-01-01

    Cartilage laser thermoforming (CLT) is a new surgical procedure that allows in situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. While some animal and human studies have shown promising results, the clinical feasibility of CLT depends on preservation of chondrocyte viability, which has not been extensively studied. The present paper characterizes cellular damage due to heat in rabbit nasal cartilage. Damage was modelled as a first order rate process for which two experimentally derived coefficients, A = 1.2 × 1070 s-1 and Ea = 4.5 × 105 J mole-1, were determined by quantifying the decrease in concentration of healthy chondrocytes in tissue samples as a function of exposure time to constant-temperature water baths. After immersion, chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the matrix and stained with a two-component fluorescent dye. The dye binds nuclear DNA differentially depending upon chondrocyte viability. A flow cytometer was used to detect differential cell fluorescence to determine the percentage of live and dead cells in each sample. As a result, a damage kinetic model was obtained that can be used to predict the onset, extent and severity of cellular injury to thermal exposure.

  18. Chaotic and ambient vibration analysis of composite lap joint damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Lou; Nichols, Jon; Seaver, Mark; Trickey, Steve; Motley, Sara

    2007-04-01

    We examined strain time series from fiber Bragg gratings sensors located in various positions on a composite material beam attached to a steel plate by a lap joint. The beam was vibrated using both broad-band chaotic signals (Lorenz system), and a narrow band signal conforming to the Pierson-Moskowitz frequency distribution for wave height (ambient excitation). The system was damaged by decreasing the torque on instrumented bolts in the lap joint from very tight all the way through to a joint with a gap and slippage. We analyzed the strain data by reconstructing the attractor of the system in the case of chaotic forcing and a pseudo-attractor in the case of sea-wave forcing. Using the highest torque case as an "undamaged" baseline, we calculated the continuity statistic between the baseline attractor and the attractors of the various damage levels for both forcing cases. We show where one can and cannot say that the functional relationship between the attractors changes and how those changes are related to damage levels.

  19. Creep Damage Analysis of a Lattice Truss Panel Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenchun; Li, Shaohua; Luo, Yun; Xu, Shugen

    2017-01-01

    The creep failure for a lattice truss sandwich panel structure has been predicted by finite element method (FEM). The creep damage is calculated by three kinds of stresses: as-brazed residual stress, operating thermal stress and mechanical load. The creep damage at tensile and compressive loads have been calculated and compared. The creep rate calculated by FEM, Gibson-Ashby and Hodge-Dunand models have been compared. The results show that the creep failure is located at the fillet at both tensile and creep loads. The damage rate at the fillet at tensile load is 50 times as much as that at compressive load. The lattice truss panel structure has a better creep resistance to compressive load than tensile load, because the creep and stress triaxiality at the fillet has been decreased at compressive load. The maximum creep strain at the fillet and the equivalent creep strain of the panel structure increase with the increase of applied load. Compared with Gibson-Ashby model and Hodge-Dunand models, the modified Gibson-Ashby model has a good prediction result compared with FEM. However, a more accurate model considering the size effect of the structure still needs to be developed.

  20. Analysis of hail damages and temperature series for peninsular Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saa Requejo, A.; García Moreno, R.; Díaz Alvarez, M. C.; Burgaz, F.; Tarquis, M.

    2011-12-01

    Hail is a serious concern for agriculture on the Iberian Peninsula. Hailstorms affect crop yield and/or quality to a degree that depends on the crop species and the phenological time. In Europe, Spain is one of the countries that experience relatively high agricultural losses related to hailstorms. It is of high interest to study models that can support calculations of the probabilities of economic losses due to hail damage and of the tendency over time for such losses. Some studies developed in France and the Netherdlands show that the summer mean temperature was highly correlated with a yearly hail severity index developed from hail-related parameters obtained for insurance purposes. Meanwhile, other studies in the USA point out that a highly significant correlation between both is not possible to find due to high climatic variability. The aim of this work is to test the correlation between average minimum temperatures and hail damage intensity over the Spanish Iberian Peninsula. With this purpose, correlation analyses on both variables were performed for the 47 Spanish provinces (as individuals and single set) and for all crops and four individual crops: grapes, wheat, barley and winter grains. Suitable crop insurance data are available from 1981 until 2007 and based on this period, temperature data were obtained. This study does not confirm the results previously obtained for France and the Netherlands that relate observed hail damage to the average minimum temperature. The reason for this difference and the nature of the cases observed are discussed.

  1. Test analysis of detection of damage to a complicated spatial model structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Long-He; Li, Zhong-Xian; Qian, Jia-Ru

    2011-06-01

    A two-stage damage detection approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated on a complicated spatial model structure with a limited number of measurements. In the experiment, five known damage patterns, including 3 brace damage cases and 2 joint damage cases, were simulated by removing braces and weakening beam-column connections in the structure. The limited acceleration response data generated by hammer impact were used for system identification, and modal parameters were extracted by using the eigensystem realization algorithm. In the first stage, the possible damaged locations are determined by using the damage index and the characteristics of the analytical model itself, and the extent of damage for those substructures identified at stage I is estimated in the second stage by using a second-order eigen-sensitivity approximation method. The main contribution of this paper is to test the two-stage method by using the real dynamic data of a complicated spatial model structure with limited sensors. The analysis results indicate that the two-stage approach is able to detect the location of both damage cases, only the severity of brace damage cases can be assessed, and the reasonable analytical model is critical for successful damage detection.

  2. A damage analysis for brittle materials using stochastic micro-structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shih-Po; Chen, Jiun-Shyan; Liang, Shixue

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a micro-crack informed stochastic damage analysis is performed to consider the failures of material with stochastic microstructure. The derivation of the damage evolution law is based on the Helmholtz free energy equivalence between cracked microstructure and homogenized continuum. The damage model is constructed under the stochastic representative volume element (SRVE) framework. The characteristics of SRVE used in the construction of the stochastic damage model have been investigated based on the principle of the minimum potential energy. The mesh dependency issue has been addressed by introducing a scaling law into the damage evolution equation. The proposed methods are then validated through the comparison between numerical simulations and experimental observations of a high strength concrete. It is observed that the standard deviation of porosity in the microstructures has stronger effect on the damage states and the peak stresses than its effect on the Young's and shear moduli in the macro-scale responses.

  3. MRI Texture Analysis Reveals Bulbar Abnormalities in Friedreich Ataxia.

    PubMed

    Santos, T A; Maistro, C E B; Silva, C B; Oliveira, M S; França, M C; Castellano, G

    2015-12-01

    Texture analysis is an image processing technique that can be used to extract parameters able to describe meaningful features of an image or ROI. Texture analysis based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix gives a second-order statistical description of the image or ROI. In this work, the co-occurrence matrix texture approach was used to extract information from brain MR images of patients with Friedreich ataxia and a control group, to see whether texture parameters were different between these groups. A longitudinal analysis was also performed. Twenty patients and 21 healthy controls participated in the study. Both groups had 2 sets of T1-weighted MR images obtained 1 year apart for every subject. ROIs chosen for analysis were the medulla oblongata and pons. Texture parameters were obtained for these ROIs for every subject, for the 2 sets of images. These parameters were compared longitudinally within groups and transversally between groups. The comparison between patients and the control group showed a significant differences for the medulla oblongata (t test, P < .05, Bonferroni-corrected) but did not show a statistically significant difference for the pons. Longitudinal comparison of images obtained 1 year apart did not show differences for either patients or for controls, in any of the analyzed structures. Gray level co-occurrence matrix-based texture analysis showed statistically significant differences for the medulla oblongata of patients with Friedreich ataxia compared with controls. These results highlight the medulla as an important site of damage in Friedreich ataxia. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. A Support Analysis Framework for mass movement damage assessment: applications to case studies in Calabria (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrucci, O.; Gullã, G.

    2009-03-01

    The analysis of data describing damage caused by mass movements in Calabria (Italy) allowed the organisation of the Support Analysis Framework (SAF), a spreadsheet that converts damage descriptions into numerical indices expressing direct, indirect, and intangible damage. The SAF assesses damage indices of past mass movements and the potential outcomes of dormant phenomena re-activations. It is based on the effects on damaged elements and is independent of both physical and geometric phenomenon characteristics. SAF sections that assess direct damage encompass several lines, each describing an element characterised by a value fixed on a relative arbitrary scale. The levels of loss are classified as: L4: complete; L3: high; L2: medium; or L1: low. For a generic line l, the SAF multiplies the value of a damaged element by its level of loss, obtaining dl, the contribution of the line to the damage. Indirect damage is appraised by two sections accounting for: (a) actions aiming to overcome emergency situations and (b) actions aiming to restore pre-movement conditions. The level of loss depends on the number of people involved (a) or the cost of actions (b). For intangible damage, the level of loss depends on the number of people involved. We examined three phenomena, assessing damage using the SAF and SAFL, customised versions of SAF based on the elements actually present in the analysed municipalities that consider the values of elements in the community framework. We show that in less populated, inland, and affluent municipalities, the impact of mass movements is greater than in coastal areas. The SAF can be useful to sort groups of phenomena according to their probable future damage, supplying results significant either for insurance companies or for local authorities involved in both disaster management and planning of defensive measures.

  5. Having a direct look: analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-11-15

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Having a direct look: Analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. PMID:25131498

  7. Aging and DNA damage in humans: a meta-analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Jorge Pinto; Cortinhas, António; Bento, Teresa; Leitão, José Carlos; Collins, Andrew R.; Gaivã, Isabel; Mota, Maria Paula

    2014-01-01

    Age-related DNA damage is regarded as one of the possible explanations of aging. Although a generalized idea about the accumulation of DNA damage with age exists, results found in the literature are inconsistent. To better understand the question of age-related DNA damage in humans and to identify possible moderator variables, a meta-analysis was conducted. Electronic databases and bibliographies for studies published since 2004 were searched. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for age-related DNA damage were calculated in a random-effects model. A total of 76 correlations from 36 studies with 4676 participants were included. Based on our analysis, a correlation between age and DNA damage was found (r = 0.230, p = 0.000; 95% confidence interval = 0.111 - 0.342). The test for heterogeneity of variance indicates that the study´s results are significantly high (Q (75) = 1754.831, p = 0.000). Moderator variables such as smoking habits, technique used, and the tissue/sample analyzed, are shown to influence age-related DNA damage (p=0.026; p=0.000; p=0.000, respectively). Nevertheless, sex did not show any influence on this relation (p=0.114). In conclusion, this meta-analysis showed an association between age and DNA damage in humans. It was also found that smoking habits, the technique used, and tissue/sample analyzed, are important moderator variables in age-related DNA damage. PMID:25140379

  8. Tyndall AFB Bomb Damage Repair Field Test, Documentation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    was not tested, as bping Irrele- vant to these tests. Simulation of this event was not attempted because it would have provided little or no...Richardson, Texas, Report No. AFWL-TR-71-42, October 1971. 11. Bussone, P.S., B.J. Bottomley, and G.C. Hoff , Rapid Repair of Bomb- Damaged Runways...Airfield Runways, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Klrtland AFB, New Mexico, Report No. AFWL-TR-73-214, February 1974. 19. Hoff , George C, Investigation of

  9. Hierarchical nanoreinforced composites: Computational analysis of damage mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon, Jr.; Pontefisso, Alessandro; Dai, Gaoming

    2016-07-01

    The potential of hierarchical composites with secondary nanoreinforcement is discussed and analysed on the basis of the computational modelling. The concept of nanostructuring of interfaces as an important reserve of the improvement of the composite properties is discussed. The influence of distribution, shape, orientation of nanoparticles (carbon nanotube, graphene) in unidirectional polymer matrix composites on the strength and damage resistance of the composites is studied in computational studies. The possible directions of the improvement of nanoreinforced composites by controlling shapes, localization and other parameters of nanoreinforcements are reviewed.

  10. Damage and fracture loci for a dual-phase steel and a high-strength low-alloyed steel: Revealing the different plastic localization-damage-ductile fracture pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Junhe; Münstermann, Sebastian; Bleck, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    The ductile fracture locus has been developed in the recent years as a relevant tool to predict the ductile fracture and assess the structure safety. In the various developed models, the occurrence of the final fracture or the initiation of the fracture is considered as the critical phase of deformation for materials or structures. However, in the application of high-strength steels, the damage onset and evolution are of significant importance in the forming processes, as they are naturally interacting with the plastic localization and ductile fracture and eventually creating various possible failure patterns. The present study contributes to a demonstration of the differences of these features in different steels by quantitatively comparing the material parameters of a hybrid damage mechanics model. A dual-phase steel sheet (DP600) and a high-strength low-alloy steel plate (S355J2+N), which show very different relation patterns between damage and fracture, are investigated. The aim of this study is to compare the plastic localization, damage and fracture loci of them and reveal the differences in their localization-damage initiation-ductile fracture patterns. The reasons for the observed different patterns are discussed and it is concluded that the microstructural features are ultimately contributing to the different patterns and the criteria for evaluating the cold formability of these steels shall be varied depending on their failure patterns.

  11. A probabilistic fatigue analysis of multiple site damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbaugh, S. M.; Ruff, D.; Hillberry, B. M.; Mccabe, G.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The variability in initial crack size and fatigue crack growth is incorporated in a probabilistic model that is used to predict the fatigue lives for unstiffened aluminum alloy panels containing multiple site damage (MSD). The uncertainty of the damage in the MSD panel is represented by a distribution of fatigue crack lengths that are analytically derived from equivalent initial flaw sizes. The variability in fatigue crack growth rate is characterized by stochastic descriptions of crack growth parameters for a modified Paris crack growth law. A Monte-Carlo simulation explicitly describes the MSD panel by randomly selecting values from the stochastic variables and then grows the MSD cracks with a deterministic fatigue model until the panel fails. Different simulations investigate the influences of the fatigue variability on the distributions of remaining fatigue lives. Six cases that consider fixed and variable conditions of initial crack size and fatigue crack growth rate are examined. The crack size distribution exhibited a dominant effect on the remaining fatigue life distribution, and the variable crack growth rate exhibited a lesser effect on the distribution. In addition, the probabilistic model predicted that only a small percentage of the life remains after a lead crack develops in the MSD panel.

  12. Equivalent Plate Analysis of Aircraft Wing with Discrete Source Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Mason, Brian H.

    2006-01-01

    An equivalent plate procedure is developed to provide a computationally efficient means of matching the stiffness and frequencies of flight vehicle wing structures for prescribed loading conditions. First, the equivalent plate is used to match the stiffness of a stiffened panel without damage and the stiffness of a stiffened panel with damage. For both stiffened panels, the equivalent plate models reproduce the deformation of a corresponding detailed model exactly for the given loading conditions. Once the stiffness was matched, the equivalent plate models were then used to predict the frequencies of the panels. Two analytical procedures using the lumped-mass matrix were used to match the first five frequencies of the corresponding detailed model. In both the procedures, the lumped-mass matrix for the equivalent plate is constructed by multiplying the diagonal terms of the consistent-mass matrix by a proportionality constant. In the first procedure, the proportionality constant is selected such that the total mass of the equivalent plate is equal to that of the detailed model. In the second method, the proportionality constant is selected to minimize the sum of the squares of the errors in a set of pre-selected frequencies between the equivalent plate model and the detailed model. The equivalent plate models reproduced the fundamental first frequency accurately in both the methods. It is observed that changing only the mass distribution in the equivalent plate model did not provide enough flexibility to match all of the frequencies.

  13. A probabilistic fatigue analysis of multiple site damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbaugh, S. M.; Ruff, D.; Hillberry, B. M.; McCabe, G.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1994-09-01

    The variability in initial crack size and fatigue crack growth is incorporated in a probabilistic model that is used to predict the fatigue lives for unstiffened aluminum alloy panels containing multiple site damage (MSD). The uncertainty of the damage in the MSD panel is represented by a distribution of fatigue crack lengths that are analytically derived from equivalent initial flaw sizes. The variability in fatigue crack growth rate is characterized by stochastic descriptions of crack growth parameters for a modified Paris crack growth law. A Monte-Carlo simulation explicitly describes the MSD panel by randomly selecting values from the stochastic variables and then grows the MSD cracks with a deterministic fatigue model until the panel fails. Different simulations investigate the influences of the fatigue variability on the distributions of remaining fatigue lives. Six cases that consider fixed and variable conditions of initial crack size and fatigue crack growth rate are examined. The crack size distribution exhibited a dominant effect on the remaining fatigue life distribution, and the variable crack growth rate exhibited a lesser effect on the distribution. In addition, the probabilistic model predicted that only a small percentage of the life remains after a lead crack develops in the MSD panel.

  14. Spatial Fourier Analysis of a Free-Free Beam for Structural Damage Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagat, Mihir; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2014-07-01

    Free-free beams (FFB) are used to model many structures, such as missiles, rockets, MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems), etc. This paper aims to illustrate a novel structural health monitoring method-Fourier analysis of mode shapes of damaged beams-and extend it to the case of FFB. The damaged mode shapes of FFB are obtained by a finite element model and then studied using spatial Fourier analysis. The effect of noise in the mode shape data is considered and it is found that the Fourier coefficients provide a useful indication about the location and size of damage.

  15. INSYDE: a synthetic, probabilistic flood damage model based on explicit cost analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dottori, Francesco; Figueiredo, Rui; Martina, Mario L. V.; Molinari, Daniela; Scorzini, Anna Rita

    2016-12-01

    Methodologies to estimate economic flood damages are increasingly important for flood risk assessment and management. In this work, we present a new synthetic flood damage model based on a component-by-component analysis of physical damage to buildings. The damage functions are designed using an expert-based approach with the support of existing scientific and technical literature, loss adjustment studies, and damage surveys carried out for past flood events in Italy. The model structure is designed to be transparent and flexible, and therefore it can be applied in different geographical contexts and adapted to the actual knowledge of hazard and vulnerability variables. The model has been tested in a recent flood event in northern Italy. Validation results provided good estimates of post-event damages, with similar or superior performances when compared with other damage models available in the literature. In addition, a local sensitivity analysis was performed in order to identify the hazard variables that have more influence on damage assessment results.

  16. Mathematical Analysis of Biomolecular Network Reveals Connections Between Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2012-02-01

    Connections between cancer and metabolic diseases may consist in the complex network of interactions among a common set of biomolecules. By applying singularity and bifurcation analysis, the phenotypes constrained by the AKT signaling pathway are identified and mapped onto the parameter space, which include cancer and certain metabolic diseases. By considering physiologic properties (sensitivity, robustness and adaptivity) the AKT pathway must possess in order to efficiently sense growth factors and nutrients, the region of normal responses is located. The analysis illuminates the parameter space and reveals system-level mechanisms in regulating biological functions (cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism) and how their deregulation may lead to the development of diseases. The analytical expressions summarize the synergistic interactions among many molecules, which provides valuable insights into therapeutic interventions.

  17. Exome capture reveals ZNF423 and CEP164 mutations, linking renal ciliopathies to DNA damage response signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Moumita; Airik, Rannar; Ghosh, Amiya K.; Giles, Rachel H.; Chen, Rui; Slaats, Gisela G.; Wang, Hui; Hurd, Toby W.; Zhou, Weibin; Cluckey, Andrew; Gee, Heon-Yung; Ramaswami, Gokul; Hong, Chen-Jei; Hamilton, Bruce A.; Červenka, Igor; Ganji, Ranjani Sri; Bryja, Vitezslav; Arts, Heleen H.; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Oud, Machteld M.; Letteboer, Stef J.F.; Roepman, Ronald; Husson, Hervé; Ibraghimov-Beskrovnaya, Oxana; Ysunaga, Takayuki; Walz, Gerd; Eley, Lorraine; Sayer, John A.; Schermer, Bernhard; Liebau, Max C.; Benzing, Thomas; Le Corre, Stephanie; Drummond, Iain; Joles, Jaap A.; Janssen, Sabine; Allen, Susan J.; Natarajan, Sivakumar; O Toole, John F.; Attanasio, Massimo; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Nayir, Ahmet; Stoetzel, Corinne; Dollfus, Helene; Massoudi, Rustin; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Andreoli, Sharon P.; Doherty, Dan G.; Lindstrad, Anna; Golzio, Christelle; Katsanis, Nicholas; Pape, Lars; Abboud, Emad B.; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.; Lewis, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Omran, Heymut; Lee, Eva; Wang, Shaohui; Sekiguchi, JoAnn M.; Saunders, Rudel; Johnson, Colin A.; Garner, Elizabeth; Vanselow, Katja; Andersen, Jens S.; Shlomai, Joseph; Nurnberg, Gudrun; Nurnberg, Peter; Levy, Shawn; Smogorzewska, Agata; Otto, Edgar A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Nephronophthisis-related ciliopathies (NPHP-RC) are degenerative recessive diseases that affect kidney, retina and brain. Genetic defects in NPHP gene products that localize to cilia and centrosomes defined them as ‘ciliopathies’. However, disease mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we identify by whole exome resequencing, mutations of MRE11, ZNF423, and CEP164 as causing NPHP-RC. All three genes function within the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, hitherto not implicated in ciliopathies. We demonstrate that, upon induced DNA damage, the NPHP-RC proteins ZNF423, CEP164 and NPHP10 colocalize to nuclear foci positive for TIP60, known to activate ATM at sites of DNA damage. We show that knockdown of CEP164 or ZNF423 causes sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, and that cep164 knockdown in zebrafish results in dysregulated DDR and an NPHP-RC phenotype. We identify TTBK2, CCDC92, NPHP3 and DVL3 as novel CEP164 interaction partners. Our findings link degenerative diseases of kidney and retina, disorders of increasing prevalence, to mechanisms of DDR. PMID:22863007

  18. Far Forward Anesthesia and Massive Blood Transfusion: Two Cases Revealing the Challenge of Damage Control Resuscitation in an Austere Environment.

    PubMed

    Gaskin, David; Kroll, Nicholas A; Ochs, Alyson A; Schreiber, Martin A; Pandalai, Prakash K

    2015-10-01

    Since the beginning of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, the US military has treated more than 51,000 casualties and sustained more than 6,600 deaths. The past decade of conflict has solidified major advances in the use of blood component therapy and the liberal use of fresh whole blood during damage control resuscitation. This resuscitation strategy, combined with far forward damage control surgery, rapid aeromedical evacuation, and major improvements in critical care air transportation and personal protective equipment has led to a 90% to 92% survival rate in US casualties. We describe 2 cases treated by a Forward Surgical Team serving in Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom in 2014. Both patients suffered severe trauma and required massive blood transfusion and damage control surgery. In describing these 2 cases, we wish to share our experience with damage control, resuscitation in an austere environment, as well as advocate for the critical role of the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist in advancing the knowledge and execution of this lifesaving strategy in both military and civilian trauma centers. In addition, we suggest alternatives to the current transfusion strategy, which will mitigate limitations currently encountered.

  19. Effects of dorsal hippocampal damage on conditioning and conditioned-response timing: A pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Shu K E; Jennings, Dómhnall J; Bonardi, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Behavioral findings suggest that the dorsal hippocampus (DHPC) plays a role in timing of appetitive conditioned responding. The present article explored the relationship between the extent of DHPC damage and timing ability, in a pooled analysis of three published studies from our laboratory. Initial analyses of variance confirmed our previous reports that DHPC damage reduced peak time (a measure of timing accuracy). However, the spread (a measure of timing precision) was unchanged, such that the coefficient of variation (spread/peak time) was significantly larger in DHPC-lesioned animals. This implies that, in addition to the well-established effect of DHPC lesions on timing accuracy, DHPC damage produced a deficit in precision of timing. To complement this analysis, different generalized linear mixed-effects models (GLMMs) were performed on the combined dataset, to examine which combinations of the different behavioral measures of timing were the best predictors of the degree of hippocampal damage. The results from the GLMM analysis suggested that the greater the DHPC damage, the greater the absolute difference between the observed peak time and reinforced duration. Nevertheless, this systematic relationship between damage and performance was not specific to the temporal domain: paradoxically the greater the damage the greater the magnitude of peak responding. We discuss these lesion effects in terms of scalar timing theory. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Characteristics of the tomato chromoplast revealed by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Barsan, Cristina; Sanchez-Bel, Paloma; Rombaldi, Cesar; Egea, Isabel; Rossignol, Michel; Kuntz, Marcel; Zouine, Mohamed; Latché, Alain; Bouzayen, Mondher; Pech, Jean-Claude

    2010-05-01

    Chromoplasts are non-photosynthetic specialized plastids that are important in ripening tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum) since, among other functions, they are the site of accumulation of coloured compounds. Analysis of the proteome of red fruit chromoplasts revealed the presence of 988 proteins corresponding to 802 Arabidopsis unigenes, among which 209 had not been listed so far in plastidial databanks. These data revealed several features of the chromoplast. Proteins of lipid metabolism and trafficking were well represented, including all the proteins of the lipoxygenase pathway required for the synthesis of lipid-derived aroma volatiles. Proteins involved in starch synthesis co-existed with several starch-degrading proteins and starch excess proteins. Chromoplasts lacked proteins of the chlorophyll biosynthesis branch and contained proteins involved in chlorophyll degradation. None of the proteins involved in the thylakoid transport machinery were discovered. Surprisingly, chromoplasts contain the entire set of Calvin cycle proteins including Rubisco, as well as the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OxPPP). The present proteomic analysis, combined with available physiological data, provides new insights into the metabolic characteristics of the tomato chromoplast and enriches our knowledge of non-photosynthetic plastids.

  1. Analysis of spatial correlations between patterns of DNA damage response and DNA replication in nuclei of cells subjected to replication stress or oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Bernas, Tytus; Berniak, Krzysztof; Rybak, Paulina; Zarębski, Mirosław; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Dobrucki, Jerzy W

    2013-10-01

    Sites of DNA replication (EdU incorporation) and DNA damage signaling (γH2AX) induced by camptothecin (Cpt) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) form characteristic patterns of foci in cell nuclei. The overlap between these patterns is a function of the number of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) formed in replication sites. The goal of this study was to optimize a method of quantitative assessment of a degree of correlation between these two patterns. Such a correlation can be used to estimate a probability of inducing damage in sections of replicating DNA. The damage and replication foci are imaged in 3D with confocal microscopy and their respective positions within nuclei are determined with adaptive image segmentation. Using correlation functions spatial proximity of the resultant point patterns is quantified over the range of distances in cells in early-, mid- and late S-phase. As the numbers (and nuclear densities) of γH2AX and replication foci differ significantly in the subsequent substages of S phase, the detected association values were corrected for the expected random overlap between both classes of foci. Thus, the probability of their nonrandom association was estimated. Moreover, self association (clustering) of DNA replication sites in different stages of S-phase of the cell cycle was detected and accounted for. While the analysis revealed a strong correlation between the γH2AX foci and the sites of DNA replication in cells treated with Cpt, only a low correlation was apparent in cells exposed to H2O2. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Cohesive Laws and Progressive Damage Analysis of Composite Bonded Joints, a Combined Numerical/Experimental Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations, in agreement with experimental tests, indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  3. Damage localization in linear-form structures based on sensitivity investigation for principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viet Ha, Nguyen; Golinval, Jean-Claude

    2010-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of damage detection and localization in linear-form structures. Principal component analysis (PCA) is a popular technique for dynamic system investigation. The aim of the paper is to present a damage diagnosis method based on sensitivities of PCA results in the frequency domain. Starting from frequency response functions (FRFs) measured at different locations on the structure; PCA is performed to determine the main features of the signals. Sensitivities of principal directions obtained from PCA to structural parameters are then computed and inspected according to the location of sensors; their variation from the healthy state to the damaged state indicates damage locations. It is worth noting that damage localization is performed without the need of modal identification. Influences of some features as noise, choice of parameter and number of sensors are discussed. The efficiency and limitations of the proposed method are illustrated using numerical and real-world examples.

  4. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  5. Geometric morphometric analysis reveals sexual dimorphism in the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Cavaignac, Etienne; Savall, Frederic; Faruch, Marie; Reina, Nicolas; Chiron, Philippe; Telmon, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    An individual's sex can be determined by the shape of their distal femur. The goal of this study was to show that differences in distal femur shape related to sexual dimorphism could be identified, visualized, and quantified using 3D geometric morphometric analysis. Geometric morphometric analysis was carried out on CT scans of the distal femur of 256 subjects living in the south of France. Ten landmarks were defined on 3D reconstructions of the distal femur. Both traditional metric and geometric morphometric analyses were carried out on these bone reconstructions; these analyses identified trends in bone shape in sex-based subgroups. Sex-related differences in shape were statistically significant. The subject's sex was correctly assigned in 77.3% of cases using geometric morphometric analysis. This study has shown that geometric morphometric analysis of the distal femur is feasible and has revealed sexual dimorphism differences in this bone segment. This reliable, accurate method could be used for virtual autopsy and be used to perform diachronic and interethnic comparisons. Moreover, this study provides updated morphometric data for a modern population in the south of France. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic analysis of axonal damage and inflammatory response in different white matter tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Leal, W; Corkill, D J; Picanço-Diniz, C W

    2005-12-20

    The mechanisms of white matter (WM) damage during secondary degeneration are a fundamental issue in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Our main goal was to describe the pattern of an acute inflammatory response and secondary damage to axons in different WM tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord. Adult rats were deeply anesthetized and injected with 20 nmol of NMDA into the spinal cord ventral horn on T7. Animals were perfused after survival times of 1 day, 3 days and 7 days. Ten micrometer sections were submitted to immunocytochemical analysis for activated macrophages/microglia, neutrophils and damaged axons. There were inflammatory response and progressive tissue destruction of ventral WM (VWM) with formation of microcysts in both VWM and lateral WM (LWM). In the VWM, the number of beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP) end-bulbs increased from 1 day with a peak at 3 days, decreasing by 7 days following the injection. APP end-bulbs were present in the dorsal WM (DWM) at 3 days survival time but were not in the LWM. Electron microscopic analysis revealed different degrees of myelin disruption and axonal pathology in the vacuolated WM up to 14 mm along the rostrocaudal axis. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant loss of medium and large axons (P < 0.05), but not of small axons (P > 0.05). Our results suggest that bystander axonal damage and myelin vacuolation are important secondary component of the pathology of WM tracts following rat SCI. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of these pathological events.

  7. A registry analysis of damage to the deceased donor pancreas during procurement.

    PubMed

    Ausania, F; Drage, M; Manas, D; Callaghan, C J

    2015-11-01

    Surgical injury to the pancreas is thought to occur commonly during procurement. The UK Transplant Registry was analyzed to determine the frequency of pancreatic injuries, identify factors associated with damage, and assess the impact of injuries on graft survival. Twelve hundred ninety-six pancreata were procured from donation after brain death donors, with 314 (19.5%) from donation after circulatory death donors. More than 50% of recovered pancreata had at least one injury, most commonly a short portal vein (21.5%). Liver donation, procurement team origin, hepatic artery (HA) arising from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and increasing donor BMI were associated with increased rates of pancreas damage on univariate analyses; on multivariate analysis only the presence of an HA from the SMA remained significant (p = 0.02). Six hundred forty solid organ pancreas transplants were performed; 238 had some form of damage. Overall, there was no difference in graft survival between damaged and undamaged organs (p = 0.28); however, graft loss was significantly more frequent in pancreata with arterial damage (p = 0.04) and in those with parenchymal damage (p = 0.05). Damage to the pancreas during organ recovery is more common than other organs, and meticulous surgical technique and awareness of damage risk factors are essential to reduce rates of procurement-related injuries. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. Structural damage localization by outlier analysis of signal-processed mode shapes - Analytical and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulriksen, M. D.; Damkilde, L.

    2016-02-01

    Contrary to global modal parameters such as eigenfrequencies, mode shapes inherently provide structural information on a local level. Therefore, this particular modal parameter and its derivatives are utilized extensively for damage identification. Typically, more or less advanced mathematical methods are employed to identify damage-induced discontinuities in the spatial mode shape signals, hereby, potentially, facilitating damage detection and/or localization. However, by being based on distinguishing damage-induced discontinuities from other signal irregularities, an intrinsic deficiency in these methods is the high sensitivity towards measurement noise. In the present paper, a damage localization method which, compared to the conventional mode shape-based methods, has greatly enhanced robustness towards measurement noise is proposed. The method is based on signal processing of a spatial mode shape by means of continuous wavelet transformation (CWT) and subsequent application of a generalized discrete Teager-Kaiser energy operator (GDTKEO) to identify damage-induced mode shape discontinuities. In order to evaluate whether the identified discontinuities are in fact damage-induced, outlier analysis is conducted by applying the Mahalanobis metric to major principal scores of the sensor-located bands of the signal-processed mode shape. The method is tested analytically and benchmarked with other mode shape-based damage localization approaches on the basis of a free-vibrating beam and validated experimentally in the context of a residential-sized wind turbine blade subjected to an impulse load.

  9. In situ micropillar compression reveals superior strength and ductility but an absence of damage in lamellar bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiedrzik, Jakob; Raghavan, Rejin; Bürki, Alexander; Lenader, Victor; Wolfram, Uwe; Michler, Johann; Zysset, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Ageing societies suffer from an increasing incidence of bone fractures. Bone strength depends on the amount of mineral measured by clinical densitometry, but also on the micromechanical properties of the hierarchical organization of bone. Here, we investigate the mechanical response under monotonic and cyclic compression of both single osteonal lamellae and macroscopic samples containing numerous osteons. Micropillar compression tests in a scanning electron microscope, microindentation and macroscopic compression tests were performed on dry ovine bone to identify the elastic modulus, yield stress, plastic deformation, damage accumulation and failure mechanisms. We found that isolated lamellae exhibit a plastic behaviour, with higher yield stress and ductility but no damage. In agreement with a proposed rheological model, these experiments illustrate a transition from a ductile mechanical behaviour of bone at the microscale to a quasi-brittle response driven by the growth of cracks along interfaces or in the vicinity of pores at the macroscale.

  10. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Dynamic Interactions of the Minichromosome Maintenance Complex (MCM) in the Cellular Response to Etoposide Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Drissi, Romain; Dubois, Marie-Line; Douziech, Mélanie; Boisvert, François-Michel

    2015-07-01

    The minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM) proteins are required for processive DNA replication and are a target of S-phase checkpoints. The eukaryotic MCM complex consists of six proteins (MCM2-7) that form a heterohexameric ring with DNA helicase activity, which is loaded on chromatin to form the pre-replication complex. Upon entry in S phase, the helicase is activated and opens the DNA duplex to recruit DNA polymerases at the replication fork. The MCM complex thus plays a crucial role during DNA replication, but recent work suggests that MCM proteins could also be involved in DNA repair. Here, we employed a combination of stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics with immunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged fusion proteins to identify proteins interacting with the MCM complex, and quantify changes in interactions in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, the MCM complex showed very dynamic changes in interaction with proteins such as Importin7, the histone chaperone ASF1, and the Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 3 (CHD3) following DNA damage. These changes in interactions were accompanied by an increase in phosphorylation and ubiquitination on specific sites on the MCM proteins and an increase in the co-localization of the MCM complex with γ-H2AX, confirming the recruitment of these proteins to sites of DNA damage. In summary, our data indicate that the MCM proteins is involved in chromatin remodeling in response to DNA damage. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. A genetic study based on PCNA-ubiquitin fusions reveals no requirement for PCNA polyubiquitylation in DNA damage tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gervai, Judit Z; Gálicza, Judit; Szeltner, Zoltán; Zámborszky, Judit; Szüts, Dávid

    2017-06-01

    Post-translational modifications of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) play a key role in regulating the bypass of DNA lesions during DNA replication. PCNA can be monoubiquitylated at lysine 164 by the RAD6-RAD18 ubiquitin ligase complex. Through this modification, PCNA can interact with low fidelity Y family DNA polymerases to promote translesion synthesis. Monoubiquitylated PCNA can be polyubiquitylated on lysine 63 of ubiquitin by a further ubiquitin-conjugating complex. This modification promotes a template switching bypass process in yeast, while its role in higher eukaryotes is less clear. We investigated the function of PCNA ubiquitylation using a PCNA(K164R) mutant DT40 chicken B lymphoblastoma cell line, which is hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), cisplatin or ultraviolet radiation (UV) due to the loss of PCNA modifications. In the PCNA(K164R) mutant we also detected cell cycle arrest following UV treatment, a reduced rate of damage bypass through translesion DNA synthesis on synthetic UV photoproducts, and an increased rate of genomic mutagenesis following MMS treatment. PCNA-ubiquitin fusion proteins have been reported to mimic endogenous PCNA ubiquitylation. We found that the stable expression of a PCNA(K164R)-ubiquitin fusion protein fully or partially rescued the observed defects of the PCNA(K164R) mutant. The expression of a PCNA(K164R)-ubiquitin(K63R) fusion protein, on which the formation of lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains is not possible, similarly rescued the cell cycle arrest, DNA damage sensitivity, reduction of translesion synthesis and increase of MMS-induced genomic mutagenesis. Template switching bypass was not affected by the genetic elimination of PCNA polyubiquitylation, but it was reduced in the absence of the recombination proteins BRCA1 or XRCC3. Our study found no requirement for PCNA polyubiquitylation to protect cells from replication-stalling DNA damage. Copyright © 2017

  12. Using synchrotron radiation-based infrared microspectroscopy to reveal microchemical structure characterization: frost damaged wheat vs. normal wheat.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-08-14

    This study was conducted to compare: (1) protein chemical characteristics, including the amide I and II region, as well as protein secondary structure; and (2) carbohydrate internal structure and functional groups spectral intensities between the frost damaged wheat and normal wheat using synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SR-FTIRM). Fingerprint regions of specific interest in our study involved protein and carbohydrate functional group band assignments, including protein amide I and II (ca. 1774-1475 cm(-1)), structural carbohydrates (SCHO, ca. 1498-1176 cm(-1)), cellulosic compounds (CELC, ca. 1295-1176 cm(-1)), total carbohydrates (CHO, ca. 1191-906 cm(-1)) and non-structural carbohydrates (NSCHO, ca. 954-809 cm(-1)). The results showed that frost did cause variations in spectral profiles in wheat grains. Compared with healthy wheat grains, frost damaged wheat had significantly lower (p < 0.05) spectral intensities in height and area ratios of amide I to II and almost all the spectral parameters of carbohydrate-related functional groups, including SCHO, CHO and NSCHO. Furthermore, the height ratio of protein amide I to the third peak of CHO and the area ratios of protein amide (amide I + II) to carbohydrate compounds (CHO and SCHO) were also changed (p < 0.05) in damaged wheat grains. It was concluded that the SR-FTIR microspectroscopic technique was able to examine inherent molecular structure features at an ultra-spatial resolution (10 × 10 μm) between different wheat grains samples. The structural characterization of wheat was influenced by climate conditions, such as frost damage, and these structural variations might be a major reason for the decreases in nutritive values, nutrients availability and milling and baking quality in wheat grains.

  13. Using Synchrotron Radiation-Based Infrared Microspectroscopy to Reveal Microchemical Structure Characterization: Frost Damaged Wheat vs. Normal Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare: (1) protein chemical characteristics, including the amide I and II region, as well as protein secondary structure; and (2) carbohydrate internal structure and functional groups spectral intensities between the frost damaged wheat and normal wheat using synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SR-FTIRM). Fingerprint regions of specific interest in our study involved protein and carbohydrate functional group band assignments, including protein amide I and II (ca. 1774–1475 cm−1), structural carbohydrates (SCHO, ca. 1498–1176 cm−1), cellulosic compounds (CELC, ca. 1295–1176 cm−1), total carbohydrates (CHO, ca. 1191–906 cm−1) and non-structural carbohydrates (NSCHO, ca. 954–809 cm−1). The results showed that frost did cause variations in spectral profiles in wheat grains. Compared with healthy wheat grains, frost damaged wheat had significantly lower (p < 0.05) spectral intensities in height and area ratios of amide I to II and almost all the spectral parameters of carbohydrate-related functional groups, including SCHO, CHO and NSCHO. Furthermore, the height ratio of protein amide I to the third peak of CHO and the area ratios of protein amide (amide I + II) to carbohydrate compounds (CHO and SCHO) were also changed (p < 0.05) in damaged wheat grains. It was concluded that the SR-FTIR microspectroscopic technique was able to examine inherent molecular structure features at an ultra-spatial resolution (10 × 10 μm) between different wheat grains samples. The structural characterization of wheat was influenced by climate conditions, such as frost damage, and these structural variations might be a major reason for the decreases in nutritive values, nutrients availability and milling and baking quality in wheat grains. PMID:23949633

  14. Physical analysis on laser-induced cerebral damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaosen; Liu, Jiangang; Tao, Chunkan; Lan, Xiufeng; Cao, Lingyan; Pan, Weimin; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-01-01

    Experimental investigation on cerebral damage of adult SD rats induced by 532nm CW laser was performed. Tissue heat conductive equation was set up based on two-layered structure model. Finite difference algorithm was utilized to numerically simulate the temperature distribution in the brain tissue. Allowing for tissue response to temperature variation, free boundary model was used to discuss tissue thermal coagulation formation in brain. Experimental observations show that thermal coagulation and necrosis can be caused due to laser light absorption. The result of the calculation shows that the process of the thermal coagulation of the given mode comprises two stages: fast and slow. At the first stage, necrosis domain grows fast. Then necrosis domain growth becomes slower because of the competition between the heat diffusion into the surrounding undamaged tissue and the heat dissipation caused by blood perfusion. At the center of coagulation area no neuron was observed and at the transitional zone few nervous cells were seen by microscope. The research can provide reference data for developing clinical therapy of some kind of encephalic diseases by using 532nm laser, and for making cerebral infarction models in animal experiment.

  15. Chemical proteomics reveals a γH2AX-53BP1 interaction in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Ralph E.; Verma, Priyanka; Molloy, Kelly R.; Chait, Brian T.; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand break repair involves phosphorylation of histone variant H2AX (‘γH2AX’), which accumulates in foci at sites of damage. In current models, the recruitment of multiple DNA repair proteins to γH2AX foci depends mainly on recognition of this ‘mark’ by a single protein, MDC1. However, DNA repair proteins accumulate at γH2AX sites without MDC1, suggesting that other ‘readers’ exist. Here, we use a quantitative chemical proteomics approach to profile direct, phospho-selective γH2AX binders in native proteomes. We identify γH2AX binders, including the DNA repair mediator, 53BP1, which we show recognizes γH2AX through its BRCT domains. Furthermore, we investigate targeting of wild-type 53BP1 or a mutant form deficient in γH2AX binding, to chromosomal breaks resulting from endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. Our results show how direct recognition of γH2AX modulates protein localization at DNA damage sites, and suggest how specific chromatin ‘mark’-‘reader’ interactions contribute to essential mechanisms ensuring genome stability. PMID:26344695

  16. Structure of BRCA1-BRCT/Abraxas Complex Reveals Phosphorylation-Dependent BRCT Dimerization at DNA Damage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Paul, Atanu; Su, Dan; Mehmood, Shahid; Foo, Tzeh Keong; Ochi, Takashi; Bunting, Emma L.; Xia, Bing; Robinson, Carol V.; Wang, Bin; Blundell, Tom L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites is an important step for its function in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair. BRCA1-BRCT domains bind to proteins containing the phosphorylated serine-proline-x-phenylalanine (pSPxF) motif including Abraxas, Bach1/FancJ, and CtIP. In this study, we demonstrate that ionizing radiation (IR)-induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation of serine 404 (S404) next to the pSPxF motif. Crystal structures of BRCT/Abraxas show that phosphorylation of S404 is important for extensive interactions through the N-terminal sequence outside the pSPxF motif and leads to formation of a stable dimer. Mutation of S404 leads to deficiency in BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites and cellular sensitivity to IR. In addition, two germline mutations of BRCA1 are found to disrupt the dimer interface and dimer formation. Thus, we demonstrate a mechanism involving IR-induced phosphorylation and dimerization of the BRCT/Abraxas complex for regulating Abraxas-mediated recruitment of BRCA1 in response to IR. PMID:26778126

  17. Structure of BRCA1-BRCT/Abraxas Complex Reveals Phosphorylation-Dependent BRCT Dimerization at DNA Damage Sites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Paul, Atanu; Su, Dan; Mehmood, Shahid; Foo, Tzeh Keong; Ochi, Takashi; Bunting, Emma L; Xia, Bing; Robinson, Carol V; Wang, Bin; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-02-04

    BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites is an important step for its function in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair. BRCA1-BRCT domains bind to proteins containing the phosphorylated serine-proline-x-phenylalanine (pSPxF) motif including Abraxas, Bach1/FancJ, and CtIP. In this study, we demonstrate that ionizing radiation (IR)-induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation of serine 404 (S404) next to the pSPxF motif. Crystal structures of BRCT/Abraxas show that phosphorylation of S404 is important for extensive interactions through the N-terminal sequence outside the pSPxF motif and leads to formation of a stable dimer. Mutation of S404 leads to deficiency in BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites and cellular sensitivity to IR. In addition, two germline mutations of BRCA1 are found to disrupt the dimer interface and dimer formation. Thus, we demonstrate a mechanism involving IR-induced phosphorylation and dimerization of the BRCT/Abraxas complex for regulating Abraxas-mediated recruitment of BRCA1 in response to IR.

  18. Systematic screening reveals a role for BRCA1 in the response to transcription-associated DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Sarah J.; Rolland, Thomas; Adelmant, Guillaume; Xia, Xianfang; Owen, Matthew S.; Dricot, Amélie; Zack, Travis I.; Sahni, Nidhi; Jacob, Yves; Hao, Tong; McKinney, Kristine M.; Clark, Allison P.; Reyon, Deepak; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Joung, J. Keith; Beroukhim, Rameen; Marto, Jarrod A.; Vidal, Marc; Gaudet, Suzanne; Hill, David E.

    2014-01-01

    BRCA1 is a breast and ovarian tumor suppressor. Given its numerous incompletely understood functions and the possibility that more exist, we performed complementary systematic screens in search of new BRCA1 protein-interacting partners. New BRCA1 functions and/or a better understanding of existing ones were sought. Among the new interacting proteins identified, genetic interactions were detected between BRCA1 and four of the interactors: TONSL, SETX, TCEANC, and TCEA2. Genetic interactions were also detected between BRCA1 and certain interactors of TONSL, including both members of the FACT complex. From these results, a new BRCA1 function in the response to transcription-associated DNA damage was detected. Specifically, new roles for BRCA1 in the restart of transcription after UV damage and in preventing or repairing damage caused by stabilized R loops were identified. These roles are likely carried out together with some of the newly identified interactors. This new function may be important in BRCA1 tumor suppression, since the expression of several interactors, including some of the above-noted transcription proteins, is repeatedly aberrant in both breast and ovarian cancers. PMID:25184681

  19. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis.

  20. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N.; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2014-01-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis. PMID:24389050

  1. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  2. Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2. Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted.

  3. Ultra-sensitive sequencing reveals an age-related increase in somatic mitochondrial mutations that are inconsistent with oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott R; Salk, Jesse J; Schmitt, Michael W; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is believed to be highly vulnerable to age-associated damage and mutagenesis by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, somatic mtDNA mutations have historically been difficult to study because of technical limitations in accurately quantifying rare mtDNA mutations. We have applied the highly sensitive Duplex Sequencing methodology, which can detect a single mutation among >10(7) wild type molecules, to sequence mtDNA purified from human brain tissue from both young and old individuals with unprecedented accuracy. We find that the frequency of point mutations increases ~5-fold over the course of 80 years of life. Overall, the mutation spectra of both groups are comprised predominantly of transition mutations, consistent with misincorporation by DNA polymerase γ or deamination of cytidine and adenosine as the primary mutagenic events in mtDNA. Surprisingly, G → T mutations, considered the hallmark of oxidative damage to DNA, do not significantly increase with age. We observe a non-uniform, age-independent distribution of mutations in mtDNA, with the D-loop exhibiting a significantly higher mutation frequency than the rest of the genome. The coding regions, but not the D-loop, exhibit a pronounced asymmetric accumulation of mutations between the two strands, with G → A and T → C mutations occurring more often on the light strand than the heavy strand. The patterns and biases we observe in our data closely mirror the mutational spectrum which has been reported in studies of human populations and closely related species. Overall our results argue against oxidative damage being a major driver of aging and suggest that replication errors by DNA polymerase γ and/or spontaneous base hydrolysis are responsible for the bulk of accumulating point mutations in mtDNA.

  4. Comparative analysis reveals the underlying mechanism of vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Keisuke; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Animals utilize photoperiodic changes as a calendar to regulate seasonal reproduction. Birds have highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanisms and functional genomics analysis in quail uncovered the signal transduction pathway regulating avian seasonal reproduction. Birds detect light with deep brain photoreceptors. Long day (LD) stimulus induces secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the pars tuberalis (PT) of the pituitary gland. PT-derived TSH locally activates thyroid hormone (TH) in the hypothalamus, which induces gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and hence gonadotropin secretion. However, during winter, low temperatures increase serum TH for adaptive thermogenesis, which accelerates germ cell apoptosis by activating the genes involved in metamorphosis. Therefore, TH has a dual role in the regulation of seasonal reproduction. Studies using TSH receptor knockout mice confirmed the involvement of PT-derived TSH in mammalian seasonal reproduction. In addition, studies in mice revealed that the tissue-specific glycosylation of TSH diversifies its function in the circulation to avoid crosstalk. In contrast to birds and mammals, one of the molecular machineries necessary for the seasonal reproduction of fish are localized in the saccus vasculosus from the photoreceptor to the neuroendocrine output. Thus, comparative analysis is a powerful tool to uncover the universality and diversity of fundamental properties in various organisms.

  5. Applying robust variant of Principal Component Analysis as a damage detector in the presence of outliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharibnezhad, Fahit; Mujica, Luis E.; Rodellar, José

    2015-01-01

    Using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has received considerable attention over the past few years. PCA has been used not only as a direct method to identify, classify and localize damages but also as a significant primary step for other methods. Despite several positive specifications that PCA conveys, it is very sensitive to outliers. Outliers are anomalous observations that can affect the variance and the covariance as vital parts of PCA method. Therefore, the results based on PCA in the presence of outliers are not fully satisfactory. As a main contribution, this work suggests the use of robust variant of PCA not sensitive to outliers, as an effective way to deal with this problem in SHM field. In addition, the robust PCA is compared with the classical PCA in the sense of detecting probable damages. The comparison between the results shows that robust PCA can distinguish the damages much better than using classical one, and even in many cases allows the detection where classic PCA is not able to discern between damaged and non-damaged structures. Moreover, different types of robust PCA are compared with each other as well as with classical counterpart in the term of damage detection. All the results are obtained through experiments with an aircraft turbine blade using piezoelectric transducers as sensors and actuators and adding simulated damages.

  6. Detection of bearing damage by statistic vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The condition of bearings, which are essential components in mechanisms, is crucial to safety. The analysis of the bearing vibration signal, which is always contaminated by certain types of noise, is a very important standard for mechanical condition diagnosis of the bearing and mechanical failure phenomenon. In this paper the method of rolling bearing fault detection by statistical analysis of vibration is proposed to filter out Gaussian noise contained in a raw vibration signal. The results of experiments show that the vibration signal can be significantly enhanced by application of the proposed method. Besides, the proposed method is used to analyse real acoustic signals of a bearing with inner race and outer race faults, respectively. The values of attributes are determined according to the degree of the fault. The results confirm that the periods between the transients, which represent bearing fault characteristics, can be successfully detected.

  7. High performance implementation of probabilistic damage tolerance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Nathan

    A number of recent studies have demonstrated that large-scale extratropical wave activity is characterized by quasi-periodic behavior on timescales of 20-30 days, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. This phenomenon has been termed the Baroclinic Annular Mode (BAM), and is responsible for the modulation of eddy heat fluxes, eddy kinetic energy, and precipitation on large scales. However, the extent to which this periodic modulation is discernable or significant on smaller spatial scales had not yet been established. Using data from the ECMWF Interim Reanalysis for the period 1979-2014, this study extensively examines the spatial structure of the BAM. Spectral analyses reveal the spatial limitations of the periodic behavior, while lag-correlation analyses reveal the patterns of propagation and development of anomalies that give rise to the observed periodicity. Periodic behavior is more robust in the Southern Hemisphere than in the Northern Hemisphere, but filtering out low wavenumbers from NH data helps clarify the BAM signal. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the BAM appears very differently in two relatively similar global climate models, suggesting further study is needed to determine how modern GCMs capture the BAM. Supplementing our analyses of observed and modeled data is a simple two-way linear feedback model, which is utilized to demonstrate the principal mechanism underlying periodic behavior in the BAM. The model makes it apparent that the BAM can be modeled as a simple linear feedback between baroclinicity and eddy heat fluxes. The periodicity seen on larger scales is a product of differential advection rates affecting the development of spatially overlapping, out-of-phase anomalies. The large-scale nature of the periodic behavior, however, makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the potential utility of the BAM for weather analysts and forecasters, and the limitations of this study limit our ability to describe its role in the climate

  8. Fatigue damage evaluation of plain woven carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) modified with MFC (micro-fibrillated cellulose) by thermo-elastic damage analysis (TDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Ryohei; Okubo, Kazuya; Fujii, Toru

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate characteristics of fatigue damage of CFRP modified with MFC by TDA under tensile cyclic loading. In this paper, fatigue life of CFRP modified with MFC was investigated under cyclic loading. Characteristics of fatigue damage of CFRP modified with MFC were evaluated by thermo-elastic damage analysis. Maximum improvement in fatigue life was also obtained under cyclic loading when epoxy matrix was enhanced with 0.3wt% of MFC as well as under static loading. Result of TDA showed same tendency as the result of fatigue test, and the result of TDA well expressed the fatigue damage behavior of plain woven CFRP plate. Eventually, TDA was effective for clear understanding the degree of fatigue damage progression of CFRP modified with MFC.

  9. Oxidative damage induced by copper in mouse primary hepatocytes by single-cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Liu, Yang; Song, Wei; Yan, Yunxing; Yan, Wenbao; Liu, Rutao

    2016-01-01

    Copper can disturb the intracellular redox balance, induce oxidative stress, and subsequently cause irreversible damage, leading to a variety of diseases. In the present study, mouse primary hepatocytes were chosen to elucidate the in vitro oxidative damage of short-term copper exposure (10-200 μM) by single-cell analysis. We evaluated the toxicity of copper by reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and oxidative DNA damage at the single-cell level. Oxidative damage induced by copper was verified by the morphological changes, persistent elevations of excessive ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA), a decrease in GSH level, and the oxidative DNA damage. Furthermore, the average ROS generation, GSH consumption, and the indicators in DNA damage did not significantly change at relatively low concentrations (10 or 50 μM), but we can find the alterations of parameters in some single cells clearly. Emphasis on the analysis of single cells is conducive to gain a better understanding on the toxicity of copper. This study will also complement studies on the environmental risk assessment of copper pollution.

  10. Fatigue analysis of multiple site damage at a row of holes in a wide panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Kimberley; Grandt, Alten F., Jr.; Moukawsher, E. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is concerned with predicting the fatigue life of unstiffened panels which contain multiple site damage (MSD). The initial damage consists of through-the-thickness cracks emanating from a row of holes in the center of a finite width panel. A fracture mechanics analysis has been developed to predict the growth, interaction, and coalescence of the various cracks which propagate in the panel. A strain-life analysis incorporating Neuber's rule for notches, and Miner's rule for cumulative damage, is also employed to predict crack initiation for holes without initial cracking. This analysis is compared with the results of a series of fatigue tests on 2024-T3 aluminum panels, and is shown to do an excellent job of predicting the influence of MSD on the fatigue life of nine inch wide specimens. Having established confidence in the ability to analyze the influence of MSD on fatigue life, a parametric study is conducted to examine the influence of various MSD scenarios in an unstiffened panel. The numerical study considered 135 cases in all, with the parametric variables being the applied cyclic stress level, the lead crack geometry, and the number and location of MSD cracks. The numerical analysis provides details for the manner in which lead cracks and MSD cracks grow and coalesce leading to final failure. The results indicate that MSD located adjacent to lead cracks is the most damaging configuration, while for cases without lead cracks, MSD clusters which are not separated by uncracked holes are most damaging.

  11. A fracture mechanics analysis of impact damage in a thick composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy filament-wound cases (FWC) for the solid rocket motors of the space shuttle are being made by NASA. The FWC cases are wound with AS4W graphite fiber impregnated with an epoxy resin and are about 1.4 inches or more thick. Graphite-epoxy composite laminates, unlike metals, can be damaged easily by low velocity impacts of objects like dropped tools. The residual tension strength of the FWC laminate, after impact, is being studied at Langley Research Center. The conditions that give minimum visual evidence of damage are being emphasized. A fracture mechanics analysis was developed to predict the residual strength, after impact, using radiographs to measure the size of the damage and an equivalent surface crack to represent the damage.

  12. Analysis about factors affecting the degree of damage of buildings in earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jing; Yan, Jinghong

    2015-07-01

    Earthquakes have been affecting human's safety through human's history. Previous studies on earthquake, mostly, focused on the performance of buildings or evaluating damages. This paper, however, compares different factors that have influence on the damage of buildings with a case study in Wenchuan earthquake, using multiple linear regression methodology, so as to identify to what extend this factors influence the buildings’ damages, then give the rank of importance of these factors. In this process, authors take the type of structure as a dummy variable to compare the degree of damages caused by different types of structure, which were barely studied before. Besides, Factor Analysis Methodology(FA) will be adapted to classify factors, the results of which will simplify later study. The outcome of this study would make a big difference in optimizing the seismic design and improving residential seismic quality.

  13. Comparison of Damage Path Predictions for Composite Laminates by Explicit and Standard Finite Element Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogert, Philip B.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Chunchu, Prasad B.

    2006-01-01

    Splitting, ultimate failure load and the damage path in center notched composite specimens subjected to in-plane tension loading are predicted using progressive failure analysis methodology. A 2-D Hashin-Rotem failure criterion is used in determining intra-laminar fiber and matrix failures. This progressive failure methodology has been implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit and Abaqus/Standard finite element codes through user written subroutines "VUMAT" and "USDFLD" respectively. A 2-D finite element model is used for predicting the intra-laminar damages. Analysis results obtained from the Abaqus/Explicit and Abaqus/Standard code show good agreement with experimental results. The importance of modeling delamination in progressive failure analysis methodology is recognized for future studies. The use of an explicit integration dynamics code for simple specimen geometry and static loading establishes a foundation for future analyses where complex loading and nonlinear dynamic interactions of damage and structure will necessitate it.

  14. Molecular analysis of aggressive renal cell carcinoma with unclassified histology reveals distinct subsets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Bei; Xu, Jianing; Skanderup, Anders Jacobsen; Dong, Yiyu; Brannon, A. Rose; Wang, Lu; Won, Helen H.; Wang, Patricia I.; Nanjangud, Gouri J.; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Li, Wei; Ojeda, Virginia; Hakimi, A. Ari; Voss, Martin H.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Motzer, Robert J.; Russo, Paul; Cheng, Emily H.; Giancotti, Filippo G.; Lee, William; Berger, Michael F.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Reuter, Victor E.; Hsieh, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas with unclassified histology (uRCC) constitute a significant portion of aggressive non-clear cell renal cell carcinomas that have no standard therapy. The oncogenic drivers in these tumours are unknown. Here we perform a molecular analysis of 62 high-grade primary uRCC, incorporating targeted cancer gene sequencing, RNA sequencing, single-nucleotide polymorphism array, fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. We identify recurrent somatic mutations in 29 genes, including NF2 (18%), SETD2 (18%), BAP1 (13%), KMT2C (10%) and MTOR (8%). Integrated analysis reveals a subset of 26% uRCC characterized by NF2 loss, dysregulated Hippo–YAP pathway and worse survival, whereas 21% uRCC with mutations of MTOR, TSC1, TSC2 or PTEN and hyperactive mTORC1 signalling are associated with better clinical outcome. FH deficiency (6%), chromatin/DNA damage regulator mutations (21%) and ALK translocation (2%) distinguish additional cases. Altogether, this study reveals distinct molecular subsets for 76% of our uRCC cohort, which could have diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:27713405

  15. Duplication and analysis of meteoroid damage on LDEF and advanced spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, David C.; Rose, M. Frank

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of exposed surfaces on LDEF since its retrieval in 1990 has revealed a wide range of meteoroid and debris (M&D) impact features in the sub-micron to millimeter size range, ranging from quasi-infinite target cratering in LDEF metallic structural members (e.g. inter-costals, tray clamps, etc.) to non-marginal perforations in metallic experimental surfaces (e.g. thin foil detectors, etc.). Approximately 34,000 impact features are estimated to exist on the exposed surfaces of LDEF. The vast majority of impact craters in metal substrates exhibit circular footprints, with approximately 50 percent retaining impactor residues in varying states of shock processing. The fundamental goals of this project were to duplicate and analyze meteoroid impact damage on spacecraft metallic materials with a view to quantifying the residue retention and oblique impact morphology characteristics. Using the hypervelocity impact test facility established at Auburn University a series of impact tests (normal and oblique incidence) were executed producing consistently high (11-12 km/s) peak impact velocities, the results of which were subsequently analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS) facilities at Auburn University.

  16. Diffraction data analysis in the presence of radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Borek, Dominika; Cymborowski, Marcin; Machius, Mischa; Minor, Wladek; Otwinowski, Zbyszek

    2010-04-01

    In macromolecular crystallography, the acquisition of a complete set of diffraction intensities typically involves a high cumulative dose of X-ray radiation. In the process of data acquisition, the irradiated crystal lattice undergoes a broad range of chemical and physical changes. These result in the gradual decay of diffraction intensities, accompanied by changes in the macroscopic organization of crystal lattice order and by localized changes in electron density that, owing to complex radiation chemistry, are specific for a particular macromolecule. The decay of diffraction intensities is a well defined physical process that is fully correctable during scaling and merging analysis and therefore, while limiting the amount of diffraction, it has no other impact on phasing procedures. Specific chemical changes, which are variable even between different crystal forms of the same macromolecule, are more difficult to predict, describe and correct in data. Appearing during the process of data collection, they result in gradual changes in structure factors and therefore have profound consequences in phasing procedures. Examples of various combinations of radiation-induced changes are presented and various considerations pertinent to the determination of the best strategies for handling diffraction data analysis in representative situations are discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Progressive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Impact Damage in Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is leading an evaluation effort in advanced destructive and nondestructive testing of composite pressure vessels and structures. WSTF is using progressive finite element analysis methods for test design and for confirmation of composite pressure vessel performance. Using composite finite element analysis models and failure theories tested in the World-Wide Failure Exercise, WSTF is able to estimate the static strength of composite pressure vessels. Additionally, test and evaluation on composites that have been impact damaged is in progress so that models can be developed to estimate damage tolerance and the degradation in static strength.

  18. Analysis of chromosome damage for biodosimetry using imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Beaton, L A; Ferrarotto, C; Kutzner, B C; McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V; Wilkins, R C

    2013-08-30

    The dicentric chromosome assay (DCA), which involves counting the frequency of dicentric chromosomes in mitotic lymphocytes and converting it to a dose-estimation for ionizing radiation exposure, is considered to be the gold standard for radiation biodosimetry. Furthermore, for emergency response, the DCA has been adapted for triage by simplifying the scoring method [1]. With the development of new technologies such as the imaging flow cytometer, it may now be possible to adapt this microscope-based method to an automated cytometry method. This technology allows the sensitivity of microscopy to be maintained while adding the increased throughput of flow cytometry. A new protocol is being developed to adapt the DCA to the imaging cytometer in order to further increase the rapid determination of a biological dose. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from ex vivo irradiated whole blood samples using a density gradient separation method and cultured with PHA and Colcemid. After 48h incubation, the chromosomes were isolated, stained for DNA content with propidium iodide (PI) and labelled with a centromere marker. Stained chromosomes were then analyzed on the ImageStream(×) (EMD-Millipore, Billerica, MA). Preliminary results indicate that individual chromosomes can be identified and mono- and dicentric chromosomes can be differentiated by imaging cytometry. A dose response curve was generated using this technology. The details of the method and the dose response curve are presented and compared to traditional microscope scoring. Imaging cytometry is a new technology which enables the rapid, automated analysis of fluorescently labelled chromosomes. Adapting the dicentric assay to this technology has the potential for high throughput analysis for mass casualty events.

  19. Point-of-gaze analysis reveals visual search strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekar, Umesh; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Bovik, Alan C.

    2004-06-01

    Seemingly complex tasks like visual search can be analyzed using a cognition-free, bottom-up framework. We sought to reveal strategies used by observers in visual search tasks using accurate eye tracking and image analysis at point of gaze. Observers were instructed to search for simple geometric targets embedded in 1/f noise. By analyzing the stimulus at the point of gaze using the classification image (CI) paradigm, we discovered CI templates that indeed resembled the target. No such structure emerged for a random-searcher. We demonstrate, qualitatively and quantitatively, that these CI templates are useful in predicting stimulus regions that draw human fixations in search tasks. Filtering a 1/f noise stimulus with a CI results in a 'fixation prediction map'. A qualitative evaluation of the prediction was obtained by overlaying k-means clusters of observers' fixations on the prediction map. The fixations clustered around the local maxima in the prediction map. To obtain a quantitative comparison, we computed the Kullback-Leibler distance between the recorded fixations and the prediction. Using random-searcher CIs in Monte Carlo simulations, a distribution of this distance was obtained. The z-scores for the human CIs and the original target were -9.70 and -9.37 respectively indicating that even in noisy stimuli, observers deploy their fixations efficiently to likely targets rather than casting them randomly hoping to fortuitously find the target.

  20. Dynamical analysis reveals individuality of locomotion in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Neumeister, H; Cellucci, C J; Rapp, P E; Korn, H; Faber, D S

    2004-02-01

    Goldfish swimming was analysed quantitatively to determine if it exhibits distinctive individual spatio-temporal patterns. Due to the inherent variability in fish locomotion, this hypothesis was tested using five nonlinear measures, complemented by mean velocity. A library was constructed of 75 trajectories, each of 5 min duration, acquired from five fish swimming in a constant and relatively homogeneous environment. Three nonlinear measures, the 'characteristic fractal dimension' and 'Richardson dimension', both quantifying the degree to which a trajectory departs from a straight line, and 'relative dispersion', characterizing the variance as a function of the duration, have coefficients of variation less than 7%, in contrast to mean velocity (30%). A discriminant analysis, or classification system, based on all six measures revealed that trajectories are indeed highly individualistic, with the probability that any two trajectories generated from different fish are equivalent being less than 1%. That is, the combination of these measures allows a given trajectory to be assigned to its source with a high degree of confidence. The Richardson dimension and the 'Hurst exponent', which quantifies persistence, were the most effective measures.

  1. Applications of a damage tolerance analysis methodology in aircraft design and production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, M. R.; Owens, S. D.; Law, G. E.; Mignery, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    Objectives of customer mandated aircraft structural integrity initiatives in design are to guide material selection, to incorporate fracture resistant concepts in the design, to utilize damage tolerance based allowables and planned inspection procedures necessary to enhance the safety and reliability of manned flight vehicles. However, validated fracture analysis tools for composite structures are needed to accomplish these objectives in a timely and economical manner. This paper briefly describes the development, validation, and application of a damage tolerance methodology for composite airframe structures. A closed-form analysis code, entitled SUBLAM was developed to predict the critical biaxial strain state necessary to cause sublaminate buckling-induced delamination extension in an impact damaged composite laminate. An embedded elliptical delamination separating a thin sublaminate from a thick parent laminate is modelled. Predicted failure strains were correlated against a variety of experimental data that included results from compression after impact coupon and element tests. An integrated analysis package was developed to predict damage tolerance based margin-of-safety (MS) using NASTRAN generated loads and element information. Damage tolerance aspects of new concepts are quickly and cost-effectively determined without the need for excessive testing.

  2. Analysis of the epithelial damage produced by Entamoeba histolytica infection.

    PubMed

    Betanzos, Abigail; Schnoor, Michael; Javier-Reyna, Rosario; García-Rivera, Guillermina; Bañuelos, Cecilia; Pais-Morales, Jonnatan; Orozco, Esther

    2014-06-12

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amoebiasis, a major cause of diarrhea and hepatic abscess in tropical countries. Infection is initiated by interaction of the pathogen with intestinal epithelial cells. This interaction leads to disruption of intercellular structures such as tight junctions (TJ). TJ ensure sealing of the epithelial layer to separate host tissue from gut lumen. Recent studies provide evidence that disruption of TJ by the parasitic protein EhCPADH112 is a prerequisite for E. histolytica invasion that is accompanied by epithelial barrier dysfunction. Thus, the analysis of molecular mechanisms involved in TJ disassembly during E. histolytica invasion is of paramount importance to improve our understanding of amoebiasis pathogenesis. This article presents an easy model that allows the assessment of initial host-pathogen interactions and the parasite invasion potential. Parameters to be analyzed include transepithelial electrical resistance, interaction of EhCPADH112 with epithelial surface receptors, changes in expression and localization of epithelial junctional markers and localization of parasite molecules within epithelial cells.

  3. Analysis of the Epithelial Damage Produced by Entamoeba histolytica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Betanzos, Abigail; Schnoor, Michael; Javier-Reyna, Rosario; García-Rivera, Guillermina; Bañuelos, Cecilia; Pais-Morales, Jonnatan; Orozco, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amoebiasis, a major cause of diarrhea and hepatic abscess in tropical countries. Infection is initiated by interaction of the pathogen with intestinal epithelial cells. This interaction leads to disruption of intercellular structures such as tight junctions (TJ). TJ ensure sealing of the epithelial layer to separate host tissue from gut lumen. Recent studies provide evidence that disruption of TJ by the parasitic protein EhCPADH112 is a prerequisite for E. histolytica invasion that is accompanied by epithelial barrier dysfunction. Thus, the analysis of molecular mechanisms involved in TJ disassembly during E. histolytica invasion is of paramount importance to improve our understanding of amoebiasis pathogenesis. This article presents an easy model that allows the assessment of initial host-pathogen interactions and the parasite invasion potential. Parameters to be analyzed include transepithelial electrical resistance, interaction of EhCPADH112 with epithelial surface receptors, changes in expression and localization of epithelial junctional markers and localization of parasite molecules within epithelial cells. PMID:24962382

  4. Comparing Monofractal and Multifractal Analysis of Corrosion Damage Evolution in Reinforcing Bars

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yidong; Qian, Chunxiang; Pan, Lei; Wang, Bingbing; Lou, Chi

    2012-01-01

    Based on fractal theory and damage mechanics, the aim of this paper is to describe the monofractal and multifractal characteristics of corrosion morphology and develop a new approach to characterize the nonuniform corrosion degree of reinforcing bars. The relationship between fractal parameters and tensile strength of reinforcing bars are discussed. The results showed that corrosion mass loss ratio of a bar cannot accurately reflect the damage degree of the bar. The corrosion morphology of reinforcing bars exhibits both monofractal and multifractal features. The fractal dimension and the tensile strength of corroded steel bars exhibit a power function relationship, while the width of multifractal spectrum and tensile strength of corroded steel bars exhibit a linear relationship. By comparison, using width of multifractal spectrum as multifractal damage variable not only reflects the distribution of corrosion damage in reinforcing bars, but also reveals the influence of nonuniform corrosion on the mechanical properties of reinforcing bars. The present research provides a new approach for the establishment of corrosion damage constitutive models of reinforcing bars. PMID:22238682

  5. Purification of DNA Damage-Dependent PARPs from E. coli for Structural and Biochemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Langelier, Marie-France; Steffen, Jamin D; Riccio, Amanda A; McCauley, Michael; Pascal, John M

    2017-01-01

    Human PARP-1, PARP-2, and PARP-3 are key players in the cellular response to DNA damage, during which their catalytic activities are acutely stimulated through interaction with DNA strand breaks. There are also roles for these PARPs outside of the DNA damage response, most notably for PARP-1 and PARP-2 in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we describe a general method to express and purify these DNA damage-dependent PARPs from E. coli cells for use in biochemical assays and for structural and functional analysis. The procedure allows for robust production of PARP enzymes that are free of contaminant DNA that can interfere with downstream analysis. The described protocols have been updated from our earlier reported methods, most importantly to introduce PARP inhibitors in the production scheme to cope with enzyme toxicity that can compromise the yield of purified protein.

  6. Analysis of cavitation damage on the Space Shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinebring, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The performance of the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) has met or exceeded specifications. However, the durability for selected components has not met the desired lifetime criteria. Thus, the High-Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) has experienced cavitation erosion problems in a number of locations in the pump. An investigation was conducted, taking into account an analysis of the cavitation damage, the development of a flow model for the pump, and the recommendation of design changes which would increase the life expectancy of the unit. The present paper is concerned with the cavitation damage analysis. A model is presented which relates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer blades to unsteady blade surface cavitation. This cavitation occurs on the inducer blades in the wakes downstream of the pump inlet housing vanes.

  7. Natural resource damage assessment for the Hebei Spirit oil spill: An application of Habitat Equivalency Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Goun; Opaluch, James; Moon, Daniel Seong-Hyeok; Petrolia, Daniel R

    2017-08-15

    Sixteen oil spills occurred in Korea between 1995 and 2010, including the Hebei Spirit oil spill (HSOS) in 2007, the largest (77,857 barrels) in Korean history. Yet compensation for environmental damages has never been claimed under the International Oil Pollution Compensation Fund for any of these accidents, because there is no adequate natural resource damage assessment (NRDA) procedure and there are no internationally-admissible economic quantification methods established in Korea. The objective of this study is to propose a methodology to overcome these shortcomings. We propose the use of Habitat Equivalency Analysis, which has dominated the US NRDA process for oil spills, and apply it to the HSOS as a case study. A Base Case analysis estimates the compensatory costs of fishery habitat damages (34,703.5ha) with a 10-year recovery rate at $119.4 million. We also conduct sensitivity analyses under several alternative assumptions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A new damage diagnosis approach for NC machine tools based on hybrid Stationary subspace analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chen; Zhou, Yuqing; Ren, Yan

    2017-05-01

    This paper focused on the damage diagnosis for NC machine tools and put forward a damage diagnosis method based on hybrid Stationary subspace analysis (SSA), for improving the accuracy and visibility of damage identification. First, the observed single sensor signal was reconstructed to multi-dimensional signals by the phase space reconstruction technique, as the inputs of SSA. SSA method was introduced to separate the reconstructed data into stationary components and non-stationary components without the need for independency and prior information of the origin signals. Subsequently, the selected non-stationary components were analysed for training LS-SVM (Least Squares Support Vector Machine) classifier model, in which several statistic parameters in the time and frequency domains were exacted as the sample of LS-SVM. An empirical analysis in NC milling machine tools is developed, and the result shows high accuracy of the proposed approach.

  9. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of damaged Reddy-Bickford beams supported on an elastic Pasternak foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanović, Vladimir; Petković, Marko D.

    2016-12-01

    Geometrically nonlinear free and forced vibrations of damaged high order shear deformable beams resting on a nonlinear Pasternak foundation are investigated in this paper. Equations of motion are derived for the beam which is under subjected combined action of arbitrarily distributed or concentrated transverse loading as well as axial loading. To account for shear deformations, the concept of high order shear deformation is used in comparison with the concept of first order shear deformation theory. Analyses are performed to investigate the effects of the specific stiffness of the foundation on the damaged beam frequencies and displacements with the aim of equalising the response of a damaged and an intact beam. According to that, functions of the foundation stiffness are determined depending on the location and size of the damage as a result of the possibility for the damaged beam to behave like one that is intact. An advanced p-version of the finite element method is developed for geometrically nonlinear vibrations of damaged Reddy-Bickford beams. The present study gives a clear view of the nonlinear dynamical behaviour of four types of beams according to high order shear deformation theory - an intact beam, a damaged beam, a damaged beam on an elastic foundation and intact beam on elastic foundation. The paper also presents the derivation of a new set of two nonlinear partial differential equations where only the transverse and axial displacements figure. The forced nonlinear vibrations problem is solved in the time domain using the Newmark integration method. Free vibration analysis carried out by harmonic balance and the use of continuation methods and backbone curves are constructed.

  10. Meta-analysis of attitudes toward damage-causing mammalian wildlife.

    PubMed

    Kansky, Ruth; Kidd, Martin; Knight, Andrew T

    2014-08-01

    Many populations of threatened mammals persist outside formally protected areas, and their survival depends on the willingness of communities to coexist with them. An understanding of the attitudes, and specifically the tolerance, of individuals and communities and the factors that determine these is therefore fundamental to designing strategies to alleviate human-wildlife conflict. We conducted a meta-analysis to identify factors that affected attitudes toward 4 groups of terrestrial mammals. Elephants (65%) elicited the most positive attitudes, followed by primates (55%), ungulates (53%), and carnivores (44%). Urban residents presented the most positive attitudes (80%), followed by commercial farmers (51%) and communal farmers (26%). A tolerance to damage index showed that human tolerance of ungulates and primates was proportional to the probability of experiencing damage while elephants elicited tolerance levels higher than anticipated and carnivores elicited tolerance levels lower than anticipated. Contrary to conventional wisdom, experiencing damage was not always the dominant factor determining attitudes. Communal farmers had a lower probability of being positive toward carnivores irrespective of probability of experiencing damage, while commercial farmers and urban residents were more likely to be positive toward carnivores irrespective of damage. Urban residents were more likely to be positive toward ungulates, elephants, and primates when probability of damage was low, but not when it was high. Commercial and communal farmers had a higher probability of being positive toward ungulates, primates, and elephants irrespective of probability of experiencing damage. Taxonomic bias may therefore be important. Identifying the distinct factors explaining these attitudes and the specific contexts in which they operate, inclusive of the species causing damage, will be essential for prioritizing conservation investments.

  11. Structural studies of the yeast DNA damage-inducible protein Ddi1 reveal domain architecture of this eukaryotic protein family

    PubMed Central

    Trempe, Jean-François; Šašková, Klára Grantz; Sivá, Monika; Ratcliffe, Colin D. H.; Veverka, Václav; Hoegl, Annabelle; Ménade, Marie; Feng, Xin; Shenker, Solomon; Svoboda, Michal; Kožíšek, Milan; Konvalinka, Jan; Gehring, Kalle

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic Ddi1 family is defined by a conserved retroviral aspartyl protease-like (RVP) domain found in association with a ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain. Ddi1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae additionally contains a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain. The substrate specificity and role of the protease domain in the biological functions of the Ddi family remain unclear. Yeast Ddi1 has been implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression, DNA-damage repair, and exocytosis. Here, we investigated the multi-domain structure of yeast Ddi1 using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and small-angle X-ray scattering. The crystal structure of the RVP domain sheds light on a putative substrate recognition site involving a conserved loop. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms that both UBL and UBA domains bind ubiquitin, and that Ddi1 binds K48-linked diubiquitin with enhanced affinity. The solution NMR structure of a helical domain that precedes the protease displays tertiary structure similarity to DNA-binding domains from transcription regulators. Our structural studies suggest that the helical domain could serve as a landing platform for substrates in conjunction with attached ubiquitin chains binding to the UBL and UBA domains. PMID:27646017

  12. Analysis of Radiation Damage in Light Water Reactors: Comparison of Cluster Analysis Methods for the Analysis of Atom Probe Data.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jonathan M; DaCosta, Gérald; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Weekes, Hannah; Radiguet, Bertrand; Styman, Paul D; Vurpillot, Francois; Pareige, Cristelle; Etienne, Auriane; Bonny, Giovanni; Castin, Nicolas; Malerba, Lorenzo; Pareige, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Irradiation of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes the formation of nanoscale microstructural features (termed radiation damage), which affect the mechanical properties of the vessel. A key tool for characterizing these nanoscale features is atom probe tomography (APT), due to its high spatial resolution and the ability to identify different chemical species in three dimensions. Microstructural observations using APT can underpin development of a mechanistic understanding of defect formation. However, with atom probe analyses there are currently multiple methods for analyzing the data. This can result in inconsistencies between results obtained from different researchers and unnecessary scatter when combining data from multiple sources. This makes interpretation of results more complex and calibration of radiation damage models challenging. In this work simulations of a range of different microstructures are used to directly compare different cluster analysis algorithms and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

  13. A new hand-held microfluidic cytometer for evaluating irradiation damage by analysis of the damaged cells distribution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junsheng; Fan, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yile; Song, Younan; Chu, Hui; Song, Wendong; Song, Yongxin; Pan, Xinxiang; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Dongqing

    2016-01-01

    Space radiation brings uneven damages to cells. The detection of the distribution of cell damage plays a very important role in radiation medicine and the related research. In this paper, a new hand-held microfluidic flow cytometer was developed to evaluate the degree of radiation damage of cells. The device we propose overcomes the shortcomings (e.g., large volume and high cost) of commercial flow cytometers and can evaluate the radiation damage of cells accurately and quickly with potential for onsite applications. The distribution of radiation-damaged cells is analyzed by a simultaneous detection of immunofluorescence intensity of γ-H2AX and resistance pulse sensor (RPS) signal. The γ-H2AX fluorescence intensity provides information of the degree of radiation damage in cells. The ratio of the number of cells with γ-H2AX fluorescence signals to the total numbers of cells detected by RPS indicates the percentage of the cells that are damaged by radiation. The comparison experiment between the developed hand-held microfluidic flow cytometer and a commercial confocal microscope indicates a consistent and comparable detection performance. PMID:26983800

  14. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison.

    PubMed

    Forgacs, David; Wallen, Rick L; Dobson, Lauren K; Derr, James N

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions.

  15. Mitochondrial Genome Analysis Reveals Historical Lineages in Yellowstone Bison

    PubMed Central

    Derr, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is home to one of the only plains bison populations that have continuously existed on their present landscape since prehistoric times without evidence of domestic cattle introgression. Previous studies characterized the relatively high levels of nuclear genetic diversity in these bison, but little is known about their mitochondrial haplotype diversity. This study assessed mitochondrial genomes from 25 randomly selected Yellowstone bison and found 10 different mitochondrial haplotypes with a haplotype diversity of 0.78 (± 0.06). Spatial analysis of these mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes did not detect geographic population subdivision (FST = -0.06, p = 0.76). However, we identified two independent and historically important lineages in Yellowstone bison by combining data from 65 bison (defined by 120 polymorphic sites) from across North America representing a total of 30 different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes from one of the Yellowstone lineages represent descendants of the 22 indigenous bison remaining in central Yellowstone in 1902. The other mitochondrial DNA lineage represents descendants of the 18 females introduced from northern Montana in 1902 to supplement the indigenous bison population and develop a new breeding herd in the northern region of the park. Comparing modern and historical mitochondrial DNA diversity in Yellowstone bison helps uncover a historical context of park restoration efforts during the early 1900s, provides evidence against a hypothesized mitochondrial disease in bison, and reveals the signature of recent hybridization between American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and Canadian wood bison (B. b. athabascae). Our study demonstrates how mitochondrial DNA can be applied to delineate the history of wildlife species and inform future conservation actions. PMID:27880780

  16. Quantitative flux analysis reveals folate-dependent NADPH production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jing; Ye, Jiangbin; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Shlomi, Tomer; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-06-01

    ATP is the dominant energy source in animals for mechanical and electrical work (for example, muscle contraction or neuronal firing). For chemical work, there is an equally important role for NADPH, which powers redox defence and reductive biosynthesis. The most direct route to produce NADPH from glucose is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, with malic enzyme sometimes also important. Although the relative contribution of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to ATP production has been extensively analysed, similar analysis of NADPH metabolism has been lacking. Here we demonstrate the ability to directly track, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the passage of deuterium from labelled substrates into NADPH, and combine this approach with carbon labelling and mathematical modelling to measure NADPH fluxes. In proliferating cells, the largest contributor to cytosolic NADPH is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Surprisingly, a nearly comparable contribution comes from serine-driven one-carbon metabolism, in which oxidation of methylene tetrahydrofolate to 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate is coupled to reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. Moreover, tracing of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism revealed complete oxidation of 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate to make NADPH. As folate metabolism has not previously been considered an NADPH producer, confirmation of its functional significance was undertaken through knockdown of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD) genes. Depletion of either the cytosolic or mitochondrial MTHFD isozyme resulted in decreased cellular NADPH/NADP+ and reduced/oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH/GSSG) and increased cell sensitivity to oxidative stress. Thus, although the importance of folate metabolism for proliferating cells has been long recognized and attributed to its function of producing one-carbon units for nucleic acid synthesis, another crucial function of this pathway is generating reducing power.

  17. Isotope analysis reveals foraging area dichotomy for atlantic leatherback turtles.

    PubMed

    Caut, Stéphane; Fossette, Sabrina; Guirlet, Elodie; Angulo, Elena; Das, Krishna; Girondot, Marc; Georges, Jean-Yves

    2008-03-26

    The leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) has undergone a dramatic decline over the last 25 years, and this is believed to be primarily the result of mortality associated with fisheries bycatch followed by egg and nesting female harvest. Atlantic leatherback turtles undertake long migrations across ocean basins from subtropical and tropical nesting beaches to productive frontal areas. Migration between two nesting seasons can last 2 or 3 years, a time period termed the remigration interval (RI). Recent satellite transmitter data revealed that Atlantic leatherbacks follow two major dispersion patterns after nesting season, through the North Gulf Stream area or more eastward across the North Equatorial Current. However, information on the whole RI is lacking, precluding the accurate identification of feeding areas where conservation measures may need to be applied. Using stable isotopes as dietary tracers we determined the characteristics of feeding grounds of leatherback females nesting in French Guiana. During migration, 3-year RI females differed from 2-year RI females in their isotope values, implying differences in their choice of feeding habitats (offshore vs. more coastal) and foraging latitude (North Atlantic vs. West African coasts, respectively). Egg-yolk and blood isotope values are correlated in nesting females, indicating that egg analysis is a useful tool for assessing isotope values in these turtles, including adults when not available. Our results complement previous data on turtle movements during the first year following the nesting season, integrating the diet consumed during the year before nesting. We suggest that the French Guiana leatherback population segregates into two distinct isotopic groupings, and highlight the urgent need to determine the feeding habitats of the turtle in the Atlantic in order to protect this species from incidental take by commercial fisheries. Our results also emphasize the use of eggs, a less-invasive sampling

  18. Isotope Analysis Reveals Foraging Area Dichotomy for Atlantic Leatherback Turtles

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Elena; Das, Krishna; Girondot, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background The leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) has undergone a dramatic decline over the last 25 years, and this is believed to be primarily the result of mortality associated with fisheries bycatch followed by egg and nesting female harvest. Atlantic leatherback turtles undertake long migrations across ocean basins from subtropical and tropical nesting beaches to productive frontal areas. Migration between two nesting seasons can last 2 or 3 years, a time period termed the remigration interval (RI). Recent satellite transmitter data revealed that Atlantic leatherbacks follow two major dispersion patterns after nesting season, through the North Gulf Stream area or more eastward across the North Equatorial Current. However, information on the whole RI is lacking, precluding the accurate identification of feeding areas where conservation measures may need to be applied. Methodology/Principal Findings Using stable isotopes as dietary tracers we determined the characteristics of feeding grounds of leatherback females nesting in French Guiana. During migration, 3-year RI females differed from 2-year RI females in their isotope values, implying differences in their choice of feeding habitats (offshore vs. more coastal) and foraging latitude (North Atlantic vs. West African coasts, respectively). Egg-yolk and blood isotope values are correlated in nesting females, indicating that egg analysis is a useful tool for assessing isotope values in these turtles, including adults when not available. Conclusions/Significance Our results complement previous data on turtle movements during the first year following the nesting season, integrating the diet consumed during the year before nesting. We suggest that the French Guiana leatherback population segregates into two distinct isotopic groupings, and highlight the urgent need to determine the feeding habitats of the turtle in the Atlantic in order to protect this species from incidental take by commercial fisheries. Our

  19. Damage detection of engine bladed-disks using multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Tang, J.

    2006-03-01

    The timely detection of damage in aero-engine bladed-disks is an extremely important and challenging research topic. Bladed-disks have high modal density and, particularly, their vibration responses are subject to significant uncertainties due to manufacturing tolerance (blade-to-blade difference or mistuning), operating condition change and sensor noise. In this study, we present a new methodology for the on-line damage detection of engine bladed-disks using their vibratory responses during spin-up or spin-down operations which can be measured by blade-tip-timing sensing technique. We apply a principle component analysis (PCA)-based approach for data compression, feature extraction, and denoising. The non-model based damage detection is achieved by analyzing the change between response features of the healthy structure and of the damaged one. We facilitate such comparison by incorporating the Hotelling's statistic T2 analysis, which yields damage declaration with a given confidence level. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by case studies.

  20. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Flag Leaves Reveals New Insight into Wheat Heat Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunze; Li, Ruiqiong; Wang, Ruochen; Wang, Xiaoming; Zheng, Weijun; Sun, Qixin; Tong, Shaoming; Dai, Shaojun; Xu, Shengbao

    2017-01-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important food crop but it is vulnerable to heat. The heat-responsive proteome of wheat remains to be fully elucidated because of previous technical and genomic limitations, and this has hindered our understanding of the mechanisms of wheat heat adaptation and advances in improving thermotolerance. Here, flag leaves of wheat during grain filling stage were subjected to high daytime temperature stress, and 258 heat-responsive proteins (HRPs) were identified with iTRAQ analysis. Enrichment analysis revealed that chlorophyll synthesis, carbon fixation, protein turnover, and redox regulation were the most remarkable heat-responsive processes. The HRPs involved in chlorophyll synthesis and carbon fixation were significantly decreased, together with severe membrane damage, demonstrating the specific effects of heat on photosynthesis of wheat leaves. In addition, the decrease in chlorophyll content may result from the decrease in HRPs involved in chlorophyll precursor synthesis. Further analysis showed that the accumulated effect of heat stress played a critical role in photosynthesis reduction, suggested that improvement in heat tolerance of photosynthesis, and extending heat tolerant period would be major research targets. The significantly accumulation of GSTs and Trxs in response to heat suggested their important roles in redox regulation, and they could be the promising candidates for improving wheat thermotolerance. In summary, our results provide new insight into wheat heat adaption and provide new perspectives on thermotolerance improvement. PMID:28676819

  1. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Flag Leaves Reveals New Insight into Wheat Heat Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunze; Li, Ruiqiong; Wang, Ruochen; Wang, Xiaoming; Zheng, Weijun; Sun, Qixin; Tong, Shaoming; Dai, Shaojun; Xu, Shengbao

    2017-01-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important food crop but it is vulnerable to heat. The heat-responsive proteome of wheat remains to be fully elucidated because of previous technical and genomic limitations, and this has hindered our understanding of the mechanisms of wheat heat adaptation and advances in improving thermotolerance. Here, flag leaves of wheat during grain filling stage were subjected to high daytime temperature stress, and 258 heat-responsive proteins (HRPs) were identified with iTRAQ analysis. Enrichment analysis revealed that chlorophyll synthesis, carbon fixation, protein turnover, and redox regulation were the most remarkable heat-responsive processes. The HRPs involved in chlorophyll synthesis and carbon fixation were significantly decreased, together with severe membrane damage, demonstrating the specific effects of heat on photosynthesis of wheat leaves. In addition, the decrease in chlorophyll content may result from the decrease in HRPs involved in chlorophyll precursor synthesis. Further analysis showed that the accumulated effect of heat stress played a critical role in photosynthesis reduction, suggested that improvement in heat tolerance of photosynthesis, and extending heat tolerant period would be major research targets. The significantly accumulation of GSTs and Trxs in response to heat suggested their important roles in redox regulation, and they could be the promising candidates for improving wheat thermotolerance. In summary, our results provide new insight into wheat heat adaption and provide new perspectives on thermotolerance improvement.

  2. Comparative proteomics reveals key proteins recruited at the nucleoid of Deinococcus after irradiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    de la Tour, Claire Bouthier; Passot, Fanny Marie; Toueille, Magali; Mirabella, Boris; Guérin, Philippe; Blanchard, Laurence; Servant, Pascale; de Groot, Arjan; Sommer, Suzanne; Armengaud, Jean

    2013-12-01

    The nucleoids of radiation-resistant Deinococcus species show a high degree of compaction maintained after ionizing irradiation. We identified proteins recruited after irradiation in nucleoids of Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus deserti by means of comparative proteomics. Proteins in nucleoid-enriched fractions from unirradiated and irradiated Deinococcus were identified and semiquantified by shotgun proteomics. The ssDNA-binding protein SSB, DNA gyrase subunits GyrA and GyrB, DNA topoisomerase I, RecA recombinase, UvrA excinuclease, RecQ helicase, DdrA, DdrB, and DdrD proteins were found in significantly higher amounts in irradiated nucleoids of both Deinococcus species. We observed, by immunofluorescence microscopy, the subcellular localization of these proteins in D. radiodurans, showing for the first time the recruitment of the DdrD protein into the D. radiodurans nucleoid. We specifically followed the kinetics of recruitment of RecA, DdrA, and DdrD to the nucleoid after irradiation. Remarkably, RecA proteins formed irregular filament-like structures 1 h after irradiation, before being redistributed throughout the cells by 3 h post-irradiation. Comparable dynamics of DdrD localization were observed, suggesting a possible functional interaction between RecA and DdrD. Several proteins involved in nucleotide synthesis were also seen in higher quantities in the nucleoids of irradiated cells, indicative of the existence of a mechanism for orchestrating the presence of proteins involved in DNA metabolism in nucleoids in response to massive DNA damage. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD00196 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000196). © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Conversation after Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: Motivations for Applying Conversation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Scott; Armstrong, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Despite the well documented pragmatic deficits that can arise subsequent to Right Hemisphere Brain Damage (RHBD), few researchers have directly studied everyday conversations involving people with RHBD. In recent years, researchers have begun applying Conversation Analysis (CA) to the everyday talk of people with aphasia. This research programme…

  4. Conversation after Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: Motivations for Applying Conversation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Scott; Armstrong, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Despite the well documented pragmatic deficits that can arise subsequent to Right Hemisphere Brain Damage (RHBD), few researchers have directly studied everyday conversations involving people with RHBD. In recent years, researchers have begun applying Conversation Analysis (CA) to the everyday talk of people with aphasia. This research programme…

  5. Retinal damage in chloroquine maculopathy, revealed by high resolution imaging: a case report utilizing adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun Jin; Kim, Kyoung Rae; Tsang, Stephen H; Park, Sung Pyo; Chang, Stanley

    2014-02-01

    A 53-year-old Asian woman was treated with hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine for lupus erythematosus. Within a few years, she noticed circle-shaped shadows in her central vision. Upon examination, the patient's visual acuity was 20 / 25 in both eyes. Humphrey visual field (HVF) testing revealed a central visual defect, and fundoscopy showed a ring-shaped area of parafoveal retinal pigment epithelium depigmentation. Fundus autofluorescence imaging showed a hypofluorescent lesion consistent with bull's eye retinopathy. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) revealed patch cone mosaic lesions, in which cones were missing or lost. In addition, the remaining cones consisted of asymmetrical shapes and sizes that varied in brightness. Unlike previous studies employing deformable mirrors for wavefront aberration correction, our AO-SLO approach utilized dual liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulators. Thus, by using AO-SLO, we were able to create a photographic montage consisting of high quality images. Disrupted cone AO-SLO images were matched with visual field test results and functional deficits were associated with a precise location on the montage, which allowed correlation of histological findings with functional changes determined by HVF. We also investigated whether adaptive optics imaging was more sensitive to anatomical changes compared with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography.

  6. Structural damage continuous monitoring by using a data driven approach based on principal component analysis and cross-correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho-Navarro, Jhonatan; Ruiz, Magda; Villamizar, Rodolfo; Mujica, Luis; Moreno-Beltrán, Gustavo; Quiroga, Jabid

    2017-05-01

    Continuous monitoring for damage detection in structural assessment comprises implementation of low cost equipment and efficient algorithms. This work describes the stages involved in the design of a methodology with high feasibility to be used in continuous damage assessment. Specifically, an algorithm based on a data-driven approach by using principal component analysis and pre-processing acquired signals by means of cross-correlation functions, is discussed. A carbon steel pipe section and a laboratory tower were used as test structures in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the methodology to detect abrupt changes in the structural response when damages occur. Two types of damage cases are studied: crack and leak for each structure, respectively. Experimental results show that the methodology is promising in the continuous monitoring of real structures.

  7. Point pattern analysis applied to flood and landslide damage events in Switzerland (1972-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbería, Laura; Schulte, Lothar; Carvalho, Filipe; Peña, Juan Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Damage caused by meteorological and hydrological extreme events depends on many factors, not only on hazard, but also on exposure and vulnerability. In order to reach a better understanding of the relation of these complex factors, their spatial pattern and underlying processes, the spatial dependency between values of damage recorded at sites of different distances can be investigated by point pattern analysis. For the Swiss flood and landslide damage database (1972-2009) first steps of point pattern analysis have been carried out. The most severe events have been selected (severe, very severe and catastrophic, according to GEES classification, a total number of 784 damage points) and Ripley's K-test and L-test have been performed, amongst others. For this purpose, R's library spatstat has been used. The results confirm that the damage points present a statistically significant clustered pattern, which could be connected to prevalence of damages near watercourses and also to rainfall distribution of each event, together with other factors. On the other hand, bivariate analysis shows there is no segregated pattern depending on process type: flood/debris flow vs landslide. This close relation points to a coupling between slope and fluvial processes, connectivity between small-size and middle-size catchments and the influence of spatial distribution of precipitation, temperature (snow melt and snow line) and other predisposing factors such as soil moisture, land-cover and environmental conditions. Therefore, further studies will investigate the relationship between the spatial pattern and one or more covariates, such as elevation, distance from watercourse or land use. The final goal will be to perform a regression model to the data, so that the adjusted model predicts the intensity of the point process as a function of the above mentioned covariates.

  8. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compressive Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compressive strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compressive loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  9. A Finite Element Analysis for Predicting the Residual Compression Strength of Impact-Damaged Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Jackson, Wade C.

    2008-01-01

    A simple analysis method has been developed for predicting the residual compression strength of impact-damaged sandwich panels. The method is tailored for honeycomb core-based sandwich specimens that exhibit an indentation growth failure mode under axial compression loading, which is driven largely by the crushing behavior of the core material. The analysis method is in the form of a finite element model, where the impact-damaged facesheet is represented using shell elements and the core material is represented using spring elements, aligned in the thickness direction of the core. The nonlinear crush response of the core material used in the analysis is based on data from flatwise compression tests. A comparison with a previous analysis method and some experimental data shows good agreement with results from this new approach.

  10. [Chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum analysis of greenhouse cucumber disease and insect damage].

    PubMed

    Sui, Yuan-yuan; Yu, Hai-ye; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Han; Ren, Shun; Zhao, Guo-gang

    2012-05-01

    The present paper is based on chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum analysis. The wavelength 685 nm was determined as the primary characteristic point for the analysis of healthy or disease and insect damaged leaf by spectrum configuration. Dimensionality reduction of the spectrum was achieved by combining simple intercorrelation bands selection and principal component analysis (PCA). The principal component factor was reduced from 10 to 5 while the spectrum information was kept reaching 99.999%. By comparing and analysing three modeling methods, namely the partial least square regression (PLSR), BP neural network (BP) and least square support vector machine regression (LSSVMR), regarding correlation coefficient of true value and predicted value as evaluation criterion, eventually, LSSVMR was confirmed as the appropriate method for modeling of greenhouse cucumber disease and insect damage chlorophyll fluorescence spectrum analysis.

  11. Tornado risk analysis at Savannah River Plant using windspeed damage thresholds and single building strike frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.H.; McDonald, J.R.; Twisdale, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to evaluate the safety of existing structures and properly design new structures, an analysis of tornado resistance was conducted on each process building at SRP and other buildings by type. Damage estimates were cataloged for each Fujita class windspeed interval and windspeeds were cataloged as a function of increased levels of damage. The probability, for any structure, of a tornado exceeding each windspeed threshold was calculated using the TORRISK computer code which was developed for calculating the probability of a tornado strike on nuclear power generating plants.

  12. Analysis of damaging effects of laser-plasma accelerated shrapnels on protecting glass shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkova, Michaela; Kalal, Milan; Shmatov, Mikhail L.

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of the damage caused by laser plasma accelerated fragments of metal target was performed. Measured as well as calculated parameters of craters and shrapnel found in BK7 glass blastshield are presented. Method applied for the measurement of parameters of craters is described. Potential damage of optical elements by the so-called striking cores (high-velocity stable objects arising due to collapse of cones or some other target parts toward their axes) that can be generated in IFE related experiments is evaluated.

  13. Chromatin Dynamics during DNA Repair Revealed by Pair Correlation Analysis of Molecular Flow in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Kong, Xiangduo; Yokomori, Kyoko; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics modulate DNA repair factor accessibility throughout the DNA damage response. The spatiotemporal scale upon which these dynamics occur render them invisible to live cell imaging. Here we present a believed novel assay to monitor the in vivo structural rearrangements of chromatin during DNA repair. By pair correlation analysis of EGFP molecular flow into chromatin before and after damage, this assay measures millisecond variations in chromatin compaction with submicron resolution. Combined with laser microirradiation we employ this assay to monitor the real-time accessibility of DNA at the damage site. We find from comparison of EGFP molecular flow with a molecule that has an affinity toward double-strand breaks (Ku-EGFP) that DNA damage induces a transient decrease in chromatin compaction at the damage site and an increase in compaction to adjacent regions, which together facilitate DNA repair factor recruitment to the lesion with high spatiotemporal control. PMID:24988341

  14. Quantitative analysis of damage clustering and void linking for spallation modeling in tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.; Hixson, R.

    1997-05-01

    In a companion paper in this volume by Zurek et al, micrographs of incipient spallation damage in rolled tantalum were numerically analyzed using image analysis techniques. Void sizes, locations, and overall porosity were measured and tabulated. In this paper, we extend this analysis to include void clusters and examine the correlation between cluster size and the ranges of local instabilities between voids visible in the micrographs. The implications for spallation modeling will be given.

  15. Decision-tree analysis of factors influencing rainfall-related building structure and content damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkers, M. H.; Kok, M.; Clemens, F. H. L. R.; ten Veldhuis, J. A. E.

    2014-09-01

    Flood-damage prediction models are essential building blocks in flood risk assessments. So far, little research has been dedicated to damage from small-scale urban floods caused by heavy rainfall, while there is a need for reliable damage models for this flood type among insurers and water authorities. The aim of this paper is to investigate a wide range of damage-influencing factors and their relationships with rainfall-related damage, using decision-tree analysis. For this, district-aggregated claim data from private property insurance companies in the Netherlands were analysed, for the period 1998-2011. The databases include claims of water-related damage (for example, damages related to rainwater intrusion through roofs and pluvial flood water entering buildings at ground floor). Response variables being modelled are average claim size and claim frequency, per district, per day. The set of predictors include rainfall-related variables derived from weather radar images, topographic variables from a digital terrain model, building-related variables and socioeconomic indicators of households. Analyses were made separately for property and content damage claim data. Results of decision-tree analysis show that claim frequency is most strongly associated with maximum hourly rainfall intensity, followed by real estate value, ground floor area, household income, season (property data only), buildings age (property data only), a fraction of homeowners (content data only), a and fraction of low-rise buildings (content data only). It was not possible to develop statistically acceptable trees for average claim size. It is recommended to investigate explanations for the failure to derive models. These require the inclusion of other explanatory factors that were not used in the present study, an investigation of the variability in average claim size at different spatial scales, and the collection of more detailed insurance data that allows one to distinguish between the

  16. ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE TO WASTE PACKAGES CAUSED BY SEISMIC EVENTS DURING POST-CLOSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, S W; Blair, S C; Carlson, S R; Gerhard, M; Buscheck, T A

    2008-05-27

    This paper presents methodology and results of an analysis of damage due to seismic ground motion for waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A series of three-dimensional rigid body kinematic simulations of waste packages, pallets, and drip shields subjected to seismic ground motions was performed. The simulations included strings of several waste packages and were used to characterize the number, location, and velocity of impacts that occur during seismic ground motion. Impacts were categorized as either waste package-to-waste package (WP-WP) or waste package-to-pallet (WP-P). In addition, a series of simulations was performed for WP-WP and WP-P impacts using a detailed representation of a single waste package. The detailed simulations were used to determine the amount of damage from individual impacts, and to form a damage catalog, indexed according to the type, angle, location and force/velocity of the impact. Finally, the results from the two analyses were combined to estimate the total damage to a waste package that may occur during an episode of seismic ground motion. This study addressed two waste package types, four levels of peak ground velocity (PGV), and 17 ground motions at each PGV. Selected aspects of waste package degradation, such as effective wall thickness and condition of the internals, were also considered. As expected, increasing the PGV level of the vibratory ground motion increases the damage to the waste packages. Results show that most of the damage is caused by WP-P impacts. TAD-bearing waste packages with intact internals are highly resistant to damage, even at a PGV of 4.07 m/s, which is the highest level analyzed.

  17. Progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanlei; Chang, Xinlong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Youhong

    A multiscale model based bridge theory is proposed for the progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading. The ablation model is adopted to calculate ablation temperature changing and ablation surface degradation. The polynomial strengthening model of matrix is used to improve bridging model for reducing parameter input. Stiffness degradation methods of bridging model are also improved in order to analyze the stress redistribution more accurately when the damage occurs. Thermal-mechanical analyses of the composite plate are performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit program with the developed model implemented in the VUMAT. The simulation results show that this model can be used to proclaim the mesoscale damage mechanism of composite laminates under coupled loading.

  18. Consequence analysis to determine the damage to humans from vapour cloud explosions using characteristic curves.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Fernando Díaz; Ferradás, Enrique González; Sánchez, Teresa de Jesús Jiménez; Aznar, Agustín Miñana; Gimeno, José Ruiz; Alonso, Jesús Martínez

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this paper is to provide a methodology to facilitate consequence analysis for vapour cloud explosions (VCE). Firstly, the main PROBIT equations to evaluate direct damage on humans from those accidents (eardrum rupture, death due to skull fracture, death due to whole body impact and lung damage) are discussed and the most suitable ones are selected. Secondly, a new methodology is developed to relate characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for VCE, obtained in a previous paper (F. Diaz Alonso et al., Characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for vapour cloud explosions using the TNO Multi-Energy model, J. Hazard. Mater. A137 (2006) 734-741) with the selected PROBIT equations. This methodology allows the determination of damage as a function of distance to the accident's origin in only one step, using explosion energy and VCE Multi-Energy charge strength as input parameters.

  19. Damage and Failure Analysis of AZ31 Alloy Sheet in Warm Stamping Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. J.; Chen, Z. H.; Dong, C. F.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a combined experimental-numerical investigation on the failure of AZ31 Mg alloy sheet in the warm stamping process was carried out based on modified GTN damage model which integrated Yld2000 anisotropic yield criterion. The constitutive equations of material were implemented into a VUMAT subroutine for solver ABAQUS/Explicit and applied to the formability analysis of mobile phone shell. The morphology near the crack area was observed using SEM, and the anisotropic damage evolution at various temperatures was simulated. The distributions of plastic strain, damage evolution, thickness, and fracture initiation obtained from FE simulation were analyzed. The corresponding forming limit diagrams were worked out, and the comparison with the experimental data showed a good agreement.

  20. Multimodal, multiphoton microscopy and image correlation analysis for characterizing corneal thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Chang, Yu-Lin; Liu, Jia-Shiu; Hseuh, Chiu-Mei; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir; Chen, Shean-Jen; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-09-01

    We used the combination of multiphoton autofluorescence (MAF), forward second-harmonic generation (FWSHG), and backward second-harmonic generation (BWSHG) imaging for the qualitative and quantitative characterization of thermal damage of ex vivo bovine cornea. We attempt to characterize the structural alterations by qualitative MAF, FWSHG, and BWSHG imaging in the temperature range of 37 to 90°C. In addition to measuring the absolute changes in the three types of signals at the stromal surface, we also performed image correlation analysis between FWSHG and BWSHG and demonstrate that with increasing thermal damage, image correlation between FWSHG and BWSHG significantly increases. Our results show that while MAF and BWSHG intensities may be used as preliminary indicators of the extent of corneal thermal damage, the most sensitive measures are provided by the decay in FWSHG intensity and the convergence of FWSHG and BWSHG images.

  1. Regularized discriminant analysis for multi-sensor decision fusion and damage detection with Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Spandan; Vanli, O. Arda; Huffer, Fred W.; Jung, Sungmoon

    2016-04-01

    In this study we propose a regularized linear discriminant analysis approach for damage detection which does not require an intermediate feature extraction step and therefore more efficient in handling data with high-dimensionality. A robust discriminant model is obtained by shrinking of the covariance matrix to a diagonal matrix and thresholding redundant predictors without hurting the predictive power of the model. The shrinking and threshold parameters of the discriminant function (decision boundary) are estimated to minimize the classification error. Furthermore, it is shown how the damage classification achieved by the proposed method can be extended to multiple sensors by following a Bayesian decision-fusion formulation. The detection probability of each sensor is used as a prior condition to estimate the posterior detection probability of the entire network and the posterior detection probability is used as a quantitative basis to make the final decision about the damage.

  2. A padding method to reduce edge effects for enhanced damage identification using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, Lorenzo; Basu, Biswajit; Spagnoli, Andrea; Broderick, Brian M.

    2015-02-01

    Vibration response based structural damage identification by spatial wavelet analysis is widely considered a powerful tool in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). This work deals with the issue of border distortions in wavelet transform that can mask tiny damages close to the boundary of a structure. Since traditional padding methods (e.g., zero-padding, symmetric padding, linear padding) are often not satisfactory, a simple and computationally inexpensive signal extension method, based on fitting polynomial functions and continuity conditions at the extrema, is proposed. The method is applied to analyze noisy mode shapes and static deflection of cracked cantilever and simply supported beams. The effectiveness and the versatility of the method in localizing tiny damages close to clamped, free or hinged beam boundaries is demonstrated. Furthermore, an extensive comparison with the linear padding method and Messina's isomorphism methods is carried out.

  3. Computerized fetal heart rate analysis in the prediction of myocardial damage in pregnancies with placental insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Mariane de Fátima Y; Nomura, Roseli M Y; Niigaki, Juliana I; Francisco, Rossana P V; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the reliability of fetal heart rate (FHR) parameters analyzed by computerized cardiotocography (cCTG) in predicting myocardial damage in pregnancies with placental insufficiency. We evaluated 38 patients with placental insufficiency detected before 34 weeks of gestation. All patients underwent 30 min of cCTG (Sonicaid Fetal Care, version 2.2) and Doppler of umbilical artery, middle cerebral artery, and ductus venosus. Umbilical vein blood samples were collected at birth to determine fetal cardiac Troponin T, and a ≥0.09ng/ml value was deemed a sign of myocardial damage. The fetuses with myocardial damage (39%) showed significantly increased values of umbilical artery pulsatility index z-score (P=0.003), ductus venosus pulsatility index z-score (P=0.007), basal FHR (P=0.033) and periods of low episodes (P=0.038). The number of small accelerations and the short-term variation (STV) were significantly reduced in the group with myocardial damage (P=0.013 and P=0.003, respectively). Logistic regression analysis identified STV and gestational age at delivery as independent predictors for fetal myocardial damage, with area under ROC curve of 0.91. Computerized cardiotocography parameters may be useful in the management of early onset placental insufficiency, and the association of STV with gestational age could play a role in detecting myocardial injury in pregnancies with placental insufficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Numerical analysis for structural health monitoring of a damaged composite panel using PZT actuators and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagabhushana, A.; Spiegel, M.; Adu, S.; Hayes, N.; Paul, D.; Trivedi, K.; Fairbee, B.; Zheng, H.; Gerrity, A.; Kotru, S.; Roy, S.; Barkey, M.; Burkett, S. L.

    2012-04-01

    Reliable damage detection is crucial for assessing the integrity of a structure. In this paper, a numerical study of a composite panel fabricated to simulate a crack is undertaken using finite element methods (FEM). The damage to be considered is a transverse crack which pre-exists in the structure. The finite element models are developed for an undamaged and a damaged composite panel to compute the change in Lamb wave response due to the existence of a crack. The model is validated using shear lag analysis applied at the crack. The results are verified experimentally by comparing the results for an undamaged composite panel and a composite panel fabricated with a simulated crack using the vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. The responses for each panel are obtained using surface mounted lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuators and sensors. PZT is used to generate Lamb waves which produce stress throughout the panel thickness. Propagation characteristics of Lamb waves are varied by the presence of damage. The sensor data provide reliable information about the integrity of the structure. Numerical results are compared to the sensor output to ensure accuracy of the damage detection system.

  5. Micro CT Analysis of Dynamic Damage in Laminates: Impact vs. blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Laurence A.; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic loading is often an unavoidable condition in various applications of carbon-fibre-reinforced polymers and can cause various modes of damage. Realisation of dynamic damage in composites can differ significantly from that under quasi-static loading conditions. A comprehensive study of damage in composites caused by a wide variety of impact and blast loading is currently lacking. The work presents a detailed analysis of damage in specimens of a 2×2 twill weave T300 carbon-fibre/epoxy composite subjected to ballistic loading with both steel and ice projectiles (with energies from 95 J to 865 J at 70-90 m/s and 300-500 m/s, respectively) and air blast (with incident pressures of 0.4 MPa, 0.6 MPa and 0.8 MPa and wave speeds between 650 m/s and 950 m/s). The resultant damage was analysed in-depth based on detailed volumetric data obtained with high-resolution X-ray micro computed tomography.

  6. Modal analysis of a cantilever beam by use of the slope-assisted BOTDA method for damage identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardo, A.; Coscetta, A.; Pirozzi, S.; Bernini, R.; Zeni, L.

    2013-05-01

    We report an experimental study on a cantilever beam, aimed to verify the feasibility of modal analysis by distributed Brillouin sensing for structural damage identification. Damage identification was carried out for three defect cases, analyzing the changes of the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the first two bending modes. Comparison with finite element method (FEM) analysis shows that the damage can be detected and localized, within the limitation dictated by the spatial resolution (30 cm) of our sensor.

  7. Structural health monitoring and damage assessment using a novel time series analysis methodology with sensor clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, Mustafa; Catbas, F. Necati

    2011-03-01

    This study presents a novel time series analysis methodology to detect, locate, and estimate the extent of the structural changes (e.g. damage). In this methodology, ARX models (Auto-Regressive models with eXogenous input) are created for different sensor clusters by using the free response of the structure. The output of each sensor in a cluster is used as an input to the ARX model to predict the output of the reference channel of that sensor cluster. Two different approaches are used for extracting Damage Features (DFs) from these ARX models. For the first approach, the coefficients of the ARX models are directly used as the DFs. It is shown with a 4 dof numerical model that damage can be identified, located and quantified for simple models and noise free data. To consider the effects of the noise and model complexity, a second approach is presented based on using the ARX model fit ratios as the DFs. The second approach is first applied to the same 4 DOF numerical model and to the numerical data coming from an international benchmark study for noisy conditions. Then, the methodology is applied to the experimental data from a large scale laboratory model. It is shown that the second approach performs successfully for different damage cases to identify and locate the damage using numerical and experimental data. Furthermore, it is observed that the DF level is a good indicator for estimating the extent of the damage for these cases. The potential and advantages of the methodology are discussed along with the analysis results. The limitations of the methodology, recommendations, and future work are also addressed.

  8. Independent component analysis of DTI data reveals white matter covariances in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xin; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guo, Ting; Sun, Qiaoyue; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with the clinical symptom of the continuous deterioration of cognitive and memory functions. Multiple diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) can successfully explain the white matter damages in AD patients. However, most studies focused on the univariate measures (voxel-based analysis) to examine the differences between AD patients and normal controls (NCs). In this investigation, we applied a multivariate independent component analysis (ICA) to investigate the white matter covariances based on FA measurement from DTI data in 35 AD patients and 45 NCs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. We found that six independent components (ICs) showed significant FA reductions in white matter covariances in AD compared with NC, including the genu and splenium of corpus callosum (IC-1 and IC-2), middle temporal gyral of temporal lobe (IC-3), sub-gyral of frontal lobe (IC-4 and IC-5) and sub-gyral of parietal lobe (IC-6). Our findings revealed covariant white matter loss in AD patients and suggest that the unsupervised data-driven ICA method is effective to explore the changes of FA in AD. This study assists us in understanding the mechanism of white matter covariant reductions in the development of AD.

  9. Pre-2014 mudslides at Oso revealed by InSAR and multi-source DEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; QU, F.

    2014-12-01

    The landslide is a process that results in the downward and outward movement of slope-reshaping materials including rocks and soils and annually causes the loss of approximately $3.5 billion and tens of casualties in the United States. The 2014 Oso mudslide was an extreme event costing nearly 40 deaths and damaging civilian properties. Landslides are often unpredictable, but in many cases, catastrophic events are repetitive. Historic record in the Oso mudslide site indicates that there have been serial events in decades, though the extent of sliding events varied from time to time. In our study, the combination of multi-source DEMs, InSAR, and time-series InSAR analysis has enabled to characterize the Oso mudslide. InSAR results from ALOS PALSAR show that there was no significant deformation between mid-2006 and 2011. The combination of time-series InSAR analysis and old-dated DEM indicated revealed topographic changes associated the 2006 sliding event, which is confirmed by the difference of multiple LiDAR DEMs. Precipitation and discharge measurements before the 2006 and 2014 landslide events did not exhibit extremely anomalous records, suggesting the precipitation is not the controlling factor in determining the sliding events at Oso. The lack of surface deformation during 2006-2011 and weak correlation between the precipitation and the sliding event, suggest other factors (such as porosity) might play a critical role on the run-away events at this Oso and other similar landslides.

  10. Advanced Damage Tolerance Analysis of International Space Station Pressure Wall Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    2006-01-01

    EM20/MSFC has sponsored technology in the area of advanced damage tolerance analysis tools used to analyze the International Space Station (ISS) pressure wall welds. The ISS European modules did not receive non-destructive evaluation (NDE) inspection after proof test. In final assembly configuration, most welds could only be inspected from one side, and some welds were uninspectible. Therefore, advanced damage tolerance analysis was required to determine the critical initial flaw sizes and predicted safe life for the pressure wall welds. EM20 sponsored the development of a new finite element tools using FEA-Crack and WARP3D to solve the problem. This presentation gives a brief overview of the new analytical tools and the analysis results.

  11. Clothing damage analysis and the phenomenon of the false sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Taupin, J M

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes three recent false sexual assaults examined at the Victoria Forensic Science Centre laboratory where clothing damage analysis assisted in the resolution of the case. Suspected false reports of sexual assaults are often sensitive cases with little other forensic evidence. Any evidential value that can be obtained is thus valuable in order to minimize any ordeal to the complainant and any suspect and to conserve valuable resources. The findings illustrate the application of clothing damage analysis in a cross section of confirmed false sexual assault reports and the fact that the forensic examiner should be aware of the potential evidential value of this kind of analysis. Furthermore, the corroboration of a victim's scenario when the investigator has doubts may be no less valuable as it may minimize the adversarial ordeal that is often faced by a rape victim.

  12. Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Peach Bottom, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Ferrell, W.L.; Cathey, N.G.; Najafi, B.; Harper, F.T.

    1986-10-01

    This document contains the internal event initiated accident sequence analyses for Peach Bottom, Unit 2; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Peach Bottom, Unit 2, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provided additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Peach Bottom core damage frequency estimate. The mean core damage frequency at Peach Bottom was calculated to be 8.2E-6. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) were found to dominate the overall results. Anticipated Transient Without Scram accidents were also found to be non-negligible contributors. The numerical results are largely driven by common mode failure probability estimates and to some extent, human error. Because of significant data and analysis uncertainties in these two areas (important, for instance, to the most dominant scenario in this study), it is recommended that the results of the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses be considered before any actions are taken based on this analysis.

  13. Decision tree analysis of factors influencing rainfall-related building damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkers, M. H.; Kok, M.; Clemens, F. H. L. R.; ten Veldhuis, J. A. E.

    2014-04-01

    Flood damage prediction models are essential building blocks in flood risk assessments. Little research has been dedicated so far to damage of small-scale urban floods caused by heavy rainfall, while there is a need for reliable damage models for this flood type among insurers and water authorities. The aim of this paper is to investigate a wide range of damage-influencing factors and their relationships with rainfall-related damage, using decision tree analysis. For this, district-aggregated claim data from private property insurance companies in the Netherlands were analysed, for the period of 1998-2011. The databases include claims of water-related damage, for example, damages related to rainwater intrusion through roofs and pluvial flood water entering buildings at ground floor. Response variables being modelled are average claim size and claim frequency, per district per day. The set of predictors include rainfall-related variables derived from weather radar images, topographic variables from a digital terrain model, building-related variables and socioeconomic indicators of households. Analyses were made separately for property and content damage claim data. Results of decision tree analysis show that claim frequency is most strongly associated with maximum hourly rainfall intensity, followed by real estate value, ground floor area, household income, season (property data only), buildings age (property data only), ownership structure (content data only) and fraction of low-rise buildings (content data only). It was not possible to develop statistically acceptable trees for average claim size, which suggest that variability in average claim size is related to explanatory variables that cannot be defined at the district scale. Cross-validation results show that decision trees were able to predict 22-26% of variance in claim frequency, which is considerably better compared to results from global multiple regression models (11-18% of variance explained). Still, a

  14. Online damage detection using recursive principal component analysis and recursive condition indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, M.; Bhowmik, B.; Tiwari, A. K.; Hazra, B.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a novel baseline free approach for continuous online damage detection of multi degree of freedom vibrating structures using recursive principal component analysis (RPCA) in conjunction with online damage indicators is proposed. In this method, the acceleration data is used to obtain recursive proper orthogonal modes in online using the rank-one perturbation method, and subsequently utilized to detect the change in the dynamic behavior of the vibrating system from its pristine state to contiguous linear/nonlinear-states that indicate damage. The RPCA algorithm iterates the eigenvector and eigenvalue estimates for sample covariance matrices and new data point at each successive time instants, using the rank-one perturbation method. An online condition indicator (CI) based on the L2 norm of the error between actual response and the response projected using recursive eigenvector matrix updates over successive iterations is proposed. This eliminates the need for offline post processing and facilitates online damage detection especially when applied to streaming data. The proposed CI, named recursive residual error, is also adopted for simultaneous spatio-temporal damage detection. Numerical simulations performed on five-degree of freedom nonlinear system under white noise and El Centro excitations, with different levels of nonlinearity simulating the damage scenarios, demonstrate the robustness of the proposed algorithm. Successful results obtained from practical case studies involving experiments performed on a cantilever beam subjected to earthquake excitation, for full sensors and underdetermined cases; and data from recorded responses of the UCLA Factor building (full data and its subset) demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology as an ideal candidate for real-time, reference free structural health monitoring.

  15. Kinetic Modeling Reveals the Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and DNA Repair Processes in Shaping the Dose-Response Curve of KBrO₃-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Spassova, Maria A; Miller, David J; Nikolov, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a kinetic model to investigate how DNA repair processes and scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect the dose-response shape of prooxidant induced DNA damage. We used as an example chemical KBrO3 which is activated by glutathione and forms reactive intermediates that directly interact with DNA to form 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine DNA adducts (8-OH-dG). The single strand breaks (SSB) that can result from failed base excision repair of these adducts were considered as an effect downstream from 8-OH-dG. We previously demonstrated that, in the presence of effective base excision repair, 8-OH-dG can exhibit threshold-like dose-response dependence, while the downstream SSB can still exhibit a linear dose-response. Here we demonstrate that this result holds for a variety of conditions, including low levels of GSH, the presence of additional SSB repair mechanisms, or a scavenger. It has been shown that melatonin, a terminal scavenger, inhibits KBrO3-caused oxidative damage. Our modeling revealed that sustained exposure to KBrO3 can lead to fast scavenger exhaustion, in which case the dose-response shapes for both endpoints are not substantially affected. The results are important to consider when forming conclusions on a chemical's toxicity dose dependence based on the dose-response of early genotoxic events.

  16. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  17. Large-scale transient sensitivity analysis of a radiation damaged bipolar junction transistor.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Robert John; Gay, David M.; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Phipps, Eric Todd

    2007-11-01

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is useful in transient sensitivity analysis of a computational simulation of a bipolar junction transistor subject to radiation damage. We used forward-mode AD, implemented in a new Trilinos package called Sacado, to compute analytic derivatives for implicit time integration and forward sensitivity analysis. Sacado addresses element-based simulation codes written in C++ and works well with forward sensitivity analysis as implemented in the Trilinos time-integration package Rythmos. The forward sensitivity calculation is significantly more efficient and robust than finite differencing.

  18. Partial Least Squares Method in the Analysis of the Intensity of Damage in Prefabricated Large-Block Building Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firek, Karol; Rusek, Janusz

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents the research methodology aimed at determining the building damage intensity index as a linear combination of indices describing the damage to its individual components. The research base comprised 129 building structures erected in the large-block technology. The study compared the results of a standardized approach to data mining - PCA (Principal Components Analysis) with the procedure of the PLSR method (Partial Least Squares Regression). As a result of the analysis, a generalized form of the building damage index was obtained, as a linear combination of the damage to its components.

  19. Analysis of WWER-440 and PWR RPV welds surveillance data to compare irradiation damage evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debarberis, L.; Acosta, B.; Zeman, A.; Sevini, F.; Ballesteros, A.; Kryukov, A.; Gillemot, F.; Brumovsky, M.

    2006-04-01

    It is known that for Russian-type and Western water reactor pressure vessel steels there is a similar degradation in mechanical properties during equivalent neutron irradiation. Available surveillance results from WWER and PWR vessels are used in this article to compare irradiation damage evolution for the different reactor pressure vessel welds. The analysis is done through the semi-mechanistic model for radiation embrittlement developed by JRC-IE. Consistency analysis with BWR vessel materials and model alloys has also been performed within this study. Globally the two families of studied materials follow similar trends regarding the evolution of irradiation damage. Moreover in the high fluence range typical of operation of WWER the radiation stability of these vessels is greater than the foreseen one for PWR.

  20. Detection of Thermal Damage in X2M Gears Steel Using Barkhausen Noise Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Victor; Sincebaugh, Patrick; Pepi, Marc; Tackitt, Kirk

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the Barkhausen Noise Analysis (BNA) technique for detecting thermal damage and to differentiate between two heat treatments for X2M steel. BNA is a nondestructive inspection method that has been shown to be sensitive to microstructural and residual stress variations in ferromagnetic materials. BNA data will be presented for X2M samples with various degrees of thermal damage, prior to and subsequent to shot peening. Microstructural analysis results will also be presented. The microstructural feature that was the distinguishing variable between the two heat treatments was the percentage of carbides present. The results clearly demonstrated that it is feasible to use BNA methods to differentiate between the two heat treatments used for the X2M steel prior to shot peening.

  1. Integrated analysis considered mitigation cost, damage cost and adaptation cost in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Lee, D. K.; Kim, H. G.; Sung, S.; Jung, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Various studies show that raising the temperature as well as storms, cold snap, raining and drought caused by climate change. And variety disasters have had a damage to mankind. The world risk report(2012, The Nature Conservancy) and UNU-EHS (the United Nations University Institute for Environment and Human Security) reported that more and more people are exposed to abnormal weather such as floods, drought, earthquakes, typhoons and hurricanes over the world. In particular, the case of Korea, we influenced by various pollutants which are occurred in Northeast Asian countries, China and Japan, due to geographical meteorological characteristics. These contaminants have had a significant impact on air quality with the pollutants generated in Korea. Recently, around the world continued their effort to reduce greenhouse gas and to improve air quality in conjunction with the national or regional development goals priority. China is also working on various efforts in accordance with the international flows to cope with climate change and air pollution. In the future, effect of climate change and air quality in Korea and Northeast Asia will be change greatly according to China's growth and mitigation policies. The purpose of this study is to minimize the damage caused by climate change on the Korean peninsula through an integrated approach taking into account the mitigation and adaptation plan. This study will suggest a climate change strategy at the national level by means of a comprehensive economic analysis of the impacts and mitigation of climate change. In order to quantify the impact and damage cost caused by climate change scenarios in a regional scale, it should be priority variables selected in accordance with impact assessment of climate change. The sectoral impact assessment was carried out on the basis of selected variables and through this, to derive the methodology how to estimate damage cost and adaptation cost. And then, the methodology was applied in Korea

  2. Development of tools to automate quantitative analysis of radiation damage in SAXS experiments

    PubMed Central

    Brooks-Bartlett, Jonathan C.; Batters, Rebecca A.; Bury, Charles S.; Lowe, Edward D.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Round, Adam; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2017-01-01

    Biological small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is an increasingly popular technique used to obtain nanoscale structural information on macromolecules in solution. However, radiation damage to the samples limits the amount of useful data that can be collected from a single sample. In contrast to the extensive analytical resources available for macromolecular crystallography (MX), there are relatively few tools to quantitate radiation damage for SAXS, some of which require a significant level of manual characterization, with the potential of leading to conflicting results from different studies. Here, computational tools have been developed to automate and standardize radiation damage analysis for SAXS data. RADDOSE-3D, a dose calculation software utility originally written for MX experiments, has been extended to account for the cylindrical geometry of the capillary tube, the liquid composition of the sample and the attenuation of the beam by the capillary material to allow doses to be calculated for many SAXS experiments. Furthermore, a library has been written to visualize and explore the pairwise similarity of frames. The calculated dose for the frame at which three subsequent frames are determined to be dissimilar is defined as the radiation damage onset threshold (RDOT). Analysis of RDOTs has been used to compare the efficacy of radioprotectant compounds to extend the useful lifetime of SAXS samples. Comparison of the RDOTs shows that, for radioprotectant compounds at 5 and 10 mM concentration, glycerol is the most effective compound. However, at 1 and 2 mM concentrations, di­thio­threitol (DTT) appears to be most effective. Our newly developed visualization library contains methods that highlight the unusual radiation damage results given by SAXS data collected using higher concentrations of DTT: these observations should pave the way to the development of more sophisticated frame merging strategies. PMID:28009547

  3. Transcriptome analysis reveals manifold mechanisms of cyst development in ADPKD.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rita M C; Clendenon, Sherry G; Richards, William G; Boedigheimer, Michael; Damore, Michael; Rossetti, Sandro; Harris, Peter C; Herbert, Britney-Shea; Xu, Wei Min; Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Ward, Heather H; Glazier, James A; Bacallao, Robert L

    2016-11-21

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) causes progressive loss of renal function in adults as a consequence of the accumulation of cysts. ADPKD is the most common genetic cause of end-stage renal disease. Mutations in polycystin-1 occur in 87% of cases of ADPKD and mutations in polycystin-2 are found in 12% of ADPKD patients. The complexity of ADPKD has hampered efforts to identify the mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis. No current FDA (Federal Drug Administration)-approved therapies ameliorate ADPKD progression. We used the de Almeida laboratory's sensitive new transcriptogram method for whole-genome gene expression data analysis to analyze microarray data from cell lines developed from cell isolates of normal kidney and of both non-cystic nephrons and cysts from the kidney of a patient with ADPKD. We compared results obtained using standard Ingenuity Volcano plot analysis, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and transcriptogram analysis. Transcriptogram analysis confirmed the findings of Ingenuity, GSEA, and published analysis of ADPKD kidney data and also identified multiple new expression changes in KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathways related to cell growth, cell death, genetic information processing, nucleotide metabolism, signal transduction, immune response, response to stimulus, cellular processes, ion homeostasis and transport and cofactors, vitamins, amino acids, energy, carbohydrates, drugs, lipids, and glycans. Transcriptogram analysis also provides significance metrics which allow us to prioritize further study of these pathways. Transcriptogram analysis identifies novel pathways altered in ADPKD, providing new avenues to identify both ADPKD's mechanisms of pathogenesis and pharmaceutical targets to ameliorate the progression of the disease.

  4. A Coupled/Uncoupled Computational Scheme for Deformation and Fatigue Damage Analysis of Unidirectional Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, Thomas E.; Arnold, Steven M.; Saleeb, Atef F.

    1997-01-01

    A fatigue damage computational algorithm utilizing a multiaxial, isothermal, continuum-based fatigue damage model for unidirectional metal-matrix composites has been implemented into the commercial finite element code MARC using MARC user subroutines. Damage is introduced into the finite element solution through the concept of effective stress that fully couples the fatigue damage calculations with the finite element deformation solution. Two applications using the fatigue damage algorithm are presented. First, an axisymmetric stress analysis of a circumferentially reinforced ring, wherein both the matrix cladding and the composite core were assumed to behave elastic-perfectly plastic. Second, a micromechanics analysis of a fiber/matrix unit cell using both the finite element method and the generalized method of cells (GMC). Results are presented in the form of S-N curves and damage distribution plots.

  5. Vibration-based damage detection in plates by using time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendafilova, Irina; Manoach, Emil

    2008-07-01

    This paper deals with the problem of vibration health monitoring (VHM) in structures with nonlinear dynamic behaviour. It aims to introduce two viable VHM methods that use large amplitude vibrations and are based on nonlinear time series analysis. The methods suggested explore some changes in the state space geometry/distribution of the structural dynamic response with damage and their use for damage detection purposes. One of the methods uses the statistical distribution of state space points on the attractor of a vibrating structure, while the other one is based on the Poincaré map of the state space projected dynamic response. In this paper both methods are developed and demonstrated for a thin vibrating plate. The investigation is based on finite element modelling of the plate vibration response. The results obtained demonstrate the influence of damage on the local dynamic attractor of the plate state space and the applicability of the proposed strategies for damage assessment. The approach taken in this study and the suggested VHM methods are rather generic and permit development and applications for other more complex nonlinear structures.

  6. Bird impact at aircraft structure - Damage analysis using Coupled Euler Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smojver, I.; Ivancevic, D.

    2010-06-01

    Numerical bird strike damage prediction procedure has been applied on the very detailed large airplane secondary structure consisting of sandwich, composite and metallic structural items. The impacted inboard flap finite element model is modelled using 3D, shell and continuum shell elements, coupled with appropriate kinematic constraints. The bird has been modelled using Coupled Euler Lagrangian approach, in order to avoid the numerical difficulties connected with mesh distortion. Various failure modes, such as Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) face layer rupture, failure of composite matrix, damage initiation / evolution in the sandwich structure Nomex core and elastoplastic failure of a metallic structure have been investigated. Besides, general contact has been applied as to efficiently capture the contact between Eulerian bird material and the structure, as well as large deformations of the different structural components. Compared to the classic Lagrangian modelling of the bird, the analysis has proven to be more stable, and the results, such as damage areas, physically more realistic. The impact has been applied in the area that is the most probably subjected to the impact damage during exploitation.

  7. Fuselage Versus Subcomponent Panel Response Correlation Based on ABAQUS Explicit Progressive Damage Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Kevin E.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis performed in this study substantiates the need for high fidelity vehicle level progressive damage analyses (PDA) structural models for use in the verification and validation of proposed sub-scale structural models and to support required full-scale vehicle level testing. PDA results are presented that capture and correlate the responses of sub-scale 3-stringer and 7-stringer panel models and an idealized 8-ft diameter fuselage model, which provides a vehicle level environment for the 7-stringer sub-scale panel model. Two unique skin-stringer attachment assumptions are considered and correlated in the models analyzed: the TIE constraint interface versus the cohesive element (COH3D8) interface. Evaluating different interfaces allows for assessing a range of predicted damage modes, including delamination and crack propagation responses. Damage models considered in this study are the ABAQUS built-in Hashin procedure and the COmplete STress Reduction (COSTR) damage procedure implemented through a VUMAT user subroutine using the ABAQUS/Explicit code.

  8. Chromosomal damage and apoptosis analysis in exfoliated oral epithelial cells from mouthwash and alcohol users

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Rodrigo dos Santos; Meireles, José Roberto Cardoso; de Moraes Marcílio Cerqueira, Eneida

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal damage and apoptosis were analyzed in users of mouthwash and/or alcoholic beverages, using the micronucleus test on exfoliated oral mucosa cells. Samples from four groups of 20 individuals each were analyzed: three exposed groups (EG1, EG2 and EG3) and a control group (CG). EG1 comprised mouthwash users; EG2 comprised drinkers, and EG3 users of both mouthwashes and alcoholic beverages. Cell material was collected by gently scraping the insides of the cheeks. Then the cells were fixed in a methanol/acetic acid (3:1) solution and stained and counterstained, respectively, with Schiff reactive and fast green. Endpoints were computed on 2,000 cells in a blind test. Statistical analysis showed that chromosomal damage and apoptosis were significantly higher in individuals of groups EG1 and EG3 than in controls (p < 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in chromosomal damage and apoptosis was observed between the exposed groups. In EG2, only the occurrence of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the controls. These results suggest that mouthwashes alone or in association with alcoholic drinks induce genotoxic effects, manifested as chromosomal damage and apoptosis. They also suggest that alcoholic drinks are effective for stimulating the process of apoptosis. However, these data need to be confirmed in larger samples. PMID:25505845

  9. Uncertainty analysis and risk-based design of detention basin without damage function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yeou-Koung

    2017-05-01

    Risk-based analysis provides an economically defensible framework for determining the optimal design of hydrosystems with the minimum total cost including project cost (installation plus operation/maintenance/repair) and failure-induced expected damage cost. However, failure-related damage function with good quality may not be widely available in practical applications for assessing annual expected damage cost. In addition to aleatory uncertainty representing natural randomness of hydrologic events, there exists a variety of epistemic uncertainties due to knowledge deficiency from the use of inadequate models, inaccurate model parameters, etc. The presence of epistemic uncertainties could affect the loads and capacity of hydrosystem facilities which, in turn, would affect the value of failure-induced physical performance indicators. Using detention basin design as an example, this paper presents a systematic framework to integrate aleatory and epistemic uncertainties for the risk-based design under the condition of no monetary damage function. For illustration, aleatory uncertainty due to randomness of rainfall intensity and epistemic uncertainties caused by runoff coefficient and curve number are considered in risk-based design of an example detention basin.

  10. Thermodynamic and Structural Analysis of DNA Damage Architectures Related to Replication

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Nicholas J.; Mwai, Christopher N.; Mueser, Timothy C.; Bryant-Friedrich, Amanda C.

    2013-01-01

    Damaged DNA, generated by the abstraction of one of five hydrogen atoms from the 2′-deoxyribose ring of the nucleic acid, can contain a variety of lesions, some of which compromise physiological processes. Recently, DNA damage, resulting from the formation of a C3′-thymidinyl radical in DNA oligomers, was found to be dependent on nucleic acid structure. Architectures relevant to DNA replication were observed to generate larger amounts of strand-break and 1-(2′-deoxy-β-D-threo-pentofuranosyl)thymidine formation than that observed for duplex DNA. To understand how this damage can affect the integrity of DNA, the impact of C3′-thymidinyl radical derived lesions on DNA stability and structure was characterized using biophysical methods. DNA architectures evaluated include duplex DNA (dsDNA), single 3′ or 5′-overhangs (OvHgs), and forks. Thermal melting analysis and differential scanning calorimetry measurements indicate that an individual 3′-OvHg is more destabilizing than a 5′-OvHg. The presence of a terminal 3′ or 5′ phosphate decreases the ΔG 25 to the same extent, while the effect of the phosphate at the ss-dsDNA junction of OvHgs is dependent on sequence. Additionally, the effect of 1-(2′-deoxy-β-D-threo-pentofuranosyl)thymidine is found to depend on DNA architecture and proximity to the 3′ end of the damaged strand. PMID:23710336

  11. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  12. Development of DNA Damage Response Signaling Biomarkers using Automated, Quantitative Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaishvilli-Feinberg, Nana; Cohen, Stephanie M.; Midkiff, Bentley; Zhou, Yingchun; Olorvida, Mark; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Omolo, Bernard; Shields, Janiel M.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Groben, Pamela A.; Kaufmann, William K.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates DNA repair with cell cycle checkpoints to ameliorate or mitigate the pathological effects of DNA damage. Automated quantitative analysis (AQUA) and Tissue Studio are commercial technologies that use digitized immunofluorescence microscopy images to quantify antigen expression in defined tissue compartments. Because DDR is commonly activated in cancer and may reflect genetic instability within the lesion, a method to quantify DDR in cancer offers potential diagnostic and/or prognostic value. In this study, both AQUA and Tissue Studio algorithms were used to quantify the DDR in radiation-damaged skin fibroblasts, melanoma cell lines, moles, and primary and metastatic melanomas. Digital image analysis results for three markers of DDR (γH2AX, P-ATM, P-Chk2) correlated with immunoblot data for irradiated fibroblasts, whereas only γH2AX and P-Chk2 correlated with immunoblot data in melanoma cell lines. Melanoma cell lines displayed substantial variation in γH2AX and P-Chk2 expression, and P-Chk2 expression was significantly correlated with radioresistance. Moles, primary melanomas, and melanoma metastases in brain, lung and liver displayed substantial variation in γH2AX expression, similar to that observed in melanoma cell lines. Automated digital analysis of immunofluorescent images stained for DDR biomarkers may be useful for predicting tumor response to radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:24309508

  13. Frequencies and Flutter Speed Estimation for Damaged Aircraft Wing Using Scaled Equivalent Plate Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan

    2010-01-01

    Equivalent plate analysis is often used to replace the computationally expensive finite element analysis in initial design stages or in conceptual design of aircraft wing structures. The equivalent plate model can also be used to design a wind tunnel model to match the stiffness characteristics of the wing box of a full-scale aircraft wing model while satisfying strength-based requirements An equivalent plate analysis technique is presented to predict the static and dynamic response of an aircraft wing with or without damage. First, a geometric scale factor and a dynamic pressure scale factor are defined to relate the stiffness, load and deformation of the equivalent plate to the aircraft wing. A procedure using an optimization technique is presented to create scaled equivalent plate models from the full scale aircraft wing using geometric and dynamic pressure scale factors. The scaled models are constructed by matching the stiffness of the scaled equivalent plate with the scaled aircraft wing stiffness. It is demonstrated that the scaled equivalent plate model can be used to predict the deformation of the aircraft wing accurately. Once the full equivalent plate geometry is obtained, any other scaled equivalent plate geometry can be obtained using the geometric scale factor. Next, an average frequency scale factor is defined as the average ratio of the frequencies of the aircraft wing to the frequencies of the full-scaled equivalent plate. The average frequency scale factor combined with the geometric scale factor is used to predict the frequency response of the aircraft wing from the scaled equivalent plate analysis. A procedure is outlined to estimate the frequency response and the flutter speed of an aircraft wing from the equivalent plate analysis using the frequency scale factor and geometric scale factor. The equivalent plate analysis is demonstrated using an aircraft wing without damage and another with damage. Both of the problems show that the scaled

  14. Characterization of Aircraft Structural Damage Using Guided Wave Based Finite Element Analysis for In-Flight Structural Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Banavara R.; Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan; Ross, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The development of multidisciplinary Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) tools will enable accurate detection, diagnosis and prognosis of damage under normal and adverse conditions during flight. The adverse conditions include loss of control caused by environmental factors, actuator and sensor faults or failures, and structural damage conditions. A major concern is the growth of undetected damage/cracks due to fatigue and low velocity foreign object impact that can reach a critical size during flight, resulting in loss of control of the aircraft. To avoid unstable catastrophic propagation of damage during a flight, load levels must be maintained that are below the load-carrying capacity for damaged aircraft structures. Hence, a capability is needed for accurate real-time predictions of safe load carrying capacity for aircraft structures with complex damage configurations. In the present work, a procedure is developed that uses guided wave responses to interrogate damage. As the guided wave interacts with damage, the signal attenuates in some directions and reflects in others. This results in a difference in signal magnitude as well as phase shifts between signal responses for damaged and undamaged structures. Accurate estimation of damage size and location is made by evaluating the cumulative signal responses at various pre-selected sensor locations using a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization procedure. The damage size and location is obtained by minimizing the difference between the reference responses and the responses obtained by wave propagation finite element analysis of different representative cracks, geometries and sizes.

  15. Global Phospholipidomics Analysis Reveals Selective Pulmonary Peroxidation Profiles Upon Inhalation of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Kapralova, Valentina I.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Samhan-Arias, Alejandro K.; Swedin, Linda; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Fadeel, Bengt; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly believed that nanomaterials cause non-specific oxidative damage. Our mass spectrometry-based oxidative lipidomics analysis of all major phospholipid classes revealed highly selective patterns of pulmonary peroxidation after inhalation exposure of mice to single-walled carbon nanotubes. No oxidized molecular species were found in two most abundant phospholipid classes – phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Peroxidation products were identified in three relatively minor classes of anionic phospholipids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol whereby oxygenation of polyunsaturated fatty acid residues also showed unusual substrate specificity. This non-random peroxidation coincided with the accumulation of apoptotic cells in the lung. A similar selective phospholipid peroxidation profile was detected upon incubation of a mixture of total lung lipids with H2O2/cytochrome c known to catalyze cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine peroxidation in apoptotic cells. The characterized specific phospholipid peroxidation signaling pathways indicate new approaches to the development of mitochondria targeted regulators of cardiolipin peroxidation to protect against deleterious effects of pro-apoptotic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the lung. PMID:21800898

  16. USAF Damage Tolerant Design Handbook: Guidelines for the analysis and Design of Damage Tolerant Aircraft Structures. Revision A

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    for the fail safe category (see Figure 2.6). The 90%-95% values were selected as being economically practical from tiie standpoint of performing a...removal at the depot is economically warranted the con- tractor may recommend that this action be taken. In this case the assumed damage subsequent to...3 3.1 Durability ................ ................... 3 3.2 Economic life ............... .................. 3 3.3

  17. Distribution of deformation in a dextral fault-tip damage zone revealed from neotectonic mapping and high-resolution ALSM topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    selander, J.; Oskin, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Fault segmentation and connectivity controls potential earthquake sizes and seismic hazard. Because longer fault ruptures produce larger earthquakes, it is important to understand the processes by which faults lengthen and how strain is distributed into the crust surrounding fault tips. Also, deformation in fault-tip damage zones could contribute to additional seismic hazard via earthquakes on unknown or blind secondary faults, and some strain may accumulate aseismically, reducing overall hazard. To investigate spatial and temporal styles and patterns of deformation at a fault tip, we studied the northwestern Gravel Hills Fault (GHF) in the central Mojave Desert, California. The ~65 km-long GHF is an actively propagating dextral fault that terminates at its northwestern end into a 4 km-long, 7 km-wide, ~200 m deep topographic depression. This fault tip lies 25 km southeast of the Garlock fault, and there are no obvious connections from the northern GHF to the Garlock or other nearby active faults. Field observations and interpretation of new ALSM topographic data collected for this study shows the distribution of deformation along the GHF and beyond the termination of faulting. A set of active en-echelon faults and gentle folds define a 3 km-wide deformation zone that extends 10 km along strike of the GHF. The faults record polyphase histories with initial dip-slip motion transitioning to dextral slip with propagation of the GHF. Analysis of syn-tectonic stratigraphy proximal to the fault tip shows that a depocenter formed and migrated northwest ahead of the GHF, consistent with elastic strain distribution in the crust at the termination of dextral fault rupture. This suggests that a portion of coseismic elastic strain has accumulated permanently in the volume of rock surrounding the tip of the GHF. We interpret our results to infer a spatio-temporal sequence of deformation in the fault-tip damage zone ahead of the GHF: First, long-wavelength (5-10 km) gentle

  18. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals posttranslational responses to aneuploidy in yeast.

    PubMed

    Dephoure, Noah; Hwang, Sunyoung; O'Sullivan, Ciara; Dodgson, Stacie E; Gygi, Steven P; Amon, Angelika; Torres, Eduardo M

    2014-07-29

    Aneuploidy causes severe developmental defects and is a near universal feature of tumor cells. Despite its profound effects, the cellular processes affected by aneuploidy are not well characterized. Here, we examined the consequences of aneuploidy on the proteome of aneuploid budding yeast strains. We show that although protein levels largely scale with gene copy number, subunits of multi-protein complexes are notable exceptions. Posttranslational mechanisms attenuate their expression when their encoding genes are in excess. Our proteomic analyses further revealed a novel aneuploidy-associated protein expression signature characteristic of altered metabolism and redox homeostasis. Indeed aneuploid cells harbor increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, increased protein turnover attenuates ROS levels and this novel aneuploidy-associated signature and improves the fitness of most aneuploid strains. Our results show that aneuploidy causes alterations in metabolism and redox homeostasis. Cells respond to these alterations through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Copyright © 2014, Dephoure et al.

  19. Subfield profitability analysis reveals an economic case for cropland diversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, E.; McNunn, G. S.; Schulte, L. A.; Bonner, I. J.; Muth, D. J.; Babcock, B. A.; Sharma, B.; Heaton, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Public agencies and private enterprises increasingly desire to achieve ecosystem service outcomes in agricultural systems, but are limited by perceived conflicts between economic and ecosystem service goals and a lack of tools enabling effective operational management. Here we use Iowa—an agriculturally homogeneous state representative of the Maize Belt—to demonstrate an economic rationale for cropland diversification at the subfield scale. We used a novel computational framework that integrates disparate but publicly available data to map ˜3.3 million unique potential management polygons (9.3 Mha) and reveal subfield opportunities to increase overall field profitability. We analyzed subfield profitability for maize/soybean fields during 2010-2013—four of the most profitable years in recent history—and projected results for 2015. While cropland operating at a loss of US 250 ha-1 or more was negligible between 2010 and 2013 at 18 000-190 000 ha (<2% of row-crop land), the extent of highly unprofitable land increased to 2.5 Mha, or 27% of row-crop land, in the 2015 projection. Aggregation of these areas to the township level revealed ‘hotspots’ for potential management change in Western, Central, and Northeast Iowa. In these least profitable areas, incorporating conservation management that breaks even (e.g., planting low-input perennials), into low-yielding portions of fields could increase overall cropland profitability by 80%. This approach is applicable to the broader region and differs substantially from the status quo of ‘top-down’ land management for conservation by harnessing private interest to align profitability with the production of ecosystem services.

  20. Towards a canonical elastoplastic damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Salah El-Din F.; Baluch, Mohammed H.; Al-Gadhib, Ali H.

    1994-05-01

    Fundamental aspects of elastoplastic damage are outlined. Time-independent isotropic damage is considered in order to study material degradation. By splitting the total strain tensor into its components of elastic damage and plastic damage and using recoverable energy equivalence, three distinct modes of behavior are particularized. For each mode of behavior, a suitable damage variable is culled. An in-depth analysis of this formulation reveals a certain incongruity in the assumptions postulated in some of the previously proposed models. The suggested generalized concepts are supported by experimental evidence.

  1. Trophic hierarchies revealed via amino acid isotopic analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite the potential of isotopic methods to illuminate trophic function, accurate estimates of lifetime feeding tendencies have remained elusive. A relatively new approach—referred to as compound-specific isotopic analysis (CSIA)—has emerged, centering on the measurement of 15N:14N ratios in amino ...

  2. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    Treesearch

    Kevin J. McGuire; Christian E. Torgersen; Gene E. Likens; Donald C. Buso; Winsor H. Lowe; Scott W. Bailey

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in...

  3. Analysis of copy number variations reveals differences among cattle breeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. Here we describe the first systematic and genome-wide analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) in the modern domesticated cattle using array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) and quanti...

  4. Differential Gene Susceptibility to Sperm DNA Damage: Analysis of Developmental Key Genes in Trout

    PubMed Central

    González-Rojo, Silvia; Fernández-Díez, Cristina; Guerra, Susana M.; Robles, Vanesa; Herraez, Maria Paz

    2014-01-01

    Sperm chromatin in mammals is packaged in different blocks associated to protamines (PDNA), histones (HDNA), or nuclear matrix proteins. Differential packaging has been related to early or late transcription and also to differential susceptibility to genotoxic damage. Genes located in the more accessible HDNA could be more susceptible to injuries than those located in PDNA, being potential biomarkers of paternal DNA damage. Fish sperm chromatin organization is much diversified, some species lacking protamines and some others totally depleted of histones. Analyzing genotoxic damage in a species homogeneously compacted with some sperm nuclear basic protein type, could help in deciphering the clues of differential susceptibility to damage. In the present study we analyzed in rainbow trout the differential susceptibility of nine genes to UV irradiation and H2O2 treatment. The absence of histones in the sperm nuclei was confirmed by Western blot. The chromatin fractionation in sensitive and resistant regions to PvuII (presumably HDNA-like and PDNA-like, respectively) revealed that the nine genes locate in the same resistant region. The number of lesions promoted was quantified using a qPCR approach. Location of 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was analyzed by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. UV irradiation promoted similar number of lesions in all the analyzed genes and a homogenous distribution of 8-OHdG within the nuclei. 8-OHdG was located in the peripheral area of the nucleus after H2O2 treatment, which promoted a significantly higher number of lesions in developmental-related genes (8.76–10.95 lesions/10 kb) than in rDNA genes (1.05–1.67 lesions/10 kb). We showed for the first time, that differential susceptibility to damage is dependent on the genotoxic mechanism and relies on positional differences between genes. Sensitive genes were also analyzed in cryopreserved sperm showing a lower number of lesions than the previous treatments and a predominant

  5. Analysis of Discrete-Source Damage Progression in a Tensile Stiffened Composite Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Lotts, Christine G.; Sleight, David W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the progressive failure analysis capability in NASA Langley s COMET-AR finite element analysis code on a large-scale built-up composite structure. A large-scale five stringer composite panel with a 7-in. long discrete source damage was analyzed from initial loading to final failure including the geometric and material nonlinearities. Predictions using different mesh sizes, different saw cut modeling approaches, and different failure criteria were performed and assessed. All failure predictions have a reasonably good correlation with the test result.

  6. Failure mechanism analysis of electromigration dominated damage in TiSi2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chen-Xia; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Xin-Zheng; Song, Xue-Feng; Yu, Da-Peng

    2009-06-01

    Electromigration-induced damage has been an important concern in very large scale integrated circuit design for a long time and will be a major road block in the pursuit of nanoelectronics devices and next generation power electronics. In this letter, the failure mechanism analysis on two-terminal TiSi2 nanowire devices was reported. Electromigration dominant mass migration is observed and verified by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The contribution of thermomigration is discussed based on temperature simulation. This work provides useful reference for future devices and the failure analysis on nanostructures.

  7. Development of advanced structural analysis methodologies for predicting widespread fatigue damage in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA is developing a 'tool box' that includes a number of advanced structural analysis computer codes which, taken together, represent the comprehensive fracture mechanics capability required to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage. These structural analysis tools have complementary and specialized capabilities ranging from a finite-element-based stress-analysis code for two- and three-dimensional built-up structures with cracks to a fatigue and fracture analysis code that uses stress-intensity factors and material-property data found in 'look-up' tables or from equations. NASA is conducting critical experiments necessary to verify the predictive capabilities of the codes, and these tests represent a first step in the technology-validation and industry-acceptance processes. NASA has established cooperative programs with aircraft manufacturers to facilitate the comprehensive transfer of this technology by making these advanced structural analysis codes available to industry.

  8. Revealing the underlying drivers of disaster risk: a global analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peduzzi, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    Disasters events are perfect examples of compound events. Disaster risk lies at the intersection of several independent components such as hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Understanding the weight of each component requires extensive standardisation. Here, I show how footprints of past disastrous events were generated using GIS modelling techniques and used for extracting population and economic exposures based on distribution models. Using past event losses, it was possible to identify and quantify a wide range of socio-politico-economic drivers associated with human vulnerability. The analysis was applied to about nine thousand individual past disastrous events covering earthquakes, floods and tropical cyclones. Using a multiple regression analysis on these individual events it was possible to quantify each risk component and assess how vulnerability is influenced by various hazard intensities. The results show that hazard intensity, exposure, poverty, governance as well as other underlying factors (e.g. remoteness) can explain the magnitude of past disasters. Analysis was also performed to highlight the role of future trends in population and climate change and how this may impacts exposure to tropical cyclones in the future. GIS models combined with statistical multiple regression analysis provided a powerful methodology to identify, quantify and model disaster risk taking into account its various components. The same methodology can be applied to various types of risk at local to global scale. This method was applied and developed for the Global Risk Analysis of the Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction (GAR). It was first applied on mortality risk in GAR 2009 and GAR 2011. New models ranging from global assets exposure and global flood hazard models were also recently developed to improve the resolution of the risk analysis and applied through CAPRA software to provide probabilistic economic risk assessments such as Average Annual Losses (AAL

  9. Progressive Damage Analysis of Laminated Composite (PDALC)-A Computational Model Implemented in the NASA COMET Finite Element Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, David C.; Coats, Timothy W.; Harris, Charles E.; Allen, David H.

    1996-01-01

    A method for analysis of progressive failure in the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed is presented in this report. The relationship employed in this analysis describes the matrix crack damage and fiber fracture via kinematics-based volume-averaged variables. Damage accumulation during monotonic and cyclic loads is predicted by damage evolution laws for tensile load conditions. The implementation of this damage model required the development of two testbed processors. While this report concentrates on the theory and usage of these processors, a complete list of all testbed processors and inputs that are required for this analysis are included. Sample calculations for laminates subjected to monotonic and cyclic loads were performed to illustrate the damage accumulation, stress redistribution, and changes to the global response that occur during the load history. Residual strength predictions made with this information compared favorably with experimental measurements.

  10. Different gene regulation strategies revealed by analysis of binding motifs.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Mirny, Leonid A

    2009-10-01

    Coordinated regulation of gene expression relies on transcription factors (TFs) binding to specific DNA sites. Our large-scale information-theoretical analysis of > 950 TF-binding motifs demonstrates that prokaryotes and eukaryotes use strikingly different strategies to target TFs to specific genome locations. Although bacterial TFs can recognize a specific DNA site in the genomic background, eukaryotic TFs exhibit widespread, nonfunctional binding and require clustering of sites to achieve specificity. We find support for this mechanism in a range of experimental studies and in our evolutionary analysis of DNA-binding domains. Our systematic characterization of binding motifs provides a quantitative assessment of the differences in transcription regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  11. Characterization of impact damage in composite laminates using guided wavefield imaging and local wavenumber domain analysis.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Matthew D; Leckey, Cara A C

    2013-09-01

    Delaminations in composite laminates resulting from impact events may be accompanied by minimal indication of damage at the surface. As such, inspections are required to ensure defects are within allowable limits. Conventional ultrasonic scanning techniques have been shown to effectively characterize the size and depth of delaminations but require physical contact with the structure and considerable setup time. Alternatively, a non-contact scanning laser vibrometer may be used to measure guided wave propagation in the laminate structure generated by permanently bonded transducers. A local Fourier domain analysis method is presented for processing guided wavefield data to estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, which can be used to determine delamination depth. The technique is applied to simulated wavefields and results are analyzed to determine limitations of the technique with regards to determining defect size and depth. Based on simulation results, guidelines for application of the technique are developed. Finally, experimental wavefield data is obtained in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with impact damage. The recorded wavefields are analyzed and wavenumber is measured to an accuracy of up to 8.5% in the region of shallow delaminations. These results show the promise of local wavenumber domain analysis to characterize the depth of delamination damage in composite laminates. The technique can find application in automated vehicle health assurance systems with potential for high detection rates and greatly reduced operator effort and setup time.

  12. Analysis of oilseed rape stem weevil chemical control using a damage rating scale.

    PubMed

    Milovac, Željko; Zorić, Miroslav; Franeta, Filip; Terzić, Sreten; Petrović Obradović, Olivera; Marjanović Jeromela, Ana

    2017-09-01

    Rape stem weevil (Ceutorhynchus napi Gyll.) and cabbage stem weevil (C. pallidactylus Marsh.) can cause significant yield losses to oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), and chemical control is often needed to protect crops from these pests. The efficacy of six insecticides, chlorpyriphos + cypermethrin, bifenthrin, alpha-cypermethrin, pirimiphos-methyl, thiacloprid and tau-fluvalinate, was tested in a 4 year field trial. Besides the standard efficacy analysis expressed through the number of larvae per stem, a damage rating scale was introduced and modelled using a regression model for ordinal categorical data. Compared with the control, expressed through damage rating and larval number, treatments with chlorpyriphos + cypermethrin and bifenthrin, showed higher efficacy in the control of stem weevils compared with alpha-cypermethrin and pirimiphos-methyl. The lowest efficacy was observed in treatments with tau-fluvalinate and thiacloprid. This study showed that a combined efficacy evaluation expressed through both damage rating scale and the count of larvae, supported by an ordinal regression model for data analysis, is indispensable for obtaining accurate results. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Sarcoidosis Granulomas Reveals Antimicrobial Targets.

    PubMed

    Rotsinger, Joseph E; Celada, Lindsay J; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Atkinson, James B; Drake, Wonder P

    2016-07-01

    Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown cause. Prior molecular and immunologic studies have confirmed the presence of mycobacterial virulence factors, such as catalase peroxidase and superoxide dismutase A, within sarcoidosis granulomas. Molecular analysis of granulomas can identify targets of known antibiotics classes. Currently, major antibiotics are directed against DNA synthesis, protein synthesis, and cell wall formation. We conducted molecular analysis of 40 sarcoidosis diagnostic specimens and compared them with 33 disease control specimens for the presence of mycobacterial genes that encode antibiotic targets. We assessed for genes involved in DNA synthesis (DNA gyrase A [gyrA] and DNA gyrase B), protein synthesis (RNA polymerase subunit β), cell wall synthesis (embCAB operon and enoyl reductase), and catalase peroxidase. Immunohistochemical analysis was conducted to investigate the locale of mycobacterial genes such as gyrA within 12 sarcoidosis specimens and 12 disease controls. Mycobacterial DNA was detected in 33 of 39 sarcoidosis specimens by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction compared with 2 of 30 disease control specimens (P < 0.001, two-tailed Fisher's test). Twenty of 39 were positive for three or more mycobacterial genes, compared with 1 of 30 control specimens (P < 0.001, two-tailed Fisher's test). Immunohistochemistry analysis localized mycobacterial gyrA nucleic acids to sites of granuloma formation in 9 of 12 sarcoidosis specimens compared with 1 of 12 disease controls (P < 0.01). Microbial genes encoding enzymes that can be targeted by currently available antimycobacterial antibiotics are present in sarcoidosis specimens and localize to sites of granulomatous inflammation. Use of antimicrobials directed against target enzymes may be an innovative treatment alternative.

  14. Diversity of Dilepididae (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) revealed by cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Petkeviciūte, R; Binkiene, R; Komisarovas, J

    2006-03-01

    Karyotypes of three dilepidid species: Molluscotaenia crassiscolex, Anomotaenia bacilligera and Dilepis undula, which have not been recorded previously, were studied using conventional Giemsa staining and comparative karyometric analysis. Twelve small biarmed chromosomes were observed in mitotic cells of M. crassiscolex, 16 biarmed chromosomes of gradually decreasing size were found in cells of A. bacilligera, while 18 elements were characteristic for D. undula. These data, together with information available in literature, prove the heterogeneity and possible polyphyletic nature of the family Dilepididae.

  15. Interindividual variability in auditory scene analysis revealed by confidence judgements.

    PubMed

    Pelofi, C; de Gardelle, V; Egré, P; Pressnitzer, D

    2017-02-19

    Because musicians are trained to discern sounds within complex acoustic scenes, such as an orchestra playing, it has been hypothesized that musicianship improves general auditory scene analysis abilities. Here, we compared musicians and non-musicians in a behavioural paradigm using ambiguous stimuli, combining performance, reaction times and confidence measures. We used 'Shepard tones', for which listeners may report either an upward or a downward pitch shift for the same ambiguous tone pair. Musicians and non-musicians performed similarly on the pitch-shift direction task. In particular, both groups were at chance for the ambiguous case. However, groups differed in their reaction times and judgements of confidence. Musicians responded to the ambiguous case with long reaction times and low confidence, whereas non-musicians responded with fast reaction times and maximal confidence. In a subsequent experiment, non-musicians displayed reduced confidence for the ambiguous case when pure-tone components of the Shepard complex were made easier to discern. The results suggest an effect of musical training on scene analysis: we speculate that musicians were more likely to discern components within complex auditory scenes, perhaps because of enhanced attentional resolution, and thus discovered the ambiguity. For untrained listeners, stimulus ambiguity was not available to perceptual awareness.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Qingzhu; Zhou, Qianjun; Gan, Susheng; Wu, Jingyu; Chen, Canbin; Li, Jiaqiang; Ye, Yaoxiong; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to “phenylpropanoid biosynthesis”, “tyrosine metabolism”, “flavonoid biosynthesis”, “ascorbate and aldarate metabolism”, “betalains biosynthesis” and “anthocyanin biosynthesis”. In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level. PMID:27690004

  17. Integrative network analysis reveals molecular mechanisms of blood pressure regulation

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Tianxiao; Meng, Qingying; Saleh, Mohamed A; Norlander, Allison E; Joehanes, Roby; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Brian H; Zhang, Bin; Johnson, Andrew D; Ying, Saixia; Courchesne, Paul; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Vasan, Ramachandran; Munson, Peter J; Madhur, Meena S; Harrison, David G; Yang, Xia; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous loci associated with blood pressure (BP). The molecular mechanisms underlying BP regulation, however, remain unclear. We investigated BP-associated molecular mechanisms by integrating BP GWAS with whole blood mRNA expression profiles in 3,679 individuals, using network approaches. BP transcriptomic signatures at the single-gene and the coexpression network module levels were identified. Four coexpression modules were identified as potentially causal based on genetic inference because expression-related SNPs for their corresponding genes demonstrated enrichment for BP GWAS signals. Genes from the four modules were further projected onto predefined molecular interaction networks, revealing key drivers. Gene subnetworks entailing molecular interactions between key drivers and BP-related genes were uncovered. As proof-of-concept, we validated SH2B3, one of the top key drivers, using Sh2b3−/− mice. We found that a significant number of genes predicted to be regulated by SH2B3 in gene networks are perturbed in Sh2b3−/− mice, which demonstrate an exaggerated pressor response to angiotensin II infusion. Our findings may help to identify novel targets for the prevention or treatment of hypertension. PMID:25882670

  18. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Ecological Differentiation in the Genus Carnobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Christelle F.; Borges, Frédéric; Taminiau, Bernard; Daube, Georges; Zagorec, Monique; Remenant, Benoît; Leisner, Jørgen J.; Hansen, Martin A.; Sørensen, Søren J.; Mangavel, Cécile; Cailliez-Grimal, Catherine; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) differ in their ability to colonize food and animal-associated habitats: while some species are specialized and colonize a limited number of habitats, other are generalist and are able to colonize multiple animal-linked habitats. In the current study, Carnobacterium was used as a model genus to elucidate the genetic basis of these colonization differences. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene meta-barcoding data showed that C. maltaromaticum followed by C. divergens are the most prevalent species in foods derived from animals (meat, fish, dairy products), and in the gut. According to phylogenetic analyses, these two animal-adapted species belong to one of two deeply branched lineages. The second lineage contains species isolated from habitats where contact with animal is rare. Genome analyses revealed that members of the animal-adapted lineage harbor a larger secretome than members of the other lineage. The predicted cell-surface proteome is highly diversified in C. maltaromaticum and C. divergens with genes involved in adaptation to the animal milieu such as those encoding biopolymer hydrolytic enzymes, a heme uptake system, and biopolymer-binding adhesins. These species also exhibit genes for gut adaptation and respiration. In contrast, Carnobacterium species belonging to the second lineage encode a poorly diversified cell-surface proteome, lack genes for gut adaptation and are unable to respire. These results shed light on the important genomics traits required for adaptation to animal-linked habitats in generalist Carnobacterium. PMID:28337181

  19. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals posttranslational responses to aneuploidy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dephoure, Noah; Hwang, Sunyoung; O'Sullivan, Ciara; Dodgson, Stacie E; Gygi, Steven P; Amon, Angelika; Torres, Eduardo M

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy causes severe developmental defects and is a near universal feature of tumor cells. Despite its profound effects, the cellular processes affected by aneuploidy are not well characterized. Here, we examined the consequences of aneuploidy on the proteome of aneuploid budding yeast strains. We show that although protein levels largely scale with gene copy number, subunits of multi-protein complexes are notable exceptions. Posttranslational mechanisms attenuate their expression when their encoding genes are in excess. Our proteomic analyses further revealed a novel aneuploidy-associated protein expression signature characteristic of altered metabolism and redox homeostasis. Indeed aneuploid cells harbor increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, increased protein turnover attenuates ROS levels and this novel aneuploidy-associated signature and improves the fitness of most aneuploid strains. Our results show that aneuploidy causes alterations in metabolism and redox homeostasis. Cells respond to these alterations through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03023.001 PMID:25073701

  20. Genomic analysis reveals selection in Chinese native black pig

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yuhua; Li, Cencen; Tang, Qianzi; Tian, Shilin; Jin, Long; Chen, Jianhai; Li, Mingzhou; Li, Changchun

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genomic signatures that help reveal mechanisms underlying desirable traits in domesticated pigs is of significant biological, agricultural and medical importance. To identify the genomic footprints left by selection during domestication of the Enshi black pig, a typical native and meat-lard breed in China, we generated about 72-fold coverage of the pig genome using pools of genomic DNA representing three different populations of Enshi black pigs from three different locations. Combining this data with the available whole genomes of 13 Chinese wild boars, we identified 417 protein-coding genes embedded in the selected regions of Enshi black pigs. These genes are mainly involved in developmental and metabolic processes, response to stimulus, and other biological processes. Signatures of selection were detected in genes involved in body size and immunity (RPS10 and VASN), lipid metabolism (GSK3), male fertility (INSL6) and developmental processes (TBX19). These findings provide a window into the potential genetic mechanism underlying development of desirable phenotypes in Enshi black pigs during domestication and subsequent artificial selection. Thus, our results illustrate how domestication has shaped patterns of genetic variation in Enshi black pigs and provide valuable genetic resources that enable effective use of pigs in agricultural production. PMID:27808243

  1. Genomic analysis reveals selection in Chinese native black pig.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuhua; Li, Cencen; Tang, Qianzi; Tian, Shilin; Jin, Long; Chen, Jianhai; Li, Mingzhou; Li, Changchun

    2016-11-03

    Identification of genomic signatures that help reveal mechanisms underlying desirable traits in domesticated pigs is of significant biological, agricultural and medical importance. To identify the genomic footprints left by selection during domestication of the Enshi black pig, a typical native and meat-lard breed in China, we generated about 72-fold coverage of the pig genome using pools of genomic DNA representing three different populations of Enshi black pigs from three different locations. Combining this data with the available whole genomes of 13 Chinese wild boars, we identified 417 protein-coding genes embedded in the selected regions of Enshi black pigs. These genes are mainly involved in developmental and metabolic processes, response to stimulus, and other biological processes. Signatures of selection were detected in genes involved in body size and immunity (RPS10 and VASN), lipid metabolism (GSK3), male fertility (INSL6) and developmental processes (TBX19). These findings provide a window into the potential genetic mechanism underlying development of desirable phenotypes in Enshi black pigs during domestication and subsequent artificial selection. Thus, our results illustrate how domestication has shaped patterns of genetic variation in Enshi black pigs and provide valuable genetic resources that enable effective use of pigs in agricultural production.

  2. Multiple etiologies for Alzheimer disease are revealed by segregation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.S.; Connor-Lacke, L.; Cupplies, L.A.; Growdon, J.H.; Farrer, L.A.; Duijn, C.M. van

    1994-11-01

    We have evaluated several transmission models for Alzheimer disease (AD), using the logistic regressive approach in 401 nuclear families of consecutively ascertained and rigorously diagnosed probands. Models postulating no major gene effect, random environmental transmission, recessive inheritance, and sporadic occurrence were rejected under varied assumptions regarding the associations among sex, age, and major gene susceptibility. Transmission of the disorder was not fully explained by a single Mendelian model for all families. Stratification of families as early- and late-onset by using the median of family mean onset ages showed that, regardless of the model studied, two groups of families fit better than a single group. AD in early-onset families is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with full penetrance in both sexes and has a gene frequency of 1.5%. Dominant inheritance also gave the best fit of the data in late-onset families, but this hypothesis was rejected, suggesting the presence of heterogeneity within this subset. Our study also revealed that genetically nonsusceptible males and females develop AD, indicating the presence of phenocopies within early-onset and late-onset groups. Moreover, our results suggest that the higher risk to females is not solely due to their increased longevity. 50 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Exceptional structured noncoding RNAs revealed by bacterial metagenome analysis.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Zasha; Perreault, Jonathan; Meyer, Michelle M; Breaker, Ronald R

    2009-12-03

    Estimates of the total number of bacterial species indicate that existing DNA sequence databases carry only a tiny fraction of the total amount of DNA sequence space represented by this division of life. Indeed, environmental DNA samples have been shown to encode many previously unknown classes of proteins and RNAs. Bioinformatics searches of genomic DNA from bacteria commonly identify new noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as riboswitches. In rare instances, RNAs that exhibit more extensive sequence and structural conservation across a wide range of bacteria are encountered. Given that large structured RNAs are known to carry out complex biochemical functions such as protein synthesis and RNA processing reactions, identifying more RNAs of great size and intricate structure is likely to reveal additional biochemical functions that can be achieved by RNA. We applied an updated computational pipeline to discover ncRNAs that rival the known large ribozymes in size and structural complexity or that are among the most abundant RNAs in bacteria that encode them. These RNAs would have been difficult or impossible to detect without examining environmental DNA sequences, indicating that numerous RNAs with extraordinary size, structural complexity, or other exceptional characteristics remain to be discovered in unexplored sequence space.

  4. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Previously Uncharacterized Virulence Factors in Vibrio proteolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ann; Kinch, Lisa N.; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the genus Vibrio include many pathogens of humans and marine animals that share genetic information via horizontal gene transfer. Hence, the Vibrio pan-genome carries the potential to establish new pathogenic strains by sharing virulence determinants, many of which have yet to be characterized. Here, we investigated the virulence properties of Vibrio proteolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterium previously identified as part of the Vibrio consortium isolated from diseased corals. We found that V. proteolyticus causes actin cytoskeleton rearrangements followed by cell lysis in HeLa cells in a contact-independent manner. In search of the responsible virulence factor involved, we determined the V. proteolyticus secretome. This proteomics approach revealed various putative virulence factors, including active type VI secretion systems and effectors with virulence toxin domains; however, these type VI secretion systems were not responsible for the observed cytotoxic effects. Further examination of the V. proteolyticus secretome led us to hypothesize and subsequently demonstrate that a secreted hemolysin, belonging to a previously uncharacterized clan of the leukocidin superfamily, was the toxin responsible for the V. proteolyticus-mediated cytotoxicity in both HeLa cells and macrophages. Clearly, there remains an armory of yet-to-be-discovered virulence factors in the Vibrio pan-genome that will undoubtedly provide a wealth of knowledge on how a pathogen can manipulate host cells. PMID:27460800

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Hylocereus polyrhizus Reveals Metabolic Pathway Changes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Qingzhu; Zhou, Qianjun; Gan, Susheng; Wu, Jingyu; Chen, Canbin; Li, Jiaqiang; Ye, Yaoxiong; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Guibing; Qin, Yonghua

    2016-09-28

    Red dragon fruit or red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is the only edible fruit that contains betalains. The color of betalains ranges from red and violet to yellow in plants. Betalains may also serve as an important component of health-promoting and disease-preventing functional food. Currently, the biosynthetic and regulatory pathways for betalain production remain to be fully deciphered. In this study, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses were used to reveal the molecular mechanism of betalain biosynthesis in H. polyrhizus fruits at white and red pulp stages, respectively. A total of 1946 proteins were identified as the differentially expressed between the two samples, and 936 of them were significantly highly expressed at the red pulp stage of H. polyrhizus. RNA-seq and iTRAQ analyses showed that some transcripts and proteins were positively correlated; they belonged to "phenylpropanoid biosynthesis", "tyrosine metabolism", "flavonoid biosynthesis", "ascorbate and aldarate metabolism", "betalains biosynthesis" and "anthocyanin biosynthesis". In betalains biosynthesis pathway, several proteins/enzymes such as polyphenol oxidase, CYP76AD3 and 4,5-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (DOPA) dioxygenase extradiol-like protein were identified. The present study provides a new insight into the molecular mechanism of the betalain biosynthesis at the posttranscriptional level.

  6. [Applications of habitat equivalency analysis in ecological damage assessment of oil spill incident].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin; Han, Da-xiong; Wang, Hai-yan

    2011-08-01

    Habitat equivalency analysis (HEA) is one of the methods commonly used by U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in natural resources damage assessment, but rarely applied in China. Based on the theory of HEA and the assessment practices of domestic oil spill incidents, a modification on the HEA was made in this paper, and applied to calculate the habitat value in oil spill incidents. According to the data collected from an oil spill incident in China, the modified HEA was applied in a case study to scale the compensatory-restoration. By introducing the ecological service equivalent factor to transfer various habitats, it was achieved to value of the injured habitats in ecological damage assessment of oil spill incident.

  7. A Neural Network/Acoustic Emission Analysis of Impact Damaged Graphite/Epoxy Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Hill, Erik v. K.; Workman, Gary L.; Russell, Samuel S.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis has been used to measure the effects of impact damage on burst pressure in 5.75 inch diameter, inert propellant filled, filament wound pressure vessels. The AE data were collected from fifteen graphite/epoxy pressure vessels featuring five damage states and three resin systems. A burst pressure prediction model was developed by correlating the AE amplitude (frequency) distribution, generated during the first pressure ramp to 800 psig (approximately 25% of the average expected burst pressure for an undamaged vessel) to known burst pressures using a four layered back propagation neural network. The neural network, trained on three vessels from each resin system, was able to predict burst pressures with a worst case error of 5.7% for the entire fifteen bottle set.

  8. Modeling technical change in climate analysis: evidence from agricultural crop damages.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Adeel; Devadason, Evelyn S; Al-Amin, Abul Quasem

    2017-03-29

    This study accounts for the Hicks neutral technical change in a calibrated model of climate analysis, to identify the optimum level of technical change for addressing climate changes. It demonstrates the reduction to crop damages, the costs to technical change, and the net gains for the adoption of technical change for a climate-sensitive Pakistan economy. The calibrated model assesses the net gains of technical change for the overall economy and at the agriculture-specific level. The study finds that the gains of technical change are overwhelmingly higher than the costs across the agriculture subsectors. The gains and costs following technical change differ substantially for different crops. More importantly, the study finds a cost-effective optimal level of technical change that potentially reduces crop damages to a minimum possible level. The study therefore contends that the climate policy for Pakistan should consider the role of technical change in addressing climate impacts on the agriculture sector.

  9. An acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic analysis of impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Walker, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on composite bottles wrapped with graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology will include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques to enhance the capability of the technique to identify dominant failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will also continue to be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. Characterization of the stress wave factor before, and after impact damage will be useful for inspection purposes in manufacturing processes. The combination of the two methods will also allow for simple nondestructive tests capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to its being placed in service and during service.

  10. Displacement damage analysis and modified electrical equivalent circuit for electron and photon-irradiated silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjhangmehr, Afshin; Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein

    2014-10-01

    Solar modules and arrays are the conventional energy resources of space satellites. Outside the earth's atmosphere, solar panels experience abnormal radiation environments and because of incident particles, photovoltaic (PV) parameters degrade. This article tries to analyze the electrical performance of electron and photon-irradiated mono-crystalline silicon (mono-Si) solar cells. PV cells are irradiated by mono-energetic electrons and poly-energetic photons and immediately characterized after the irradiation. The mean degradation of the maximum power (Pmax) of silicon solar cells is presented and correlated using the displacement damage dose (Dd) methodology. This method simplifies evaluation of cell performance in space radiation environments and produces a single characteristic curve for Pmax degradation. Furthermore, complete analysis of the results revealed that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) and the filling factor of mono-Si cells did not significantly change during the irradiation and were independent of the radiation type and fluence. Moreover, a new technique is developed that adapts the irradiation-induced effects in a single-cell equivalent electrical circuit and adjusts its elements. The "modified circuit" is capable of modeling the "radiation damage" in the electrical behavior of mono-Si solar cells and simplifies the designing of the compensation circuits.

  11. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of renal cortex in a salt-load rat model of advanced kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shaoling; He, Hanchang; Tan, Lishan; Wang, Liangliang; Su, Zhengxiu; Liu, Yufeng; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2016-01-01

    Salt plays an essential role in the progression of chronic kidney disease and hypertension. However, the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis of salt-induced kidney damage remain largely unknown. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats, that underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx, a model of advanced kidney damage) or sham operation, were treated for 2 weeks with a normal or high-salt diet. We employed aTiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiling of the renal cortex. We found 318 proteins differentially expressed in 5/6Nx group relative to sham group, and 310 proteins significantly changed in response to salt load in 5/6Nx animals. Totally, 1810 unique phosphopeptides corresponding to 550 phosphoproteins were identified. We identified 113 upregulated and 84 downregulated phosphopeptides in 5/6Nx animals relative to sham animals. Salt load induced 78 upregulated and 91 downregulated phosphopeptides in 5/6Nx rats. The differentially expressed phospholproteins are important transporters, structural molecules, and receptors. Protein-protein interaction analysis revealed that the differentially phosphorylated proteins in 5/6Nx group, Polr2a, Srrm1, Gsta2 and Pxn were the most linked. Salt-induced differential phosphoproteins, Myh6, Lmna and Des were the most linked. Altered phosphorylation levels of lamin A and phospholamban were validated. This study will provide new insight into pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic kidney disease and salt sensitivity. PMID:27775022

  12. Molecular analysis of Baylisascaris columnaris revealed mitochondrial and nuclear polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Baylisascaris species are intestinal nematodes of skunks, raccoons, badgers, and bears belonging to the genus Ascarididae. Oral uptake of embryonated Baylisascaris sp. eggs by a wide variety of mammals and birds can lead to visceral, ocular and neurological larva migrans. B. procyonis, the raccoon roundworm, is known to cause severe illness in intermediate hosts and in humans, whereas the skunk roundworm B. columnaris is probably less pathogenic. Skunks and raccoons are kept as pets in Europe, sometimes together with cats and dogs, living in close contact with humans. B. procyonis and B. columnaris are difficult to differentiate based on morphological criteria and molecular and phylogenetic information concerning B. columnaris is missing. This is the first study on the genetic characterisation of B. columnaris, based on mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers. Methods B. columnaris worms were isolated from pet skunks, and used for molecular analysis. PCR primers targeted at mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 and 2 (CO1 and CO2), ribosomal ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and ribosomal 28S genes were used. DNA sequences from B. columnaris, B. procyonis and B. transfuga from bears were analysed by cluster analysis. Results Four different multi-locus genotypes were found in B. columnaris, based on 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two insertions / deletions in CO1, CO2, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 28S. Conclusions The genetic characteristics of B. columnaris show close resemblance to those of B. procyonis, but in contrast to B. procyonis, show several polymorphisms in both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. These polymorphisms could be used as a tool to differentiate B. columnaris from B. procyonis in molecular diagnostic assays, and to identify B. columnaris by PCR, in addition to or replacing morphometric analysis. This might lead to more insight into the zoonotic relevance of B. columnaris in humans. PMID:23627901

  13. Molecular analysis of Baylisascaris columnaris revealed mitochondrial and nuclear polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Frits; Xie, Kayin; Sprong, Hein; van der Giessen, Joke

    2013-04-29

    Baylisascaris species are intestinal nematodes of skunks, raccoons, badgers, and bears belonging to the genus Ascarididae. Oral uptake of embryonated Baylisascaris sp. eggs by a wide variety of mammals and birds can lead to visceral, ocular and neurological larva migrans. B. procyonis, the raccoon roundworm, is known to cause severe illness in intermediate hosts and in humans, whereas the skunk roundworm B. columnaris is probably less pathogenic. Skunks and raccoons are kept as pets in Europe, sometimes together with cats and dogs, living in close contact with humans. B. procyonis and B. columnaris are difficult to differentiate based on morphological criteria and molecular and phylogenetic information concerning B. columnaris is missing. This is the first study on the genetic characterisation of B. columnaris, based on mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers. B. columnaris worms were isolated from pet skunks, and used for molecular analysis. PCR primers targeted at mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 and 2 (CO1 and CO2), ribosomal ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and ribosomal 28S genes were used. DNA sequences from B. columnaris, B. procyonis and B. transfuga from bears were analysed by cluster analysis. Four different multi-locus genotypes were found in B. columnaris, based on 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two insertions / deletions in CO1, CO2, ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 and 28S. The genetic characteristics of B. columnaris show close resemblance to those of B. procyonis, but in contrast to B. procyonis, show several polymorphisms in both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. These polymorphisms could be used as a tool to differentiate B. columnaris from B. procyonis in molecular diagnostic assays, and to identify B. columnaris by PCR, in addition to or replacing morphometric analysis. This might lead to more insight into the zoonotic relevance of B. columnaris in humans.

  14. EST analysis reveals putative genes involved in glycyrrhizin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycyrrhiza uralensis is one of the most popular medicinal plants in the world and is also widely used in the flavoring of food and tobacco. Due to limited genomic and transcriptomic data, the biosynthetic pathway of glycyrrhizin, the major bioactive compound in G. uralensis, is currently unclear. Identification of candidate genes involved in the glycyrrhizin biosynthetic pathway will significantly contribute to the understanding of the biosynthetic and medicinal chemistry of this compound. Results We used the 454 GS FLX platform and Titanium regents to produce a substantial expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset from the vegetative organs of G. uralensis. A total of 59,219 ESTs with an average read length of 409 bp were generated. 454 ESTs were combined with the 50,666 G. uralensis ESTs in GenBank. The combined ESTs were assembled into 27,229 unique sequences (11,694 contigs and 15,535 singletons). A total of 20,437 unique gene elements representing approximately 10,000 independent transcripts were annotated using BLAST searches (e-value ≤ 1e-5) against the SwissProt, KEGG, TAIR, Nr and Nt databases. The assembled sequences were annotated with gene names and Gene Ontology (GO) terms. With respect to the genes related to glycyrrhizin metabolism, genes encoding 16 enzymes of the 18 total steps of the glycyrrhizin skeleton synthesis pathway were found. To identify novel genes that encode cytochrome P450 enzymes and glycosyltransferases, which are related to glycyrrhizin metabolism, a total of 125 and 172 unigenes were found to be homologous to cytochrome P450s and glycosyltransferases, respectively. The cytochrome P450 candidate genes were classified into 32 CYP families, while the glycosyltransferase candidate genes were classified into 45 categories by GO analysis. Finally, 3 cytochrome P450 enzymes and 6 glycosyltransferases were selected as the candidates most likely to be involved in glycyrrhizin biosynthesis through an organ-specific expression

  15. Global Analysis of ATM Polymorphism Reveals Significant Functional Constraint

    PubMed Central

    Thorstenson, Yvonne R.; Shen, Peidong; Tusher, Virginia G.; Wayne, Tierney L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Chu, Gilbert; Oefner, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    ATM, the gene that is mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia, is associated with cerebellar degeneration, abnormal proliferation of small blood vessels, and cancer. These clinically important manifestations have stimulated interest in defining the sequence variation in the ATM gene. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive survey of sequence variation in ATM in diverse human populations. The protein-encoding exons of the gene (9,168 bp) and the adjacent intron and untranslated sequences (14,661 bp) were analyzed in 93 individuals from seven major human populations. In addition, the coding sequence was analyzed in one chimpanzee, one gorilla, one orangutan, and one Old World monkey. In human ATM, 88 variant sites were discovered by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, which is 96%–100% sensitive for detection of DNA sequence variation. ATM was compared to 14 other autosomal genes for nucleotide diversity. The noncoding regions of ATM had diversity values comparable to other genes, but the coding regions had very low diversity, especially in the last 29% of the protein sequence. A test of the neutral evolution hypothesis, through use of the Hudson/Kreitman/Aguadé statistic, revealed that this region of the human ATM gene was significantly constrained relative to that of the orangutan, the Old World monkey, and the mouse, but not relative to that of the chimpanzee or the gorilla. ATM displayed extensive linkage disequilibrium, consistent with suppression of meiotic recombination at this locus. Seven haplotypes were defined. Two haplotypes accounted for 82% of all chromosomes analyzed in all major populations; two others carrying the same D126E missense polymorphism accounted for 33% of chromosomes in Africa but were never observed outside of Africa. The high frequency of this polymorphism may be due either to a population expansion within Africa or to selective pressure. PMID:11443540

  16. Clostridium clariflavum: Key Cellulosome Players Are Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Artzi, Lior; Morag, Ely; Barak, Yoav; Lamed, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium clariflavum is an anaerobic, cellulosome-forming thermophile, containing in its genome genes for a large number of cellulosomal enzyme and a complex scaffoldin system. Previously, we described the major cohesin-dockerin interactions of the cellulosome components, and on this basis a model of diverse cellulosome assemblies was derived. In this work, we cultivated C. clariflavum on cellobiose-, microcrystalline cellulose-, and switchgrass-containing media and isolated cell-free cellulosome complexes from each culture. Gel filtration separation of the cellulosome samples revealed two major fractions, which were analyzed by label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in order to identify the key players of the cellulosome assemblies therein. From the 13 scaffoldins present in the C. clariflavum genome, 11 were identified, and a variety of enzymes from different glycoside hydrolase and carbohydrate esterase families were identified, including the glycoside hydrolase families GH48, GH9, GH5, GH30, GH11, and GH10. The expression level of the cellulosomal proteins varied as a function of the carbon source used for cultivation of the bacterium. In addition, the catalytic activity of each cellulosome was examined on different cellulosic substrates, xylan and switchgrass. The cellulosome isolated from the microcrystalline cellulose-containing medium was the most active of all the cellulosomes that were tested. The results suggest that the expression of the cellulosome proteins is regulated by the type of substrate in the growth medium. Moreover, both cell-free and cell-bound cellulosome complexes were produced which together may degrade the substrate in a synergistic manner. These observations are compatible with our previously published model of cellulosome assemblies in this bacterium. PMID:25991683

  17. Quantifying clustered DNA damage induction and repair by gel electrophoresis, electronic imaging and number average length analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bennett, Paula V.; Laval, Jacques; Sutherland, John C.; Gewirtz, A. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Assessing DNA damage induction, repair and consequences of such damages requires measurement of specific DNA lesions by methods that are independent of biological responses to such lesions. Lesions affecting one DNA strand (altered bases, abasic sites, single strand breaks (SSB)) as well as damages affecting both strands (clustered damages, double strand breaks) can be quantified by direct measurement of DNA using gel electrophoresis, gel imaging and number average length analysis. Damage frequencies as low as a few sites per gigabase pair (10(9)bp) can be quantified by this approach in about 50ng of non-radioactive DNA, and single molecule methods may allow such measurements in DNA from single cells. This review presents the theoretical basis, biochemical requirements and practical aspects of this approach, and shows examples of their applications in identification and quantitation of complex clustered damages.

  18. Quantifying clustered DNA damage induction and repair by gel electrophoresis, electronic imaging and number average length analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bennett, Paula V.; Laval, Jacques; Sutherland, John C.; Gewirtz, A. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Assessing DNA damage induction, repair and consequences of such damages requires measurement of specific DNA lesions by methods that are independent of biological responses to such lesions. Lesions affecting one DNA strand (altered bases, abasic sites, single strand breaks (SSB)) as well as damages affecting both strands (clustered damages, double strand breaks) can be quantified by direct measurement of DNA using gel electrophoresis, gel imaging and number average length analysis. Damage frequencies as low as a few sites per gigabase pair (10(9)bp) can be quantified by this approach in about 50ng of non-radioactive DNA, and single molecule methods may allow such measurements in DNA from single cells. This review presents the theoretical basis, biochemical requirements and practical aspects of this approach, and shows examples of their applications in identification and quantitation of complex clustered damages.

  19. Global Analysis of Perovskite Photophysics Reveals Importance of Geminate Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, Lydia H.; Rowley, Matthew B.; Fu, Yongping; Foote, Alexander K.; Rea, Morgan T.; Wood, Sharla L.; Jin, Song; Wright, John C.; Goldsmith, Randall H.

    2016-12-20

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites demonstrate desirable photophysical behaviors and promising applications from efficient photovoltaics to lasing, but the fundamental nature of excited state species is still under debate. We also collected time-resolved photoluminescence of single-crystal nanoplates of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (MAPbI3), with excitation over a range of fluences and repetition rates, to provide a more complete photophysical picture. A fundamentally different way of simulating the photophysics is developed that relies on unnormalized decays, global analysis over a large array of conditions, and inclusion of steady-state behavior; these details are critical to capturing observed behaviors. These additional constraints require inclusion of spatially-correlated pairs, along with free carriers and traps, demonstrating the importance of our comprehensive analysis. Modeling geminate and non-geminate pathways shows geminate processes are dominant at high carrier densities and early times. This combination of data and simulation provides a detailed picture of perovskite photophysics across multiple excitation regimes that was not previously available.

  20. Global Analysis of Perovskite Photophysics Reveals Importance of Geminate Pathways

    DOE PAGES

    Manger, Lydia H.; Rowley, Matthew B.; Fu, Yongping; ...

    2016-12-20

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites demonstrate desirable photophysical behaviors and promising applications from efficient photovoltaics to lasing, but the fundamental nature of excited state species is still under debate. We also collected time-resolved photoluminescence of single-crystal nanoplates of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (MAPbI3), with excitation over a range of fluences and repetition rates, to provide a more complete photophysical picture. A fundamentally different way of simulating the photophysics is developed that relies on unnormalized decays, global analysis over a large array of conditions, and inclusion of steady-state behavior; these details are critical to capturing observed behaviors. These additional constraints require inclusion ofmore » spatially-correlated pairs, along with free carriers and traps, demonstrating the importance of our comprehensive analysis. Modeling geminate and non-geminate pathways shows geminate processes are dominant at high carrier densities and early times. This combination of data and simulation provides a detailed picture of perovskite photophysics across multiple excitation regimes that was not previously available.« less

  1. Network analysis reveals potential markers for pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Anurag; Suman, Shikha; Ranjan, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy with a poor outcome. Molecular mechanisms of pediatric ACC oncogenesis and advancement are not well understood. Accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease requires identification of new markers for pediatric ACC. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from the gene expression profile of pediatric ACC and obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Gene Ontology functional and pathway enrichment analysis was implemented to recognize the functions of DEGs. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) and gene–gene functional interaction (GGI) network of DEGs was constructed. Hub gene detection and enrichment analysis of functional modules were performed. Furthermore, a gene regulatory network incorporating DEGs–microRNAs–transcription factors was constructed and analyzed. A total of 431 DEGs including 228 upregulated and 203 downregulated DEGs were screened. These genes were largely involved in cell cycle, steroid biosynthesis, and p53 signaling pathways. Upregulated genes, CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B, were identified as the common hubs of PPI and GGI networks. All the four common hub genes were also part of modules of the PPI network. Moreover, all the four genes were also present in the largest module of GGI network. A gene regulatory network consisting of 82 microRNAs and 100 transcription factors was also constructed. CDK1, CCNB1, CDC20, and BUB1B may serve as potential biomarker of pediatric ACC and as potential targets for therapeutic approach, although experimental studies are required to authenticate our findings. PMID:27555782

  2. Genomic analysis of regulatory network dynamics reveals large topological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Madan Babu, M.; Yu, Haiyuan; Snyder, Michael; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Gerstein, Mark

    2004-09-01

    Network analysis has been applied widely, providing a unifying language to describe disparate systems ranging from social interactions to power grids. It has recently been used in molecular biology, but so far the resulting networks have only been analysed statically. Here we present the dynamics of a biological network on a genomic scale, by integrating transcriptional regulatory information and gene-expression data for multiple conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We develop an approach for the statistical analysis of network dynamics, called SANDY, combining well-known global topological measures, local motifs and newly derived statistics. We uncover large changes in underlying network architecture that are unexpected given current viewpoints and random simulations. In response to diverse stimuli, transcription factors alter their interactions to varying degrees, thereby rewiring the network. A few transcription factors serve as permanent hubs, but most act transiently only during certain conditions. By studying sub-network structures, we show that environmental responses facilitate fast signal propagation (for example, with short regulatory cascades), whereas the cell cycle and sporulation direct temporal progression through multiple stages (for example, with highly inter-connected transcription factors). Indeed, to drive the latter processes forward, phase-specific transcription factors inter-regulate serially, and ubiquitously active transcription factors layer above them in a two-tiered hierarchy. We anticipate that many of the concepts presented here-particularly the large-scale topological changes and hub transience-will apply to other biological networks, including complex sub-systems in higher eukaryotes.

  3. Gas Hydrate-Sediment Morphologies Revealed by Pressure Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of HYACINTH pressure cores collected on IODP Expedition 311 and NGHP Expedition 1 showed gas hydrate layers, lenses, and veins contained in fine-grained sediments as well as gas hydrate contained in coarse-grained layers. Pressure cores were recovered from sediments on the Cascadia Margin off the North American West Coast and in the Krishna-Godavari Basin in the Western Bay of Bengal in water depths of 800- 1400 meters. Recovered cores were transferred to laboratory chambers without loss of pressure and nondestructive measurements were made at in situ pressures and controlled temperatures. Gamma density, P-wave velocity, and X-ray images showed evidence of grain-displacing and pore-filling gas hydrate in the cores. Data highlights include X-ray images of fine-grained sediment cores showing wispy subvertical veins of gas hydrate and P-wave velocity excursions corresponding to grain-displacing layers and pore-filling layers of gas hydrate. Most cores were subjected to controlled depressurization experiments, where expelled gas was collected, analyzed for composition, and used to calculate gas hydrate saturation within the core. Selected cores were stored under pressure for postcruise analysis and subsampling.

  4. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through tumor-derived EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics analysis highlighted the enrichment of oncogenic cargo in exosomes and ectosomes. Interestingly, exosomes induced significant cell proliferation and migration in recipient cells compared to ectosomes confirming the oncogenic nature of exosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes. The integrative proteogenomics approach utilized in this study has the potential to identify disease biomarker candidates which can be later assayed in liquid biopsies obtained from cancer patients. PMID:25944692

  5. Proteogenomic analysis reveals exosomes are more oncogenic than ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Gangoda, Lahiru; Liem, Michael; Fonseka, Pamali; Atukorala, Ishara; Ozcitti, Cemil; Mechler, Adam; Adda, Christopher G; Ang, Ching-Seng; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-06-20

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) include the exosomes (30-100 nm) that are produced through the endocytic pathway via the multivesicular bodies and the ectosomes (100-1000 nm) that are released through the budding of the plasma membrane. Despite the differences in the mode of biogenesis and size, reliable markers that can distinguish between exosomes and ectosomes are non-existent. Moreover, the precise functional differences between exosomes and ectosomes remains poorly characterised. Here, using label-free quantitative proteomics, we highlight proteins that could be exploited as markers to discriminate between exosomes and ectosomes. For the first time, a global proteogenomics analysis unveiled the secretion of mutant proteins that are implicated in cancer progression through tumor-derived EVs. Follow up integrated bioinformatics analysis highlighted the enrichment of oncogenic cargo in exosomes and ectosomes. Interestingly, exosomes induced significant cell proliferation and migration in recipient cells compared to ectosomes confirming the oncogenic nature of exosomes. These findings ascertain that cancer cells facilitate oncogenesis by the secretion of mutant and oncoproteins into the tumor microenvironment via exosomes and ectosomes. The integrative proteogenomics approach utilized in this study has the potential to identify disease biomarker candidates which can be later assayed in liquid biopsies obtained from cancer patients.

  6. Genomic analysis of regulatory network dynamics reveals large topological changes.

    PubMed

    Luscombe, Nicholas M; Babu, M Madan; Yu, Haiyuan; Snyder, Michael; Teichmann, Sarah A; Gerstein, Mark

    2004-09-16

    Network analysis has been applied widely, providing a unifying language to describe disparate systems ranging from social interactions to power grids. It has recently been used in molecular biology, but so far the resulting networks have only been analysed statically. Here we present the dynamics of a biological network on a genomic scale, by integrating transcriptional regulatory information and gene-expression data for multiple conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We develop an approach for the statistical analysis of network dynamics, called SANDY, combining well-known global topological measures, local motifs and newly derived statistics. We uncover large changes in underlying network architecture that are unexpected given current viewpoints and random simulations. In response to diverse stimuli, transcription factors alter their interactions to varying degrees, thereby rewiring the network. A few transcription factors serve as permanent hubs, but most act transiently only during certain conditions. By studying sub-network structures, we show that environmental responses facilitate fast signal propagation (for example, with short regulatory cascades), whereas the cell cycle and sporulation direct temporal progression through multiple stages (for example, with highly inter-connected transcription factors). Indeed, to drive the latter processes forward, phase-specific transcription factors inter-regulate serially, and ubiquitously active transcription factors layer above them in a two-tiered hierarchy. We anticipate that many of the concepts presented here--particularly the large-scale topological changes and hub transience--will apply to other biological networks, including complex sub-systems in higher eukaryotes.

  7. A secretomics analysis reveals major differences in the macrophage responses towards different types of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Palomäki, Jaana; Sund, Jukka; Vippola, Minnamari; Kinaret, Pia; Greco, Dario; Savolainen, Kai; Puustinen, Anne; Alenius, Harri

    2015-01-01

    Certain types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) can evoke inflammation, fibrosis and mesothelioma in vivo, raising concerns about their potential health effects. It has been recently postulated that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is important in the CNT-induced toxicity. However, more comprehensive studies of the protein secretion induced by CNT can provide new information about their possible pathogenic mechanisms. Here, we studied protein secretion from human macrophages with a proteomic approach in an unbiased way. Human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were exposed to tangled or rigid, long multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) or crocidolite asbestos for 6 h. The growth media was concentrated and secreted proteins were analyzed using 2D-DIGE and DeCyder software. Subsequently, significantly up- or down-regulated protein spots were in-gel digested and identified with an LC-MS/MS approach. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to reveal the different patterns of protein secretion induced by these materials. The results show that both long rigid MWCNT and asbestos elicited ample and highly similar protein secretion. In contrast, exposure to long tangled MWCNT induced weaker protein secretion with a more distinct profile. Secretion of lysosomal proteins followed the exposure to all materials, suggesting lysosomal damage. However, only long rigid MWCNT was associated with apoptosis. This analysis suggests that the CNT toxicity in human MDM is mediated via vigorous secretion of inflammation-related proteins and apoptosis. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of toxicity of high aspect ratio nanomaterials and indicates that not all types of CNT are as hazardous as asbestos fibers.

  8. Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Wesley C.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Birney, Ewan; Ponting, Chris P.; Grützner, Frank; Belov, Katherine; Miller, Webb; Clarke, Laura; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Heger, Andreas; Locke, Devin P.; Miethke, Pat; Waters, Paul D.; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Wallis, John; Puente, Xose S.; López-Otín, Carlos; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Eichler, Evan E.; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Deakin, Janine E.; Alsop, Amber; Thompson, Katherine; Kirby, Patrick; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; Wakefield, Matthew J.; Olender, Tsviya; Lancet, Doron; Huttley, Gavin A.; Smit, Arian F. A.; Pask, Andrew; Temple-Smith, Peter; Batzer, Mark A.; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Harris, Robert S.; Whittington, Camilla M.; Wong, Emily S. W.; Gemmell, Neil J.; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M.; Merkel, Angelika; Schmitz, Juergen; Zemann, Anja; Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Brosius, Juergen; Murchison, Elizabeth P.; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Smith, Carly; Hannon, Gregory J.; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; McMillan, Daniel; Attenborough, Rosalind; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; Lefèvre, Christophe M.; Sharp, Julie A.; Nicholas, Kevin R.; Ray, David A.; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Pringle, Thomas H.; Taylor, James; Jones, Russell C.; Nixon, Brett; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Niwa, Hitoshi; Sekita, Yoko; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Stark, Alexander; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis; Flicek, Paul; Chen, Yuan; Webber, Caleb; Hardison, Ross; Nelson, Joanne; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Minx, Pat; Feng, Yucheng; Kremitzki, Colin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Glasscock, Jarret; Wylie, Todd; Wohldmann, Patricia; Thiru, Prathapan; Nhan, Michael N.; Pohl, Craig S.; Smith, Scott M.; Hou, Shunfeng; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these features with genetic innovations. We find that reptile and platypus venom proteins have been co-opted independently from the same gene families; milk protein genes are conserved despite platypuses laying eggs; and immune gene family expansions are directly related to platypus biology. Expansions of protein, non-protein-coding RNA and microRNA families, as well as repeat elements, are identified. Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation. PMID:18464734

  9. Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Ida E.; Backes, André; Walsh, Patrick T.; Morgan, Kate V.; Meddle, Simone L.; Healy, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual weaverbird that built them. We found that a computer-aided texture analysis approach does allow the assignment of a signature to weaverbirds' nests. We suggest that this approach will be a useful tool with which to examine individual variation across a range of animal constructions, not just for nests. PMID:26543586

  10. Image analysis of weaverbird nests reveals signature weave textures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Ida E; Backes, André; Walsh, Patrick T; Morgan, Kate V; Meddle, Simone L; Healy, Susan D

    2015-06-01

    In nature, many animals build structures that can be readily measured at the scale of their gross morphology (e.g. length, volume and weight). Capturing individuality as can be done with the structures designed and built by human architects or artists, however, is more challenging. Here, we tested whether computer-aided image texture classification approaches can be used to describe textural variation in the nests of weaverbirds (Ploceus species) in order to attribute nests to the individual weaverbird that built them. We found that a computer-aided texture analysis approach does allow the assignment of a signature to weaverbirds' nests. We suggest that this approach will be a useful tool with which to examine individual variation across a range of animal constructions, not just for nests.

  11. Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution.

    PubMed

    Warren, Wesley C; Hillier, LaDeana W; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Birney, Ewan; Ponting, Chris P; Grützner, Frank; Belov, Katherine; Miller, Webb; Clarke, Laura; Chinwalla, Asif T; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Heger, Andreas; Locke, Devin P; Miethke, Pat; Waters, Paul D; Veyrunes, Frédéric; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Bob; Graves, Tina; Wallis, John; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R; Eichler, Evan E; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Ze; Deakin, Janine E; Alsop, Amber; Thompson, Katherine; Kirby, Patrick; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Wakefield, Matthew J; Olender, Tsviya; Lancet, Doron; Huttley, Gavin A; Smit, Arian F A; Pask, Andrew; Temple-Smith, Peter; Batzer, Mark A; Walker, Jerilyn A; Konkel, Miriam K; Harris, Robert S; Whittington, Camilla M; Wong, Emily S W; Gemmell, Neil J; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Vargas Jentzsch, Iris M; Merkel, Angelika; Schmitz, Juergen; Zemann, Anja; Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Brosius, Juergen; Murchison, Elizabeth P; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Smith, Carly; Hannon, Gregory J; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; McMillan, Daniel; Attenborough, Rosalind; Rens, Willem; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm; Lefèvre, Christophe M; Sharp, Julie A; Nicholas, Kevin R; Ray, David A; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Pringle, Thomas H; Taylor, James; Jones, Russell C; Nixon, Brett; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Niwa, Hitoshi; Sekita, Yoko; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Stark, Alexander; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis; Flicek, Paul; Chen, Yuan; Webber, Caleb; Hardison, Ross; Nelson, Joanne; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Delehaunty, Kim; Markovic, Chris; Minx, Pat; Feng, Yucheng; Kremitzki, Colin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Glasscock, Jarret; Wylie, Todd; Wohldmann, Patricia; Thiru, Prathapan; Nhan, Michael N; Pohl, Craig S; Smith, Scott M; Hou, Shunfeng; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J; Renfree, Marilyn B; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K

    2008-05-08

    We present a draft genome sequence of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus. This monotreme exhibits a fascinating combination of reptilian and mammalian characters. For example, platypuses have a coat of fur adapted to an aquatic lifestyle; platypus females lactate, yet lay eggs; and males are equipped with venom similar to that of reptiles. Analysis of the first monotreme genome aligned these features with genetic innovations. We find that reptile and platypus venom proteins have been co-opted independently from the same gene families; milk protein genes are conserved despite platypuses laying eggs; and immune gene family expansions are directly related to platypus biology. Expansions of protein, non-protein-coding RNA and microRNA families, as well as repeat elements, are identified. Sequencing of this genome now provides a valuable resource for deep mammalian comparative analyses, as well as for monotreme biology and conservation.

  12. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals vertebrate phylotypic period during organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Naoki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    One of the central issues in evolutionary developmental biology is how we can formulate the relationships between evolutionary and developmental processes. Two major models have been proposed: the 'funnel-like' model, in which the earliest embryo shows the most conserved morphological pattern, followed by diversifying later stages, and the 'hourglass' model, in which constraints are imposed to conserve organogenesis stages, which is called the phylotypic period. Here we perform a quantitative comparative transcriptome analysis of several model vertebrate embryos and show that the pharyngula stage is most conserved, whereas earlier and later stages are rather divergent. These results allow us to predict approximate developmental timetables between different species, and indicate that pharyngula embryos have the most conserved gene expression profiles, which may be the source of the basic body plan of vertebrates. PMID:21427719

  13. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2015-06-01

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function.

  14. SRSF shape analysis for sequencing data reveal new differentiating patterns.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, Sergiusz; Vera, Daniel; Wu, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Sequencing-based methods to examine fundamental features of the genome, such as gene expression and chromatin structure, rely on inferences from the abundance and distribution of reads derived from Illumina sequencing. Drawing sound inferences from such experiments relies on appropriate mathematical methods to model the distribution of reads along the genome, which has been challenging due to the scale and nature of these data. We propose a new framework (SRSFseq) based on square root slope functions shape analysis to analyse Illumina sequencing data. In the new approach the basic unit of information is the density of mapped reads over region of interest located on the known reference genome. The densities are interpreted as shapes and a new shape analysis model is proposed. An equivalent of a Fisher test is used to quantify the significance of shape differences in read distribution patterns between groups of density functions in different experimental conditions. We evaluated the performance of this new framework to analyze RNA-seq data at the exon level, which enabled the detection of variation in read distributions and abundances between experimental conditions not detected by other methods. Thus, the method is a suitable supplement to the state-of-the-art count based techniques. The variety of density representations and flexibility of mathematical design allow the model to be easily adapted to other data types or problems in which the distribution of reads is to be tested. The functional interpretation and SRSF phase-amplitude separation technique give an efficient noise reduction procedure improving the sensitivity and specificity of the method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Kidney tumor biomarkers revealed by simultaneous multiple matrix metabolomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Sheila; Taylor, Sandra L; Abu Aboud, Omran; Yang, Joy; Evans, Christopher; Osier, Michael V; Alexander, Danny C; Kim, Kyoungmi; Weiss, Robert H

    2012-07-15

    Metabolomics is increasingly being used in cancer biology for biomarker discovery and identification of potential novel therapeutic targets. However, a systematic metabolomics study of multiple biofluids to determine their interrelationships and to describe their use as tumor proxies is lacking. Using a mouse xenograft model of kidney cancer, characterized by subcapsular implantation of Caki-1 clear cell human kidney cancer cells, we examined tissue, serum, and urine all obtained simultaneously at baseline (urine) and at, or close to, animal sacrifice (urine, tissue, and plasma). Uniform metabolomics analysis of all three "matrices" was accomplished using gas chromatography- and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Of all the metabolites identified (267 in tissue, 246 in serum, and 267 in urine), 89 were detected in all 3 matrices, and the majority was altered in the same direction. Heat maps of individual metabolites showed that alterations in serum were more closely related to tissue than was urine. Two metabolites, cinnamoylglycine and nicotinamide, were concordantly and significantly (when corrected for multiple testing) altered in tissue and serum, and cysteine-glutathione disulfide showed the highest change (232.4-fold in tissue) of any metabolite. On the basis of these and other considerations, three pathways were chosen for biologic validation of the metabolomic data, resulting in potential therapeutic target identification. These data show that serum metabolomics analysis is a more accurate proxy for tissue changes than urine and that tryptophan degradation (yielding anti-inflammatory metabolites) is highly represented in renal cell carcinoma, and support the concept that PPAR-α antagonism may be a potential therapeutic approach for this disease.

  16. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  17. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  18. Damage detection and quantification using mode curvature variation on framed structures: analysis of the preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovino, Chiara; Ditommaso, Rocco; Auletta, Gianluca; Ponzo, Felice C.

    2017-04-01

    Continuous monitoring based on vibrational identification methods is increasingly employed for the evaluation of the state of health of existing buildings after strong motion earthquake. Different damage identification methods are based on the variations of damage indices defined in terms modal (eigenfrequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping) and/or non-modal parameters. Most of simplified methods for structural health monitoring and damage detection are based on the evaluation of the dynamic characteristics evolution associated to the fundamental mode of vibration of a monitored structure. Aim of this work is the upgrade of an existing method for damage localization on framed structures during a moderate/destructive earthquake. The existing version of the method is based on the comparison of the geometric characteristics (with particular reference to the mode curvature) exhibited by the structures, related to fundamental mode of vibration, before and during an earthquake. The approach is based on the use of a nonlinear filter, the band-variable filter, based on the Stockwell Transform able to extract the nonlinear response of each mode of vibration. The new version of the method provides the possibility to quantify a possible damage occurred on the monitored structure linking the mode curvature variation with the maximum inter-story drift. This paper shows the preliminary results obtained from several simulations on nonlinear numerical models of reinforced concrete framed structures, designed for only gravity loads, without and with the presence of infill panels. Furthermore, a correlation between maximum mode curvature difference and maximum inter-story drift has been defined for the different numerical models in order to quantify the structural damage. Acknowledgements This study was partially funded by the Italian Department of Civil Protection within the project DPC-RELUIS 2016 - RS4 ''Seismic observatory of structures and health monitoring'' and by the

  19. Network Analysis Reveals Distinct Clinical Syndromes Underlying Acute Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David P.; MacCormick, Ian J. C.; Phythian-Adams, Alex T.; Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G. D.; Collier, David J.; Hume, David A.; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A. A. Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes. PMID:24465370

  20. Functional network analysis reveals differences in the semantic priming task.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, Stefan; Zamora-López, Gorka; Dimigen, Olaf; Sommer, Werner; Kurths, Jürgen

    2011-04-30

    The recent years have seen the emergence of graph theoretical analysis of complex, functional brain networks estimated from neurophysiological measurements. The research has mainly focused on the graph characterization of the resting-state/default network, and its potential for clinical application. Functional resting-state networks usually display the characteristics of small-world networks and their statistical properties have been observed to change due to pathological conditions or aging. In the present paper we move forward in the application of graph theoretical tools in functional connectivity by investigating high-level cognitive processing in healthy adults, in a manner similar to that used in psychological research in the framework of event-related potentials (ERPs). More specifically we aim at investigating how graph theoretical approaches can help to discover systematic and task-dependent differences in high-level cognitive processes such as language perception. We will show that such an approach is feasible and that the results coincide well with the findings from neuroimaging studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Autocorrelation analysis reveals widespread spatial biases in microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Amnon; Tirosh, Itay; Barkai, Naama

    2007-01-01

    Background DNA microarrays provide the ability to interrogate multiple genes in a single experiment and have revolutionized genomic research. However, the microarray technology suffers from various forms of biases and relatively low reproducibility. A particular source of false data has been described, in which non-random placement of gene probes on the microarray surface is associated with spurious correlations between genes. Results In order to assess the prevalence of this effect and better understand its origins, we applied an autocorrelation analysis of the relationship between chromosomal position and expression level to a database of over 2000 individual yeast microarray experiments. We show that at least 60% of these experiments exhibit spurious chromosomal position-dependent gene correlations, which nonetheless appear in a stochastic manner within each experimental dataset. Using computer simulations, we show that large spatial biases caused in the microarray hybridization step and independently of printing procedures can exclusively account for the observed spurious correlations, in contrast to previous suggestions. Our data suggest that such biases may generate more than 15% false data per experiment. Importantly, spatial biases are expected to occur regardless of microarray design and over a wide range of microarray platforms, organisms and experimental procedures. Conclusions Spatial biases comprise a major source of noise in microarray studies; revision of routine experimental practices and normalizations to account for these biases may significantly and comprehensively improve the quality of new as well as existing DNA microarray data. PMID:17565680

  2. Autocorrelation analysis reveals widespread spatial biases in microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Koren, Amnon; Tirosh, Itay; Barkai, Naama

    2007-06-12

    DNA microarrays provide the ability to interrogate multiple genes in a single experiment and have revolutionized genomic research. However, the microarray technology suffers from various forms of biases and relatively low reproducibility. A particular source of false data has been described, in which non-random placement of gene probes on the microarray surface is associated with spurious correlations between genes. In order to assess the prevalence of this effect and better understand its origins, we applied an autocorrelation analysis of the relationship between chromosomal position and expression level to a database of over 2000 individual yeast microarray experiments. We show that at least 60% of these experiments exhibit spurious chromosomal position-dependent gene correlations, which nonetheless appear in a stochastic manner within each experimental dataset. Using computer simulations, we show that large spatial biases caused in the microarray hybridization step and independently of printing procedures can exclusively account for the observed spurious correlations, in contrast to previous suggestions. Our data suggest that such biases may generate more than 15% false data per experiment. Importantly, spatial biases are expected to occur regardless of microarray design and over a wide range of microarray platforms, organisms and experimental procedures. Spatial biases comprise a major source of noise in microarray studies; revision of routine experimental practices and normalizations to account for these biases may significantly and comprehensively improve the quality of new as well as existing DNA microarray data.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a scattered distribution of autumn colours

    PubMed Central

    Archetti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf colour in autumn is rarely considered informative for taxonomy, but there is now growing interest in the evolution of autumn colours and different hypotheses are debated. Research efforts are hindered by the lack of basic information: the phylogenetic distribution of autumn colours. It is not known when and how autumn colours evolved. Methods Data are reported on the autumn colours of 2368 tree species belonging to 400 genera of the temperate regions of the world, and an analysis is made of their phylogenetic relationships in order to reconstruct the evolutionary origin of red and yellow in autumn leaves. Key Results Red autumn colours are present in at least 290 species (70 genera), and evolved independently at least 25 times. Yellow is present independently from red in at least 378 species (97 genera) and evolved at least 28 times. Conclusions The phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that autumn colours have been acquired and lost many times during evolution. This scattered distribution could be explained by hypotheses involving some kind of coevolutionary interaction or by hypotheses that rely on the need for photoprotection. PMID:19126636

  4. Bioimage analysis of Shigella infection reveals targeting of colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Arena, Ellen T; Campbell-Valois, Francois-Xavier; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sachse, Martin; Moya-Nilges, Maryse; Nothelfer, Katharina; Marteyn, Benoit; Shorte, Spencer L; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2015-06-23

    Few studies within the pathogenic field have used advanced imaging and analytical tools to quantitatively measure pathogenicity in vivo. In this work, we present a novel approach for the investigation of host-pathogen processes based on medium-throughput 3D fluorescence imaging. The guinea pig model for Shigella flexneri invasion of the colonic mucosa was used to monitor the infectious process over time with GFP-expressing S. flexneri. A precise quantitative imaging protocol was devised to follow individual S. flexneri in a large tissue volume. An extensive dataset of confocal images was obtained and processed to extract specific quantitative information regarding the progression of S. flexneri infection in an unbiased and exhaustive manner. Specific parameters included the analysis of S. flexneri positions relative to the epithelial surface, S. flexneri density within the tissue, and volume of tissue destruction. In particular, at early time points, there was a clear association of S. flexneri with crypts, key morphological features of the colonic mucosa. Numerical simulations based on random bacterial entry confirmed the bias of experimentally measured S. flexneri for early crypt targeting. The application of a correlative light and electron microscopy technique adapted for thick tissue samples further confirmed the location of S. flexneri within colonocytes at the mouth of crypts. This quantitative imaging approach is a novel means to examine host-pathogen systems in a tailored and robust manner, inclusive of the infectious agent.

  5. Differential Network Analysis Reveals Genetic Effects on Catalepsy Modules

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Ovidiu D.; Oberbeck, Denesa; Darakjian, Priscila; Kawane, Sunita; Erk, Jason; McWeeney, Shannon; Hitzemann, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We performed short-term bi-directional selective breeding for haloperidol-induced catalepsy, starting from three mouse populations of increasingly complex genetic structure: an F2 intercross, a heterogeneous stock (HS) formed by crossing four inbred strains (HS4) and a heterogeneous stock (HS-CC) formed from the inbred strain founders of the Collaborative Cross (CC). All three selections were successful, with large differences in haloperidol response emerging within three generations. Using a custom differential network analysis procedure, we found that gene coexpression patterns changed significantly; importantly, a number of these changes were concordant across genetic backgrounds. In contrast, absolute gene-expression changes were modest and not concordant across genetic backgrounds, in spite of the large and similar phenotypic differences. By inferring strain contributions from the parental lines, we are able to identify significant differences in allelic content between the selected lines concurrent with large changes in transcript connectivity. Importantly, this observation implies that genetic polymorphisms can affect transcript and module connectivity without large changes in absolute expression levels. We conclude that, in this case, selective breeding acts at the subnetwork level, with the same modules but not the same transcripts affected across the three selections. PMID:23555609

  6. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Hall, David P; MacCormick, Ian J C; Phythian-Adams, Alex T; Rzechorzek, Nina M; Hope-Jones, David; Cosens, Sorrel; Jackson, Stewart; Bates, Matthew G D; Collier, David J; Hume, David A; Freeman, Thomas; Thompson, A A Roger; Baillie, John Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS), we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25). These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  7. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners.

    PubMed

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W Thomas; Bush, Nicole R; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of "reciprocal" interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored.

  8. Consanguinity and late fertility: spatial analysis reveals positive association patterns.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Antonella; Astolfi, Paola; Zei, Gianna; Tentoni, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The role of consanguinity on human complex traits is an important and controversial issue. In this work we focused on the Sardinian population and examined the effect of consanguineous unions on late female fertility. During the last century the island has been characterized by a high incidence of marriages between relatives, favoured by socio economic conditions and geographical isolation, and by high fertility despite a widespread tendency to delay reproduction. Through spatial analysis techniques, we explored the geographical heterogeneity of consanguinity and late fertility, and identified in Central-Eastern Sardinia a common area with an excess of both traits, where the traits are positively associated. We found that their association did not significantly affect women's fertility in the area, despite the expected negative role of both traits. Intriguingly, this critical zone corresponds well to areas reported by previous studies as being peculiar for a high frequency of centenarians and for lower risk in pregnancy outcome. The proposed approach can be generally exploited to identify target populations on which socioeconomic, biodemographic and genetic data can be collected at the individual level, and deeper analyses carried out to disentangle the determinants of complex biological traits and to investigate their association.

  9. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners

    PubMed Central

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W. Thomas; Bush, Nicole R.; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of “reciprocal” interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  10. Interaction network analysis revealed biomarkers in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Zhao, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhuo-Ran; Fu, Pei-De; Su, Zhen-Dong; Qi, Li-Chun; Li, Xue-Qi; Dong, Yu-Mei

    2014-08-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a serious heart disease. The cardiac cells of patients with MI will die due to lack of blood for a long time. In this study, we aimed to find new targets for MI diagnosis and therapy. We downloaded GSE22229 including 12 blood samples from healthy persons and GSE29111 from Gene Expression Omnibus including 36 blood samples from MI patients. Then we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in patients with MI compared to normal controls with p value < 0.05 and |logFC| > 1. Furthermore, interaction network and sub-network of these of these DEGs were constructed by NetBox. Linker genes were screened in the Global Network database. The degree of linker genes were calculated by igraph package in R language. Gene ontology and kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes pathway analysis were performed for DEGs and network modules. A total of 246 DEGs were identified in MI, which were enriched in the immune response. In the interaction network, LCK, CD247, CD3D, FYN, HLA-DRA, IL2, CD8A CD3E, CD4, CD3G had high degree, among which CD3E, CD4, CD3G were DEGs while others were linker genes screened from Global Network database. Genes in the sub-network were also enriched in the immune response pathway. The genes with high degree may be biomarkers for MI diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Multi scale analysis by acoustic emission of damage mechanisms in natural fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnafous, C.; Touchard, F.; Chocinski-Arnault, L.

    2010-06-01

    This paper proposes to develop an experimental program to characterize the type and the development of damage in composite with complex microstructure. A multi-scale analysis by acoustic emission has been developed and applied to hemp fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composite. The experimental program consists of tensile tests performed on single yarn, neat epoxy resin and composite materials to identify their AE amplitude signatures. A statistical analysis of AE amplitude signals has been realised and correlated with microscopic observations. Results have enabled to identify three types of damage in composites and their associated AE amplitudes: matrix cracking, interfacial debonding and reinforcement damage and fracture. Tracking of these damage mechanisms in hemp/epoxy composites has been performed to show the process of damage development in natural fibre reinforced composites.

  12. Damage detection and quantification in a structural model under seismic excitation using time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chun-Kai; Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Wu, Tzu-Hsiu

    2015-04-01

    In civil engineering, health monitoring and damage detection are typically carry out by using a large amount of sensors. Typically, most methods require global measurements to extract the properties of the structure. However, some sensors, like LVDT, cannot be used due to in situ limitation so that the global deformation remains unknown. An experiment is used to demonstrate the proposed algorithms: a one-story 2-bay reinforce concrete frame under weak and strong seismic excitation. In this paper signal processing techniques and nonlinear identification are used and applied to the response measurements of seismic response of reinforced concrete structures subject to different level of earthquake excitations. Both modal-based and signal-based system identification and feature extraction techniques are used to study the nonlinear inelastic response of RC frame using both input and output response data or output only measurement. From the signal-based damage identification method, which include the enhancement of time-frequency analysis of acceleration responses and the estimation of permanent deformation using directly from acceleration response data. Finally, local deformation measurement from dense optical tractor is also use to quantify the damage of the RC frame structure.

  13. Analysis of damaged components from DOE security helicopter N7EG

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, C.E.

    1989-11-06

    Initial contact with the writer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was made on October 16, 1989 through a telephone call by Frank Reilly, Accident Investigator with the EG G Energy Measurements organization in Las Vegas, Nevada. This subsequently led to shipment to Livermore of the damaged searchlight components, together with several photographs showing views of the damaged searchlight and its attachment locations on the helicopter. Photographs of an intact and undamaged searchlight assembly in various positions mounted on an operating helicopter were also supplied. The damaged parts were shipped under EG G Shipping Order No. 78931 on October 19th with a covering letter by Frank Reilly dated October 18th. The shipment included two major sub-assemblies: (a) the searchlight body, and (b) its supporting yoke. Accompanying these were several fractured screw-heads and two fractured steel tubes. The objectives of the LLNL investigation, as stated in the covering letter, were to conduct an {hor ellipsis}analysis of the broken brackets, screws, and other apparatus{hor ellipsis}to assist{hor ellipsis}in establishing a failure mode of the{hor ellipsis}assembly{hor ellipsis}.'' 14 figs.

  14. Gastric Tissue Damage Analysis Generated by Ischemia: Bioimpedance, Confocal Endomicroscopy, and Light Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Nohra E.; Garcia, Laura E.; Garcia-Lorenzana, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The gastric mucosa ischemic tissular damage plays an important role in critical care patients' outcome, because it is the first damaged tissue by compensatory mechanism during shock. The aim of the study is to relate bioimpedance changes with tissular damage level generated by ischemia by means of confocal endomicroscopy and light microscopy. Bioimpedance of the gastric mucosa and confocal images were obtained from Wistar male rats during basal and ischemia conditions. They were anesthetized, and stain was applied (fluorescein and/or acriflavine). The impedance spectroscopy catheter was inserted and then confocal endomicroscopy probe. After basal measurements and biopsy, hepatic and gastric arteries clamping induced ischemia. Finally, pyloric antrum tissue was preserved in buffered formaldehyde (10%) for histology processing using light microscopy. Confocal images were equalized, binarized, and boundary defined, and infiltrations were quantified. Impedance and infiltrations increased with ischemia showing significant changes between basal and ischemia conditions (P < 0.01). Light microscopy analysis allows detection of general alterations in cellular and tissular integrity, confirming gastric reactance and confocal images quantification increments obtained during ischemia. PMID:23841094

  15. Functional Tissue Analysis Reveals Successful Cryopreservation of Human Osteoarthritic Synovium

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Marieke; Bennink, Miranda B.; van Lent, Peter L. E. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.; Koenders, Marije I.; Thurlings, Rogier M.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease affecting cartilage and is the most common form of arthritis worldwide. One third of OA patients have severe synovitis and less than 10% have no evidence of synovitis. Moreover, synovitis is predictive for more severe disease progression. This offers a target for therapy but more research on the pathophysiological processes in the synovial tissue of these patients is needed. Functional studies performed with synovial tissue will be more approachable when this material, that becomes available by joint replacement surgery, can be stored for later use. We set out to determine the consequences of slow-freezing of human OA synovial tissue. Therefore, we validated a method that can be applied in every routine laboratory and performed a comparative study of five cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions. To determine possible deleterious cryopreservation-thaw effects on viability, the synovial tissue architecture, metabolic activity, RNA quality, expression of cryopreservation associated stress genes, and expression of OA characteristic disease genes was studied. Furthermore, the biological activity of the cryopreserved tissue was determined by measuring cytokine secretion induced by the TLR ligands lipopolysaccharides and Pam3Cys. Compared to non frozen synovium, no difference in cell and tissue morphology could be identified in the conditions using the CS10, standard and CryoSFM CPA solution for cryopreservation. However, we observed significantly lower preservation of tissue morphology with the Biofreeze and CS2 media. The other viability assays showed trends in the same direction but were not sensitive enough to detect significant differences between conditions. In all assays tested a clearly lower viability was detected in the condition in which synovium was frozen without CPA solution. This detailed analysis showed that OA synovial tissue explants can be cryopreserved while maintaining the morphology, viability and

  16. Network analysis reveals multiscale controls on streamwater chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Kevin J.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Likens, Gene E.; Buso, Donald C.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Bailey, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    By coupling synoptic data from a basin-wide assessment of streamwater chemistry with network-based geostatistical analysis, we show that spatial processes differentially affect biogeochemical condition and pattern across a headwater stream network. We analyzed a high-resolution dataset consisting of 664 water samples collected every 100 m throughout 32 tributaries in an entire fifth-order stream network. These samples were analyzed for an exhaustive suite of chemical constituents. The fine grain and broad extent of this study design allowed us to quantify spatial patterns over a range of scales by using empirical semivariograms that explicitly incorporated network topology. Here, we show that spatial structure, as determined by the characteristic shape of the semivariograms, differed both among chemical constituents and by spatial relationship (flow-connected, flow-unconnected, or Euclidean). Spatial structure was apparent at either a single scale or at multiple nested scales, suggesting separate processes operating simultaneously within the stream network and surrounding terrestrial landscape. Expected patterns of spatial dependence for flow-connected relationships (e.g., increasing homogeneity with downstream distance) occurred for some chemical constituents (e.g., dissolved organic carbon, sulfate, and aluminum) but not for others (e.g., nitrate, sodium). By comparing semivariograms for the different chemical constituents and spatial relationships, we were able to separate effects on streamwater chemistry of (i) fine-scale versus broad-scale processes and (ii) in-stream processes versus landscape controls. These findings provide insight on the hierarchical scaling of local, longitudinal, and landscape processes that drive biogeochemical patterns in stream networks.

  17. Conformational diversity analysis reveals three functional mechanisms in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fornasari, María Silvina

    2017-01-01

    Protein motions are a key feature to understand biological function. Recently, a large-scale analysis of protein conformational diversity showed a positively skewed distribution with a peak at 0.5 Å C-alpha root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD). To understand this distribution in terms of structure-function relationships, we studied a well curated and large dataset of ~5,000 proteins with experimentally determined conformational diversity. We searched for global behaviour patterns studying how structure-based features change among the available conformer population for each protein. This procedure allowed us to describe the RMSD distribution in terms of three main protein classes sharing given properties. The largest of these protein subsets (~60%), which we call “rigid” (average RMSD = 0.83 Å), has no disordered regions, shows low conformational diversity, the largest tunnels and smaller and buried cavities. The two additional subsets contain disordered regions, but with differential sequence composition and behaviour. Partially disordered proteins have on average 67% of their conformers with disordered regions, average RMSD = 1.1 Å, the highest number of hinges and the longest disordered regions. In contrast, malleable proteins have on average only 25% of disordered conformers and average RMSD = 1.3 Å, flexible cavities affected in size by the presence of disordered regions and show the highest diversity of cognate ligands. Proteins in each set are mostly non-homologous to each other, share no given fold class, nor functional similarity but do share features derived from their conformer population. These shared features could represent conformational mechanisms related with biological functions. PMID:28192432

  18. Neuronal Networks during Burst Suppression as Revealed by Source Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reinicke, Christine; Moeller, Friederike; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Pressler, Ronit; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burst-suppression (BS) is an electroencephalography (EEG) pattern consisting of alternant periods of slow waves of high amplitude (burst) and periods of so called flat EEG (suppression). It is generally associated with coma of various etiologies (hypoxia, drug-related intoxication, hypothermia, and childhood encephalopathies, but also anesthesia). Animal studies suggest that both the cortex and the thalamus are involved in the generation of BS. However, very little is known about mechanisms of BS in humans. The aim of this study was to identify the neuronal network underlying both burst and suppression phases using source reconstruction and analysis of functional and effective connectivity in EEG. Material/Methods Dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) was applied to EEG segments of 13 neonates and infants with burst and suppression EEG pattern. The brain area with the strongest power in the analyzed frequency (1–4 Hz) range was defined as the reference region. DICS was used to compute the coherence between this reference region and the entire brain. The renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) was used to describe the informational flow between the identified sources. Results/Conclusion Delta activity during the burst phases was associated with coherent sources in the thalamus and brainstem as well as bilateral sources in cortical regions mainly frontal and parietal, whereas suppression phases were associated with coherent sources only in cortical regions. Results of the RPDC analyses showed an upwards informational flow from the brainstem towards the thalamus and from the thalamus to cortical regions, which was absent during the suppression phases. These findings may support the theory that a “cortical deafferentiation” between the cortex and sub-cortical structures exists especially in suppression phases compared to burst phases in burst suppression EEGs. Such a deafferentiation may play a role in the poor neurological outcome of

  19. DNA Damage Analysis in Children with Non-syndromic Developmental Delay by Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chand, Parkash; Ballambattu, Vishnu Bhat; Hanumanthappa, Nandeesha; Veeramani, Raveendranath

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Majority of the developmental delays in children are non-syndromic and they are believed to have an underlying DNA damage, though not well substantiated. Hence the present study was carried out to find out if there is any increased DNA damage in children with non-syndromic developmental delay by using the comet assay. Aim The present case-control study was undertaken to assess the level of DNA damage in children with non syndromic developmental delay and compare the same with that of age and sex matched controls using submarine gel electrophoresis (Comet Assay). Materials and Methods The blood from clinically diagnosed children with non syndromic developmental delay and controls were subjected for alkaline version of comet assay – Single cell gel electrophoresis using lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood. The comets were observed under a bright field microscope; photocaptured and scored using the Image J image quantification software. Comet parameters were compared between the cases and controls and statistical analysis and interpretation of results was done using the statistical software SPSS version 20. Results The mean comet tail length in cases and control was 20.77+7.659μm and 08.97+4.398μm respectively which was statistically significant (p<0.001). Other comet parameters like total comet length and % DNA in tail also showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) between cases and controls. Conclusion The current investigation unraveled increased levels of DNA damage in children with non syndromic developmental delay when compared to the controls. PMID:27437200

  20. Semiquantitative analysis by scanning electron microscopy of cochlear hair cell damage by ototoxic drugs.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Manabe, Y; Honda, N; Yamada, T; Yamamoto, T; Saito, H

    1995-03-01

    The ototoxicity of cisplatin and carboplatin in the organ of Corti of the guinea pig was evaluated semiquantitatively. Damage of the stereocilia of outer hair cells (OHCs) observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was classified into normal, grade 1 (10-50% loss of stereocilia), grade 2 (less than 50% remaining stereocilia), or grade 3 (missing stereocilia). The OHCs observed by light microscopy (LM) were classified as remaining or missing cells. Fifty OHCs of each row in the middle part of each turn of the cochlea were counted (a total of 150 cells per turn). Guinea pigs were administered 5 mg/kg of cisplatin or 50 mg/kg of carboplatin intraperitoneally for three consecutive days. In groups 1 and 2, in which both cochlea were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde and 1% osmium tetroxide (OsO4) and observed by SEM, the percentages of damage of the OHC stereocilia were similar in each cochlear turn bilaterally. In group 3, the right cochleae were fixed in OsO4 and observed by phase contrast microscopy as surface preparations. Left cochleae were submitted for SEM observation. Missing and grade 3 cells were observed at similar percentages in each row of each turn. In group 4, succinate dehydrogenase staining was performed in the right cochleae and observed by LM. The degree of damage in the right cochleae was compared with that of the left cochleae which was observed by SEM. On average, the mean numbers of missing cells and cells showing grade 3 damage were similar in each row of each turn. From these similarities of evaluation of ototoxicity at LM and SEM levels, it was concluded that semiquantitative analysis by SEM only is appropriate for the assessment of ototoxicity.

  1. Transcriptomic Analysis of Carboxylic Acid Challenge in Escherichia coli: Beyond Membrane Damage

    PubMed Central

    Royce, Liam A.; Boggess, Erin; Fu, Yao; Liu, Ping; Shanks, Jacqueline V.; Dickerson, Julie; Jarboe, Laura R.

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical. Enormous progress has been made in engineering microbes for production of these compounds though titers remain lower than desired. Here we used transcriptome analysis of Escherichia coli during exogenous challenge with octanoic acid (C8) at pH 7.0 to probe mechanisms of toxicity. This analysis highlights the intracellular acidification and membrane damage caused by C8 challenge. Network component analysis identified transcription factors with altered activity including GadE, the activator of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system (AR2) and Lrp, the amino acid biosynthesis regulator. The intracellular acidification was quantified during exogenous challenge, but was not observed in a carboxylic acid producing strain, though this may be due to lower titers than those used in our exogenous challenge studies. We developed a framework for predicting the proton motive force during adaptation to strong inorganic acids and carboxylic acids. This model predicts that inorganic acid challenge is mitigated by cation accumulation, but that carboxylic acid challenge inverts the proton motive force and requires anion accumulation. Utilization of native acid resistance systems was not useful in terms of supporting growth or alleviating intracellular acidification. AR2 was found to be non-functional, possibly due to membrane damage. We proposed that interaction of Lrp and C8 resulted in repression of amino acid biosynthesis. However, this hypothesis was not supported by perturbation of lrp expression or amino acid supplementation. E. coli strains were also engineered for altered cyclopropane fatty acid content in the membrane, which had a dramatic effect on membrane properties, though C8 tolerance was not increased. We conclude that achieving higher production titers requires circumventing the membrane damage. As higher titers are achieved, acidification may become problematic. PMID:24586888

  2. Time-frequency vibration analysis for the detection of motor damages caused by bearing currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudhom, Aurelien; Antonino-Daviu, Jose; Razik, Hubert; Climente-Alarcon, Vicente

    2017-02-01

    Motor failure due to bearing currents is an issue that has drawn an increasing industrial interest over recent years. Bearing currents usually appear in motors operated by variable frequency drives (VFD); these drives may lead to common voltage modes which cause currents induced in the motor shaft that are discharged through the bearings. The presence of these currents may lead to the motor bearing failure only few months after system startup. Vibration monitoring is one of the most common ways for detecting bearing damages caused by circulating currents; the evaluation of the amplitudes of well-known characteristic components in the vibration Fourier spectrum that are associated with race, ball or cage defects enables to evaluate the bearing condition and, hence, to identify an eventual damage due to bearing currents. However, the inherent constraints of the Fourier transform may complicate the detection of the progressive bearing degradation; for instance, in some cases, other frequency components may mask or be confused with bearing defect-related while, in other cases, the analysis may not be suitable due to the eventual non-stationary nature of the captured vibration signals. Moreover, the fact that this analysis implies to lose the time-dimension limits the amount of information obtained from this technique. This work proposes the use of time-frequency (T-F) transforms to analyse vibration data in motors affected by bearing currents. The experimental results obtained in real machines show that the vibration analysis via T-F tools may provide significant advantages for the detection of bearing current damages; among other, these techniques enable to visualise the progressive degradation of the bearing while providing an effective discrimination versus other components that are not related with the fault. Moreover, their application is valid regardless of the operation regime of the machine. Both factors confirm the robustness and reliability of these tools

  3. Mutant Analysis Reveals Allosteric Regulation of ClpB Disaggregase

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Kamila B.; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The members of the hexameric AAA+ disaggregase of E. coli and S. cerevisiae, ClpB, and Hsp104, cooperate with the Hsp70 chaperone system in the solubilization of aggregated proteins. Aggregate solubilization relies on a substrate threading activity of ClpB/Hsp104 fueled by ATP hydrolysis in both ATPase rings (AAA-1, AAA-2). ClpB/Hsp104 ATPase activity is controlled by the M-domains, which associate to the AAA-1 ring to downregulate ATP hydrolysis. Keeping M-domains displaced from the AAA-1 ring by association with Hsp70 increases ATPase activity due to enhanced communication between protomers. This communication involves conserved arginine fingers. The control of ClpB/Hsp104 activity is crucial, as hyperactive mutants with permanently dissociated M-domains exhibit cellular toxicity. Here, we analyzed AAA-1 inter-ring communication in relation to the M-domain mediated ATPase regulation, by subjecting a conserved residue of the AAA-1 domain subunit interface of ClpB (A328) to mutational analysis. While all A328X mutants have reduced disaggregation activities, their ATPase activities strongly differed. ClpB-A328I/L mutants have reduced ATPase activity and when combined with the hyperactive ClpB-K476C M-domain mutation, suppress cellular toxicity. This underlines that ClpB ATPase activation by M-domain dissociation relies on increased subunit communication. The ClpB-A328V mutant in contrast has very high ATPase activity and exhibits cellular toxicity on its own, qualifying it as novel hyperactive ClpB mutant. ClpB-A328V hyperactivity is however, different from that of M-domain mutants as M-domains stay associated with the AAA-1 ring. The high ATPase activity of ClpB-A328V primarily relies on the AAA-2 ring and correlates with distinct conformational changes in the AAA-2 catalytic site. These findings characterize the subunit interface residue A328 as crucial regulatory element to control ATP hydrolysis in both AAA rings. PMID:28275610

  4. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  5. Mutant Analysis Reveals Allosteric Regulation of ClpB Disaggregase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Kamila B; Bukau, Bernd; Mogk, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The members of the hexameric AAA+ disaggregase of E. coli and S. cerevisiae, ClpB, and Hsp104, cooperate with the Hsp70 chaperone system in the solubilization of aggregated proteins. Aggregate solubilization relies on a substrate threading activity of ClpB/Hsp104 fueled by ATP hydrolysis in both ATPase rings (AAA-1, AAA-2). ClpB/Hsp104 ATPase activity is controlled by the M-domains, which associate to the AAA-1 ring to downregulate ATP hydrolysis. Keeping M-domains displaced from the AAA-1 ring by association with Hsp70 increases ATPase activity due to enhanced communication between protomers. This communication involves conserved arginine fingers. The control of ClpB/Hsp104 activity is crucial, as hyperactive mutants with permanently dissociated M-domains exhibit cellular toxicity. Here, we analyzed AAA-1 inter-ring communication in relation to the M-domain mediated ATPase regulation, by subjecting a conserved residue of the AAA-1 domain subunit interface of ClpB (A328) to mutational analysis. While all A328X mutants have reduced disaggregation activities, their ATPase activities strongly differed. ClpB-A328I/L mutants have reduced ATPase activity and when combined with the hyperactive ClpB-K476C M-domain mutation, suppress cellular toxicity. This underlines that ClpB ATPase activation by M-domain dissociation relies on increased subunit communication. The ClpB-A328V mutant in contrast has very high ATPase activity and exhibits cellular toxicity on its own, qualifying it as novel hyperactive ClpB mutant. ClpB-A328V hyperactivity is however, different from that of M-domain mutants as M-domains stay associated with the AAA-1 ring. The high ATPase activity of ClpB-A328V primarily relies on the AAA-2 ring and correlates with distinct conformational changes in the AAA-2 catalytic site. These findings characterize the subunit interface residue A328 as crucial regulatory element to control ATP hydrolysis in both AAA rings.

  6. Full-Length High-Temperature Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 5: Final safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lanning, D.D.; Lombardo, N.J.; Panisko, F.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the final safety analysis for the preparation, conduct, and post-test discharge operation for the Full-Length High Temperature Experiment-5 (FLHT-5) to be conducted in the L-24 position of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), Ontario, Canada. The test is sponsored by an international group organized by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The test is designed and conducted by staff from Pacific Northwest Laboratory with CRNL staff support. The test will study the consequences of loss-of-coolant and the progression of severe fuel damage.

  7. The Comet-FISH assay for the analysis of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, I describe the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technology, used in our laboratory, to study the incidence and repair of lesions induced in human cells by ultraviolet light. The Comet-FISH method permits the simultaneous and comparative analysis of DNA damage and its repair throughout the genome and in defined chromosomal regions. This very sensitive approach can be applied to any lesion, such as those induced by chemical carcinogens and products of cellular metabolism that can be converted to DNA single- or double-strand breaks. The unique advantages and limitations of the method for particular applications are discussed.

  8. Oxidative Damage Induced by Arsenic in Mice or Rats: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mengchuan; Rui, Dongsheng; Yan, Yizhong; Xu, Shangzhi; Niu, Qiang; Feng, Gangling; Wang, Yan; Li, Shugang; Jing, Mingxia

    2017-03-01

    In this meta-analysis, studies reporting arsenic-induced oxidative damage in mouse models were systematically evaluated to provide a scientific understanding of oxidative stress mechanisms associated with arsenic poisoning. Fifty-eight relevant peer-reviewed publications were identified through exhaustive database searching. Oxidative stress indexes assessed included superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), malondialdehyde (MDA), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our meta-analysis showed that arsenic exposure generally suppressed measured levels of the antioxidants, SOD, CAT, GSH, GPx, GST, and GR, but increased levels of the oxidants, GSSG, MDA, and ROS. Arsenic valence was important and GR and MDA levels increased to a significantly (P < 0.05) greater extent upon exposure to As(3+) than to As(5+). Other factors that contributed to a greater overall oxidative effect from arsenic exposure included intervention time, intervention method, dosage, age of animals, and the sample source from which the indexes were estimated. Our meta-analysis effectively summarized a wide range of studies and detected a positive relationship between arsenic exposure and oxidative damage. These data provide a scientific basis for the prevention and treatment of arsenic poisoning.

  9. Ice crystal damage and radiation effects in relation to microscopy and analysis at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Echlin, P

    1991-01-01

    There are several limitations to the low-temperature techniques which are currently being used for the preparation, examination and analysis of biological and organic samples by means of high-energy beam instrumentation. The low thermal conductivity of samples and the inadequacy of rapid cooling techniques means that, with the exception of thin-film suspensions and the surface of impact-cooled bulk specimens which may be vitrified, ice crystals of varying sizes will be present in nearly all samples which are quench cooled. Data are presented which indicate the depth to which adequate cryo-fixation may be achieved for both morphological and analytical studies. Although dynamic processes may be time resolved in the outer parts of quench-cooled samples, the decreased freezing rate below the surface makes resolution of these processes much less certain. The quality of information which may be obtained from quench-cooled samples is limited by radiation damage. Low-dose microscopy of vitrified thin-film suspensions of macromolecules continues to provide valid structural information at the molecular level. The increased doses needed for X-ray microanalysis present serious problems with the high spatial resolution analysis of thin frozen-hydrated sections although much less damage is observed in dried samples. A case is presented for using the outer fracture faces of frozen-hydrated bulk samples for low-resolution analysis of cells and tissues.

  10. Application of alkaline sucrose gradient centrifugation in the analysis of DNA replication after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Raschke, Sascha; Guan, Jun; Iliakis, George

    2009-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation is a powerful technique for fractionating macromolecules like DNA, RNA, and proteins. For this purpose, a sample containing a mixture of different size macromolecules is layered on the surface of a gradient whose density increases linearly from top to bottom. During centrifugation, different size macromolecules sediment through the gradient at different rates. The rate of sedimentation depends, in addition to centrifugal force, on the size, shape, and density of the macromolecules, as well as on the density and viscosity of the gradient. In this way, macromolecules are separated by size with larger ones sedimenting towards the bottom and lighter ones remaining close to the top of the gradient. The method has been particularly successful in the size fractionation of large DNA molecules and has been extensively used to measure induction and repair of DNA breaks after exposure to clastogenic factors. Here, we describe an adaptation of this method that can be used in the analysis of newly synthesized DNA formed during DNA replication. Through size analysis of nascent DNA in alkaline sucrose gradients, variations in replication activity can be measured after exposure of cells to DNA-damaging agents. The method is particularly useful as it allows distinction between DNA damage-mediated effects on chain elongation vs. replicon initiation, which is essential for an in-depth analysis of the intra-S-phase checkpoint. This ability makes the technique unique and justifies its somewhat labour-intensive nature.

  11. Analysis of core damage frequency: Peach Bottom, Unit 2 internal events appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.; Maloney, K.J.; Wheeler, T.A.; Daniel, S.L.; Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM )

    1989-08-01

    This document contains the appendices for the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for the Peach Bottom, Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. This is one of the five plant analyses conducted as part of the NUREG-1150 effort for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The work performed and described here is an extensive reanalysis of that published in October 1986 as NUREG/CR-4550, Volume 4. It addresses comments from numerous reviewers and significant changes to the plant systems and procedures made since the first report. The uncertainty analysis and presentation of results are also much improved, and considerable effort was expended on an improved analysis of loss of offsite power. The content and detail of this report is directed toward PRA practitioners who need to know how the work was done and the details for use in further studies. The mean core damage frequency is 4.5E-6 with 5% and 95% uncertainty bounds of 3.5E-7 and 1.3E-5, respectively. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) contributed about 46% of the core damage frequency with Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) accidents contributing another 42%. The numerical results are driven by loss of offsite power, transients with the power conversion system initially available operator errors, and mechanical failure to scram. 13 refs., 345 figs., 171 tabs.

  12. Full-Scale Test and Analysis of a PRSEUS Fuselage Panel to Assess Damage-Containment Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergan, Andrew; Bakuckas, John G.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Linton, Kim A.; Korkosz, Gregory; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Tan, Tein-Min

    2011-01-01

    Stitched composite technology has the potential to substantially decrease structural weight through enhanced damage containment capabilities. The most recent generation of stitched composite technology, the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept, has been shown to successfully arrest damage at the sub-component level through tension testing of a three stringer panel with damage in the form of a two-bay notch. In a joint effort undertaken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Boeing Company, further studies are being conducted to characterize the damage containment features of the PRSEUS concept. A full-scale residual strength test will be performed on a fuselage panel to determine if the load capacity will meet strength, deformation, and damage tolerance requirements. A curved panel was designed, fabricated, and prepared for residual strength testing. A pre-test Finite Element Model (FEM) was developed using design allowables from previous test programs to predict test panel deformation characteristics and margins of safety. Three phases of testing with increasing damage severity include: (1) as manufactured; (2) barely visible impact damage (BVID) and visible impact damage (VID); and (3) discrete source damage (DSD) where the panel will be loaded to catastrophic failure. This paper presents the background information, test plan, and experimental procedure. This paper is the first of several future articles reporting the test preparations, results, and analysis conducted in the test program.

  13. Damage Tolerance Analysis of Space Shuttle External Tank Lug Fillet Welds Using NASGRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.

    2006-01-01

    The damage tolerance of the External Tank (ET) lug welds were reassessed because of an increase in the loads due to the removal of the protuberance air load (PAT.,) ramp. The analysis methods included detailed finite element analysis (FEA) of the ET welded lugs and FEA of the lug weld test configuration. The FEA results were used as input to the crack growth analysis code NASGRO to calculate the mission life capability of the ET lug welds and to predict the number of cycles to failure in the lug weld testing. The presentation presents the method of transferring the FEM results to the NASGRO model and gives correlations between FEM and NASGRO stress intensity calculations.

  14. Visualization of co-localization in Aβ42-administered neuroblastoma cells reveals lysosome damage and autophagosome accumulation related to cell death.

    PubMed

    Soura, Violetta; Stewart-Parker, Maris; Williams, Thomas L; Ratnayaka, Arjuna; Atherton, Joe; Gorringe, Kirsti; Tuffin, Jack; Darwent, Elisabeth; Rambaran, Roma; Klein, William; Lacor, Pascale; Staras, Kevin; Thorpe, Julian; Serpell, Louise C

    2012-01-15

    Aβ42 [amyloid-β peptide-(1-42)] plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease and is known to have a detrimental effect on neuronal cell function and survival when assembled into an oligomeric form. In the present study we show that administration of freshly prepared Aβ42 oligomers to a neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell line results in a reduction in survival, and that Aβ42 enters the cells prior to cell death. Immunoconfocal and immunogold electron microscopy reveal the path of the Aβ42 with time through the endosomal system and shows that it accumulates in lysosomes. A 24 h incubation with Aβ results in cells that have damaged lysosomes showing signs of enzyme leakage, accumulate autophagic vacuoles and exhibit severely disrupted nuclei. Endogenous Aβ is evident in the cells and the results of the present study suggest that the addition of Aβ oligomers disrupts a crucial balance in Aβ conformation and concentration inside neuronal cells, resulting in catastrophic effects on cellular function and, ultimately, in cell death.

  15. Whole-exome sequencing reveals genetic variants associated with chronic kidney disease characterized by tubulointerstitial damages in North Central Region, Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Nanayakkara, Shanika; Senevirathna, S T M L D; Parahitiyawa, Nipuna B; Abeysekera, Tilak; Chandrajith, Rohana; Ratnatunga, Neelakanthi; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio

    2015-09-01

    The familial clustering observed in chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) characterized by tubulointerstitial damages in the North Central Region of Sri Lanka strongly suggests the involvement of genetic factors in its pathogenesis. The objective of the present study is to use whole-exome sequencing to identify the genetic variants associated with CKDu. Whole-exome sequencing of eight CKDu cases and eight controls was performed, followed by direct sequencing of candidate loci in 301 CKDu cases and 276 controls. Association study revealed rs34970857 (c.658G > A/p.V220M) located in the KCNA10 gene encoding a voltage-gated K channel as the most promising SNP with the highest odds ratio of 1.74. Four rare variants were identified in gene encoding Laminin beta2 (LAMB2) which is known to cause congenital nephrotic syndrome. Three out of four variants in LAMB2 were novel variants found exclusively in cases. Genetic investigations provide strong evidence on the presence of genetic susceptibility for CKDu. Possibility of presence of several rare variants associated with CKDu in this population is also suggested.

  16. Quantitative analysis of isolated and clustered DNA damage induced by gamma-rays, carbon ion beams, and iron ion beams.

    PubMed

    Terato, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Ruri; Nakaarai, Yusuke; Nohara, Tomonori; Doi, Yusuke; Iwai, Shigenori; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Ide, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Ionizing radiation induces multiple damaged sites (clustered damage) together with isolated lesions in DNA. Clustered damage consists of closely spaced lesions within a few helical turns of DNA and is considered to be crucial for understanding the biological consequences of ionizing radiation. In the present study, two types of DNA, supercoiled plasmid DNA and linear lambda DNA, were irradiated with gamma-rays, carbon ion beams, and iron ion beams, and the spectra and yield of isolated DNA damage and bistranded clustered DNA damage were fully analyzed. Despite using different methods for damage analysis, the experiments with plasmid and lambda DNA gave largely consistent results. The spectra of both isolated and clustered damage were essentially independent of the quality of the ionizing radiation used for irradiation. The yields of clustered damage as well as of isolated damage decreased with the different radiation beams in the order gamma> C > Fe, thus exhibiting an inverse correlation with LET [gamma (0.2 keV/microm) < C (13 keV/microm) < Fe (200 keV/microm)]. Consistent with in vitro data, the yield of chromosomal DNA DSBs decreased with increasing LET in Chinese hamster cells irradiated with carbon ion beams with different LETs, suggesting that the decrease in the yield of clustered damage with increasing LET is not peculiar to in vitro irradiation of DNA, but is common for both in vitro and in vivo irradiation. These results suggest that the adverse biological effect of the ionizing radiation is not simply accounted for by the yield of clustered DNA damage, and that the complexity of the clustered damage needs to be considered to understand the biological consequences of ionizing radiation.

  17. Product analysis of partial discharge damage to oil-impregnated insulation paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaming; Liao, Ruijin; Yang, Lijun; Li, Jian; Liu, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Surface products of oil-impregnated insulation paper during the damage process caused by partial discharge (PD), as well as gas within the cavity, were studied. An optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to investigate surface morphology, while an infrared spectroscopy (IR) and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study surface products and their components. The volume variation in cavity gas was also analyzed. Furthermore, gas constituents and their relevant contents were studied using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The study results reveal the following: during the PD damage process, the total gas volume and the content of electronegative gasses alternately decline and increase, while discharge types alternate between pulse type and pseudo-glow type (or glow type); “surface droplets” and “crystalline solids” appear on the insulation surface one after another; surface droplets mainly consist of (Cdbnd O)-group-containing compounds, whereas crystalline solids are mainly carboxylic acids, with carboxyl groups also found in cellulose chains; and the discharge type related to the oxidization of decomposition products is the main factor that determines the state (liquid or solid) of the surface products.

  18. [Criminal enquiry and determination of dental damage. Analysis of a prosthetic fracture following an accident].

    PubMed

    Tabak, M; Roelandt, A; Vereecken, J; Verstappen, Ch

    2002-01-01

    When signing a legal insurance policy, one is not always aware of the seriousness of the reciprocal legal consequences. Physical injuries mainly involve civil procedures in spite of the fact that criminal proceedings are instituted in some cases. This article deals with the judicial inquiry concerning the notification of an accident with insurance claim. The object of this inquiry is a porcelain fracture caused by a so-called accident where verification becomes very complicated for the appointed experts. If diagnosis, anamnesis and the initial examination indicate possible fraud in the case, the expert's assessment for the insurer will rightly include the criminal section. What does this involve for the expert and his team? The violation of the public interest by making a false statement will result in the expert trying to reveal the truth instead of estimating the damage.

  19. Genome wide analysis of Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis development reveals dynamic expression using network enrichment analysis.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Valérie S; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Development involves precise timing of gene expression and coordinated pathways for organogenesis and morphogenesis. Functional and sub-network enrichment analysis provides an integrated approach for identifying networks underlying development. The objectives of this study were to characterize early gene regulatory networks over Silurana tropicalis development from NF stage 2 to 46 using a custom Agilent 4×44K microarray. There were >8000 unique gene probes that were differentially expressed between Nieuwkoop-Faber (NF) stage 2 and stage 16, and >2000 gene probes differentially expressed between NF 34 and 46. Gene ontology revealed that genes involved in nucleosome assembly, cell division, pattern specification, neurotransmission, and general metabolism were increasingly regulated throughout development, consistent with active development. Sub-network enrichment analysis revealed that processes such as membrane hyperpolarisation, retinoic acid, cholesterol, and dopamine metabolic gene networks were activated/inhibited over time. This study identifies RNA transcripts that are potentially maternally inherited in an anuran species, provides evidence that the expression of genes involved in retinoic acid receptor signaling may increase prior to those involved in thyroid receptor signaling, and characterizes novel gene expression networks preceding organogenesis which increases understanding of the spatiotemporal embryonic development in frogs.

  20. Proteomic Profiling Analysis Reveals a Link between Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis and Complement Activation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, D D; Hu, B; Tang, H Y; Sun, Y Y; Liu, B; Tian, Q M; Bi, H S

    2017-05-01

    Uveitis is an autoimmune disease that usually damages the vision function, leading to poor visual quality in patients. As an autoimmune ocular inflammatory disease, the pathogenesis of uveitis is associated with abnormal expression of some proteins and aberrant regulation of multiple signalling pathways. Nevertheless, the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we induced an experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) model in rats. We determined the levels of C3a and membrane attack complex C5b-9 (soluble C5b-9, sC5b-9) in both plasma and aqueous humour, identified the differentially expressed proteins in plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and employed bioinformatics algorithms to analyse differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasma. The results demonstrate that there were 168 differentially expressed plasma proteins in EAU rats versus control subjects. The levels of sC5b-9 and C3a were elevated in the plasmas and aqueous humours of EAU rats. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed that the differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasma were mainly involved in metabolic and immune processes. Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation, database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery (DAVID) and protein-protein interaction analyses revealed that the differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasmas were closely associated with complement and coagulation cascades, metabolic pathways, NF-kappa B, PI3K-Akt, Toll-like receptors and autophagy. Overall, the differentially expressed proteins in EAU rat plasmas are mainly involved in the complement and coagulation cascades. The pathogenesis of uveitis closely correlates with complement activation. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  1. Analysis of Individual Molecular Events of DNA Damage Response by Flow and Image Assisted Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Traganos, Frank; Zhao, Hong; Halicka, H. Dorota; Skommer, Joanna; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes molecular mechanisms of DNA damage response (DDR) and presents flow- and image-assisted cytometric approaches to assess these mechanisms and measure the extent of DDR in individual cells. DNA damage was induced by cell treatment with oxidizing agents, UV light, DNA topoisomerase I or II inhibitors, cisplatin, tobacco smoke, and by exogenous and endogenous oxidants. Chromatin relaxation (decondensation) is an early event of DDR chromatin that involves modification of high mobility group proteins (HMGs) and histone H1 and was detected by cytometry by analysis of the susceptibility of DNA in situ to denaturation using the metachromatic fluorochrome acridine orange. Translocation of the MRN complex consisting of Meiotic Recombination 11 Homolog A (Mre11), Rad50 homolog and Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome 1 (NMR1) into DNA damage sites was assessed by laser scanning cytometry as the increase in the intensity of maximal pixel as well as integral value of Mre11 immunofluorescence. Examples of cytometric detection of activation of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), and Check 2 (Chk2) protein kinases using phospho-specific Abs targeting Ser1981 and Thr68 of these proteins, respectively are also presented. We also discuss approaches to correlate activation of ATM and Chk2 with phosphorylation of p53 on Ser15 and histone H2AX on Ser139 as well as with cell cycle position and DNA replication. The capability of laser scanning cytometry to quantify individual foci of phosphorylated H2AX and/or ATM that provides more dependable assessment of the presence of DNA double-strand breaks is outlined. The new microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip platforms for interrogation of individual cells offer a novel approach for DDR cytometric analysis. PMID:21722802

  2. Damage analysis of CFRP-confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular columns by acoustic emission techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi; Feng, Quanming; Wang, Yanlei

    2015-08-01

    Damage properties of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular (CCFT) columns were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. AE characteristic parameters were obtained through axial compression tests. The severity of damage to CFRP-CCFT columns was estimated using the growing trend of AE accumulated energy as basis. The bearing capacity of CFRP-CCFT columns and AE accumulated energy improved as CFRP layers increased. The damage process was studied using a number of crucial AE parameters. The cracks’ mode can be differentiated through the ratio of the rise time to the waveform amplitude and through average frequency analysis. With the use of intensity signal analysis, the damage process of the CFRP-CCFT columns can be classified into three levels that represent different degrees. Based on b-value analysis, the development of the obtained cracks can be defined. Thus, identifying an initial yielding and providing early warning is possible.

  3. Micromechanics Fatigue Damage Analysis Modeling for Fabric Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Xue, D.; Shi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis modeling method was developed to analyze the damage progression and fatigue failure of fabric reinforced composite structures, especially for the brittle ceramic matrix material composites. A repeating unit cell concept of fabric reinforced composites was used to represent the global composite structure. The thermal and mechanical properties of the repeating unit cell were considered as the same as those of the global composite structure. The three-phase micromechanics, the shear-lag, and the continuum fracture mechanics models were integrated with a statistical model in the repeating unit cell to predict the progressive damages and fatigue life of the composite structures. The global structure failure was defined as the loss of loading capability of the repeating unit cell, which depends on the stiffness reduction due to material slice failures and nonlinear material properties in the repeating unit cell. The present methodology is demonstrated with the analysis results evaluated through the experimental test performed with carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix plain weave composite specimens.

  4. Compression garments and recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jessica; Howatson, Glyn; van Someren, Ken; Leeder, Jonathan; Pedlar, Charles

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of compression garments on recovery following damaging exercise. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted using studies that evaluated the efficacy of compression garments on measures of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), muscular strength, muscular power and creatine kinase (CK). Studies were extracted from a literature search of online databases. Data were extracted from 12 studies, where variables were measured at baseline and at 24 or 48 or 72 h postexercise. Analysis of pooled data indicated that the use of compression garments had a moderate effect in reducing the severity of DOMS (Hedges' g=0.403, 95% CI 0.236 to 0.569, p<0.001), muscle strength (Hedges' g=0.462, 95% CI 0.221 to 0.703, p<0.001), muscle power (Hedges' g=0.487, 95% CI 0.267 to 0.707, p<0.001) and CK (Hedges' g=0.439, 95% CI 0.171 to 0.706, p<0.001). These results indicate that compression garments are effective in enhancing recovery from muscle damage. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Stress analysis and damage evaluation of flawed composite laminates by hybrid-numerical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yii-Ching

    1992-01-01

    Structural components in flight vehicles is often inherited flaws, such as microcracks, voids, holes, and delamination. These defects will degrade structures the same as that due to damages in service, such as impact, corrosion, and erosion. It is very important to know how a structural component can be useful and survive after these flaws and damages. To understand the behavior and limitation of these structural components researchers usually do experimental tests or theoretical analyses on structures with simulated flaws. However, neither approach has been completely successful. As Durelli states that 'Seldom does one method give a complete solution, with the most efficiency'. Examples of this principle is seen in photomechanics which additional strain-gage testing can only average stresses at locations of high concentration. On the other hand, theoretical analyses including numerical analyses are implemented with simplified assumptions which may not reflect actual boundary conditions. Hybrid-Numerical methods which combine photomechanics and numerical analysis have been used to correct this inefficiency since 1950's. But its application is limited until 1970's when modern computer codes became available. In recent years, researchers have enhanced the data obtained from photoelasticity, laser speckle, holography and moire' interferometry for input of finite element analysis on metals. Nevertheless, there is only few of literature being done on composite laminates. Therefore, this research is dedicated to this highly anisotropic material.

  6. Testing and Analysis of a Composite Non-Cylindrical Aircraft Fuselage Structure . Part II; Severe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Rouse, Marshall; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2016-01-01

    The Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project aimed to develop aircraft technologies enabling significant fuel burn and community noise reductions. Small incremental changes to the conventional metallic alloy-based 'tube and wing' configuration were not sufficient to achieve the desired metrics. One airframe concept identified by the project as having the potential to dramatically improve aircraft performance was a composite-based hybrid wing body configuration. Such a concept, however, presented inherent challenges stemming from, among other factors, the necessity to transfer wing loads through the entire center fuselage section which accommodates a pressurized cabin confined by flat or nearly flat panels. This paper discusses a finite element analysis and the testing of a large-scale hybrid wing body center section structure developed and constructed to demonstrate that the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept can meet these challenging demands of the next generation airframes. Part II of the paper considers the final test to failure of the test article in the presence of an intentionally inflicted severe discrete source damage under the wing up-bending loading condition. Finite element analysis results are compared with measurements acquired during the test and demonstrate that the hybrid wing body test article was able to redistribute and support the required design loads in a severely damaged condition.

  7. Finite Elements Analysis of a Composite Semi-Span Test Article With and Without Discrete Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Jegley, Dawn C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    AS&M Inc. performed finite element analysis, with and without discrete damage, of a composite semi-span test article that represents the Boeing 220-passenger transport aircraft composite semi-span test article. A NASTRAN bulk data file and drawings of the test mount fixtures and semi-span components were utilized to generate the baseline finite element model. In this model, the stringer blades are represented by shell elements, and the stringer flanges are combined with the skin. Numerous modeling modifications and discrete source damage scenarios were applied to the test article model throughout the course of the study. This report details the analysis method and results obtained from the composite semi-span study. Analyses were carried out for three load cases: Braked Roll, LOG Down-Bending and 2.5G Up-Bending. These analyses included linear and nonlinear static response, as well as linear and nonlinear buckling response. Results are presented in the form of stress and strain plots. factors of safety for failed elements, buckling loads and modes, deflection prediction tables and plots, and strainage prediction tables and plots. The collected results are presented within this report for comparison to test results.

  8. Damage sensitivity investigations of EMI technique on different materials through coupled field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhrigu; Adhikari, Sailesh; Bhalla, Suresh

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a comparative study through the piezoelectric coupled field analysis mode of finite element method (FEM) on detection of damages of varying magnitude, encompassing three different types of structural materials, using piezo impedance transducers. An aluminum block, a concrete block and a steel block of dimensions 48×48×10 mm were modelled in finite element software ANSYS. A PZT patch of 10×10×0.3 mm was also included in the model as surface bonded on the block. Coupled field analysis (CFA) was performed to obtain the admittance signatures of the piezo sensor in the frequency range of 0-250 kHz. The root mean square deviation (RMSD) index was employed to quantify the degree of variation of the signatures. It was found that concrete exhibited deviation in the signatures only with the change of damping values. However, the other two materials showed variation in the signatures even with changes in density and elasticity values in a small portion of the specimen. The comparative study shows that the PZT patches are more sensitive to damage detection in materials with low damping and the sensitivity typically decreases with increase in the damping.

  9. Advanced Durability and Damage Tolerance Design and Analysis Methods for Composite Structures: Lessons Learned from NASA Technology Development Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Shuart, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are designed to be durable and damage tolerant. Durability is largely an economic life-cycle design consideration whereas damage tolerance directly addresses the structural airworthiness (safety) of the vehicle. However, both durability and damage tolerance design methodologies must address the deleterious effects of changes in material properties and the initiation and growth of microstructural damage that may occur during the service lifetime of the vehicle. Durability and damage tolerance design and certification requirements are addressed for commercial transport aircraft and NASA manned spacecraft systems. The state-of-the-art in advanced design and analysis methods is illustrated by discussing the results of several recently completed NASA technology development programs. These programs include the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program demonstrating technologies for large transport aircraft and the X-33 hypersonic test vehicle demonstrating technologies for a single-stage-to-orbit space launch vehicle.

  10. Seismic damage analysis of the outlet piers of arch dams using the finite element sub-model method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Liangfeng; Wu, Mingxin; Wang, Jinting; Xu, Yanjie

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to analyze seismic damage of reinforced outlet piers of arch dams by the nonlinear finite element (FE) sub-model method. First, the dam-foundation system is modeled and analyzed, in which the effects of infinite foundation, contraction joints, and nonlinear concrete are taken into account. The detailed structures of the outlet pier are then simulated with a refined FE model in the sub-model analysis. In this way the damage mechanism of the plain (unreinforced) outlet pier is analyzed, and the effects of two reinforcement measures (i.e., post-tensioned anchor cables and reinforcing bar) on the dynamic damage to the outlet pier are investigated comprehensively. Results show that the plain pier is damaged severely by strong earthquakes while implementation of post-tensioned anchor cables strengthens the pier effectively. In addition, radiation damping strongly alleviates seismic damage to the piers.

  11. Microtexture Analysis and Modeling of Ambient Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Damages in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Singh, A. K.; Raman, S. Ganesh Sundara; Kumar, Vikas

    2017-02-01

    In the present investigation, microtexture analysis using electron back-scattered diffraction technique has been performed to study fatigue- and creep-fatigue damages and associated deformation structures in Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Special emphasis has been given to low-angle grain boundary configuration and its possible application as a damage indicator. Damage is mostly present in the form of voids as investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Stored deformation energies have been evaluated for the strain-controlled fatigue-, the stress-controlled fatigue-, and the creep-fatigue-tested samples. Stored deformation energies have also been analyzed vis-à-vis total damage energies to quantify the contribution of damages to various samples. A relation between the stored deformation energy and the applied strain amplitude has been proposed in this study.

  12. Microstructural analysis of MTR fuel plates damaged by a coolant flow blockage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaers, A.; Joppen, F.; Van den Berghe, S.

    2009-10-01

    In 1975, as a result of a blockage of the coolant inlet flow, two plates of a fuel element of the BR2 reactor of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK•CEN) were partially melted. The fuel element consisted of Al-clad plates with 90% 235U enriched UAl x fuel dispersed in an Al matrix. The element had accumulated a burn up of 21% 235U before it was removed from the reactor. Recently, the damaged fuel plates were sent to the hot laboratory for detailed PIE. Microstructural changes and associated temperature markers were used to identify several stages in the progression to fuel melting. It was found that the temperature in the center of the fuel plate had increased above 900-950 °C before the reactor was scrammed. In view of the limited availability of such datasets, the results of this microstructural analysis provide valuable input in the analysis of accident scenarios for research reactors.

  13. Advances in Structural Integrity Analysis Methods for Aging Metallic Airframe Structures with Local Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis methodologies for predicting fatigue-crack growth from rivet holes in panels subjected to cyclic loads and for predicting the residual strength of aluminum fuselage structures with cracks and subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are described. The fatigue-crack growth analysis methodology is based on small-crack theory and a plasticity induced crack-closure model, and the effect of a corrosive environment on crack-growth rate is included. The residual strength analysis methodology is based on the critical crack-tip-opening-angle fracture criterion that characterizes the fracture behavior of a material of interest, and a geometric and material nonlinear finite element shell analysis code that performs the structural analysis of the fuselage structure of interest. The methodologies have been verified experimentally for structures ranging from laboratory coupons to full-scale structural components. Analytical and experimental results based on these methodologies are described and compared for laboratory coupons and flat panels, small-scale pressurized shells, and full-scale curved stiffened panels. The residual strength analysis methodology is sufficiently general to include the effects of multiple-site damage on structural behavior.

  14. Evaluation of skin damage caused by percutaneous absorption enhancers using fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Obata, Y; Sesumi, T; Takayama, K; Isowa, K; Grosh, S; Wick, S; Sitz, R; Nagai, T

    2000-04-01

    Fractal analysis of the cross-sectional morphology of rat skin was conducted to evaluate pathologic changes evoked by percutaneous absorption enhancers. Male hairless rats (WBN/Ht-ILA), 8 weeks old, weighing 160 to 180 g were used. Under anesthetization, glass cells (10-mm inner diameter) were attached to the rats' abdomens, and test solutions containing various mixtures of the percutaneous absorption enhancers, sodium lauryl sulfate, isopropanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and sodium myristate were applied. Six hours after application, the solutions were removed and the abdominal skin was excised. Skin cross sections were analyzed with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Image data taken by the CCD camera were fed into a desktop digital computer; then the fractal dimension of each skin cross section was determined on the basis of the box-counting algorithm. A pathologic study was also performed on the skin treated with the test solution. All sections of skin were examined with an optical photo microscope. Pathologic findings were classified into five levels. The total irritation score (TIS) was defined as the summation of damage levels in all regions. Only with the administration of hydrogel containing 2-methyl-1-butanol or sodium lauryl sulfate were positive values of TIS observed. However, the TIS values were independent of the concentration of these components. The most severe skin damage was evoked by application of sodium lauryl sulfate. Noticeable skin damage was also seen with 2-methyl-1-butanol. No irritation to the skin resulted from treatment with isopropanol or sodium myristate. When test solution containing sodium lauryl sulfate was applied to the skin, a remarkable increment in fractal dimensions was noted. This may suggest that the structure of the skin was greatly compromised as a result of sodium lauryl sulfate application. Although no change in fractal dimension was observed as a result of application of the test solution containing only 25

  15. Study on the evaluation of erosion damage by using laser ultrasonic integrated with a wavelet analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, T.; Naoe, T.; Wakui, T.; Futakawa, M.; Obayashi, H.; Sasa, T.

    2017-05-01

    Spallation targets are the key components of accelerator driven systems (ADSs) that are being developed in the world. Erosion damages on the target vessels are anticipated. To prevent accidents occurrence due to erosion of spallation target vessel, the damage evaluation technique is desirable. The excited vibration of LBE target vessel will be monitored remotely to establish the technique. In this study, the basic researches were carried out through experiments and numerical simulations to investigate the interaction between ultrasonic waves and damage to understand the correlation between structural vibration and damage degree. Specimens with distributed erosion damage was irradiated by laser shots, and the vibration was detected by a laser vibrometer subsequently. A technique, Wavelet Differential Analysis (WDA), was developed to quantitatively and clearly indicate the differences caused by damage in the vibration signals. The results illustrated that the developed technique is sensitive to erosion damage with small size and is capable of quantitatively evaluating erosion damage. It is expected that the developed techniques can be applied to monitor the real spallation targets in the future.

  16. Novel method for site-specific induction of oxidative DNA damage reveals differences in recruitment of repair proteins to heterochromatin and euchromatin

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Wei, Leizhen; Sun, Luxi; Hsieh, Ching-Lung; Sobol, Robert W.; Bruchez, Marcel; Van Houten, Bennett; Yasui, Akira; Levine, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair pathway. However, the effect of chromatin structure on BER protein recruitment to DNA damage sites in living cells is poorly understood. To address this problem, we developed a method to specifically produce ROS-induced DNA damage by fusing KillerRed (KR), a light-stimulated ROS-inducer, to a tet-repressor (tetR-KR) or a transcription activator (TA-KR). TetR-KR or TA-KR, bound to a TRE cassette (∼90 kb) integrated at a defined genomic locus in U2OS cells, was used to induce ROS damage in hetero- or euchromatin, respectively. We found that DNA glycosylases were efficiently recruited to DNA damage in heterochromatin, as well as in euchromatin. PARP1 was recruited to DNA damage within condensed chromatin more efficiently than in active chromatin. In contrast, recruitment of FEN1 was highly enriched at sites of DNA damage within active chromatin in a PCNA- and transcription activation-dependent manner. These results indicate that oxidative DNA damage is differentially processed within hetero or euchromatin. PMID:24293652

  17. A novel approach for organelle-specific DNA damage targeting reveals different susceptibility of mitochondrial DNA to the anticancer drugs camptothecin and topotecan

    PubMed Central

    de la Loza, M. C. Díaz; Wellinger, R. E.

    2009-01-01

    DNA is susceptible of being damaged by chemicals, UV light or gamma irradiation. Nuclear DNA damage invokes both a checkpoint and a repair response. By contrast, little is known about the cellular response to mitochondrial DNA damage. We designed an experimental system that allows organelle-specific DNA damage targeting in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DNA damage is mediated by a toxic topoisomerase I allele which leads to the formation of persistent DNA single-strand breaks. We show that organelle-specific targeting of a toxic topoisomerase I to either the nucleus or mitochondria leads to nuclear DNA damage and cell death or to loss of mitochondrial DNA and formation of respiration-deficient ‘petite’ cells, respectively. In wild-type cells, toxic topoisomerase I–DNA intermediates are formed as a consequence of topoisomerase I interaction with camptothecin-based anticancer drugs. We reasoned that targeting of topoisomerase I to the mitochondria of top1Δ cells should lead to petite formation in the presence of camptothecin. Interestingly, camptothecin failed to generate petite; however, its derivative topotecan accumulates in mitochondria and induces petite formation. Our findings demonstrate that drug modifications can lead to organelle-specific DNA damage and thus opens new perspectives on the role of mitochondrial DNA-damage in cancer treatment. PMID:19151088

  18. Novel method for site-specific induction of oxidative DNA damage reveals differences in recruitment of repair proteins to heterochromatin and euchromatin.

    PubMed

    Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Wei, Leizhen; Sun, Luxi; Hsieh, Ching-Lung; Sobol, Robert W; Bruchez, Marcel; Van Houten, Bennett; Yasui, Akira; Levine, Arthur S

    2014-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair pathway. However, the effect of chromatin structure on BER protein recruitment to DNA damage sites in living cells is poorly understood. To address this problem, we developed a method to specifically produce ROS-induced DNA damage by fusing KillerRed (KR), a light-stimulated ROS-inducer, to a tet-repressor (tetR-KR) or a transcription activator (TA-KR). TetR-KR or TA-KR, bound to a TRE cassette (∼ 90 kb) integrated at a defined genomic locus in U2OS cells, was used to induce ROS damage in hetero- or euchromatin, respectively. We found that DNA glycosylases were efficiently recruited to DNA damage in heterochromatin, as well as in euchromatin. PARP1 was recruited to DNA damage within condensed chromatin more efficiently than in active chromatin. In contrast, recruitment of FEN1 was highly enriched at sites of DNA damage within active chromatin in a PCNA- and transcription activation-dependent manner. These results indicate that oxidative DNA damage is differentially processed within hetero or euchromatin.

  19. Lost ecosystem services as a measure of oil spill damages: a conceptual analysis of the importance of baselines.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Chris J; Cheong, So-Min

    2013-10-15

    The assessment and quantification of damages resulting from marine oil spills is typically coordinated by NOAA, and has historically utilized Habitat Equivalency Analysis (HEA) to estimate damages. Resource economists and others have called for the damage assessment process to instead estimate injuries through the valuation of lost ecosystem services. Our conceptual analysis explores ecosystem service valuation from the perspective of "baselines," which are a fundamental component of both primary and compensatory restoration activities. In practice, baselines have been defined in ecological terms, with minimal consideration of the socioeconomic side of ecosystem service provision. We argue that, for the purposes of scaling compensatory restoration, it is more appropriate to characterize baselines in value terms, thereby integrating non-market valuation approaches from the onset of the damage assessment process. Benefits and challenges of this approach are discussed, along with guidelines for practitioners to identify circumstances in which socioeconomic variables are likely to be important for baseline characterization.

  20. Failure Analysis of Discrete Damaged Tailored Extension-Shear-Coupled Stiffened Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    2005-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of the failure of composite is tiffener panels with extension-shear coupling are presented. This tailored concept, when used in the cover skins of a tiltrotor aircraft wing has the potential for increasing the aeroelastic stability margins and improving the aircraft productivity. The extension-shear coupling is achieved by using unbalanced 45 plies in the skin. The failure analysis of two tailored panel configurations that have the center stringer and adjacent skin severed is presented. Finite element analysis of the damaged panels was conducted using STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) general purpose finite element program that includes a progressive failure capability for laminated composite structures that is based on point-stress analysis, traditional failure criteria, and ply discounting for material degradation. The progressive failure predicted the path of the failure and maximum load capability. There is less than 12 percent difference between the predicted failure load and experimental failure load. There is a good match of the panel stiffness and strength between the progressive failure analysis and the experimental results. The results indicate that the tailored concept would be feasible to use in the wing skin of a tiltrotor aircraft.

  1. Photo-cross-linking of XPC-Rad23B to cisplatin-damaged DNA reveals contacts with both strands of the DNA duplex and spans the DNA adduct.

    PubMed

    Neher, Tracy M; Rechkunova, Nadejda I; Lavrik, Olga I; Turchi, John J

    2010-02-02

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main pathway used for the repair of bulky DNA adducts such as those caused by UV light exposure and the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC)-Rad23B complex is involved in the recognition of these bulky DNA adducts and initiates the global genomic nucleotide excision repair pathway (GG-NER). Photo-cross-linking experiments revealed that the human XPC-Rad23B complex makes direct contact with both the cisplatin-damaged DNA strand and the complementary undamaged strand of a duplex DNA substrate. Coupling photo-cross-linking with denaturation and immunoprecipitation of protein-DNA complexes, we identified the XPC subunit in complex with damaged DNA. While the interaction of the XPC subunit with DNA was direct, studies revealed that although Rad23B was found in complex with DNA, the Rad23B-DNA interaction was largely indirect via its interaction with XPC. Using site specific cross-linking, we determined that the XPC-Rad23B complex is preferentially cross-linked to the damaged DNA when the photoreactive FAP-dCMP (exo-N-{2-[N-(4-azido-2,5-difluoro-3-chloropyridin-6-yl)-3-aminopropionyl]aminoethyl}-2'-deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate) analogue is located to the 5' side of the cisplatin-DNA adduct. When the FAP-dCMP analogue is located to the 3' side of the adduct, no difference in binding was detected between undamaged and damaged DNA. Collectively, these data suggest a model in which XPC-DNA interactions drive the damage recognition process contacting both the damaged and undamaged DNA strand. Preferential cross-linking 5' of the cisplatin-damaged site suggests that the XPC-Rad23B complex displays orientation specific binding to eventually impart directionality to the downstream binding and incision events relative to the site of DNA damage.

  2. Damage detection method for wind turbine blades based on dynamics analysis and mode shape difference curvature information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanfeng; Liang, Ming; Xiang, Jiawei

    2014-10-01

    Blades are among the key components of wind turbines. Blade damage is one of the most common types of structural defects and can cause catastrophic structural failure. Therefore, it is highly desirable to detect and diagnose blade damage as early as possible. In this paper, we propose a method for blade damage detection and diagnosis. This method incorporates finite element method (FEM) for dynamics analysis (modal analysis and response analysis) and the mode shape difference curvature (MSDC) information for damage detection/diagnosis. Finite element models of wind turbine blades have been built and modified via frequency comparison with experimental data and the formula for the model updating technique. Our numerical simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed technique can detect the spatial locations of damages for wind turbine blades. Changes in natural frequencies and modes for smaller size blades with damage are found to occur at lower frequencies and lower modes than in the larger sized blade case. The relationship between modal parameters and damage information (location, size) is very complicated especially for larger size blades. Moreover, structure and dynamic characters for larger size blades are different from those for smaller sized blades. Therefore, dynamic response analysis for a larger sized wind turbine blade with a multi-layer composite material based on aerodynamic loads’ (including lift forces and drag forces) calculation has been carried out and improved the efficiency and precision to damage detection by combining (MSDC) information. This method provides a low cost and efficient non-destructive tool for wind turbine blade condition monitoring.

  3. An analysis of ozone damage to historical maize and soybean yields in the United States.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Justin M; Betzelberger, Amy M; Wang, Shaowen; Shook, Eric; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Long, Stephen P; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-17

    Numerous controlled experiments find that elevated ground-level ozone concentrations ([O3]) damage crops and reduce yield. There have been no estimates of the actual yield losses in the field in the United States from [O3], even though such estimates would be valuable for projections of future food production and for cost-benefit analyses of reducing ground-level [O3]. Regression analysis of historical yield, climate, and [O3] data for the United States were used to determine the loss of production due to O3 for maize (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) from 1980 to 2011, showing that over that period production of rain-fed fields of soybean and maize were reduced by roughly 5% and 10%, respectively, costing approximately $9 billion annually. Maize, thought to be inherently resistant to O3, was at least as sensitive as soybean to O3 damage. Overcoming this yield loss with improved emission controls or more tolerant germplasm could substantially increase world food and feed supply at a time when a global yield jump is urgently needed.

  4. Analysis of Beam-Induced Damage to the SLC Positron Production Target

    SciTech Connect

    Bharadwaj, Vinod

    2002-08-20

    The nominal Next Linear Collider (NLC) positron production design is based on extrapolation of the existing SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) positron production system. Given that the SLC positron production target failed during a run, it is necessary to analyze the beam-induced damage to the target in order to validate the extrapolations on which the NLC target is based. The failed SLC target and its associated housing were sent to existing ''hot-cell'' facilities at LANL for analysis. The target material, a tungsten-rhenium ''puck'', was removed from the housing and photographed and x-rayed. Leak-checking on the cooling system was performed. Sections were then removed from the target to determine the extent of internal damage to the material. High resolution photographs were taken and extensive hardness tests were performed on the irradiated and non-irradiated areas of the target material. The results of these analyses and conclusions applicable to the NLC target design are presented in this paper.

  5. Damage analysis of aluminum matrix composite considering non-uniform distribution of SiC particles

    SciTech Connect

    Geni, M.; Kikuchi, M.

    1998-05-22

    In this study, based on the fracture surface observations using an SEM (scanning electron microscope), a numerical unit model and 3-dimensional non-uniform model for FEM (finite element method) analysis are proposed by using Gurson`s model as a constitutive equation. The effect of the non-uniform distribution of the SiC particle volume fraction and aspect ratio in the matrix are considered for the evaluation of the stress-strain relationship and the damage. The results show that the dimple fracture process of matrix aluminum alloy is well simulated, after a large amount of plastic deformation. The non-uniformity of the SiC particle volume fraction, aspect ratio and its locations have a strong effect on the local and global damage behavior and stress-strain relationships. It is shown that the fracture strain increases largely when the aspect ratio of SiC particles is 1.0 and it is distributed uniformly in the matrix. The numerical model is improved by considering the non-uniform effect on the tensile stress, fracture strain and local and global fracture.

  6. Balloon crash damage and injuries: an analysis of 86 accidents, 2000-2004.

    PubMed

    de Voogt, Alexander J; van Doorn, Robert R A

    2006-05-01

    General aviation accounts for the majority of aviation crashes and casualties in the United States. The role of ballooning in these statistics is not regularly studied. Since 2001, the National Transportation and Safety Board has made its accident reports more readily available, which presents opportunities for further study. This study analyzes and compares a 5-yr period of accident reports and includes an analysis of injuries and balloon damage in hot-air and gas balloon accidents. Balloon crash 2-page briefs and 5-page accident reports published by the National Transportation and Safety Board for the 5-yr time period 2000-2004 were examined. Data collected in the investigation of these crashes were analyzed and compared with the epidemiological data collected in earlier research. In 86 crashes during a 5-yr period, there were 4 fatalities and 75 people were seriously injured. Only one accident was reported involving a student pilot. Broken ankles and legs have been the most commonly recorded serious injury, but could not be linked to the severity of damage to the balloon. The absence of student pilot accidents may be explained by possible stricter supervision. Balloon basket and envelopes appear of sufficient quality to withstand crashes, but improving the protection of passengers during hard landings should help to decrease the number of serious injuries in ballooning.

  7. Fourier spectral-based modal curvature analysis and its application to damage detection in beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhi-Bo; Radzienski, Maciej; Kudela, Pawel; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a simple Fourier spectral-based method is proposed to calculate the modal curvature (MC) of beams instead of the traditional central difference method. Based on the present method, damages in beam-like structures are localized. The present method provides an alternative selection to estimate MC in damage detection. There are two advantages of the present method. Firstly, the spectral calculation of spatial derivatives is conducted globally, which provides the suppression for noise. In addition, signal processing in the wavenumber domain provides an alternative choice for spatial filtering for mode shapes. Secondly, the proposed method provides a precise estimation of the MC which is related to original definition. With the absence of numerical derivative, the estimated results can be more stable and robust. Statistical analysis is conducted to show the effectiveness and noise immunity of the proposed method. In order to obtain the better identification, the MC calculated by the proposed method is employed as the input of continuous wavelet transform, and then the hybrid method is generated. The validations of the present method and comparison with the traditional central difference method are numerically and experimentally demonstrated.

  8. Closing the loop: a spatial analysis to link observed environmental damage to predicted heavy metal emissions.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Anja; Hankard, Peter K; Spurgeon, David J; Svendsen, Claus; Wadsworth, Richard A; Weeks, Jason M

    2003-05-01

    In many cases, the link between industrial emissions and damage to the environment can only be inferred. The Environment Agency of the United Kingdom imposes emissions limits on industrial sites so that predicted concentrations and deposition rates remain below standard thresholds. Estimates of appropriate critical levels and loads are usually based on laboratory results and rarely estimate synergistic effects between pollutants or consider biological adaptation or selection in the target receptor organisms. The Avonmouth smelter has been emitting zinc and other heavy metals since 1929. It has been the subject of a number of detailed and synoptic studies, especially the impact on soil invertebrates. Damage was assessed using both physiological and ecological measurements. Two methods of spatial analysis were investigated, namely interpolation using standard geographical information system (GIS) operators and atmospheric dispersal modeling using an off-the-shelf model. Both methods can be used to compute contours (isolines) of predicted biological effect. Correlation results show that dispersal modeling is at least as good as kriging but requires much less data. This article demonstrates the usefulness of GIS and dispersal models as tools in decision making to determine the most suitable sampling sites in the assessment and monitoring of the impact of contamination around major point sources.

  9. Treatment and Analysis of a Paint Chip from "Water Lilies": A Fire Damaged Monet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.; Banks, Bruce A.; Tollis, Greg

    2001-01-01

    A museum fire in 1958 severely damaged a Monet 'Water Lilies' (1916-1926) painting that was on display. The surface of the painting is very dark with areas of blistering and charring. Over the years, traditional techniques have been found to be ineffective at removal of the soot and char from the surface. The painting, which is now in the care of the New York University (NYU) Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, was the subject of a study to determine if atomic oxygen treatment could remove the soot and char without damaging the fragile painting underneath. For test purposes, a small chip of paint was removed from the edge of the painting by a conservator at NYU and supplied to NASA Glenn Research Center for atomic oxygen treatment and analysis. The diffuse spectral reflectance, at three locations on the paint chip, was monitored at intervals during the atomic oxygen treatment process. Photo documentation of the chip during treatment was also performed. The color contrast was calculated from the spectral reflectance data as a function of treatment duration. Results of the testing indicated that the contrast improved as a result of the treatment, and the differentiation of colors on the surface was significantly improved. Soot and char could be removed without visibly affecting the gross surface features such as impasto areas. These results indicate the feasibility for the treatment of the 'Water Lilies' painting.

  10. An analysis of ozone damage to historical maize and soybean yields in the United States

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Justin M.; Betzelberger, Amy M.; Wang, Shaowen; Shook, Eric; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Long, Stephen P.; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous controlled experiments find that elevated ground-level ozone concentrations ([O3]) damage crops and reduce yield. There have been no estimates of the actual yield losses in the field in the United States from [O3], even though such estimates would be valuable for projections of future food production and for cost–benefit analyses of reducing ground-level [O3]. Regression analysis of historical yield, climate, and [O3] data for the United States were used to determine the loss of production due to O3 for maize (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) from 1980 to 2011, showing that over that period production of rain-fed fields of soybean and maize were reduced by roughly 5% and 10%, respectively, costing approximately $9 billion annually. Maize, thought to be inherently resistant to O3, was at least as sensitive as soybean to O3 damage. Overcoming this yield loss with improved emission controls or more tolerant germplasm could substantially increase world food and feed supply at a time when a global yield jump is urgently needed. PMID:26578785

  11. Analysis of CYP4501A1, PAHs metabolites in bile, and genotoxic damage in Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed to Biobío River sediments, Central Chile.

    PubMed

    Inzunza, Bárbara; Orrego, Rodrigo; Peñalosa, Marcelina; Gavilán, Juan F; Barra, Ricardo

    2006-10-01

    The responses of cytochrome P4501A1 in the liver, the appearance of fluorescent metabolites in bile, and genotoxic damage in erythrocytes were studied in Oncorhynchus mykiss exposed under laboratory conditions to sediments taken from the Biobio River, central Chile. Samples were taken at four sampling sites in the Biobio River, following a pollution gradient from the discharge, where Stations 2 and 3 are impacted by a petrochemical industrial discharge effluent. Chemical analysis indicates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) presence in a range of 2000 to 7000 ng g(-1) dry weight in sediments from Stations 2 and 3, respectively. Both the CYP1A1 activity and the bile metabolites of O. mykiss exposed to the PAH-contaminated sediments present statistically significant differences with respect to the other stations. Additionally, the comet assay revealed notable genotoxic damage in trout erythrocytes from Stations 2 and 3, an effect that was not observed at the other stations.

  12. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, D. G.

    1980-02-01

    Progress on each of the following topics is outlined: (1) rotating target neutron source, (2) fusion materials irradiation test facility, (3) environmental characterization, (4) damage production, and (5) damage microstructure evolution and mechanical behavior. (MOW)

  13. Using landscape analysis to assess and model tsunami damage in Aceh province, Sumatra

    Treesearch

    Louis R. Iverson; Anantha Prasad

    2007-01-01

    The nearly unprecedented loss of life resulting from the earthquake and tsunami of December 26,2004, was greatest in the province of Aceh, Sumatra (Indonesia). We evaluated tsunami damage and built empirical vulnerability models of damage/no damage based on elevation, distance from shore, vegetation, and exposure. We found that highly predictive models are possible and...

  14. Spectrophotometric analysis of flavonoid-DNA interactions and DNA damaging/protecting and cytotoxic potential of flavonoids in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Rusak, Gordana; Piantanida, Ivo; Masić, Lozika; Kapuralin, Katarina; Durgo, Ksenija; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2010-10-06

    The ability of luteolin, kaempferol and apigenin to bind to calf thymus (ct)-DNA, mode of action and stability of flavonoids in buffer were investigated. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed a rapid degradation of apigenin in an aqueous medium, while kaempferol and luteolin were stable for 24h upon dissolution in water. Spectrophotometric study of the interactions of kaempferol and luteolin with calf thymus DNA suggests classic intercalation as their dominant binding mode to DNA. Cytotoxicity/genotoxicity and cytoprotective/genoprotective effects of flavonoids in non-stressed and hydrogen peroxide stressed human peripheral lymphocytes were investigated using the fluorescent dye exclusion method and alkaline comet assay. Flavonoids revealed significant genoprotective effects in hydrogen peroxide stressed cells and in cells submitted to longer incubation in the cell culture medium. Luteolin, followed by apigenin and kaempferol, was shown to be the most effective in protecting DNA from oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide. However, the investigated flavonoids also induced DNA damage, indicating their prooxidative capacity. The balance between the protection of DNA from oxidative damage and prooxidative effects was strongly dependent on flavonoid concentration and the incubation period.

  15. Joint independent component analysis of structural and functional images reveals complex patterns of functional reorganisation in stroke aphasia.

    PubMed

    Specht, Karsten; Zahn, Roland; Willmes, Klaus; Weis, Susanne; Holtel, Christiane; Krause, Bernd J; Herzog, Hans; Huber, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Previous functional activation studies in patients with aphasia have mostly relied on standard group comparisons of aphasic patients with healthy controls, which are biased towards regions showing the most consistent effects and disregard variability within groups. Groups of aphasic patients, however, show considerable variability with respect to lesion localisation and extent. Here, we use a novel method, joint independent component analysis (jICA), which allowed us to investigate abnormal patterns of functional activation with O(15)-PET during lexical decision in aphasic patients after middle cerebral artery stroke and to directly relate them to lesion information from structural MRI. Our results demonstrate that with jICA we could detect a network of compensatory increases in activity within bilateral anterior inferior temporal areas (BA20), which was not revealed by standard group comparisons. In addition, both types of analyses, jICA and group comparison, showed increased activity in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus in aphasic patients. Further, whereas standard analyses revealed no decreases in activation, jICA identified that left perisylvian lesions were associated with decreased activation of left posterior inferior frontal cortex, damaged in most patients, and extralesional remote decreases of activity within polar parts of the inferior temporal gyrus (BA38/20) and the occipital cortex (BA19). Taken together, our results demonstrate that jICA may be superior in revealing complex patterns of functional reorganisation in aphasia.

  16. Development of synthetic velocity - depth damage curves using a Weighted Monte Carlo method and Logistic Regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozinaki, Anthi Eirini K.; Karatzas, George P.; Sibetheros, Ioannis A.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2014-05-01

    Damage curves are the most significant component of the flood loss estimation models. Their development is quite complex. Two types of damage curves exist, historical and synthetic curves. Historical curves are developed from historical loss data from actual flood events. However, due to the scarcity of historical data, synthetic damage curves can be alternatively developed. Synthetic curves rely on the analysis of expected damage under certain hypothetical flooding conditions. A synthetic approach was developed and presented in this work for the development of damage curves, which are subsequently used as the basic input to a flood loss estimation model. A questionnaire-based survey took place among practicing and research agronomists, in order to generate rural loss data based on the responders' loss estimates, for several flood condition scenarios. In addition, a similar questionnaire-based survey took place among building experts, i.e. civil engineers and architects, in order to generate loss data for the urban sector. By answering the questionnaire, the experts were in essence expressing their opinion on how damage to various crop types or building types is related to a range of values of flood inundation parameters, such as floodwater depth and velocity. However, the loss data compiled from the completed questionnaires were not sufficient for the construction of workable damage curves; to overcome this problem, a Weighted Monte Carlo method was implemented, in order to generate extra synthetic datasets with statistical properties identical to those of the questionnaire-based data. The data generated by the Weighted Monte Carlo method were processed via Logistic Regression techniques in order to develop accurate logistic damage curves for the rural and the urban sectors. A Python-based code was developed, which combines the Weighted Monte Carlo method and the Logistic Regression analysis into a single code (WMCLR Python code). Each WMCLR code execution

  17. Integrative proteome analysis of Brachypodium distachyon roots and leaves reveals a synergetic responsive network under H2O2 stress.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yan-Wei; Lv, Dong-Wen; Cheng, Zhi-Wei; Gu, Ai-Qin; Cao, Hui; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2015-10-14

    The plant oxidative stress response is vital for defense against various abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, ultrastructural changes and the proteomic response to H2O2 stress in roots and leaves of the model plant Brachypodium distachyon were studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the ultrastructural damage in roots was more serious than in leaves. Particularly, the ultrastructures of organelles and the nucleus in root tip cells were damaged, leading to the inhibition of normal biological activities of roots, which then spread throughout the plant. Based on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, 84 and 53 differentially accumulated protein (DAP) spots representing 75 and 45 unique proteins responsive to H2O2 stress in roots and leaves, respectively, were identified. These protein species were mainly involved in signal transduction, energy metabolism, redox homeostasis/stress defense, protein folding/degradation, and cell wall/cell structure. Interestingly, two 14-3-3 proteins (GF14-B and GF14-D) were identified as DAPs in both roots and leaves. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis revealed a synergetic H2O2-responsive network.

  18. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The DAFS program element is a national effort composed of contributions from a number of National Laboratories and other government laboratories, universities, and industrial laboratories. It was organized by the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch, Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, and a Task Group on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies which operates under the auspices of that Branch. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record of that effort for the use of the program participants, for the fusion energy program in general, and for the Department of Energy. This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily, relative to that Program Plan.

  19. Structural damage detection in an aeronautical panel using analysis of variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalez, Camila Gianini; da Silva, Samuel; Brennan, Michael J.; Lopes Junior, Vicente

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes a procedure for structural health assessment based on one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) together with Tukey's multiple comparison test, to determine whether the results are statistically significant. The feature indices are obtained from electromechanical impedance measurements using piezoceramic sensor/actuator patches bonded to the structure. Compared to the classical approach based on a simple change of the observed signals, using for example root mean square responses, the decision procedure in this paper involves a rigorous statistical test. Experimental tests were carried out on an aeronautical panel in the laboratory to validate the approach. In order to include uncontrolled variability in the dynamic responses, the measurements were taken over several days in different environmental conditions using all eight sensor/actuator patches. The damage was simulated by controlling the tightness and looseness of the bolts and was correctly diagnosed. The paper discusses the strengths and weakness of the approach in light of the experimental results.

  20. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The DAFS program element is a national effort composed of contributions from a number of National Laboratories and other government laboratories, universities, and industrial laboratories. It was organized by the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch, Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, and a Task Group on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies which operates under the auspices of that Branch. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record of that effort for the use of the program participants, for the fusion energy program in general, and for the Department of Energy. This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily, relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader.

  1. Biomechanics Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Using Damaged Interface Model between Bone and Muscle in the Human Buttock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamet, Samuel Susanto; Takano, Naoki; Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Hatano, Asako; Nagasao, Tomohisa

    This paper aims at building up a computational procedure to study the bio-mechanism of pressure ulcer using the finite element method. Pressure ulcer is a disease that occurs in the human body after 2 hours of continuous external force. In the very early stage of pressure ulcer, it is found that the tissues inside the body are damaged, even though skin surface looks normal. This study assumes that tension and/or shear strain will cause damage to loose fibril tissue between the bone and muscle and that propagation of damaged area will lead to fatal stage. Analysis was performed using the finite element method by modeling the damaged fibril tissue as a cutout. By varying the loading directions and watching both tensile and shear strains, the risk of fibril tissue damage and propagation of the damaged area is discussed, which may give new insight for the careful nursing for patients, particularly after surgical treatment. It was found that the pressure ulcer could reoccur for a surgical flap treatment. The bone cut and surgical flap surgery is not perfect to prevent the bone-muscle interfacial damage.

  2. Systems modelling of NHEJ reveals the importance of redox regulation of Ku70/80 in the dynamics of dna damage foci.

    PubMed

    Dolan, David; Nelson, Glyn; Zupanic, Anze; Smith, Graham; Shanley, Daryl

    2013-01-01

    The presence of DNA double-stranded breaks in a mammalian cell typically activates the Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) pathway to repair the damage and signal to downstream systems that govern cellular decisions such as apoptosis or senescence. The signalling system also stimulates effects such as the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which in turn feed back into the damage response. Although the overall process of NHEJ is well documented, we know little of the dynamics and how the system operates as a whole. We have developed a computational model which includes DNA Protein Kinase (DNA-PK) dependent NHEJ (D-NHEJ) and back-up NHEJ mechanisms (B-NHEJ) and use it to explain the dynamic response to damage induced by different levels of gamma irradiation in human fibroblasts. Our work suggests that the observed shift from fast to slow repair of DNA damage foci at higher levels of damage cannot be explained solely by inherent stochasticity in the NHEJ system. Instead, our model highlights the importance of Ku oxidation which leads to increased Ku dissociation rates from DNA damage foci and shifts repair in favour of the less efficient B-NHEJ system.

  3. Efficiency of Analytical Methodologies in Uncertainty Analysis of Seismic Core Damage Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kenji; Uchiyama, Tomoaki; Muramatsu, Ken

    Fault Tree and Event Tree analysis is almost exclusively relied upon in the assessments of seismic Core Damage Frequency (CDF). In this approach, Direct Quantification of Fault tree using Monte Carlo simulation (DQFM) method, or simply called Monte Carlo (MC) method, and Binary Decision Diagram (BDD) method were introduced as alternatives for a traditional approximation method, namely Minimal Cut Set (MCS) method. However, there is still no agreement as to which method should be used in a risk assessment of seismic CDF, especially for uncertainty analysis. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficiencies of the three methods in uncertainty analysis as well as in point estimation so that the decision of selecting a proper method can be made effectively. The results show that the most efficient method would be BDD method in terms of accuracy and computational time. However, it will be discussed that BDD method is not always applicable to PSA models while MC method is so in theory. In turn, MC method was confirmed to agree with the exact solution obtained by BDD method, but it took a large amount of time, in particular for uncertainty analysis. On the other hand, it was shown that the approximation error of MCS method may not be as bad in uncertainty analysis as it is in point estimation. Based on these results and previous works, this paper will propose a scheme to select an appropriate analytical method for a seismic PSA study. Throughout this study, SECOM2-DQFM code was expanded to be able to utilize BDD method and to conduct uncertainty analysis with both MC and BDD method.

  4. Review Article: Economic evaluation of flood damage to agriculture - review and analysis of existing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémond, P.; Grelot, F.; Agenais, A.-L.

    2013-10-01

    In Europe, economic evaluation of flood management projects is increasingly used to help decision making. At the same time, the management of flood risk is shifting towards new concepts such as giving more room to water by restoring floodplains. Agricultural areas are particularly targeted by projects following those concepts since they are frequently located in floodplain areas and since the potential damage to such areas is expected to be lower than to cities or industries for example. Additional or avoided damage to agriculture may have a major influence on decisions concerning these projects and the economic evaluation of flood damage to agriculture is thus an issue that needs to be tackled. The question of flood damage to agriculture can be addressed in different ways. This paper reviews and analyzes existing studies which have developed or used damage functions for agriculture in the framework of an economic appraisal of flood management projects. A conceptual framework of damage categories is proposed for the agricultural sector. The damage categories were used to structure the review. Then, a total of 42 studies are described, with a detailed review of 26 of them, based on the following criteria: types of damage considered, the influential flood parameters chosen, and monetized damage indicators used. The main recommendations resulting from this review are that even if existing methods have already focused on damage to crops, still some improvement is needed for crop damage functions. There is also a need to develop damage functions for other agricultural damage categories, including farm buildings and their contents. Finally, to cover all possible agricultural damage, and in particular loss of activity, a farm scale approach needs to be used.

  5. Clustered DNA damage induced by γ radiation in human fibroblasts (HF19), hamster (V79-4) cells and plasmid DNA is revealed as Fpg and Nth sensitive sites

    PubMed Central

    Gulston, Melanie; Fulford, Jonathan; Jenner, Terry; de Lara, Catherine; O’Neill, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The signature DNA lesion induced by ionizing radiation is clustered DNA damage. Gamma radiation-induced clustered DNA damage containing base lesions was investigated in plasmid DNA under cell mimetic conditions and in two cell lines, V79-4 (hamster) and HF19 (human), using bacterial endonucleases Nth (endonuclease III) and Fpg (formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase). Following irradiation with 60Co γ-rays, induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) and clustered DNA damage, revealed as DSB by the proteins, was determined in plasmid using the plasmid-nicking assay and in cells by either conventional pulsed field gel electrophoresis or a hybridization assay, in which a 3 Mb restriction fragment of the X chromosome is used as a radioactive labeled probe. Enzyme concentrations (30–60 ng/µg DNA) were optimized to minimize visualization of background levels of endogenous DNA damage and DSB produced by non-specific cutting by Fpg and Nth in cellular DNA. 60Co γ- radiation produces a 1.8-fold increase in the yields of both types of enzyme sensitive sites, visualized as DSB compared with that of prompt DSB in plasmid DNA. In mammalian cells, the increase in yields of clustered DNA damage containing either Fpg or Nth sensitive sites compared with that of prompt DSB is 1.4–2.0- and 1.8-fold, respectively. Therefore, clustered DNA damage is induced in cells by sparsely ionizing radiation and their yield is significantly greater than that of prompt DSB. PMID:12140332

  6. The perception of positive and negative facial expressions in unilateral brain-damaged patients: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jacenta D; Cumming, Geoff; Fidler, Fiona; Lindell, Annukka K

    2013-01-01

    How the brain is lateralised for emotion processing remains a key question in contemporary neuropsychological research. The right hemisphere hypothesis asserts that the right hemisphere dominates emotion processing, whereas the valence hypothesis holds that positive emotion is processed in the left hemisphere and negative emotion is controlled by the right hemisphere. A meta-analysis was conducted to assess unilateral brain-damaged individuals' performance on tasks of facial emotion perception according to valence. A systematic search of the literature identified seven articles that met the conservative selection criteria and could be included in a meta-analysis. A total of 12 meta-analyses of facial expression perception were constructed assessing identification and labelling tasks according to valence and the side of brain damage. The results demonstrated that both left and right hemisphere damage leads to impairments in emotion perception (identification and labelling) irrespective of valence. Importantly, right hemisphere damage prompted more pronounced emotion perception impairment than left hemisphere damage, across valence, suggesting right hemisphere dominance for emotion perception. Furthermore, right hemisphere damage was associated with a larger tendency for impaired perception of negative than positive emotion across identification and labelling tasks. Overall the findings support Adolphs, Jansari, and Tranel (2001) model whereby the right hemisphere preferentially processes negative facial expressions and both hemispheres process positive facial expressions.

  7. Bladed wheels damage detection through Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis improved algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, P.

    2017-05-01

    Recent papers introduced the Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis for bladed wheels damage detection. This technique showed its potential in estimating the frequency of sinusoidal signals even when the acquisition time is short with respect to the vibration period, provided that some hypothesis are fulfilled. Anyway, previously proposed algorithms showed severe limitations in cracks detection at their early stage. The present paper proposes an improved algorithm which allows to detect a blade vibration frequency shift due to a crack whose size is really small compared to the blade width. Such a technique could be implemented for condition-based maintenance, allowing to use non-contact methods for vibration measurements. A stator-fixed laser sensor could monitor all the blades as they pass in front of the spot, giving precious information about the wheel health. This configuration determines an acquisition time for each blade which become shorter as the machine rotational speed increases. In this situation, traditional Discrete Fourier Transform analysis results in poor frequency resolution, being not suitable for small frequency shift detection. Non-Harmonic Fourier Analysis instead showed high reliability in vibration frequency estimation even with data samples collected in a short time range. A description of the improved algorithm is provided in the paper, along with a comparison with the previous one. Finally, a validation of the method is presented, based on finite element simulations results.

  8. Finite element method for viscoelastic medium with damage and the application to structural analysis of solid rocket motor grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bin; Shen, ZhiBin; Duan, JingBo; Tang, GuoJin

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the damage-viscoelastic behavior of composite solid propellants of solid rocket motors (SRM). Based on viscoelastic theories and strain equivalent hypothesis in damage mechanics, a three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating with damage is developed. The resulting viscoelastic constitutive equations are numerically discretized by integration algorithm, and a stress-updating method is presented by solving nonlinear equations according to the Newton-Raphson method. A material subroutine of stress-updating is made up and embedded into commercial code of Abaqus. The material subroutine is validated through typical examples. Our results indicate that the finite element results are in good agreement with the analytical ones and have high accuracy, and the suggested method and designed subroutine are efficient and can be further applied to damage-coupling structural analysis of practical SRM grain.

  9. Transcriptome analysis of human cumulus cells reveals hypoxia as the main determinant of follicular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, E.; Bar, H.; Pyle, A.M.; Patrizio, P.

    2016-01-01

    Study question Can RNA sequencing of human cumulus cells (CC) reveal molecular pathways involved in the physiology of reproductive aging? Study finding Senescent but not young CC activate gene pathways associated with hypoxia and oxidative stress. What is known already Shifts in socioeconomic norms are resulting in larger numbers of women postponing childbearing. The reproductive potential is sharply decreased with aging, and the reasons are poorly understood. Since CCs play an integral role in oocyte maturation and direct access to human oocytes is limited, we used whole transcriptome analysis of these somatic cells to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms playing a role in follicular senescence. Study design, samples/materials, methods Twenty CC samples (from a total of 15 patients) were obtained from oocytes of either male factor or egg donor patients. RNA sequencing and bioinformatic tools were used to identify differentially expressed genes between CCs from seven aged and eight young patients (<35 (years old) y.o. vs >40 y.o.). Quantitative-PCR and immunoflourescent staining were used for validation. Main results and the role of chance RNA sequencing identified 11 572 genes expressed in CC of both age cohorts, 45 of which were differentially expressed. In CC collected from patients >40 y.o., genes involved in the hypoxia stress response (NOS2, RORA and NR4A3), vasculature development (NR2F2, PTHLH), glycolysis (RALGAPA2 and TBC1D4) and cAMP turnover (PDE4D) were significantly overexpressed when compared with CC of patients younger than 35 y.o. Limitations, reasons for caution This study focused almost exclusively on assessing the genetic differences in CC transcriptome between young and older women. These genetic findings were not fully correlated with embryonic development and clinical outcome. Wider implications of the findings Our data provide a new hypothesis—follicular hypoxia—as the main mechanism leading to ovarian follicular senescence and

  10. Meta-Analysis of Attitudes toward Damage-Causing Mammalian Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    KANSKY, RUTH; KIDD, MARTIN; KNIGHT, ANDREW T

    2014-01-01

    Many populations of threatened mammals persist outside formally protected areas, and their survival depends on the willingness of communities to coexist with them. An understanding of the attitudes, and specifically the tolerance, of individuals and communities and the factors that determine these is therefore fundamental to designing strategies to alleviate human-wildlife conflict. We conducted a meta-analysis to identify factors that affected attitudes toward 4 groups of terrestrial mammals. Elephants (65%) elicited the most positive attitudes, followed by primates (55%), ungulates (53%), and carnivores (44%). Urban residents presented the most positive attitudes (80%), followed by commercial farmers (51%) and communal farmers (26%). A tolerance to damage index showed that human tolerance of ungulates and primates was proportional to the probability of experiencing damage while elephants elicited tolerance levels higher than anticipated and carnivores elicited tolerance levels lower than anticipated. Contrary to conventional wisdom, experiencing damage was not always the dominant factor determining attitudes. Communal farmers had a lower probability of being positive toward carnivores irrespective of probability of experiencing damage, while commercial farmers and urban residents were more likely to be positive toward carnivores irrespective of damage. Urban residents were more likely to be positive toward ungulates, elephants, and primates when probability of damage was low, but not when it was high. Commercial and communal farmers had a higher probability of being positive toward ungulates, primates, and elephants irrespective of probability of experiencing damage. Taxonomic bias may therefore be important. Identifying the distinct factors explaining these attitudes and the specific contexts in which they operate, inclusive of the species causing damage, will be essential for prioritizing conservation investments. Meta-Análisis de las Posturas hacia la Mam

  11. Influence of Corrosion Damage on Prediction of Residual Strength Capacities - An Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appuhamy, Jayasinghe Mudalige Ruwan Sanjeewa; Ohga, Mitao; Kaita, Tatsumasa; Chun, Pang-Jo; Fujii, Katashi; Dissanayake, Ranjith

    Civil infrastructure systems are prone to age related deterioration due to the exposure to aggressive environmental conditions and inadequate maintenance, and often causes reduction of their carrying capacities. Designing these systems for a particular service life and maintaining them in a safe condition during their entire service life have been recognized as very critical issues worldwide. There have been many damage examples of older steel bridge structures due to corrosion around the world during past few decades and they intensified the importance of attention to the careful evaluation of existing structures for the feasibility of current usage and strengthening them by retrofitting some selected corroded members to ensure the public safety. Therefore, a simple and accurate method to calculate the remaining yield and tensile strength by using a concept of representative effective thickness with correlation of initial thickness and the maximum corroded depth is proposed in this study, based on the results of many tensile coupon tests conducted on corroded specimens cut from a steel girder used for about hundred years with severe corrosion. The proposed methodology revealed more accurate and reliable estimation for the maintenance management of existing corroded steel structures.

  12. Scaling craters in carbonates: Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of shock damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate samples from the 8.9-Mt nuclear (near-surface explosion) crater, OAK, and a terrestrial impact crater, Meteor Crater, were analyzed for shock damage using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Samples from below the OAK apparent crater floor were obtained from six boreholes, as well as ejecta recovered from the crater floor. The degree of shock damage in the carbonate material was assessed by comparing the sample spectra to the spectra of Solenhofen and Kaibab limestone, which had been skocked to known pressures. Analysis of the OAK Crater borehole samples has identified a thin zone of allocthonous highly shocked (10-13 GPa) carbonate material underneath the apparent crater floor. This approx. 5- to 15-m-thick zone occurs at a maximum depth of approx. 125 m below current seafloor at the borehole, sited at the initial position of the OAK explosive, and decreases in depth towards the apparent crater edge. Because this zone of allocthonous shocked rock delineates deformed rock below, and a breccia of mobilized sand and collapse debris above, it appears to outline the transient crater. The transient crater volume inferred in this way is found to by 3.2 +/- 0.2 times 10(exp 6)cu m, which is in good agreement with a volume of 5.3 times 10(exp 6)cu m inferred from gravity scaling of laboratory experiments. A layer of highly shocked material is also found near the surface outside the crater. The latter material could represent a fallout ejecta layer. The ejecta boulders recovered from the present crater floor experienced a range of shock pressures from approx. 0 to 15 GPa with the more heavily shocked samples all occurring between radii of 360 and approx. 600 m. Moreover, the fossil content, lithology and Sr isotopic composition all demonstrate that the initial position of the bulk of the heavily shocked rock ejecta sampled was originally near surface rock at initial depths in the 32 to 45-m depth (below sea level) range. The EPR technique is also sensitive to

  13. Scaling craters in carbonates: Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of shock damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate samples from the 8.9-Mt nuclear (near-surface explosion) crater, OAK, and a terrestrial impact crater, Meteor Crater, were analyzed for shock damage using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Samples from below the OAK apparent crater floor were obtained from six boreholes, as well as ejecta recovered from the crater floor. The degree of shock damage in the carbonate material was assessed by comparing the sample spectra to the spectra of Solenhofen and Kaibab limestone, which had been skocked to known pressures. Analysis of the OAK Crater borehole samples has identified a thin zone of allocthonous highly shocked (10-13 GPa) carbonate material underneath the apparent crater floor. This approx. 5- to 15-m-thick zone occurs at a maximum depth of approx. 125 m below current seafloor at the borehole, sited at the initial position of the OAK explosive, and decreases in depth towards the apparent crater edge. Because this zone of allocthonous shocked rock delineates deformed rock below, and a breccia of mobilized sand and collapse debris above, it appears to outline the transient crater. The transient crater volume inferred in this way is found to by 3.2 +/- 0.2 times 10(exp 6)cu m, which is in good agreement with a volume of 5.3 times 10(exp 6)cu m inferred from gravity scaling of laboratory experiments. A layer of highly shocked material is also found near the surface outside the crater. The latter material could represent a fallout ejecta layer. The ejecta boulders recovered from the present crater floor experienced a range of shock pressures from approx. 0 to 15 GPa with the more heavily shocked samples all occurring between radii of 360 and approx. 600 m. Moreover, the fossil content, lithology and Sr isotopic composition all demonstrate that the initial position of the bulk of the heavily shocked rock ejecta sampled was originally near surface rock at initial depths in the 32 to 45-m depth (below sea level) range. The EPR technique is also sensitive to

  14. Damage-Resistant